WorldWideScience

Sample records for terrestrial natural radionuclides

  1. Estimation of internal and external exposures of terrestrial reference organisms to natural radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ros, J M [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Proehl, G [GSF, Postfach 1129, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Taranenko, V [GSF, Postfach 1129, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, an estimation of the doses absorbed by terrestrial reference organisms due to naturally occurring radionuclides is described. For terrestrial organisms under normal circumstances, external exposure is estimated to be of the order of 0.1-0.4 mGy a{sup -1}, depending on size and habitat, and the main contributor is {sup 40}K. Internal background exposures of terrestrial organisms are more variable. Again, {sup 40}K is an important contributor giving doses of the order of 0.3 mGy a{sup -1}. The exposures of muscles and plant tissues to uranium, thorium, radium, lead and polonium are lower, but liver, bone and kidney may be exposed at levels of 0.1-1 mGy a{sup -1} absorbed dose. There can also be significant increases in the received dose under specific environmental conditions as is the case for burrowing mammals that receive relatively high lung doses due to the inhalation of radon and its progeny.

  2. Terrestrial pathways of radionuclide particulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, F.W. (Allied-General Nuclear Services, Barnwell, SC (USA)); Ng, Y.C. (California Univ., Livermore (USA). Lawrence Livermore National Lab.); Palms, J.M. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1981-11-01

    Formulations are developed for computing potential human intake of 13 radionuclides via the terrestrial food chains. The formulations are an extension of the NRC methodology. Specific regional crop and livestock transfer and fractional distribution data from the southern part of the U.S.A. are provided and used in the computation of comparative values with those computed by means of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 formulations. In the development of the model, emphasis was also placed on identifying the various time-delay compartments of the food chains and accounting for all of the activity initially deposited. For all radionuclides considered, except /sup 137/Cs, the new formulations predict lower potential intakes from the total of all food chains combined than do the comparable Regulatory Guide formulations by as much as a factor of 40. For /sup 137/Cs the new formulations predict 10% higher potential intakes.

  3. Environmental radionuclides tracers and timers of terrestrial processes

    CERN Document Server

    Froehlich, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The book presents a state-of-the-art summary of knowledge on the use of radionuclides to study processes and systems in the continental part of the Earth's environment. It is conceived as a companion to the two volumes of this series, which deal with isotopes as tracers in the marine environment (Livingston, Marine Radioactivity) and with the radioecology of natural and man-made terrestrial systems (Shaw, Radioactivity in Terrestrial Ecosystems). Although the book focuses on natural and anthropogenic radionuclides (radioactive isotopes), it also refers to stable environmental isotopes, which i

  4. Traces of natural radionuclides in animal food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merli, Isabella Desan; Guazzelli da Silveira, Marcilei A. [Centro Universitário da FEI, São Bernardo do Campo (Brazil); Medina, Nilberto H. [Instituto de Física da USP, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials are present everywhere, e.g., in soil, air, housing materials, food, etc. Therefore, human beings and animals receive internal exposure from radioactive elements inside their bodies through breathing and alimentation. Gamma radiation has enough energy to remove an electron from the atom and compromise the rearrangement of electrons in the search for a more stable configuration which can disturb molecule chemical bonding. Food ingestion is one of the most common forms of radioisotopes absorption. The goal of this work is the measurement of natural gamma radiation rates from natural radioisotopes present in animal food. To determine the concentration of natural radionuclides present in animal food gamma-ray spectrometry was applied. We have prepared animal food samples for poultry, fish, dogs, cats and cattle. The two highest total ingestion effective doses observed refers to a sample of mineral salt cattle, 95.3(15) μSv/year, rabbit chow, with a value of 48(5) μSv/year, and cattle mineral salt, with a value of 69(7) μSv/year, while the annual total dose value from terrestrial intake radionuclide is of the order of 290 μSv/year.

  5. Traces of natural radionuclides in animal food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Isabella Desan; da Silveira, Marcilei A. Guazzelli; Medina, Nilberto H.

    2014-11-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials are present everywhere, e.g., in soil, air, housing materials, food, etc. Therefore, human beings and animals receive internal exposure from radioactive elements inside their bodies through breathing and alimentation. Gamma radiation has enough energy to remove an electron from the atom and compromise the rearrangement of electrons in the search for a more stable configuration which can disturb molecule chemical bonding. Food ingestion is one of the most common forms of radioisotopes absorption. The goal of this work is the measurement of natural gamma radiation rates from natural radioisotopes present in animal food. To determine the concentration of natural radionuclides present in animal food gamma-ray spectrometry was applied. We have prepared animal food samples for poultry, fish, dogs, cats and cattle. The two highest total ingestion effective doses observed refers to a sample of mineral salt cattle, 95.3(15) μSv/year, rabbit chow, with a value of 48(5) μSv/year, and cattle mineral salt, with a value of 69(7) μSv/year, while the annual total dose value from terrestrial intake radionuclide is of the order of 290 μSv/year.

  6. Natural radionuclides in volcanic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Jun E-mail: jsato@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2003-03-01

    Natural radionuclides of {sup 222}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 212}Pb present in the magma are emitted during the eruption of volcanoes. Depletion of {sup 222}Rn in pumices and in lava showed that significant amounts of {sup 222}Rn were released from erupting magmas. Atmospheric {sup 210}Pb originating from the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo was detected in Japan and in Korea as a temporal increase in the atmospheric concentration after the eruption. Atmospheric {sup 212}Pb originating from the 2000 eruption of Mt. Miyake-jima was also detected as an abrupt rise in atmospheric concentration after the event.

  7. Po-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial and freshwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjelsvik, Runhild; Brown, Justin (eds.) (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Holm, Elis (Univ. of Lund (Sweden)); Roos, Per (Risoe DTU (Denmark)); Saxen, Ritva; Outola, Iisa (STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    This report provides new information on Po-210 (and where appropriate its grandparent Pb-210) behaviour in environmental systems including humans. This has primarily been achieved through measurements of Po-210 in aquatic and terrestrial environments that has led to the derivation of information on the levels of this radioisotope in plants, animals and the biotic components of their habitat (i.e. water, soil) providing basic information on transfer where practicable. For freshwater environments, Po-210 concentration ratios derived for freshwater benthic fish and bivalve mollusc were substantially different to values collated from earlier review work. For terrestrial environments, activity concentrations of Po-210 in small mammals (although of a preliminary nature because no correction was made for ingrowth from Pb-210) were considerably higher than values derived from earlier data compilations. It was envisaged that data on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides would render underpinning data sets more comprehensive and would thus allow more robust background dose calculations to be performed subsequently. By way of example, unweighted background dose-rates arising from internal distributions of Po-210 were calculated for small mammals in the terrestrial study. The biokinetics of polonium in humans has been studied following chronic and acute oral intakes of selected Po radioisotopes. This work has provided information on gastrointestinal absorption factors and biological retention times thus improving the database upon which committed effective doses to humans are derived. The information generated in the report, in its entirety, should be of direct relevance for both human and non-human impact assessments. (au)

  8. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Steinhäusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-01

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  9. Vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Low-level alpha spectrometry techniques using semiconductor detectors (PIPS and liquid scintillation counters (LKB Quantulus 1220™ were used in order to determine the activity concentration of 238U, 232Th, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra, and 210Pb in soil samples. The soils were collected from an old disused uranium mine located in southwest Spain. The soils were selected with different levels of influence from the installation, in such a way that they had different levels of radioactive contamination. The vertical profiles in the soils (down to 40 cm depth were studied in order to evaluate the vertical distribution of the natural radionuclides. The possible contamination of subsurface waters depends strongly on vertical migration, and the transfer to plants (herbs, shrubs, and trees also will depend on the distribution of the radionuclides in the root zone. The study of the activity ratios between radionuclides belonging to the same series allowed us to assess the differing behaviour of the radionuclides involved. The vertical profiles for these radionuclides were different at each sampling point, showing the local impact of the installation. However, the profiles per point were similar for the long-lived radionuclides of the 238TJ series (238U, 234U, 230Th, and 226Ra. Also, a major disequilibrium was observed between 210Pb and 226Ra in the surface layer, due to 222Rn emanation and subsequent surface deposition of 210Pb.

  10. Subject-3: Study on migration of radionuclides released into terrestrial and aquatic environment after nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, H.; Matsunaga, T.; Ueno, T.; Nagao, S.; Yanase, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Arkhipov, A.N. [Chernobyl Scientific and Technical Center for International Research (Ukraine); Tkachenko, Yu. [The State Enterprise Regional Monitoring and Domestic Control (RADEC) (Unknown)

    2001-03-01

    Subject-3 has been focused on the migration behavior of long-lived radionuclides in the terrestrial surface environment, especially in connection with their chemical and physical forms. Migration behavior of radionuclides is strongly affected with their chemical and physical forms (for example; Gunten and Benes 1995). One of the two categories in Subject-3 consists of migration from surface soils including aging effects of hot particles, plant uptake from contaminated soils, and resuspension of radionuclides. The other is run off by river system, considering the role of organic materials. (author)

  11. Modelling accumulation of radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems originating from a long-term groundwater contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaerdenaes, Annemieke I. [Dept. of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), P.O. Box 7001, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Eckersten, Henrik [Dept. of Ecology and Crop Production, SLU, P.O. Box 7042, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Reinlert, Andre [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University, 223 62 Lund (Sweden); MMT, Sven Kaellfelts Gata 11 SE 426 71 Vaestra Froelunda (Sweden); Gustafsson, David; Jansson, Per-Erik [Dept. Land and Water Resources, KTH, SE 100 44, Stockholm (Sweden); Ekstroem, Per-Anders [Facilia AB, Gustavlundsvaegen 151A, 167 51 Bromma (Sweden); Greger, Maria [Dept. of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted as part of the risk assessment of final deposits of nuclear fuel waste. The overall objective is to assess the possible accumulation of radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems after an eventual long-term groundwater contamination. The specific objectives are to assess: i) What proportion of the contamination will accumulate in the soil-plant-system? ii) Where in the soil-plant- system will it accumulate? iii) Which ecosystem characteristics and radionuclides properties are important for the accumulation? and iv) Under which circumstances do losses from the ecosystems occur? We developed the dynamic model Tracey (Gaerdenaes et al. 2009) describing cycling of radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems with high temporal resolution (1 day). The model is a multi-compartmental model in which fluxes and storage of radionuclides are described for different plant parts and soil pools in each of the 10 soil layers. The radionuclide fluxes are driven either by water or carbon fluxes. The water and the carbon fluxes are simulated with the dynamic, bio-geophysical Coup Model (Jansson and Karlberg, 2004). Tracey includes two root uptake approaches of radionuclides; (i) passive uptake driven by root water uptake and (ii) active uptake driven by plant growth. A linear approach describes the adsorption of radionuclides to soil particles and organic matter. Tracey was applied on two ecosystems with contrasting hydrology, the mixed Pinus-Picea forests found in the dry, elevated areas and the Alnus forests found in the wet, low-land areas of Uppland in central east Sweden. Different varieties of the two forest types were created by varying the root depth and radiation use efficiency. The climate was cold-temperate and based on 30-year daily weather data from Uppsala. The assumed groundwater contamination was close to 1 mg of an unspecified radionuclide per m2 and year. This load corresponds to 1 Bq per m{sup 2} and year of {sup 238}U, a common long

  12. Quality assurance in the analysis of natural radionuclides - measures and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothe, M. [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    In the Laboratory for Environmental and Radionuclide Analytics we analyze several natural and also some artificial radionuclides in different materials. For the determination of radionuclides we use various analytical methods. (orig./DG)

  13. Application of radionuclides ratio method for identification of techno-genic soil contamination by natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmoshenko, I.; Ekidin, A. [Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS (Russian Federation); Vasyanovich, M. [Ural Federal University named after the first President of Russia B.N. Yeltsin (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Approach to identification of environmental surface contamination by TENORM is suggested. The investigation consists of analysis of ratio between activities of radionuclides from different natural radioactive series (method of radionuclides ratio). Approach includes investigation of correlations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 40}K activity concentrations in the soil samples. Distortion of naturally formed radionuclide ratio is considered as an evidence of soil contamination and can be utilized for assessment of man-made contribution of radium, thorium and uranium. The soil contamination investigation using the approach based on radionuclide ratio analysis was performed at three sites: oil producing company, thorium storage facility and uranium processing facility. Activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K in soil samples were measured by gamma spectrometry in Marinelli geometry. The results of gamma-spectrometry analysis of these samples demonstrated: - excess of {sup 226}Ra in the soil samples taken at the oil-producing company site; - excess of {sup 232}Th in the soil samples taken near the monazite concentrate storage site; - excess of {sup 238}U in the soil samples taken around the uranium processing site. At oil-producing site technological processes of extraction and primary processing of oil lead to a shift of balance in the chains of natural radionuclides. Out of 49 samples gathered at oil producing company sites 8 were contaminated by {sup 226}Ra. Additional contamination doesn't exceed 92 Bq/kg. At monazite concentrate storage site {sup 232}Th soil contamination is associated with spillage of monazite with high content of the radionuclide. Contamination of soil by {sup 232}Th at the territory of monazite storage facility was determined for 6 samples out of 32 gathered. Uranium processing gives an additional contribution of {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U in natural soil samples. The data demonstrate

  14. Natural radionuclides in ground water in western Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, F.; Lozano, J.C.; Gomez, J.M.G. (Salamanca Univ. (Spain). Lab. de Radioactividad Ambiental)

    1992-01-01

    A survey of natural radioactivity in drinking water was carried out in a granitic area in western Spain covering the so-called greywacke-schist complex. This region is known to be rich in uranium ores, such that natural radionuclides should be expected in the groundwater. During 1988, 345 water samples were collected from the water supplies of 115 different villages. These samples were analysed for gross alpha U, Th and Ra. The average concentrations of radionuclides were found to be 5-30 times higher in groundwater from bedrock than in groundwater from soil. The results indicate that Ra makes the highest contribution to the effective dose equivalent. (author).

  15. Natural-Series Radionuclides in Traditional Aboriginal Foods in Tropical Northern Australia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Martin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a review of available information on natural-series radionuclides in traditional Aboriginal foods of northern Australia. Research on this topic has been carried out primarily for radiological impact assessment purposes in relation to uranium mining activities in the region. Many of the studies have concentrated on providing purely concentration data or concentration ratios, although more detailed uptake studies have been undertaken for freshwater mussels, turtles, and water lilies. The most-studied radionuclides are 238U and 226Ra. However, dose estimates based on current data highlight the importance of 210Po, particularly for the natural (nonmining-related dose. Data on uptake by terrestrial flora and fauna are scarce in comparison with aquatic organisms, and this knowledge gap will need to be addressed in relation to planning for uranium minesite rehabilitation.

  16. Natural radionuclides in soils from Sao Paulo State cerrado forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Marcia V.F.E.S.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de; Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Franca, Elvis J. de, E-mail: mvaleria@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Considering the long life history, forests should be preferentially evaluated for the monitoring of radionuclides, mainly artificial radioisotopes. However, little is known about nuclides from Uranium and Thorium series, as well as, K-40, in soils from the Sao Paulo State forests. Soils are the main reservoir of natural radionuclides for vegetation, thereby deserving attention. Taking into account the advantages of High-Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometry (HRGS), diverse radionuclides can be quantified simultaneously. In this work natural radionuclides in soils from the Estacao Ecologica de Assis were evaluated by HRGS. Samples of 0-10 cm depth were collected under crown projection of most abundant tree species of long-term plots installed within the Estacao Ecologica de Assis, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. After drying and milling until 0.5 mm particle size, test portions of 30 g were transferred to polypropylene vials, sealed with silicone and kept under controlled conditions until 30 days to achieve secular equilibrium. A group of gamma-ray spectrometers was used to analyze about 27 samples by 80,000 seconds. Activity concentrations of Pb-214, Ac-228 and K-40 and their respective expanded analytical uncertainties at the 95% confidence level were calculated by Genie software from Canberra. Abnormal values were not detected for radionuclides in soils samples, however K-40 activity concentrations changed considerably due to the mineral cycling, in which K and, consequently K-40, is mainly stocked in vegetation in spite of soils. (author)

  17. Phytoremediation: role of terrestrial plants and aquatic macrophytes in the remediation of radionuclides and heavy metal contaminated soil and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunita; Singh, Bikram; Manchanda, V K

    2015-01-01

    significantly raised the amount of heavy metals and radionuclides in it. Also, these activities are continuously increasing the area of the contaminated sites. In this context, an attempt has been made to review different modes of the phytoremediation and various terrestrial and aquatic plants which are being used to remediate the heavy metals and radionuclide-contaminated soil and aquatic systems. Natural and synthetic enhancers, those hasten the process of metal adsorption/absorption by plants, are also discussed. The article includes 216 references.

  18. Modelling seasonal variations of natural radionuclides in agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guagliardi I.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Estimating activity of natural radionuclides in agricultural soil is very important for the protection of public health because the released radioactivity can enter the food chain. Radioactivity measurements were carried out in two different dates (winter and summer in agricultural soil using a GRM-260 gamma-ray spectrometer. The study area (100 m x 100 m was an olive orchard in southern Italy. Measurements were carried out at 361 locations in January and July 2011. At the same locations, soil water content was measured to take into account the effect of soil moisture on radioactivity. A multi-Gaussian approach was used to explore and map the activity of naturally occurring radionuclides and soil water content for both seasons of measurements. The minimum radioactivity values were recorded in winter and the maximum values in summer, probably as a consequence of changes in weather and soil conditions (rainfall, soil moisture, temperature.

  19. Natural Radionuclides Content of some Local Cereals in Akura ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The natural radionuclides contents of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L walp), guinea corn (Sorghum bicolor L), rice (Oryza sativa L) and soyabean (Glycin max L) have been investigated. The specific activities ranged from 36.4 ± 13.5 Bqkg-1 to 186.9 ± 23.1 Bqkg-1 for 40K, 0.2 ± 0.1 Bqkg-1 to 1.4 ± 0.5 Bqkg-1 for 238U, and 0.3 ...

  20. Soil depth profiles and radiological assessment of natural radionuclides in forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manigandan, P.K. [Al Musanna College of Technology, Muscat (Oman); Chandar Shekar, B. [Bharathiar Univ., Coimbatore (India). Kongunadu Arts and Science College

    2017-08-01

    We measured the distribution of three naturally occurring radionuclides, {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K, in soil samples collected from a rainforest in the Western Ghats of India. For each surface sample, we calculated average activity concentration, outdoor terrestrial γ dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE), and radiation hazard index. The activity concentrations of surface samples were randomly distributed over space, but differed slightly with different soil depths. The concentration of {sup 232}Th and the average terrestrial γ dose rates were slightly higher than the world averages, so slightly high γ radiation appears to be a general characteristic of the Western Ghats. However, all radiological hazard indices were within the limits proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The results reported here indicate that, except for {sup 232}Th, the naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest soils of the Western Ghats were within the ranges specified by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for undisturbed virgin soils.

  1. Natural radionuclide concentrations in two phosphate ores of east Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakehal, Ch. [Department of Physics, Mentouri Constantine University, 25000 Constantine (Algeria); Ramdhane, M., E-mail: ramdhane@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, Mentouri Constantine University, 25000 Constantine (Algeria); Boucenna, A. [Department of Physics, Ferhat-Abbas University, 19000 Setif (Algeria)

    2010-05-15

    Ore is considered as an important source of many elements such as the iron, phosphorus, and uranium. Concerning the natural radionuclides, their concentrations vary from an ore to other depending on the chemical composition of each site. In this work, two phosphate ores found in East of Algeria have been chosen to assess the activity concentration of natural radionuclides represented mainly by three natural radioactive series {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th, and the primordial radionuclide {sup 40}K where they were determined using ultra-low background, high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The measured activity concentrations of radioactive series ranged from 6.2 +- 0.4 to 733 +- 33 Bq.kg{sup -1} for the {sup 232}Th series, from 249 +- 16 to 547 +- 39 Bq.kg{sup -1} for the {sup 238}U series, around 24.2 +- 2.5 Bq.kg{sup -1} for the {sup 235}U series, and from 1.4 +- 0.2 to 6.7 +- 0.7 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K. To assess exposure to gamma radiation in the two ores, from specific activities of {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 226}Ra, three indexes were determined: Radium equivalent (Ra{sub eq}), external and internal hazard indexes (H{sub ex} and H{sub in}), their values ranged from 831 +- 8 to 1298 +- 14 Bq.kg{sup -1} for Ra{sub eq}, from 2.2 +- 0.4 to 3.5 +- 0.7 Bq.kg{sup -1} for H{sub ex}, and from 4.2 +- 0.7 to 4.5 +- 0.7 Bq.kg{sup -1} for H{sub in}.

  2. A comparison of the dose from natural radionuclides and artificial radionuclides after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Iwaoka, Kazuki

    2016-07-01

    Due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, the evacuees from Namie Town still cannot reside in the town, and some continue to live in temporary housing units. In this study, the radon activity concentrations were measured at temporary housing facilities, apartments and detached houses in Fukushima Prefecture in order to estimate the annual internal exposure dose of residents. A passive radon-thoron monitor (using a CR-39) and a pulse-type ionization chamber were used to evaluate the radon activity concentration. The average radon activity concentrations at temporary housing units, including a medical clinic, apartments and detached houses, were 5, 7 and 9 Bq m(-3), respectively. Assuming the residents lived in these facilities for one year, the average annual effective doses due to indoor radon in each housing type were evaluated as 0.18, 0.22 and 0.29 mSv, respectively. The average effective doses to all residents in Fukushima Prefecture due to natural and artificial sources were estimated using the results of the indoor radon measurements and published data. The average effective dose due to natural sources for the evacuees from Namie Town was estimated to be 1.9 mSv. In comparison, for the first year after the FDNPP accident, the average effective dose for the evacuees due to artificial sources from the accident was 5.0 mSv. Although residents' internal and external exposures due to natural radionuclides cannot be avoided, it might be possible to lower external exposure due to the artificial radionuclides by changing some behaviors of residents. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  3. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronese, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy) and INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: ivan.veronese@unimi.it; Guzzi, G. [AIRMEB - Italian Association for Metal and Biocompatibility Research, Milan (Italy); Giussani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Cantone, M.C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to {sup 4}K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials.

  4. Risk Due to Radiological Terror Attacks With Natural Radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Steinhäusler; Stan, Rydell; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclides radium (Ra-226) and polonium (Po-210) have the potential to be used for criminal acts. Analysis of international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (CSTO), operated at the University of Salzburg, shows that several acts of murder and terrorism with natural radionuclides have already been carried out in Europe and Russia. Five different modes of attack (T) are possible: (1) Covert irradiation of an individual in order to deliver a high individual dose; (2) Covert irradiation of a group of persons delivering a large collective dose; (3) Contamination of food or drink; (4) Generation of radioactive aerosols or solutions; (5) Combination of Ra-226 with conventional explosives (Dirty Bomb). This paper assesses the risk (R) of such criminal acts in terms of: (a) Probability of terrorist motivation deploying a certain attack mode T; (b) Probability of success by the terrorists for the selected attack mode T; (c) Primary damage consequence (C) to the attacked target (activity, dose); (d) Secondary damage consequence (C') to the attacked target (psychological and socio-economic effects); (e) Probability that the consequences (C, C') cannot be brought under control, resulting in a failure to manage successfully the emergency situation due to logistical and/or technical deficits in implementing adequate countermeasures. Extensive computer modelling is used to determine the potential impact of such a criminal attack on directly affected victims and on the environment.

  5. Evaluation of the radionuclide concentrations in soil and plants from the 1975 terrestrial survey of Bikini and Eneu Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colsher, C.S.; Robison, W.L.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1977-01-21

    In June 1975 a radiological survey was conducted of the terrestrial environment of Bikini and Eneu islands (Bikini Atoll) to evaluate the potential radiation dose to the returning Bikini population. In this report, we present measurements of the radionuclide concentration in soil profiles and in dominant species of edible and nonedible, indicator plants. The use of these data to derive relationships to predict the plant uptake of radionuclides from soil is described. Approximately 620 soil and vegetation samples from Bikini and Eneu Islands were analyzed by Ge(Li) gamma spectrometry and by wet chemistry. The predominant radionuclides in these samples were /sup 60/Co, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 239,240/Pu, /sup 241/Pu, and /sup 241/Am.

  6. Natural radionuclides in the human body; Natuerliche Radionuklide im menschlichen Koerper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelkle, Hansruedi [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Physikdept.

    2017-08-01

    Natural radionuclides in the human body produce worldwide a medium annual radiation exposure of 0.31 mSv. 0.17 mSv are due to potassium-40 (K-40) per year, 0.12 mSv per year are due to radionuclides from the uranium and thorium decay series, less than 0.02 mSv due to cosmogenic radionuclides. Natural radioactivity is therefore the largest exposure source, anthropogenic exposure is comparatively marginal.

  7. Natural radionuclides in soil profiles surrounding the largest coal-fired power plant in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Tanić Milan N.; Janković-Mandić Ljiljana J.; Gajić Boško A.; Daković Marko Z.; Dragović Snežana D.; Bačić Goran G.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the influence of the largest Serbian coal-fired power plant on radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles up to 50 cm in depth. Thirty soil profiles were sampled from the plant surroundings (up to 10 km distance) and analyzed using standard methods for soil physicochemical properties and gamma ray spectrometry for specific activities of natural radionuclides (40K, 226Ra and 232Th). Spatial and vertical distribution of radionuclides wa...

  8. Incorporation monitoring, above all for naturally occuring radionuclides; Inkorporationsueberwachung, vor allem bei natuerlichen radioaktiven Stoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breustedt, Bastian [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenforschung; Buchholz, Werner [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). FB Strahlenschutz und Gesundheit; Burow, Mechthild [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Geschaeftsbereich ' ' Sicherheit und Strahlenschutz' ' ; and others

    2017-08-01

    The contribution of the main topic deals with further development of ICRP-models and standardization of regulations in the field of incorporation monitoring. Natural radionuclides, medically used radionuclides and quality assurance, will be discussed. The planning and realization of a shielding chamber for a whole body counter is presented.

  9. Natural Radionuclides in Meadow and Pasture land in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosén, Klas; Villanueva, José - Luis Gutiérrez; Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve

    The amount of natural radionuclides in the environment differs between the Nordic countries as shown by previous investigations and also by this study. Agricultural areas of high natural background are predominantly found in Sweden, Southern Finland and Norway while low background areas are typical...... for Iceland and Denmark. Thus, this study offers possibilities for studying behaviour of natural radionuclides under different conditions such as the influence of different soil types as well as the husbandry. Furthermore the areas also enable studying environmental behaviour of radium and other natural...... radionuclides under seemingly steady state conditions. However, migration and accumulation of natural radionuclides in cultivated soil is complex involving various processes. Thus, a long term goal of this study was to identify the implications of some of these processes by determining the soil to plant...

  10. Natural radionuclides in soil profiles surrounding the largest coal-fired power plant in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanić Milan N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the influence of the largest Serbian coal-fired power plant on radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles up to 50 cm in depth. Thirty soil profiles were sampled from the plant surroundings (up to 10 km distance and analyzed using standard methods for soil physicochemical properties and gamma ray spectrometry for specific activities of natural radionuclides (40K, 226Ra and 232Th. Spatial and vertical distribution of radionuclides was determined and analyzed to show the relations between the specific activities in the soil and soil properties and the most influential factors of natural radionuclide variability were identified. The radiological indices for surface soil were calculated and radiological risk assessment was performed. The measured specific activities were similar to values of background levels for Serbia. The sampling depth did not show any significant influence on specific activities of natural radionuclides. The strongest predictor of specific activities of the investigated radionuclides was soil granulometry. All parameters of radiological risk assessment were below the recommended values and adopted limits. It appears that the coal-fired power plant does not have a significant impact on the spatial and vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in the area of interest, but technologically enhanced natural radioactivity as a consequence of the plant operations was identified within the first 1.5 km from the power plant. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije br. III43009 i br. III41005

  11. Natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, K.; Gutierrez Villanueva, J.-L.; Sundell-Bergman, S. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) (Sweden)] [and others

    2012-06-15

    The amount of natural radionuclides in the environment differs between the Nordic countries as shown by previous investigations and also by this study. Agricultural areas of high natural background are predominantly found in Sweden, Southern Finland and Norway while low background areas are typical for Iceland and Denmark. Thus, this study offers possibilities for studying behaviour of natural radionuclides under different conditions such as the influence of different soil types as well as the husbandry. Furthermore the areas also enable studying environmental behaviour of radium and other natural radionuclides under seemingly steady state conditions. However, migration and accumulation of natural radionuclides in cultivated soil is complex involving various processes. Thus, a long term goal of this study was to identify the implications of some of these processes by determining the soil to plant transfer for pasture land under the different conditions that prevail in the Nordic countries. The potential health hazards due to chronic ingestion of low concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides are fairly unknown but the results of this study may provide valuable background information for assessing these radiation risks. The aim of this project has been to gain knowledge on the status of natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land and in grassland plants in different Nordic countries and on the transfer of these radionuclides from soil/water to man via the milk/food chain (soil- meadow/pasture grass -cow-milk). Limited data are available on the mobility and the transfer of naturally occurring radionuclides in the ecosystems of the agricultural land. In addition, information concerning the concentrations in meat and dairy products is of interest for assessing exposures of humans to natural radionuclides. Soil characteristics are known to have significant impact on the mobility and uptake of natural radionuclides. Therefore, the uptake in relation to

  12. Study on natural radionuclide activities in meat samples consumed in Sao Paulo City, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Mychelle M.L.; Taddei, Maria HelenaT. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Avegliano, Roseane P.; Maihara, Vera A., E-mail: mychelle@cnen.gov.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Consumption of food is usually the most important route by which natural and artificial radionuclides can enter the human body. An assessment of radionuclide levels in different foods and diets is therefore important to estimate the intake of these radionuclides by man. The contamination by radionuclides can occur via the food chain (soil, root, plant and animal), with emphasis to the long half-life radionuclides, which can also have their transfer through the animal meat. The inclusion of meat in human nutrition is important because it is an excellent source of high quality protein, nutrient related to construction and cell regeneration. This work aims the determination of natural radionuclides ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 228}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb) in meat samples. Five groups of samples were analyzed, such as cattle meat (beef), fish, pork, poultry, and processed meat, after radiochemical separation followed by alpha or alpha beta spectrophotometry, and total count quantification. The determination of these radionuclides is very important because they are products of the natural decay series of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, being easily found in meat samples. (author)

  13. Remote sensing the vulnerability of vegetation in natural terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alistair M. S. Smith; Crystal A. Kolden; Wade T. Tinkham; Alan F. Talhelm; John D. Marshall; Andrew T. Hudak; Luigi Boschetti; Michael J. Falkowski; Jonathan A. Greenberg; John W. Anderson; Andrew Kliskey; Lilian Alessa; Robert F. Keefe; James R. Gosz

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is altering the species composition, structure, and function of vegetation in natural terrestrial ecosystems. These changes can also impact the essential ecosystem goods and services derived from these ecosystems. Following disturbances, remote-sensing datasets have been used to monitor the disturbance and describe antecedent conditions as a means of...

  14. Naturally occurring radionuclides in pasture soil, feed ingredients and milk of dairy cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turtiainen, T.; Kostiainen, E.; Solatie, D. [STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)

    2014-07-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides are generally considered being respective part of the environment and hence no statutory monitoring of their levels are required in food products. Therefore, limited data are available on the naturally occurring radionuclides in food. Dairy products constitute a significant portion of Finnish diet (400-500 g/d) and hence it is reasonable to study radionuclide levels in milk in more detail. Contrary to caesium, strontium and iodine, few transfer coefficients are available in the literature for naturally occurring radionuclide transfer to cow's milk. The renaissance of mining industry in Finland has raised a question among the public about the baseline values of naturally occurring radionuclides in Finnish agricultural products. The objective of this study was to investigate naturally occurring radionuclides in the components of dairy cattle diet and milk and calculate their transfer to milk. This information is needed for regulating the permitted discharges to the environment and for setting up monitoring programs if any unplanned discharges are released. In modern dairy farming, cattle are fed a precise diet in order to maximize milk production and quality and to achieve cost-effectiveness. Therefore, several different components are found in dairy cattle's diet and pasture grass concentrations are not sufficient for calculating radionuclide transfer to cow's milk. In this study, we carried out comprehensive sampling at four dairy farms each representing different areas of natural radiation background. The pasture soils were characterized and measured for natural radioactivity. Samples were taken from cattle's total diet (including e.g. pasture grass, water, silage, mineral forage) and milk. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  15. Natural and man-made terrestrial electromagnetic noise: an outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, C.; Meloni, A.

    2007-01-01

    The terrestrial environment is continuously exposed to electromagnetic radiations which set up a «background» electromagnetic noise. Within the Non Ionizing Radiation band (NIR), i.e. for frequencies lower than 300 GHz, this background can have a natural or an artificial origin. Natural origins of electromagnetic radiations are generally atmospheric or cosmic while artificial origins are technological applications, power transmission, communications, etc. This paper briefly descri...

  16. Natural radionuclides in effluents release by a deactivated uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Kelecom, Alphonse; Silva, Ademir X.; Lopes, José M.; Pinto, Carlos E.C.; Py Júnior, Delcy A.; Antunes, Marcos M., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com, E-mail: caerjbr@gmail.com, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.br, E-mail: Antunes@inb.gov.br, E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com, E-mail: Ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: marqueslopes@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Veiga de Almeida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (COMAP.N/FCN/INB), Resende RJ (Brazil). Fábrica de Combustível Nuclear. Coordenação de Meio Ambiente e Proteção Radiológica Ambiental; Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil). Laboratório de Radiobiologia e Radiometria; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (OTU) is a mine and deactivated uranium plant in the city of Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil. This facility possesses three points of release of liquid effluents containing radionuclides: point 014, 025 and 076. At these points, the values of activity concentrations (AC) of the radionuclides U{sub nat}, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 232}Th and {sup 228}Ra were analyzed in 2012. The evaluation of point 014 by univariate statistics pointed four groups. [U{sub nat} > {sup 228}Ra > ({sup 226}Ra = {sup 210}Pb) >{sup 232}Th]. The multivariate statistics separated the radionuclides into two groups: [(U{sub nat} and {sup 232}Th) and ({sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb)]. At point 025, the univariate statistics described three groups: [Un{sub at} > ({sup 228}Ra = {sup 210}Pb) > ({sup 226}Ra = {sup 232}Th)] and the multivariate analysis also described three but different groups: [(U{sub nat} and {sup 228}Ra), ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb) and {sup 232}Th]. In turn, point 076 showed another behavior. The univariate analysis showed only two groups: [(U{sub nat}) > ({sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 232}Th)]. Differently, the multivariate statistics defined three groups: [(U{sub nat} and {sup 232}Th), ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) and {sup 210}Pb].Thus, statistical analysis showed that each point has releases of effluents with different characteristics. Both the behaviors of releases, based on multivariate statistics, and of the AC magnitudes, based on the univariate statistics, are different between the points. The only common features were the greater magnitude of uranium and the smaller magnitude of thorium. (author)

  17. Spatial distribution of natural and artificial radionuclides at the catchment scale (South Central Pyrenees)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navas, A., E-mail: anavas@eead.csic.e [Estacion Experimental de Aula Dei, Department of Soil and Water, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, CSIC, Apartado 13034, 50080 Zaragoza (Spain); Gaspar, L. [Estacion Experimental de Aula Dei, Department of Soil and Water, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, CSIC, Apartado 13034, 50080 Zaragoza (Spain); Lopez-Vicente, M. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200E, B-3001 Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium); Machin, J. [Estacion Experimental de Aula Dei, Department of Soil and Water, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, CSIC, Apartado 13034, 50080 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    Natural and artificial gamma-emitting radionuclides ({sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 40}K, and {sup 137}Cs) were measured in the soils of a small catchment in the Central Pyrenees, Spain. The study was carried out in a mountainous area that was representative of the Tertiary Flysch landscapes in the Southern Pyrenees. Bulk soil cores (n = 77) were collected at the intersections of a 200 x 200-m grid established in the Arnas River Catchment. Mean radioisotope activities (Bq kg{sup -1}) were 40 ({sup 238}U), 27 ({sup 226}Ra), 35 ({sup 232}Th), 74 ({sup 210}Pb), 48 ({sup 210}Pb{sub ex}), 590 ({sup 40}K), and 31 ({sup 137}Cs). The {sup 210}Pb and {sup 137}Cs exhibited the greatest variability, whereas {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K showed the least spatial variation. The relationships between basic soil properties and radionuclide activities indicate that only the radionuclides, {sup 210}Pb{sub ex} and {sup 137}Cs, that are fixed to the fine fraction of the soil are directly correlated with the organic matter content, whereas the natural radionuclides are inversely correlated with the carbonate content. GIS and geospatial interpolations revealed patterns in the spatial concentrations of radionuclides and indicated important differences in their distributions showing the different behaviour of natural and fallout-derived radionuclides. The radionuclide spatial patterns were strongly correlated with physiographic features such as gradient, orientation, and vegetation cover of the slopes. Within the catchment, the least vegetated and steepest slopes had the lowest radionuclide activities, which suggest that physical processes such as erosion are primary factors in the mobilization of radionuclides in association with soil particles. The results provide insights into the main factors that have affected the spatial distribution of radionuclides in the soils of the catchment, which improves our knowledge of the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment

  18. Microbial transformations of natural organic compounds and radionuclides in subsurface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.

    1985-10-01

    A major national concern in the subsurface disposal of energy wastes is the contamination of ground and surface waters by waste leachates containing radionuclides, toxic metals, and organic compounds. Microorganisms play an important role in the transformation of organic compounds, radionuclides, and toxic metals present in the waste and affect their mobility in subsurface environments. Microbial processes involved in dissolution, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are briefly reviewed. Metal complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in subsurface environments. Information on the persistence of and biodegradation rates of synthetic as well as microbiologically produced complexing agents is scarce but important in determining the mobility of metal organic complexes in subsoils. Several gaps in knowledge in the area of microbial transformation of naturally occurring organics, radionuclides, and toxic metals have been identified, and further basic research has been suggested. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Radionuclide Concentrations in Terrestrial Vegetation and Soil Samples On and Around the Hanford Site, 1971 Through 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Fritz, Brad G.; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2011-07-29

    Environmental monitoring is conducted on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to comply with DOE Orders and federal and state regulations. Major objectives of the monitoring are to characterize contaminant levels in the environment and to determine site contributions to the contaminant inventory. This report focuses on surface soil and perennial vegetation samples collected between 1971 and 2008 as part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Surface Environmental Surveillance Project performed under contract to DOE. Areas sampled under this program are located on the Hanford Site but outside facility boundaries and on public lands surrounding the Hanford Site. Additional samples were collected during the past 8 years under DOE projects that evaluated parcels of land for radiological release. These data were included because the same sampling methodology and analytical laboratory were used for the projects. The spatial and temporal trends of six radionuclides collected over a 38-year period were evaluated. The radionuclides----cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239/240, and uranium (reported either as uranium-238 or total uranium)----were selected because they persist in the environment and are still being monitored routinely and reported in Hanford Site environmental reports. All these radionuclides were associated with plutonium production and waste management of activities occurring on the site. Other sources include fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which ended in 1980, and the Chernobyl explosion in 1986. Uranium is also a natural component of the soil. This assessment of soil and vegetation data provides important information on the distribution of radionuclides in areas adjacent to industrial areas, established perimeter locations and buffer areas, and more offsite nearby and distant locations. The concentrations reflect a tendency for detection of some radionuclides close to where they were

  20. Natural attenuation of metals and radionuclides: Report from a workshop held by Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, P.V.; Borns, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geochemistry Dept.

    1997-11-01

    Natural attenuation is increasingly applied to remediate contaminated soils and ground waters. Roughly 25% of Superfund groundwater remedies in 1995 involved some type of monitored natural attenuation, compared to almost none 5 years ago. Remediation by natural attenuation (RNA) requires clear evidence that contaminant levels are decreasing sufficiently over time, a defensible explanation of the attenuation mechanism, long-term monitoring, and a contingency plan at the very least. Although the primary focus of implementation has to date been the biodegradation of organic contaminants, there is a wealth of scientific evidence that natural processes reduce the bioavailability of contaminant metals and radionuclides. Natural attenuation of metals and radionuclides is likely to revolve around sorption, solubility, biologic uptake and dilution controls over contaminant availability. Some of these processes can be applied to actively remediate sites. Others, such as phytoremediation, are likely to be ineffective. RNA of metals and radionuclides is likely to require specialized site characterization to construct contaminant and site-specific conceptual models of contaminant behavior. Ideally, conceptual models should be refined such that contaminant attenuation can be confidently predicted into the future. The technical approach to RNA of metals and radionuclides is explored here.

  1. Initinal and secondary decline of transport of radionuclides in Fukushima in the terrestrial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Yuichi; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Wakiyama, Yoshifumi; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Smith, Hugh; Brake, Will; Iwagami, Sho; Kato, Hiroaki

    2017-04-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident has released massive amount of radiocesium into the terrestrial environment, and the radiocecium have been moved through rainfall and erosional processes. Especially, radiocesium (Cs-137) transfer and flux through river network is important to understand the redistribution of radiocesium in terrestrial environment. An intensive field monitoring campaign has been started including mapping project, immediately after the Fukushima NPP accident including detailed monitoring site in upstream (Yamakiya site), and 30 monitoring sites in downstream river sites. In this presentation, I will present the initial and secondary decline of summary of environmental transfer studies after the Fukushima NPP accident The processes includes forest canopy to ground soil and aquifers, transfer to river and marine. The activity concentration of radiocesium of suspended sediment declining rapidly in rivers until about 1 year after the fallout, then decline slowly, but the tendency of rate of decline differs between rivers. The rate of decline in paddy field and headwater stream is quicker in initial decline followed by slower decline. However, the slow decline of activity concentration of suspend sediment in cropland and decline steadily. We will analyse the difference in initial and secondary decline between rivers using upstream land use and runoff characteristics.

  2. Influence of terrestrial radionuclides on environmental gamma exposure in a uranium deposit in Paraíba, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo Dos Santos Júnior, José; Dos Santos Amaral, Romilton; Simões Cezar Menezes, Rômulo; Reinaldo Estevez Álvarez, Juan; Marques do Nascimento Santos, Josineide; Herrero Fernández, Zahily; Dias Bezerra, Jairo; Antônio da Silva, Alberto; Francys Rodrigues Damascena, Kennedy; de Almeida Maciel Neto, José

    2017-07-01

    One of the main natural uranium deposits in Brazil is located in the municipality of Espinharas, in the State of Paraíba. This area may present high levels of natural radioactivity due to the presence of these radionuclides. Since this is a populated area, there is need for a radioecological dosimetry assessment to investigate the possible risks to the population. Based on this problem, the objective of this study was to estimate the environmental effective dose outdoors in inhabited areas influenced by the uranium deposit, using the specific activities of equivalent uranium, equivalent thorium and 40K and conversion factors. The environmental assessment was carried using gamma spectroscopy in sixty-two points within the municipality, with a high-resolution gamma spectrometer with HPGe semiconductor detector and Be window. The results obtained ranged from 0.01 to 19.11 mSv y-1, with an average of 2.64 mSv y-1. These levels are, on average, 23 times higher than UNSCEAR reference levels and up to 273 times the reference value of the earth's crust for primordial radionuclides. Therefore, given the high radioactivity levels found, we conclude that there is need for further investigation to evaluate the levels of radioactivity in indoor environments, which will reflect more closely the risks of the local population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Soil and vegetation influence in plants natural radionuclides uptake at a uranium mining site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charro, E.; Moyano, A.

    2017-12-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the uptake of several radionuclides by the vegetation characteristic of a dehesa ecosystem in uranium mining-impacted soils in Central-West of Spain. The activity concentration for 238U, 226Ra, 210Pb, 232Th, and 224Ra was measured in soil and vegetation samples using a Canberra n-type HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. Transfer factors of natural radionuclides in different tissues (leaves, branches, twigs, and others) of native plants were evaluated. From these data, the influence of the mine, the physicochemical parameters of the soils and the type of vegetation were analyzed in order to explain the accumulation of radionuclides in the vegetation. A preferential uptake of 210Pb and 226Ra by plants, particularly by trees of the Quercus species (Quercus pyrenaica and Quercus ilex rotundifolia), has been observed, being the transfer factors for 226Ra and 210Pb in these tree species higher than those for other plants (like Pinus pinaster, Rubur ulmifolius and Populus sp.). The analysis of radionuclide contents and transfer factors in the vegetation showed no evidence of influence of the radionuclide concentration in soils, although it could be explained in terms of the type of plants and, in particular, of the tree's species, with special attention to the tree's rate of growth, being higher in slow growing species.

  4. Calibration and testing of a portable NaI(Tl gamma-ray spectrometer-dosimeter for evaluation of terrestrial radionuclides and 137Cs contributions to ambient dose equivalent rate outdoors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ramzaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercially available NaI(Tl based spectrometer-dosimeter has been used to separate contributions of the terrestrial radionuclides (238U series, 232Th series and 40K and 137Cs to the total ambient dose equivalent rate (ADER, Ḣ*(10 , outdoors. The device had been initially calibrated by the manufacturer to measure: 1 the total ADER; 2 activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and ‘effective’ activity concentration of the terrestrial radionuclides, ACeff, in soil, agricultural raw materials, forestry products and construction materials; and 3 ground contamination density by 137Cs. In order to derive a conversion coefficient from ACeff to the ADER stipulated by the terrestrial radionuclides (ADERTRN, two series of additional calibration measurements were performed. The calibration measurements were conducted at 27 outdoor locations in the center of St.-Petersburg and in the Leningradskaya region  (background areas. The conversion coefficient from ACeff to ADERTRN of 0.51 (nSv h–1/(Bq kg–1 has been obtained using a regression analysis of experimental data. The intrinsic noise of the spectrometer and its response to cosmic radiation at sea level has been estimated to 7 nSv h–1. The calibration factors must be used with caution and only for detectors similar to the one employed in this study (assembly based on a NaI(Tl single crystal, 63 mm in diameter and 63 mm in length. The spectrometer-dosimeter and experimentally derived calibration coefficients have been tested in field at seven sites in the south-western districts of the Bryansk region that had been heavily contaminated by Chernobyl fallout. The contribution of 137Cs to the total ADER varies between 40% and 95%. The preliminary results of the measurements confirm the potential of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry for assaying natural and artificial components of the ambient dose equivalent rate outdoors.

  5. Natural radionuclides in some romanian medicinal mineral water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botezatu, E.; Iacob, O. [Institute of Public Health, Iasi (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    Radioactive minerals occur irregularly in the bedrock, similar to other minerals and they dissolve easily in water. Bedrock contains naturally occurring radioactivity including uranium, thorium, radium and potassium. The natural radioactivity results from water passing through deposits of naturally occurring radioactive materials.Many mineral water springs are traditionally used as drinking mineral water sources in the area.During the period from 1997 to 2000, we accomplished a study that had as basic objectives the radioacty control of the drinking mineral waters according to existing standards and evaluation of doses to population by ingestion of mineral water (bottled waters commercially available for human intake and some spring waters).For this reason, we were interested in finding out the extent to which these waters can be a natural radiation source. This survey aimed at assessing the radioactive content of these waters and their contribution to the population exposure.The presented data contribute to a national database concerning the natural radioactive content of Romanian mineral waters. A hypothetical person that undergoes a cure of mineral water by ingestion, inhalation and immersion is receiving an average supplementary dose of 3 {mu}Sv over background radiation of 2,512 {mu}Sv.y{sup -1} due to all natural radiation sources in Romania. The contribution of mineral water used in therapeutic purposes to the natural irradiation of population is very slight, almost insignificant. This supports the conclusion that these spring mineral waters can be used without any restrictions for drinking or bathing / washing for medical therapy of ailing persons even other sources of exposure are also taken into account. (N.C.)

  6. Natural and man-made terrestrial electromagnetic noise: an outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meloni

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial environment is continuously exposed to electromagnetic radiations which set up a «background» electromagnetic noise. Within the Non Ionizing Radiation band (NIR, i.e. for frequencies lower than 300 GHz, this background can have a natural or an artificial origin. Natural origins of electromagnetic radiations are generally atmospheric or cosmic while artificial origins are technological applications, power transmission, communications, etc. This paper briefly describes the natural and man-made electromagnetic noise in the NIR band. Natural noise comes from a large variety of sources involving different physical phenomena and covering a wide range of frequencies and showing various propagation characteristics with an extremely broad range of power levels. Due to technological growth man-made electromagnetic noise is nowadays superimposed on natural noise almost everywhere on Earth. In the last decades man-made noise has increased dramatically over and above the natural noise in residential and business areas. This increase has led some scientists to consider possible negative effects of electromagnetic waves on human life and living systems in general. Accurate measurements of natural and man-made electromagnetic noise are necessary to understand the relative power levels in the different bands and their influence on life.

  7. Determination of radionuclide concentration of landfill at Eliozu, Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of the radionuclide concentration from landfill around Eliozu in Port- Harcourt Area of River State was carried out. This study assessed the level of terrestrial gamma radiation and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides; 232Th, 238U and 40K. 10 soil and 10 water samples collected from the ...

  8. Subcellular localisation of radionuclides by transmission electronic microscopy in aquatic and terrestrial organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floriani, M.; Grasset, G.; Simon, O.; Morlon, H.; Laroche, L. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The global framework of this study is to go further in the understanding of the involved mechanisms of uranium and selenium internalisation at the subcellular level and of their toxicity towards several aquatic and terrestrial organisms. In this context, the applications and performances of a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM/STEM) equipped with CCD camera and Energy-Dispersive- X-Ray (EDAX) analysis are reported. The principal merit of this equipment is the clear expression of element distribution with nanometer resolution. The sample for TEM analysis were prepared in ultrathin sections of 70-140 nm (thickness) and those for EDAX in sections of 200-500 nm. This method offers the possibility of a direct correlation between histological image and distribution map of trace elements. For each sample, following TEM analysis, EDAX spectra or EDAX mapping were also recorded to confirm the identity of the electron dense material in the scanned sections. Demonstration of the usefulness of this method to understand the bioaccumulation mechanisms and to study the effect of the pollutant uptake at the subcellular level was performed for target organs of a metal (U) and a metalloid (Se) in various biological models: a higher rooted plant (Phaseolus vulgaris)) and a freshwater invertebrate (Orconectes Limosus) and a unicellular green alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii)). TEM-EDAX analysis revealed the presence of U-deposits in gills and digestive gland in crayfish, and in vacuoles or in the cytoplasm of different rooted cells bean. In the alga, the accumulation of Se was found in electron-dense granules within cytoplasm associated with ultrastructural changes and starch accumulation. (author)

  9. Radon flux maps for the Netherlands and Europe using terrestrial gamma radiation derived from soil radionuclides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manohar, S.N.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Herber, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive noble gas, radon (Rn-222) is a valuable tracer to study atmospheric processes and to validate global chemical transport models. However, the use of radon as a proxy in atmospheric and climate research is limited by the uncertainties in the magnitude and distribution

  10. Concentrations of natural radionuclides in imported zirconium minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Marija M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural radioactivity in imported zircon samples used as glaze for ceramic tiles in the ceramics industry has been presented in this paper. The measurements were made by gamma spectrometry with a high purity germanium detector. The average activity concentrations of 238U and 232Th determined in the measured samples (3250 Bq/kg, and 556 Bq/kg, respectively are much higher than the concentrations found in the Earth’s crust. The activity concentration of 226Ra is also high in all analyzed samples, while 40K was not detected. The gamma index, I, the external hazard index, Hex, the internal hazard index, Hin, and the radium equivalent activity, Raeq, were calculated. Due to relatively high activity concentration level of uranium in imported zircon samples, specific regulations are necessary for zircon compound used in ceramic industry. It can be concluded that the investigated samples can be used as the component of ceramic glaze in the concentrations not above 3%.

  11. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2012-12-12

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  12. Isotopic identification of nitrogen hotspots across natural terrestrial ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N influences local biological processes, ecosystem productivity, the composition of the atmospheric-climate system, and the human endeavour as a whole. Here we use natural variations in N isotopes, coupled with two models, to trace global pathways of N loss from the land to the water and atmosphere. We show that denitrification accounts for approximately 35 % of total N losses from the natural soil, with NO, N2O, and N2 fluxes equal to 15.7 ± 4.7 Tg N yr−1, 10.2 ± 3.0 Tg N yr−1, and 21.0 ± 6.1 Tg N yr−1, respectively. Our analysis points to tropical regions as the major "hotspot" of nitrogen export from the terrestrial biosphere, accounting for 71 % of global N losses from the natural land surface. The poorly studied Congo Basin is further identified as one of the major natural sources of atmospheric N2O. Extra-tropical areas, by contrast, lose a greater fraction of N via leaching pathways (~77 % of total N losses than do tropical biomes, likely contributing to N limitations of CO2 uptake at higher latitudes. Our results provide an independent constraint on global models of the N cycle among different regions of the unfertilized biosphere.

  13. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Delakowitz, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Zeh, P. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Probst, T. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Lin, X. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Ehrlicher, U. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Schauer, C. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Ivanovich, M. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Longworth, G. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Hasler, S.E. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell (United Kingdom); Gardiner, M. [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Fritz, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Klotz, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Lazik, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Wolf, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Geyer, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany); Alexander, J.L. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Read, D. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Thomas, J.B. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom)

    1994-08-01

    In this joint research programme the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration has been studied. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena for radionuclides were the main objectives of this research programme. Groundwaters, colloids and sediments were sampled from aquifer system overlying a saltdome in the Gorleben area in northern Germany and were characterized by various analytical methods (ICP-MS, ICP-AES, neutron activation analysis (NAA), DOC-Analyser, HPIC, potentiometric titration). Different natural isotopes ({sup 2}H, {sup 3}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}C, {sup 18}O, {sup 34}S, U/Th decay series) were determined and their ratios were compared with one another in the order to ascertain the provenance of the groundwater colloids. The investigated groundwaters contain substantial amounts of colloids mainly composed of humic and fulvic acids loaded with various metal ions. The chemical interaction of radionuclide ions of various oxidation states (Am, Eu, for M(III), Th, Pu for M(IV), Np for M(V) and U for M(VI)) with groundwater colloids was investigated in order to elucidate the colloid facilitated migration behaviour of actinides in a given aquifer system. Transport process studies with generated pseudocolloids of radionuclides in various oxidation states were undertaken in scaled column experiments, pre-equilibrated with colloid rich Gorleben groundwater. A modelling programme was developed to predict chemical transport of radionuclides in the presence of humic colloids using a modified version of the CHEMTARD code. Modelling predictions have generated acceptable results for Eu, Am and U and poorer agreement between experimental and modelling results for Th and Np as a result of more limited data. (orig.)

  14. Radiological impact due to natural radionuclides (U and Th-isotopes) in soils from Salamanca, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandujano G, C. D.; Sosa, M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Loma del Bosque 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Mantero, J.; Manjon, G.; Garcia T, R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Grupo en Fisica Nuclear Aplicada, Av. Reina Mercedes No. 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Costilla, R., E-mail: cmandujano@fisica.ugto.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias de la Vida, Departamento de Ciencias Ambientales, Ex-Hacienda El Copal Km 9 Irapuato-Silao, 36500 Irapuato, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Activity concentrations of U ({sup 238}U, {sup 234}U) and Th ({sup 232}Th, {sup 230}Th) radionuclides in samples of superficial urban soils surrounding an industrial complex in Salamanca, Mexico have been determined. Levels of naturally occurring radionuclides (Norm) in the environment may be affected due to the presence of different industrial activities in this zone, representing a potential radiological risk for the population which should be evaluated. Alpha-particle Spectrometry with Pips detectors has been used for the radiometric characterization. A well established radiochemical procedure was used for the isolation of the radionuclides of interest. Alkali fusion for sample digestion, liquid-liquid extraction with Tbp (tri-butyl-phosphate) for U and Th isolation and electrodeposition in stainless steel dishes for measurement conditioning has been used. The results cover the ranges of 10-42, 12-60, 12-52 and 11-51 Bq·kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th respectively, being not observed any clear anthropogenic increments in relation with the values normally found in unaffected soils. Although there is disequilibrium between U isotopes and {sup 230}Th in some soil samples, it can be attributed to natural processes. The radiological impact of the industrial activities in the surrounding soils can be then evaluated as very low. Hence, from the Radiological Protection point of view, the soils studied do not represent a radiological risk for the health of the population. (Author)

  15. Natural radionuclides in waste water discharged from coal-fired power plants in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Marija M; Todorović, Dragana J; Sarap, Nataša B; Krneta Nikolić, Jelena D; Rajačić, Milica M; Pantelić, Gordana K

    2016-12-01

    Investigation of the natural radioactivity levels in water around power plants, as well as in plants, coal, ash, slag and soil, and to assess the associated radiation hazard is becoming an emerging and interesting topic. This paper is focused on the results of the radioactivity analysis in waste water samples from five coal-fired power plants in Serbia (Nikola Tesla A, Nikola Tesla B, Kolubara, Morava and Kostolac), which were analyzed in the period 2003-2015. River water samples taken upstream and downstream from the power plants, drain water and overflow water were analyzed. In the water samples gamma spectrometry analysis was performed as well as determination of gross alpha and beta activity. Natural radionuclide 40 K was detected by gamma spectrometry, while the concentrations of other radionuclides, 226 Ra, 235 U and 238 U, usually were below the minimum detection activity (MDA). 232 Th and artificial radionuclide 137 Cs were not detected in these samples. Gross alpha and beta activities were determined by the α/β low level proportional counter Thermo Eberline FHT 770 T. In the analyzed samples, gross alpha activity ranged from MDA to 0.47 Bq L - 1 , while the gross beta activity ranged from MDA to 1.55 Bq L - 1 .

  16. External exposure doses due to gamma emitting natural radionuclides in some Egyptian building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharram, B M; Suliman, M N; Zahran, N F; Shennawy, S E; El Sayed, A R

    2012-01-01

    Using of building materials containing naturally occurring radionuclides as (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K and their progeny results in an external exposures of the housing of such buildings. In the present study, indoor dose rates for typical Egyptian rooms are calculated using the analytical method and activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in some building materials. Uniform chemical composition of the walls, floor and ceiling as well as uniform mass concentrations of the radionuclides in walls, floor and ceiling assumed. Different room models are assumed to discuss variation of indoor dose rates according to variation in room construction. Activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K content in eight samples representative Clay soil and different building materials used in most recent Egyptian building were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The specific activity for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K, from the selected samples, were in the range 14.15-60.64, 2.75-84.66 and 7.35-554.4Bqkg(-1), respectively. The average indoor absorbed dose rates in air ranged from 0.005μGyh(-1) to 0.071μGyh(-1) and the corresponding population-weighted annual effective dose due to external gamma radiation varies from 0.025 to 0.345mSv. An outdoor dose rate for typical building samples in addition to some radiological hazards has been introduced for comparison. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of the Research Status and Topics on the Radionuclide Migration and Retardation in Natural Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Min Hoon; Park, Chung Kyun; Kim, Seung Soo; Lee, Seung Yeop; Lee, Jae Kwang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    In this report, recent research status for major developed countries in the high-level radioactive waste disposal including international organizations was investigated and analyzed in research topics for the radionuclide migration and retardation in natural barriers. Besides, recent research trends and future prospects were investigated for selected major 10 topics about the radionuclide migration and retardation processes. Based upon these investigations and analyses, future research goals and topics to be concentrated were presented. This report will be helpful for understanding our current research status and technical position and establishing future research direction and topics by analyzing domestic and foreign research status and trends. The results will also be utilized as basic information for establishing future policy and plans of the government for the high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  18. Natural radionuclides in bottled drinking waters produced in Croatia and their contribution to radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozmaric, Martina, E-mail: rozmar@irb.hr [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia); Rogic, Matea [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia); Benedik, Ljudmila; Strok, Marko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-10-15

    Activity concentrations of {sup 234}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in all Croatian bottled drinking natural spring and natural mineral water products, commercially available on the market, were determined. The samples originated from various geological regions of Croatia. Activity concentrations of measured radionuclides are in general decreasing in this order: {sup 234}U > {sup 238}U > {sup 226}Ra > {sup 228}Ra > {sup 210}Pb > {sup 210}Po and {sup 226}Ra > {sup 228}Ra > {sup 234}U > {sup 238}U > {sup 210}Pb > {sup 210}Po for natural spring and mineral waters, respectively. Based on the radionuclide activity concentrations average total annual effective ingestion doses for infants, children and adults, as well as contribution of each particular radionuclide to total dose, were assessed and discussed. The highest doses were calculated for children from 7 to 12 years of age, which makes them the most critical group of population. All values for each type of water, as well as for each population group, were well below the recommended reference dose level (RDL) of 0.1 mSv from one year's consumption of drinking water according to the European Commission recommendations from 1998. Contribution of each particular radionuclide to total doses varied among different water types and within each water type, as well as between different age groups, where the lowest contribution was found for uranium isotopes and the highest for {sup 228}Ra. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Levels of {sup 234,238}U, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in Croatian bottled drinking waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dose assessment for three groups of population (infants, children and adults). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The most critical group of population are children (they assessed the highest dose). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contribution of each radionuclide to total annual effective ingestion doses. Black

  19. Treatment techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. Final report of the TENAWA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annanmaeki, M.; Turtiainen, T. [eds.

    2000-01-01

    TENAWA project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water) was carried out on a cost-shared basic with the European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of Directorate-General XII, Radiation Protection Unit. TENAWA project was started because in several European countries ground water supplies may contain high amounts of natural radionuclides. During the project both laboratory and field research was performed in order to test the applicability of different equipment and techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. The measurable objectives of the project were: to give recommendations on the most suitable methods for removing radon ({sup 222}Rn), uranium ({sup 238,234}U), radium ({sup 226}, {sup 228}Ra), lead ({sup 210}Pb) and polonium ({sup 210}Po) from drinking water of different qualities (i.e. soft, hard, iron-, manganese- and humus-rich, acidic) to test commercially available equipment for its ability to remove radionuclides; to find new materials, absorbents and membranes effective in the removal of radionuclides and to issue guidelines for the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in water treatment. Radon could be removed efficiently (>95%) from domestic water supplies by both aeration and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Defects in technical reliability or radon removal efficiency were observed in some aerators. The significant drawback of GAC filtration was the elevated gamma dose rates (up to 120 {mu}Sv/h) near the filter and the radioactivity of spent GAC. Aeration was found to be a suitable method for removing radon at waterworks, too. The removal efficiencies at waterworks where the aeration process was designed to remove radon or carbon dioxide were 67-99%. If the aeration process was properly designed, removal efficiencies higher than 95% could be attained. Uranium could best be removed (>95%) with strong basic anion exchange resins and radium by applying strong

  20. New best estimates for radionuclide solid-liquid distribution coefficients in soils. Part 2. Naturally occurring radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenhove, H. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, Antwerp (Belgium)], E-mail: hvandenh@sckcen.be; Gil-Garcia, C.; Rigol, A.; Vidal, M. [University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-09-15

    Predicting the transfer of radionuclides in the environment for normal release, accidental, disposal or remediation scenarios in order to assess exposure requires the availability of an important number of generic parameter values. One of the key parameters in environmental assessment is the solid liquid distribution coefficient, K{sub d}, which is used to predict radionuclide-soil interaction and subsequent radionuclide transport in the soil column. This article presents a review of K{sub d} values for uranium, radium, lead, polonium and thorium based on an extensive literature survey, including recent publications. The K{sub d} estimates were presented per soil groups defined by their texture and organic matter content (Sand, Loam, Clay and Organic), although the texture class seemed not to significantly affect K{sub d}. Where relevant, other K{sub d} classification systems are proposed and correlations with soil parameters are highlighted. The K{sub d} values obtained in this compilation are compared with earlier review data.

  1. Spatial and vertical distribution and risk assessment of natural radionuclides in soils surrounding the lignite-fired power plants in Megalopolis basin, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaefthymiou, H V; Manousakas, M; Fouskas, A; Siavalas, G

    2013-01-01

    Twenty soil profile samples and fourteen surface soil samples collected from the vicinity of the lignite-fired power plants in the Megalopolis basin (Greece) were analysed for their natural radionuclide concentration and (137)Cs, since fossil fuels are associated with naturally occurring radioactive materials and hence with radiological impact. No significant enhancement of surface soil radioactivity levels in the vicinity of lignite-fired plants was observed. A downcore decreasing trend of (137)Cs was observed in a number of cores reflecting its atmospheric origin, whereas the uniform distribution observed in a number of other cores gave information on the mechanical alteration of the soil. The average dose rate value was found to be 63 ± 22 nGy h(-1), while the annual average effective dose from the terrestrial gamma radiation was found to be 0.08 ± 0.03 mSv.

  2. The Palmottu natural analogue project. The behaviour of natural radionuclides in and around uranium deposits. Summary report 1992-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, R.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Suksi, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry; Niini, H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Engineering Geology and Geophysics; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Jakobsson, K. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-06-01

    The Palmottu U-Th mineralization at Nummi-Pusula, southwestern Finland, has been studied as a natural analogue to deep disposal of radioactive wastes since 1988. The report gives a summary of the results of investigations carried out during the years 1992-1994. The Palmottu Analogue Project aims at a more profound understanding of radionuclide transport processes in fractured crystalline bedrock. The essential factors controlling transport are groundwater flow and interaction between water and rock. Accordingly, the study includes structural interpretations based in part on geophysical measurements, hydrological studies including hydraulic downhole measurements, flow modelling, hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwater, uranium chemistry and colloid chemistry, mineralogical studies, geochemical interpretation and modelling, including paleohydrogeological aspects, and studies of radionuclide mobilization and migration processes including numerical simulations. The project has produced a large amount of data related to natural analogue aspects. The data obtained have already been utilized in developing logical conceptual ideas of the time frames and processes operating in the bedrock of the site. (61 refs., 24 figs., 8 tabs.).

  3. Natural radionuclides distribution in the shelf and upper slope of southeast Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Luisa M.; Figueira, Rubens C.L., E-mail: luisa.cordero@usp.b, E-mail: rfigueira@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. Oceanografico. Lab. de Quimica Inorganica Marinha; Mahiques, Michel M., E-mail: mahiques@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. Oceanografico. Lab. de Analise de Materia Organica; Tessler, Moyses G., E-mail: mgtessle@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. Oceanografico. Lab. de Espectrometria Gama

    2009-07-01

    In recent decades, Oceanography has been using a variety of radionuclides as tracers to understand the ocean dynamic processes, handling and disposal of sediments of seabed. In this context, the determination of natural radionuclides distributions ({sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K) has been carried out with sediments samples from the shelf and upper slope off Southeast Brazil using a gamma spectrometry technique. The samples were sliced into strata of 2 cm, dried, ground and properly packed to be analysed. The concentration of activities was performed in a hyperpure Ge detector with a resolution of 1,9 keV for the peak of 1332,3 keV of {sup 60}Co, model GEM50P by EGG and ORTEC. The study area is located between latitudes 28 deg 40'S and 23 deg 00'S and extends from Cabo Frio (RJ) to Cabo de Santa Marta Grande (SC). The activity concentrations varied from 0,6 to 52,8 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, from 1,6 to 50,9BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th and from 65,4 to 873,3 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K. From these results it is possible to establish a correlation between the depositional area dynamics and the samples size parameters. (author)

  4. Natural radionuclides in the Brazilian coast region: 1. Estuarine complex Cananeia-Iguape, Sao Paulo State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, E.J. de; Ferreira, Fabiano S.; Silva Neto, Paulo C.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de; Figueira, Rubens C.L.; Ribeiro, Andreza P., E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: biologofabiano10@gmail.com, E-mail: ptpoli@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Mangrove forests are of utmost important ecosystems for biogeochemical transport processes in a global scale because of the preferential transport via sediments and organic matter from continents to oceans. Such ecosystems are the richest biodiversity areas, in which bioaccumulation of chemical substances can be expected for some species, in this case, there is a lack of knowledge of natural radionuclides accumulation in mangrove vegetation. This work encompasses the first results obtained for the Estuarine Complex Cananeia-Iguape, a peculiar coast area of the Sao Paulo State, Brazil. In 2011, leaf samples of Rhyzophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa trees with perimeter at the breast height higher than 15 cm were collected in the conservation unit Parque Estadual Ilha do Cardoso. Sample preparation consisted of leaf washing, oven-drying, milling in porcelain mortar at the particle size lower than 0.5 mm. Portions of 10 g were transferred to polyethylene vials of appropriate geometry for the analysis by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Reference materials were analyzed together to evaluate the quality of the analytical procedure. K-40 was preferentially allocated in leaves. Some accumulation in leaves was noticed for Pb-210 and Ac-228 depending on the species, indicating differences of radionuclide distribution in the mangrove vegetation. (author)

  5. Bio-availability and transfer of natural radionuclides in a Mediterranean ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza, A.; Paniagua, J.; Rufo, M. [Universidad de Extremadura, Caceres (Spain). Dept. de Fisica; Barandica, J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ecologia

    1996-09-01

    The soil to plant transfer coefficients for the natural radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 228}Th in the species Cistus ladanifer in a Mediterranean type ecosystem has been studied. The secular equilibrium that exists between {sup 228}Ra and {sup 228}Th in the total fraction of the soil is broken in the available fraction and, consequently, in the different vegetation fractions considered. The bio-availability of {sup 226}Ra is similar to that of {sup 228}Ra. There exists, nevertheless, a positive discrimination by the plant in favour of the former. The transfer coefficients from the available fraction of the soil to the different fractions in the plant present a characteristic time-dependence for each vegetation fraction. (author).

  6. Natural radionuclide and radiological assessment of building materials in high background radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Moghaddam, Masoud Vahabi; Fathabadi, Nasrin

    2013-04-01

    Building materials, collected from different sites in Ramsar, a northern coastal city in Iran, were analyzed for their natural radionuclide contents. The measurements were carried out using a high resolution high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer system. The activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K content varied from below the minimum detection limit up to 86,400 Bqkg(-1), 187 Bqkg(-1), and 1350 Bqkg(-1), respectively. The radiological hazards incurred from the use of these building materials were estimated through various radiation hazard indices. The result of this survey shows that values obtained for some samples are more than the internationally accepted maximum limits and as such, the use of them as a building material pose significant radiation hazard to individuals.

  7. Identification and validation of heavy metal and radionuclide hyperaccumulating terrestrial plant species. Quarterly technical progress report, March 20, 1997--June 19, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochian, L.

    1997-11-01

    This laboratory has been involved in a collaborative project focusing on a range of issues related to the phytoremediation of heavy metal-and radionuclide- contaminated soils. While much of the research has been fundamental in nature, involving physiological and molecular characterizations of the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation in plants, the laboratory is also investigating more practical issues related to phytoremediation. A central issue in this latter research has been the identification of amendments capable of increasing the bioavailability and subsequent phytoextraction of radionuclides. The results described here detail these efforts for uranium and Cs-137. A study was also conducted on a Cs-137 contaminated site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which allowed application of the laboratory and greenhouse results to a field setting.

  8. The natural and artificial radionuclides in drinking water samples and consequent population doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan Altıkulaç

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Concentration levels of 226Ra, 228Ra, 40K and 137Cs were determined in 52 drinking water samples collected from the different supplies in Samsun province to evaluate annual effective dose due to the ingestion of the drinking water samples. The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K natural radionuclides in the drinking water samples varied from <27 to 2431 mBq L−1, <36 to 270 mBq L−1 and <47 to 2880 mBq L−1 respectively. The activity concentrations of the artificial radionuclide 137Cs in the drinking water samples were lower than minimum detectable activity except in one drinking water sample (DW14 with an associated activity concentration of 2576 mBq L−1. Contributions of the consumed water samples to annual effective dose from 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K varied from 1.6 to 33.4 μSv y−1 with a mean of 6.1 μSv y−1, 2.2 to 46.8 μSv y−1 with a mean of 8.6 μSv y−1, 4.7 to 97.5 μSv y−1 with a mean of 17.9 μSv y−1 for infants, children and adults, respectively. The results showed that all values of the annual effective dose of ingestion of these water samples were below the individual dose criterion of 100 μSv y−1 reported by World Health Organization (WHO.

  9. Correlation analysis of the natural radionuclides in soil and indoor radon in Vojvodina, Province of Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkapic, S; Maletić, D; Vasin, J; Bikit, K; Mrdja, D; Bikit, I; Udovičić, V; Banjanac, R

    2017-01-01

    The most dominant source of indoor radon is the underlying soil, so the enhanced levels of radon are usually expected in mountain regions and geology units with high radium and uranium content in surface soils. Laboratory for radioactivity and dose measurement, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad has rich databases of natural radionuclides concentrations in Vojvodina soil and also of indoor radon concentrations for the region of Vojvodina, Northern Province of Serbia. In this paper we present the results of correlative and multivariate analysis of these results and soil characteristics in order to estimate the geogenic radon potential. The correlative and multivariate analysis were done using Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis software package TMVA package, within ROOT analysis framework, which uses several comparable multivariate methods for our analysis. The evaluation ranking results based on the best signal efficiency and purity, show that the Boosted Decision Trees (BDT) and Multi Layer Preceptor (MLP), based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN), are multivariate methods which give the best results in the analysis. The BDTG multivariate method shows that variables with the highest importance are radio-nuclides activity on 30 cm depth. Moreover, the multivariate regression methods give a good approximation of indoor radon activity using full set of input variables. On several locations in the city of Novi Sad the results of indoor radon concentrations, radon emanation from soil, gamma spectrometry measurements of underlying soil and geology characteristics of soil were analyzed in detail in order to verify previously obtained correlations for Vojvodina soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genotoxic endpoints in the earthworms sub-lethal assay to evaluate natural soils contaminated by metals and radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenco, Joana I., E-mail: joanalourenco@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Ruth O., E-mail: ruthp@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Silva, Ana C., E-mail: ana.cmj@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Morgado, Jose M., E-mail: jmtmorgado@gmail.com [Centro de Histocompatibilidade do Centro, Praceta Prof. Mota Pinto, Edificio S. Jeronimo, 4o piso, Apartado 9041, 3001-301 Coimbra (Portugal); Carvalho, Fernando P., E-mail: fernando.carvalho@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Oliveira, Joao M., E-mail: joaomota@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Malta, Margarida P., E-mail: margm@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Paiva, Artur A., E-mail: apaiva@histocentro.min-saude.pt [Centro de Histocompatibilidade do Centro, Praceta Prof. Mota Pinto, Edificio S. Jeronimo, 4o piso, Apartado 9041, 3001-301 Coimbra (Portugal); Mendo, Sonia A., E-mail: smendo@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Goncalves, Fernando J., E-mail: fjmg@ua.pt [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-02-15

    Eisenia andrei was exposed, for 56 days, to a contaminated soil from an abandoned uranium mine and to the natural reference soil LUFA 2.2. The organisms were sampled after 0, 1, 2, 7, 14 and 56 days of exposure, to assess metals bioaccumulation, coelomocytes DNA integrity and cytotoxicity. Radionuclides bioaccumulation and growth were also determined at 0 h, 14 and 56 days of exposure. Results have shown the bioaccumulation of metals and radionuclides, as well as, growth reduction, DNA damages and cytotoxicity in earthworms exposed to contaminated soil. The usefulness of the comet assay and flow cytometry, to evaluate the toxicity of contaminants such as metals and radionuclides in earthworms are herein reported. We also demonstrated that DNA strand breakage and immune cells frequency are important endpoints to be employed in the earthworm reproduction assay, for the evaluation of soil geno and cytotoxicity, as part of the risk assessment of contaminated areas. This is the first study that integrates DNA damage and cytotoxicity evaluation, growth and bioaccumulation of metals and radionuclides in a sub lethal assay, for earthworms exposed to soil contaminated with metals and radionuclides.

  11. Colloid migration in groundwaters: Geochemical interactions of radionuclides with natural colloids. 5. progress report. Period covered: July - December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.I. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Delakowitz, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Zeh, P. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Probst, T. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Lin, X. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Ehrlicher, U. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Schauer, C. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Ivanovich, M. [Harwell Lab., AEA Environment and Energy, Oxon (United Kingdom); Longworth, G. [Harwell Lab., AEA Environment and Energy, Oxon (United Kingdom); Hasler, S.E. [Harwell Lab., AEA Environment and Energy, Oxon (United Kingdom); Gardiner, M. [Harwell Lab., AEA Decommissioning and RadWaste, Oxon (United Kingdom); Fritz, P. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Klotz, D. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Lazik, D. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Wolf, M. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Geyer, S. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Alexander, J.L. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Read, D. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom); Thomas, J.B. [Atkins (W.S.) Engineering Sciences, Epsom (United Kingdom)

    1994-02-01

    The aim of the joint research programme is to determine the significance of groundwater colloids in far field radionuclide migration. The characterization, quantification and theoretical interpretation of colloid-borne transport phenomena of radionuclides in selected Gorleben aquifer systems are the main objectives of the present research programme. Gorleben aquifer systems are chosen because they are well characterized in terms of their hydrological and geological properties and because they contain substantial amounts of colloids of different chemical compositions as well as considerable quantities of chemical homologues and natural analogues of radionuclides, e.g. M(III), M(IV), M(VI), and Th and U decay series. The research tasks are investigated jointly by the four laboratories (listed below) in close coordination of experimental capacities of each laboratory. (orig.)

  12. Terrestrial ecological systems and natural communities of Nebraska

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Over two decades ago, The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and state natural heritage programs developed the “coarse filter/fine filter” approach to preserving biological...

  13. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclide distributions in the Nansen Basin, Artic Ocean: Scavenging rates and circulation timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk Cochran, J.; Hirschberg, David J.; Livingston, Hugh D.; Buesseler, Ken O.; Key, Robert M.

    Determination of the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th, 230Th, 228 Th and 210Pb, and the anthropogenic radionuclides 241Am, 239,240Pu, 134Cs and 137Cs in water samples collected across the Nansen Basin from the Barents Sea slope to the Gakkel Ridge provides tracers with which to characterize both scavenging rates and circulation timescales in this portion of the Arctic Ocean. Large volume water samples (˜ 15001) were filtered in situ to separate particulate (> 0.5 μm) and dissolved Th isotopes and 241Am. Thorium-230 displays increases in both particulate and dissolved activities with depth, with dissolved 230Th greater and particulate 230Th lower in the deep central Nansen Basin than at the Barents Sea slope. Dissolved 228Th activities also are greater relative to 228Ra, in the central basin. Residence times for Th relative to removal from solution onto particles are ˜1 year in surface water, ˜10 years in deep water adjacent to the Barents Sea slope, and ˜20 years in the Eurasian Basin Deep Water. Lead-210 in the central basin deep water also has a residence time of ˜20 years with respect to its removal from the water column. This texture of scavenging is reflected in distributions of the particle-reactive anthropogenic radionuclide 241Am, which shows higher activities relative to Pu in the central Nansen Basin than at the Barents Sea slope. Distributions Of 137Cs show more rapid mixing at the basin margins (Barents Sea slope in the south, Gakkel Ridge in the north) than in the basin interior. Cesium-137 is mixed throughout the water column adjacent to the Barents Sea slope and is present in low but detectable activities in the Eurasian Basin Deep Water in the central basin. At the time of sampling (1987) the surface water at all stations had been labeled with 134Cs released in the 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. In the ˜1 year since the introduction of Chernobyl 134Cs to the Nansen Basin, it had been mixed to depths of ˜800 m at

  14. Distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (U, Th) in Timahdit black shale (Morocco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, C; Mougin, L; Fakhi, S; Nourreddine, A; Lamghari, A; Hannache, H

    2007-01-01

    Attention has been focused recently on the use of Moroccan black oil shale as the raw material for production of a new type of adsorbent and its application to U and Th removal from contaminated wastewaters. The purpose of the present work is to provide a better understanding of the composition and structure of this shale and to determine its natural content in uranium and thorium. A black shale collected from Timahdit (Morocco) was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques. It was found that calcite, dolomite, quartz and clays constitute the main composition of the inorganic matrix. Pyrite crystals are also present. A selective leaching procedure, followed by radiochemical purification and alpha-counting, was performed to assess the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides. Leaching results indicate that 238U, 235U, 234U, 232Th, 230Th and 228Th have multiple modes of occurrence in the shale. U is interpreted to have been concentrated under anaerobic conditions. An integrated isotopic approach showed the preferential mobilization of uranium carried by humic acids to carbonate and apatite phases. Th is partitioned between silicate minerals and pyrite.

  15. Distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (U, Th) in Timahdit black shale (Morocco)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, C. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23, rue du Loess BP28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: Catherine.galindo@ires.in2p3.fr; Mougin, L. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23, rue du Loess BP28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Fakhi, S. [Laboratoire de Radiochimie (LRC), Faculte des Sciences Ben M' sik, Casablanca (Morocco); Nourreddine, A. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23, rue du Loess BP28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Lamghari, A. [Laboratoire de Radiochimie (LRC), Faculte des Sciences Ben M' sik, Casablanca (Morocco); Hannache, H. [Laboratoire de Materiaux Thermo-Structuraux Faculte des Sciences Ben M' sik, Casablanca (Morocco)

    2007-07-01

    Attention has been focused recently on the use of Moroccan black oil shale as the raw material for production of a new type of adsorbent and its application to U and Th removal from contaminated wastewaters. The purpose of the present work is to provide a better understanding of the composition and structure of this shale and to determine its natural content in uranium and thorium. A black shale collected from Timahdit (Morocco) was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques. It was found that calcite, dolomite, quartz and clays constitute the main composition of the inorganic matrix. Pyrite crystals are also present. A selective leaching procedure, followed by radiochemical purification and {alpha}-counting, was performed to assess the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides. Leaching results indicate that {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 23}Th and {sup 228}Th have multiple modes of occurrence in the shale. U is interpreted to have been concentrated under anaerobic conditions. An integrated isotopic approach showed the preferential mobilization of uranium carried by humic acids to carbonate and apatite phases. Th is partitioned between silicate minerals and pyrite.

  16. Utilization of natural hematite as reactive barrier for immobilization of radionuclides from radioactive liquid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Afifi, E M; Attallah, M F; Borai, E H

    2016-01-01

    Potential utilization of hematite as a natural material for immobilization of long-lived radionuclides from radioactive liquid waste was investigated. Hematite ore has been characterized by different analytical tools such as Fourier transformer infrared (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal (DT) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET-surface area. In this study, europium was used as REEs(III) and as a homolog of Am(III)-isotopes (such as (241)Am of 432.6 y, (242m)Am of 141 y and (243)Am of 7370 y). Micro particles of the hematite ore were used for treatment of radioactive waste containing (152+154)Eu(III). The results indicated that 96% (4.1 × 10(4) Bq) of (152+154)Eu(III) was efficiently retained onto hematite ore. Kinetic experiments indicated that the processes could be simulated by a pseudo-second-order model and suggested that the process may be chemisorption in nature. The applicability of Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models was investigated. It was found that Langmuir isotherm exhibited the best fit with the experimental results. It can be concluded that hematite is an economic and efficient reactive barrier for immobilization of long-lived radio isotopes of actinides and REEs(III). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in Brazilian commercial dog food: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, Fernanda; Pecequilo, Brigitte R.S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN, Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In recent decades, the exposure of non-human species to ionizing radiation, as well as its effects, has been given a different focus; on the one hand due to the increasing knowledge on different exposure situations that these species are subjected to and on the other hand, due to the concern regarding biodiversity and its protection. To estimate the effects of ionizing radiation over non-human biota, several key points must be considered, such as radionuclide concentration, dosimetry models, reference biota and others. A vast number of non-human individuals can be represented by reference organisms defined by different international organisms (UNSCEAR, ICRP and the FASSET project), to facilitate the assessment of exposure, absorbed dose and radiation effect for individuals from alike environments. There is, however, no specific representative for domestic animals, like dogs and cats. Brazil holds the second largest dog and cat population in the world, consuming over 2 million tons of feed every year. The Brazilian Association of the Industry of Products for Pets (ABINPET) foresees, for the year of 2013, an economic growth of 8.1% that may represent 0.34% of the gross domestic product (GDP). Animal food content and quality evaluations have been presented elsewhere, while no radiological study and the consequences from its ingestion have ever been conducted in the country. Hence, the present study will evaluate absorbed doses for domestic animals (i.e. dogs and cats) due to ingestion of food designed for them, by determining the radioactivity content of natural and anthropogenic cause. Initially, the activity concentrations in different brands of dry dog and cat food will be assessed by high resolution gamma spectrometry. Several brands usually consumed in Brazil were selected for the study. Eighteen dog food samples were prepared (crushed into powder and kiln dried) and tightly sealed in 100 mL high density polyethylene flasks, with a plan screw cap and bubble

  18. A multielement analysis of natural radionuclides in an area of Pernambuco - Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Junior, Jose Araujo dos [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br; Cardoso, Jorge Joao Ricardo Ferreira [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia]. E-mail: jcardoso@ufpe.br; Amaral, Romilton dos Santos; Leoterio, Dilmo Marques da Silva [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Radioecologia (RAE)]. E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br; Menezes, Romulo Simoes Cezar [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Fertilidade de Solos]. E-mail: rmenezes@ufpe.br; Silva, Cleomacio Miguel da [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica]. E-mail: cleomacio@hotmail.com; Rocha, Edilson Accioly [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mail: edilsonaccioly@cefetpe.br

    2007-07-01

    Levels of natural radioactivity are the major cause of external exposure to gamma radiation. Based on this parameter, natural radioactivity of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K were evaluated in a semiarid region of Pernambuco, Brazil, with the aim of obtaining radiometric monitoring of agricultural soils. For the analyses, the gamma spectrometry was utilized with a hyperpure germanium detector with an intrinsic efficiency of 27.7%. Seventy eight samples of soil that were collected in an area of approximately 55,500 m{sup 2}, around an anomaly of uranium in rock, were analyzed. The activities of {sup 238}U were evaluated by the 63 keV photopeak of {sup 234}Th, that of {sup 232}Th by the 338, 911 and 969 keV peak of {sup 228}Ac, and that of {sup 40}K by its 1,461 keV peak. The mean of the activities for these radionuclides were 91 Bq.kg{sup -1} (median 88 Bq.kg{sup -1}) for the {sup 238}U, {sup 228} Bq.kg{sup -1} (median 215 Bq.kg{sup -1}) for the {sup 232}Th and 1,827 Bq.kg{sup -1} (median 1,662 Bq.kg{sup -1}) for the {sup 40}K. The anomalous rock did not present neither associated thorium nor potassium (values below the limit of detection: < 10 Bq.kg{sup -1} of {sup 232}Th and < 62 Bq.kg{sup -}'1 of {sup 40}K), thus giving the characteristic of another natural radioactivity source. The obtained data allow to take important conclusions about the distribution of the radioactivity levels, to establish radioecological parameters. (author)

  19. Effectiveness of Agricultural Practices in Decreasing Radionuclide Transfer to Plants in Natural Meadows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, M.; Camps, M.; Grebenshikova, N.; Sanzharova, N.; Ivanov, Y.; Ringol, A.; Firsakova, S.; Fesenko, S.; Levchuk, S.; Sauras, T.; Podolyak, A.G.; Rauret, G

    2000-07-01

    Agricultural practices (discing+ploughing, reseeding, liming and the use of NPK fertilisers) were used to decrease {sup 137}Cs (RCs) and {sup 90}Sr (RSr) transfer to plants in natural meadows in Russia, Belarus and Ukraine. Experiments were carried out in the 1997-1999 period. Results from field experiments showed that RCs transfer in control meadows was in most cases higher than in ploughed plots (up to 3-4 times). Discing+ploughing was the most effective treatment. In addition, there was a significant trend in decreasing RCs transfer when using increasing amounts of NPK fertiliser. A time dependence was noticed, since the overall transfer was lower in the following years after the start of the experiments. Regarding RSr, no significant effect was observed in the first year. However, the effect of ploughing caused a transfer decrease by 2-4 times in the second year. Laboratory experiments showed that changes in RCs soil sorption properties are likely after ploughing, and that NPK fertilisation and liming rates used were not sufficient to ensure K and Ca+Mg concentrations in soil solution high enough to achieve the maximum decrease in radionuclide transfer. (author)

  20. Enrichment of naturally occurring radionuclides and trace elements in Yatagan and Yenikoy coal-fired thermal power plants, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Banu; Guler, Erkan; Vaasma, Taavi; Horvath, Maria; Kiisk, Madis; Kovacs, Tibor

    2017-09-29

    Coal, residues and waste produced by the combustion of the coal contain naturally occurring radionuclides such as 238 U, 226 Ra, 210 Pb, 232 Th and 40 K and trace elements such as Cd, Cr, Pb, Ni and Zn. In this work, coal and its combustion residues collected from Yatagan and Yenikoy coal fired thermal power plants (CPPs) in Turkey were studied to determine the concentrations of natural radionuclides and trace elements, and their enrichments factors to better understand the radionuclide concentration processes within the combustion system. In addition, the utilization of coal fly ash as a secondary raw material in building industry was also studied in terms of radiological aspects. Fly ash samples were taken at different stages along the emission control system of the thermal power plants. Activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides were determined with Canberra Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector BE3830-P and ORTEC Soloist PIPS type semiconductor detector. The particle size distribution and trace elements contents were determined in various ash fractions by the laser scattering particle size distribution analyzer and inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES). From the obtained data, natural radionuclides tend to condense on fly ash with and the activity concentrations increase as the temperature drop in CPPs. Measured 210 Pb and 210 Po concentration varied between 186 ± 20-1153 ± 44 Bq kg -1 , and 56 ± 5-1174 ± 45 Bq kg -1 , respectively. The highest 210 Pb and 210 Po activity concentrations were determined in fly ash taken from the temporary storage point as 1153 ± 44 Bq kg -1 and 1174 ± 45 Bq kg -1 , respectively. There were significant differences in the activity concentrations of some natural radionuclide and trace elements (Pb and Zn) contents in ash fractions among the sampling point inside both of the plants (ANOVA, p electrostatic precipitators for both of the power plants. The enrichment factors for Zn follow a similar

  1. Assessment of terrestrial naturally occurring radioactive Material in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of natural radioactivity of 40K, 238U and 232Th in soils and mine tailings of Awo and Ede areas of Osunstate, Nigeria have been measured using a portable, advanced survey meter 992 Fluke Victoreen Gamma Scout Model for in-situ investigation and a 1 inch by 1 inch Cesium Iodide detector system.

  2. Radionuclide Migration at the Rio Blanco Site, A Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay A. Cooper; Ming Ye; Jenny Chapman; Craig Shirley

    2005-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability gas reservoirs. The third and final project in the program, Project Rio Blanco, was conducted in Rio Blanco County, in northwestern Colorado. In this experiment, three 33-kiloton nuclear explosives were simultaneously detonated in a single emplacement well in the Mesaverde Group and Fort Union Formation, at depths of 1,780, 1,899, and 2,039 m below land surface on May 17, 1973. The objective of this work is to estimate lateral distances that tritium released from the detonations may have traveled in the subsurface and evaluate the possible effect of postulated natural-gas development on radionuclide migration. Other radionuclides were considered in the analysis, but the majority occur in relatively immobile forms (such as nuclear melt glass). Of the radionuclides present in the gas phase, tritium dominates in terms of quantity of radioactivity in the long term and contribution to possible whole body exposure. One simulation is performed for {sup 85}Kr, the second most abundant gaseous radionuclide produced after tritium.

  3. Analysis of Natural and Anthropogenic Radionuclide Content in Palm Date Fruit of the United Arab Emirates: A Baseline Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Rubina; Solodov, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to a wider effort of establishing an environmental radiation baseline for the United Arab Emirates (UAE) before the startup of the country's first nuclear reactor in 2017. An investigation of gamma-emitting radionuclide concentrations in palm dates grown in the UAE was performed. Palm date samples of 10 varieties originating from several local commercial date palm farms of the UAE were collected and analyzed. The study targeted the naturally occurring radionuclides, such as U, Th, and K, in addition to any potential anthropogenic radionuclides, such as Cs and others. Gamma spectrometry revealed measured activity concentrations for U (Ra), Th (Ra), and K that ranged from 0.61 to 0.80 Bq kg, 0.10 to 0.23 Bq kg, and 191 to 362 Bq kg, respectively, on a dry-weight basis, and calculated activity concentrations on a wet basis ranged from 0.52 to 0.69 Bq kg, 0.09 to 0.22 Bq kg, and 168 to 297 Bq kg, respectively. No Cs or other anthropogenic radionuclides could be detected in this study. All measurements were performed using a coaxial HPGe detector with 40% relative efficiency quoted by the manufacturer. Efficiency calibration correction factors were calculated using Angle software.

  4. Naturally occurring radionuclides in food and drinking water from a thorium-rich area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa Lauria, Dejanira da; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; Godoy, Maria Luisa D.P.; Santos, Eliane E. [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Hacon, Sandra S. [Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Escola Nacional de Saude Publica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    This paper focuses on a survey of uranium and thorium decay chain radionuclides in food and drinking water from the thorium-rich (monazite-bearing) region of Buena, which is located in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The radionuclide concentration values in the food and drinking water from Buena reached values higher than 100-fold the international reference values. The daily intake of radionuclides by the local population is similar to that of another high background radiation area in Brazil, but the intake is higher than that of residents from a normal background radiation area. Approximately 58 % of the food consumed by Buena inhabitants is produced locally. Based on that figure, locally produced food and the dilution of total radionuclides in the diet of residents caused by food importation are both highly relevant to a population's intake of radionuclides. The concentration values for {sup 210}Pb and the radium isotopes in drinking water from Buena are among the highest values to be reported in the literature. {sup 228}Ra is the most important radionuclide ingested with both food and water among the inhabitants of Buena. (orig.)

  5. Radiological Assessment of the Artificial and Natural Radionuclide Concentrations of Some Species of Wild Fungi and Nourished Mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Pourimani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Artificial and natural radionuclides are found in diverse environmental compartments, such as water, soil, rocks, vegetables, animals, and human body tissues. As such, humans and environments are at constant exposure of these radiation types. In this research investigated specific activities of radionuclide and dose assessment of some species of mushrooms. Materials and Methods In this study, natural and artificial radioactivity concentrations were determined in Agaricus bispora (nourished mushrooms, Cantharellus cibarius, Coprinus micaceus (wild fungi species and their composts through gamma-ray spectrometryusinga high-purity germanium (HPGe detector with 30% relative efficiency. Results Radioactivity concentrations of 238U and 232Th in edible mushroom samples were lower than the minimum detectable activity (MDA. For 40K and 137Cs, these concentrations were within the ranges of 1895.24-1920.24and

  6. Transfer of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides to ants, bryophytes and lichen in a semi-natural ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragović, Snezana; Howard, Brenda J; Caborn, Jane A; Barnett, Catherine L; Mihailović, Nevena

    2010-07-01

    Few data are available to quantify the transfer of both natural and anthropogenic radionuclides to detritivorous invertebrates to facilitate estimation of the internal dose to such biota in models used to assess radiation exposure. To enhance the available data, activity concentrations of (137)Cs, (40)K, (90)Sr, (239 + 240)Pu, (241)Am, (235)U and (238)U were measured in ants (Formicidae) and corresponding undisturbed soil collected from the Zlatibor mountain in Serbia and ant/soil concentration ratios (CR) calculated. The (241)Am concentration ratios for ants were fourfold higher than those calculated for ants in a previous study whereas they are similar to the more numerous data previously reported for a range of detritivorous invertebrates in other studies. CR values for (137)Cs in ants were similar to the few other reported values and slightly lower than those for a range of detritivorous invertebrates. Those for (239 + 240)Pu were slightly higher than those for ants in two other studies but they were close to upper limit of a range of data reported for detritivorous invertebrates. All the CR values will be included in a future revision of the ERICA Tool database and will particularly improve the information available for uranium.

  7. Natural radionuclide content in building materials and gamma dose rate in dwellings in Cuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigido Flores, O. [Department of Applied Nuclear Techniques and Environmental Monitoring, Environmental Engineering Centre of Camagoeey, Ave. Finlay km 2.5, Esquina Circunvalacion, Rpto. Puerto Principe, Camagueey 8, CP 70800, Camagueey (Cuba)], E-mail: o.brigido@ciac.cmw.inf.cu; Montalvan Estrada, A.; Rosa Suarez, R. [Department of Applied Nuclear Techniques and Environmental Monitoring, Environmental Engineering Centre of Camagoeey, Ave. Finlay km 2.5, Esquina Circunvalacion, Rpto. Puerto Principe, Camagueey 8, CP 70800, Camagueey (Cuba); Tomas Zerquera, J. [Centre for Radiation Protection and Hygiene, 20 St. No. 4109, Miramar, PO Box 6195, Havana 6, Havana City (Cuba); Hernandez Perez, A. [Environmental Radiological Monitoring Laboratory, Centre for Environmental Studies of Holguin, Pachuco Feria No. 46, Rpto. Peralta, Holguin (Cuba)

    2008-12-15

    An extensive research project to investigate the radioactive properties of Cuban building materials was carried out because there is a lack of information on the radioactivity of such materials in Cuba. In the framework of this project 44 samples of commonly used raw materials and building products were collected in five Cuban provinces. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides were determined by gamma ray spectrometry using a p-type coaxial high purity germanium detector and their mean values were in the ranges: 9-857 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K; 6-57 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra; and 1.2-22 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th. The radium equivalent activity in the 44 samples varied from 4 Bq kg{sup -1} (wood) to 272 Bq kg{sup -1} (brick). A high pressure ionisation chamber was used to measure the indoor absorbed dose rate in 543 dwellings and workplaces in five Cuban provinces. The average absorbed dose rates in air ranged from 43 nGy h{sup -1} (Holguin) to 73 nGy h{sup -1} (Camagueey) and the corresponding population-weighted annual effective dose due to external gamma radiation was estimated to be 145 {+-} 40 {mu}Sv. This value is 51% lower than the effective dose due to internal exposure from inhalation of decay products of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn and it is 16% higher than the calculated value for the typical room geometry of a Cuban house.

  8. Terrestrial gastropods of Srebarna Nature Reserve, North-Eastern Bulgaria (Gastropoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedov, Ivailo; Antonova, Vera

    2015-01-01

    We give the results from the first investigation focused on the land snail fauna in Srebarna Nature Reserve in Bulgaria. A total of 23 localities were studied and 27 species of terrestrial gastropods were found, 23 of which were new observations for the Reserve.

  9. Can small terrestrial rodents affect the natural regeneration of tropical forest?

    OpenAIRE

    ELEXHAUSEROVÁ, Anna

    2011-01-01

    In my bachelor thesis, I focused on the question if small terrestrial rodents can affect natural regeneration of tropical forest. In this work, I summarize knowledge about rodents acting as dispersers of tree seeds and I mention the factors affecting rodents in treating with seeds.

  10. A study on integrating surveys of terrestrial natural resources: The Oregon Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Jeffery Goebel; Hans T. Schreuder; Carol C. House; Paul H. Geissler; Anthony R. Olsen; William Williams

    1998-01-01

    An interagency project demonstrated the feasibility of integrating Federal surveys of terrestrial natural resources and offers a vision for that integration. At locations selected from forest inventory and analysis, National forest system Region 6, and national resources inventory surveys in a six-county area in Northern Oregon, experienced teams interpreted and made...

  11. Spatial distribution of the atmospheric radionuclide production by galactic cosmic rays and its imprint in natural archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. K.; Blinov, A. V.; Frolov, D. A.; Konstantinov, A. N.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.

    2017-11-01

    We used the GEANT4 toolkit to simulate the altitude and latitude profiles of the production rate of 14C, 10Be and 36Cl radionuclides by the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) interactions in the terrestrial atmosphere at a varying geomagnetic field. We found that applying two intranuclear cascade models incorporated in GEANT4 (Binary Intranuclear Cascade, BIC, and Bertini Intranuclear Cascade, BERT) result in significantly different production rate values. We present the conclusions about the certain model relevance to the abundance of these isotopes in the surface fallout, ice-core records and lunar soil depth profile. Comparison of our simulations with the recent publication of Poluianov et al. (2016) shows a good agreement for 14C (BIC) and 10Be (BERT) and a definite by the factor 2-3 difference in the 36Cl (BIC) atmospheric yield functions. Also, the mean level and amplitude of the 10Be variations in polar ice from central regions of Antarctica and Greenland could be accounted for its tropospheric production by GCRs. The fallout rate of 36Cl there can be explained assuming its additional input from the stratosphere. Significant additional variations of radionuclide sedimentation rate in polar regions may arise due to tropopause height changes even at a constant atmospheric production rate of the certain isotope.

  12. Selected natural and fallout radionuclides in plant foods around the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, E Mahiban; Raj, Y Lenin; Wesley, S Godwin; Rajan, M P

    2013-01-01

    The activity concentrations of certain radionuclides were quantified in some plant foods cultivated around Kudankulam, where a mega-nuclear power plant is being established. The activity concentrations were found more in the 'pulses' group and were the lowest in 'other vegetable' category. The annual effective dose was computed based on the activity concentration of radionuclides and it was found to be higher due to the consumption of cereals and pulses. Other vegetables, cereals, pulses and nuts recorded high transfer factors for the radionuclide (228)Ra. Fruits, leafy vegetables, tubers and roots, and palm embryo registered high transfer factors for (226)Ra. Group-wise activity concentration, radiation dose to the public and soil-plant-to-transfer factor are discussed in detail. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ecological transfer of radionuclides and metals to free-living earthworm species in natural habitats rich in NORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena, E-mail: jelena.mrdakovic.popic@umb.no; Salbu, Brit; Skipperud, Lindis

    2012-01-01

    Transfer of radionuclides ({sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U) and associated metals (As, Cd, Pb and Cr) from soil to free-living earthworm species was investigated in a thorium ({sup 232}Th) rich area in Norway. Sampling took place within former mining sites representing the technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM), at undisturbed site with unique bedrock geology representing the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) and at site outside the {sup 232}Th rich area taken as reference Background site. Soil analysis revealed the elevated levels of investigated elements at NORM and TENORM sites. Based on sequential extraction, uranium ({sup 238}U) and cadmium (Cd) were quite mobile, while the other elements were strongly associated with mineral components of soil. Four investigated earthworm species (Aporrectodea caliginosa, Aporrectodea rosea, Dendrodrilus rubidus and Lumbricus rubellus) showed large individual variability in the accumulation of radionuclides and metals. Differences in uptake by epigeic and endogeic species, as well as differences within same species from the NORM, TENORM and Background sites were also seen. Based on total concentrations in soil, the transfer factors (TF) were in ranges 0.03-0.08 and 0.09-0.25, for {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, respectively. TFs for lead (Pb), chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) were low (less than 0.5), while TFs for Cd were higher (about 10). Using the ERICA tool, the estimated radiation exposure dose rate of the earthworms ranged from 2.2 to 3.9 {mu}Gy/h. The radiological risk for investigated earthworms was low (0.28). The obtained results demonstrated that free-living earthworm species can survive in soil containing elevated {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, as well As, Cd, Pb and Cr levels, although certain amount of radionuclides was accumulated within their bodies. The present investigation contributes to general better understanding of complex soil-to-biota transfer processes of

  14. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of natural radionuclides (226Ra and40K) in selected Thai medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Phonchanthuek, Endu; Prasandee, Kamonkhuan

    2018-04-01

    A soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF) is an important parameter that could be used to estimate radionuclides levels in medicinal plants. This work reports concentrations of natural radionuclides ( 226 Ra and 40 K) and TFs in six Thai medicinal plants grown in central Thailand using an HPGe gamma ray spectrometer. Either root, leaf, or flower parts of each medicinal plant were selected for use in the investigation according to their practical uses in traditional medicine. The results showed that due to K being essential in plants, 40 K had higher arithmetic means of activity concentrations and geometric means of TFs (geometric standard deviations in parentheses) of 610 ± 260 Bq kg -1 dry weight (DW) and 2.0 (1.4), respectively, than 226 Ra, which had the activity concentrations and TFs of 4.8 ± 2.6 Bq kg -1 DW and 0.17 (1.8), respectively. The results also showed that the leaves of medicinal plants had higher activity concentrations and TFs than root and flower parts, probably due to higher metabolic activities in leaves. Furthermore, there was good agreement between the results from the current work and other similar reports on medicinal plants. The information obtained from this work could strengthen knowledge of natural radionuclides in plants and particularly increase available TF data on Thai medicinal plants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transfer of radionuclides to plants of natural ecosystems at the Semipalatinsk Test Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionova, N V; Lukashenko, S N; Kabdyrakova, A M; Kunduzbayeva, A Ye; Panitskiy, A V; Ivanova, A R

    2017-10-06

    A systematic study devoted to (137)Cs, (90)Sr, (241)Am, (239+240)Pu radionuclides in vegetation cover from several spots of the Semipalatinsk test site (STS) is summarised in this paper, highlighting the main findings obtained. The analysed spots are characterized by various types of radioactive contamination. Transfer factors (Tf) required for the quantitative description of the radionuclides transition from the soil to aboveground plant parts were determined, being found that, on average, the minimum Tf for all the radionuclides concerned were determined on the "Experimental Field" ground, followed by the determined ones in the "plumes" of radioactive fallout and in the conditionally "background" territories analysed. The highest transfer factors were characteristic of zones of radioactive streamflows and places of warfare radioactive agent (WRA) tests. On the other hand, ordering the radionuclide transferring factors in descending order, the following sequence was obtained: (90)Sr Tf > Cs Tf > (239+240)Pu Tf > (241)Am Tf, with the (90)Sr Tf, on the average, exceeding the (137)Cs Tf by 8 times and exceeding the (239+240)Pu Tf by up 16 times. (239+240)Pu Tf values were up to 3 times higher than the (241)Am Tf. The exception to the indicated radionuclide Tf descending order corresponded to places of WRA tests where Tf of radionuclides of interest by plants follows the sequence (90)Sr > (239+240)Pu > (137)Cs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radionuclide concentrations in samples of medicinal herbs and effective dose from ingestion of ¹³⁷Cs and natural radionuclides in herbal tea products from Serbian market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevremovic, Milutin; Lazarevic, Natasa; Pavlovic, Snezana; Orlic, Milan

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate natural and artificial radioactivity levels in 18 different samples of medicinal herbs from Serbian market. The activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs were measured using gamma spectroscopy system with a high-purity germanium detector. The activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs were found to be in a range of 0.6-8.2, 1.7-15.1, 126-1243.7, and 0.3-8.8 Bq/kg, respectively. The annual whole body doses from ingestion of (137)Cs and natural radionuclides for an adult person who consumed herbal tea from these medicinal herbs were found to be 2.5-469.9 nSv for (137)Cs, 0.7-9.7 nSv for (238)U, 0.3-2.8 nSv for (232)Th, and 1026.0-10,132.0 nSv for (40)K. These doses are not hazardous to public health. The obtained results were compared with correspondent studies conducted worldwide.

  17. Unsaturated zone waters from the Nopal I natural analog, Chihuahua, Mexico -- Implications for radionuclide mobility at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, D.A.; Murphy, W.M.

    1999-07-01

    Chemical and U-Th isotopic data on unsaturated zone waters from the Nopal I natural analog reveal effects of water-rock interaction and help constrain models of radionuclide release and transport at the site and, by analogy, at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Geochemical reaction-path modeling indicates that, under oxidizing conditions, dissolution of uraninite (spent fuel analog) by these waters will lead to eventual schoepite precipitation regardless of initial silica concentration provided that groundwater is not continuously replenished. Thus, less soluble uranyl silicates may not dominate the initial alteration assemblage and keep dissolved U concentrations low. Uranium-series activity ratios are consistent with models of U transport at the site and display varying degrees of leaching versus recoil mobilization. Thorium concentrations may reflect the importance of colloidal transport of low-solubility radionuclides in the unsaturated zone.

  18. Species diversity of plant communities from territories with natural origin radionuclides contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneva, A.V.; Belykh, E.S.; Maystrenko, T.A.; Grusdev, B.I.; Zainullin, V.G.; Vakhrusheva, O.M. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division of RAS, Syktyvkar, 167982 (Russian Federation); Oughton, D. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Aas (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    Since plants dominate every landscape, the impact of any environmental stressor on plants can directly affect the structure and function of an ecosystem, resulting in decreased primary productivity and degradation of wildlife habitat. The investigation goal of the present research was to study how vascular plant species' composition at a former radium mining site could be related to i) soil contamination with heavy metals and uranium and thorium decay chain radionuclides and ii) soil agrochemical properties. Between the 1930's and 1950's, the commercial extraction of radium, storage of the uranium mill tailings and radium production wastes, together with deactivation of the site with a mixture of sand and gravel completely destroyed plant communities in the vicinity of Vodny settlement (Komi Republic, Russia). The plant cover recovery started more than 60 years ago, and resulted in overgrowing with common grassland plant species. Three meadow sites were investigated, one with low contamination (on the territory of former radium production plant), one with high contamination (waste storage cell) and a reference sites out of the radiochemical plant zone of influence, but with similar natural conditions. Geo-botanical descriptions revealed 134 vascular plant species from 34 families in the meadow communities studied. The greatest richness was seen for Poaceae, Asteraceae, Rosaceae and Fabaceae families; others had 1-5 species. The highest richness in diversity was seen at reference sites with 95 vascular plant species. 87 species were registered on low contaminated sites and 75 species on high contaminated. Perennial herbs were the dominant life form on all the studied meadow communities. Arboreal species expansion in vegetation was noted at both experimental and reference sites. Shannon index calculations indicated a significant (p<0.05) decrease in species diversity on sample areas of the highly contaminated radioactive waste storage cell. Mean values

  19. Natural radiation doses for cosmic and terrestrial components in Costa Rica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, Patricia [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Atomicas, Nucleares y Moleculares, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca, San Jose (Costa Rica)]. E-mail: pmora@cariari.ucr.ac.cr; Picado, Esteban [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Atomicas, Nucleares y Moleculares, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca, San Jose (Costa Rica); Minato, Susumu [Radiation Earth Science Laboratory, Yamaguchi-cho 9-6, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, 461-0024 (Japan)

    2007-01-15

    A study of external natural radiation, cosmic and terrestrial components, was carried out with in situ measurements using NaI scintillation counters while driving along the roads in Costa Rica for the period July 2003-July 2005. The geographical distribution of the terrestrial air-absorbed dose rates and the total effective dose rates (including cosmic) are represented on contour maps. Information on the population density of the country permitted the calculation of the per capita doses. The average effective dose for the total cosmic component was 46.88{+-}18.06 nSv h{sup -1} and the average air-absorbed dose for the terrestrial component was 29.52{+-}14.46 nGy h{sup -1}. The average total effective dose rate (cosmic plus terrestrial components) was 0.60{+-}0.18 mSv per year. The effective dose rate per capita was found to be 83.97 nSv h{sup -1} which gives an annual dose of 0.74 mSv. Assuming the world average for the internal radiation component, the natural radiation dose for Costa Rica will be 2.29 mSv annually.

  20. Application of natural radionuclides for determination of tropospheric ozone and aerosol transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Drayton, P. J.; Orlandini, K. A.

    2000-12-06

    Natural radionuclides have been proposed for use in assessing the transport of ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. For example, {sup 7}Be is known to be produced in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere by interactions with cosmogenic particles. Beryllium-7 has a 53.28-day half-life and is a gamma emitter that attaches itself to fine particles in the atmosphere once it is formed. Indeed, in tropospheric aerosol samples TBe is typically found in association with aerosol particles that are 0.3 {micro}m in diameter. Some investigators have asserted that ozone from aloft can be transported into rural and urban regions during stratospheric/tropospheric folding events, leading to increased background levels of ozone. During the Texas 2000 Air Quality study, aerosol samples with a 2.5-{micro}m cutoff were collected during 12-hour cycles (day/night) for a 30-day period at the Deer Park, Texas, field site in August-September 2000. To monitor {sup 7}Be levels, high-volume samples were collected on glass fiber filters on Julian dates 225-259. Sample collection was at a field site near a city park, away from any nearby traffic. This site is under routine operation by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. Instruments operated at this same site during the study period included an ozone monitor (Dasibi), a nitrogen oxides instrument (API), a CO instrument (API), a nephelometer, a UV-B meter (Richardson-Berger), and a multifilter rotating shadow band radiometer (MFRSR, Yankee Environmental Systems). In addition, we made modified fast-response NO{sub 2} and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) measurements by using a fast gas chromatography with luminol detection, to be described at this meeting (3). The results for {sup 7}Be (mBq m{sup {minus}3})are compared in Figure 1 with the maximum and average ozone values (ppb) observed at the site to identify potential correlations. In Figure 2, all of the {sup 7}Be data are plotted against the maximum and average ozone

  1. Lixiviation of natural radionuclides and heavy metals in tropical soils amended with phosphogypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisti, M B; Saueia, C R; Malheiro, L H; Groppo, G H; Mazzilli, B P

    2015-06-01

    The main phosphate industries in Brazil are responsible for the annual production of 5.5 million tons of a residue (phosphogypsum), which is stored in stacks. The presence of radionuclides and metals puts restrictions on the use of phosphogypsum in agriculture. To assure a safe utilization, it is important to estimate the lixiviation of the radionuclides ((238)U, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, (210)Po, (232)Th and (228)Ra) and metals (As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Se, Hg and Pb) present in phosphogypsum. For this purpose, an experiment was carried out, in which columns filled with sandy and clay Brazilian typical soils mixed with phosphogypsum were percolated with water, to achieve a mild extraction of these elements. The results obtained for the concentration of the radionuclides and metals in the leachate were low; giving evidence that, even when these elements are present in the phosphogypsum, they do not contribute to an enhancement of their content in water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coming down from the trees: Is terrestrial activity in Bornean orangutans natural or disturbance driven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancrenaz, Marc; Sollmann, Rahel; Meijaard, Erik; Hearn, Andrew J.; Ross, Joanna; Samejima, Hiromitsu; Loken, Brent; Cheyne, Susan M.; Stark, Danica J.; Gardner, Penny C.; Goossens, Benoit; Mohamed, Azlan; Bohm, Torsten; Matsuda, Ikki; Nakabayasi, Miyabi; Lee, Shan Khee; Bernard, Henry; Brodie, Jedediah; Wich, Serge; Fredriksson, Gabriella; Hanya, Goro; Harrison, Mark E.; Kanamori, Tomoko; Kretzschmar, Petra; Macdonald, David W.; Riger, Peter; Spehar, Stephanie; Ambu, Laurentius N.; Wilting, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The orangutan is the world's largest arboreal mammal, and images of the red ape moving through the tropical forest canopy symbolise its typical arboreal behaviour. Records of terrestrial behaviour are scarce and often associated with habitat disturbance. We conducted a large-scale species-level analysis of ground-based camera-trapping data to evaluate the extent to which Bornean orangutans Pongo pygmaeus come down from the trees to travel terrestrially, and whether they are indeed forced to the ground primarily by anthropogenic forest disturbances. Although the degree of forest disturbance and canopy gap size influenced terrestriality, orangutans were recorded on the ground as frequently in heavily degraded habitats as in primary forests. Furthermore, all age-sex classes were recorded on the ground (flanged males more often). This suggests that terrestrial locomotion is part of the Bornean orangutan's natural behavioural repertoire to a much greater extent than previously thought, and is only modified by habitat disturbance. The capacity of orangutans to come down from the trees may increase their ability to cope with at least smaller-scale forest fragmentation, and to cross moderately open spaces in mosaic landscapes, although the extent of this versatility remains to be investigated. PMID:24526001

  3. The detailed analysis of natural radionuclides dissolved in spa waters of the Kłodzko Valley, Sudety Mountains, Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walencik-Łata, A., E-mail: agata.walencik@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Uniwersytecka 4 St., 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Kozłowska, B.; Dorda, J. [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Uniwersytecka 4 St., 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Przylibski, T.A. [Wrocław University of Technology, Faculty of Geoengineering, Mining and Geology, Division of Geology and Mineral Waters, Wybrzeże S. Wyspiańskiego 27, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland)

    2016-11-01

    A survey was conducted to measure natural radioactivity in spa waters from the Kłodzko Valley. The main goal of this study was to determine the activity concentration of uranium, radium and radon isotopes in the investigated groundwaters. Samples were collected several times from 35 water intakes from 5 spas and 2 mineral water bottling plants. The authors examined whether the increased gamma radiation background, as well as the elevated values of radium and uranium content in reservoir rocks, have a significant impact on the natural radioactivity of these waters. The second objective of this research was to provide information about geochemistry of U, Ra, Rn radionuclides and the radiological and chemical risks incurred by ingestion of isotopes with drinking water. On the basis of results obtained, it is feasible to assess the health hazard posed by ingestion of natural radioactivity with drinking waters. Moreover, the data yielded by this research may be helpful in the process of verification of the application of these waters in balneotherapy. In addition, annual effective radiation doses resulting from the isotopes consumption were calculated on the basis of the evaluated activity concentrations. In dose assessment for uranium and radium isotopes, the authors provided values for different human age groups. The obtained uranium content in the investigated waters was compared with the currently valid regulations concerning the quality of drinking water. Based on the activity concentrations data, the activity isotopic ratios {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra/{sup 238}U, {sup 222}Rn/{sup 238}U, {sup 222}Rn/{sup 226}Ra and the correlations between radionuclides content were then examined. In brief, it may be concluded on the basis of the obtained results that radon solubility is inversely proportional to radium and uranium dissolution in environmental water circulation. The presented study allows conclusions to be drawn on the radionuclide circulation among

  4. The importance of flooded terrestrial habitats for larval fish in a semi-natural large floodplain (Volga, Russian Federation)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorski, Konrad; Leeuw, De Joep; Winter, Hendrik; Khoruzhaya, Victoria; Boldyrev, Vasily; Vekhov, Dmitry; Nagelkerke, Leo

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the importance of flooded terrestrial habitats for fish larvae in a semi-natural large floodplain (Volga, Russian Federation) by comparing abundances at the shoreline of permanent waterbodies with flooded terrestrial habitats. We found that overall larval abundance at the shoreline of

  5. The Environmental Geochemistry of Trace Elements and Naturally Radionuclides in a Coal Gangue Brick-Making Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuncai; Liu, Guijian; Cheng, Siwei; Fang, Ting; Lam, Paul K. S.

    2014-01-01

    An investigation focused on the transformation and distribution behaviors of trace elements and natural radionuclides around a coal gangue brick plant was conducted. Simultaneous sampling of coal gangue, brick, fly ash and flue gas were implemented. Soil, soybean and earthworm samples around the brick plant were also collected for comprehensive ecological assessment. During the firing process, trace elements were released and redistributed in the brick, fly ash and the flue gas. Elements can be divided into two groups according to their releasing characteristics, high volatile elements (release ratio higher than 30%) are represented by Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Se and Sn, which emitted mainly in flue gas that would travel and deposit at the northeast and southwest direction around the brick plant. Cadmium, Ni and Pb are bio-accumulated in the soybean grown on the study area, which indicates potential health impacts in case of human consumption. The high activity of natural radionuclides in the atmosphere around the plant as well as in the made-up bricks will increase the health risk of respiratory system. PMID:25164252

  6. Analysis and risk estimates to workers of Brazilian granitic industries and sandblasters exposed to respirable crystalline silica and natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estellita, L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Gragoata, 24210-340 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Santos, A.M.A. [Fundacao Jorge Duprat Figueiredo de Seguranca e Medicina do Trabalho, Fundacentro, C.P. 11484, 05499-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Anjos, R.M., E-mail: meigikos@if.uff.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Gragoata, 24210-340 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Yoshimura, E.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Velasco, H. [Grupo de Estudios Ambientales - IMASL. Universidad Nacional de San Luis / CONICET. Ej. de los Andes 950, D5700HHW San Luis (Argentina); Silva, A.A.R. da [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, J.G. [Fundacao Jorge Duprat Figueiredo de Seguranca e Medicina do Trabalho, Fundacentro, C.P. 11484, 05499-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica and to radiation emitted by natural radionuclides present both in rocks and sands was studied in the Brazilian extractive process and granite product manufacture. Respirable airborne dust samples were collected in working environments, where workers perform different tasks with distinct commercial granites types, and also in places where sandblasters work with sands from different origins. The free crystalline silica contents were determined using X-ray diffraction of the respirable particulate fraction of each sample. Dust samples from granite cutting and sandblasting ambient had the natural radionuclides concentrations measured by gamma spectrometry. Dust concentrations in the workplaces were quite variable, reaching values up to 10 times higher than the respirable particle mass threshold limit value (TLV) set by the American Conference for Governmental Industrial Hygienists of 3 mg m{sup -3}. Also the free crystalline silica concentrations were high, reaching values up to 48 times the TLV of 0.025 mg m{sup -3}. Additionally, our results suggest that the risk of radiation-induced cancer in the granite or marble industries is negligible. However, the combined exposure to dust, gamma radiation, and radon daughter products could result in the enhancement of lung cancer risks associated to sandblasting activities.

  7. The environmental geochemistry of trace elements and naturally radionuclides in a coal gangue brick-making plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuncai; Liu, Guijian; Cheng, Siwei; Fang, Ting; Lam, Paul K S

    2014-08-28

    An investigation focused on the transformation and distribution behaviors of trace elements and natural radionuclides around a coal gangue brick plant was conducted. Simultaneous sampling of coal gangue, brick, fly ash and flue gas were implemented. Soil, soybean and earthworm samples around the brick plant were also collected for comprehensive ecological assessment. During the firing process, trace elements were released and redistributed in the brick, fly ash and the flue gas. Elements can be divided into two groups according to their releasing characteristics, high volatile elements (release ratio higher than 30%) are represented by Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Se and Sn, which emitted mainly in flue gas that would travel and deposit at the northeast and southwest direction around the brick plant. Cadmium, Ni and Pb are bio-accumulated in the soybean grown on the study area, which indicates potential health impacts in case of human consumption. The high activity of natural radionuclides in the atmosphere around the plant as well as in the made-up bricks will increase the health risk of respiratory system.

  8. Distribution of Natural (U-238, Th-232, Ra-226) and Technogenic (Sr-90, Cs-137) Radionuclides in Soil-Plants Complex Near Issyk-Kul Lake, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, L.; Kaldybaev, B.; Djenbaev, B.; Tilenbaev, A.

    2012-04-01

    Researches on radionuclides distribution in the soil-plants complex provide essential information in understanding human exposure to natural and technogenic sources of radiation. It is necessary in establishing regulation relating to radiation protection. The aim of this study was the radiochemical analysis of the content natural radionuclides 238U, 232Th,226Ra and technogenic radionuclides content (90Sr, 137Cs) in soils near Issyk-Kul lake (Kyrgyzstan). Results of radiochemical analyses have shown, that the concentrations of thorium-232 are fluctuating in the limits (11.7-84.1)-10-4% in the soils. The greatest concentration of thorium-232 has been found in the light chestnut soils. The content of uranium-238 in the soils near Issyk-Kul lake is fluctuating from 2.8 up to 12.7-10-4%. Radium-226 has more migration ability in comparison with other heavy natural radionuclides. According to our research the concentrations of radium-226 are fluctuating in the limits (9.4-43.0)-10-11%. The greatest concentration of radium-226 (43,0±2,8)-10-11% has been determined in the light chestnut soil. In connection with global migration of contaminating substances, including radioactive, the special attention is given long-lived radionuclides strontium-90 and caesium-137 in food-chains, and agroecosystems. Results of radiochemical analyses have shown, that specific activity of strontium-90 is fluctuating in the range of 2.9 up to 11.1 Bq/kg, and caesium-137 from 3.7 up to 14,3 Bq/kg in the soil of agroecosystems in the region of Issyk-Kul. In soil samples down to 1 meter we have observed vertical migration of these radionuclides, they were found to accumulate on the surface of soil horizon (0-5 cm) and their specific activity sharply decreases with depth. In addition in high-mountain pastures characterized by horizontal migration of cattle in profiles of soil, it was discovered that specific activity of radionuclides are lower on the slope than at the foot of the mountain. The

  9. Preliminary analyses of natural radionuclides in selected Turkish power plant lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozturk, N.; Ozdogan, Z.S. [Cekmece Nuclear Research & Training Center, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    This preliminary study presents the experimental results concerning the concentrations of selected radionuclides (K-40, U-238, Ra-226, Th-232) in Afsin-Elbistan, Can, Cayirhan, Erzurum, Goynuk, Kangal, Orhaneli, Saray, Seyitomer, Soma, Tuncbilek, Yatagan and Yenikoy lignites, which are primarily utilized as fuel for thermal power plants in Turkey. Gamma-spectrometry of 39 representative lignite samples gave results with the following concentration ranges: 8 to 296 Bq/kg for U-238, 3 to 79 Bq/kg for Th-232, 17 to 360 Bq/kg for K-40, and 5 to 130 Bq/kg for Ra-226. The U-238 results reported here are higher than other literature values for various world coals, earth's crust and world average.

  10. Foliar and woody materials discriminated using terrestrial LiDAR in a mixed natural forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Niemann, K. Olaf; Liu, Jing; Shi, Yifang; Wang, Tiejun

    2018-02-01

    Separation of foliar and woody materials using remotely sensed data is crucial for the accurate estimation of leaf area index (LAI) and woody biomass across forest stands. In this paper, we present a new method to accurately separate foliar and woody materials using terrestrial LiDAR point clouds obtained from ten test sites in a mixed forest in Bavarian Forest National Park, Germany. Firstly, we applied and compared an adaptive radius near-neighbor search algorithm with a fixed radius near-neighbor search method in order to obtain both radiometric and geometric features derived from terrestrial LiDAR point clouds. Secondly, we used a random forest machine learning algorithm to classify foliar and woody materials and examined the impact of understory and slope on the classification accuracy. An average overall accuracy of 84.4% (Kappa = 0.75) was achieved across all experimental plots. The adaptive radius near-neighbor search method outperformed the fixed radius near-neighbor search method. The classification accuracy was significantly higher when the combination of both radiometric and geometric features was utilized. The analysis showed that increasing slope and understory coverage had a significant negative effect on the overall classification accuracy. Our results suggest that the utilization of the adaptive radius near-neighbor search method coupling both radiometric and geometric features has the potential to accurately discriminate foliar and woody materials from terrestrial LiDAR data in a mixed natural forest.

  11. Novel peptide chemistry in terrestrial animals: natural luciferin analogues from the bioluminescent earthworm Fridericia heliota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinnyi, Maxim A; Tsarkova, Aleksandra S; Petushkov, Valentin N; Kaskova, Zinaida M; Rodionova, Natalja S; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Baranov, Mikhail S; Mineev, Konstantin S; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2015-03-02

    We report isolation and structure elucidation of AsLn5, AsLn7, AsLn11 and AsLn12: novel luciferin analogs from the bioluminescent earthworm Fridericia heliota. They were found to be highly unusual modified peptides, comprising either of the two tyrosine-derived chromophores, CompX or CompY and a set of amino acids, including threonine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, homoarginine, and unsymmetrical N,N-dimethylarginine. These natural compounds represent a unique peptide chemistry found in terrestrial animals and rise novel questions concerning their biosynthetic origin. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Radiological hazards due to naturally occurring radionuclides in the selected building materials used for the construction of dwellings in four districts of the Punjab Province, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S U; Rafique, M; Jabbar, A; Matiullah

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the finding of a study undertaken to determine the naturally occurring radionuclides present in commonly used building materials for dwellings and workplaces in four districts of the Punjab Province, Pakistan. The concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were measured by using gamma-ray spectroscopy. A total of 80 samples of building materials were collected from various manufacturers and suppliers of the studied area. The specific activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were measured in building samples, and results ranged from minimum values of 9 ± 1, 9 ± 2 and 27 ± 8 Bq kg(-1) to maximum values of 106 ± 5, 133 ± 5 and 914 ± 21 Bq kg(-1) with mean values of 42 ± 3, 48 ± 3 and 376 ± 16 Bq kg(-1), respectively. From the measured activity concentrations, equivalent radium (Ra(eq)), terrestrial absorbed dose rate, annual effective dose as well as external and internal hazard indices were calculated and found to range from 52 ± 7 to 274 ± 15 Bq kg(-1), 23 ± 3 to 130 6 nGy h(-1), 0.15 ± 0.02 to 0.80 ± 0.03 mSv, 0.14 ± 0.02 to 0.75 ± 0.04 and 0.2 ± 0.02 to 0.98 ± 0.05, respectively. These results were comparable to the results of similar studies undertaken locally and in other countries. The samples considered were safe for use in construction of dwellings in the study area and do not pose any significant source of radiation hazard.

  13. Evaluation of the use of reverse osmosis to eliminate natural radionuclides from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Antonio; Palomo, Marta; Ruana, Josep; Peñalver, Alejandra; Aguilar, Carme; Borrull, Francesc

    2013-12-01

    The objective of drinking water treatment plants (DWTP) is to supply the population with tap water that is in optimal condition and in compliance with water quality regulations. In the DWTP of L'Ampolla (Tarragona, Spain), slightly high values of gross alpha activity and the amount of salts in the raw water have been observed. Conventional treatment has reduced these levels only minimally. This study tested a tertiary treatment based on reverse osmosis is tested in an industrial pilot plant (240 m3/day) The efficiency of this pilot plant to reduce the gross alpha and beta activities and the activity of some individual radioisotopes (U(238), U(234), U(235) and Ra(226)) was tested. Results showed that the elimination of alpha emitters was greater than 90%, whereas the elimination of beta emitters was about 35%. Overall, the data provided evidence that the pilot plant is effective for removing different radionuclides that can be present in the incoming water treated. Therefore, tertiary treatment based on reverse osmosis has a positive effect in water quality.

  14. Humic substances in natural waters and their complexation with trace metals and radionuclides: a review. [129 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Livermore, D.; Seitz, M.G.

    1985-07-01

    Dissolved humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) occur in surface waters and groundwaters in concentrations ranging from less than 1 mg(C)/L to more than 100 mg(C)/L. Humic substances are strong complexing agents for many trace metals in the environment and are also capable of forming stable soluble complexes or chelates with radionuclides. Concentrations of humic materials as low as 1 mg(C)/L can produce a detectable increase in the mobility of some actinide elements by forming soluble complexes that inhibit sorption of the radionuclides onto rock materials. The stability of trace metal- or radionuclide-organic complexes is commonly measured by an empirically determined conditional stability constant (K'), which is based on the ratio of complexed metal (radionuclide) in solution to the product concentration of uncomplexed metal and humic complexant. Larger values of stability constants indicate greater complex stability. The stability of radionuclide-organic complexes is affected both by concentration variables and envionmental factors. In general, complexing is favored by increased of radionuclide, increased pH, and decreased ionic strength. Actinide elements are generally most soluble in their higher oxidation states. Radionuclides can also form stable, insoluble complexes with humic materials that tend to reduce radionuclide mobility. These insoluble complexes may be radionuclide-humate colloids that subsequently precipitate from solution, or complexes of radionuclides and humic substances that sorb to clay minerals or other soil particulates strongly enough to immobilize the radionuclides. Colloid formation appears to be favored by increased radionuclide concentration and lowered pH; however, the conditions that favor formation of insoluble complexes that sorb to particulates are still poorly understood. 129 refs., 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  15. ESTIMATION OF THE POPULATION EXPOSURE DOSES FROM NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL RADIONUCLIDES DUE TO DRINKING-WATER CONSUMPTION FOR THE INHABITANTS OF DIFFERENT AREAS OF RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju. N. Goncharova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The report contains data on specific activity values of natural and artificial radionuclides in the water of underground and surface sources in 19 areas of Russian Federation and data on population internal exposure doses from drinking water consumption in these areas.

  16. Natural radionuclides in plants, soils and sediments affected by U-rich coal mining activities in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhardi, Juliana Aparecida; García-Tenorio, Rafael; Bonotto, Daniel Marcos; Díaz Francés, Inmaculada; Motta, João Gabriel

    2017-10-01

    Mining activities can increase the mobility of metals by accelerating the dissolution and leaching of minerals from the rocks and tailing piles to the environment and, consequently, their availability for plants and subsequent transfer to the food chain. The weathering of minerals and the disposal of coal waste in tailing piles can accelerate the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD), which is responsible for the higher dissolution of metals in mining areas. In this context, the behavior of U, Th and K in soils and sediment, and the transfer factor (TF) of 238U, 234U and 210Po for soybean, wheat, pine and eucalyptus cultivated around a coal mine in southern Brazil was evaluated. Alpha and gamma spectrometry were used for the measurements of the activity concentration of the radioelements. 210Po was the radionuclide that is most accumulated in the plants, especially in the leaves. When comparing the plant species, pine showed the highest TF values for 234U (0.311 ± 0.420) for leaves, while eucalyptus showed the highest TF for 238U (0.344 ± 0.414) for leaves. In general, TF were higher for the leaves of soybean and wheat when compared to the grains, and grains of wheat showed higher TF for 210Po and 238U than grains of soybean. Deviations from the natural U isotopic ratio were recorded at all investigated areas, indicating possible industrial and mining sources of U for the vegetables. A safety assessment of transport routes and accumulation of radionuclides in soils with a potential for cultivation is important, mainly in tropical areas contaminated with solid waste and effluents from mines and industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Production cross-sections of long-lived radionuclides in deuteron-induced reactions on natural zinc up to 23 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin, E-mail: mu_khandaker@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Haba, Hiromitsu; Murakami, Masashi [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Otuka, Naohiko [Nuclear Data Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-03-01

    Production cross-sections of long-lived radionuclides {sup 66,67}Ga, {sup 64,67}Cu, {sup 65,69m}Zn, and {sup 58m+g}Co via a deuteron irradiation on a natural zinc target were measured up to 23 MeV using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. The present results showed partial agreements with the earlier experimental cross-sections and also with the theoretical data extracted from the TENDL-2013 library. Physical thick target yields of the investigated radionuclides were deduced using the measured cross-sections, and they found agreements with the directly measured ones in the literatures except for those reported by Dmitriev et al. for {sup 65}Zn. Optimal production pathways of the medically important {sup 67}Ga radionuclide using a low energy cyclotron are discussed.

  18. Production cross-sections of long-lived radionuclides in deuteron-induced reactions on natural zinc up to 23 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Haba, Hiromitsu; Murakami, Masashi; Otuka, Naohiko

    2015-03-01

    Production cross-sections of long-lived radionuclides 66,67Ga, 64,67Cu, 65,69mZn, and 58m+gCo via a deuteron irradiation on a natural zinc target were measured up to 23 MeV using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. The present results showed partial agreements with the earlier experimental cross-sections and also with the theoretical data extracted from the TENDL-2013 library. Physical thick target yields of the investigated radionuclides were deduced using the measured cross-sections, and they found agreements with the directly measured ones in the literatures except for those reported by Dmitriev et al. for 65Zn. Optimal production pathways of the medically important 67Ga radionuclide using a low energy cyclotron are discussed.

  19. The greenhouse gas balance of Italy. An insight on managed and natural terrestrial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Riccardo [Tuscia Univ., Viterbo (Italy). Dept. for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food and Forest System (DIBAF); Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Changes (CMCC), Viterbo (Italy). Impacts on Agriculture, Forest and Natural Ecosystem Division (IAFENT); Miglietta, Franco (ed.) [National Research Council of Italy (CNR) and Edmund Mach Foundation, San Michele all' Adige (Italy). FoxLab Inst. of Biometeorology

    2015-04-01

    Comprehensively addresses the full greenhouse gases budget of the Italian landscape. Presents the results of the national project CARBOITALY. Provides new data and analyses in the framework of climate policies. The book addresses in a comprehensive way the full greenhouse gases budget of the Italian landscape, focusing on land use and terrestrial ecosystems. In recent years there has been a growing interest in the role of terrestrial ecosystems with regard to the carbon cycle and only recently a regional approach has been considered for its specificity in terms of new methodologies for observations and models and its relevance for national policies on mitigation and adaptation to climate changes. In terms of methods this book describes the role of flux networks and data-driven models, airborne regional measurements of fluxes and specific sectoral approaches related to important components of the human and natural landscapes. There is also a growing need on the part of institutions, agencies and policy stakeholders for new data and analyses enabling them to improve their national inventories of greenhouse gases and their compliance with the UNFCCC process. In this respect the data presented is a basis for a full carbon accounting and available to relevant stakeholders for improvements and/or verification of national inventories. The wealth of research information is the result of a national project, CARBOITALY, which involved 15 Italian institutions and several researchers to provide new data and analyses in the framework of climate policies.

  20. Radiometric evaluation of excessive lifetime cancer probability due to naturally occurring radionuclides in wastes dumpsites soils in Agbara, Southwest, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Gbadamosi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The concentration and spatial distribution of the gamma ray emitting 238U, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs radionuclides in dumpsite soils in Agbara were analyzed with the aim of evaluating the radiation hazards and excessive lifetime cancer risk using well calibrated HPGe γ-ray spectrometry technique. The ranges of activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs are 11.5 ± 1.0 ↔ 166 ± 40 Bq kg−1, 15.6 ± 1.8 ↔ 31.4 ± 2.3 Bq kg−1, 20.4 ± 1.3 ↔ 366 ± 30 Bq kg−1 and 0.52 ± 0.1 ↔ 8.44 ± 0.2 Bq kg−1 respectively. Radiological parameters such as absorbed dose rate, radium equivalent, annual effective dose equivalent, internal and external hazard indices, gamma level index, activity utilization index, annual genetic significant dose equivalent, exposure rate and excessive lifetime cancer risk were calculated to know the complete radiological hazardous nature of the dumpsite soils to the inhabitants of the sites. The calculated radiological parameters were higher than the world average value in two of the sampling points. The ratio of the detected radioisotopes was calculated for spatial distribution of natural radionuclides in the study area. RESRAD computer code was applied to calculate the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE. The code was also used to calculate the probability of excess lifetime cancer incurred by dwellers/inhabitants of the dumpsites, the level of which was determined to be 0.5 × 10−4 and 2.5 × 10−5 for Idowale and Ibijola dumpsite soils over a period of 30 years respectively. Therefore, the radiological risks to the general populations from waste enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (WENORM from the Idowale dumpsite top soils are considered to be significant.

  1. Removal naturally occurring radionuclides from drinking water using a filter specifically designed for Drinking Water Treatment Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, A; Salas, A; Guillén, J; Muñoz-Serrano, A; Ontalba-Salamanca, M Á; Jiménez-Ramos, M C

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of naturally occurring radionuclides in drinking water can pose health hazards in some populations, especially taking into account that routine procedures in Drinking Water Treatment Plants (DWTPs) are normally unable to remove them efficiently from drinking water. In fact, these procedures are practically transparent to them, and in particular to radium. In this paper, the characterization and capabilities of a patented filter designed to remove radium from drinking water with high efficiency is described. This filter is based on a sandwich structure of silica and green sand, with a natural high content manganese oxide. Both sands are authorized by Spanish authorities to be used in Drinking Water Treatment Plants. The Mn distribution in the green sand was found to be homogenous, thus providing a great number of adsorption sites for radium. Kinetic studies showed that the 226Ra adsorption on green sand was influenced by the content of major cations solved in the treated water, but the saturation level, about 96-99%, was not affected by it. The physico-chemical parameters of the treated water were unaltered by the filter. The efficiency of the filter for the removal of 226Ra remained unchanged with large water volumes passed through it, proving its potential use in DWTP. This filter was also able to remove initially the uranium content due to the presence of Fe2O3 particles in it, although it is saturated faster than radium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification and validation of heavy metal and radionuclide hyperaccumulating terrestrial plant species, Quarterly technical progress report, December 20, 1995--March 20, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochian, L.; Brady, D.; Last, M.; Ebbs, S.

    1995-12-01

    Although the period covered by this progress report began on December 20, 1994, which was the date that DOE approved the Interagency Agreement, the agreement was not approved by USDA until January 9, 1995 and the first scientists working on the project were not hired until February 1, 1995. The first goal of the research supported by the Interagency Agreement is to use hydroponic techniques to identify plant species and genotypes with potential for heavy metal hyperaccumulation for planting on a test site at Silverbow Creek and for radionuclide ({sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs) accumulation on a test site at INEL, Idaho, later this year. The second goal of this research is to identify soil amendment procedures that will enhance the bioavailability of heavy metals and radionuclides in the soil without increasing the movement of the contaminants of concern (COC`s) into the groundwater. Our initial research covered in this report focuses on the first goal.

  3. Long-term dynamics of radionuclides in semi-natural environments. Derivation of parameters and modelling. Final Report 1996-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, M. [Agenzia Nazionale per la Protezione dell' Ambiente, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Stato Ambiente, Controlli e Sistemi Informativi, Unita' Interdipartimentale di Metrologia Ambientale

    2000-07-01

    During the Chernobyl accident large areas of semi-natural ecosystems were affected by radionuclide deposition. Meadows and forests are typical semi-natural ecosystems. Meadows are used extensively in many countries as pastures for cattle, sheep and goats, while forests are important to man since they provide wood, paper, wild berries, mushrooms, game and recreational areas. Post-Chernobyl investigations have shown that dose to man from semi-natural ecosystems is relatively greater than from agricultural systems and that this dose risk persists for the long-term. Predictive models are essential to take long-term decisions on the management of contaminated environment and to identify key processes controlling the dynamics of radionuclides inside the ecosystems. During the period following the atmospheric fallout due to the nuclear weapons testing, few models for some specific semi-natural environments were developed. The applicability of these models to a wide range of semi-natural ecosystem is questionable, because in these complex systems it is more difficult to identify general key processes and to apply to other sites models developed for one site. Studies carried out since the Chernobyl accident have increased the understanding of radionuclide behaviour in semi-natural ecosystems, especially for boreal forests and middle European meadow systems which have been extensively investigated. Data sets have been obtained which describe the distribution and the cycling of radionuclides (especially {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr) within these systems. However, predictive modelling has largely been restricted to aggregated transfer factors which provide good contamination estimates, but only for the sites from which data have been obtained directly. There was a need to develop models that can be applied to a broad variety of ecosystems. They are needed for dose estimation, countermeasure implementation and environmental management. They should give reliable estimates of the

  4. Natural radionuclides in urine- and faeces samples; Natuerliche Radionuklide in Urin- und Stuhlproben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froning, M.; Burow, M.; Ennen, R.; Hoelters, A.; Laumen-Sentis, S.; Zoriy, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Geschaeftsbereich Sicherheit und Strahlenschutz

    2016-07-01

    In interpreting of measurement data for incorporation monitoring by excretion samples a clear distinction between the natural intake and the fraction subjected due to occupational exposure should be performed. At the present only a few data about an excretion of primordial elements such as {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th are available in the literature. In the following study actual data measured in urine and faeces will be presented and discussed.

  5. Natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics, and radionuclides in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, G.; Pintauro, P.; O`Connor, S. [and others

    1996-05-02

    This project focuses on the chemical aspects of remediation, with the underlying theme that chemical remediation does occur naturally. Included are studies on the fate of heavy metal and organic contaminants discharged into aquatic environments; accurate assay metal contaminants partitioned into soils, water and tissue; development of novel polymeric membranes and microporous solids for the entrapment of heavy metals; and the development of hybrid chemo-enzymatic oxidative schemes for aromatics decontamination. 49 refs.

  6. Distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (U, Th) in Timahdit black shale (Morocco)

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo, C.; Mougin, L.; Fakhi, S.; Nourreddine, A.; Lamghari, A.; Hannache, H.

    2007-01-01

    Attention has been focused recently on the use of Moroccan black oil shale as the raw material for production of a new type of adsorbent and its application to U and Th removal from contaminated wastewaters. The purpose of the present work is to provide a better understanding of the composition and structure of this shale and to determine its natural content in uranium and thorium. A black shale collected from Timahdit (Morocco) was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques. It ...

  7. Effects of azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil, and ethoprophos on the reproduction of three terrestrial invertebrates using a natural Mediterranean soil

    OpenAIRE

    Leitão, Sara; Cerejeira, M. José; Van den Brink, Paul J.; Sousa, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    The potential terrestrial toxicity of three pesticides, azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil, and ethoprophos was evaluated using reproduction ecotoxicological tests with different non-target species: the collembolan Folsomia candida, the earthworm Eisenia andrei, and the enchytraeid Enchytraeus crypticus. All reproduction tests were performed with natural soil from a Mediterranean agricultural area (with no pesticide residues) in order to improve the relevance of laboratory data to field...

  8. Influence of mineralogical and heavy metal composition on natural radionuclide concentrations in the river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, G; Ramasamy, V; Meenakshisundaram, V; Venkatachalapathy, R; Ponnusamy, V

    2011-10-01

    The natural radiation level has been determined for the sediment samples of the Ponnaiyar River with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard. The mineralogical characterizations of the sediments have been carried out using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction coefficient. The concentration and spatial distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni) have been studied to understand the heavy metal contamination and its level of toxicity. To evaluate the potential toxicity, heavy metal concentrations are compared with different toxicological and geological reference values. The comparison results suggest that the present metals create an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystems associated with this river. To assess the sediment contamination due to the studied heavy metals, the Pollution Load Index (PLI) is calculated. Multivariate Statistical analyses (Pearson Correlation, Cluster and Factor analysis) were carried out between the parameters obtained from radioactivity, mineralogical and geochemical analysis to know the existing relations. Obtained results showed that the effect of mineralogy on level of radioactivity should be significant. However, mineralogy effect on heavy metal composition in the sediments should be limited, indicating that other factors such as vicinity of the pollution sources are more important. Also, the influence of mineralogical characterization on level of radioactivity is significant, whereas the influence of the heavy metal composition on level of radioactivity should be limited. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Deriving Vegetation Dynamics of Natural Terrestrial Ecosystems from MODIS NDVI/EVI Data over Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrendilek, Fatih; Gulbeyaz, Onder

    2008-09-01

    The 16-day composite MODIS vegetation indices (VIs) at 500-m resolution for the period between 2000 to 2007 were seasonally averaged on the basis of the estimated distribution of 16 potential natural terrestrial ecosystems (NTEs) across Turkey. Graphical and statistical analyses of the time-series VIs for the NTEs spatially disaggregated in terms of biogeoclimate zones and land cover types included descriptive statistics, correlations, discrete Fourier transform (DFT), time-series decomposition, and simple linear regression (SLR) models. Our spatio-temporal analyses revealed that both MODIS VIs, on average, depicted similar seasonal variations for the NTEs, with the NDVI values having higher mean and SD values. The seasonal VIs were most correlated in decreasing order for: barren/sparsely vegetated land > grassland > shrubland/woodland > forest; (sub)nival > warm temperate > alpine > cool temperate > boreal = Mediterranean; and summer > spring > autumn > winter. Most pronounced differences between the MODIS VI responses over Turkey occurred in boreal and Mediterranean climate zones and forests, and in winter (the senescence phase of the growing season). Our results showed the potential of the time-series MODIS VI datasets in the estimation and monitoring of seasonal and interannual ecosystem dynamics over Turkey that needs to be further improved and refined through systematic and extensive field measurements and validations across various biomes.

  10. Standard Test Method for Electrical Performance of Concentrator Terrestrial Photovoltaic Modules and Systems Under Natural Sunlight

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the electrical performance of photovoltaic concentrator modules and systems under natural sunlight using a normal incidence pyrheliometer. 1.2 The test method is limited to module assemblies and systems where the geometric concentration ratio specified by the manufacturer is greater than 5. 1.3 This test method applies to concentrators that use passive cooling where the cell temperature is related to the air temperature. 1.4 Measurements under a variety of conditions are allowed; results are reported under a select set of concentrator reporting conditions to facilitate comparison of results. 1.5 This test method applies only to concentrator terrestrial modules and systems. 1.6 This test method assumes that the module or system electrical performance characteristics do not change during the period of test. 1.7 The performance rating determined by this test method applies only at the period of the test, and implies no past or future performance level. 1.8...

  11. Tracing the origin of suspended sediment in a large Mediterranean river by combining continuous river monitoring and measurement of artificial and natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebracki, Mathilde, E-mail: zebracki@free.fr [Laboratoire d' Etudes Radioécologiques en milieu Continental et Marin (LERCM), Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Eyrolle-Boyer, Frédérique [Laboratoire d' Etudes Radioécologiques en milieu Continental et Marin (LERCM), Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Evrard, Olivier [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE/IPSL), Unité Mixte de Recherche 8212 (CEA/CNRS/UVSQ), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Claval, David [Laboratoire d' Etudes Radioécologiques en milieu Continental et Marin (LERCM), Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Mourier, Brice [Université Lyon 1, UMR 5023 Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, ENTPE, CNRS, 3, Rue Maurice Audin, F-69518 Vaulx-en-Velin (France); Université de Limoges, GRESE, EA 4330, 123 avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Gairoard, Stéphanie [Centre de Recherche et d' Enseignement de Géosciences de l' Environnement (CEREGE), Unité Mixte 34 (AMU/CNRS/IRD), Aix-en-Provence (France); and others

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of suspended sediment from large rivers to marine environments has important environmental impacts on coastal zones. In France, the Rhone River (catchment area of 98,000 km{sup 2}) is by far the main supplier of sediment to the Mediterranean Sea and its annual solid discharge is largely controlled by flood events. This study investigates the relevance of alternative and original fingerprinting techniques based on the relative abundances of a series of radionuclides measured routinely at the Rhone River outlet to quantify the relative contribution of sediment supplied by the main tributaries during floods. Floods were classified according to the relative contribution of the main subcatchments (i.e., Oceanic, Cevenol, extensive Mediterranean and generalised). Between 2000 and 2012, 221 samples of suspended sediment were collected at the outlet and were shown to be representative of all flood types that occurred during the last decade. Three geogenic radionuclides (i.e., {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K) were used as fingerprints in a multivariate mixing model in order to estimate the relative contribution of the main subcatchment sources—characterised by different lithologies—in sediment samples collected at the outlet. Results showed that total sediment supply originating from Pre-Alpine, Upstream, and Cevenol sources amounted to 10, 7 and 2.10{sup 6} tons, respectively. These results highlight the role of Pre-Alpine tributaries as the main sediment supplier (53%) to the Rhone River during floods. Other fingerprinting approaches based on artificial radionuclide activity ratios (i.e., {sup 137}Cs/{sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239+240}Pu) were tested and provided a way to quantify sediment remobilisation or the relative contributions of the southern tributaries. In the future, fingerprinting methods based on natural radionuclides should be further applied to catchments with heterogeneous lithologies. Methods based on artificial radionuclides

  12. Vegetation-derived insights on the mobilization and potential transport of radionuclides from the Nopal I natural analog site, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie, B.W.; Pickett, D.A.; Pearcy, E.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Nopal I uranium (U) deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico is a source term and contaminant transport natural analog to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In an attempt to characterize the mobilization and potential transport of radionuclides in the unsaturated zone at the Nopal I deposit, vegetation growing on ore piles was analyzed for {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 232}Th decay-series isotopes. Specimens of Phacelia robusta growing on high-grade piles of U ore were collected and analyzed by alpha autoradiography, and by alpha and gamma spectrometry. Activities for U, thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) isotopes (Bq/kg dried plant) were 300, 1,000, and 7,000 for {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 226}Ra, respectively. The {sup 226}Ra activities in these specimens are among the highest ever measured for plants; furthermore, the plant-to-soil {sup 226}Ra concentration ratio is higher than expected. These results demonstrate the large mobility and bio-availability of Ra in the Nopal I environment, and support previous indications of recent loss of {sup 226}Ra from the ore body. Comparison between the activities of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th decay-chain Th isotopes in the plants and in the ore substrate indicate that relative mobilization into pore solutions of {sup 228}Th > {sup 230}Th > {sup 232}Th, in a ratio of about 50--25:4:1, respectively. The similarity of the plant's {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio ({approximately}1.2) to that of a caliche deposit that formed adjacent to the Nopal ore body around 54 ka suggests the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio of U released from the ore is approximately 1.2. The U and {sup 226}Ra isotope activities of the plants and ore substrate, and solubility considerations, are used to assess a source term model of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. These results suggest the use of a natural analog source term model in performance assessments may be non-conservative.

  13. Diagnosing phosphorus limitations in natural terrestrial ecosystems in carbon cycle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Peng, Shushi; Goll, Daniel S.; Ciais, Philippe; Guenet, Bertrand; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Hinsinger, Philippe; Janssens, Ivan A.; Peñuelas, Josep; Piao, Shilong; Poulter, Benjamin; Violette, Aurélie; Yang, Xiaojuan; Yin, Yi; Zeng, Hui

    2017-07-01

    Most of the Earth System Models (ESMs) project increases in net primary productivity (NPP) and terrestrial carbon (C) storage during the 21st century. Despite empirical evidence that limited availability of phosphorus (P) may limit the response of NPP to increasing atmospheric CO2, none of the ESMs used in the previous Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment accounted for P limitation. We diagnosed from ESM simulations the amount of P need to support increases in carbon uptake by natural ecosystems using two approaches: the demand derived from (1) changes in C stocks and (2) changes in NPP. The C stock-based additional P demand was estimated to range between -31 and 193 Tg P and between -89 and 262 Tg P for Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively, with negative values indicating a P surplus. The NPP-based demand, which takes ecosystem P recycling into account, results in a significantly higher P demand of 648-1606 Tg P for RCP2.6 and 924-2110 Tg P for RCP8.5. We found that the P demand is sensitive to the turnover of P in decomposing plant material, explaining the large differences between the NPP-based demand and C stock-based demand. The discrepancy between diagnosed P demand and actual P availability (potential P deficit) depends mainly on the assumptions about availability of the different soil P forms. Overall, future P limitation strongly depends on both soil P availability and P recycling on ecosystem scale.

  14. Absorbed dose rate due to intake of natural radionuclides by Tilapia fish (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) estimated near uranium anomaly at Santa Quiteria, Ceara, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica. Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios], E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia Ambiental; Py Junior, Delcy de Azevedo [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Caetite, BA (Brazil). Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica. Unidade de Concentrado de Uranio], E-mail: Delcy@inb.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    The uranium mining at Santa Quiteria (Santa Quiteria Unit - USQ) is in its environmental licensing phase. Aiming to estimate the radiological environmental impact of the USQ, a monitoring program is underway. However, radioprotection of biota is not explicitly mentioned in Brazilian norms. In order to preserve the biota of the deleterious effects from radiation and to behave in a pro-active way as expected by licensing organs, the present work aims to use an environmental protection methodology, based on the calculation of absorbed dose rate in biota. Thus, selected biomarker was the fish tilapia (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) and the radionuclides were: uranium (U-238), thorium (Th-232), radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) and lead (Pb-210). Since there are no exposition limits for biota, in Brazil, the value proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of 3.5 x 10{sup 3} {mu}Gy/y has been used. The derived absorbed dose rate calculated for tilapia was 2.76 x 10{sup 0} {mu}Gy/y, that is less than 0.1 % of the limit established by DOE. The critical radionuclide was U-238, with 99% of the absorbed dose rate. This value of 0.1% of the limit allows to state that in pre-operational conditions analyzed natural radionuclides do not represent a radiological problem to the biota. (author)

  15. Preparation, characterization and application of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles modified with natural polymers for removal of {sup 60}Co-radionuclides from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharaf El-Deen, Gehan E. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Radioactive Waste Management Dept.; Imam, Neama G. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Experimental Physics Dept.; Elettra, Sincrotrone, Trieste (Italy); Ayoub, Refaat R. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Chemistry Dept.

    2017-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IO-MNPs) coated with natural polymers, starch (IO-S MNPs) and dextrin (IO-D MNPs), were synthesized by modified co-precipitation method. IO and hybrid-IO-MNPs were characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and zeta potential (ZP). IO-S MNPs and IO-D MNPs have IO core-shell structure with core of 10.8 nm and 13.8 nm and shell of 7.5 nm and 5.9 nm, respectively. The efficiency of the hybrid IO-MNPs for sorption of {sup 60}Co(II)-radionuclides from aqueous solution was investigated under varying experimental conditions. Kinetic data were described well by pseudo-second-order mode, sorption isotherms were fitted quite with Freundlich model with maximum adsorption capacity 36.89 (mmol.g{sup -1})/(L.mmol{sup -1}){sup n} for IO-S MNPs and 24.9 (mmol.g{sup -1})/(L.mmol{sup -1}){sup n} for IO-D MNPs. Sorption of {sup 60}Co-radionuclides by IO-S MNPs was suppressed with salinity and most of the adsorbed {sup 60}Co onto IO-S MNPs could be remove with 0.1 M HCl solution. IO-S MNPs exhibits superparamagnetic properties, easier separation according to higher saturation magnetization (47 emu/g) and better adsorption for {sup 60}CO-radionuclides than IO-D MNPs.

  16. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frostick, A., E-mail: Alison.Frostick@cdu.edu.au [Charles Darwin University, School of Environment and Life Sciences, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Bollhoefer, A. [ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Parry, D. [AIMS, PO Box 41775, Casuarina NT 0811 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly no. 2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra.

  17. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostick, A; Bollhöfer, A; Parry, D

    2011-10-01

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly #2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Natural radionuclides tracing in marine surface waters along the northern coast of Oman Sea by combining the radioactivity analysis, oceanic currents and the SWAN model results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Mostajaboddavati, Mojtaba; Kamali, Mahdi; Tari, Marziyeh; Mosayebi, Sanaz; Mortazavi, Mohammad Seddigh

    2015-03-15

    This study aims to establish a managed sampling plan for rapid estimate of natural radio-nuclides diffusion in the northern coast of the Oman Sea. First, the natural radioactivity analysis in 36 high volume surface water samples was carried out using a portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Second, the oceanic currents in the northern coast were investigated. Then, the third generation spectral SWAN model was utilized to simulate wave parameters. Direction of natural radioactivity propagation was coupled with the preferable wave vectors and oceanic currents direction that face to any marine pollution, these last two factors will contribute to increase or decrease of pollution in each grid. The results were indicated that the natural radioactivity concentration between the grids 8600 and 8604 is gathered in the grid 8600 and between the grids 8605 and 8608 is propagated toward middle part of Oman Sea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Background exposure rates of terrestrial wildlife in England and Wales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH-Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nab@ceh.ac.uk; Barnett, C.L. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH-Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Jones, D.G. [British Geological Society, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Wood, M.D. [Institute for Sustainable Water Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER), Nicholson Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GP (United Kingdom); Appleton, J.D.; Breward, N. [British Geological Society, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Copplestone, D. [Environment Agency, Richard Fairclough House, Knutsford Road, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 1HG (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    It has been suggested that, when assessing radiation impacts on non-human biota, estimated dose rates due to anthropogenically released radionuclides should be put in context by comparison to dose rates from natural background radiation. In order to make these comparisons, we need data on the activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in environmental media and organisms of interest. This paper presents the results of a study to determine the exposure of terrestrial organisms in England and Wales to naturally occurring radionuclides, specifically {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U series and {sup 232}Th series radionuclides. Whole-body activity concentrations for the reference animals and plants (RAPs) as proposed by the ICRP have been collated from literature review, data archives and a targeted sampling campaign. Data specifically for the proposed RAP are sparse. Soil activity concentrations have been derived from an extensive geochemical survey of the UK. Unweighted and weighted absorbed dose rates were estimated using the ERICA Tool. Mean total weighted whole-body absorbed dose rates estimated for the selected terrestrial organisms was in the range 6.9 x 10{sup -2} to 6.1 x 10{sup -1} {mu}Gy h{sup -1}.

  20. Cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natural cadmium leading to the formation of radionuclides of indium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, F.S. [Physics Dept., Girls Coll. of Education, Riyadh Univ. for Women, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-07-01

    Cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on {sup nat}Cd, leading to the formation of {sup 110g}In,{sup 111}In,{sup 113m}In, and {sup 116ml}In for energies up to 14.7 MeV were measured using the stacked-foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. Our experimental data were analyzed and the excitation functions for the studied radionuclides were compared with the previously reported data. Model codes ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE-II were used for calculating the excitation functions theoretically. Integral yields of the radionuclides {sup 110g}In,{sup 111}In,{sup 113m}In and {sup 116ml}In were also calculated. (orig.)

  1. Balance of natural radionuclides in the brown coal based power generation and harmlessness of the residues and side product utilization; Bilanz natuerlicher Radionuklide in der Braunkohleverstromung und Unbedenklichkeit bei der Verwendung von Rueckstaenden und Nebenprodukten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Hartmut; Kunze, Christian; Hummrich, Holger [IAF-Radiooekologie GmbH, Radeberg (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    During brown coal combustion a partial enrichment of natural radionuclides occurs in different residues. Residues and side product from brown coal based power generation are used in different ways, for example filter ashes and gypsum from flue gas desulfurization facilities are used in the construction materials fabrication and slags for road construction. Detailed measurement and accounting of radionuclides in the mass throughputs in coal combustion power plants have shown that the utilized gypsum and filter ashes are harmless in radiologic aspects.

  2. Naturalization of host-dependent microbes after introduction into terrestrial ecosystems [Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geral I. McDonald; Paul J. Zambino; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2005-01-01

    Introduction of plant pathogens, insects, parasites, and predators into terrestrial and marine ecosystems is second only to habitat loss among major threats to biodiversity (Torchin et. al. 2002), and the frequency of introductions continues to increase (Flather et al. 1998, Torchin et al. 2002, Wilcove et al. 1998). Despite their detrimental impacts, introductions can...

  3. Terrestrial Soundscapes: Status of Ecological Research in Natural and Human-Dominated Landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijanowski, Bryan Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Soundscape ecological research in terrestrial systems is relatively new. In this paper, I present a brief summary of the origins of this research area, describe research questions related to several research thrusts that are ongoing, summarize several soundscape projects that exist and how these relate to the research thrusts, and briefly describe the work of a global network of scientists, musicians, and engineers that are attempting to move this new field forward.

  4. Developing Terrestrial Trophic Models for Petroleum and Natural Gas Exploration and Production Sites: The Oklahoma Tallgrass Prairie Preserve Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, M; Coty, J; Stewart, J; Carlsen, T; Callaham, M

    2001-01-26

    This document details procedures to be used when constructing a conceptual terrestrial trophic model for natural gas and oil exploration and production sites. A site conceptual trophic model is intended for use in evaluating ecological impacts of oil and brine releases at E&P sites from a landscape or ecosystem perspective. The terrestrial trophic model protocol was developed using an example site, the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (TPP) in Oklahoma. The procedure focuses on developing a terrestrial trophic model using information found in the primary literature, and augmented using site-specific research where available. Although the TPP has been the subject of considerable research and public interest since the high-profile reintroduction of bison (Bison bison) in 1993, little formal work has been done to develop a food web for the plant and animal communities found at the preserve. We describe how to divide species into guilds using explicit criteria on the basis of resource use and spatial distribution. For the TPP, sixteen guilds were developed for use in the trophic model, and the relationships among these guilds were analyzed. A brief discussion of the results of this model is provided, along with considerations for its use and areas for further study.

  5. Microbial plant litter decomposition in aquatic and terrestrial boreal systems along a natural fertility gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, A. Margarida P. M.; Kritzberg, Emma S.; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Plant litter decomposition is a global ecosystem process, with a crucial role in carbon and nutrient cycling. The majority of litter processing occurs in terrestrial systems, but an important fraction also takes place in inland waters. Among environmental factors, pH impacts the litter decomposition through its selective influence on microbial decomposers. Fungal communities are less affected by pH than bacteria, possibly owing to a wider pH tolerance by this group. On the other hand, bacterial pH optima are constrained to a narrower range of pH values. The microbial decomposition of litter is universally nutrient limited; but few comparisons exist between terrestrial and aquatic systems. We investigated the microbial colonisation and decomposition of plant litter along a fertility gradient, which varied in both pH and N availability in both soil and adjacent water. To do this we installed litterbags with birch (Betula pendula) in streams and corresponding soils in adjacent riparian areas in a boreal system, in Krycklan, Sweden. During the four months covering the ice-free growth season we monitored the successional dynamics of fungal (acetate incorporation into ergosterol) and bacterial growth (thymidine incorporation), microbial respiration in leaf litter, and quantitative and qualitative changes in litter over time. We observed that bacterial growth rates were initially higher in litter decomposing in streams than those in soils, but differences between terrestrial and aquatic bacterial production converged towards the end of the experiment. In litter bags installed in soils, bacterial growth was lower at sites with more acidic pH and lower N availability, while aquatic bacteria were relatively unaffected by the fertility level. Fungal growth rates were two-fold higher for litter decomposing in streams than in soils. In aquatic systems, fungal growth was initially lower in low fertility sites, but differences gradually disappeared over the time course. Fungal

  6. EFFECTIVE SPECIFIC ACTIVITY OF NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES FOR THE NORM BELONGED TO 238U AND 232TH SERIES BEING IN THE STATE OF DISTURBED RADIOACTIVE EQUILIBRIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Stamat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Sanitary Rules SR 2.6.1.1292-03 and SR 2.6.6.1169-02 classification of the industrial waste containing naturally occurring radioactive materials is adopted in accordance to the values of their effective specific activity Aeff. In a case of the disturbed equilibrium in 238U and 232Th series it is necessary to take into consideration actual contribution of the separate natural radionuclides of the mentioned series into the value of gamma dose rate of the waste. This will permit to avoid unjustified overestimating or understating of the waste category which prevents as unjustified expenditures on their treating so undertaking of the necessary measures providing radiation safety.

  7. Natural and artificial radionuclides distribution in some lichens, mosses, and trees in the vicinity of lignite power plants from West Macedonia, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsikritzis, L.I.; Ganatsios, S.S.; Duliu, O.G.; Sawidis, T.D. [University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania). Dept. of Atomic & Nuclear Physics

    2003-07-01

    The distribution of natural K-40, Ra-226 and Ra-228 and artificial Cs-137 has been investigated in nonvascular mosses (9 species) and lichens (10 species) and vascular gymnosperm (1 species), angiosperm trees and shrubs (3 species) over the Kozani-Ptolemaida-Amynteon lignite basin in West Macedonia, Greece. Four lignite power plants producing about 70% of the electric energy of the country are to be found in this region. Both specific activity and transfer factors of these radionuclides have been determined by means of experiments. This study indicates that with regard to Ra-226 and Cs-137, nonvascular lichens and mosses have a much higher transfer factor (2.27 for Ra-226 and 43.77 Cs-137) compared with vascular plants (0.17 for Ra-226 and 0.03 Cs-137), but a lower one for natural K-40 (0.493 for lichens and mosses and respectively 1.190 for vascular plants).

  8. Radiation-Induced Defects in Kaolinite as Tracers of Past Occurrence of Radionuclides in a Natural Analogue of High Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, T.; Fourdrin, C.; Calas, G.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the processes controlling migrations of radioelements at the Earth's surface is an important issue for the long-term safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repositories (HLNWR). Evidence of past occurrence and transfer of radionuclides can be found using radiation-induced defects in minerals. Clay minerals are particularly relevant because of their widespread occurrence at the Earth's surface and their finely divided nature which provides high contact area with radioactive fluids. Owing to its sensitivity to radiations, kaolinite can be used as natural, in situ dosimeter. Kaolinite is known to contain radiation-induced defects which are detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. They are differentiated by their nature, their production kinetics and their thermal stability. One of these defects is stable at the scale of geological periods and provides a record of past radionuclide occurrence. Based on artificial irradiations, a methodology has been subsequently proposed to determine paleodose cumulated by kaolinite since its formation. The paleodose can be used to derive equivalent radioelement concentrations, provided that the age of kaolinite formation can be constrained. This allows quantitative reconstruction of past transfers of radioelements in natural systems. An example is given for the Nopal I U-deposit (Chihuahua, Mexico), hosted in hydrothermally altered volcanic tufs and considered as analogue of the Yucca Mountain site. The paleodoses experienced by kaolinites were determined from the concentration of defects and dosimetry parameters of experimental irradiations. Using few geochemical assumption, a equivalent U-content responsible for defects in kaolinite was calculated from the paleodose, a dose rate balance and model ages of kaolinites constrained by tectonic phases. In a former study, the ages were assumptions derived from regional tectonic events. In thepresent study, ages of mineralization events are measured from U

  9. Influence of natural organic matter on the speciation of radionuclides in a geochemistry context; Influence de la matiere organique naturelle sur la speciation des radionucleides en contexte geochimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marang, L

    2007-09-15

    The principal aim of this work is the study of the influence of natural organic matter, in particularly humic substances (HS), on the speciation of radionuclides (RN). The studied radionuclides are cobalt (II), europium (III) and uranium (VI). It has been shown that mobility and bioavailability of a metal are related to its speciation. The NICA-Donnan model describes metal ion binding to NOM: it accounts for NOM chemical heterogeneity, competition during binding and ionic strength effects. However the model has been calibrated with a limited number of experimental data for the RN. Indeed there is only a few speciation technique available for the study of the interactions RN-HS. Within the framework of this study, we have developed and optimised speciation technique (Flux Donnan Membrane Technique and the use of an un-solubilized humic acid) in order to acquire new experimental data, we have also studied the effect of the competition on RN speciation and finally we have tested the model capacity to predict the RN behavior in laboratory or in situ. (author)

  10. Distribution of some natural and man-made radionuclides in soil from the city of Veles (Republic of Macedonia) and its environs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimovska, Snezana; Stafilov, Trajce; Sajn, Robert; Frontasyeva, Marina

    2010-02-01

    A systematic study of soil radioactivity in the metallurgical centre of the Republic of Macedonia, the city of Veles and its environs, was carried out. The measurement of the radioactivity was performed in 55 samples from evenly distributed sampling sites. The gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity measurements were made as a screening, using a low background gas-flow proportional counter. For the analysis of (40)K, (238)U, (232)Th and (137)Cs, a P-type coaxial high purity germanium detector was used. The values for the activity concentrations of the natural radionuclides fall well within the worldwide range as reported in the literature. It is shown that the activity of man-made radionuclides, except for (137)Cs, is below the detection limit. (137)Cs originated from the atmospheric deposition and present in soil in the activity concentration range of 2-358 Bq kg(-1) is irregularly distributed over the sampled territory owing to the complicated orography of the land. The results of gamma spectrometry are compared to the K, U, and Th concentrations previously obtained by the reactor neutron activation analysis in the same soil samples.

  11. Soil-to-plant transfer factors for natural radionuclides in grass in the vicinity of a former uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Štrok, Marko, E-mail: Marko.Strok@ijs.si; Smodiš, Borut, E-mail: Borut.Smodis@ijs.si

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Soil and grass samples were collected from sites at the uranium mill tailings pile. • {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb activity concentrations were determined. • Soil-to-plant transfer factors were determined and are comparable with literature. • Potential use of grass as a monitor of radionuclide migration was evaluated. • Grass has potential in predicting {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra migration. -- Abstract: The activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb were determined in soil and grass samples collected from sites at the uranium mill tailings waste pile, which lies near the former uranium mine at Žirovski vrh in Slovenia. Soil-to-plant transfer factors were determined and the potential use of grass as a monitor of radionuclide migration from the waste pile was evaluated. It was found that grass was not suitable for monitoring {sup 230}Th and {sup 210}Pb migration (no linear correlation between soil and grass activity concentrations) but has potential in predicting {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra migration (linear correlation between soil and grass activity concentrations). Soil-to-plant transfer factors for grass were in the range from 0.0014 to 0.015 kg/kg DM for {sup 238}U, 0.0039 to 0.012 kg/kg DM for {sup 230}Th, 0.035 to 0.46 kg/kg DM for {sup 226}Ra and 0.098 to 1.5 kg/kg DM for {sup 210}Pb.

  12. Comparison of silvicultural and natural disturbance effects on terrestrial salamanders in northern hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Hocking; Kimberly J. Babbitt; Mariko. Yamasaki

    2013-01-01

    In forested ecosystems timber harvesting has the potential to emulate natural disturbances, thereby maintaining the natural communities adapted to particular disturbances. We compared the effects of even-aged (clearcut and patch cut) and uneven-aged (group cut, single-tree selection) timber management techniques with natural ice-storm damage and unmanipulated reference...

  13. Estimate of the annual effective dose for natural radionuclides of anthropogenic origin in the Bay of Cadiz; Estimacion de la dosis efectiva anual correspondiente a radionucleidos naturales y de origen antropogenico en la Bahia de Cadiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo, J. F.; Martinez-Ramos, C.; Barbero, L.; Casas-Ruiz, M.

    2011-07-01

    Knowledge of radioactivity levels in soils has a double interest: on the one hand, allows you to set the reference values ??(base Linne) from a region or geographic area, and secondly, to evaluate the external radiation dose received by the population and biota, through appropriate dosimetric model. The natural radioactivity, especially the radionuclides in the natural series. The aim of this study is to determine the levels of gamma emitting radionuclides in marine sediments of the Bay of Cadiz, and dose rates from external radiation received in the areas studied. (Author)

  14. Natural radionuclide emission from coal-fired power plants in the southwestern of Turkey and the population exposure to external radiation in their vicinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür, Filiz; Yaprak, Günseli

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of radionuclide emission on the environment from Yatagan, Yenikoy and Kemerkoy coal-fired power plants which are located in southwestern Anatolia of Turkey, the concentrations of natural radionuclides such as (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in coal, bottom ash and fly ash samples, have been measured, as well as the concentration of the same radionuclides in surface soils. The dose rate arises from the total radioactivity content of soil that the people living by the power plants are exposed to be assessed additionally. The average activity concentrations of (226)Ra for Yatagan CPP is 80 ± 22 Bq kg(-1) ranging from 56 to 131 Bq kg(-1), for Yenikoy CPP is 138 ± 20 Bq kg(-1) ranging from 115 to 189 Bq kg(-1), for Kemerkoy CPP is 238 ± 80 Bq kg(-1) ranging from 134 to 356 Bq kg(-1) in coal; average activity concentrations of (226)Ra in fly ash and in bottom ash for above-mentioned power plants are 334 ± 60 Bq kg(-1) ranging from 291 to 481 Bq kg(-1), 461 ± 33 Bq kg(-1) ranging from 398 to 511 Bq kg(-1), 815 ± 254 Bq kg(-1) ranging from 316 to 1260 Bq kg(-1), 276 ± 51 Bq kg(-1) ranging from 222 to 349 Bq kg(-1), 285 ± 69 Bq kg(-1) ranging from 213 to 409 Bq kg(-1), 743 ± 234 Bq kg(-1) ranging from 366 to 1098 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The radionuclides activity concentrations of surface soil in the vicinity of coal-fired power plants are 32 ± 9 Bq kg(-1) (18-53 Bq kg(-1)) for (226)Ra, 37 ± 16 Bq kg(-1) (17-89 Bq kg(-1)) for (232)Th, 455 ± 165 Bq kg(-1) (203-794 Bq kg(-1)) for (40)K relevant to Yatagan CPP; 42 ± 30 Bq kg(-1) (9-168 Bq kg(-1)) for (226)Ra, 32 ± 14 Bq kg(-1) (6-74 Bq kg(-1)) for (232)Th, 365 ± 151 Bq kg(-1) (117-937 Bq kg(-1)) for (40)K relevant to Yenikoy and Kemerkoy CPP. As a result, average dose rates in the vicinity of coal-fired power plants have been calculated to be 56 ± 16 nGy h(-1) ranging from 30 to 100 nGy h(-1) for Yatagan CPP, 54 ± 22 nGy h(-1) ranging from 15 to 126 nGy h(-1) for Yenikoy and Kemerkoy CPP. To

  15. Uranium-series radionuclides as tracers of geochemical processes in Long Island Sound. [Natural /sup 210/Pb tracer study of estuarine geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benninger, L.K.

    1976-05-01

    An estuary can be visualized as a membrane between land and the deep ocean, and the understanding of the estuarine processes which determine the permeability of this membrane to terrigenous materials is necessary for the estimation of fluxes of these materials to the oceans. Natural radionuclides are useful probes into estuarine geochemistry because of the time-dependent relationships among them and because, as analogs of stable elements, they are much less subject to contamination during sampling and analysis. In this study the flux of heavy metals through Long Island Sound is considered in light of the material balance for excess /sup 210/Pb, and analyses of concurrent seston and water samples from central Long Island Sound are used to probe the internal workings of the estuary.

  16. Specific Activities of Natural Radionuclides and Annual Effective Dose Due to the Intake of Some Types of Children Powdered Milk Available in Baghdad Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim Khalaf Rejah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research the specific activity of natural radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were determined by sodium iodide enhanced by thallium NaI(TI detector and assessed the annual effective dose in Dielac 1 and 2 and Nactalia 1 and 2 for children of less than 1 year which are available in Baghdad markets. The specific activity of 40K has the greater value in all the types which is in the range of allowed levels globally that suggested by UNSCEAR. The mean value of annual effective doses were 2.92, 4.005 and 1.6325 mSv/y for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K respectively.

  17. Natural and Anthropogenic Controls over Global Terrestrial N2O Emission Growth at a Century-Long Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.; Tian, H.; Kamaljit, K.; Zhang, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Atmospheric concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) has increased by 20% relative to pre-industrial level. It has attracted growing attention since N2O has long life time and radiative forcing 265 times higher than CO2 at 100-year time horizon. Global N2O emission from terrestrial ecosystem is among the most important contributors to the increase of atmospheric N2O. However, compared to CO2- and CH4-related research, less intensive studies have been performed in assessing the spatiotemporal patterns of terrestrial N2O emission and attributing its changes to both natural and anthropogenic disturbances across the globe. Here we integrated gridded time-series data of climate variability, atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, land use and land cover changes, and agricultural land management practices (i.e., synthetic nitrogen fertilizer use, manure application, and irrigation etc.) to a process-based land ecosystem model, DLEM, for answering the above questions. During 1900-2010, the inter-annual variation and long-term trend of terrestrial N2O emission driven by individual and combined environmental changes have been examined. Through this, we distinguished and quantified the relative contributions of changes in climate, atmospheric composition, and human activities to N2O emission growth at biome-, latitudinal, continental and global scales. The impacts of climate variability, and increasing nitrogen input, particularly nitrogen fertilizer use along with enhanced food production, have been paid special attention. Hot spots and hot time periods of global N2O emission are identified in this study. It provides clue for scientific community and policy makers to develop potential management strategies for mitigating atmospheric N2O increase and climate warming.

  18. Analysis of natural radionuclides and lead in foods and diets; Analise de radionuclideos naturais e chumbo em produtos alimenticios e dietas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, Luciana

    1999-07-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to determine the lead-210, polonium-210 and lead concentrations in foods and diets. Consumption of food is generally the main route by which radionuclides can enter the human organism. Precision and accuracy of the methods developed were verifies by the analysis of reference materials from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The method for polonium-210 analysis consisted of sample dissolution by using a microwave digester (open system) employing concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, evaporation almost dryness, addition of hydrochloric acid, polonium deposition onto silver disc for six hours and counting by alpha spectrometry. Lead was analysed by atomic absorption technique. After sample dissolution in a microwave digester (using concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide) and dilution to 50 ml, 20{mu}l of the sample was injected in a pyrolytic graphite furnace - atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with Zeeman background correction. The assessment of the contaminants in foods and diets allowed to estimate the intake of these elements and for the radionuclides were also evaluated the radiation doses that the individuals selected were exposed by the food consumption. The effective dose for lead-210 by diets intake ranged from 1.3 to 4.3 {mu}Sv/year, corresponding to 25% of the resulting from polonium-210 intake. The dose due to the both natural radionuclides varied from 6.8 to 23.0 {mu}Sv/year. These values are in good agreement with the literature data. The value estimated by the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR, 1993) that is 60 {mu}Sv and lower than the dose of 0.02 Sv, limit established by ICRP, 1980. The lead levels found in the majority of the Brazilian foods are in good agreement with the values published by CONAT and FAO/WHO. However, some foods such as bean, potato, papaya, apple and rice present levels above of the recommended values by the

  19. AUTOMATIC REGISTRATION OF TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER POINT CLOUDS USING NATURAL PLANAR SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. Theiler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanners have become a standard piece of surveying equipment, used in diverse fields like geomatics, manufacturing and medicine. However, the processing of today's large point clouds is time-consuming, cumbersome and not automated enough. A basic step of post-processing is the registration of scans from different viewpoints. At present this is still done using artificial targets or tie points, mostly by manual clicking. The aim of this registration step is a coarse alignment, which can then be improved with the existing algorithm for fine registration. The focus of this paper is to provide such a coarse registration in a fully automatic fashion, and without placing any target objects in the scene. The basic idea is to use virtual tie points generated by intersecting planar surfaces in the scene. Such planes are detected in the data with RANSAC and optimally fitted using least squares estimation. Due to the huge amount of recorded points, planes can be determined very accurately, resulting in well-defined tie points. Given two sets of potential tie points recovered in two different scans, registration is performed by searching for the assignment which preserves the geometric configuration of the largest possible subset of all tie points. Since exhaustive search over all possible assignments is intractable even for moderate numbers of points, the search is guided by matching individual pairs of tie points with the help of a novel descriptor based on the properties of a point's parent planes. Experiments show that the proposed method is able to successfully coarse register TLS point clouds without the need for artificial targets.

  20. Discriminating between effects of metals and natural variables in terrestrial bacterial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boivin, M.E.Y.; Greve, G.D.; Kools, S.A.E.; Wurff, van der A.W.G.; Leeflang, P.; Smit, E.; Breure, A.M.; Rutgers, M.; Straalen, van N.M.

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to assess effects of metals on bacterial communities in grassland soil and to discriminate these effects from natural variability in soil properties. Changes in gross parameters of bacterial communities were investigated by the determination of 14C-leucine and 3H-thymidine

  1. Activity of natural radionuclides and their contribution to the absorbed dose in the fish cubera snapper (lutjanus cyanopterus, cuvier, 1828 on the coast of Ceara, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner de S. Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology was developed for converting the activity concentration of radionuclides (Bq kg-1 into absorbed dose rate (Gy y-1, aiming an approach to environmental radioprotection based on the concept of standard dose limit. The model considers only the internal absorbed dose rate. This methodology was applied to the cubera snapper fish (Lutjanus cyanopterus, Cuvier, 1828 caught off the coast of Ceará. The natural radionuclides considered were uranium-238, radium-226, lead-210, thorium-232 and radium-228. The absorbed dose rates were calculated for individual radionuclides and the type of emitted radiation. The average dose rate due to these radionuclides was 5.36 µGy y-1, a value six orders of magnitude smaller than the threshold value of absorbed dose rate used in this study (3.65 10³ mGy y-1, and similar to that found in the literature for benthic fish. Ra-226 and U-238 contributed 67% and 22% of the absorbed dose rate, followed by Th-232 with 10%. Ra-228 and Pb-210, in turn, accounted for less than 1% of the absorbed dose rate. This distribution is somewhat different from that reported in the literature, where the Ra-226 accounts for 86% of the absorbed dose rate.Visando a radioproteção ambiental, baseada no conceito de limite de taxa de dose absorvida, foi desenvolvida uma metodologia de conversão da concentração de atividade de radionuclídeos (Bq kg-1 em taxa de dose absorvida (Gy a-1. O modelo considera apenas a taxa de dose absorvida interna. Essa metodologia foi aplicada ao peixe vermelho-caranho (Lutjanus cyanopterus, Cuvier, 1828 capturado na costa do Ceará e aos radionuclídeos naturais: urânio-238, rádio-226, chumbo-210, tório-232 e rádio-228. As taxas de dose absorvidas foram calculadas por radionuclídeo e por tipo de radiação emitida. A taxa de dose média devida a esses radionuclídeos foi de 5.36 µGy a-1, valor seis ordens de grandeza menor que o valor de limite de taxa de dose absorvida utilizada no presente

  2. Global Trends in Exposure to Light Pollution in Natural Terrestrial Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Bennie

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth in electric light usage across the globe has led to increasing presence of artificial light in natural and semi-natural ecosystems at night. This occurs both due to direct illumination and skyglow - scattered light in the atmosphere. There is increasing concern about the effects of artificial light on biological processes, biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems. We combine intercalibrated Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS images of stable night-time lights for the period 1992 to 2012 with a remotely sensed landcover product (GLC2000 to assess recent changes in exposure to artificial light at night in 43 global ecosystem types. We find that Mediterranean-climate ecosystems have experienced the greatest increases in exposure, followed by temperate ecosystems. Boreal, Arctic and montane systems experienced the lowest increases. In tropical and subtropical regions, the greatest increases are in mangroves and subtropical needleleaf and mixed forests, and in arid regions increases are mainly in forest and agricultural areas. The global ecosystems experiencing the greatest increase in exposure to artificial light are already localized and fragmented, and often of particular conservation importance due to high levels of diversity, endemism and rarity. Night time remote sensing can play a key role in identifying the extent to which natural ecosystems are exposed to light pollution.

  3. Natural and human-induced terrestrial water storage change: A global analysis using hydrological models and GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfelani, Farshid; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Pokhrel, Yadu N.

    2017-10-01

    Hydrological models and the data derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission have been widely used to study the variations in terrestrial water storage (TWS) over large regions. However, both GRACE products and model results suffer from inherent uncertainties, calling for the need to make a combined use of GRACE and models to examine the variations in total TWS and their individual components, especially in relation to natural and human-induced changes in the terrestrial water cycle. In this study, we use the results from two state-of-the-art hydrological models and different GRACE spherical harmonic products to examine the variations in TWS and its individual components, and to attribute the changes to natural and human-induced factors over large global river basins. Analysis of the spatial patterns of the long-term trend in TWS from the two models and GRACE suggests that both models capture the GRACE-measured direction of change, but differ from GRACE as well as each other in terms of the magnitude over different regions. A detailed analysis of the seasonal cycle of TWS variations over 30 river basins shows notable differences not only between models and GRACE but also among different GRACE products and between the two models. Further, it is found that while one model performs well in highly-managed river basins, it fails to reproduce the GRACE-observed signal in snow-dominated regions, and vice versa. The isolation of natural and human-induced changes in TWS in some of the managed basins reveals a consistently declining TWS trend during 2002-2010, however; significant differences are again obvious both between GRACE and models and among different GRACE products and models. Results from the decomposition of the TWS signal into the general trend and seasonality indicate that both models do not adequately capture both the trend and seasonality in the managed or snow-dominated basins implying that the TWS variations from a

  4. Determination of the risk associated with the natural and anthropogenic radionuclides from the soil of Skardu in Central Karakoram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Manzoor; Wasim, Mohammad; Iqbal, Sajid; Arif, Mohammad; Saif, Farhan

    2013-09-01

    The radioactivity levels were determined in 39 soil samples from six towns of Skardu using gamma-ray spectrometry. The samples were collected at an average altitude of 2293 m above sea level in Central Karakoram. The activity concentration data were analysed by principal component analysis for outlier detection and data structure elucidation and for frequency distributions. The median activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs were found to be 49.8 ± 12.6, 80.9 ± 18.7, 977 ± 91 and 4.37 ± 4.08 Bq kg(-1), respectively. An uncertainty analysis showed that the main contribution to uncertainty budget was from the counting statistics and uncertainty in the reference activity of standard. The activity concentration data showed a positive significant correlation between (226)Ra and (232)Th. Three hazard indices named the radium equivalent activity, external hazard index and internal hazard index were calculated. In the total activity concentration, (40)K accounted for the most (87.5 %), whilst in the radium equivalent activity, (232)Th contributed the most (48.5 %). In the Skardu samples, the air-absorbed dose rate was found to be 112 ± 17 nGy h(-1), annual effective dose rate from terrestrial to be 243 ± 38 μSv y(-1), effective dose rate due to the deposition of (137)Cs on soil to be 1.1 ± 2.4 μSv y(-1) and dose rate from the cosmic radiations to be 1371 ± 107 μSv y(-1). The ratio of mass fractions of Th/U was 4.8 ± 0.6.The results were compared with the similar measurements made in other parts of the world. A comparison with the other cities of Pakistan revealed that the soil in Skardu presented the highest external exposure rate.

  5. Monitoring of the Nirano Mud Volcanoes Regional Natural Reserve (North Italy using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Santagata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, measurement instruments and techniques for three-dimensional mapping as Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS and photogrammetry from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV are being increasingly used to monitor topographic changes on particular geological features such as volcanic areas. In addition, topographic instruments such as Total Station Theodolite (TST and GPS receivers can be used to obtain precise elevation and coordinate position data measuring fixed points both inside and outside the area interested by volcanic activity. In this study, the integration of these instruments has helped to obtain several types of data to monitor both the variations in heights of extrusive edifices within the mud volcano field of the Nirano Regional Natural Reserve (Northern Italy, as well as to study the mechanism of micro-fracturing and the evolution of mud flows and volcanic cones with very high accuracy by 3D point clouds surface analysis and digitization. The large amount of data detected were also analysed to derive morphological information about mud-cracks and surface roughness. This contribution is focused on methods and analysis performed using measurement instruments as TLS and UAV to study and monitoring the main volcanic complexes of the Nirano Natural Reserve as part of a research project, which also involves other studies addressing gases and acoustic measurements, mineralogical and paleontological analysis, organized by the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in collaboration with the Municipality of Fiorano Modenese.

  6. Determination of natural radionuclides, U, Th-232, Ra-226, Ra-228, Pb-210 and K-40 in sediments from CananÉIa-Iguape System, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Gleyka J.D.; Chiozzini, Vitor G.; Saueia, Cátia H.R.; Nisti, Marcelo B.; Braga, Elisabete S.; Fávaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: gjdjesus@ipen.br, E-mail: chsaueia@ipen.br, E-mail: mbnisti@ipen.br, E-mail: defavaro@ipen.br, E-mail: vitor.chio@usp.br, E-mail: edsbraga@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto Oceanográfico

    2017-07-01

    The Cananéia-Iguape estuarine-lagoon complex, located in the south of São Paulo State, Brazil, is a protected area recognized by UNESCO as part of the Biosphere Reserve, due to its importance as a natural ecosystem. However, along the years, the mining activities in the region affected the river basin, to such an extent that contamination was observed for As, Cu, Pb and Zn. Since the mining activities can also enhance the levels of natural radioactivity in the sediments, this study aimed to determine the activity concentration of the natural radionuclides (K-40, U, Ra-226, Pb-210, Th-232 and Ra-228) in 34 bottom sediments samples collected in the Cananéia-Iguape system. The samples were measured by gamma spectrometry, using a HPGe for the determination of K-40, Ra-226, Pb-210 and Ra-228. The concentration of U and Th-232 was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The activity concentration of K-40 varied from 119 ± 17 to 522 ± 74 Bq kg{sup -1}; U-238 varied from 0.31 ± 0.05 to 5.8 ± 0.3 mg kg{sup -1}; Ra-226 varied from 3.7 ± 0.3 to 43.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg{sup -1}; Pb-210 varied from 5.8 ± 2.6 to 118 ± 12 Bq kg{sup -1}; Th-232 varied from 0.67 ± 0.02 to 16.6 ± 0.4 mg kg{sup -1} and Ra-228 varied from 3.5 ± 0.6 to 64.9 ± 2.4 Bq kg{sup -1}. These results were compared with literature values for the region, indicating that they are the background of the region and no contamination was observed from NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) industries. (author)

  7. The intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon: Their nature, origin and role in terrestrial planet evolution. Discussion of the nature, origin and role of the intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The nature and origin of the intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon as determined through geologic mapping, crater statistics, and remotely sensed data are summarized. Implications of these results regarding scarp formation, absolute ages, and terrestrial planet surfaces are included. The role of the intercrater plains is defined and future work which might lead to a better understanding of these units and terrestrial planet evolution is outlined.

  8. Modelling of plant-soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jessica; Quinton, John; Rowe, Ed; Tipping, Ed

    2013-04-01

    In recent centuries pools and fluxes of C, N and P in natural and semi-natural UK ecosystems have been transformed by atmospheric pollution leading to: acidification; eutrophication of surface waters; loss of biodiversity; and increased greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, climate change now threatens to perturb these systems further. Understanding in this field is vital in determining the consequences of artificial nutrient enrichment and land use and climate change, and mitigating against their effects. The N14CP model has been recently developed to assess the temporal responses of soil C, N and P pools to nutrient enrichment in semi-natural ecosystems, and explore the connections between these nutrients. It is a dynamic, mechanistic model, driven by: climate; CO2, N (fixation and pollutant deposition), and P (weathering and atmospheric deposition) inputs; and plant cover type. It explicitly links C, N, and P in both plants and soils, using plant element stoichiometry as the primary constraint. Net primary production, and plant/soil element pools, are calculated over time, and output fluxes of dissolved organic and inorganic, and gaseous, forms of C, N, and P produced. Radiocarbon data are used to constrain Soil Organic Matter (SOM) turnover. The SOM is represented as three pools, undergoing first-order decomposition reactions with turn-over rates ranging from 2 to 1000 years. The N14CP modelling methodology is discussed and its calibration and verification using observations from 200 northern European sites presented. Whilst the primary period of interest with respect to nutrient enrichment is from the industrial revolution onwards, plant-soil C, N and P are simulated at these sites for a period spanning from the start of the Holocene (to provide a spin-up period) to the present day. Clearly, during this time span land cover and usage will have changed at these sites, and histories of these changes are used as an input to the model. The influence of these land

  9. Shock-implanted noble gases. II - Additional experimental studies and recognition in naturally shocked terrestrial materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Donald; Horz, Friedrich; Johnson, Pratt

    1989-01-01

    The process by which ambient gases can be implanted into silicates by shocks was investigated by analyzing the noble-gas content of several experimentally and naturally shocked silicate samples. The retentivity of shock-implanted gas during stepwise heating in the laboratory was defined in terms of two parameters, namely, the activation energy for diffusion and the extraction temperature at which 50 percent of the gas is released, both of which correlate with the shock pressure. The experiments indicate that, with increasing shock pressure, gas implantation occurs through an increasing production of microcracks/defects in the silicate lattice. The degree of annealing of these defects control the degree of diffusive loss of implanted gas.

  10. Compilation of minimum and maximum isotope ratios of selected elements in naturally occurring terrestrial materials and reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.B.; Hopple, J.A.; Böhlke, J.K.; Peiser, H.S.; Rieder, S.E.; Krouse, H.R.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Ding, T.; Vocke, R.D.; Revesz, K.M.; Lamberty, A.; Taylor, P.; De Bievre, P.

    2002-01-01

    Documented variations in the isotopic compositions of some chemical elements are responsible for expanded uncertainties in the standard atomic weights published by the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. This report summarizes reported variations in the isotopic compositions of 20 elements that are due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay) and their effects on the standard atomic weight uncertainties. For 11 of those elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and selenium), standard atomic weight uncertainties have been assigned values that are substantially larger than analytical uncertainties because of common isotope abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin. For 2 elements (chromium and thallium), recently reported isotope abundance variations potentially are large enough to result in future expansion of their atomic weight uncertainties. For 7 elements (magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium), documented isotope-abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin are too small to have a significant effect on their standard atomic weight uncertainties. This compilation indicates the extent to which the atomic weight of an element in a given material may differ from the standard atomic weight of the element. For most elements given above, data are graphically illustrated by a diagram in which the materials are specified in the ordinate and the compositional ranges are plotted along the abscissa in scales of (1) atomic weight, (2) mole fraction of a selected isotope, and (3) delta value of a selected isotope ratio. There are no internationally distributed isotopic reference materials for the elements zinc, selenium, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium. Preparation of such materials will help to make isotope ratio measurements among

  11. Accelerator Production of Radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David J.; Ruth, Thomas J.

    2012-06-01

    While many radioactive isotopes in use today are found in nature, many more are artificially produced by irradiating target materials with nuclear particles. Two different technologies can provide the energetic particles needed: nuclear reactors, which produce a flux of neutrons, and particle accelerators, which produce a flux of charged particles. This chapter will deal with the important aspects of the production of radionuclides with accelerators, along with some details on their applications, commercially-available accelerator systems used for this purpose, and the size of the equipment business.

  12. Trade-offs for food production, nature conservation and climate limit the terrestrial carbon dioxide removal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Lena R; Lucht, Wolfgang; Gerten, Dieter

    2017-10-01

    Large-scale biomass plantations (BPs) are a common factor in climate mitigation scenarios as they promise double benefits: extracting carbon from the atmosphere and providing a renewable energy source. However, their terrestrial carbon dioxide removal (tCDR) potentials depend on important factors such as land availability, efficiency of capturing biomass-derived carbon and the timing of operation. Land availability is restricted by the demands of future food production depending on yield increases and population growth, by requirements for nature conservation and, with respect to climate mitigation, avoiding unfavourable albedo changes. We integrate these factors in one spatially explicit biogeochemical simulation framework to explore the tCDR opportunity space on land available after these constraints are taken into account, starting either in 2020 or 2050, and lasting until 2100. We find that assumed future needs for nature protection and food production strongly limit tCDR potentials. BPs on abandoned crop and pasture areas (~1,300 Mha in scenarios of either 8.0 billion people and yield gap reductions of 25% until 2020 or 9.5 billion people and yield gap reductions of 50% until 2050) could, theoretically, sequester ~100 GtC in land carbon stocks and biomass harvest by 2100. However, this potential would be ~80% lower if only cropland was available or ~50% lower if albedo decreases were considered as a factor restricting land availability. Converting instead natural forest, shrubland or grassland into BPs could result in much larger tCDR potentials ̶ but at high environmental costs (e.g. biodiversity loss). The most promising avenue for effective tCDR seems to be improvement of efficient carbon utilization pathways, changes in dietary trends or the restoration of marginal lands for the implementation of tCDR. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Final Report (BMWi Project No.: 02 E 10971): Joint project: Retention of radionuclides relevant for final disposal in natural clay rock and saline systems - Subproject 2: Geochemical behavior and transport of radionuclides in saline systems in the prese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Fritsch, Katharina [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Lippold, Holger [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Poetsch, Maria [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Kulenkampff, Johannes [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Jordan, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Joseph, Claudia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Moll, Henry [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Cherkouk, Andrea [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Bader, Miriam [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden, (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2016-02-29

    The objective of this project was to study the influence of increased salinities on interaction processes in the system radionuclide – organics – clay – aquifer. For this, complexation, redox, sorption, and diffusion studies were performed under variation of the ionic strength (up to 4 mol kg-1) and the background electrolyte (NaCl, CaCl2, MgCl2).

  14. Does leaching of naturally occurring radionuclides from roadway pavements stabilised with coal fly ash have negative impacts on groundwater quality and human health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahayni, T; Vanhoudt, N

    2018-05-05

    We assessed the potential impact of using coal fly ash to stabilise roadway pavements on groundwater quality and human health. The leaching potential of naturally occurring radionuclides (NORs) typically present in the fly ash was assessed with the HYDRUS-1D code and data representative of a segment of the Wisconsin State Trunk Highway 60 as a case study. Our assessment suggests that the impact would be mainly from the chemical toxicity of uranium (U). In our particular case study, U concentration in the leachate exceeded the maximum contaminant level for this element (MCL = 30 μg L -1 ) in almost all the scenarios. In the groundwater, the MCL was only exceeded under conditions of high leaching and low dilution in the aquifer. The radiological toxicity from the consumption of the contaminated groundwater by a hypothetical adult, however, was at maximum 43% of the individual dose criterion (IDC = 0.1 mSv y -1 ). The results also highlight the need to consider site-specific conditions such as climate and hydrogeology when assessing the environmental impacts of utilising fly ash in roadway construction applications since they could have profound effects on the assessment findings. There is also a pressing need for reliable and representative data to support realistic assessments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Physical setting and natural sources of exposure to carcinogenic trace elements and radionuclides in Lahontan Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Ralph L.

    2012-01-01

    In Lahontan Valley, Nevada, arsenic, cobalt, tungsten, uranium, radon, and polonium-210 are carcinogens that occur naturally in sediments and groundwater. Arsenic and cobalt are principally derived from erosion of volcanic rocks in the local mountains and tungsten and uranium are derived from erosion of granitic rocks in headwater reaches of the Carson River. Radon and 210Po originate from radioactive decay of uranium in the sediments. Arsenic, aluminum, cobalt, iron, and manganese concentrations in household dust suggest it is derived from the local soils. Excess zinc and chromium in the dust are probably derived from the vacuum cleaner used to collect the dust, or household sources such as the furnace. Some samples have more than 5 times more cobalt in the dust than in the local soil, but whether the source of the excess cobalt is anthropogenic or natural cannot be determined with the available data. Cobalt concentrations are low in groundwater, but arsenic, uranium, radon, and 210Po concentrations often exceed human-health standards, and sometime greatly exceed them. Exposure to radon and its decay products in drinking water can vary significantly depending on when during the day that the water is consumed. Although the data suggests there have been no long term changes in groundwater chemistry that corresponds to the Lahontan Valley leukemia cluster, the occurrence of the very unusual leukemia cluster in an area with numerous 210Po and arsenic contaminated wells is striking, particularly in conjunction with the exceptionally high levels of urinary tungsten in Lahontan Valley residents. Additional research is needed on potential exposure pathways involving food or inhalation, and on synergistic effects of mixtures of these natural contaminants on susceptibility to development of leukemia.

  16. Agricultural handling and natural radionuclide contents on vegetables cultivated at Rio de Janeiro; Manejo agricola e teores de radionuclideos naturais em vegetais cultivados no Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Fernando Carlos Araujo

    2004-07-01

    The food consumption is an important way of internal exposition of human beings to ionizing radiation. The chemical fertilizers, mainly the phosphate, may contain uranium and thorium and their decay radioactive products in significant levels. This way, the amount of natural radionuclides in vegetables can increase as well as the dose due to food consumption to consumers. This research aims to investigate the level of radionuclides in vegetables which were grown under different tillages and to obtain information about radionuclides concentrations in Brazilian fertilizers as well as it aims to get data of transfer factors for vegetables cultivated in Brazil. In the phosphate fertilizer samples, the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra varied from 35 to 430 Bq.kg{sup -1}, whereas the {sup 228}Ra concentrations ranged from 32 to 176 Bq.kg{sup -1}. Among the phosphate fertilizers, the highest radium concentrations were found in the super phosphate one. The values of radium concentrations in organic fertilizers varied from 14 to 51 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra and from 34 to 142 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra. Among these fertilizers the highest concentrations were found in bovine manure Significant statistical differences were not observed between the concentration of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra in the vegetables cultivated in conventional tillage and the ones cultivated in organic tillage. The same was observed for the soil-to-plant transfer factors, whose values were 2.56 E-02 for {sup 226}Ra and 3.56 E-02 for {sup 228}Ra for the bean crop, 3.74 E-02 for {sup 226}Ra and 4.74 E-02 for {sup 228}Ra to lettuce crop. For carrot, the {sup 226}Ra transfer factor value for the two tillages was 5.79 E-02, while the value for {sup 228}Ra in the organic tillage (1.14 E-01) was higher than the value observed in the conventional tillages (3.94 E-02). For the culture of the bean, the values of concentration found in the samples of the subsistence handling had been inferior to the values

  17. RADIATION EXPOSURE OF THE POPULATION FROM 222Rn AND OTHER NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES AROUND MOCHOVCE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT, SLOVAKIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulko, Martin; Holý, Karol; Pohronská, Žofia; Mullerová, Monika; Böhm, Radoslav; Holá, Ol'ga

    2017-09-18

    In this article, the effective dose to the population from natural sources of ionizing radiation in the vicinity of Mochovce nuclear power plant in Slovakia is presented. All major contributions to the effective dose were taken into account, including the contributions from gamma radiation of soil and rocks, cosmic radiation, and indoor and outdoor radon and thoron. On the basis of recent indoor radon measurements in Slovak cities and publicly available data about radon concentration in the soil air, a roughly linear relationship was found between these variables. Consequently, the annual effective dose from indoor radon and thoron was conservatively estimated. For the area of interest, a map of conservatively estimated potential effective doses was created. For the villages in the vicinity of Mochovce, the conservatively estimated effective dose to the population from natural sources ranged from 5.4 to 14.6 mSv, which is four orders of magnitude higher than the contribution of radioactive discharges from Mochovce nuclear power plant. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Characteristic of pollution with groundwater inflow (90)Sr natural waters and terrestrial ecosystems near a radioactive waste storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentyeva, G V

    2014-09-01

    The studies were conducted in the territory contaminated by (90)Sr with groundwater inflow as a result of leakage from the near-surface trench-type radioactive waste storage. The vertical soil (90)Sr distribution up to the depth of 2-3 m is analyzed. The area of radioactive contamination to be calculated with a value which exceeds the minimum significant activity 1 kBq/kg for the tested soil layers: the contaminated area for the 0-5 cm soil layer amounted to 1800 ± 85 m(2), for the 5-10 cm soil layer amounted to 300 ± 12 m(2), for the 10-15 cm soil layer amounted to 180 ± 10 m(2). It is found that (90)Sr accumulation proceeds in a natural sorption geochemical barrier of the marshy terrace near flood plain. The exposure doses for terrestrial mollusks Bradybaena fruticum are presented. The excess (90)Sr interference level was registered both in the ground and surface water during winter and summer low-water periods and autumn heavy rains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimates of global terrestrial isoprene emissions using MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guenther

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive gases and aerosols are produced by terrestrial ecosystems, processed within plant canopies, and can then be emitted into the above-canopy atmosphere. Estimates of the above-canopy fluxes are needed for quantitative earth system studies and assessments of past, present and future air quality and climate. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN is described and used to quantify net terrestrial biosphere emission of isoprene into the atmosphere. MEGAN is designed for both global and regional emission modeling and has global coverage with ~1 km2 spatial resolution. Field and laboratory investigations of the processes controlling isoprene emission are described and data available for model development and evaluation are summarized. The factors controlling isoprene emissions include biological, physical and chemical driving variables. MEGAN driving variables are derived from models and satellite and ground observations. Tropical broadleaf trees contribute almost half of the estimated global annual isoprene emission due to their relatively high emission factors and because they are often exposed to conditions that are conducive for isoprene emission. The remaining flux is primarily from shrubs which have a widespread distribution. The annual global isoprene emission estimated with MEGAN ranges from about 500 to 750 Tg isoprene (440 to 660 Tg carbon depending on the driving variables which include temperature, solar radiation, Leaf Area Index, and plant functional type. The global annual isoprene emission estimated using the standard driving variables is ~600 Tg isoprene. Differences in driving variables result in emission estimates that differ by more than a factor of three for specific times and locations. It is difficult to evaluate isoprene emission estimates using the concentration distributions simulated using chemistry and transport models, due to the substantial uncertainties in other model components, but at

  20. Estimation of annual effective dose and radiation hazards due to natural radionuclides in Mount Homa, southwestern Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otwoma, D; Patel, J P; Bartilol, S; Mustapha, A O

    2013-08-01

    The radiological hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material in Mount Homa in southwestern Kenya was investigated after 210 point measurements and 44 samples were analysed. In situ measured average outdoor absorbed dose rate in air using survey meters was found to vary from 154.8 to 2280.6 nGy h(-1). The mean (range) values of radioactive concentrations measured using an HpGe detection system for (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th were 915 ± 3 (64-3017), 195 ± 8 (17-1447) and 409 ± 4 (23-1369) Bq kg(-1), respectively. The calculated range of the annual effective dose for a person living in Homa Mountain area varied from 28.6 to 1681.2, with a mean of 470.4 µSv. All calculated average radiological indices, namely Radium equivalent, Representative level, Gamma activity, External and Internal hazard, were higher than the limits set by various national and international bodies. These results imply that Mount Homa region is a high background radiation area.

  1. GNIS: Natural Terrestrial Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) actively seeks data from and partnerships with Government agencies at all levels and other interested organizations....

  2. Effects of azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil and ethoprophos on the reproduction of three terrestrial invertebrates using a natural Mediterranean soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leitao, S.; Cerejeira, J.; Brink, van den P.J.; Sousa, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The potential terrestrial toxicity of three pesticides, azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil, and ethoprophos was evaluated using reproduction ecotoxicological tests with different non-target species: the collembolan Folsomia candida, the earthworm Eisenia andrei, and the enchytraeid Enchytraeus crypticus.

  3. Differentiating the degradation dynamics of algal and terrestrial carbon within complex natural dissolved organic carbon in temperate lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, François; McCallister, S. Leigh; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2013-07-01

    It has often been hypothesized that the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool of algal origin in lakes is more bioavailable than its terrestrial counterpart, but this hypothesis has seldom been directly tested. Here we test this hypothesis by tracking the production and isotopic signature of bacterial respiratory CO2 in 2 week lake water incubations and use the resulting data to reconstruct and model the bacterial consumption dynamics of algal and terrestrial DOC. The proportion of algal DOC respired decreased systematically over time in all experiments, suggesting a rapid consumption and depletion of this substrate. Our results further show that the algal DOC pool was used in proportions and at rates twice and 10 times as high as the terrestrial DOC pool, respectively. On the other hand, the absolute amount of labile terrestrial DOC was on average four times higher than labile algal DOC, accounting for almost the entire long-term residual C metabolism, but also contributing to short-term bacterial C consumption. The absolute amount of labile algal DOC increased with chlorophyll a concentrations, whereas total phosphorus appeared to enhance the amount of terrestrial DOC that bacteria could consume, suggesting that the degradation of these pools is not solely governed by their respective chemical properties, but also by interactions with nutrients. Our study shows that there is a highly reactive pool of terrestrial DOC that is processed in parallel to algal DOC, and because of interactions with nutrients, terrestrial DOC likely supports high levels of bacterial metabolism and CO2 production even in more productive lakes.

  4. Method Validation for the Gamma-ray Spectrometric Determination of Natural Radioactive Nuclides in NORM Samples - Method Validation for the Gamma-ray Spectrometric Determination of Natural Radionuclides in raw materials and by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Lim, Jong-Myoung; Jang, Mee; Kim, Chang-Jong; Chung, Kun Ho; Kang, Mun Ja; Choi, Geun-Sik [Environmental Radioactivity Assessment Team, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111, Daedeok-daero 989, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    It has established the 'Act on safety control of radioactive rays around living environment' in Korea, since 2011, to protect the public from natural occurring radioactive materials (NORM) and their by-products. The increasing concerns regarding the radioactivity of those materials therefore dictate many demands for the radioactive analysis for them. There are several methods to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides, such as {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, and so on, through a radiochemical analysis using an alpha spectrometer, mass spectrometer and liquid scintillation counter. However, gamma-ray spectroscopy still has an effect on the assessment of radioactive concentration for these nuclides and their progenies. To adapt a gamma spectrometer to the determination of natural radionuclides, the feasibility of their analysis methods should be first verified and validated with respect to accuracy and time and cost constraints. In general, one of the well-known processes in analyzing uranium with a gamma spectrometer is an indirect measurement using the secular equilibrium state with their progenies in a sample. This method, however, demands the time elapsed about 3 weeks to reach the equilibrium state between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn and the sufficient integrity of a sample bottle to prevent the leakage of radon isotopes which is a form of noble gas. The simple and quick method is to directly measure a full energy absorption peak of 186.2 keV from {sup 226}Ra without the secular equilibrium state between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn in the common sample bottle. However, this direct measurement also has difficulties about the interference with a full energy absorption peak of 185.7 keV from {sup 235}U. In this study, direct measurement with the interference correction technique, which uses several reference peaks for gamma-rays from {sup 235}U and {sup 234}Th, and indirect measurement, which means the identification of {sup

  5. Sequential determination of natural ({sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U) and anthropogenic ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239+240}Pu) radionuclides in environmental matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, H.; Levent, D.; Barci, V.; Barci-Funel, G.; Hurel, C. [Laboratoire de Radiochimie, Sciences Analytiques et Environnement (LRSAE), Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis 06108 Nice Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    A new sequential method for the determination of both natural (U, Th) and anthropogenic (Sr, Cs, Pu, Am) radionuclides has been developed for application to soil and sediment samples. The procedure was optimised using a reference sediment (IAEA-368) and reference soils (IAEA-375 and IAEA-326). Reference materials were first digested using acids (leaching), 'total' acids on hot plate, and acids in microwave in order to compare the different digestion technique. Then, the separation and purification were made by anion exchange resin and selective extraction chromatography: Transuranic (TRU) and Strontium (SR) resins. Natural and anthropogenic alpha radionuclides were separated by Uranium and Tetravalent Actinide (UTEVA) resin, considering different acid elution medium. Finally, alpha and gamma semiconductor spectrometer and liquid scintillation spectrometer were used to measure radionuclide activities. The results obtained for strontium-90, cesium-137, thorium-232, uranium- 238, plutonium-239+240 and americium-241 isotopes by the proposed method for the reference materials provided excellent agreement with the recommended values and good chemical recoveries. (authors)

  6. Using natural radionuclides 210Po and 210Pb in GEOTRACES data from the North Atlantic to estimate particulate and biologically reactive trace element scavenging and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, Sylvain; Church, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Central to understanding the coupling of oceanic carbon and nutrient cycles are trace elements that can limit ocean production and ultimately climate change. These include elements that are both lithogenic (particle reactive) and biogenic (biologically reactive) central to particle scavenging, exchange and bioavailability. The natural 210Po and 210Pb radionuclide (granddaughter/parent) pair provides the radiometric means to model particle scavenging and exchange in the ocean on monthly to annual time scales. Data on dissolved (0.2 μm, >53μm) 210Po (t1/2= 138.4 d) and 210Pb (T1/2 = 22.3 y) are available from seven complete water profiles during two U.S. GEOTRACES cruises that transited the North Atlantic during fall 2010 and 2011. The transects correspond to a wide range of marine environments: coastal slopes at the western and eutrophic up-welling at the eastern margins, Saharan dust sources from the east, hydro-thermal vents in the TAG plume on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and oligotrophic gyres in both the western and eastern basins. Steady state box modeling at each depth interval was employed to estimate radionuclide exchange rates at the fine-large particle and fine particulate-dissolved interface, in terms of biological uptake, and net of radioactive support or decay. By proxy, the results should predict the rates of biological (210Po) and particle reactive (210Pb) trace element adsorption and resorption, vertical particulate and carbon export, and respective residence times. The model results show the contrasting chemical behaviour of the two nuclides over the large range of oceanic conditions encountered in the North Atlantic. In the surface ocean, 210Po scavenging is linearly correlated with the concentration of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large particles, supporting the role of biogenic particles in 210Po bioaccumulation and export. At depth, 210Po exhibits significant widespread deficit with respect to 210Pb, which could in part be attributed to in

  7. Assessment of reproductive capacity of seeds sampled from natural populations of plants from a territory contaminated with radionuclides and heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakhusheva, O.; Evseeva, T. [Institute of biology Komi SC Ural Branch of RAS (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Plants are an essential component of any ecosystem and are permanently exposed to soil contamination. Therefore, they are widely used for characterization of ecological situation of the territory. Located at the base of the food chain, plants are exposed to toxic agents before the organisms at higher trophic levels. Kirovo-Chepetsk chemical plant (Kirov, Russia) is one of the biggest chemical enterprises in Europe. Vascular plant communities from surrounding area are exposed to industrial wastes, including uranium production wastes from 1938. The aim of this work was to estimate reproductive capacity of Urtica dioica L., Cirsium setosum (Willd.) Bess and Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim - natural populations inhabiting the chemical plant industrial zone. The plant species studied are common for the meadow communities of south taiga zone, and are characterized by high seed yield and living in wide range of ecological conditions. Plant seeds were collected from two experimental sites with different soil contamination levels, located in the vicinity of the Kirovo-Chepetsk chemical plant, as well as from the reference site, in 2011 and 2012. Soil specific activities of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr and concentrations of Ni, Pb, Cd, Zn, Hg and Cu were measured and ecological criteria of the radioactive (C{sub r}) and chemical (C{sub c}) contamination of the soil cover were calculated. Seeds germination, germinative energy and seedling survival rate were used for assessing reproductive capacity. Urtica dioicawas found to be the most sensitive among plant species studied. Germination of seeds from contaminated sites was significantly lower compared with the reference values. Exponential relationship was found between the levels of soil radioactive contamination and seeds germination (R{sup 2}=0.8, p<0.001). Germination of Cirsium setosum seeds, sampled from contaminated sites, exceeded the values obtained for the reference plant population and was linearly dependent (R{sup 2

  8. Knowledge gaps in relation to radionuclide levels and transfer to wild plants and animals, in the context of environmental impact assessments, and a strategy to fill them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.E. (ed.); Gjelsvik, R. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Saxen, R.; Mattila, J. (STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    International activities with regards the development of methods for assessing impacts on the environment from ionising radiation have been substantial in recent years. In developing these methods, there are requirements (i) to determine the transfer of radionuclides within ecosystems and (ii) to determine background dose-rates arising from the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides, in a satisfactory manner. It has quickly become evident that fulfilling these 2 requirements is not entirely straightforward reflecting a lack of data in many cases. This report specifies exactly where these data-gaps lie through analyses of data generated from the most recent studies conducted internationally on this topic. It is evident that information is limited for numerous radionuclides from U-238 and Th-232 decay series and notably, in view of its importance as a contributor to dose-rates in plants and animals, Po-210. The simple way to rectify these data deficiencies is to organise target field campaigns focusing on particular species and radionuclides where information is lacking. To this end, field sampling has been conducted in a semi-natural mountain ecosystem in Norway and freshwater aquatic systems in Finland. It is envisaged that the data derived from the studies briefly described in this report will provide fundamental information for our understanding of the behaviour and fate of natural decay series radionuclides in terrestrial and aquatic systems and provide the basis for more robust way. (au)

  9. Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

  10. [Radionuclide diagnosis of kidney calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlakhov, N; Penkova, D

    1986-09-01

    Radionuclide investigations were conducted in 322 patients with nephrolithiasis. Unilateral calculosis was established in 46.3% of the patients, bilateral calculosis in 50.6%. The nature of changes on renograms, scintigrams and in clearance values was shown to depend on the localization of concrements, their size and the presence of concomitant infection. A conclusion has been made as to the usefulness of the methods with relation to operative treatment, especially in a bilateral localization of a pathological renal process.

  11. The use of lichens as bioindicators of atmospheric contamination by natural radionuclides and metals in a region impacted by TENORM; Utilizacao de liquens como bioindicadores de contaminacao atmosferica por radionuclideos naturais e metais em regiao impactada por TENORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonardo, Lucio

    2010-07-01

    The main aim of this thesis is to study the possibility of using lichen as bioindicator of atmospheric pollution in regions contaminated by radionuclides, metals and rare earth elements. Two regions were chosen, one in Pirapora do Bom Jesus, where a tin and lead industry is located, and a second one in Cubatao, where a phosphate fertilizer industrial complex is located. The two industries chosen are considered as TENORM - Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material, since they can cause a significant increase in the natural radionuclides concentration in the industrial process, and consequently a potential increase in the radiation exposure in products, byproducts and residue. To achieve this aim, the radionuclides {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 2'}3{sup 2}Th and {sup 228}Ra, rare earth elements and metals were analyzed in samples of raw material and residues from the installations, lichens and soils. Lichens and soil samples were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis for the determination of uranium, thorium, rare earth elements and metals. The radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 2}'1{sup 0}Pb in soil samples were determined by gamma spectrometry and in lichen sample by radiochemical separation and gross alpha and beta counting on a gas flow proportional counter. The concentrations of {sup 238}U (from 19 to 473 Bq kg{sup -1}), {sup 226}Ra (from 21 to 265 Bq kg{sup -1}), {sup 210}Pb (from 401 to 1461 Bq kg{sup -1}), {sup 232}Th (from 15 to 574 Bq kg{sup -1}), {sup 228}Ra (from 176 to 535 Bq kg'-{sup 1}), rare earth elements, Hf and Ta determined in lichen samples around the tin and lead industry show an enrichment in these elements. Therefore, the lichens can be used as a fingerprint of the atmospheric contamination. The results obtained for the lichen samples, in the Cubatao region, present a fingerprint mainly of {sup 210}Pb, from industries of the region. The results obtained in this

  12. Semipalatinsk test site: Parameters of radionuclide transfer to livestock and poultry products under actual radioactive contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baigazinov, Z.; Lukashenko, S. [Institute of Radiation Safety and Ecology (Kazakhstan)

    2014-07-01

    The IAEA document 'Handbook of Parameter Values for the Prediction of Radionuclide Transfer in Terrestrial and Freshwater Environments' published in 2010 is one of the major sources of knowledge about the migration parameters of radionuclides in the agro-ecosystems that is necessary to assess the dose loads to the population. It is known from there that Sr and Cs transfer has been studied thoroughly, however the factors vary over a wide range. Few studies were conducted for Pu and Am transfer. It should be noted that the studies carried out in real conditions of radioactive contamination, i.e. under natural conditions is also very few. In this regard, since 2007 the territory of the former Semipalatinsk Test Site has been used for comprehensive radioecological studies, where the major radionuclides to be investigated are {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 241}Am. The objects for these studies are birds and animals typical for the region, as well as products obtained from them (lamb, beef, horse meat, chicken, pork, cow's milk, mare's milk, eggs, chicken, chicken feathers, wool, leather). It should be noted that these products are the main agricultural goods that are available in these areas. The studies have been conducted with grazing animals in the most contaminated areas of the test site. Some groups of animals and birds were fed to contaminated feed, soil, contaminated water. Radionuclide intake by animal body with air were studied. Husbandry periods for animals and birds ranged from 1 to 150 days. The transfer parameters to cow and mare's milk have been investigated at single and prolonged intake of radionuclides, also their excretion dynamics has been studied. The studies revealed features of the radionuclide transfer into organs and tissues of animals and birds intaken with hay, water and soil. The results showed that the transfer factors vary up to one order. A relationship has been identified between distribution of

  13. Radionuclide analysis in the soil of Kumaun Himalaya, India, using gamma ray spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R. C. Ramola; V. M. Choubey; Ganesh Prasad; G. S. Gusain; Z. Tosheva; A. Kies

    2011-01-01

    .... The activity concentration and gamma-absorbed dose rates of the terrestrial radionuclides caused by 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were determined in the soil samples collected from the eastern part of Kumaun Himalaya...

  14. Natural radionuclide of Po210 in the edible seafood affected by coal-fired power plant industry in Kapar coastal area of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Che Abd Rahim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Po210 can be accumulated in various environmental materials, including marine organisms, and contributes to the dose of natural radiation in seafood. The concentration of this radionuclide in the marine environment can be influenced by the operation of a coal burning power plant but existing studies regarding this issue are not well documented. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the Po210 concentration level in marine organisms from the coastal area of Kapar, Malaysia which is very near to a coal burning power plant station and to assess its impact on seafood consumers. Methods Concentration of Po210 was determined in the edible muscle of seafood and water from the coastal area of Kapar, Malaysia using radiochemical separation and the Alpha Spectrometry technique. Results The activities of Po210 in the dissolved phase of water samples ranged between 0.51 ± 0.21 and 0.71 ± 0.24 mBql-1 whereas the particulate phase registered a range of 50.34 ± 11.40 to 72.07 ± 21.20 Bqkg-1. The ranges of Po210 activities in the organism samples were 4.4 ± 0.12 to 6.4 ± 0.95 Bqkg-1 dry wt in fish (Arius maculatus, 45.7 ± 0.86 to 54.4 ± 1.58 Bqkg-1 dry wt in shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis and 104.3 ± 3.44 to 293.8 ± 10.04 Bqkg-1 dry wt in cockle (Anadara granosa. The variation of Po210 in organisms is dependent on the mode of their life style, ambient water concentration and seasonal changes. The concentration factors calculated for fish and molluscs were higher than the recommended values by the IAEA. An assessment of daily intake and received dose due to the consumption of seafood was also carried out and found to be 2083.85 mBqday-1person-1 and 249.30 μSvyr-1 respectively. These values are comparatively higher than reported values in other countries. Moreover, the transformation of Po210 in the human body was calculated and revealed that a considerable amount of Po210 can be absorbed in the internal organs. The

  15. [Construction of an indicator system for evaluating the protection efficacy of national nature reserves in China: A case study on terrestrial vertebrates (excluding migratory birds)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yu-ying; Yang, Dao-de; Deng, Jiao; Zhang, Zhi-qiang; Zhou, Xian-yan; Wang, Wei; Li, Jun-sheng

    2015-05-01

    The protection efficacy of nature reserves is a key element in achieving targets of biodiversity conservation. It is therefore very important to develop a scientific, systematic, and accurate index system for evaluating the protection efficacy of national nature reserves in China. Using methods of frequency statistics, expert consultation, analytic hierarchy process, and demonstration survey, we present a novel index system for evaluating the protection efficacy of Chinese national nature reserves for terrestrial vertebrates (excluding migratory birds) over a 10-year period. The indicator system included one target layer, two system layers, nine factor layers, and forty index layers. The system layer included ecological effectiveness evaluation (with a score of 60%) and management effectiveness evaluation (score of 40%). The ecological effectiveness evaluation was a comprehensive, dynamic evaluation of the target species, population, habitat, and ecological system. The management effectiveness evaluation was focused on the effectiveness of patrol and monitoring. The additional part aimed to analyze the impact of humans on the target species, population and nature resources of the nature reserve. This study combined the ecological effectiveness evaluation and the management effectiveness evaluation for the first time, highlighted the importance of time and space changes, distinguished the influence of natural factors from human factors, and integrated them into the evaluation results. By emphasizing quantifiable indicators, this evaluation index system could vastly assist the protection of nature reserves by improving management effectiveness, biodiversity conservation, and macroscopic decision-making.

  16. The applicability and limitations of the geochemical models and tools used in simulating radionuclide behaviour in natural waters. Lessons learned from the Blind Predictive Modelling exercises performed in conjunction with Natural Analogue studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, J.; Duro, L.; Grive, M. [QuantiSci SL, Parc Tecnologic del Valles (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    One of the key applications of Natural Analogue studies to the Performance Assessment (PA) of nuclear waste disposal has been the possibility to test the geochemical models and tools to be used in describing the migration of radionuclides in a future radioactive waste repository system. To this end, several geochemical modelling testing exercises (commonly denoted as Blind Predictive Modelling), have formed an integral part of Natural Analogue Studies over the last decade. Consequently, we thought that this is a timely occasion to make an evaluation of the experience gained and lessons learnt. We have reviewed, discussed and compared the results obtained from the Blind Prediction Modelling (BPM) exercises carried out within 7 Natural Analogue Studies: Oman, Pocos de Caldas, Cigar Lake, Maqarin, El Berrocal, Oklo and Palmottu. To make this comparison meaningful, we present the main geochemical characteristics of each site in order to highlight the most relevant mineralogical and hydrochemical differences. From the complete list of elements studied at all the investigated sites we have made a selection based on the relevance of a given element from a PA viewpoint and on the frequency this element has been included in the BPM exercises. The elements selected for discussion are: Sr, Ba, Sn, Pb, Se, Ni, Zn, REEs, Th and U. We have based our discussion on the results obtained from the speciation as well as solubility calculations. From the comparison of the results it is concluded that we can differentiate between three element categories: 1. Elements whose geochemical behaviour can be fairly well described by assuming solubility control exerted by pure solid phases of the given element (i.e. Th, U under reducing conditions and U in some sites under oxidising conditions); 2. Elements for which the association to major geochemical components of the system must be considered in order to explain their concentrations in groundwaters (i.e. Sr, Ba, Zn, Se, REEs and U under

  17. Accumulation of Dechlorane Plus flame retardant in terrestrial passerines from a nature reserve in South China: The influences of biological and chemical variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Ying [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu, Jiang-Ping, E-mail: jpwu@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Tao, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Mo, Ling [Hainan Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Haikou 571126 (China); Zheng, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Although a number of studies have addressed the bioaccumulation of Dechlorane Plus (DP) flame retardant in wildlife, few data are available on terrestrial organisms. This study examined the presence of DP isomers in the muscle tissue of seven terrestrial resident passerine species, i.e., the great tit (Parus major), the oriental magpie-robin (Copsychus saularis), the red-whiskered bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus), the light-vented bulbul (Pycnonotus sinensis), the streak-breasted scimitar babbler (Pomatorhinus ruficollis), the long-tailed shrike (Lanius schach), and the orange-headed thrush (Zoothera citrina), from a national nature reserve located in South China. The ∑DP (sum of syn-DP and anti-DP) concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 104 ng/g lipid weight, with significantly higher levels in insectivorous birds than in omnivorous birds. The overall exposure to DP isomers of the current passerines may be attributed to the intensive release of this pollutant from electronic waste recycling sites and industrial zones in the vicinity of the nature reserve. Species-specific DP isomeric profiles were also found, with significantly greater f{sub anti} values (the isomer fractions of anti-DP) in the red-whiskered bulbul and the oriental magpie-robin. Additionally, the f{sub anti} values were significantly negatively correlated to ∑DP concentrations for the individual bird samples, suggesting the influence of DP concentrations on the isomeric profiles. - Highlights: • We investigated the occurrence of DP in seven species of terrestrial passerines. • Insectivorous birds accumulated higher ∑DP concentrations than omnivorous birds. • Inter-species differences in the f{sub anti} values were observed. • The f{sub anti} values were significantly correlated to DP concentrations.

  18. Accumulation of Dechlorane Plus flame retardant in terrestrial passerines from a nature reserve in South China: the influences of biological and chemical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Tao, Lin; Mo, Ling; Zheng, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Bin; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2015-05-01

    Although a number of studies have addressed the bioaccumulation of Dechlorane Plus (DP) flame retardant in wildlife, few data are available on terrestrial organisms. This study examined the presence of DP isomers in the muscle tissue of seven terrestrial resident passerine species, i.e., the great tit (Parus major), the oriental magpie-robin (Copsychus saularis), the red-whiskered bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus), the light-vented bulbul (Pycnonotus sinensis), the streak-breasted scimitar babbler (Pomatorhinus ruficollis), the long-tailed shrike (Lanius schach), and the orange-headed thrush (Zoothera citrina), from a national nature reserve located in South China. The ∑DP (sum of syn-DP and anti-DP) concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 104 ng/g lipid weight, with significantly higher levels in insectivorous birds than in omnivorous birds. The overall exposure to DP isomers of the current passerines may be attributed to the intensive release of this pollutant from electronic waste recycling sites and industrial zones in the vicinity of the nature reserve. Species-specific DP isomeric profiles were also found, with significantly greater fanti values (the isomer fractions of anti-DP) in the red-whiskered bulbul and the oriental magpie-robin. Additionally, the fanti values were significantly negatively correlated to ∑DP concentrations for the individual bird samples, suggesting the influence of DP concentrations on the isomeric profiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Migration of radionuclides through a river system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    Migration behavior of several atmospherically-derived radionuclides in a river watershed was studied. A main interest was in their relocation from the ground soil of the watershed to a downstream region through a river. Studied radionuclides are: {sup 137}Cs generated by weapon tests in the atmosphere; {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be of naturally occurring radionuclides; {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am released by the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Dominance of the form in suspended solid in river water (particulate form) was qualified for the radionuclides in the Kuji river watershed. An importance of discharge in flooding was also confirmed. A historical budget analysis for weapon test derived {sup 137}Cs was presented for the Hi-i river watershed and its accompanied lake sediment (Lake Shinji). The work afforded a scheme of a fate of {sup 137}Cs after falling on the ground soil and on the lake surface. Several controlling factors, which can influence on the chemical form of radionuclides discharged to a river, were also investigated in the vicinity of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. A special attention was paid on the association of the radionuclides with dissolved species in water. Preferential association of Pu and Am isotopes to a large molecular size of dissolved matrices, probably of humic substances, was suggested. (author)

  20. Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    1981-04-01

    The study objective of "The Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters" is to synthesize and test radionuclide transport models capable of realistically assessing radionuclide transport in various types of surface water bodies by including the sediment-radionuclide interactions. These interactions include radionuclide adsorption by sediment; desorption from sediment into water; and transport, deposition, and resuspension of sorbed radionuclides controlled by the sediment movements. During FY-1979, the modification of sediment and contaminant (radionuclide) transport model, FETRA, was completed to make it applicable to coastal waters. The model is an unsteady, two-dimensional (longitudinal and lateral) model that consists of three submodels (for sediment, dissolved-contaminant, and particulate-contaminant transport), coupled to include the sediment-contaminant interactions. In estuaries, flow phenomena and consequent sediment and radionuclide migration are often three-dimensional in nature mainly because of nonuniform channel cross-sections, salinity intrusion, and lateral-flow circulation. Thus, an unsteady, three-dimensional radionuclide transport model for estuaries is also being synthesized by combining and modifying a PNL unsteady hydrothermal model and FETRA. These two radionuclide transport models for coastal waters and estuaries will be applied to actual sites to examine the validity of the codes.

  1. Joint project. Retention of radionuclides relevant for final disposal in natural clay rock and saline systems. Subproject 2. Geochemical behavior and transport of radionuclides in saline systems in the presence of repository-relevant organics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeide, Katja; Fritsch, Katharina; Lippold, Holger [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Ressource Ecology; and others

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this project was to study the influence of increased salinities on interaction processes in the system radionuclide - organics - clay - aquifer. For this purpose, complexation, redox, sorption, and diffusion studies were performed under variation of the ionic strength (up to 4 mol kg{sup -1}) and the background electrolyte. The U(VI) complexation by propionate was studied in dependence on ionic strength (up to 4 mol kg{sup -1} NaClO{sub 4}) by TRLFS, ATR FT-IR spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. An influence of ionic strength on stability constants was detected, depending on the charge of the respective complexes. The conditional stability constants, determined for 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 complexes at specific ionic strengths, were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. The interaction of the bacteria Sporomusa sp. MT-2.99 and Paenibacillus sp. MT-2.2 cells, isolated from Opalinus Clay, with Pu was studied. The experiments can be divided into such without an electron donor where biosorption is favored and such with addition of Na-pyruvate as an electron donor stimulating also bioreduction processes. Moreover, experiments were performed to study the interactions of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 with U(VI), Eu(III), and Cm(III) in 3 M NaCl solutions. Research for improving process understanding with respect to the mobility of multivalent metals in systems containing humic matter was focused on the reversibility of elementary processes and on their interaction. Kinetic stabilization processes in the dynamics of humate complexation equilibria were quantified in isotope exchange studies. The influence of high salinity on the mobilizing potential of humic-like clay organics was systematically investigated and was described by modeling. The sorption of Tc(VII)/Tc(IV) onto the iron(II)-containing minerals magnetite and siderite was studied by means of batch sorption experiments, ATR FT-IR and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The strong Tc

  2. Assessment of environmental impact models in natural occurring radionuclides solid wastes disposal from the mineral industry; Avaliacao de modelos de impacto ambiental para deposicao de residuos solidos com radionuclideos naturais em instalacoes minero-industriais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontedeiro, Elizabeth May Braga Dulley

    2006-07-15

    This work evaluates the behavior of wastes with naturally occurring radionuclides as generated by the mineral industry and their final disposal in landfills. An integrated methodology is used to predict the performance of an industrial landfill for disposal of wastes containing NORM/TENORM, and to define acceptable amounts that can be disposed at the landfill using long-term environmental assessment. The governing equations for radionuclide transport are solved analytically using the generalized integral transform technique. Results obtained for each compartment of the biogeosphere are validated with experimental results or compared to other classes of solutions. An impact analysis is performed in order to define the potential consequences of a landfill to the environment, considering not only the engineering characteristics of the waste deposit but also the exposure pathways and plausible scenarios in which the contaminants could migrate and reach the environment and the human population. The present work permits the development of a safety approach that can be used to derive quantitative waste acceptance criteria for the disposal of NORM/TENORM waste in landfills. (author)

  3. An integrated approach to radionuclide flow in semi-natural ecosystems underlying exposure pathways to man. Final report of the LANDSCAPE project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moberg, L.; Hubbard, L.; Avila, R.; Wallberg, L. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Feoli, E.; Scimone, M.; Milesi, C. [Trieste Univ. (Italy); Mayes, B.; Iason, G. [Macaulay Land Use Research Inst., Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Rantavaara, A.; Vetikko, V. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Bergman, R.; Nylen, T. [National Defence Research Establishment, Umeaa (Sweden); Palo, T.; White, N. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Faculty of Forestry; Raitio, H.; Aro, L.; Kaunisto, S. [The Finnish Forest Research Inst., Parkano (Finland); Guillitte, O. [Faculte Univ. des Sciences Agronomiques de Gembloux (Belgium)

    1999-10-01

    The general objective of the LANDSCAPE project has been to obtain a basis for reliable assessments of the radiation exposure to man under different time scales from radionuclides in plant and animal products of representative forest ecosystems in Europe. The work has been focussed on radiocaesium, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs. In particular, the project has included (i) to quantify some major processes which influence the radiocaesium contamination of vegetation and fungi, (ii) to quantify radiocaesium intake of key herbivores, particularly free ranging moose, relative to food availability and degree of contamination, (iii) to quantify the influence of forest management on radiocaesium dynamics, and (iv) to incorporate these processes in dynamic models. The LANDSCAPE project has been the combined effort of eight research groups from five European countries, and this report describes the results obtained during 30 months of common work.

  4. Contaminants of legacy and emerging concern in terrestrial passerines from a nature reserve in South China: Residue levels and inter-species differences in the accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Tao, Lin; Mo, Ling; Tang, Bin; Zhang, Qiang; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Zou, Fa-Sheng; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge is limited about the bioaccumulation of persistent halogenated compounds (PHCs) in terrestrial wildlife. Several PHCs, including dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites (designated as DDTs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), and stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) were analyzed in the muscle of four terrestrial passerines, Parus major, Copsychus saularis, Pycnonotus sinensis and Pycnonotus jocosus, from a nature reserve in South China. P. major had the highest PHC concentrations, with median values of 1060, 401, 92, 25 and 0.3 ng/g lipid weight for DDTs, PCBs, PBDEs, DBDPE and BTBPE, respectively. Fractions of DDT in P. jocosus and PCBs 153, 118 and 180 in C. saularis were higher compared with the other species. The inter-species differences in PHC concentrations and profiles could be attributed to the differences in trophic level, diet, living habits and metabolic capacity among the birds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Naturally occurring arsenic in terrestrial geothermal systems of western Anatolia, Turkey: potential role in contamination of freshwater resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Jochen; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Nath, Bibhash; Baba, Alper; Gunduz, Orhan; Kulp, Thomas R; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Kar, Sandeep; Yang, Huai-Jen; Tseng, Yu-Jung; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Chen, Chien-Yen

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination in terrestrial geothermal systems has been identified in many countries worldwide. Concentrations higher than 0.01 mg/L are detrimental to human health. We examined potential consequences for As contamination of freshwater resources based on hydrogeochemical investigations of geothermal waters in deep wells and hot springs collected from western Anatolia, Turkey. We analyzed samples for major ions and trace element concentrations. Temperature of geothermal waters in deep wells showed extreme ranges (40 and 230 °C), while, temperature of hot spring fluids was up to 90 °C. The Piper plot illustrated two dominant water types: Na-HCO3(-) type for geothermal waters in deep wells and Ca-HCO3(-) type for hot spring fluids. Arsenic concentration ranged from 0.03 to 1.5mg/L. Dominance of reduced As species, i.e., As(III), was observed in our samples. The Eh value ranged between -250 and 119 mV, which suggests diverse geochemical conditions. Some of the measured trace elements were found above the World Health Organization guidelines and Turkish national safe drinking water limits. The variation in pH (range: 6.4-9.3) and As in geothermal waters suggest mixing with groundwater. Mixing of geothermal waters is primarily responsible for contamination of freshwater resources and making them unsuitable for drinking or irrigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of the effect of kinetics on colloid facilitated radionuclide transport in porous media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd, van de H.; Leijnse, A.

    1997-01-01

    Binding of radionuclides to natural colloids can significantly alter their transport behaviour in porous media. Dependent on the interaction between radionuclides, colloids and the solid matrix, radionuclide transport may be enhanced or retarded as a result of the presence of colloids. Often,

  7. An overview of BORIS: Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamponnet, C. [Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, DEI/SECRE, CADARACHE, B.P. 1, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, Cedex (France)], E-mail: christian.tamponnet@irsn.fr; Martin-Garin, A.; Gonze, M.-A. [Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, DEI/SECRE, CADARACHE, B.P. 1, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, Cedex (France); Parekh, N. [Center for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Vallejo, R.; Sauras-Yera, T.; Casadesus, J. [Department of Plant Biology, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Plassard, C.; Staunton, S. [INRA, UMR Rhizosphere and Symbiosis, Place Viala, 34060 Montpellier (France); Norden, M. [Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, 171 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Avila, R. [Facilia AB, Valsgaerdevaegen 12, 168 53 Bromma, Stockholm (Sweden); Shaw, G. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    The ability to predict the consequences of an accidental release of radionuclides relies mainly on the level of understanding of the mechanisms involved in radionuclide interactions with different components of agricultural and natural ecosystems and their formalisation into predictive models. Numerous studies and databases on contaminated agricultural and natural areas have been obtained, but their use to enhance our prediction ability has been largely limited by their unresolved variability. Such variability seems to stem from incomplete knowledge about radionuclide interactions with the soil matrix, soil moisture, and biological elements in the soil and additional pollutants, which may be found in such soils. In the 5th European Framework Programme entitled Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils (BORIS), we investigated the role of the abiotic (soil components and soil structure) and biological elements (organic compounds, plants, mycorrhiza, and microbes) in radionuclide sorption/desorption in soils and radionuclide uptake/release by plants. Because of the importance of their radioisotopes, the bioavailability of three elements, caesium, strontium, and technetium has been followed. The role of one additional non-radioactive pollutant (copper) has been scrutinised in some cases. Role of microorganisms (e.g., K{sub d} for caesium and strontium in organic soils is much greater in the presence of microorganisms than in their absence), plant physiology (e.g., changes in plant physiology affect radionuclide uptake by plants), and the presence of mycorrhizal fungi (e.g., interferes with the uptake of radionuclides by plants) have been demonstrated. Knowledge acquired from these experiments has been incorporated into two mechanistic models CHEMFAST and BIORUR, specifically modelling radionuclide sorption/desorption from soil matrices and radionuclide uptake by/release from plants. These mechanistic models have been incorporated into an assessment model to enhance

  8. An overview of BORIS: Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamponnet, C; Martin-Garin, A; Gonze, M-A; Parekh, N; Vallejo, R; Sauras-Yera, T; Casadesus, J; Plassard, C; Staunton, S; Norden, M; Avila, R; Shaw, G

    2008-05-01

    The ability to predict the consequences of an accidental release of radionuclides relies mainly on the level of understanding of the mechanisms involved in radionuclide interactions with different components of agricultural and natural ecosystems and their formalisation into predictive models. Numerous studies and databases on contaminated agricultural and natural areas have been obtained, but their use to enhance our prediction ability has been largely limited by their unresolved variability. Such variability seems to stem from incomplete knowledge about radionuclide interactions with the soil matrix, soil moisture, and biological elements in the soil and additional pollutants, which may be found in such soils. In the 5th European Framework Programme entitled Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils (BORIS), we investigated the role of the abiotic (soil components and soil structure) and biological elements (organic compounds, plants, mycorrhiza, and microbes) in radionuclide sorption/desorption in soils and radionuclide uptake/release by plants. Because of the importance of their radioisotopes, the bioavailability of three elements, caesium, strontium, and technetium has been followed. The role of one additional non-radioactive pollutant (copper) has been scrutinised in some cases. Role of microorganisms (e.g., K(d) for caesium and strontium in organic soils is much greater in the presence of microorganisms than in their absence), plant physiology (e.g., changes in plant physiology affect radionuclide uptake by plants), and the presence of mycorrhizal fungi (e.g., interferes with the uptake of radionuclides by plants) have been demonstrated. Knowledge acquired from these experiments has been incorporated into two mechanistic models CHEMFAST and BIORUR, specifically modelling radionuclide sorption/desorption from soil matrices and radionuclide uptake by/release from plants. These mechanistic models have been incorporated into an assessment model to enhance its

  9. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  10. Radionuclide studies in impotence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilson, A.J.; Lewis, C.A. (St. Peter' s Hospitals, London (England))

    1991-04-01

    Impotence may be of physiological origin with causes including vascular or neurological pathology. Alternatively, it may be of psychogenic origin. Clinicians can distinguish between psychological and organic impotence by observing nocturnal penile tumescence. Non-radionuclide investigations for organic impotence include penile plethysmography or pulse Doppler analysis for arterial supply, cavernosometry for venous drainage, and biothesiometry or evoked potentials for neurological pathology. Radionuclide studies are primarily based on the use of technetium 99m-pertechnetate, 99mTc-red blood cells, or xenon 133 to study the blood flow, with or without pharmacological intervention, commonly papaverine. 26 references.

  11. Anthropogenic lead dynamics in the terrestrial and marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuer, Matthew K.; Weiss, Dominik J.

    2002-12-01

    Human activities have greatly altered the natural geochemical cycles of several heavy metals, most notably lead derived from leaded-petrol and metal-smelting emissions. This inadvertent geochemical tracer experiment poses two challenges: understanding how anthropogenic lead affects human health and the environment, and quantifying its time-dependent distribution within terrestrial and marine systems. Accurate assessment of the latter relies on well-constrained historical and modern lead fluxes from proxy records and direct observations, lead source estimates from stable lead isotopes, and transport rate estimates from radionuclides. Numerous studies support the global-scale atmospheric lead fluxes principally derived from anthropogenic activities, the short lead residence time in the atmosphere and surface ocean, and the predominance of North American and European lead emissions. Emerging observations and models are currently addressing the time-dependent evolution of this reactive tracer in the atmosphere and oceans.

  12. Natural radioactivity levels and associated health hazards from the terrestrial ecosystem in Rosetta branch of the River Nile, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, W M; Diab, H M; El-Kameesy, S U; Salama, E; El-Framawy, S

    2017-08-01

    Twenty soil and 25 sediment samples were collected from the banks and bottom of the River Nile in the surroundings of biggest cities located close to it. Natural radioactivity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K have been evaluated for all samples by means of γ spectrometric analysis. The radioactivity levels of soil and sediment samples fall within the internationally recommended values. Nevertheless, high natural background radiation zones are detected in the Kafr El-Zayat region due to the presence of a fertilizer factory, and in the Rosetta region due to the presence of black sand deposits. The absorbed dose rate, the γ index and excess life time cancer risk are calculated. High values for some of the radiation health parameters are detected in the Kafr El-Zayat and Rosetta regions representing a serious problem to public health because the soil and sediment are used as constructing material for buildings. Furthermore, the isotope analysis of uranium for representative collected sediment samples via α spectrometry showed average specific activities of 18.7 ± 3.6, 0.087 ± 0.0038 and 18.6 ± 3.8 Bq kg(-1) for (234)U, (235)U and (238)U, respectively. In general, these values confirm the balance in the isotopic abundance of U isotopes.

  13. Evolution of a natural debris flow: In situ measurements of flow dynamics, video imagery, and terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, S.W.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.; Staley, D.M.; Wasklewicz, T.A.; Tucker, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    Many theoretical and laboratory studies have been undertaken to understand debris-flow processes and their associated hazards. However, complete and quantitative data sets from natural debris flows needed for confirmation of these results are limited. We used a novel combination of in situ measurements of debris-flow dynamics, video imagery, and pre- and postflow 2-cm-resolution digital terrain models to study a natural debris-flow event. Our field data constrain the initial and final reach morphology and key flow dynamics. The observed event consisted of multiple surges, each with clear variation of flow properties along the length of the surge. Steep, highly resistant, surge fronts of coarse-grained material without measurable pore-fluid pressure were pushed along by relatively fine-grained and water-rich tails that had a wide range of pore-fluid pressures (some two times greater than hydrostatic). Surges with larger nonequilibrium pore-fluid pressures had longer travel distances. A wide range of travel distances from different surges of similar size indicates that dynamic flow properties are of equal or greater importance than channel properties in determining where a particular surge will stop. Progressive vertical accretion of multiple surges generated the total thickness of mapped debris-flow deposits; nevertheless, deposits had massive, vertically unstratified sedimentological textures. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  14. Terrestrial and extraterrestrial fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heymann, D.; Jenneskens, L.W.; Jehlicka, J; Koper, C.; Vlietstra, E. [Rice Univ, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Science

    2003-07-01

    This paper reviews reports of occurrences of fullerenes in circumstellar media, interstellar media, meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), lunar rocks, hard terrestrial rocks from Shunga (Russia), Sudbury (Canada) and Mitov (Czech Republic), coal, terrestrial sediments from the Cretaceous-Tertiary-Boundary and Pennian-Triassic-Boundary, fulgurite, ink sticks, dinosaur eggs, and a tree char. The occurrences are discussed in the context of known and postulated processes of fullerene formation, including the suggestion that some natural fullerenes might have formed from biological (algal) remains.

  15. The diversity of terrestrial isopods in the natural reserve “Saline di Trapani e Paceco” (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea in northwestern Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Messina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystems comprising coastal lakes and ponds are important areas for preserving biodiversity. The natural reserve “Saline di Trapani e Paceco” is an interesting natural area in Sicily, formed by the remaining strips of land among salt pans near the coastline. From January 2008 to January 2010, pitfall trapping was conducted in five sampling sites inside the study area. The community of terrestrial isopods was assessed using the main diversity indices. Twenty-four species were collected, only one of them endemic to western Sicily: Porcellio siculoccidentalis Viglianisi, Lombardo & Caruso, 1992. Two species are new to Sicily: Armadilloniscus candidus Budde-Lund, 1885 and Armadilloniscus ellipticus (Harger, 1878. This is high species richness for a single reserve in Sicily. The extended sampling period also allowed us to study species phenology. Most of the species exhibited higher activity in spring than in autumn while some species also exhibited lower activity in the summer. The species richness revealed that the study area is in an acceptable conservation status; Shannon and Pielou indices also confirmed a more or less even distribution of individuals belonging to different species.

  16. Sedimentation of mixed cultures using natural coagulants for the treatment of effluents generated in terrestrial fuel distribution terminals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, R.B., E-mail: rafaelbrunovieira@yahoo.com.br [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica - Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Campus Santa Monica, 2121 - CEP: 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Vieira, P.A., E-mail: patriciavieira@feq.ufu.br [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica - Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Campus Santa Monica, 2121 - CEP: 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Cardoso, S.L., E-mail: saulo_shaulin_@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica - Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Campus Santa Monica, 2121 - CEP: 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Ribeiro, E.J., E-mail: ejribeiro@ufu.br [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica - Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Campus Santa Monica, 2121 - CEP: 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Cardoso, V.L., E-mail: vicelma@ufu.br [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica - Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Campus Santa Monica, 2121 - CEP: 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moringa oleifera and chitosan as natural coagulant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitosan is a superior coagulant compared with Moringa oleifera for the sedimentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitosan reduced the process cost without compromising the process performance. - Abstract: This study evaluated the use of natural coagulants (Moringa oleifera and chitosan) under different conditions with a mixed culture (C1 mixed culture). This culture was used for the biodegradation of hydrocarbons present in the effluent from fuel distribution terminals contaminated with diesel oil and gasoline. The biodegradation was evaluated by two central composite design (CCD) experiments: the first with varying concentrations of Moringa oleifera (MO), drying temperatures (TE) and seed drying times (TI); the second with varying concentrations of chitosan and the hydrochloric acid in which chitosan had been solubilized. The responses monitored in the CCD experiments included the sludge volume index (SVI), the turbidity removal (TR) and the specific rate of oxygen uptake (SOUR). Subsequently, the biodegradation was monitored in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) under the optimal conditions obtained for each CCD experiment. The results indicated that the best coagulant was chitosan solubilized in 0.25 N HCl at a concentration of 50 mg/L. Within five cycles with chitosan as a coagulant, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal increased from 77 {+-} 1.0% to 82 {+-} 0.5%, the volatile suspended solids (VSS) increased from 1.4 {+-} 0.3 to 2.25 {+-} 0.3 g/L and the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal increased from 75 {+-} 1.0% to 81 {+-} 0.5%.

  17. (Radiological assessments of radionuclide releases)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, F.O.

    1990-12-28

    As a consequence of the Chernobyl accident, data have been obtained throughout the Northern Hemisphere on the concentrations of radionuclides in air, vegetation, soil, water, and foodstuffs that could be important means of human exposure. At the IAEA's invitation, the traveler reviewed recently published data and handbook summaries. The traveler evaluated the need for revising the default values recommended in Chapter 5, Terrestrial and Aquatic Food Chain Transport,'' of IAEA Safety Series No. 57. All attempts at revision were made to keep the mathematical complexity of the models to a minimum without substantial underestimation of dose to critical population subgroups. The traveler also served as chairman of the Multiple Pathways Working Group of the Coordinated Research Program on VAMP. This group has been established to test predictions of models assessing multiple exposure pathways potentially leading to human exposure to {sup 137}Cs. Testing is carried out for major components of assessment models that predict deposition, environmental transport, food chain bioaccumulation, and subsequent uptake and retention in the human body and dose due to exposure to external gamma radiation.

  18. Natural radionuclides in urine and feces samples and their importance for incorporation monitoring; Natuerliche Radionuklide in Urin- und Stuhlproben und deren Bedeutung in der Inkorporationsueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froning, Martina; Burow, Mechthild; Droop, Philipp; Laumen-Sentis, Sandra; Zoriy, Myroslav [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2017-08-01

    Incorporation monitoring is performed for personnel dealing with open radioactive materials if incorporation cannot be excluded. Besides occupational exposure everybody is exposed to natural radioactivity. For the interpretation of occupational incorporation or in case of a radiation accident it is necessary to know the diet related share of natural radioactivity.

  19. Sedimentation of mixed cultures using natural coagulants for the treatment of effluents generated in terrestrial fuel distribution terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R B; Vieira, P A; Cardoso, S L; Ribeiro, E J; Cardoso, V L

    2012-09-15

    This study evaluated the use of natural coagulants (Moringa oleifera and chitosan) under different conditions with a mixed culture (C1 mixed culture). This culture was used for the biodegradation of hydrocarbons present in the effluent from fuel distribution terminals contaminated with diesel oil and gasoline. The biodegradation was evaluated by two central composite design (CCD) experiments: the first with varying concentrations of Moringa oleifera (MO), drying temperatures (TE) and seed drying times (TI); the second with varying concentrations of chitosan and the hydrochloric acid in which chitosan had been solubilized. The responses monitored in the CCD experiments included the sludge volume index (SVI), the turbidity removal (TR) and the specific rate of oxygen uptake (SOUR). Subsequently, the biodegradation was monitored in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) under the optimal conditions obtained for each CCD experiment. The results indicated that the best coagulant was chitosan solubilized in 0.25 N HCl at a concentration of 50mg/L. Within five cycles with chitosan as a coagulant, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal increased from 77±1.0% to 82±0.5%, the volatile suspended solids (VSS) increased from 1.4±0.3 to 2.25±0.3 g/L and the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal increased from 75±1.0% to 81±0.5%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A conservation assessment of the terrestrial invertebrate fauna of Mkambati Nature Reserve in the Pondoland Centre of Endemism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. Hamer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mkambati Nature Reserve (NR falls within the Pondoland Centre of Endemism, which is part of the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany global biodiversity hotspot. The biodiversity status of this area is based largely on its flora, and the invertebrates are poorly known. The area is under threat from various proposed developments. We surveyed 14 orders in three invertebrate phyla at 26 sites with two main objectives: (1 to assess the fauna in terms of conservation value, and, (2 to identify habitats and sites of conservation concern. From the survey, 3231 samples were sent for identification and 425 species were identified. A minimum of 18 new species were confirmed. Mkambati NR shows exceptional diversity for molluscs (Gastropoda, 51 species, bees (Apoidea, 48 species and true bugs (Heteroptera, 65 species. At least 43 species collected from the Reserve are South African endemics, 31 have a restricted distribution within South Africa and 18 are only known from the Reserve itself.Conservation implications: The authors provide the first assessment of the invertebrate fauna of the Mkambati NR, which indicates that it is a rich and important fauna. The results highlight the need to consider invertebrates in other biodiversity assessments in the Pondoland region. In terms of habitats, for both forest and grassland there was a large difference in the invertebrate communities at different sites, even over relatively short distances in grassland; shared habitat attributes clustered sites with more similar communities, for example, rocky ledges or the sea shore. All forest patches are a priority for protection.

  1. Distribution of radionuclides in Dardanelle Reservoir sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgy, J R; Epperson, C E; Swindle, D L

    1984-02-01

    Natural and reactor-discharged gamma-ray emitting radionuclides were measured in Dardanelle Reservoir surface sediments taken near the Arkansas Nuclear One Power Plant site. Samples represented several water depths and particle sizes, at 33 locations, in a field survey conducted in early September 1980. Radionuclide contents of dry sediments ranged as follows: natural radioactivity (40K as well as uranium and thorium decay products) 661-1210 Bq/kg; and reactor discharged radioactivity (137Cs, 134Cs, 60Co,, 58Co, 54Mn), no detectable activity to 237 Bq/kg. In general, radionuclide contents were positively correlated with decreasing sediment particle size. The average external whole-body and skin doses from all measurable reactor-discharged radionuclides were calculated according to the mathematical formula for determining external dose from sediment given by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Inside the discharge embayment near the reactor discharge canal, the doses were 1.7 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the whole body and 2.0 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the skin. Outside this area, the doses were 0.15 X 10(-3) and 0.18 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the whole body and skin, respectively.

  2. Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. M.; Boutrup, S.; Bijl, L. van der

    This report presents the 2004 results of the Danish National Monitoring and Assess-ment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments (NOVANA). 2004 was the first year in which terrestrial nature was included in the monitoring pro-gramme. The report reviews the state of the groundwater......, watercourses, lakes and marine waters and the pressures upon them and reviews the monitoring of terrestrial natural habitats and selected plants and animals. The report is based on the annual reports prepared for each subprogramme by the Topic Centres. The latter reports are mainly based on data collected...

  3. Excitation functions of proton-induced reactions on natural Nd in the 10-30 MeV energy range, and production of radionuclides relevant for double-β decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeda, O.; Lozza, V.; Schrock, P.; Štursa, J.; Zuber, K.

    2012-01-01

    A preferred candidate for neutrinoless double-β decay, 150Nd, is present in natural neodymium at an abundance level of 5.64%. However, neodymium could be activated by cosmic rays during the period it spends on the Earth's surface. Its activation by protons is therefore of interest when it comes to estimating the possible disturbance effects and increased background during neutrinoless double-β-decay experiments like Sudbury Neutrino Observatory plus liquid scintillator (SNO+). In most cases, we lack experimental data on proton-induced reactions on neodymium. Therefore, a measurement of cross sections has been performed for the formation of 141Pm, 143Pm, 144Pm, 146Pm, 148Pm, 148Pmm, 149Pm, 150Pm, 140Nd, 141Nd, 147Nd, 149Nd, 138Prm, 139Pr, 142Pr, and 139Ce by 10-30 MeV protons. Oxidation-protected metal foil targets of natural isotopic abundance were irradiated by the usual stacked-foil technique on the external proton beam of the isochronous cyclotron U-120M at the Nuclear Physics Institute at Řež near Prague. Special attention was paid to the excitation functions of long-lived radionuclides. The measured data were compared with TENDL-2010 library data (talys code).

  4. Organization and operation of the Sixth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment (NRE VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-10-01

    An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogenic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in the dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits and harm the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied to the situation.

  5. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  6. Concerning initial and secondary character of radionuclide distribution in elementary landscape geochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Specificity of radionuclide distribution in elementary landscape geochemical systems (ELGS) treated as local system of geochemically linked elementary terrestrial units (in toposequence: watershed-slope-closing depression), belongs to one of the less investigated but practically significant problems of current geochemistry. First measurements after the Chernobyl accident showed a considerable variation of Cs-137 distribution in all examined ELGS (Shcheglov et al, 2001; Romanov, 1989; Korobova, Korovaykov, 1990; Linnik, 2008). The results may be interpreted in frames of two alternative hypotheses: 1) irregularity of the initial contamination; 2) secondary redistribution of the initially regular level of fallout. But herewith only a disproof of the first hypothesis automatically justifies the second one. Factors responsible for initial irregularity of surface contamination included: 1) the presence of the so-called "hot" particles in the initial fallout; 2) interception of radionuclides by forest canopy; 3) irregular aerial particles deposition; 4) uneven initial precipitation. Basing on monitoring Cs-137 spatial distribution that has been performed since 2005, we demonstrate that the observed spatial irregularity in distribution of Cs-137 in ELGS reflects a purely secondary distribution of initial reserves of radionuclides in fallout matter due to its migration with water in local geochemical systems. This statement has some significant consequences. 1. Mechanism of migration of matter in ELGS is complicated and could not be reduced solely to a primitive moving from watershed to closing depression. 2. The control of migration of "labeled atoms" (Cs-137) permits to understand common mechanism of migration of water in all systems on the level of ELGS. 3. Understanding formation of the structure of contamination zones in ELGS permits to use mathematical model to solve the inverse problem of restoration of the initially equable level of their contamination. Performed

  7. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.; Tabak, Henry H.

    2007-03-15

    Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had manyfield tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recentyears. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metalsand radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies canbe generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation,bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization,treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applicationsthere are a number of critical biogeochemical issues that most beaddressed for the successful field application. Monitoring andcharacterization parameters that are enabling to bioremediation of metalsand radionuclides are presented here. For each of the strategies a casestudy is presented to demonstrate a field application that uses thisstrategy.

  8. Terrestrial planet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids.

  9. Assessment of the radiological hazards due to naturally occurring radionuclides in soil samples collected from the north western areas of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S; Matiullah; Mujahid, S A; Hussain, S

    2008-01-01

    (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were measured in soil samples, these were collected from different localities of the North West Frontier Province and Federally Administered Tribal Areas, Pakistan. In order to measure the specific activities in these samples P-type coaxial high purity germanium based gamma-ray spectrometer was used. Average values of the measured activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were 26 +/- 11, 39 +/- 17 and 485 +/- 177 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Average radium equivalent activity was found to be 122 +/- 42 Bq kg(-1). External and internal hazard indices were also calculated and found to be 0.33 +/- 0.12 and 0.40 +/- 0.14, respectively. Average effective dose received due to gamma rays was 0.34 +/- 0.12 mSv y(-1). Measured natural radioactivity, hazard indices and effective doses received by the population were found within the recommended limits. The aim of this work was to make a baseline data of natural radioactive elements for the soil of the area and to assess it radiological significance if used as a building material for the construction of houses.

  10. Mass spectrometry of long-lived radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine

    2003-10-01

    The capability of determining element concentrations at the trace and ultratrace level and isotope ratios is a main feature of inorganic mass spectrometry. The precise and accurate determination of isotope ratios of long-lived natural and artificial radionuclides is required, e.g. for their environmental monitoring and health control, for studying radionuclide migration, for age dating, for determining isotope ratios of radiogenic elements in the nuclear industry, for quality assurance and determination of the burn-up of fuel material in a nuclear power plant, for reprocessing plants, nuclear material accounting and radioactive waste control. Inorganic mass spectrometry, especially inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as the most important inorganic mass spectrometric technique today, possesses excellent sensitivity, precision and good accuracy for isotope ratio measurements and practically no restriction with respect to the ionization potential of the element investigated—therefore, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), which has been used as the dominant analytical technique for precise isotope ratio measurements of long-lived radionuclides for many decades, is being replaced increasingly by ICP-MS. In the last few years instrumental progress in improving figures of merit for the determination of isotope ratio measurements of long-lived radionuclides in ICP-MS has been achieved by the application of a multiple ion collector device (MC-ICP-MS) and the introduction of the collision cell interface in order to dissociate disturbing argon-based molecular ions, to reduce the kinetic energy of ions and neutralize the disturbing noble gas ions (e.g. of 129Xe + for the determination of 129I). The review describes the state of the art and the progress of different inorganic mass spectrometric techniques such as ICP-MS, laser ablation ICP-MS vs. TIMS, glow discharge mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass

  11. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  12. Assessment of radiological hazards due to the presence of natural radionuclides in samples of building materials collected from the northwestern areas of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S; Matiullah; Mujahid, S A; Hussain, S

    2008-06-01

    Brick, sand, marble and cement are mainly used for the construction of dwellings in Pakistan. Therefore, knowledge of the presence of natural radioactivity in these materials is of great importance in order to assess the radiological hazards associated with them. In this context, specific activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were measured in brick, sand, marble and cement samples collected from different localities of the North West Frontier province and federally administered tribal areas, Pakistan, using a P-type coaxial high-purity germanium spectrometer. In brick samples, the average measured activities for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were 30 +/- 15, 41 +/- 21 and 523 +/- 182 Bq kg(-1), whereas in sand samples, these values were 19 +/- 9, 30 +/- 15 and 769 +/- 461 Bq kg(-1), respectively. In marble samples, the average specific activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were found to be 18 +/- 19, 18 +/- 21 and 299 +/- 328 Bq kg(-1), whilst in cement samples they were 24 +/- 6, 18 +/- 4 and 244 +/- 29 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Radium equivalent activities were also calculated and were found to be 129 +/- 54, 121 +/- 57, 67 +/- 60 and 68 +/- 9 Bq kg(-1) for brick, sand, marble and cement samples, respectively. The annual average effective doses from these samples were 0.37 +/- 0.15, 0.33 +/- 0.15, 0.20 +/- 0.17 and 0.20 +/- 0.03 mSv, respectively. External and internal hazard indices were less than one for all the samples studied.

  13. Application of the 15N-Gas Flux method for measuring in situ N2 and N2O fluxes due to denitrification in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems and comparison with the acetylene inhibition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouridis, F.; Ullah, S.; Stott, A.

    2015-08-01

    Soil denitrification is considered the most un-constrained process in the global N cycle due to uncertain in situ N2 flux measurements, particularly in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems. 15N tracer approaches can provide in situ measurements of both N2 and N2O simultaneously, but their use has been limited to fertilised agro-ecosystems due to the need for large 15N additions in order to detect 15N2 production against the high atmospheric N2. For 15N-N2 analyses, we have used an "in house" laboratory designed and manufactured N2 preparation instrument which can be interfaced to any commercial continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The N2 prep unit has gas purification steps, a copper based reduction furnace, and allows the analysis of small gas injection volumes (4 μL) for 15N-N2 analysis. For the analysis of N2O, an automated Tracegas Pre-concentrator (Isoprime Ltd) coupled to an IRMS was used to measure the 15N-N2O (4 mL gas injection volume). Consequently, the coefficient of variation for the determination of isotope ratios for N2 in air and in standard N2O (0.5 ppm) was better than 0.5 %. The 15N Gas-Flux method was adapted for application in natural and semi-natural land use types (peatlands, forests and grasslands) by lowering the 15N tracer application rate to 0.04-0.5 kg 15N ha-1. For our chamber design (volume / surface = 8:1) and a 20 h incubation period, the minimum detectable flux rates were 4 μg N m-2 h-1 and 0.2 ng N m-2 h-1 for the N2 and N2O fluxes respectively. The N2 flux ranged between 2.4 and 416.6 μg N m-2 h-1, and the grassland soils showed on average 3 and 14 times higher denitrification rates than the woodland and organic soils respectively. The N2O flux was on average 20 to 200 times lower than the N2 flux, while the denitrification product ratio (N2O/N2 + N2O) was low, ranging between 0.03 and 13 %. Total denitrification rates measured by the acetylene inhibition technique under the same field conditions

  14. Application of the 15N gas-flux method for measuring in situ N2 and N2O fluxes due to denitrification in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems and comparison with the acetylene inhibition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouridis, Fotis; Stott, Andrew; Ullah, Sami

    2016-03-01

    Soil denitrification is considered the most un-constrained process in the global N cycle due to uncertain in situ N2 flux measurements, particularly in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems. 15N tracer approaches can provide in situ measurements of both N2 and N2O simultaneously, but their use has been limited to fertilized agro-ecosystems due to the need for large 15N additions in order to detect 15N2 production against the high atmospheric N2. For 15N-N2 analyses, we have used an "in-house" laboratory designed and manufactured N2 preparation instrument which can be interfaced to any commercial continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The N2 prep unit has gas purification steps and a copper-based reduction furnace, and allows the analysis of small gas injection volumes (4 µL) for 15N-N2 analysis. For the analysis of N2O, an automated Tracegas Preconcentrator (Isoprime Ltd) coupled to an IRMS was used to measure the 15N-N2O (4 mL gas injection volume). Consequently, the coefficient of variation for the determination of isotope ratios for N2 in air and in standard N2O (0.5 ppm) was better than 0.5 %. The 15N gas-flux method was adapted for application in natural and semi-natural land use types (peatlands, forests, and grasslands) by lowering the 15N tracer application rate to 0.04-0.5 kg 15N ha-1. The minimum detectable flux rates were 4 µg N m-2 h-1 and 0.2 ng N m-2 h-1 for the N2 and N2O fluxes respectively. Total denitrification rates measured by the acetylene inhibition technique in the same land use types correlated (r = 0.58) with the denitrification rates measured under the 15N gas-flux method, but were underestimated by a factor of 4, and this was partially attributed to the incomplete inhibition of N2O reduction to N2, under a relatively high soil moisture content, and/or the catalytic NO decomposition in the presence of acetylene. Even though relatively robust for in situ denitrification measurements, methodological

  15. Radionuclide - Soil Organic Matter Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between soil organic matter, i.e. humic and fulvic acids, and radionuclides of primary interest to shallow land burial of low activity solid waste have been reviewed and to some extent studied experimentally. The radionuclides considered in the present study comprise cesium, strontium...

  16. Transfer coefficients for terrestrial foodchain: their derivation and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y.C.; Colsher, C.S.; Thompson, S.E.

    1979-03-30

    Transfer coefficients to predict the passage of isotopes from the environment to terrestrial foods have been derived for various radionuclides of importance in the nuclear fuel cycle. These data update and extend previously recommended handbook values. We derive transfer coefficients to terrestrial foods and describe the systematics of the derived transfer coefficients. Suggestions are offered for changes in the values of transfer coefficients to terrestrial foods that now appear in federal regulatory guides. Deficiencies in our present knowledge concerning transfer coefficients and limitations in the use of these values to ensure compliance with radiation protection standards are discussed.

  17. Geochemistry of natural radionuclide in soils surrounding a mining and plant uranium concentration;Geoquimica de radionuclindeos naturais em solos de areas circunvizinhas a uma unidade de mineracao e atividade de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Gildevan Viana, E-mail: gildevan.cardoso@vta.incra.gov.b [Instituto Nacional de Colonizacao e Reforma Agraria (INCRA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Amaral Sobrinho, Nelson Moura Brasil do; Mazur, Nelson, E-mail: nelmoura@ufrrj.b, E-mail: nelmazur@ufrrj.b [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Agronomia. Dept. de Solos; Wasserman, Maria Angelica Vergara, E-mail: angelica@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-11-15

    The environmental impacts resulting from uranium exploration and processing are to a great extent identical to those caused by extractive mining activities in general. This study aimed to determine the geochemical partitioning of the natural radionuclides {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb in areas surrounding the Uranium Mining and Concentration Plant (URA) of the Brazilian Nuclear Industries S.A., in the uranium deposit region of Lagoa Real, in Caetite, southwestern Bahia state. Representative soil samples of the main regional soil classes were collected from the layer 0-20 cm, in five areas around the URA. The level of total activity and geochemical fractionation (F1 slightly acidic, F2 reducible, F3 oxidisable, F4 alkaline, and F5 residual) were determined for the five areas. The average total radioactivity levels were, in Bq kg{sup -1} soil: 50 for {sup 238}U, 51 for {sup 226}Ra, and 159 for {sup 210}Pb. During the potentially bioavailable phase (F1) 11 % were extracted for {sup 238}U, 13 % for {sup 226}Ra and 3 % for {sup 210}Pb. The bioavailability of {sup 238}U was higher in more acidic soils and the affinity for iron oxides was greater, unlike in the case of {sup 226}Ra, with the greatest bioavailability. {sup 210}Pb was predominantly associated with F5. The high percentage of {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb in the geochemical fraction F5 indicates that the concentrations observed in the five soils are predominantly associated to the parent material of these soils, rather than to an artificial contamination caused by the URA activity. (author)

  18. Estimated dose to man from uranium milling via the terrestrial food-chain pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayno, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    One of the major pathways of radiological exposure to man from uranium milling operations is through the terrestrial food chain. Studies by various investigators have shown the extent of uptake and distribution of U-238, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-210, and Po-210 in plants and animals. These long-lived natural radioisotopes, all nuclides of the uranium decay series, are found in concentrated amounts in uranium mill tailings. Data from these investigations are used to estimate the dose to man from consumption of beef and milk contaminated by the tailings. This dose estimate from this technologically enhanced source is compared with that from average normal dietary intake of these radionuclides from natural sources.

  19. The intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon: Their nature, origin and role in terrestrial planet evolution. Thermal models of Mercury. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Recent and more complex thermal models of Mercury and the terrestrial planets are discussed or noted. These models isolate a particular aspect of the planet's thermal history in an attempt to understand that parameter. Among these topics are thermal conductivity, convection, radiogenic sources of heat, other heat sources, and the problem of the molten core and regenerative dynamo.

  20. Radioactivity, radionuclides, radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Magill, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    RADIOACTIVITY – RADIONUCLIDES – RADIATION is suitable for a general audience interested in topical environmental and human health radiological issues such as radiation exposure in aircraft, food sterilisation, nuclear medicine, radon gas, radiation dispersion devices ("dirty bombs")… It leads the interested reader through the three Rs of nuclear science, to the forefront of research and developments in the field. The book is also suitable for students and professionals in the related disciplines of nuclear and radiochemistry, health physics, environmental sciences, nuclear and astrophysics. Recent developments in the areas of exotic decay modes (bound beta decay of ‘bare’ or fully ionized nuclei), laser transmutation, nuclear forensics, radiation hormesis and the LNT hypothesis are covered. Atomic mass data for over 3000 nuclides from the most recent (2003) evaluation are included.

  1. Production of cyclotron radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Yong Sup; Lim, Sang Moo; Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, Kwon Soo; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Yun, Yong Kee; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sup; Lee, Jong Doo; Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Yoo Seok; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Beak, Seung Ki [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    In the project, 11,492mCi of {sup 201}Tl, 4,384mCi of {sup 67}Ga, 1,245mCi of {sup 123}l, 523mCi of [{sup 123}I]mlBG and 1,283mCi of {sup 18}FDG were supplied, and the revenue were 304,723,000won. In the production of RI, 13 deg for {sup 201}Tl and {sup 67}Ga, 45 deg for {sup 123}l angle solid target have been used, and liquid target system has been used for {sup 18}F production. For the efficient use of the cyclotron, the MC-50 cyclotron was opened to outside user and basic research project was carried out. The technical supports and radionuclides analysis were done during the execution of the research. Then the facilities of safety supervision and handling techniques of radioisotope production were improved. 7 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  2. Production of cyclotron radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwon Soo; Lim, Sang Moo; Yang, Seung Dae; Suh, Yong Sup; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Yun, Yong Kee; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sup; Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Yoo Seok; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Beak, Seung Ki; Kim, Jang Hye; Kim, Gi Sup [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    In the project, 12,077mCi of {sup 201}Tl, 5,717mCi of {sup 67}Ga, 2,096mCi of {sup 123}l, 482mCi of [{sup 123}I]mlBG and 2,738mCi of {sup 18}FDG were supplied, and the revenue were 387,253,000won. In the production of RI, 13 deg for {sup 201}Tl and {sup 67}Ga, 45 deg for {sup 123}l angle solid target have been used, and liquid target system has been used for {sup 18}F production. For the efficient use of the cyclotron, the MC-50 cyclotron was opened to outside user and basic research project was carried out. The technical supports and radionuclides analysis were done during the execution of the research. Then the facilities of safety supervision and handling techniques of radioisotope production were improved. 7 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  3. Production rates of terrestrial in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tuniz, C.; Fink, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides made in situ in terrestrial samples and how they are applied to the interpretation of measured radionuclide concentrations were discussed at a one-day Workshop held 2 October 1993 in Sydney, Australia. The status of terrestrial in-situ studies using the long-lived radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, and {sup 41}Ca and of various modeling and related studies were presented. The relative uncertainties in the various factors that go into the interpretation of these terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic nuclides were discussed. The magnitudes of the errors for these factors were estimated and none dominated the final uncertainty.

  4. Comparing the influence of wildfire and prescribed burns on watershed nitrogen biogeochemistry using 15N natural abundance in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Kirsten; Kavanagh, Kathleen L; Koyama, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated differences in the effects of three low-severity spring prescribed burns and four wildfires on nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry in Rocky Mountain headwater watersheds. We compared paired (burned/unburned) watersheds of four wildfires and three spring prescribed burns for three growing seasons post-fire. To better understand fire effects on the entire watershed ecosystem, we measured N concentrations and δ15N in both the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems components, i.e., soil, understory plants in upland and riparian areas, streamwater, and in-stream moss. In addition, we measured nitrate reductase activity in foliage of Spiraea betulifolia, a dominant understory species. We found increases of δ15N and N concentrations in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem N pools after wildfire, but responses were limited to terrestrial N pools after prescribed burns indicating that N transfer from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystem components did not occur in low-severity prescribed burns. Foliar δ15N differed between wildfire and prescribed burn sites; the δ15N of foliage of upland plants was enriched by 2.9 ‰ (difference between burned and unburned watersheds) in the first two years after wildfire, but only 1.3 ‰ after prescribed burns. In-stream moss δ15N in wildfire-burned watersheds was enriched by 1.3 ‰, but there was no response by moss in prescription-burned watersheds, mirroring patterns of streamwater nitrate concentrations. S. betulifolia showed significantly higher nitrate reductase activity two years after wildfires relative to corresponding unburned watersheds, but no such difference was found after prescribed burns. These responses are consistent with less altered N biogeochemistry after prescribed burns relative to wildfire. We concluded that δ15N values in terrestrial and aquatic plants and streamwater nitrate concentrations after fire can be useful indicators of the magnitude and duration of fire effects and the fate of post

  5. Comparing the influence of wildfire and prescribed burns on watershed nitrogen biogeochemistry using 15N natural abundance in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Stephan

    Full Text Available We evaluated differences in the effects of three low-severity spring prescribed burns and four wildfires on nitrogen (N biogeochemistry in Rocky Mountain headwater watersheds. We compared paired (burned/unburned watersheds of four wildfires and three spring prescribed burns for three growing seasons post-fire. To better understand fire effects on the entire watershed ecosystem, we measured N concentrations and δ15N in both the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems components, i.e., soil, understory plants in upland and riparian areas, streamwater, and in-stream moss. In addition, we measured nitrate reductase activity in foliage of Spiraea betulifolia, a dominant understory species. We found increases of δ15N and N concentrations in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem N pools after wildfire, but responses were limited to terrestrial N pools after prescribed burns indicating that N transfer from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystem components did not occur in low-severity prescribed burns. Foliar δ15N differed between wildfire and prescribed burn sites; the δ15N of foliage of upland plants was enriched by 2.9 ‰ (difference between burned and unburned watersheds in the first two years after wildfire, but only 1.3 ‰ after prescribed burns. In-stream moss δ15N in wildfire-burned watersheds was enriched by 1.3 ‰, but there was no response by moss in prescription-burned watersheds, mirroring patterns of streamwater nitrate concentrations. S. betulifolia showed significantly higher nitrate reductase activity two years after wildfires relative to corresponding unburned watersheds, but no such difference was found after prescribed burns. These responses are consistent with less altered N biogeochemistry after prescribed burns relative to wildfire. We concluded that δ15N values in terrestrial and aquatic plants and streamwater nitrate concentrations after fire can be useful indicators of the magnitude and duration of fire effects and the fate of

  6. Exposure to radionuclides in smoke from vegetation fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fernando P., E-mail: carvalho@itn.pt; Oliveira, João M.; Malta, Margarida

    2014-02-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides of uranium, thorium, radium, lead and polonium were determined in bushes and trees and in the smoke from summer forest fires. Activity concentrations of radionuclides in smoke particles were much enriched when compared to original vegetation. Polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po) in smoke was measured in concentrations much higher than all other radionuclides, reaching 7255 ± 285 Bq kg{sup −1}, mostly associated with the smaller size smoke particles (< 1.0 μm). Depending on smoke particle concentration, {sup 210}Po in surface air near forest fires displayed volume concentrations up to 70 mBq m{sup −3}, while in smoke-free air {sup 210}Po concentration was about 30 μBq m{sup −3}. The estimated absorbed radiation dose to an adult member of the public or a firefighter exposed for 24 h to inhalation of smoke near forest fires could exceed 5 μSv per day, i.e, more than 2000 times above the radiation dose from background radioactivity in surface air, and also higher than the radiation dose from {sup 210}Po inhalation in a chronic cigarette smoker. It is concluded that prolonged exposure to smoke allows for enhanced inhalation of radionuclides associated with smoke particles. Due to high radiotoxicity of alpha emitting radionuclides, and in particular of {sup 210}Po, the protection of respiratory tract of fire fighters is strongly recommended. - Highlights: • Natural radionuclides in vegetation are in low concentrations. • Forest fires release natural radionuclides from vegetation and concentrate them in inhalable ash particles. • Prolonged inhalation of smoke from forest fires gives rise enhanced radiation exposure of lungs especially due to polonium. • Respiratory protection of fire fighters and members of public is highly recommended for radioprotection reasons.

  7. Radionuclides in Bayer process residues: previous analysis for radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccia, Valeria; Rocha, Zildete, E-mail: vc@cdtn.b, E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Arno H. de, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Natural occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Human activities may enhance concentrations of radionuclides and/or enhance potential of exposure to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The industrial residues containing radionuclides have been receiving a considerable global attention, because of the large amounts of NORM containing wastes and the potential long term risks of long-lived radionuclides. Included in this global concern, this work focuses on the characterization of radioactivity in the main residues of Bayer process for alumina production: red mud and sand samples. Usually, the residues of Bayer process are named red mud, in their totality. However, in the industry where the samples were collected, there is an additional residues separation: sand and red mud. The analytical techniques used were gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector) and neutron activation analysis. The concentrations of radionuclides are higher in the red mud than in the sand. These solid residues present activities concentrations enhanced, when compared to bauxite. Further uses for the residues as building material must be more evaluated from the radiological point of view, due to its potential of radiological exposure enhancement, specially caused by radon emission. (author)

  8. Radionuclide transfer from feed to camel milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masri, M S; Al-Hamwi, A; Amin, Y; Safieh, M B; Zarkawi, M; Soukouti, A; Dayyoub, R; Voigt, G; Fesenko, S

    2014-06-01

    The transfer of (137)Cs, (85)Sr, (131)I, (210)Po, (210)Pb and (238)U from feed to camel's milk was investigated in a pilot experiment with three lactating camels. For a period of 60 days, the animals were fed on spiked feed containing the studied radionuclides. They were subsequently returned to a contamination-free diet and monitored for another 90 days. The activity concentrations of (137)Cs, (85)Sr and (131)I in milk decreased with time and reached background levels after 20 days. Equilibrium transfer coefficients and biological half-lives were estimated and transfer coefficients were calculated as (8.1 ± 3.6) × 10(-4), (4.4 ± 1.6) × 10(-2), (7.8 ± 3.9) × 10(-4), (2.7 ± 3.5) × 10(-4), (1.8 ± 1.5) × 10(-4) and (7.0 ± 3.6) × 10(-3) d L(-1) for (85)Sr, (131)I, (137)Cs, (210)Po, (210)Pb and (238)U, respectively. The biological half-lives were estimated to be 6.4, 4.2, 8.9, and 53.3 days for (85)Sr, (131)I, (137)Cs, and (238)U, respectively. Estimates of the half-lives were based on a one component model: it was found that the half-life values measured for artificial radionuclides were slightly shorter than those for natural radionuclides. The data obtained in the study are the first published experimental data on radionuclide transfer to camel milk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The behavior of radionuclides in the soils of Rocky Flats, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litaor, M.I. [Tel-Hai Rodman Coll., Upper Galilee (Israel); Barth, G.; Zika, E.M.; Litus, G.; Moffitt, J.; Daniels, H. [Colorado Univ., Civil and Environmental Engineering Dept., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Radionuclide contamination of soils in Rocky Flats, Colorado, resulted from leaking drums of Pu-contaminated oil stored at an outdoor area. To evaluated the mechanisms of radionuclide transport from the contaminated soils to groundwater, an advanced monitoring system was installed across a toposequence. The impact of natural rain, snowmelt, and large-scale rain simulations on the mobility and distribution of the radionuclides in soil interstitial water was studied. The distribution of radionuclides during the monitoring period from 1993 to 1995 suggested that Pu-239 + 240 and Am-241 are largely immobile in semi-arid soils. Fractionation of Pu-239 + 240 and Am-241 to different particle sizes in the soil interstitial water suggested that most of the radionuclides (83-97%) were associated with suspended particles, whereas the level of radionuclides associated with colloidal (0.45 {mu}m > X > 1 nm) and nonfilterable (< 1 nm) fractions ranged from 1.5 to 15%. (author).

  10. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground Water Volume 3 Assessment for Radionuclides IncludingTritium, Radon, Strontium, Technetium, Uranium, Iodine, Radium, Thorium, Cesium, and Plutonium-Americium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current document represents the third volume of a set of three volumes that address the technical basis and requirements for assessing the potential applicability of MNA as part of a ground-water remedy for plumes with nonradionuclide and/or radionuclide inorganic contamina...

  11. Natural Radiation in byproducts of the production of phosphoric acid; Radiacao natural em residuos gerados no processo de producao de acido fosforico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marcilei A. Guazzelli da; Cardoso, L.L., E-mail: marcilei@fei.edu.br [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Medina, N.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Institutlo de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    Natural radiation is the largest source of radiation exposure to which man is subject. It is formed basically by cosmic radiation and the radionuclides present in the Earth crust, as {sup 40}K and the elements of the decay series of {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U. Phosphate ores, which constitutes the raw material for the production of phosphoric acid, have a high rate of natural radiation from the decay series of {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U. Phosphogypsum, which is naturally radioactivity, is a by-product of the production of phosphoric acid by the wet method. For each ton of phosphoric acid it is produced about 4.5 tons of phosphogypsum. This work presents the analysis of samples collected in all stages of the manufacturing process of phosphoric acid, which generates the phosphogypsum. Gamma-ray spectrometry was used to measure the concentration of the elements of the decay series of {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U. All analyzed samples showed a high concentration of radionuclides, promoting the need for further steps in the process in order to reduce the presence of such radionuclides in the phosphogypsum. The results indicate the radionuclide {sup 238}U has higher contribution in some samples of the intermediate stages of the process. All samples exceeded the international average range of human exposure to terrestrial gamma radiation, which is 0.3 to 1.0 mSv/year. (author)

  12. Natural radionuclides in the environment. A contribution for the localization and characterization of natural hot particles in solid samples; Natuerliche Radionuklide in der Umwelt. Ein Beitrag zur Lokalisierung und Charakterisierung natuerlicher Heisser Teilchen in festen Proben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnke, A.

    2006-07-01

    In the present thesis appearance, spreading, origin, and mineralogical properties of natural hot particles are studied and the radioecological relevance of these particles judged. For this first relevent quaestions on radioactivity in the environment and on hot particles are theoretically treated. In the following detailedly the method of the autoradiography and solid-state track detectors is considered, which make possible to quote the precise position, the number and distribution of radioactive particles on the cutting area or surface of a sample. Basing on these methodical considerations by laboratory experiments determined track pattern formations of alpha emitters are documentated and interpreted. Starting from the knowledge obtained from this in the further part of the thesis a detection technique is developed, by means of which it is possible, to determine and mark the position of natural hot particles in sold samples. Thereafter follows a description of the electron-microscopical studies for the identification of the localized natural hot particles. Using the developed detection technique, as well as the electron-microscopical methods, a broad spectrum of samples - anthropogeneous depositions (industrial residues, industry products, by-products) and natural depositions (rocks, sediments, minerals) - is studied.

  13. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water

  14. Reference material for radionuclides in sediment IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon sediment)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Povinec, P.P.; Pham, M.K.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Barci-Funel, G.; Bojanowski, R.; Boshkova, T.; Burnett, W.C.; Carvalho, F.; Chapeyron, B.; Cunha, I.L.; Dahlgaard, H.; Galabov, N.; FiField, L.K.; Gastaud, J.; Geering, J.J.; Gomez, I.F.; Green, N.; Hamilton, T.; Ibanez, F.L.; Ibn Majah, M.; John, M.; Kanisch, G.; Kenna, T.C.; Kloster, M.; Korun, M.; Liong Wee Kwong, L.; Rosa, la J.; Lee, S.H.; Levy-Palomo, I.; Malatova, M.; Maruo, Y.; Mitchell, P.; Murciano, I.V.; Nelson, R.; Nouredine, A.; Oh, J.S.; Origioni, B.; Petit, le G.; Petterson, H.B.L.; Reineking, A.; Smedley, P.A.; Suckow, A.; Struijs, van der T.D.B.; Voors, P.I.; Yoshimizu, K.; Wyse, E.

    2007-01-01

    A reference material designed for the determination of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in sediment, IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon sediment), is described and the results of certification are presented. The material has been certified for 8 radionuclides (40K, 60Co, 155Eu, 230Th, 238U, 238Pu,

  15. Radionuclide injury to the lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from ...

  16. Concentration levels of alpha emitting radionuclides in natural waters. Implications in the use of various radionuclides of reference for the determination of total alpha activity index; Niveles de concentracion de radionucleidos emisores alfa en aguas de origen natural. Implicaciones en el uso de los distintos radionucleidos de referencia para la determinacion del indice de actividad total alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbacho, J. A.; Baeza, A.; Guillen, J.; Valles, I.; Serrano, I.; Camacho, A.; Montana, M.

    2013-07-01

    The present study was carried out a statistical evaluation of the natural radioactive contents of a large number of water samples collected at different points of the Spanish geography, in order to meet its controlling radioactive composition and assessing the implications of total alpha activity index can have in this type of samples. (Author)

  17. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  18. Radionuclides in the Great Lakes basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahier, B A; Tracy, B L

    1995-12-01

    The Great Lakes basin is of radiologic interest due to the large population within its boundaries that may be exposed to various sources of ionizing radiation. Specific radionuclides of interest in the basin arising from natural and artificial sources include 3H, 14C, 90Sr, 129I, 131I, 137Cs, 222Rn, 226Ra, 235U, 238U, 239Pu, and 241Am. The greatest contribution to total radiation exposure is the natural background radiation that provides an average dose of about 2.6 mSv/year to all basin residents. Global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests conducted before 1963 has resulted in the largest input of anthropogenic radioactivity into the lakes. Of increasing importance is the radionuclide input from the various components of the nuclear fuel cycle. Although the dose from these activities is currently very low, it is expected to increase if there is continued growth of the nuclear industry. In spite of strict regulations on design and operation of nuclear power facilities, the potential exists for a serious accident as a result of the large inventories of radionuclides contained in the reactor cores; however, these risks are several orders of magnitude less than the risks from other natural and man-made hazards. An area of major priority over the next few decades will be the management of the substantial amounts of radioactive waste generated by nuclear fuel cycle activities. Based on derived risk coefficients, the theoretical incidence of fatal and weighted nonfatal cancers and hereditary defects in the basin's population, attributable to 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation, is conservatively estimated to be of the order of 3.4 x 10(5) cases. The total number of attributable health effects to the year 2050 from fallout radionuclides in the Great Lakes basin is of the order of 5.0 x 10(3). In contrast, estimates of attributable health effects from 50 years of exposure to current nuclear fuel cycle effluent in the basin are of the order of 2

  19. The intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon: Their nature, origin and role in terrestrial planet evolution: Introduction. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The relative ages of various geologic units and structures place tight constraints on the origin of the Moon and the planet Mercury, and thus provide a better understanding of the geologic histories of these bodies. Crater statistics, a reexamination of lunar geologic maps, and the compilation of a geologic map of a quarter of Mercury's surface based on plains units dated relative to crater degradation classes were used to determine relative ages. This provided the basis for deducing the origin of intercrater plains and their role in terrestrial planet evolution.

  20. Production parameters of the therapeutic Rh radionuclide using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Production cross-sections of the therapeutic 105Rh radionuclide from proton-induced reactions on natural palladium target were measured using stacked-foil activation technique com- bined with high resolution γ-ray spectrometry at the MC50 cyclotron of the Korea Institute of. Radiological and Medical Sciences.

  1. The investigation of radionuclides distributions in beach sand by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A transportable and robust gamma ray detection system (GISPI) was employed to determine the concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides on various beaches in and around Saldanha Bay, located on the West Coast of South Africa. Several mathematical techniques were applied to obtain GIS overlay that could be ...

  2. Cluster analysis of radionuclide concentrations in beach sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meijer, R.J.; James, I.; Jennings, P.J.; Keoyers, J.E.

    This paper presents a method in which natural radionuclide concentrations of beach sand minerals are traced along a stretch of coast by cluster analysis. This analysis yields two groups of mineral deposit with different origins. The method deviates from standard methods of following dispersal of

  3. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  4. Radiological assessment of natural radionuclides in soil within and around crude oil flow and gas compression stations in the Niger Delta, Nigeria; Evaluation radiologique de radionucleides naturels dans le sol collectes a l'interieur et autour des stations de compression des gaz dans le delta du Niger, Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ademola, J.A.; Atare, E.E. [University of Ibadan, Department of Physics, Ibadan (Nigeria)

    2010-04-15

    Natural radionuclide concentrations in soil samples collected within and around crude oil flow and gas compression stations in the Niger Delta, Nigeria, were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The mean activity concentrations of {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th varied from 30.1 +- 3.0 to 59.0 +- 17.1, B.D.L. to 8.8 +- 2.3 and 7.9 +- 3.7 to 10.9 +- 1.9 Bq.kg-1, respectively. The {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th contents of the soil samples are very low compared with the world average for natural background area. The absorbed dose rate and effective dose ranged from 6.9 to 11.1 n Gy.h-1 and 8.5 to 13.6 muSv.y-1, respectively. The annual gonadal dose equivalent rate ranged from 48.9 to 77.5 muSv.y-1, which is lower than the world average of 0.30 mSv.y-1. The radium equivalent activity and the external hazard index of the soil samples were below the recommended limits of 370 Bq.kg-1 and unity, respectively. The results obtained reveal that there is no significant radiation hazard due to natural radionuclides of the soil samples in the studied areas. (authors)

  5. 100 years of radionuclide metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, S M; Arnold, D; Chauvenet, B; Collé, R; De Felice, P; García-Toraño, E; Wätjen, U

    2014-05-01

    The discipline of radionuclide metrology at national standards institutes started in 1913 with the certification by Curie, Rutherford and Meyer of the first primary standards of radium. In early years, radium was a valuable commodity and the aim of the standards was largely to facilitate trade. The focus later changed to providing standards for the new wide range of radionuclides, so that radioactivity could be used for healthcare and industrial applications while minimising the risk to patients, workers and the environment. National measurement institutes responded to the changing demands by developing new techniques for realising primary standards of radioactivity. Looking ahead, there are likely to be demands for standards for new radionuclides used in nuclear medicine, an expansion of the scope of the field into quantitative imaging to facilitate accurate patient dosimetry for nuclear medicine, and an increasing need for accurate standards for radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

  7. Radioecology of natural systems in Colordao. Fourteenth annual progress report, May 1, 1975--July 31, 1976. [Pu diffusion in terrestrial ecosystems at Rocky Flats Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1976-08-01

    This report summarizes project activities during the period May 1, 1975 through July 31, 1976. The major study on the distribution and levels of Pu in major components of the terrestrial ecosystem at Rocky Flats was completed. Supportive studies on the ecology and pathology of small mammals and their role in Pu transport were essentially completed as well. Detailed studies on mule deer food habits, population dynamics, and movements at Rocky Flats are progressing. These studies are designed to measure the potential of mule deer in transporting Pu to uncontrolled areas. Alpha autoradiographic studies designed to measure Pu particle size and distribution and spatial patterns in soil were initiated. Field and greenhouse transport pathways from soil to vegetation are in progress and some early results reported. The status of studies on seasonal kinetics of Cs in a montane lake and stable lead geochemistry in an alpine lake watershed are also reported.

  8. Radionuclide Basics: Thorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorium is a naturally occurring radioactive metal found at trace levels in soil, rocks, plants and animals. Thorium is used very little in industry, but can be found in heat-resistant alloys and paints and optical lenses.

  9. Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, C.L.

    1994-09-01

    As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

  10. Behavior of radionuclides in the ecosystem; Comportamento dos radionuclideos no ecossistema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzilli, Barbara Paci

    2016-07-01

    In this chapter 4 the Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material - NORM is presented, besides an introduction to the environmental radiological impact of NORM industries, the waste transportation, its proprieties and the behavior of specific groups of radionuclides in the ecosystems.

  11. Indicator organisms for marine and terrestrial environmental radioactivity[Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaum, A.; Christensen, G.C.; Ruud, A.M.B.; Straelberg, E. [Institute for Energy Technology, IFE, Kjeller (Norway)

    2006-04-15

    The aim of this work was to study different terrestrial and marine indicator organisms for environmental radioactivity. An area in central Norway, consisting of forests, mountain forests and high mountains without forests was subject to the study for terrestrial indicator organisms. This area received fairly high contamination of Chernobyl fallout. In 1990 samples of several species of biota were collected from the same area as a part of a NKS project. For marine indicator organisms, samples of the two species of brown algae Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum were collected from Tromoeya in southern Norway. Seasonal variations in activity concentrations and indicator properties of Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum were compared for several radionuclides, including some radionuclides that have not been focused on previously. (au)

  12. Transfer into the biosphere of radionuclides released from deep storage of radioactive wastes. Bibliographical study; Transfert dans la biosphere des radionucleides issus des stockages profonds de dechets radioactifs. Etude bibliographique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedon, V.; Siclet, F.

    1995-03-01

    Most countries with civilian nuclear programs today are encountering difficulty in implementing a nuclear waste management policy that is both technically safe in the long term and accepted by the public. To meet both criteria, the solution most generally envisaged is deep storage either of untreated spent nuclear fuel or of highly radioactive wastes resulting from reprocessing. In order to predict the potential impact of such storage on man, one needs to understand the path followed by radionuclides in the geosphere, and later in the biosphere. Given the time scales involved and the critical nature of the elements concerned, it is indispensable to turn to mathematical modeling of the phenomena. This report presents what is hoped to be a complete inventory of the radionuclides contained in ``high level`` wastes (categories B AND C). The elements concerned in studies on deep storage are essentially long-life radionuclides (both actinides and certain fission and activation products). Their physico-chemical characteristics and their behavior in various ecological compartments are examined. Bibliographical data bearing on: solubility (in an oxidizing, reducing medium), distribution factors (water/rock-sediment-soil), concentration and transfer factors (in aquatic and terrestrial mediums), dose conversion factors (in the case of internal and external irradiation), principal paths of exposure for each radionuclide studied, are presented in this report. Initial results from international projects to model what happens to radionuclides in the biosphere are also presented. In general, they are optimistic as to the future, but nonetheless point to a need to improve the conceptual base of the models, to ensure that all major phenomena and processes are taken into consideration and to examine any possible amplification (author). 67 refs., 39 figs., 20 tabs.

  13. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-06-30

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

  14. Levels and transfer of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in Nordic terrestrial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.E., E-mail: justin.brown@nrpa.n [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, PO Box 55, N-1332, Osteras (Norway); Gjelsvik, R. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, PO Box 55, N-1332, Osteras (Norway); Roos, P. [RISO-DTU P.O. Box 49 DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Kalas, J.A. [Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Tungasletta 2, 7485 Trondheim (Norway); Outola, I. [STUK, Laippatie 4/P.O. BOX 14, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Holm, E. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, PO Box 55, N-1332, Osteras (Norway)

    2011-05-15

    Recent developments regarding environmental impact assessment methodologies for radioactivity have precipitated the need for information on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides within and transfer to wild flora and fauna. The objectives of this study were therefore to determine activity concentrations of the main dose forming radionuclides {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in biota from terrestrial ecosystems thus providing insight into the behaviour of these radioisotopes. Samples of soil, plants and animals were collected at Dovrefjell, Central Norway and Olkiluoto, Finland. Soil profiles from Dovrefjell exhibited an approximately exponential fall in {sup 210}Pb activity concentrations from elevated levels in humus/surface soils to 'supported' levels at depth. Activity concentrations of {sup 210}Po in fauna (invertebrates, mammals, birds) ranged between 2 and 123 Bq kg{sup -1} d.w. and in plants and lichens between 20 and 138 Bq kg{sup -1} d.w. The results showed that soil humus is an important reservoir for {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb and that fauna in close contact with this media may also exhibit elevated levels of {sup 210}Po. Concentration ratios appear to have limited applicability with regards to prediction of activity concentrations of {sup 210}Po in invertebrates and vertebrates. Biokinetic models may provide a tool to explore in a more mechanistic way the behaviour of {sup 210}Po in this system.

  15. Modeling radionuclide migration from underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pandey, Sachin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); O' Malley, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    The travel time of radionuclide gases to the ground surface in fracture rock depends on many complex factors. Numerical simulators are the most complete repositories of knowledge of the complex processes governing radionuclide gas migration to the ground surface allowing us to verify conceptualizations of physical processes against observations and forecast radionuclide gas travel times to the ground surface and isotopic ratios

  16. Identification and Quantification of Radionuclides in Coal Ash

    OpenAIRE

    Alleman, James E.; Clikeman, Franklyn M.; Skronski, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    One of the important environmental issues raised recently in regard to coal ash reuse for highway construction purposes (e.g., embankment development) is that of worker, and public, exposure to radiation which might possibly be emitted by these types of residuals. Radiation emission is, in fact, a natural phenomenon for most materials, both natural and man-made, but in the case of coal ash residuals the process of combustion produces an inevitable concentration of radionuclides from the origi...

  17. Tumor Immunotargeting Using Innovative Radionuclides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Kraeber-Bodéré

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality.

  18. Chemistry and analysis of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Lehto, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    Written by chemists for chemists, this is a comprehensive guide to the important radionuclides as well as techniques for their separation and analysis. It introduces readers to the important laboratory techniques and methodologies in the field, providing practical instructions on how to handle nuclear waste and radioactivity in the environment.

  19. Radionuclide Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an integral role in the diagnostic workup of suspected pulmonary embolism, and several modalities have been employed over the years. In recent years, the choice has been narrowed to either computer tomographic or radionuclide based methods, i.e. computer tomographic...

  20. Radionuclide Basics: Tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritium is a hydrogen atom that has two neutrons in the nucleus and one proton. It is radioactive and behaves like other forms of hydrogen in the environment. Tritium is produced naturally in the upper atmosphere and as a byproduct of nuclear fission.

  1. Radionuclide Basics: Technetium-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technetium-99 (chemical symbol Tc-99) is a silver-gray, radioactive metal. It occurs naturally in very small amounts in the earth's crust, but is primarily man-made. Technetium-99m is a short-lived form of Tc-99 that is used as a medical diagnostic tool.

  2. Radioecology of natural systems. Fifteenth annual progress report, August 1, 1976--July 31, 1977. [Plutonium transport in terrestrial ecosystems at Rocky Flats Plant with emphasis on biological effects on mule deer and coyotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1977-08-01

    This report summarizes project activities during the period August 1, 1976 through July 31, 1977. Four major areas of effort are reported, namely plutonium behavior in a terrestrial ecosystem at Rocky Flats, mule deer and coyote studies at Rocky Flats, ecological consequences of transuranics in the terrestrial environment, and lead geochemistry of an alpine lake ecosystem. Much of the first area of effort involved the synthesis of data and preparation of manuscripts, although some new data are reported on plutonium levels in small mammals, plant uptake of plutonium from contaminated soil, and plutonium deposition rates on macroplot 1. The mule deer studies generated a substantial body of new information which will permit quantitative assessment of plutonium dispersion by deer that utilize contaminated areas. These studies involve population dynamics, movement and use patterns, food habits, ingestion rates of contaminated soil and vegetation and plutonium burdens of deer tissues. A related study of coyote food habits in summer at Rocky Flats is reported. A manuscript dealing with the question of ecological effects of transuranics was prepared. This manuscript incorporates data from Rocky Flats on characteristics of natural populations which occupy ecologically similar areas having differing levels of plutonium contamination. The lead geochemistry studies continued to generate new data but the data are not yet reported.

  3. Modeling Radionuclide Transport in Clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Lianchong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Hui -Hai [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated or plastic clays (Tsang and Hudson, 2010). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. During the lifespan of a clay repository, the repository performance is affected by complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow, formation of damage zones, radionuclide transport, waste dissolution, and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) of the repository. These coupled processes may affect radionuclide transport by changing transport paths (e.g., formation and evolution of excavation damaged zone (EDZ)) and altering flow, mineral, and mechanical properties that are related to radionuclide transport. While radionuclide transport in clay formation has been studied using laboratory tests (e,g, Appelo et al. 2010, Garcia-Gutierrez et al., 2008, Maes et al., 2008), short-term field

  4. Sedimentation Deposition Patterns on the Chukchi Shelf Using Radionuclide Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, L. W.; Grebmeier, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Sediment core collections and assays of the anthropogenic and natural radioisotopes, 137Cs and 210Pb, respectively, are providing long-term indications of sedimentation and current flow processes on the Chukchi and East Siberian sea continental shelf. This work, which has been integrated into interdisciplinary studies of the Chukchi Sea supported by both the US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (COMIDA Hanna Shoal Project) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Russian-US Long Term Census of the Arctic, RUSALCA) includes studies of total radiocesium inventories, sedimentation rate determinations, where practical, and depths of maxima in radionuclide deposition. Shallow maxima in the activities of the anthropogenic radionuclide in sediment cores reflect areas with higher current flow (Barrow Canyon and Herald Canyon; 3-6 cm) or low sedimentation (Hanna Shoal; 1-3 cm). The first sedimentation studies from Long Strait are consistent with quiescent current conditions and steady recent sedimentation of clay particles. Elsewhere, higher and more deeply buried radionuclide inventories (> 2 mBq cm-2 at 15-17 cm depth) in the sediments correspond to areas of high particle deposition north of Bering Strait where bioturbation in productive sediments is also clearly an important influence. Radiocesium activities from bomb fallout dating to 1964 are now present at low levels (20 cm. Independent sedimentation rate measurements with the natural radionuclide 210Pb are largely consistent with the radiocesium measurements.

  5. Moon, Mars and Mundus: primary school children discover the nature and science of planet Earth from experimentation and extra-terrestrial perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinhans, M.g.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/217675123; Verkade, A.j.; Van Wessel, T.; Bastings, M.a.s.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/133948676; Marra, W.a.; Van Gog, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/294304975; Van Westrenen, W.; Reichwein, M.

    Like earth and planetary scientists, most children are curious about the world, the solar system and the rest of the universe. However, for various reasons primary schools emphasise language and calculus rather than natural sciences. When science is taught, examination systems often favour knowledge

  6. Removal of radionuclides at a waterworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäfvert, T.; Ellmark, C.; Holm, E.

    2002-01-01

    % in the coagulation–flocculation process) while caesium, strontium and radium pass through the purification process with almost unchanged activity concentrations. During transportation of the water in the tunnel it was also observed that infiltration of groundwater leads to a change in isotopic ratios and/or activity......A waterworks with an average production rate of 1.3 m3 s−1, providing several large cities in the province of Scania with drinking water has been studied regarding its capacity to remove several natural and anthropogenic radionuclides. The raw water is surface water from lake Bolmen which...... is transported through an 80 km long tunnel in the bedrock before it enters the waterworks. The method used for purification is a combination of coagulation–flocculation and filtration in sand filters. Two different purification lines are currently in use, one using Al2(SO4)3 as a coagulant and one using FeCl3...

  7. Radionuclide transfer to invertebrates and small mammals in a coastal sand dune ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M.D., E-mail: mwood@liv.ac.uk [Institute for Sustainable Water Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER)/School of Biological Sciences, Nicholson Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside, L69 3GP (United Kingdom); Leah, R.T. [Institute for Sustainable Water Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER)/School of Biological Sciences, Nicholson Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside, L69 3GP (United Kingdom); Jones, S.R. [Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd., The Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria, CA24 3LN (United Kingdom); Copplestone, D. [Environment Agency, PO Box 12, Richard Fairclough House, Knutsford Road, Latchford, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 1HG (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    International intercomparisons of models to assess the impact of ionising radiation on wildlife have identified radionuclide transfer assumptions as a significant source of uncertainty in the modelling process. There is a need to improve the underpinning data sets on radionuclide transfer to reduce this uncertainty, especially for poorly-studied ecosystems such as coastal sand dunes. This paper presents the results of the first published study of radionuclide transfer to invertebrates and small mammals in a coastal sand dune ecosystem. Activity concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are reported for detritivorous, herbivorous, carnivorous and omnivorous biota. Differences in activity concentrations measured in the sand dune biota are related to the trophic level of the organisms and the influence of sea-to-land transfer is apparent in the food chain transfer observed at the site. There are notable differences in the concentration ratios (CRs) calculated for the sand dune biota compared to other terrestrial ecosystems, especially for the small mammals which have CRs that are two orders of magnitude lower than the generic terrestrial ecosystem CRs published by the recent EC EURATOM ERICA project. The lower CRs at the sand dunes may be due to the influence of other cations from the marine environment (e.g. K and Na) on the net radionuclide transfer observed, but further research is required to test this hypothesis.

  8. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  9. Radionuclide synovectomy - essentials for rheumatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowski, Marek M; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Kobylecka, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70-80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice.

  10. Radionuclide solubility control by solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, F.; Klinkenberg, M.; Rozov, K.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6); Vinograd, V. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences

    2015-07-01

    The migration of radionuclides in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption processes onto minerals and colloids. On a molecular level, sorption phenomena involve surface complexation, ion exchange as well as solid solution formation. The formation of solid solutions leads to the structural incorporation of radionuclides in a host structure. Such solid solutions are ubiquitous in natural systems - most minerals in nature are atomistic mixtures of elements rather than pure compounds because their formation leads to a thermodynamically more stable situation compared to the formation of pure compounds. However, due to a lack of reliable data for the expected scenario at close-to equilibrium conditions, solid solution systems have so far not been considered in long-term safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories. In recent years, various solid-solution aqueous solution systems have been studied. Here we present state-of-the art results regarding the formation of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions. In some scenarios describing a waste repository system for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rocks {sup 226}Ra dominates the radiological impact to the environment associated with the potential release of radionuclides from the repository in the future. The solubility of Ra in equilibrium with (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} is much lower than the one calculated with RaSO{sub 4} as solubility limiting phase. Especially, the available literature data for the interaction parameter W{sub BaRa}, which describes the non-ideality of the solid solution, vary by about one order of magnitude (Zhu, 2004; Curti et al., 2010). The final {sup 226}Ra concentration in this system is extremely sensitive to the amount of barite, the difference in the solubility products of the end-member phases, and the degree of non-ideality of the solid solution phase. Here, we have enhanced the fundamental understanding regarding (1) the thermodynamics of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions and (2) the

  11. Intercomparison NaI(Tl) and HPGe spectrometry to studies of natural radioactivity on geological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen Quoc; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Vuong, Le Quang; Thanh, Tran Thien; Tao, Chau Van

    2016-11-01

    In this study, in situ gamma spectra using NaI(Tl) detector have been compared with the laboratory measurements by using HPGe detector on geological samples. The results for measuring naturally occurring terrestrial gamma radiation of 40K and the decay series of 232Th and, 238U respectively of both detectors show a maximum deviation about 5%. The mass activities series from both detectors were checked for coherence using proficiency test procedure from the International Atomic Energy Agency. The reliability and precision pass for final scores for all the analytical determinations of are received "acceptable" for all radionuclides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radionuclide behavior in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway))

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs.

  13. Radionuclide Transport in Tuff and Carbonate Fractures from Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M; Johnson, M R; Roberts, S K; Pletcher, R; Rose, T P; Kersting, A B; Eaton, G; Hu, Q; Ramon, E; Walensky, J; Zhao, P

    2006-02-01

    In the Yucca Flat basin of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), 747 shaft and tunnel nuclear detonations were conducted primarily within the tuff confining unit (TCU) or the overlying alluvium. The TCU in the Yucca Flat basin is hypothesized to reduce radionuclide migration to the regional carbonate aquifer (lower carbonate aquifer) due to its wide-spread aerial extent and chemical reactivity. However, shortcuts through the TCU by way of fractures may provide a migration path for radionuclides to the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA). It is, therefore, imperative to understand how radionuclides migrate or are retarded in TCU fractures. Furthermore, understanding the migration behavior of radionuclides once they reach the fractured LCA is important for predicting contaminant transport within the regional aquifer. The work presented in this report includes: (1) information on the radionuclide reactive transport through Yucca Flat TCU fractures (likely to be the primary conduit to the LCA), (2) information on the reactive transport of radionuclides through LCA fractures and (3) data needed to calibrate the fracture flow conceptualization of predictive models. The predictive models are used to define the extent of contamination for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. Because of the complex nature of reactive transport in fractures, a stepwise approach to identifying mechanisms controlling radionuclide transport was used. In the first set of TCU experiments, radionuclide transport through simple synthetic parallel-plate fractured tuff cores was examined. In the second, naturally fractured TCU cores were used. For the fractured LCA experiments, both parallel-plate and rough-walled fracture transport experiments were conducted to evaluate how fracture topography affects radionuclide transport. Tuff cores were prepared from archived UE-7az and UE-7ba core obtained from the USGS core library, Mercury, Nevada. Carbonate cores were prepared from archived ER-6-1 core, also obtained

  14. RIVER-RAD: A computer code for simulating the transport of radionuclides in rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetrick, D.M.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Thorne, D.J.; Patterson, M.R.

    1992-11-01

    A screening-level model, RIVER-RAD, has been developed to assess the potential fate of radionuclides released to rivers. The model is simplified in nature and is intended to provide guidance in determining the potential importance of the surface water pathway, relevant transport mechanisms, and key radionuclides in estimating radiological dose to man. The purpose of this report is to provide a description of the model and a user's manual for the FORTRAN computer code.

  15. Influence of airborne chemical substances on the behaviour of radionuclides in boreal forest ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinnes, E. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway)

    2002-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition of chemical substances may influence the behaviour of radionuclides in soil and their uptake in plants. This is a fact that has so far received limited attention in radioecological studies. This paper presents briefly two cases where differences in atmospheric deposition of heavy metals from a strong pollution source and marine aerosols, respectively, influence the turnover of radionuclides in natural boreal ecosystems. (au)

  16. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Gudkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  17. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  18. Radionuclide sorption-desorption characterization of soils from non-temperate areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, C.J.; Rigol, A.; Vidal, M.; Rauret, G. [Barcelona Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The prediction of the radionuclide mobility in terrestrial ecosystems needs of specific information on radionuclide speciation and interaction in soils. Radionuclide transfer in the food chain is the result of a multifactorial process in which, from the soil standpoint, sorption and desorption steps in the solid phase govern the amount of radionuclide that can be available for root uptake. One of the lessons learnt from the Chernobyl accident was that any soil scenario could be contaminated. Therefore, data on radionuclide interaction in various types of soil/climate must be available. Moreover, environmental decision support systems may become useless when extrapolated to other conditions than those used in their construction. The significance of considering the specificity of the scenarios is due to the distinctive interaction in every radionuclide-soil combination. Although relevant information is available for a certain number of radionuclides in soils from temperate areas, there are still gaps of data for significant scenarios, such as those affected by the Mediterranean conditions. The potentially distinctive characteristics of the soils in this area (high carbonate and clay content; low organic matter content; dry seasons followed by potential flooding periods) justify further studies to adapt or verify conclusions and ranges of values for the most significant parameters derived from previous experiments performed in other environmental conditions. Here we present radiostrontium and radiocaesium sorption-desorption data (mainly soil-soil solution distribution coefficient and reversibly sorbed fraction) of soils coming from areas representative of the Spanish territory, including soils from areas close to radioactive facilities. Data obtained are compared with sorption-desorption data previously obtained by the authors in areas affected by the Chernobyl accident and common default data used in prediction models. (author)

  19. In-situ remediation of soil contaminated with low concentrations of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entry, J.A. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Agronomy and Soils; Vance, N.C. [Forest Service, Corvallis, OR (United States). Pacific Northwest Research Station; Hamilton, M.A. [idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zabowski, D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Coll. of Forest Resources

    1994-12-31

    Since plants are known to take up and accumulate {sup 37}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, removal of these radionuclides from contaminated soils by plants would provide a reliable and economical method of remediation. One approach is to use fast-growing, perennial plants combined with specific mycorrhizal fungi to maximize plant accumulation and removal of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr from contaminated soils. The objective is to find a series of plants that can quickly accumulate and remove radionuclides from soils. Specific mycorrhizal fungi inoculated onto plants should enhance the uptake of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr. Laboratory studies indicate that certain plants may be able to remove radionuclides, especially {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, from soil over a period of less than 10 yr. In addition, one could change the physical and chemical properties of the soil to enhance the availability of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr to plants while decreasing the mobility of these radionuclides in soil. The above-ground portion of perennial plants would be harvested. High-temperature combustion would be used to oxidize plant material, concentrating {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in ash for disposal. One of the many strengths of this method is its applicability to any terrestrial environment. Transportation of radionuclides from the site could be minimized through plant management, selection of plants that are less palatable to grazing animals, and fencing. Environmental conditions will change with each site; however, radionuclide accumulation could be accomplished by plants that are adapted to a wide spectrum of environmental conditions. There is no other practical and economic method to remove these radionuclides form the vast areas of land that have been contaminated by nuclear testing and nuclear reactor accidents.

  20. MIRD radionuclide data and decay schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    For all physicians, scientists, and physicists working in the nuclear medicine field, the MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes updated edition is an essential sourcebook for radiation dosimetry and understanding the properties of radionuclides. Includes CD Table of Contents Decay schemes listed by atomic number Radioactive decay processes Serial decay schemes Decay schemes and decay tables This essential reference for nuclear medicine physicians, scientists and physicists also includes a CD with tabulations of the radionuclide data necessary for dosimetry calculations.

  1. Radionuclides in groundwater flow system understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erőss, Anita; Csondor, Katalin; Horváth, Ákos; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Surbeck, Heinz

    2017-04-01

    Using radionuclides is a novel approach to characterize fluids of groundwater flow systems and understand their mixing. Particularly, in regional discharge areas, where different order flow systems convey waters with different temperature, composition and redox-state to the discharge zone. Radium and uranium are redox-sensitive parameters, which causes fractionation along groundwater flow paths. Discharging waters of regional flow systems are characterized by elevated total dissolved solid content (TDS), temperature and by reducing conditions, and therefore with negligible uranium content, whereas local flow systems have lower TDS and temperature and represent oxidizing environments, and therefore their radium content is low. Due to the short transit time, radon may appear in local systems' discharge, where its source is the soil zone. However, our studies revealed the importance of FeOOH precipitates as local radon sources throughout the adsorption of radium transported by the thermal waters of regional flow systems. These precipitates can form either by direct oxidizing of thermal waters at discharge, or by mixing of waters with different redox state. Therefore elevated radon content often occurs in regional discharge areas as well. This study compares the results of geochemical studies in three thermal karst areas in Hungary, focusing on radionuclides as natural tracers. In the Buda Thermal Karst, the waters of the distinct discharge areas are characterized by different temperature and chemical composition. In the central discharge area both lukewarm (20-35°C, 770-980 mg/l TDS) and thermal waters (40-65°C, 800-1350 mg/l TDS), in the South only thermal water discharge (33-43°C, 1450-1700 mg/l TDS) occur. Radionuclides helped to identify mixing of fluids and to infer the temperature and chemical composition of the end members for the central discharge area. For the southern discharge zone mixing components could not be identified, which suggests different cave

  2. The more the better - polyandry and genetic similarity are positively linked to reproductive success in a natural population of terrestrial salamanders (Salamandra salamandra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspers, Barbara A; Krause, E Tobias; Hendrix, Ralf; Kopp, Michael; Rupp, Oliver; Rosentreter, Katrin; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Although classically thought to be rare, female polyandry is widespread and may entail significant fitness benefits. If females store sperm over extended periods of time, the consequences of polyandry will depend on the pattern of sperm storage, and some of the potential benefits of polyandry can only be realized if sperm from different males is mixed. Our study aimed to determine patterns and consequences of polyandry in an amphibian species, the fire salamander, under fully natural conditions. Fire salamanders are ideal study objects, because mating, fertilization and larval deposition are temporally decoupled, females store sperm for several months, and larvae are deposited in the order of fertilization. Based on 18 microsatellite loci, we conducted paternity analysis of 24 female-offspring arrays with, in total, over 600 larvae fertilized under complete natural conditions. More than one-third of females were polyandrous and up to four males were found as sires. Our data clearly show that sperm from multiple males is mixed in the female's spermatheca. Nevertheless, paternity is biased, and the most successful male sires on average 70% of the larvae, suggesting a 'topping off' mechanism with first-male precedence. Female reproductive success increased with the number of sires, most probably because multiple mating ensured high fertilization success. In contrast, offspring number was unaffected by female condition and genetic characteristics, but surprisingly, it increased with the degree of genetic relatedness between females and their sires. Sires of polyandrous females tended to be genetically similar to each other, indicating a role for active female choice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Elucidating key factors affecting radionuclide aging in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roig, M. [Universitat Politecnica Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Barcelona (Spain); Rigola, A.; Vidal, M.; Rauret, G. [Barcelona Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanistic studies allow at present to describe the processes governing the short-term interaction of radiostrontium and radiocaesium in soils. The initial sorption step can be described through the estimation of the soil-soil solution distribution coefficient from soil parameters, as cationic exchange capacity, radiocaesium interception potential and concentration of competing ions in the soil solution. After the initial soil-radionuclide interaction, a fraction of radionuclide is no longer available for exchange with the solution, and it remains fixed in the solid fraction. At present, the initial fixed fraction of a radionuclide in a given soil cannot be predicted from soil properties. Besides, little is known about soil and environmental factors (e.g., temperature; hydric regime) provoking the increase in the fixed fraction with time, the so-called aging process. This process is considered to control the reduction of food contamination with time at contaminated scenarios. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to predict the radionuclide aging in the medium and long term for a better risk assessment, especially when a decision has to be made between relying on natural attenuation versus implementing intervention actions. Here we study radiostrontium and radiocaesium aging in a set of soils, covering a wide range of soil types of contrasting properties (e.g., loamy calcareous; podzol; chernozem, organic). Three factors are separately and simultaneously tested: time elapsed since contamination, temperature and hydric regime. Changes in the radionuclide fixed fraction are estimated with a leaching test based on the use of a mild extractant solution. In addition to this, secondary effects on the radiocaesium interception potential in various soils are also considered. (author)

  4. Proposed law of nature linking impacts, plume volcanism, and Milankovitch cycles to terrestrial vertebrate mass extinctions via greenhouse-embryo death coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclean, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    A greenhouse-physiological coupling killing mechanism active among mammals, birds, and reptiles has been identified. Operating via environmental thermal effects upon the maternal core-skin blood flow critical to the survival and development of embryos, it reduces the flow of blood to the uterine tract. Today, during hot summers, this phenomena kills embryos on a vast, global scale. Because of sensitivity of many mammals to modern heat, a major modern greenhouse could reduce population numbers on a global scale, and potentially trigger population collapses in the more vulnerable parts of the world. In the geological past, the killing mechanism has likely been triggered into action by greenhouse warming via impact events, plume volcanism, and Earth orbital variations (Milankovitch cycles). Earth's biosphere is maintained and molded by the flow of energy from the solar energy source to Earth and on to the space energy sink (SES). This SES energy flow maintains Earth's biosphere and its living components, as open, intermediate, dissipative, nonequilibrium systems whose states are dependent upon the rate of energy flowing through them. Greenhouse gases such as CO2 in the atmosphere influence the SES energy flow rate. Steady-state flow is necessary for global ecological stability (autopoiesis). Natural fluctuations of the C cycle such as rapid releases of CO2 from the mantle, or oceans, disrupt steady-state SES flow. These fluctuations constantly challenge the biosphere; slowdown of SES energy flow drives it toward thermodynamical equilibrium and stagnation. Fluctuations induced by impact event, mantle plume volcanism, and Milankovitch cycles can grow into structure-breaking waves triggering major perturbations of Earth's C cycle and mass extinctions. A major C cycle perturbation involves readjustment of the outer physiochemical spheres of the Earth: the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere; and by necessity, the biosphere. A greenhouse, one manifestation of a major

  5. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  6. Experimental determination of CO2 content at graphite saturation along a natural basalt-peridotite melt join: Implications for the fate of carbon in terrestrial magma oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Megan S.; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge of the carbon carrying capacity of peridotite melt at reducing conditions is critical to constrain the mantle budget and planet-scale distribution of carbon set at early stage of differentiation. Yet, neither measurements of CO2 content in reduced peridotite melt nor a reliable model to extrapolate the known solubility of CO2 in basaltic (mafic) melt to solubility in peridotitic (ultramafic) melt exist. There are several reasons for this gap; one reason is due to the unknown relative contributions of individual network modifying cations, such as Ca2+ versus Mg2+, on carbonate dissolution particularly at reducing conditions. Here we conducted high pressure, temperature experiments to estimate the CO2 contents in silicate melts at graphite saturation over a compositional range from natural basalts toward peridotite at a fixed pressure (P) of 1.0 GPa, temperature (T) of 1600 °C, and oxygen fugacity (log ⁡ fO2 ∼ IW + 1.6). We also conducted experiments to determine the relative effects of variable Ca and Mg contents in mafic compositions on the dissolution of carbonate. Carbon in quenched glasses was measured and characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy and was found to be dissolved as carbonate (CO32-). The FTIR spectra showed CO32- doublets that shifted systematically with the MgO and CaO content of silicate melts. Using our data and previous work we constructed a new composition-based model to determine the CO2 content of ultramafic (peridotitic) melt representative of an early Earth, magma ocean composition at graphite saturation. Our data and model suggest that the dissolved CO2 content of reduced, peridotite melt is significantly higher than that of basaltic melt at shallow magma ocean conditions; however, the difference in C content between the basaltic and peridotitic melts may diminish with depth as the more depolymerized peridotite melt is more compressible. Using our model of CO2 content at

  7. The IAEA handbook on radionuclide transfer to wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, B J; Beresford, N A; Copplestone, D; Telleria, D; Proehl, G; Fesenko, S; Jeffree, R A; Yankovich, T L; Brown, J E; Higley, K; Johansen, M P; Mulye, H; Vandenhove, H; Gashchak, S; Wood, M D; Takata, H; Andersson, P; Dale, P; Ryan, J; Bollhöfer, A; Doering, C; Barnett, C L; Wells, C

    2013-07-01

    An IAEA handbook presenting transfer parameter values for wildlife has recently been produced. Concentration ratios (CRwo-media) between the whole organism (fresh weight) and either soil (dry weight) or water were collated for a range of wildlife groups (classified taxonomically and by feeding strategy) in terrestrial, freshwater, marine and brackish generic ecosystems. The data have been compiled in an on line database, which will continue to be updated in the future providing the basis for subsequent revision of the Wildlife TRS values. An overview of the compilation and analysis, and discussion of the extent and limitations of the data is presented. Example comparisons of the CRwo-media values are given for polonium across all wildlife groups and ecosystems and for molluscs for all radionuclides. The CRwo-media values have also been compared with those currently used in the ERICA Tool which represented the most complete published database for wildlife transfer values prior to this work. The use of CRwo-media values is a pragmatic approach to predicting radionuclide activity concentrations in wildlife and is similar to that used for screening assessments for the human food chain. The CRwo-media values are most suitable for a screening application where there are several conservative assumptions built into the models which will, to varying extents, compensate for the variable data quality and quantity, and associated uncertainty. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Introduced Terrestrial Species (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted future potential distributions of terrestrial plants, animals, and pathogens non-native to the Middle-Atlantic region. These data are...

  9. Radiographic and radionuclide findings in Rhizopus osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, P.H. Jr.; McKinney, R.G.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    A case of Rhizopus osteromyelitis is described. The radionuclide and radiographic findings differ from those of osteomyelitis secondary to common pathogens: low-level radionuclide activity is observed, while soft-tissue swelling, periosteal reaction, and loss of fascial margins are absent.

  10. Intercomparison of radionuclides in environmental samples 2000-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogh, C.L.; Nielsen, S.P.; Keith-Roach, M.J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-07-01

    An intercomparison exercise on radionuclides in environmental samples was carried out during 2000-2001 as part of a Nordic NKS project. The exercise included six sample types (aerosols, dry milk, soil, seawater, seaweed and lake water) and a range of man-made and naturally occurring radionuclides, mainly gamma-emitters but also beta- and alpha-emitters. A total of 25 Nordic and Baltic laboratories participated. The analytical quality across participants was generally good with about two thirds of the results in close agreement with estimated mean values. The exercise has demonstrated improved agreement between the results and more realistic analytical uncertainties submitted by the participants compared with a previous exercise carried out during 1998-1999 in the same NKS project. (au)

  11. Riparian vegetation in the alpine connectome: Terrestrial-aquatic and terrestrial-terrestrial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharescu, Dragos G; Palanca-Soler, Antonio; Hooda, Peter S; Tanase, Catalin; Burghelea, Carmen I; Lester, Richard N

    2017-12-01

    Alpine regions are under increased attention worldwide for their critical role in early biogeochemical cycles, their high sensitivity to environmental change, and as repositories of natural resources of high quality. Their riparian ecosystems, at the interface between aquatic and terrestrial environments, play important geochemical functions in the watershed and are biodiversity hotspots, despite a harsh climate and topographic setting. With climate change rapidly affecting the alpine biome, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of the extent of interactions between riparian surface, lake and catchment environments. A total of 189 glacial - origin lakes were surveyed in the Central Pyrenees to test how key elements of the lake and terrestrial environments interact at different scales to shape riparian plant composition. Secondly, we evaluated how underlying ecotope features drive the formation of natural communities potentially sensitive to environmental change and assessed their habitat distribution. At the macroscale, vegetation composition responded to pan-climatic gradients altitude and latitude, which captured in a narrow geographic area the transition between large European climatic zones. Hydrodynamics was the main catchment-scale factor connecting riparian vegetation with major water fluxes, followed by topography and geomorphology. Lake sediment Mg and Pb, and water Mn and Fe contents reflected local influences from mafic bedrock and soil water saturation. Community analysis identified four keystone ecosystems: (i) damp ecotone, (ii) snow bed-silicate bedrock, (iii) wet heath, and (iv) calcareous substrate. These communities and their connections with ecotope elements could be at risk from a number of environmental change factors including warmer seasons, snow line and lowland species advancement, increased nutrient/metal input and water level fluctuations. The results imply important natural terrestrial-aquatic linkages in the riparian environment

  12. Final Technical Report: Viral Infection of Subsurface Microorganisms and Metal/Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Bender, Kelly S.; Li, Yusong

    2013-09-28

    Microbially mediated metabolisms have been identified as a significant factor either directly or indirectly impacting the fate and transport of heavy metal/radionuclide contaminants. To date microorganisms have been isolated from contaminated environments. Examination of annotated finished genome sequences of many of these subsurface isolates from DOE sites, revealed evidence of prior viral infection. To date the role that viruses play influencing microbial mortality and the resulting community structure which directly influences biogeochemical cycling in soils and sedimentary environments remains poorly understood. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the role of viral infection of subsurface bacteria and the formation of contaminant-bearing viral particles. This objective was approached by examining the following working hypotheses: (i) subsurface microorganisms are susceptible to viral infections by the indigenous subsurface viral community, and (ii) viral surfaces will adsorb heavy metals and radionuclides. Our results have addressed basic research needed to accomplish the BER Long Term Measure to provide sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites would be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical and biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation or natural attenuation and long-term stewardship by establishing viral-microbial relationships on the subsequent fate and transport of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we demonstrated that viruses play a significant role in microbial mortality and community structure in terrestrial subsurface sedimentary systems. The production of viral-like particles within subsurface sediments in response to biostimulation with dissolved organic carbon and a terminal electron acceptor resulted in the production of viral-like particles. Organic carbon alone did not result in significant viral production and required the addition of a terminal electron acceptor

  13. Phytoremediation and land management of radionuclide-contaminated areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanek, T.; Valenova, S.; Soudek, P. [Czech Academy of Science, Inst. of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, (Czech Republic). Dept. of Plant Tissue Cultures

    2006-07-01

    A study was conducted to examine the feasibility of using radiophytoremediation for wastewater treatment, where the conditions of contaminants can be similar to hydroponic arrangement. Due to the fact that large doses of radiation can cause cellular damage, the remediation of radionuclides from the environment is important for human health. These high risk pollutants are introduced into the environment at uranium ore processing factories, nuclear power plants, and nuclear bomb testing sites. Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, various studies were conducted to analyze the dynamic of {sup 137}Cs radionuclide in natural and semi-natural environments. The use of plants to clean up soils, sediments, surface and ground waters contaminated by radionuclides or toxic elements has been extensively tested. This study in particular, examined the uptake, translocation and distribution of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 125}I uptake from a radioactive hydroponic solution. It also examined the activity distribution within different plant tissues. The influence of K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} on {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr uptake and accumulation by sunflowers was also studied in order to evaluate the effects of these ions that are normally present in the soil. The study examined which plant species could grow in contaminated areas and accumulate large amounts of radionuclides which would be suitable for radiophytoremediation purposes. Approximately 44 plant species were tested in greenhouse experiments, field studies and constructed wetlands. It was concluded that for soil-cleaning purposes, the solubility of the contaminant and its mobility in soil is the main limiting factor along with the extent of root-zone of certain plant species. 38 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

  14. Phytoremediation and land management of radionuclide contaminated areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanek, T.; Valenova, S.; Soudek, P. [Czech Academy of Science, Dept. of Plant Tissue Cultures, Inst. of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (Czech Republic)

    2006-07-01

    A study was conducted to examine the feasibility of using radiophytoremediation for wastewater treatment, where the conditions of contaminants can be similar to hydroponic arrangement. Due to the fact that large doses of radiation can cause cellular damage, the remediation of radionuclides from the environment is important for human health. These high risk pollutants are introduced into the environment at uranium ore processing factories, nuclear power plants, and nuclear bomb testing sites. Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, various studies were conducted to analyze the dynamic of {sup 137}Cs radionuclide in natural and semi-natural environments. The use of plants to clean up soils, sediments, surface and ground waters contaminated by radionuclides or toxic elements has been extensively tested. This study in particular, examined the uptake, translocation and distribution of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 125}I uptake from a radioactive hydroponic solution. It also examined the activity distribution within different plant tissues. The influence of K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} on {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr uptake and accumulation by sunflowers was also studied in order to evaluate the effects of these ions that are normally present in the soil. The study examined which plant species could grow in contaminated areas and accumulate large amounts of radionuclides which would be suitable for radiophytoremediation purposes. Approximately 44 plant species were tested in greenhouse experiments, field studies and constructed wetlands. It was concluded that for soil-cleaning purposes, the solubility of the contaminant and its mobility in soil is the main limiting factor along with the extent of root-zone of certain plant species.

  15. Radionuclide Distribution in the Soil on the Stabatishkes Site in the Vicinity of the Ignalina NPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevgenij Aliončik

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A near surface repository for low and intermediate-level short-lived radioactive waste will be built on the Stabatiškės site in the vicinity of Ignalina NPP during decommissioning works. The reservoir can also be used for the waste stored in the temporary repositories of the Ignalina NPP. Engineering and nature protective barriers are used in the repository for radioactive waste, however, radionuclides can spread into the environment, extend in the biosphere and cause (define the external power light exposure of the environment due to the natural and premature (prescheduled degradation of the engineering barriers of the repository. The properties of the soil (acidity, quantity of organic substances, humidity are being investigated for estimating the possible migration and dispersion of radionuclides. The activity of radionuclides in the soil is also estimated before building the repository. Natural and artificial radionuclides make the pollution of the soil, and therefore the accumulation and vertical migration of artificial (137Cs, 60Co and natural (226Ra, 232Th, 40K radionuclides are being researched in the soil on the Stabatiškės site.Article in Lithuanian

  16. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [Ghent Maria-Middelares, General Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Medical Center Leeuwarden (MCL), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Henri Dunantweg 2, Postbus 888, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Dumarey, Nicolas [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Long Island, NY (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor {sup 99m}Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and {sup 67}Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including

  17. Assessment of the radiological impact of coal utilization. I. Preliminary studies on Western coal. [Western USA; radionuclide impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styron, C.E.; Casella, V.R.; Farmer, B.M.; Hopkins, L.C.; Jenkins, P.H.; Phillips, C.A.; Robinson, B.

    1979-02-12

    It was the purpose of this project to broadly survey pathways of radionuclides in the coal fuel cycle, identifying critical questions and providing direction for subsequent, definitive studies of radionuclides in coal and the technological enhancement of concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides through use of this coal. Western coal was selected for study because of its prominence in the National Energy Plan. Specific objectives were to: investigate the fate of radionuclides in the coal fuel cycle and, where possible, delineate the scope of the potential environmental and human health problem associated with radionuclides in coal; compile and evaluate data for uranium-238, uranium-234, lead-210, polonium-210, and thorium-230 in coal; study the release, fate, and accumulation of radionuclides from a power plant burning Western coal; and assess the possible need for additional control technology or standards. Results indicate that concentration of radionuclides in coal from Western mines varies widely, both within and between mines similar to other minor and trace constituents. The concentration of radionuclides in Western coal being mined today is roughly comparable to that of Eastern coal and is slightly below the average for all U.S. coal. A radionuclide balance for a power plant indicated that over 80% of uranium-234, uranium-238, and lead-210 present in the feed coal remained with the fly ash. Thus, collection of fly ash by electrostatic precipitators is of value in controlling radionuclide emissions. An additional 8 to 9% of the radionuclidesremained with bottom ash. Since over 90% of uranium-234, uranium-238, and lead-210 in feed coal remains with bottom ash and fly ash, it is suggested that the possible migration of radionuclides--particularly radon-222 which decays to lead-210 and polonium-210--from the ash pond, warrants further study.

  18. Cosmogenic Radionuclides in Hot Desert Chondrites with Low C-14 Activities: A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, Kees; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Caffee, Marc W.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial ages of meteorites from hot deserts provide an important tool to estimate meteorite fluxes to the Earth. Most desert meteorites have terrestrial ages less than 40 ky, but a few achondrites from the Sahara region were recently shown to have significantly higher ages, up to approx. 100 ky. In general, C-14 (half-life = 5730 y) is the most suited radionuclide to determine terrestrial ages for desert meteorites. However for meteorites with ages greater than 35 ky, the concentration of cosmogenic C-14 has decreased to a level at which it becomes difficult to distinguish between cosmogenic C-14 and terrestrial contamination. These meteorites may therefore be much older than 35 ky. We selected chondrites with low C-14 activities (less than or equal to 2 dpm/kg) for measurements of the concentrations of cosmogenic Cl-36 (half-life= 3.01 x 10 (exp 5) y) and Ca-41 (half-life= 1.04 x 10 (exp 5) y) in the metal phase. Since the ratio of Ca-14/Cl-36 in the metal phase of chondrites is relatively constant and well known, the measured ratio is a direct measure of the terrestrial age. A major problem is that most or sometimes all of the metal in these old "hot desert" meteorites has been oxidized to hydrated Fe-Ni-oxides. Therefore, we also measured the concentrations of Be-10, Al-26 and Cl-36 in the stony phase in order to constrain the terrestrial age as much as possible.

  19. Cosmogenic Radionuclides in Hot Desert Chondrites With Low C-14 Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.

    2000-01-01

    Terrestrial ages of meteorites from hot deserts provide an important tool to estimate meteorite fluxes to the Earth. Most desert meteorites have terrestrial ages less than 40 ky, but a few achondrites from the Sahara region were recently shown to have significantly higher ages, up to approx.100 ky. In general, C-14 (half-life = 5730 y) is the most suited radionuclide to determine terrestrial ages for desert meteorites. However for meteorites with ages >35 ky, the concentration of cosmogenic C-14 has decreased to a level at which it becomes difficult to distinguish between cosmogenic C-14 and terrestrial contamination. These meteorites may therefore be much older than 35 ky. We selected chondrites with low C-14 activities (less than or equal to 2 dpm/kg) for measurements of the concentrations of cosmogenic Cl-36 (half-life= 3.01 x 105 y) and Ca-41 (half-life= 1.04 x 105 y) in the metal phase. Since the ratio of Ca-41/Cl-36 in the metal phase of chondrites is relatively constant and well known, the measured ratio is a direct measure of the terrestrial age]. A major problem is that most or sometimes all. of the metal in these old "hot desert" meteorites has been oxidized to hydrated Fe-Ni-oxides. Therefore, we also measured the concentrations of Be-10, Al-26 and Cl-36 in the stony phase in order to constrain the terrestrial age as much as possible.

  20. Natural and anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment of Kopaonik mountain, Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, Branislava; Ajtić, Jelena; Lazić, Marko; Andrić, Velibor; Krstić, Nikola; Vranješ, Borjana; Vićentijević, Mihajlo

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the state of the environment in Kopaonik, a mountain in Serbia, the activity concentrations of (4) K, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (137)Cs in five different types of environmental samples are determined by gamma ray spectrometry, and radiological hazard due to terrestrial radionuclides is calculated. The mean activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in the soil are higher than the global average. However, with an exception of two sampling locations, the external radiation hazard index is below one, implying an insignificant radiation hazard. Apart from (40)K, content of the natural radionuclides is predominantly below minimum detectable activities in grass and cow milk, but not in mosses. Although (137)Cs is present in the soil, grass, mosses and herbal plants, its specific activity in cow milk is below minimum detectable activity. Amongst the investigated herbal plants, Vaccinium myrtillus L. shows accumulating properties, as a high content of (137)Cs is detected therein. Therefore, moderation is advised in consuming Vaccinium myrtillus L. tea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radionuclides: Accumulation and Transport in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Voronina, A V; Walther, C

    Application of radioactive elements or radionuclides for anthropogenic use is a widespread phenomenon nowadays. Radionuclides undergo radioactive decays releasing ionizing radiation like gamma ray(s) and/or alpha or beta particles that can displace electrons in the living matter (like in DNA) and disturb its function. Radionuclides are highly hazardous pollutants of considerable impact on the environment, food chain and human health. Cleaning up of the contaminated environment through plants is a promising technology where the rhizosphere may play an important role. Plants belonging to the families of Brassicaceae, Papilionaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae are most important in this respect and offer the largest potential for heavy metal phytoremediation. Plants like Lactuca sativa L., Silybum marianum Gaertn., Centaurea cyanus L., Carthamus tinctorius L., Helianthus annuus and H. tuberosus are also important plants for heavy metal phytoremediation. However, transfer factors (TF) of radionuclide from soil/water to plant ([Radionuclide]plant/[Radionuclide]soil) vary widely in different plants. Rhizosphere, rhizobacteria and varied metal transporters like NRAMP, ZIP families CDF, ATPases (HMAs) family like P1B-ATPases, are involved in the radio-phytoremediation processes. This review will discuss recent advancements and potential application of plants for radionuclide removal from the environment.

  2. Automation of radionuclide analysis in nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gostilo, V.; Sokolov, A.; Kuzmenko, V.; Kondratjev, V. [Bruker Baltic Ltd., Riga, LV-1005 (Latvia)

    2009-07-01

    The development results for the automated precise HPGe spectrometers and systems for radionuclide analyses in nuclear industry and environmental monitoring are presented. Automated HPGe spectrometer for radionuclide monitoring of coolant in primary circuit of NPPs is intended for technological monitoring of the radionuclide specific activity in liquid and gaseous flows in the on-line mode. The automated spectrometer based on flowing HPGe detector with the through channel is intended for control of the uniformity of distribution of uranium and/or plutonium in fresh fuel elements, transferred through the detector, as well as for on-line control of the fluids and gases flows with low activity. Automated monitoring system for radionuclide volumetric activity in outlet channels of NPPs is intended for radionuclide monitoring of water reservoirs in the regions of nuclear weapons testing, near nuclear storage, nuclear power plants and other objects of nuclear energetic. Autonomous HPGe spectrometer for deep water radionuclide monitoring is applicable for registration of gamma radionuclides, distributed in water depth up to 3000 m (radioactive wastes storage, wreck of atomic ships, lost nuclear charges, atomic industry technological waste release etc.).(authors)

  3. Levels and transfer of 210Po and 210Pb in Nordic terrestrial ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, J.E.; Gjelsvik, R.; Roos, Per

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments regarding environmental impact assessment methodologies for radioactivity have precipitated the need for information on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides within and transfer to wild flora and fauna. The objectives of this study were therefore to determine activity...

  4. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  5. 2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2009-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  6. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  7. Organization and operation of the sixth international symposium on the natural radiation environment (NRE VI). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1995-12-31

    An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogonic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits (medical x-rays and nuclear medicine), and harm (Chernobyl fallout), the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied. To facilitate the exchange of information and the review of uncertainties and scientific research priorities, a series of 5 international meetings on Natural Radiation Environment, 1963, 1987, 1991. This conference (Montreal, 1995) covers the range of natural radiation environments that give rise to human exposure and dose. This document is a program summary.

  8. Twenty-five-year study of radionuclides in the Susquehanna river via periphyton biomonitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Ruth; Palms, John; Kreeger, Danielle; Harris, Charles

    2007-01-01

    This 25-y study monitored aquatic and terrestrial gamma-ray-emitting radionuclide levels near a nuclear power plant. It is the only known, long-term environmental survey of its kind. It was conducted neither by a utility owner, nor by a government agency, but rather by a private, environmental research institution. Compared to dozens of other flora and fauna, periphyton was found to be the best indicator to biomonitor the Susquehanna River, which runs near PPL Susquehanna's nuclear plant. Sampling began in 1979 before the first plant start-up and continued for the next 24 years. Monitoring began two months after the Three Mile Island accident of 28 March 1979 and includes Three Mile Island area measurements. Ongoing measurements detected fallout from Chernobyl in 1986, as well as I not released from PPL Susquehanna. Although this paper concentrates on radionuclides found in periphyton, the scope of the entire environmental program includes a wide variety of aquatic and land-based plants, animals, and inorganic matter. Other species and matter studied were fish, mussels, snails, crayfish, insects, humus, mushrooms, lichens, squirrels, deer, cabbage, tomatoes, coarse and flocculated sediment, and more. Results show periphyton works well for detection of radionuclide activity, even in concentrations less than 100 Bq kg (picocuries per gram amounts). Data indicate that PPL Susquehanna's radionuclide releases have had no known environmental or human health impact.

  9. Upscaling the Use of Fallout Radionuclides in Soil Erosion and Sediment Budget Investigations: Addressing the Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E. Walling

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of fallout radionuclides in soil erosion investigations and related sediment budget studies has provided a widely used tool for improving understanding of soil erosion and sediment transfer processes. However, most studies using fallout radionuclides undertaken to date have focussed on small areas. This focus on small areas reflects both the issues addressed and practical constraints associated with sample collection and analysis. Increasing acceptance of the important role of fine sediment in degrading aquatic habitats and in the transfer and fate of nutrients and contaminants within terrestrial and fluvial systems has emphasised the need to consider larger areas and the catchment or regional scale. The need to upscale existing approaches to the use of fallout radionuclides to larger areas represents an important challenge. This contribution provides a brief review of existing and potential approaches to upscaling the use of fallout radionuclides and presents two examples where such approaches have been successfully applied. These involve a national scale assessment of soil erosion rates in England and Wales based on 137Cs measurements and an investigation of the sediment budgets of three small/intermediate-size catchments in southern Italy.

  10. Modelling of radionuclide migration in forest ecosystems. A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, R.; Moberg, L.; Hubbard, L.

    1998-03-01

    The Chernobyl accident has clearly shown the long-term effects of a radioactive contamination of forest ecosystems. This report is based on a literature review of models which describe the migration of radionuclides, radioactive caesium in particular, in forest ecosystems. The report describes the particularities of the forest ecosystem, the time dynamics of the contamination, the transfer processes and factors influencing caesium migration. This provides a basis for a discussion of different approaches for modelling caesium migration in the forest. It is concluded that the studied dynamic models include the most relevant transfer processes both for the acute and the long-term phase after a radioactive deposition. However, most models are site specific and do not consider some of the factors responsible for the differences in radionuclide behaviour and distribution in different types of forests. Although model improvements are constrained by the availability of experimental data and by the lack of knowledge of the migration mechanisms some possible improvements are discussed. This report is part of the LANDSCAPE project. -An integrated approach to radionuclide flow in the semi-natural ecosystems underlying exposure pathways to man. 42 refs, 3 tabs, 9 figs.

  11. Radionuclide and metal contamination in pit lakes in former U mining sites in Central Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skipperud, L.; Rosseland, B.O.; Heier, L.S.; Salbu, B. [Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, Norwegian University of Life Sciences - NMBU (Norway); Stegnar, P. [Josef Stefan Institute (Slovenia); Yunusov, M. [IA Vostokredmet (Tajikistan); Burkitbaev, L.M. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan)

    2014-07-01

    The uranium mining industry in the USSR was established in the late 1940's - early 1950's in the former Soviet Republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan as part of the nuclear weapon program. In most countries, uranium mining is considered a hazardous step of nuclear materials production, both in terms of radiation doses and in the number of people affected. Key problems have been associated with the transport of uranium and its daughters in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, where radionuclides are transferred from air, water, and soils into plants, fish/animals and finally to man. In this paper, special attention is paid to the assessment of radionuclides and metals in Central Asian Pit Lakes. Field works to Kurday, Kasakhstan, and Taboshar, Tajikistan, Pit Lakes have been performed. In addition to sampling of water, fish, sediments, and vegetation, in situ fractionation of water were achieved. The concentrations of U and associated trace metals were enriched in the Kurday Pit Lake and in the artesian water at the Kurday site (U exceeding the WHO guideline value for drinking water), and decreased downstream from the mining area. Uranium, As, Mo and Ni were predominantly present as mobile low molecular mass species in waters, while a significant proportion of Cr, Mn and Fe were associated with colloids and particles. Due to oxidation of divalent iron in the artesian ground water upon contact with air, Fe served as scavenger for other elements, and peak concentrations of U, Ra-isotopes, As and Mn were seen. The U concentrations in water from Taboshar Pit Lake (2.0 mg U/L) were higher than waters collected in other areas in Tajikistan. The Pit Lake and the stream water from the tailing mountain were also characterized by elevated concentrations of As, Mo, Mn and Fe, exceeding the WHO recommended values for drinking water. Uranium, As, Mo and Ni were present as low molecular mass species in the waters, and are therefore considered

  12. Isolation of Cu radionuclides with dithizone impregnated XAD-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolley, S.G. [Cape Peninsula Univ. of Technology, Bellville (South Africa). Dept. of Chemistry; Walt, T.N. van der [Cape Peninsula Univ. of Technology, Bellville (South Africa). Dept. of Chemistry; National Research Foundation, Somerset West (South Africa). iThemba LABS

    2014-04-01

    A novel separation method for Cu radionuclides from proton bombardment of {sup nat}Zn is presented. A solid phase extraction procedure using a modified dithizone (diphenylthiocarbazone) XAD-8 chelating resin was used for the purification of the Cu radionuclides from up to 5 g of {sup nat}Zn and other radionuclides. More than 95% of the Cu radionuclides was recovered. (orig.)

  13. Determination of glomerular filtration rate with radionuclide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of glomerular filtration rate with radionuclide renography and direct urinary activity quantitation. A. C. Otto, P. H. Pretorius, M. Dunn, M. G. Nel, A. van Aswegen, J. Marais, M. G. Lotter ...

  14. Radiation safety requirements for radionuclide laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide lays down the requirements for laboratories and storage rooms in which radioactive substances are used or stored as unsealed sources. In addition, some general instructions concerning work in radionuclide laboratories are set out.

  15. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Palestro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of "complicating osteomyelitis" such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose.Estudos através de imagens com o uso de radionuclídeos são rotineiramente usadas para avaliar pacientes suspeitos de terem infecção músculo-esquelética. A imagem óssea em tridimensional é facilmente avaliável, relativamente de baixo custo, e muito precisa na localização de alterações ósseas. Imagem com leucócito marcado poderia ser usada nos casos de "osteomielite com complicações" tais como infecção prostética articular. Esse teste também é útil na não suspeita clinica de osteomielite associada ao pé diabético tanto quanto nas junções neuropáticas. É sempre necessário, por outro lado, realizar imagem complementar da medula óssea para aumentar a precisão da imagem com leucócito marcado. Em contraste com outras regiões no esqueleto, imagem com leucócito marcado não é útil para diagnosticar osteomielite da coluna vertebral. Até agora, o gálio é o radionuclídeo preferido para

  16. Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bleuel, Darren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, Micah [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rusnak, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Soltz, Ron [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tonchev, Anton [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-05

    The Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS) will generate intense photon and neutron beams to address important gaps in the study of radionuclide science that directly impact Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Forensics, and Nuclear Material Detection. The co-location of MeV-scale neutral and photon sources with radiochemical analytics provides a unique facility to meet current and future challenges in nuclear security and nuclear science.

  17. Experimental evaluation of admission and disposition of artificial radionuclides including transuranium elements in agricultural plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozhakhanov, T.; Lukashenko, S. [Institute of radiation safety and ecology (Kazakhstan)

    2014-07-01

    Processes of radionuclides migration and transfer to agricultural plants are quite well developed worldwide, but the information on character of accumulation of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu transuranium radionuclides in agricultural plants is still fragmentary. Even in generalized materials of worldwide studies, IAEA guide, accumulation coefficient (AC) can have wide range of values (5-6 orders), no data exists on radionuclides' distribution in different organs of plants and they are given for joined groups of plants and types of soils. That is why the main aim of this work was to obtain basic quantitative parameters of radionuclides' migration in 'soil-plant' system, and firs of all- for transuranium elements.. In 2010 a series of experiments with agricultural plants was started at the territory of the former Semipalatinsk Test Site aimed to investigate entry of artificial radionuclides by crop products in natural climatic conditions. To conduct the experiment for study of coefficient of radionuclides' accumulation by agricultural corps, there was chosen a land spot at the STS territory, characterized by high concentration of radionuclides: {sup 241}Am - n*10{sup 4} Bq/kg, {sup 137}Cs - n*10{sup 3} Bq/kg, {sup 90}Sr - n*10{sup 3} Bq/kg and {sup 239+240}Pu- n*10{sup 5} Bq/kg. As objects of investigation, cultures, cultivated in Kazakhstan have been selected: wheat (Triticum vulgare), barley (Hordeum vulgare), oat (Avena sativa L.), water melon (Citrullus vulgaris), melon (Cucumis melo), potato (Solanum tuberosum), eggplant (Solanum melongena), pepper (Capsicum annuum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), sunflower (Helianthus cultus), onion (Allium cepa), carrot (Daucus carota), parsley(Petroselinum vulgare)and cabbage (Brassica oleracea). Investigated plants have been planted within the time limits, recommended for selected types of agricultural plants. Cropping system included simple agronomic and amelioration measures. Fertilizers were not

  18. The terrestrial silica pump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna C Carey

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si cycling controls atmospheric CO(2 concentrations and thus, the global climate, through three well-recognized means: chemical weathering of mineral silicates, occlusion of carbon (C to soil phytoliths, and the oceanic biological Si pump. In the latter, oceanic diatoms directly sequester 25.8 Gton C yr(-1, accounting for 43% of the total oceanic net primary production (NPP. However, another important link between C and Si cycling remains largely ignored, specifically the role of Si in terrestrial NPP. Here we show that 55% of terrestrial NPP (33 Gton C yr(-1 is due to active Si-accumulating vegetation, on par with the amount of C sequestered annually via marine diatoms. Our results suggest that similar to oceanic diatoms, the biological Si cycle of land plants also controls atmospheric CO(2 levels. In addition, we provide the first estimates of Si fixed in terrestrial vegetation by major global biome type, highlighting the ecosystems of most dynamic Si fixation. Projected global land use change will convert forests to agricultural lands, increasing the fixation of Si by land plants, and the magnitude of the terrestrial Si pump.

  19. Batteries for terrestrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulin, T.M.

    1998-07-01

    Extensive research has been conducted in the design and manufacture of very long life vented and sealed maintenance free nickel-cadmium aircraft batteries. These batteries have also been used in a number of terrestrial applications with good success. This study presents an overview of the Ni-Cd chemistry and technology as well as detailed analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the Ni-Cd couple for terrestrial applications. The performance characteristics of both sealed and vented Ni-Cd's are presented. Various charge algorithms are examined and evaluated for effectiveness and ease of implementation. Hardware requirements for charging are also presented and evaluated. The discharge characteristics of vented and sealed Ni-Cd's are presented and compared to other battery chemistries. The performance of Ni-Cd's under extreme environmental conditions is also compared to other battery chemistries. The history of various terrestrial applications is reviewed and some of the lessons learned are presented. Applications discussed include the NASA Middeck Payload Battery, Raytheon Aegis Missile System Battery, THAAD Launcher battery, and the Titan IV battery. The suitability of the Ni-Cd chemistry for other terrestrial applications such as electric vehicles and Uninterruptible Power Supply is discussed.

  20. Radionuclide Transport in Fractured Tuff under Episodic Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Sun, Y.; Ewing, R. P.

    2005-12-01

    The current conceptual model of radionuclide transport in unsaturated fractured rock includes water movement in fractures, with migration of the entrained radionuclides being retarded by diffusion into and sorption within the rock matrix. Water infiltration and radionuclide transport through low-permeability unsaturated fractured rock are episodic and intermittent in nature, at least at local scales. Under episodic flow conditions, the matrix is constantly imbibing or draining, and this fluctuating wetness both drives two-way advective movement of radionuclides, and forces changes in the matrix diffusivity. This work is intended to examine, both experimentally and numerically, how radionuclide transport under episodic flow conditions is affected by the interacting processes of imbibition and drainage, diffusion, and matrix sorption. Using Topopah Spring welded volcanic tuff, collected from the potential repository geologic unit at Yucca Mountain for storing high-level nuclear waste, we prepared a saw-cut fracture core (length 10.2 cm, diameter 4.4 cm, and fracture aperture 100 microns). The dry core was packed into a flow reactor, flushed with CO2, then saturated via slow pumping (0.01 mL/min) of synthetic groundwater. The fractured core was then flushed with air at 97% relative humidity (to simulate in situ unsaturated fractured rock conditions at Yucca Mountain), then the episodic transport experiment was conducted. Episodic flow involved 4 cycles of tracer solution flow within the fracture, followed by flushing with high humidity air. Each flow episode contained a different suite of non-sorbing and sorbing tracers, which included 3H, ReO4- (a chemical analog for 99TcO4-), I- (for 129I-), Sr and Cs (for 90Sr and 137Cs), plus the radionuclides 235U, 237Np, and 241Pu. These radionuclides span a variety of sorption strengths and represent a large fraction of the radionuclides of concern at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. Meanwhile, the non-sorbing 3H and Re

  1. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are produced, handled, store d, and potentially emitted . These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989a). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2012, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]) . These minor sources include d about 140 stack sources and no diffuse sources . T here were no unplanned airborne radionuclide emissions from Berkeley Lab operations . Emissions from minor sources were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building- specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA -approved computer code s, CAP88-PC and COMPLY , to calculate doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) at any offsite point where there is a residence, school, business, or office. Because radionuclides are used at three noncontiguous locations (the main site, Berkeley West Bio center, and Joint BioEnergy Institute), three different MEIs were identified.

  2. Achievements and opportunities from ESF Research Networking Programme: Natural molecular structures as drivers and tracers of terrestrial C fluxes, and COST Action 639: Greenhouse gas budget of soils under changing climate and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckx, P.; Rasse, D.; Jandl, R.

    2009-04-01

    One of the activities of the European Science Foundation (ESF, www.esf.org) is developing European scale Research Networking Programmes (RNPs). RNPs lay the foundation for nationally funded research groups to address major scientific and research infrastructure issues, in order to advance the frontiers of existing science. MOLTER (www.esf.org/molter or www.molter.no) is such an RNP. MOLTER stands for "Natural molecular structures as drivers and tracers of terrestrial C fluxes" aims at stimulating the use of isotopic and organic chemistry to study carbon stabilization and biogeochemistry in terrestrial ecosystems and soils in particular. The understanding of the formation, stabilization and decomposition of complex organic compounds in the environment is currently being revolutionized by advanced techniques in identification, quantification, and origin tracing of functional groups and individual molecules. MOLTER focuses on five major research themes: - Molecular composition and turnover time of soil organic matter; - Plant molecular structures as drivers of C stabilisation in soils; - Fire transformations of plant and soil molecular structures - Molecular markers in soils; - Dissolved organic molecules in soils: origin, functionality and transport. These research themes are covered via the following activities: - Organisation of international conferences; - Organisation of specific topical workshops; - Organisation of summer schools for PhD students; - Short- and long-term exchange grants for scientists. MOLTER is supported by research funding or performing agencies from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. The ESF is also the implementing agency of COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology, www.cost.esf.org), one of the longest-running European instruments supporting cooperation among scientists and researchers across Europe. COST Action 639 "Greenhouse gas budget of

  3. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  4. Propuesta metodológica para la zonificación funcional de áreas naturales protegidas terrestres desde la perspectiva del paisaje. Methodological proposal for functional zoning of terrestrial natural areas protected from the landscape perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adonis Maikel RAMÓN PUEBLA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available La división de un área natural protegida en zonas de manejo es un proceso arduo y complejo, para lo cual es necesario un sistema de evaluación y clasificación de la superficie del territorio en cuestión que permita el reconocimiento en el terreno de los sitios donde se llevarán a cabo las acciones para la protección y el manejo de los valores y recursos del área. El presente trabajo propone una guía metodológica que describe, analiza y privilegia como soporte teórico-metodológico la Geoecología de los Paisajes como vía para llegar a la propuesta de zonificación funcional de un Área Natural Protegida terrestre, partiendo de la delimitación, clasificación y cartografía de las unidades de paisaje con el empleo de los Sistemas de Información Geográfica; el análisis de algunas de las propiedades sistémicas de los paisajes y el cálculo de indicadores como naturalidad, heterogeneidad, peligro, estabilidad y sensibilidad entre otros, así como la evaluación de los potenciales y los conflictos de uso como parte del diagnóstico, permitirá realizar la propuesta de zonificación funcional con una visión integral del territorio y determinar para cada zona y subzona las acciones a desarrollar para mitigar los impactos, atenuar o eliminar las amenazas, mejorar la salud de los objetos de conservación y proteger los valores en cada una de las áreas identificadas con problemas.The division of a protected natural area in managed territories is a difficult and complex process for which an assessment and classification system of the surface of the territory, allowing the recognition of the places, where actions to protect the manage values and the resources of the area will be carried out, is necessary. This paper proposes a methodological guide, describes, assesses and favors, as a theoretical and methodological medium, the Geoecology of Landscapes as a means to reach the functional zoning proposal of a terrestrial protected area from

  5. Washout of particle-bound radionuclides for characterised rain and snow events on Mt. Zugspitze, Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerkamp, K.; Bernauer, F.; Tschiersch, J. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Washout of radionuclides by precipitation is regarded to be an efficient deposition process depending on various parameters. Precipitation in the form of snow is suspected to be most efficient in scavenging of aerosol particles. Accidental releases of radionuclides, as seen in the recent nuclear accident of Fukushima-Daiichi in March 2011, have had serious impacts on the terrestrial environment, especially in the mountainous regions where major precipitation has fallen as snow. Supposing that wet deposition depends strongly on the type and characteristics of the precipitation event we present field experiments on the quantification of wet deposition of radionuclides by snow and rain events. The experiments took place in the free atmosphere at the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus on Mt. Zugspitze, Germany (2,650 m a.s.l.). Snowfall event characterisation by meteorological and snow micro-physical parameters was carried out using a 2D video disdrometer combined with a precipitation gauge. Washout of aerosol particles in the size range from 10{sup -2} μm to 10 μm was quantified operating an electrical low pressure cascade impactor ELPI+. Trace analysis was performed by ultra-low level gamma spectrometry (HPGe detectors) of cosmogenic {sup 7}Be, of terrigenic {sup 210}Pb (radon decay product) and of {sup 137}Cs from resuspended fallout of the Chernobyl accident in precipitation and bulk aerosol samples. Dependencies of washout efficiencies of the radionuclides on precipitation rates and snow parameters will be presented. The results shall help to improve radionuclide transport models used in modern decision support systems for emergency management (e.g. ARTM, RODOS), which do not include snow parameters so far. Proposal is made how to incorporate such parameters in future. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  6. The terrestrial ecosystems at Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Anders (ed.) (EcoAnalytica, Haegersten (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    The ecosystem is in most cases the link between radionuclides released from a repository and the exposure of humans and other biota to them. This report describes the terrestrial ecosystems in the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas by summarizing and performing cross-disciplinary analyses of data from a large number of reports produced during the site investigations, Figure 1-2. The report describes the terrestrial landscape, divided here into the three main categories: forests, wetlands and agriculture land, by identifying properties that are important for element accumulation and transport

  7. Transfer of radionuclides by crops. Differences in crops species and radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Sumiya, Misako; Ohmomo, Yoichiro; Umebayashi, Masanao.

    1988-03-01

    Transfer coefficient defined as the ratio of radionuclide concentration in crops to that in soil is a key parameter to assess the concentration of the nuclide in crops in the fields. This coefficient fluctuates by several factors such as plant species, kinds of radionuclides, properties of soils and conditions of plant husbandary. In order to estimate the variations specifically by plant species and kinds of radionuclides, transfer rates of some radionuclides from culture solution to the edible parts were measured on crops such as rice plant, spinach, soybean, cucumber, eggplant and radish. Results obtained are summarized below; 1) The orders of transfer rates are /sup 65/Zn > /sup 54/Mn > /sup 137/Cs/similar to//sup 60/Co > /sup 85/ Sr > /sup 131/I. 2) Differences of transfer rates are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude among crops and/or radionuclides.

  8. Natural radioactivity content in soil and indoor air of Chellanam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, S; Rajagopalan, M; Abraham, J P; Balakrishnan, D; Umadevi, A G

    2012-11-01

    Contribution of terrestrial radiation due to the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil and air constitutes a significant component of the background radiation exposure to the population. The concentrations of natural radionuclides in the soil and indoor air of Chellanam were investigated with an aim of evaluating the environmental radioactivity level and radiation hazard to the population. Chellanam is in the suburbs of Cochin, with the Arabian Sea in the west and the Cochin backwaters in the east. Chellanam is situated at ∼25 km from the sites of these factories. The data obtained serve as a reference in documenting changes to the environmental radioactivity due to technical activities. Soil samples were collected from 30 locations of the study area. The activity concentrations of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in the samples were analysed using gamma spectrometry. The gamma dose rates were calculated using conversion factors recommended by UNSCEAR [United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. UNSCEAR (2000)]. The ambient radiation exposure rates measured in the area ranged from 74 to 195 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 131 nGy h(-1). The significant radionuclides being (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K, their activities were used to arrive at the absorbed gamma dose rate with a mean value of 131 nGy h(-1) and the radium equivalent activity with a mean value of 162 Bq kg(-1). The radon progeny levels varied from 0.21 to 1.4 mWL with a mean value of 0.6 mWL. The thoron progeny varied from 0.34 to 2.9 mWL with a mean value of 0.85 mWL. The ratio between thoron and radon progenies varied from 1.4 to 2.3 with a mean of 1.6. The details of the study, analysis and results are discussed.

  9. Solar-Terrestrial Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    satellite for polar cap passes during large SEP events to determine the experimental geographic cutoff latitudes for the two energy ranges. 9 These...E. Lamanna, Societa Italiana di Fisica , Bologna, Italy, 1997.) Shea, M.A., and D.F. Smart, Overview of the Effects of Solar Terrestrial Phenomena...Conference, Invited, Rapporteurs, & Highlight Papers, edited by N. Iucci and E. Lamanna, Societa Italiana di Fisica , Bologna, Italy, 1997.) 27

  10. Solubility of 238U radionuclide from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids using "US in vitro" digestion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2015-04-01

    238U radionuclide is a naturally occuring radioactive material that can be found in soil. In this study, the solubility of 238U radionuclide obtained from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids was analysed by "US P in vitro" digestion method. The synthetic gastrointestinal fluids were added to the samples with well-ordered, mixed throughly and incubated according to the human physiology digestive system. The concentration of 238U radionuclide in the solutions extracted from the soil was measured using Induced Coupling Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The concentration of 238U radionuclide from the soil samples in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids showed different values due to different homogenity of soil types and chemical reaction of 238U radionuclide. In general, the solubility of 238U radionuclide in gastric fluid was higher (0.050 - 0.209 ppm) than gastrointestinal fluids (0.024 - 0.050 ppm). It could be concluded that the US P in vitro digestion method is practicle for estimating the solubility of 238U radionuclide from soil materials and could be useful for monitoring and risk assessment purposes applying to environmental, health and contaminated soil samples.

  11. Comparative Climatology of Terrestrial Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackwell, Stephen J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Harder, Jerald W.; Bullock, Mark A.

    Public awareness of climate change on Earth is currently very high, promoting significant interest in atmospheric processes. We are fortunate to live in an era where it is possible to study the climates of many planets, including our own, using spacecraft and groundbased observations as well as advanced computational power that allows detailed modeling. Planetary atmospheric dynamics and structure are all governed by the same basic physics. Thus differences in the input variables (such as composition, internal structure, and solar radiation) among the known planets provide a broad suite of natural laboratory settings for gaining new understanding of these physical processes and their outcomes. Diverse planetary settings provide insightful comparisons to atmospheric processes and feedbacks on Earth, allowing a greater understanding of the driving forces and external influences on our own planetary climate. They also inform us in our search for habitable environments on planets orbiting distant stars, a topic that was a focus of Exoplanets, the preceding book in the University of Arizona Press Space Sciences Series. Quite naturally, and perhaps inevitably, our fascination with climate is largely driven toward investigating the interplay between the early development of life and the presence of a suitable planetary climate. Our understanding of how habitable planets come to be begins with the worlds closest to home. Venus, Earth, and Mars differ only modestly in their mass and distance from the Sun, yet their current climates could scarcely be more divergent. Our purpose for this book is to set forth the foundations for this emerging science and to bring to the forefront our current understanding of atmospheric formation and climate evolution. Although there is significant comparison to be made to atmospheric processes on nonterrestrial planets in our solar system — the gas and ice giants — here we focus on the terrestrial planets, leaving even broader comparisons

  12. Determination of radionuclide solubility limits to be used in SR 97. Uncertainties associated to calculated solubilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, J.; Cera, E.; Duro, L.; Jordana, S. [QuantiSci S.L., Barcelona (Spain); Pablo, J. de [DEQ-UPC, Barcelona (Spain); Savage, D. [QuantiSci Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-01

    The thermochemical behaviour of 24 critical radionuclides for the forthcoming SR97 PA exercise is discussed. The available databases are reviewed and updated with new data and an extended database for aqueous and solid species of the radionuclides of interest is proposed. We have calculated solubility limits for the radionuclides of interest under different groundwater compositions. A sensitivity analysis of the calculated solubilities with the composition of the groundwater is presented. Besides selecting the most likely solubility limiting phases, in this work we have used coprecipitation approaches in order to calculate more realistic solubility limits for minor radionuclides, such as Ra, Am and Cm. The comparison between the calculated solubilities and the concentrations measured in relevant natural systems (NA) and in spent fuel leaching experiments helps to assess the validity of the methodology used and to derive source term concentrations for the radionuclides studied. The uncertainties associated to the solubilities of the main radionuclides involved in the spent nuclear fuel have also been discussed in this work. The variability of the groundwater chemistry; redox conditions and temperature of the system have been considered the main factors affecting the solubilities. In this case, a sensitivity analysis has been performed in order to study solubility changes as a function of these parameters. The uncertainties have been calculated by including the values found in a major extent in typical granitic groundwaters. The results obtained from this analysis indicate that there are some radionuclides which are not affected by these parameters, i.e. Ag, Cm, Ho, Nb, Ni, Np, Pu, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tc and U

  13. Programme for terrestrial monitoring of nature. Monitoring of chemical precipitation connected to the field research areas, 1994; Program for terrestrisk naturovervaaking. Overvaaking av nedboerkjemi i tilknytning til feltforskningsomraadene, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toerseth, K.; Hermansen, O.

    1995-06-01

    The report relates to the Norwegian programme for terrestrial monitoring covering precipitation sampling and chemical analysis from seven experimental fields. Weekly precipitation samples are analysed for all main ions together with monthly samples for different trace elements. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the

  15. Spatial distribution of caesium-137 in soil cover of background terrestrial ecosystems, Central European Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonova, Tatiana A. [Radioecology and Ecotoxicology Department of Soil Science Faculty, Moscow State Lomonosov University, 119234 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shamshurina, Evgenia N. [Laboratory of soil erosion and fluvial processes of Geography Faculty, Moscow State Lomonosov University, 119234 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    ¹³⁷Cs - the main long-living anthropogenic radionuclide - arrived in mass at Russian terrestrial ecosystems after nuclear tests in the atmosphere in 1960-yy. and after Chernobyl accident in 1986 y., but in spite of a long period since these events soil cover contamination by ¹³⁷Cs is considered as extremely resistant due to its firmly fixation by soil solid matter and a long half-life of the radionuclide. Wide-scale investigation in maximal diversity of natural, semi-natural and anthropogenic landscapes of Central European Russia (more than 400 soils samples from Vologda, Yaroslavl, Ivanovo, Tver regions which are representative for the southern taiga zone) demonstrates that modern average specific activity of ¹³⁷Cs in the upper 15-cm layer of soil is 11±3 Bq/kg (contamination density 0.05±0.01 Ci/km²), that is fully ecologically acceptable. It is important that the average concentrations of ¹³⁷Cs in the soil cover of individual regions are close to each other. The most likely these average values are approximate assessment of background radioactive contamination of soils in central European Russia outside of the immediate Chernobyl trace. At the same time approximately 3% of soils are characterized by elevated ¹³⁷Cs content - 62-98 Bq/kg (0.24-0.43 Ci/km²), that indicates the presence of low radioactive spots on the territory and may be considered as local Chernobyl fallout. All of them attribute with forest soils which are commonly characterized by considerably more high accumulation of ¹³⁷Cs (18±5 Bq/kg, 0.06±0.01 Ci/km²) due to advanced absorbing surface of trees. Agricultural lands (plagued or under meadows) and soils of industrial plots with scarce vegetation contain only 6±2 Bq/kg (0.03±0.01 Ci/km²) of ¹³⁷Cs. About 84-92% of ¹³⁷Cs are concentrated in the upper 15-cm layer of natural soils or in Ap horizon of plagued soils, thus vertical migration of radionuclide is very slow in spite of ~30 years after Chernobyl

  16. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2010-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  17. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  18. A review on studies of the transport and the form of radionuclides in the fluvial environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-06-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has conducted studies with an aim to contribute to understanding the long-term behavior of atmospherically-derived radionuclides deposited on the ground. The present report reviews a series of studies among them which have especially dealt with the behavior of those radionuclides in a fluvial environment. The studies cited here include investigations of 1) the evaluation of the transport rate of the atmospherically-derived radionuclides from the ground via a river to the downstream areas where the affected water is consumed; 2) the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides in the fluvial environment. An investigation in the Kuji river watershed with {sup 137}Cs, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be has validated i) the importance of suspended particulate materials in the fluvial discharge of those radionuclides, and ii) a methodology to estimate the discharge of those radionuclides based on the regression analysis with the river water flow rate. From a viewpoint of their distribution between water and suspended particles, the form of radionuclides released by the Chernobyl accident in rivers and lakes in the vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant were analyzed. As a result, a general reasonability and some cautions were suggested when commonly reported distribution ratios obtained in the laboratory and the different environment are applied to describe the partitioning of the radionuclides in specific natural environmental conditions. This experimental investigation in Chernobyl also revealed the role of natural dissolved organics in affecting the dissolution and transport of {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am through complexation to form soluble species. Further, a chemical equilibrium model was applied to describe this complexation. The similar model was also applied for the behavior of iron and manganese (hydr)oxides in river recharged aquifers which can bear riverborne radionuclides and can influence their migration. The

  19. Radionuclides and heavy metals in Borovac, Southern Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Dragana; Todorovic, Dragana; Frontasyeva, Marina; Ajtic, Jelena; Tasic, Mirjana; Rajsic, Slavica

    2008-09-01

    , honey, and water in Southern Serbia (Bujanovac) gave no evidence of the DU contamination of the environment 5 years after the military actions in 1999. Activities of radionuclides in soils were within the range of the values obtained in the other parts of the country and within the global average. The ratio of uranium isotopes confirmed the natural origin of uranium. In general, concentrations of heavy metals in the samples of soils, plant leaves, mosses, and lichen are found to be less or in the lower range of values found in other parts of the country, in spite of the differences in plant and moss species or soil characteristics. Possible sources of heavy metal contamination were identified as a power coal plant in the vicinity of the sampling sites and wood and waste burning processes. The collected data should provide a base for the health risk assessments on animals and humans in the near future. It should be emphasized that the sampling was carried out 5 years after the military action and that the number of samples was limited; therefore, the conclusions should be accepted only as observed tendencies and a detailed study should be recommended in the future.

  20. Terrestrial short-term ecotoxicity of a green formicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiepo, Erasmo N; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Resgalla, Charrid; Cotelle, Sylvie; Férard, Jean-François; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2010-07-01

    When ants become annoying, large quantities of formicide are applied to terrestrial ecosystems in tropical regions, but awareness of the health and environmental impacts related to the use of synthetic pesticides has been increasing. The use of green pesticides to combat target organisms could reduce these impacts. In this regard, terrestrial ecotoxicity tests with higher plants (Brassica olaracea, Lactuca sativa and Mucuna aterrima), annelids (Eisenia foetida), Collembola (Folsomia candida) and soil enzyme activity analysis (diacetate fluorescein hydrolysis) were used to evaluate short-term terrestrial ecotoxicity of a green pesticide prepared from naturally-occurring organic compounds. At the highest formicide concentration tested in these experiments (i.e., 50 g kg(-1) soil) no toxicity toward terrestrial organisms was observed. The lack of short-term terrestrial ecotoxicity suggest that this green formicide can be classed as an environmentally friendly product as compared to the ecotoxicity of the most commonly used commercialized formicides. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Marine plankton as an indicator of low-level radionuclide contamination in the Southern Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1984-07-01

    We have initiated an investigation of the utility of marine plankton as bioconcentrating samplers of low-level marine radioactivity in the southern hemisphere. A literature review shows that both freshwater and marine plankton have trace element and radionuclide concentration factors (relative to water) of up to 10/sup 4/. In the years 1956-1958, considerable work was done on the accumulation and distribution of a variety of fission and activation products produced by the nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands. Since then, studies have largely been confined to a few selected radionuclides, and by far most of this work has been done in the northern hemisphere. We participated in Operation Deepfreeze 1981, collecting 32 plankton samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Glacier on its Antarctic cruise, while Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories concurrently sampled air, water, rain and fallout. We were able to measure concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides /sup 7/Be, /sup 40/K and the U and th series, and we believe that we have detected low levels of /sup 144/Ce and /sup 95/Nb in seven samples ranging as far south as 68/sup 0/. There is a definite association between the radionuclide content of plankton and air filters, suggesting that aerosol resuspension of marine radioactivity may be occurring. Biological identification of the plankton suggests a possible correlation between radionuclide concentration and foraminifera content of the samples. 38 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Radionuclide distributions and sorption behavior in the Susquehanna--Chesapeake Bay System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Lowry, P.D.; McLean, R.I.; Domotor, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Radionuclides released into the Susquehanna--Chesapeake System from the Three Mile Island, Peach Bottom, and Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plants are partitioned among dissolved, particulate, and biological phases and may thus exist in a number of physical and chemical forms. In this project, we have measured the dissolved and particulate distributions of fallout /sup 137/Cs; reactor-released /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs, /sup 65/Zn, /sup 60/Co, and /sup 58/Co; and naturally occurring /sup 7/Be and /sup 210/Pb in the lower Susquehanna River and Upper Chesapeake Bay. In addition, we chemically leached suspended particles and bottom sediments in the laboratory to determine radionuclide partitioning among different particulate-sorbing phases to complement the site-specific field data. This information has been used to document the important geochemical processes that affect the transport, sorption, distribution, and fate of reactor-released radionuclides (and by analogy, other trace contaminants) in this river-estuarine system. Knowledge of the mechanisms, kinetic factors, and processes that affect radionuclide distributions is crucial for predicting their biological availability, toxicity, chemical behavior, physical transport, and accumulation in aquatic systems. The results from this project provide the information necessary for developing accurate radionuclide-transport and biological-uptake models. 76 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Distribution of radionuclides in the guano sediments of Xisha Islands, South China Sea and its implication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, L.Q. [Institute of Polar Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Liu, X.D., E-mail: ycx@ustc.edu.c [Institute of Polar Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Sun, L.G., E-mail: slg@ustc.edu.c [Institute of Polar Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yan, H.; Liu, Y.; Luo, Y.H.; Huang, J. [Institute of Polar Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wang, Y.H. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Several natural and anthropogenic radionuclides ({sup 210}Pb, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 137}Cs) in guano-phosphatic coral sediments and pure guano particles collected from Ganquan, Guangjin, Jinqing and Jinyin Islands of the Xisha archipelago, South China Sea, were analyzed. The Constant Initial Concentration (CIC) model and the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) model were applied for age calculation. The average supply rate of {sup 210}Pb was 126 Bq m{sup -2} a{sup -1}, very close to the flux of northern hemisphere average (125 Bq m{sup -2} a{sup -1}). The activities of anthropogenic radionuclides in the sediments were very low, indicating that human nuclear tests did not notably impact this region. The main source of radionuclides in the sediments was from atmospheric precipitation, and the organic matter derived from plant and produced by nutrient-rich guano could further enhance them.

  4. Concentrations of radionuclides in coastal sediments from the Bay of Bengal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, A.K.M.; Bilkis, A.B.; Roy, S.; Sikder, M.D.H.; Idriss Ali, K.M. [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Safiullah, S. [Department of Chemistry, Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    1994-10-20

    The natural radionuclides of uranium and thorium series as well as {sup 40}K have been determined by gamma-spectroscopy on core-profile sediments collected from the Karnafuli estuarine zone in the Bay of Bengal. The specific activity levels of the estuarine deposits are measured. The observed contents of the radionuclides present in the sediments are greatly influenced by the geomorphological conditions in the area and show the presence of concentrations of thorium and uranium radionuclides. Elevated concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K values observed in the sediments may be due to the anthropogenic input of phosphate fertilizers (gypsum) into the estuarine zone from agricultural lands and wastes in the vicinity. The results have been compared with the global radioactivity measurements and evaluated.

  5. Targeted radionuclide therapy: frontiers in theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivanone, Francesca; Valente, Mauro; Savi, Annarita; Canevari, Carla; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2017-06-01

    The concept of targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) relies on the use of injected nuclear medicine as treating agents, targeted at the cellular or molecular level. The growth of the interest in TRT was stimulated by the advances in radionuclide production and labeling as well as by the improvement in the knowledge of appropriate and specific molecular targets. In recent years, different studies on TRT were focused on the evaluation of radionuclide compounds able to combine imaging of the disease with TRT, in a theranostic approach. This approach is of particular interest towards the personalization of treatments, allowing both the baseline characterization of oncological pathologies and treatment optimization by correct dosimetric calculation as well as therapy monitoring. This paper presents a review of recent literature on TRT, with a particular focus on clinical applications promoting such a theranostic approach, showing the impact of the synergy of diagnostic imaging and therapeutics.

  6. Therapeutic radionuclides: Making the right choice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1996-08-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in nuclear medicine therapeutic procedures. Using unsealed sources for therapy is not a new concept; it has been around since the beginnings of nuclear medicine. Treatment of thyroid disorders with radioiodine is a classic example. The availability of radionuclides with suitable therapeutic properties for specific applications, as well as methods for their selective targeting to diseased tissue have, however, remained the main obstacles for therapy to assume a more widespread role in nuclear medicine. Nonetheless, a number of new techniques that have recently emerged, (e.g., tumor therapy with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, treatment of metastatic bone pain, etc.) appear to have provided a substantial impetus to research on production of new therapeutic radionuclides. Although there are a number of new therapeutic approaches requiring specific radionuclides, only selected broad areas will be used as examples in this article.

  7. 2014 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-21

    This report describes the emissions of airborne radionuclides from operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2014, and the resulting off-site dose from these emissions. This document fulfills the requirements established by the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H – Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, commonly referred to as the Radionuclide NESHAP or Rad-NESHAP. Compliance with this regulation and preparation of this document is the responsibility of LANL’s RadNESHAP compliance program, which is part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6.

  8. Terrestrial Steering Group. 2014. Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aastrup, Peter; Aronsson, Mora; Barry, Tom

    implementation of the Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan for the next two years. Identify expert networks required for successful implementation of the plan. Identify key gaps and opportunities for the TSG related to plan implementation and identify near-term next steps to address gaps.......The Terrestrial Steering Group (TSG), has initiated the implementation phase of the CBMP Terrestrial Plan. The CBMP Terrestrial Steering Group, along with a set of invited experts (see Appendix A for a participants list), met in Iceland from February 25-27th to develop a three year work plan...... to guide implementation of the CBMP-Terrestrial Plan. This report describes the outcome of that workshop. The aim of the workshop was to develop a three year work plan to guide implementation of the CBMP-Terrestrial Plan. The participants were tasked with devising an approach to both (a) determine what...

  9. Research on radionuclide migration under subsurface geochemical conditions. JAERI/AECL Phase II Collaborative Program Year 1 (joint research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    A radionuclide migration experiment program for fractured rocks was performed under the JAERI/AECL Phase-II Collaborative Program on research and development in radioactive waste management. The program started in the fiscal year 1993, as a five-year program consists of Quarried block radionuclide migration program, Speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, Isotopic hydrogeology and Groundwater flow model development. During the first year of the program (Program Year 1: March 18, 1994 - September 30, 1994), a plan was developed to take out granite blocks containing part of natural water-bearing fracture from the wall of the experimental gallery at the depth of 240 m, and literature reviews were done in the area of the speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, isotopic hydrogeology and the groundwater flow model development to proceed further work for the Program Year 2. (author)

  10. The Watchboy Radionuclide Detector Deployment and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dazeley, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The Watchboy detector was designed to measure the rate of radionuclide production in water created via muon spallation. The three primary nuclei of interest, 11Li, 8He and 9Li, can mimic an antineutrino induced inverse beta decay, producing a high energy beta particle in coincidence with a neutron. Their signature in Watchboy would be the passage of a muon through the target, followed some time later, characterized by the decay time of the radionuclide, by a beta and a neutron emitted in coincidence.

  11. Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

    1989-10-01

    The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Assessment of Radionuclides in the Savannah River Site Environment Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.

    1999-01-26

    This document summarizes the impact of radionuclide releases from Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities from 1954 through 1996. The radionuclides reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS.

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals and other compounds labelled with short-lived radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals and Other Compounds Labelled with Short-Lived Radionuclides covers through both review and contributed articles the potential applications and developments in labeling with short-lived radionuclides whose use is restricted to institutions with accelerators. The book discusses the current and potential use of generator-produced radionuclides as well as other short-lived radionuclides, and the problems of quality control of such labeled compounds. The book is useful to nuclear medicine physicians.

  14. Fe-Mn substance in ocean as reason of regulation radionuclide pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asavin, Alex; Martynov, Konstantin; Konstantinova, Lia

    2013-04-01

    Distribution of radionuclide in marine sediments as yet little studied [Choppin & Wong 1998]. The work mainly focused on effects of nuclear test fallout. In the works are examined isotopes of Pu - 238; Th - 232; U -234;238; Pu - 239,240,241; Am - 241; Np - 237; Cm -244 [Holm 1995]. It has been shown that seems to accumulate radionuclides in marine sediments. In particular, the importance attached to carbonate complexes (corals, etc.). But questions about the possibility of re-mobilization of radionuclide, forms their concentration, their participation in global geochemical cycles in the ocean, remain open. We believe a major factor controlling the distribution of heavy metals is the formation of ocean ferromanganese crusts and nodules hydrogenic at the bottom of the ocean and seamounts. It is likely that the process of formation of Fe-manganese hydrogenic can play a major role in the control of radioactive contamination in the oceanic sediment. At least for the U number of works on the subject [Sherman et al. 2008]. The high sensitivity of the Fe-manganese crust is known to the isotopic composition of lead [Loranger & Zayed 1994, Collen et al 2011]. Recent work [Wilkins etal 2006, Renshaw etal 2009] show a large role; Fe (III)-and Mn (IV)-reducing organisms that anaerobic bacteria in oxidation and therefore changes in mobility systems U and Pu. So much interest is data for sorption of radionuclide on hydroxides Fe and Mn. Unfortunately we are not aware of works on the subject. We have therefore taken their own experimental studies on sorption of radionuclide on natural Fe-Mn crusts (sample from Magellan seamount Pacific ocean) [Martynov et al 2012]. The results showed high sorption ability of material crusts for fixation of radionuclides: U-233, Np-237, Pu-238, Am-241. For all radionuclide experiment absorption has been reached already in the first hour it was 96.0% of total substance radionuclide absorbed from the solution, and after the first day it was reached

  15. Modelling seasonal variations of natural radioactivity in soils: A case ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The activity of natural radionuclides in soil has become an environmental concern for local public and national authorities because of the harmful effects of radiation exposure on human health. In this context, modelling and mapping the activity of natural radionuclides in soil is an important research topic. The study was ...

  16. Microstructure of terrestrial catastrophism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clube, S.V.M. (Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astrophysics); Napier, W.M. (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (UK))

    1984-12-15

    The theory of evolution involving episodic terrestrial catastrophism predicts that the Oort cloud is disturbed by close encounters with massive nebulae. Each disturbance generates bombardment pulses of a few million years duration, the pulse frequencies being determined by the Sun's passage through the spiral arms and central plane of the Galaxy where nebulae concentrate. The structure within a pulse is shown here to be dominated by a series of 'spikes' of approx. 0.01-0.1 Myr duration separated by approx. 0.1-1.0 Myr, each caused by the arrival in circumterrestrial space of the largest comets followed by their disintegration into short-lived Apollo asteroids. Evidence is presented that a bombardment pulse was induced 3-5 Myr ago and that a 'spike' in the form of debris from a Chiron-like progenitor of Encke's comet has dominated the terrestrial environment for the last 0.02 Myr.

  17. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide test pattern phantom. 892.1420... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern phantom. (a) Identification. A radionuclide test pattern phantom is a device that consists of an arrangement...

  18. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5750 Radionuclide radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit an...

  19. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A radionuclide brachytherapy source is a device that consists of a...

  20. REMOVAL OF RADIONUCLIDES BY ELECTROKINETIC SOIL PROCESSING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrokinetics promises to be an innovative treatment process for in-situ treatment of soils and groundwater contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides. Electrokinetics refers to the movement of ionic liquids and charged particles relative to one another under the action ...

  1. Plant uptake of radionuclides and rhizosphere factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arie, Tsutomu; Gouthu, S.; Ambe, Shizuko; Yamaguchi, Isamu [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Hirata, Hiroaki

    1999-03-01

    Influence of soil factors such as nuclide availability, pH, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity (CEC), exchangeable cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and K{sup +}), phosphate absorption coefficient (PAC), physical composition of soil (coarse sand, fine sand, silt, and clay), soil texture, and rhizosphere microbes on uptake of radionuclides by plants are studied. (author)

  2. Radionuclide tumor therapy with ultrasound contrast microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wamel, Annemieke; Bouakaz, Ayache; Bernard, Bert; ten Cate, Folkert; de Jong, N.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclides have shown to be effective in tumour therapy. However, the side effects determine the maximum deliverable dose. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cells can be permeabilised through sonoporation using ultrasound and contrast microbubbles. The use of sonoporation in treatment of

  3. Determination of glomerular filtration rate with radionuclide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    r J Clin acin- armacal itidine n in man. Determination of glomerular filtration rate with radionuclide renography and direct urinary activity quantitation. A. C. 000, P. H. Pretorius, M. Dunn, M. G. Net,. A. van Aswegen, J. Marais, M. G. Latter. Objective. The direct urinary activity quantitation method is quick (approximately 40 ...

  4. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  5. Growth and reproductive attributes of radionuclide phytoremediators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study reveals that growth attributes including relative growth rate, net assimilation rate, leaf are index and specific leaf area, dry matter allocated to stem and leaves and number of reproductive organs decreased with the increase of radionuclide content of the plant, while the dry matter allocated to root and reproductive ...

  6. Terrestrial Plume Impingement Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Masten Space Systems proposes to create a terrestrial plume impingement testbed for generating novel datasets for extraterrestrial robotic missions. This testbed...

  7. Radionuclide Migration through Sediment and Concrete: 16 Years of Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mattigod, Shas V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle MV [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Powers, Laura [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Whyatt, Greg A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Part of these services includes safe disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, performance assessment analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires continuing data collection to increase confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied on to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the order. Cement-based solidification and stabilization is considered for hazardous waste disposal because it is easily done and cost-efficient. One critical assumption is that concrete will be used as a waste form or container material at the Hanford Site to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The radionuclides iodine-129, selenium-75, technetium-99, and uranium-238 have been identified as long-term dose contributors (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, these constituents of potential concern may be released from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and migrate into the surrounding subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989; 1992; 1993a, b; 1995). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. Each of the

  8. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

  9. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  10. Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ragan

    2002-08-09

    The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent

  11. Chalk Formations as Natural Barriers towards Radionuclide Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Walther Batsberg; Carlsen, Lars; Jensen, Bror Skytte

    1985-01-01

    A series of chalk samples from the cretaceous formation overlying the Erslev salt dome have been studied in order to establish permeabilities, porosities, dispersion-, diffusion-, and sorption characteristics of the chalk. The chalk was found to be porous (∊≈0.4), however, of rather low permeabil...

  12. CONCENTRATION OF NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES IN PRIVATE DRINKING WATER WELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, R; Otahal, P; Merta, J; Burian, I

    2017-11-01

    Water is one of the most important resources for a human being; therefore, its quality should be properly tested. According to Council Directive No. 2013/51/EUROATOM, there shall be established requirements for the general public health protection with regard to radioactive substances in water intended for human consumption. This article summarises measurement results of selected water samples at 444 private drinking water wells, which are not subject to regular inspection in terms of the Czech legislation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Transfer of radionuclides to plants[Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Sven P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2006-04-15

    Sampling of Water Horsetail and Bracken Fern including upper soil layer (0-10 cm) and water was carried out in Torahult, Sweden, in Almindingen on Bornholm, in Asserbo and Arresoe on Zealand and in Sdr. Hostrup and Nydam mose in Jutland. Furthermore, sampling was carried out in 2004 for seawater, seaweed and shrimps at locations in Danish waters at Bornholm (Svenskehavn), at Zealand (Klint), at Lolland/Falster (Guldborgsund) and on the west coast of Jutland (Hirtshals, Agger, Hvide Sande and Roemoe). Concentrations of gamma-emitting radionuclides and uranium were determined in Bracken Fern, Water Horsetail and soil samples. The concentration ratios (CR) are highest for {sup 40}K in both plant species and show the lowest variability across locations. The CR's for 40K range from 1 to 2, while the CR's for the other radionuclides range one to three orders of magnitude lower. The CR's for {sup 137}Cs show particularly high variability across locations. The CR's were analysed in a two-way ANOVA on the log-transformed values to test differences between plant species and radionuclides. The difference between radionuclides was highly significant, p<0.01, whereas the difference between plant species was not significant. The concentration ratios are listed by radionuclide showing geometric mean values and geometric standard deviations. Analyses were made of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 99}Tc in marine samples. Concentration ratios calculated from the analysed samples are presented. The concentration ratios for {sup 99}Tc agree with those reported elsewhere in the Indofern Project. The concentration ratios for {sup 137}Cs in Fucus show a correlation to salinity with higher values in low salinity water at Bornholm than in high salinity water on the west coast of Jutland. (LN)

  14. RADIONUCLIDES DISTRIBUTION NEAR FORMER URANIUM MINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zaredinov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows, that radionuclides from the stony rocks of uranium mines can be leached by atmospheric precipitations. In acid conditions, a degree of leaching is greater.Goal. The aim of this investigation was to study the distribution of radionuclides in uranium minings and their impact on the environmental contamination.Materials and methods. The study was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, a blade of rock was mixed with distilled water in proportions of 0,3 kg of gravel and 1 liter of water. After thirty days of soaking, water was sent to the gamma-spectrometric analysis to Canberra’s spectrometer (USA with a high-purity germanium detector. In the second stage, we carried out the similar experiment with water, wich was acidified to pH = 3. Contamination levels of areas near the in-situ leaching mine were determined. Intervention levels were used to estimate risk and possible water consumption by the population. Estimations were carried out taking into account the combined presence of several radionuclides in the water.Results. The results of these studies have shown that the distribution of radionuclides from the source of the contamination is about 360 meters during the 30 y period. The stream, along which samples of soil were collected and studied, was formed by the miner waters that flow along small ruts towards a village, thereby increasing the likelihood of water use by the public.Conclusions. The uranium mines are the source of radioactive contamination. Radionuclides are distributed due to the erosion of rocks and leached out of the stony rock by precipitations. The extent of leaching is significantly increased in an acidic environment, which takes place near the in-situ leaching mines.

  15. 2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Fuehne

    2007-06-30

    This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

  16. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Ryu, Youngryel; Keenan, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO 2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO 2 , temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions). The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y -1 ) with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y -1 ), and

  17. RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  18. Radionuclides of foods in Japan and uptake of radio/stable elements by terrestrial food, microorganism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, H.; Kuwahara, C.; Kato, F. [National Institute of Public Health, Dept. of Environmental Health, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    According to our recent investigation from 2000 to 2003, radiocesium concentrations of foods in Japan imported from various foreign countries were low levels (<1 Bq/kg) the same as those of Japanese food products, yet only several saprophytic mushrooms showed higher {sup 137}Cs concentrations. And also, we obtained the data that wild mushrooms collected from four points of Japanese forests in 2002 had been still contaminated by {sup 137}Cs (<0.47 - 958 Bq/kg). The pH values of these soils were 4.2 - 6.5. Since the fact of these results and the previous reports, it is important to continue clarifying the characteristic and the speciation of radio/stable cesium in mushrooms. We assumed that the transfer of {sup 137}Cs to mushrooms is both a direct path way from soil and an indirect path way from the cells of soil microorganisms. We performed the culture experiments of the saprophytic edible mushroom (Pleurotus otsreatus) mycelia and one of the representative soil microorganisms isolated from wild mushroom substrata, using several stable elements. On the isolation of soil microorganisms from mushroom substrata, the appearance frequencies of planktonic bacteria and filamentous actinomycetes were affected by pH of isolation medium. Cs tolerance of the planktonic bacteria and the filamentous actinomycetes showed considerable difference; as far as tested 13 soil samples, planktonic bacteria being able to grow in the presence of 50 mM CsCl were present in all the samples at a higher density but no filamentous actinomycetes could grow in the presence of 50 mM. Accumulation of Cs in filamentous actinomycetes (Streptomyces sp. K202) were two to eight times higher than those in bacteria when they were incubated in the presence of 5 mM CsCl. (author)

  19. Biogeochemical cycles of Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems: long-term dynamics of the migration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcheglov, Alexey; Tsvetnova, Ol'ga; Klyashtorin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Biogeochemical migration is a dominant factor of the radionuclide transport through the biosphere. In the early XX century, V.I. Vernadskii, a Russian scientist known, noted about a special role living things play in transport and accumulation of natural radionuclide in various environments. The role of biogeochemical processes in migration and redistribution of technogenic radionuclides is not less important. In Russia, V. M. Klechkovskii and N.V. Timofeev-Ressovskii showed some important biogeochemical aspects of radionuclide migration by the example of global fallout and Kyshtym accident. Their followers, R.M. Alexakhin, M.A. Naryshkin, N.V. Kulikov, F.A. Tikhomirov, E.B. Tyuryukanova, and others also contributed a lot to biogeochemistry of radionuclides. In the post-Chernobyl period, this area of knowledge received a lot of data that allowed building the radioactive element balance and flux estimation in various biogeochemical cycles [Shcheglov et al., 1999]. Regrettably, many of recent radioecological studies are only focused on specific radionuclide fluxes or pursue some applied tasks, missing the holistic approach. Most of the studies consider biogeochemical fluxes of radioactive isotopes in terms of either dose estimation or radionuclide migration rates in various food chains. However, to get a comprehensive picture and develop a reliable forecast of environmental, ecological, and social consequences of radioactive pollution in a vast contaminated area, it is necessary to investigate all the radionuclide fluxes associated with the biogeochemical cycles in affected ecosystems. We believe such an integrated approach would be useful to study long-term environmental consequences of the Fukushima accident as well. In our long-term research, we tried to characterize the flux dynamics of the Chernobyl-born radionuclides in the contaminated forest ecosystems and landscapes as a part of the integrated biogeochemical process. Our field studies were started in June of

  20. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature......, ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species. Further, we analyze rates of measured emission of aerobically produced CH4 in pectin and in plant tissues from different studies and argue that pectin is very far from the sole contributing precursor. Hence, scaling up of aerobic CH4 emission needs to take...... the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  1. Space Weather: Terrestrial Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulkkinen Tuija

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Space weather effects arise from the dynamic conditions in the Earth’s space environment driven by processes on the Sun. While some effects are influenced neither by the properties of nor the processes within the Earth’s magnetosphere, others are critically dependent on the interaction of the impinging solar wind with the terrestrial magnetic field and plasma environment. As the utilization of space has become part of our everyday lives, and as our lives have become increasingly dependent on technological systems vulnerable to space weather influences, understanding and predicting hazards posed by the active solar events has grown in importance. This review introduces key dynamic processes within the magnetosphere and discusses their relationship to space weather hazards.

  2. Assessment of radionuclides and heavy metals in marine sediments along the Upper Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuntong, S.; Phaophang, C.; Sudprasert, W.

    2015-05-01

    Due to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011 and the development of nuclear power plant in neighboring countries such as Vietnam in the near future, radionuclide assessment in marine sediment during 2010 - 2011 may be useful as background levels for radiation protection in Thailand. Marine sediments (10 samples) were collected approximately 1 km away from the coastline along Chonburi to Pattaya, Chonburi Province. The sediments were ground and sieved through 2-mm test sieve after air drying. Radionuclides were measured with a gamma spectrometer equipped with a well-calibrated HPGe detector. The samples were prepared in the same geometry as the reference material. The optimal counting time was 60,000 - 80,000 s for statistical evaluation and uncertainties. No contamination of 137Cs as an artificial radionuclide was found. Naturally-occurring radionuclides including 238U, 232Th and 40K were found. The mean specific activities of 238U, 232Th and 40K were 44 ± 10, 59 ± 17 and 463 ± 94 Bq/kg in the rainy season (2010); 41 ± 6, 50 ± 9 and 484 ± 83 Bq/kg in the winter (2010), and 39 ± 6, 41 ± 7 and 472 ± 81 Bq/kg in the summer (2011), respectively. The mean specific activities were higher than the values in the UNSCEAR report of 35, 30 and 400 Bq/kg for 238U, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the measured specific activities, the absorbed dose rate, radium equivalent activity, external hazard index and annual external effective dose rate were calculated in order to assess the health risk. No radiation hazards related to the radioactivity in the sediment were expected. The accumulation of radionuclides varied with the particle size and the organic matter content in the sediment. The accumulation of heavy metals showed similar results to that of the radionuclides in the sediment.

  3. Spiral arms, comets and terrestrial catastrophism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clube, S.V.M.; Napier, W.M. (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (UK))

    1982-03-01

    A review is presented of an hypothesis of terrestrial catastrophism in which comets grow in molecular clouds and are captured by the Sun as it passes through the spiral arms of the Galaxy. Assuming that comets are a major supplier of the Earth-crossing (Appollo) asteroid population, the latter fluctuates correspondingly and leads to episodes of terrestrial bombardment. Changes in the rotational momentum of core and mantle, generated by impacts, lead to episodes of magnetic field reversal and tectonic activity, while surface phenomena lead to ice-ages and mass extinctions. An episodic geophysical history with an interstellar connection is thus implied. If comets in spiral arms are necessary intermediaries in the process of star formation, the theory also has implications relating to early solar system history and galactic chemistry. These aspects are briefly discussed with special reference to the nature of spiral arms.

  4. Production cross sections of short-lived silver radionuclides from natPd(p,xn) nuclear processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Guinyun

    2012-03-01

    Production cross-sections of short-lived 103Ag, 104mAg and 104gAg radionuclides from proton-induced reactions on natural palladium (Pd) were measured up to 41 MeV by using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The present results are compared with the available literature values as well as theoretical data calculated by the TALYS and the ALICE-IPPE computer codes. Note that production cross-sections of the 104mAg radionuclide from natPd(p,xn) processes has been measured here for the first time. Physical thick target yields for the investigated radionuclides were deduced from the respective threshold energy to 41 MeV taking into account that the total energy is absorbed in the targets. Measured data of the short-lived 103Ag radionuclide are noteworthy due to its possible applications as a precursor for the indirect production of widely used therapeutic 103Pd radionuclide via natPd(p,xn)103Ag → 103Pd processes. On the other hand, the investigated 104Ag radionuclide finds importance due to its potential use as a diagnostic and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging analogue. Above all, measured data will enrich the literature database leading to various applications in science and technology.

  5. Production cross sections of short-lived silver radionuclides from {sup nat}Pd(p,xn) nuclear processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin, E-mail: mu_khandaker@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Kim, Kwangsoo [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guinyun, E-mail: gnkim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-01

    Production cross-sections of short-lived {sup 103}Ag, {sup 104m}Ag and {sup 104g}Ag radionuclides from proton-induced reactions on natural palladium (Pd) were measured up to 41 MeV by using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with high resolution {gamma}-ray spectrometry. The present results are compared with the available literature values as well as theoretical data calculated by the TALYS and the ALICE-IPPE computer codes. Note that production cross-sections of the {sup 104m}Ag radionuclide from {sup nat}Pd(p,xn) processes has been measured here for the first time. Physical thick target yields for the investigated radionuclides were deduced from the respective threshold energy to 41 MeV taking into account that the total energy is absorbed in the targets. Measured data of the short-lived {sup 103}Ag radionuclide are noteworthy due to its possible applications as a precursor for the indirect production of widely used therapeutic {sup 103}Pd radionuclide via {sup nat}Pd(p,xn){sup 103}Ag {yields} {sup 103}Pd processes. On the other hand, the investigated {sup 104}Ag radionuclide finds importance due to its potential use as a diagnostic and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging analogue. Above all, measured data will enrich the literature database leading to various applications in science and technology.

  6. Doses to the red bone marrow of young people and adults from radiation of natural origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, G M [Childhood Cancer Research Group, University of Oxford, Richards Building, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 7LG (United Kingdom); Fell, T P, E-mail: Gerald.Kendall@ccrg.ox.ac.uk [Health Protection Agency, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-01

    Natural radiation sources comprise cosmic rays, terrestrial gamma rays, radionuclides in food and inhaled isotopes of radon with their decay products. These deliver doses to all organs and tissues including red bone marrow (RBM), the tissue in which leukaemia is thought to originate. In this paper we calculate the age-dependent annual RBM doses from natural radiation sources to young people and to adults at average levels of exposure in the UK. The contributions to dose are generally less complex than in the case of doses to foetuses and young children where it is necessary to take into account transfer of radionuclides across the placenta, intakes in mother's milk and changes in gut uptake in young infants. However, there is high uptake of alkaline earths and of similar elements in the developing skeleton and this significantly affects the doses from radioisotopes of these elements, not just in the teens and twenties but through into the fifth decade of life. The total equivalent dose to the RBM from all natural sources of radiation at age 15 years is calculated to be about 1200 {mu}Sv a year at average UK levels, falling to rather less than 1100 {mu}Sv per year in later life; the gentle fall from the late teens onwards reflects the diminishing effect of the high uptakes of radioisotopes of the alkaline earths and of lead in this period. About 60% of the equivalent dose is contributed by the low linear energy transfer (LET) component. Radionuclides in food make the largest contribution to equivalent doses to RBM and much the largest contribution to the absorbed dose from high LET radiation (mainly alpha particles).

  7. The terrestrial biosphere in the SFR region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerling, L.; Isaeus, M. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Botany; Lanneck, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physical Geography; Lindborg, T.; Schueldt, R. [Danish Nature Council, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2001-03-01

    This report is a part of the SKB project 'SAFE' (Safety Assessment of the Final Repository of Radioactive Operational Waste). The aim of project SAFE is to update the previous safety analysis of SFR-1.SFR-1 is a facility for disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste, which is situated in bedrock beneath the Baltic Sea, one km off the coast near the Forsmark nuclear power plant in Northern Uppland. A part of the SAFE-analysis aims at analysing the transport of radionuclides in the ecosystems.To do so one has to build a model that includes a large amount of information concerning the biosphere.The first step is to collect and compile descriptions of the biosphere.This report is a first attempt to characterise the terrestrial environment of the SFR area of Forsmark. In the first part of the report the terrestrial environment, land class distribution and production of the area is described. The primary production in different terrestrial ecosystems is estimated for a model area in the Forsmark region. The estimations are based on the actual land class distribution and the values for the total primary production (d.w. above ground biomass)and the amount carbon produced, presented as g/m{sup 2} for each land class respectively. An important aspect of the biosphere is the vegetation and its development. The future development of vegetation is of interest since production,decomposition and thus storage of organic material, vary strongly among vegetation types and this has strong implications for the transport of radionuclides.Therefore an attempt to describe the development of terrestrial vegetation has been made in the second part. Any prediction of future vegetation is based on knowledge of the past together with premises for the future development.The predictions made, thus, becomes marred with errors enforced by the assumptions and incomplete information of the past. The assumptions made for the predictions in this report are crude and results

  8. On Site Inspection Radionuclide Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J. C.; Haas, D.; Milbrath, B. D.; Miley, H.; Seifert, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of an On Site Inspection for the CTBT is the clarification of the nature of a triggering event - probably a seismic signal. After a request for inspection is made and accepted, an inspection team proceeds to the environs of the triggering event and uses visual, seismic, radiological, or other location-finding methods to narrow down the search area. Survey, environmental sampling, and field-lab measurement methods then are used to try to collect definitive facts to support decisions of an Executive Council of the Treaty. Refining and optimizing the science methods for practical survey, sampling, and measurement requires reasonable measurement objectives to be stated. The authors will present a few scenario-dependant objectives such that the field approaches and equipment specifications could follow.

  9. Natural gamma radioactivity and of {sup 137} Cs in soil of the Chimaltitan municipality, Jalisco, Mexico; Radiactividad gamma natural y del {sup 137} Cs en suelo del Municipio de Chimaltitan, Jalisco, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garay, A.; Mireles, F.; Quirino, L.L.; Davila, J.I.; Rios, C.; Lugo, J.F.; Soriano, J.M.; Angoli, A. [UAEN-Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Frac. La Penuela, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)]. e-mail: albinogaray@hotmail.com.mx

    2003-07-01

    With the purpose of determining the activity due to the natural presence of the {sup 226} Ra, {sup 232} Th, {sup 40} K and {sup 137} Cs in soil samples, of the municipality of Chimaltitan Jalisco. A set of these samples was measured in a gamma ray spectrometric system based on a High-purity Germanium detector. It is well-known that approximately 87% of the dose of the received radiation by the population is due to sources of natural radiation and 13% of the anthropogenic radiation. The gamma radiation comes mainly from the {sup 40} K and of those radionuclides of the series of radioactive decay of {sup 238} U and {sup 232} Th that its find dispersed thoroughly in the terrestrial crust. In this work its were analyzed twenty-two soil samples. It is enlarged the activity characterization for the radioisotopes of {sup 226} Ra {sup 232} Th, {sup 40} K and {sup 137} Cs. (Author)

  10. Radionuclides accumulation in milk and its products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmuleva, N.I.; Barinov, E.Y.; Petukhov, V.L. [Novosibirsk State Agrarian University (Russian Federation)

    2003-05-01

    The problem of radioactive pollution is extremely urgent in Russia in connection with presence of territories polluted by radionuclides on places of nuclear tests, in zones around the enterprises on production, processing and storage of radioactive materials, and also in areas of emergency pollution (Barakhtin, 2001). The aim of our investigation was a determination of the levels of the main radioactive elements - {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in diary products. 363 samples of milk, dry milk, butter, cheese and yogurt from Novosibirsk region were examined. {sup 137}Cs level was 3.7 to 9.2 times higher than {sup 90}Sr one in milk, cheese and yogurt. At the same time the level of these radio-nuclides in butter was identical (8.03 Bk/kg). (authors)

  11. Tracing Noble Gas Radionuclides in the Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Collon, P; Lu, Z T

    2004-01-01

    Trace analysis of radionuclides is an essential and versatile tool in modern science and technology. Due to their ideal geophysical and geochemical properties, long-lived noble gas radionuclides, in particular, 39Ar (t1/2 = 269 yr), 81Kr (t1/2 = 2.3x10^5 yr) and 85Kr (t1/2 = 10.8 yr), have long been recognized to have a wide range of important applications in Earth sciences. In recent years, significant progress has been made in the development of practical analytical methods, and has led to applications of these isotopes in the hydrosphere (tracing the flow of groundwater and ocean water). In this article, we introduce the applications of these isotopes and review three leading analytical methods: Low-Level Counting (LLC), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA).

  12. Radionuclide transport in the Yenisei River

    CERN Document Server

    Vakulovsky, S M; Kabanov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Data characterizing the pollution of the Yenisei River (water and bottom sediment) by radionuclide resulting from the use of the river water for cooling industrial reactors in the Mining-Chemical Complex are presented. Studies have been made of the contamination of the river during the period when reactors with direct flow cooling were used and after these were shut down. Distinctive features of the migration of radionuclide in the Yenisei are noted, in particular, their distribution between the solid and liquid phases. The amounts of 137Cs, 65Zn, 60Co, 54Mn, and 152Eu in the channel are determined from the effluent discharge site to Dudinka port. The rate of continuous self removal of 137Cs is estimated to be 0.19 1/year, corresponding to a half purification time of 3.6 years for a 600 km long segment of the river bed.

  13. Radionuclide synovectomy – essentials for rheumatologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek M. Chojnowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70–80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice.

  14. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  15. Radionuclide demonstration of intrapulmonary shunting in cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bank, E.R.; Thrall, J.H.; Dantzker, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The association of hepatic cirrhosis and severe arterial hypoxemia has been well described. Although alterations in ventilatory function may partially account for the hypoxemia, the principal mechanism is thought to be a microangiopathic change in the pulmonary vasculature resulting in intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting with resultant systemic desaturation. Whole-body radionuclide scans with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin labeling have been diagnostic of right-to-left shunting by their demonstration of tracer accumulation within the extrapulmonary circulation. A case of severe pulmonary arteriovenous shunting in an alcoholic patient in whom hepatic disease had not been of apparent clinical significance before radionuclide scanning is reported. He did not have cuntaeous angiomata as have all other patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hypoxemia.

  16. Radionuclide demonstration of intrapulmonary shunting in cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bank, E.R.; Thrall, J.H.; Dantzker, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The association of hepatic cirrhosis and severe arterial hypoxemia has been well described. Although alterations in ventilatory function may partially account for the hypoxemia, the principal mechanism is thought to be a microangiopathic change in the pulmonary arteriovenous shunting with resultant systemic desaturation. Whole-body radionuclide scans with technetium-99m macroaggrregated albumin (/sup 99m/Tc MAA) labeling have been diagnostic of right-to-left shunting by their demonstration of tracer accumulation within the extrapulmonary circulation. A case of severe pulmonary arteriovenous shunting in an alcoholic patient in whom hepatic disease had not been of apparent clinical significance before radionuclide scanning is reported. He did not have cutaneous angiomata as have all other patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hypoxemia.

  17. Mixotrophy in the terrestrial green alga Apatococcus lobatus (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavs, Lydia; Schumann, Rhena; Karsten, Ulf; Lorenz, Maike

    2016-04-01

    The green microalga Apatococcus lobatus is widely distributed in terrestrial habitats throughout many climatic zones. It dominates green biofilms on natural and artificial substrata in temperate latitudes and is regarded as a key genus of obligate terrestrial consortia. Until now, its isolation, cultivation and application as a terrestrial model organism has been hampered by slow growth rates and low growth capacities. A mixotrophic culturing approach clearly enhanced the accumulation of biomass, thereby permitting the future application of A. lobatus in different types of bio-assays necessary for material and biofilm research. The ability of A. lobatus to grow mixotrophically is assumed as a competitive advantage in terrestrial habitats. © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  18. Loading technique for preparing radionuclide containing nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2012213698A The present invention relates to a novel composition and method for loading delivery systems such as liposome compositions with radionuclides useful in targeted diagnostic and/or therapy of target site, such as cancerous tissue and, in general, pathological conditions associ...... of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging technique. One specific aspect of the invention is directed to a method of producing nanoparticles with desired targeting properties for diagnostic and/or radio-therapeutic applications....

  19. Breast-Dedicated Radionuclide Imaging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, David F C; Freese, David L; Levin, Craig S

    2016-02-01

    Breast-dedicated radionuclide imaging systems show promise for increasing clinical sensitivity for breast cancer while minimizing patient dose and cost. We present several breast-dedicated coincidence-photon and single-photon camera designs that have been described in the literature and examine their intrinsic performance, clinical relevance, and impact. Recent tracer development is mentioned, results from recent clinical tests are summarized, and potential areas for improvement are highlighted. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea; Wahl, Linnea

    2008-06-13

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). The EPA regulates radionuclide emissions that may be released from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or that may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2007, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor stack or building emissions sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]), there were no diffuse emissions, and there were no unplanned emissions. Emissions from minor sources either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities received for use or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 3.0, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2007 is 1.2 x 10{sup -2} mrem/yr (1.2 x 10{sup -4} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) EPA dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 3.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (3.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2007.

  1. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea

    2009-05-21

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

  2. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea

    2010-06-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40CFR61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2009, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2009 is 7.0 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (7.0 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.5 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.5 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2009.

  3. Radionuclide release calculations for SAR-08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Gavin; Miller, Alex; Smith, Graham; Jackson, Duncan (Enviros Consulting Ltd, Wolverhampton (United Kingdom))

    2008-04-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the post-closure safety assessment of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate waste (L/ILW), SAFE, the SKB has prepared an updated assessment called SAR-08. This report describes the radionuclide release calculations that have been undertaken as part of SAR-08. The information, assumptions and data used in the calculations are reported and the results are presented. The calculations address issues raised in the regulatory review, but also take account of new information including revised inventory data. The scenarios considered include the main case of expected behaviour of the system, with variants; low probability releases, and so-called residual scenarios. Apart from these scenario uncertainties, data uncertainties have been examined using a probabilistic approach. Calculations have been made using the AMBER software. This allows all the component features of the assessment model to be included in one place. AMBER has been previously used to reproduce results the corresponding calculations in the SAFE assessment. It is also used in demonstration of the IAEA's near surface disposal assessment methodology ISAM and has been subject to very substantial verification tests and has been used in verifying other assessment codes. Results are presented as a function of time for the release of radionuclides from the near field, and then from the far field into the biosphere. Radiological impacts of the releases are reported elsewhere. Consideration is given to each radionuclide and to each component part of the repository. The releases from the entire repository are also presented. The peak releases rates are, for most scenarios, due to organic C-14. Other radionuclides which contribute to peak release rates include inorganic C-14, Ni-59 and Ni-63. (author)

  4. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, J.J.

    1986-12-01

    Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the toddler's fracture, sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. 64 references.

  5. Terrestrial locomotion in arachnids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagna, Joseph C; Peattie, Anne M

    2012-05-01

    In this review, we assess the current state of knowledge on terrestrial locomotion in Arachnida. Arachnids represent a single diverse (>100,000 species) clade containing well-defined subgroups (at both the order and subordinal levels) that vary morphologically around a basic body plan, yet exhibit highly disparate limb usage, running performance, and tarsal attachment mechanisms. Spiders (Araneae), scorpions (Scorpiones), and harvestmen (Opiliones) have received the most attention in the literature, while some orders have never been subject to rigorous mechanical characterization. Most well-characterized taxa move with gaits analogous to the alternating tripod gaits that characterize fast-moving Insecta - alternating tetrapods or alternating tripods (when one pair of legs is lifted from the ground for some other function). However, between taxa, there is considerable variation in the regularity of phasing between legs. Both large and small spiders appear to show a large amount of variation in the distribution of foot-ground contact, even between consecutive step-cycles of a single run. Mechanisms for attachment to vertical surfaces also vary, and may depend on tufts of adhesive hairs, fluid adhesives, silks, or a combination of these. We conclude that Arachnida, particularly with improvements in microelectronic force sensing technology, can serve as a powerful study system for understanding the kinematics, dynamics, and ecological correlates of sprawled-posture locomotion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Biosorption of Radionuclide Uranium by Deinococcus radiodurans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Dong, Fa-qin; Dai, Qun-wei; Liu, Ming-xue; Nie, Xiao-qin; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Jia-lin; Zhou, Xian

    2015-04-01

    As a biological adsorbent, Living Deinococcus radiodurans was used for removing radionuclide uranium in the aqueous solution. The effect factors on biosorption of radionuclide uranium were researched in the present paper, including solution pH values and initial uranium concentration. Meanwhile, the biosorption mechanism was researched by the method of FTIR and SEM/EDS. The results show that the optimum conditions for biosorption are as follows: pH = 5, co = 100 mg · L(-1) and the maximum biosorption capacity is up to 240 mgU · g(-1). According to the SEM results and EDXS analysis, it is indicated that the cell surface is attached by lots of sheet uranium crystals, and the main biosorpiton way of uranium is the ion exchange or surface complexation. Comparing FTIR spectra and FTIR fitting spectra before and after biosorption, we can find that the whole spectra has a certain change, particularly active groups (such as amide groups of the protein, hydroxy, carboxyl and phosphate group) are involved in the biosorption process. Then, there is a new peak at 906 cm(-1) and it is a stretching vibration peak of UO2(2+). Obviously, it is possible that as an anti radiation microorganism, Deinococcus radiodurans could be used for removing radionuclide uranium in radiation environment.

  7. Radionuclide Penogram in Diagnosis of Vasculogenic Impotence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Kim, Kwang Won; Ha, Sung Woo; Lee, Kyu Bo; Whang, Kee Suk; Yoon, Yeo Deuk; Paek, Yoo Kyu [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-07-15

    Vasculogenic impotence is produced by abnormalities of vascular blood supply or drainage, and is the most common cause of various organic impotences. An increasing awareness of vascular causes of impotence has resulted from development of various diagnostic tests, but precise measurement of penile blood flow is difficult. Radionuclide penogram has been introduced recently to diagnose vasculogenic impotence. Forty-one impotent patients and 12 normal men were studied with radionuclide erection penogram using {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate and an intracavernous injection of papaverine. We defined arteriogenic impotence as arterial index less than 0.66, and venogram impotence as venous index greater than 0.09. By this criteria, the false positive ratio in normal men was 17% and the false negative ratio in radically cystectomized patients was 0%. Side effects were small purpura of the penile shaft and dull pain during injection of papaverine. The radionuclide erection penogram was noninvasive and gave a dynamic evaluation of the arterial supply, venous drainage, and blood flow in the corporeal bodies. This method should be considered as a valuable adjunct to evaluate patients with vasculogenic impotence.

  8. UPTAKE OF RADIONUCLIDE METALS BY SPME FIBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duff, M; S Crump, S; Robert02 Ray, R; Keisha Martin, K; Donna Beals, D

    2006-08-28

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating high explosive (HE) and fire debris (FD) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of HE and FD residue involves using solid phase microextraction or SPME fibers to remove residue of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most metals. However, no studies have measured the affinity of radionuclides for SPME fibers. The focus of this research was to examine the affinity of dissolved radionuclide ({sup 239/240}Pu, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co and {sup 226}Ra) and stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Sr, Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr, Ru, and Nd) for SPME fibers at the exposure conditions that favor the uptake of HE and FD residues. Our results from radiochemical and mass spectrometric analyses indicate these metals have little measurable affinity for these SPME fibers during conditions that are conducive to HE and FD residue uptake with subsequent analysis by liquid or gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

  9. Assessing doses to terrestrial wildlife at a radioactive waste disposal site: Inter-comparison of modelling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, M.P., E-mail: mathew.johansen@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW, 2232 (Australia); Barnett, C.L., E-mail: clb@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Beresford, N.A., E-mail: nab@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Brown, J.E., E-mail: justin.brown@nrpa.no [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Cerne, M., E-mail: marko.cerne@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Howard, B.J., E-mail: bjho@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Kamboj, S., E-mail: skamboj@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States); Keum, D.-K., E-mail: dkkeum@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Smodis, B. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Twining, J.R., E-mail: jrt@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW, 2232 (Australia); Vandenhove, H., E-mail: hvandenh@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium); Vives i Batlle, J., E-mail: jvbatll@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium); Wood, M.D., E-mail: m.d.wood@salford.ac.uk [University of Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom); Yu, C., E-mail: cyu@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Radiological doses to terrestrial wildlife were examined in this model inter-comparison study that emphasised factors causing variability in dose estimation. The study participants used varying modelling approaches and information sources to estimate dose rates and tissue concentrations for a range of biota types exposed to soil contamination at a shallow radionuclide waste burial site in Australia. Results indicated that the dominant factor causing variation in dose rate estimates (up to three orders of magnitude on mean total dose rates) was the soil-to-organism transfer of radionuclides that included variation in transfer parameter values as well as transfer calculation methods. Additional variation was associated with other modelling factors including: how participants conceptualised and modelled the exposure configurations (two orders of magnitude); which progeny to include with the parent radionuclide (typically less than one order of magnitude); and dose calculation parameters, including radiation weighting factors and dose conversion coefficients (typically less than one order of magnitude). Probabilistic approaches to model parameterisation were used to encompass and describe variable model parameters and outcomes. The study confirms the need for continued evaluation of the underlying mechanisms governing soil-to-organism transfer of radionuclides to improve estimation of dose rates to terrestrial wildlife. The exposure pathways and configurations available in most current codes are limited when considering instances where organisms access subsurface contamination through rooting, burrowing, or using different localised waste areas as part of their habitual routines. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of modelled dose rates to terrestrial biota from radionuclides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The substantial variation among current approaches is quantifiable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dominant variable was soil

  10. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William; Peyton, Brent; Gerlach, Robin; Lee, Brady

    2006-04-05

    Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and medium-level radioactive waste sites contain mixtures of heavy metals, radionuclides and assorted organic materials. Over time, water infiltrates the wastes, and releases metals and radionuclides causing transport into the surrounding environment. We propose that fermentative microorganisms are active in these sites and may control metal and radionuclide migration from source zones (Figure 1). The following overarching hypothesis will drive our research: 'Metals and radionuclides can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic compounds. These low molecular weight organic compounds can increase metal and radionuclide mobility by chelation (i.e., certain organic acids) or decrease mobility by stimulating respiratory metal reducing microorganisms.' The objective of our research is to determine the effect of carbon and energy flow through simulated waste environments on metal and radionuclide migration from waste pits and trenches across the DOE complex. Metals and radionuclides can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic fermentative microorganisms have been chosen as the focus of this research because their activity is a critical first step that we hypothesize will control subsequent fate and transport in contaminated natural systems. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic

  11. Secondary Uranium-Phase Paragenesis and Incorporation of Radionuclides into Secondary Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Finch

    2001-06-05

    The purpose of this analysis/model report (AMR) is to assess the potential for uranium (U) (VI) compounds, formed during the oxidative corrosion of spent uranium-oxide (UO{sub 2}) fuels, to sequester certain radionuclides and, thereby, limit their release. The ''unsaturated drip tests'' being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provide the basis of this AMR (Table 1). The ANL drip tests on spent fuel are the only experiments on fuel corrosion from which solids have been analyzed for trace levels of radionuclides. Brief summaries are provided of the results from other selected corrosion and dissolution experiments on spent UO{sub 2} fuels, specifically those conducted under nominally oxidizing conditions. Discussions of the current understanding of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of U(VI) compounds is provided in order to outline the scientific basis for modeling precipitation and dissolution of potential radionuclide-bearing phases under repository-relevant conditions. Attachment I provides additional information on corrosion mechanisms and behaviors of radionuclides in the tests at ANL. Attachment II reviews occurrence, formation, and alteration (collectively known as paragenesis) of naturally occurring U(VI) minerals because natural mineral occurrences can be used to assess the possible long-term behaviors of U(VI) compounds formed in short-term laboratory experiments and to extrapolate experimental results to repository-relevant time scales. This AMR develops a model for calculating dissolved concentrations of radionuclides that are incorporated into U(VI) compounds, which is an alternative to models currently used in TSPA to calculate dissolved concentration limits for certain radionuclides. In particular, the model developed in this AMR applies to Np (neptunium) concentrations being controlled by solid uranyl oxyhydroxides that are known to contain trace levels of Np. The results of this AMR and the conceptual model

  12. Real-time radionuclide identification in γ-emitter mixtures based on spiking neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, C; Bichler, O; Lourenço, V; Thiam, C; Thévenin, M

    2016-03-01

    Portal radiation monitors dedicated to the prevention of illegal traffic of nuclear materials at international borders need to deliver as fast as possible a radionuclide identification of a potential radiological threat. Spectrometry techniques applied to identify the radionuclides contributing to γ-emitter mixtures are usually performed using off-line spectrum analysis. As an alternative to these usual methods, a real-time processing based on an artificial neural network and Bayes' rule is proposed for fast radionuclide identification. The validation of this real-time approach was carried out using γ-emitter spectra ((241)Am, (133)Ba, (207)Bi, (60)Co, (137)Cs) obtained with a high-efficiency well-type NaI(Tl). The first tests showed that the proposed algorithm enables a fast identification of each γ-emitting radionuclide using the information given by the whole spectrum. Based on an iterative process, the on-line analysis only needs low-statistics spectra without energy calibration to identify the nature of a radiological threat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radionuclides in waters and soil near the Lagoa Real uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Susana Oliveira de; Freire, Fabinara Dantas, E-mail: sosouza@ufs.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica; Kozlowska, Beata; Walencik-Lata, Agata, E-mail: beata.kozlowska@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Dias, Dario M., E-mail: engenheirodario@gmail.com [Secretaria Municipal de Meio Ambiente e Turismo, Andarai, BA (Brazil); Veiga, Artur Jose Pires, E-mail: tk1@ibest.com [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia (UESB), Itapetinga, BA (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas

    2015-07-01

    Uranium mining generates fuel for the nuclear power plants and it is the main source of income for the region of Caetite-BA. However, Non-Governmental Organizations claim that mining pollutes the environment and jeopardizes human health and safety. Besides uranium, the ground contains significant concentrations of thorium and of all radionuclides of its family, such as radium isotopes. In this framework, we carried out an independent study analyzing the concentration of the radionuclides activities {sup 226,} {sup 228}Ra and {sup 234,238}U in water samples and radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K in soil samples using different techniques of nuclear spectrometry. The selection criteria for the collection points were their proximity to the uranium processing plant and to affluent rivers. The soil samples presented very low concentration of activity for radionuclides investigated, compared to the limits established of the exclusion, exemption and impartiality for radiation protection requirement given by the Regulator Position established by CNEN. The amount of radioisotopes appears consistent with a natural origin, thus it is not possible to state that the mining process in Caetite increases pollution or radiation exposure in a significant way. (author)

  14. Determination of Radionuclide Concentrations in Tea Samples Cultivated in Guilan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Poursharif

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Foodstuffs are known to contain natural and artificial radionuclides. Determination of radionuclide concentration is of great significance for the protection of human health. The main objective of the present study was the quantification of radionuclides in tea samples, cultivated in Guilan Province in North of Iran. Materials and Methods The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K, and 137Cs in 18 tea samples were measured, using a gamma spectrometry system. In addition, radium equivalent index (Raeq and radiation hazard index (HI were calculated. ANOVA test was used for the statistical analysis of the data Results The concentration of 137Cs was below the minimum detectable activity (MDA. The concentrations of 226Ra and 232Th ranged from < MDA to 0.042 and < MDA to 0.037  Bq/kg respectively. The mean concentration of 40K was 410±15  Bq/kg. Based on the findings, the concentration of 40K was significantly higher than other radionuclides (P

  15. Obliquity and Eccentricity Constraints for Terrestrial Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Torres, Stephanie M.

    2017-11-01

    Exoplanet discoveries over recent years have shown that terrestrial planets are exceptionally common. Many of these planets are in compact systems that result in complex orbital dynamics. A key step toward determining the surface conditions of these planets is understanding the latitudinally dependent flux incident at the top of the atmosphere as a function of orbital phase. The two main properties of a planet that influence the time-dependent nature of the flux are the obliquity and orbital eccentricity of the planet. We derive the criterion for which the flux variation due to obliquity is equivalent to the flux variation due to orbital eccentricity. This equivalence is computed for both the maximum and average flux scenarios, the latter of which includes the effects of the diurnal cycle. We apply these calculations to four known multi-planet systems (GJ 163, K2-3, Kepler-186, and Proxima Centauri), where we constrain the eccentricity of terrestrial planets using orbital dynamics considerations and model the effect of obliquity on incident flux. We discuss the implications of these simulations on climate models for terrestrial planets and outline detectable signatures of planetary obliquity.

  16. Terrestrial forest management plan for Palmyra Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Stacie A.; McEachern, Kathryn; Fisher, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    This 'Terrestrial Forest Management Plan for Palmyra Atoll' was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for The Nature Conservancy (TNC) Palmyra Program to refine and expand goals and objectives developed through the Conservation Action Plan process. It is one in a series of adaptive management plans designed to achieve TNC's mission toward the protection and enhancement of native wildlife and habitat. The 'Terrestrial Forest Management Plan for Palmyra Atoll' focuses on ecosystem integrity and specifically identifies and addresses issues related to assessing the status and distribution of resources, as well as the pressures acting upon them, most specifically nonnative and potentially invasive species. The plan, which presents strategies for increasing ecosystem integrity, provides a framework to implement and track the progress of conservation and restoration goals related to terrestrial resources on Palmyra Atoll. The report in its present form is intended to be an overview of what is known about historical and current forest resources; it is not an exhaustive review of all available literature relevant to forest management but an attempt to assemble as much information specific to Palmyra Atoll as possible. Palmyra Atoll is one of the Northern Line Islands in the Pacific Ocean southwest of the Hawai`ian Islands. It consists of many heavily vegetated islets arranged in a horseshoe pattern around four lagoons and surrounded by a coral reef. The terrestrial ecosystem consists of three primary native vegetation types: Pisonia grandis forest, coastal strand forest, and grassland. Among these vegetation types, the health and extent of Pisonia grandis forest is of particular concern. Overall, the three vegetation types support 25 native plant species (two of which may be extirpated), 14 species of sea birds, six shore birds, at least one native reptile, at least seven native insects, and six native land crabs. Green and hawksbill turtles forage at Palmyra Atoll

  17. Cryoconites from Alpine glaciers: Radionuclide accumulation and age estimation with Pu and Cs isotopes and 210Pb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilflinger, T; Lettner, H; Hubmer, A; Bossew, P; Sattler, B; Slupetzky, H

    2017-10-19

    Cryoconites ("cold dust", derived from the Greek) are aeolian sediments accumulated on glacier surfaces. In cryoconites from the surface of the Stubacher Sonnblickkees, a temperate Austrian glacier, extremely high activity concentrations of artificial and natural radionuclides were found. Artificial radionuclides stem from two clearly distinguishable sources, global fallout from the nuclear weapons testing era deposited over a period of years until roughly 1966 and the fallout from Chernobyl in 1986, which was essentially deposited as a single input during one week. Anthropogenic radionuclides identified were 137Cs, 134Cs, 238Pu, 239+240Pu, 90Sr, 241Am, 60Co, 125Sb, 154Eu, and 207Bi. The naturally occurring radionuclides detected were the long-lived radon decay product 210Pb, the primordial radionuclide 4 K and the cosmogenic 7Be. Isotopic ratios of 134Cs/137Cs and 239+240Pu/238Pu were used to separate the nuclide inventory into the contributions of the two aforementioned sources, which show varying degrees of mixing and provide information on the mixing age of the cryoconites. Since isotopic ratios of Pu often have high uncertainties due to low absolute concentrations, age estimation based on this method can be quite inaccurate. Additional information about the age of cryoconites was obtained through analysis of 210Pb, which is constantly deposited over time. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Assessment of natural radionuclides concentration from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series in Virginia and Burley varieties of Nicotiana tabacum L; Avaliacao da concentracao dos radionuclideos naturais das series do {sup 238}U e {sup 232}Th nas variedades Burley e Virginia da Nicotiana tabacum L.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carolina Fernanda da

    2015-07-01

    Brazil is the largest exporter and second largest producer of tobacco worldwide, according to the crop production of 2013/2014. The tobacco plant (Nicotiana tabacum L.) is used to manufacture all derivatives and the chemical composition of the resulting tobacco products varies with the type of tobacco leaves, how they are grown, the region where they are cultivated, the characteristics of preparation (compression, filter and paper) and the temperature variations resulting from the incomplete combustion of tobacco. Tobacco products are extensively used throughout the world, and the most consumed are cigarettes, cigars and narghile. The damaging effects that these products cause to human health are discussed globally, and many surveys are performed with the aim of relating the use of these products with various illnesses. There is a lack of information about the radiological characterization of the tobacco plant both in international and Brazilian literature. The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of radionuclides {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 22}'6Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po, members from the {sup 238}U decay series, and the radionuclides {sup 232}Th and {sup 228}Ra members of the {sup 232}Th decay series in the varieties Burley and Virginia, which are the most cultivated in Brazil. Plants from these varieties were cultivated in pots with organic substrate and fertilizer and also acquired from the producers and analyzed by alpha spectrometry for U and Th isotopes and {sup 210}Po determination, and gross alpha and beta counting, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb determination. The whole plant, from both places, was analyzed; root, stem, leaves, as well as the organic substrate, the fertilizers, and the soil. The results for U and Th isotopes presented values below the detection limits of the methods to the leaves and stems of all plants analyzed, with measurable results only in roots, soil, and substrate. The

  19. Terrestrial feeding in aquatic turtles: environment-dependent feeding behavior modulation and the evolution of terrestrial feeding in Emydidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stayton, Charles Tristan

    2011-12-15

    Evolutionary transitions between aquatic and terrestrial environments are common in vertebrate evolution. These transitions require major changes in most physiological functions, including feeding. Emydid turtles are ancestrally aquatic, with most species naturally feeding only in water, but some terrestrial species can modulate their feeding behavior appropriately for both media. In addition, many aquatic species can be induced to feed terrestrially. A comparison of feeding in both aquatic and terrestrial environments presents an excellent opportunity to investigate the evolution of terrestrial feeding from aquatic feeding, as well as a system within which to develop methods for studying major evolutionary transitions between environments. Individuals from eight species of emydid turtles (six aquatic, two terrestrial) were filmed while feeding underwater and on land. Bite kinematics were analyzed to determine whether aquatic turtles modulated their feeding behavior in a consistent and appropriate manner between environments. Aquatic turtles showed consistent changes between environments, taking longer bites and using more extensive motions of the jaw and hyoid when feeding on land. However, these motions differ from those shown by species that naturally feed in both environments and mostly do not seem to be appropriate for terrestrial feeding. For example, more extensive motions of the hyoid are only effective during underwater suction feeding. Emydids evolving to feed on land probably would have needed to evolve or learn to overcome many, but not all, aspects of the intrinsic emydid response to terrestrial feeding. Studies that investigate major evolutionary transitions must determine what responses to the new environment are shown by naïve individuals in order to fully understand the evolutionary patterns and processes associated with these transitions.

  20. Long-term modelling of fly ash and radionuclide emissions as well as deposition fluxes due to the operation of large oil shale-fired power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaasma, Taavi; Kaasik, Marko; Loosaar, Jüri; Kiisk, Madis; Tkaczyk, Alan H

    2017-11-01

    Two of the world's largest oil shale-fired power plants (PPs) in Estonia have been operational over 40 years, emitting various pollutants, such as fly ash, SOx, NOx, heavy metals, volatile organic compounds as well as radionuclides to the environment. The emissions from these PPs have varied significantly during this period, with the maximum during the 1970s and 1980s. The oil shale burned in the PPs contains naturally occurring radionuclides from the (238)U and (232)Th decay series as well as (40)K. These radionuclides become enriched in fly ash fractions (up to 10 times), especially in the fine fly ash escaping the purification system. Using a validated Gaussian-plume model, atmospheric dispersion modelling was carried out to determine the quantity and a real magnitude of fly ash and radionuclide deposition fluxes during different decades. The maximum deposition fluxes of volatile radionuclides ((210)Pb and (210)Po) were around 70 mBq m(-2) d(-1) nearby the PPs during 1970s and 1980s. Due to the reduction of burned oil shale and significant renovations done on the PPs, the deposition fluxes were reduced to 10 mBq m(-2) d(-1) in the 2000s and down to 1.5 mBq m(-2) d(-1) in 2015. The maximum deposition occurs within couple of kilometers of the PPs, but the impacted area extends to over 50 km from the sources. For many radionuclides, including (210)Po, the PPs have been larger contributors of radionuclides to the environment via atmospheric pathway than natural sources. This is the first time that the emissions and deposition fluxes of radionuclides from the PPs have been quantified, providing the information about their radionuclide deposition load on the surrounding environment during various time periods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Terrestrial nitrogen cycles: Some unanswered questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen is generally considered to be the element which most often limits the growth of plants in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. It regulates plant growth because photosynthetic rates are strongly dependent on the concentration of nitrogen in leaves, and because relatively large mounts of protein are required for cell division and growth. Yet nitrogen is abundant in the biosphere - the well-mixed pool in the atmosphere is considered inexhaustible compared to biotic demand, and the amount of already fixed organic nitrogen in soils far exceeds annual plant uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. In regions where natural vegetation is not nitrogen limited, continuous cultivation induces nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen loss from cultivated lands is more rapid than that of other elements, and nitrogen fertilization is generally required to maintain crop yield under any continuous system. The pervasiveness of nitrogen deficiency in many natural and most managed sites is discussed.

  2. Bioconcentration of artificial radionuclides in edible mushrooms: in situ and in vitro studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dementyev, Dmitry V.; Manukovsky, Nikolai S.; Bolsunovsky, Alexander Ya.; Alexandrova, Yuliyana V. [Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 660036, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    grown on the soil-like substrate showed that accumulation of Am-241 from solution by mycelium of Pleurotus ostreatus and Neonothopanus nimbi reached 97%. Hence, these mushroom species can be used for bioremediation of solutions contaminated by radionuclides. The substrates prepared from Yenisei flood plain soils and bottom sediments, which contained Co-60, Cs-137, and Eu-152 and were also supplemented with Am-241, were used to grow fruiting bodies of P. ostreatus. The analysis showed that the fruiting bodies accumulated only Cs-137 and Am-241. The highest CF of Cs-137 by P. ostreatus grown on the sediment-based substrate was an order of magnitude higher than the CF of Cs-137 by the mushrooms grown on the soil-based substrate (0.1 vs. 0.008), due to differences in Cs-137 bioavailability in soil and sediment. Also, the CF of Am-241 was twice higher in the fruiting bodies grown on the sediment-based substrate than in those grown on the soil-based substrate (0.005 vs. 0.0026). Analysis of the CFs showed that under natural conditions, accumulation rates of Cs-137 by mushrooms were an order of magnitude higher than those of U-238. Under laboratory conditions, accumulation of Cs-137 in fruiting bodies was an order of magnitude greater than accumulation of Am-241, a transuranium radionuclide. The ability of mushrooms to accumulate artificial radionuclides makes them good candidates for bioremediation of contaminated solutions and soils. (authors)

  3. Remediation of radionuclide pollutants through biosorption - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Nilanjana [Environmental Biotechnology Division, School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore (India)

    2012-01-15

    The development of nuclear science and technology has led to the increase of nuclear wastes containing radionuclides to be released and disposed in the environment. Pollution caused by radionuclides is a serious problem throughout the world. To solve the problem, substantial research efforts have been directed worldwide to adopt sustainable technologies for the treatment of radionuclide containing wastes. Biosorption represents a technological innovation as well as a cost effective excellent remediation technology for cleaning up radionuclides from aqueous environment. A variety of biomaterials viz. algae, fungi, bacteria, plant biomass, etc. have been reported for radionuclide remediation with encouraging results. This paper reviews the achievements and current status of radionuclide remediation through biosorption which will provide insights into this research frontier. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Radionuclides and stable elements in the sediments of the Yesa Reservoir, Central Spanish Pyrenees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navas, Ana; Gaspar, Leticia; Palazon, Leticia [Estacion Experimental Aula Dei (EEAD- CSIC), Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Soil and Water; Valero-Garces, Blas [Instituto Pirenaico de Ecologia (IPE-CSIC), Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    radionuclides, sediment components and stable elements provided evidence of a stronger influence of the dynamics of sediment supply by floods in the central areas closer to the main channel (cores) than in the littoral areas (profile). Conclusions: The radionuclide distributions were consistent with the history of the reservoir infilling and with the processes of transport and accumulation of sediments. Compared to the natural radionuclides, the artificial radionuclide {sup 137}Cs varied the most and showed distinctive patterns. The methods used allowed the identification of natural inputs into the system and its differentiation from fluvial transport and reservoir deposition. The results provide insights into the pathways and processes involved in the mobilization of radionuclides in the environment. (orig.)

  5. Radionuclides and heavy metal contents in phosphogypsum samples in comparison to cerrado soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacomino, Vanusa Maria Feliciano; Oliveira, Kerley Alberto Pereira de, E-mail: vmfj@cdtn.b, E-mail: kapo@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Taddei, Maria Helena Tirollo; Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes, E-mail: mhtaddei@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: pmarcos@cnen.gov.b [Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas (LAPOC/CNEN-MG), MG (Brazil); Siqueira, Maria Celia, E-mail: mc.ufscar@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Carneiro, Maria Eleonora Deschamps Pires, E-mail: eleonora.deschamps@meioambiente.mg.gov.b [Fundacao Estadual do Meio Ambiente (FEAM), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Gestao de Residuos Solidos; Silva, David Faria da; Mello, Jaime Wilson Vargas de, E-mail: davidf.agro@hotmail.co, E-mail: jwvmello@ufv.b [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Solos

    2009-09-15

    Phosphogypsum (PG) or agricultural gypsum, a solid waste from the phosphate fertilizer industry, is used as soil amendment, especially on soils in the Cerrado region, in Brazil. This material may however contain natural radionuclides and metals which can be transferred to soils, plants and water sources. This paper presents and discusses the results of physical and chemical analyses that characterized samples of PG and compares them to the results found in two typical soils of the Cerrado, a clayey and sandy one. These analyses included: solid waste classification, evaluation of organic matter content and of P, K, Ca, Mg, and Al concentrations and of the mineralogical composition. Natural radionuclides and metal concentrations in PG and soil samples were also measured. Phosphogypsum was classified as Class II A - not dangerous, not inert, not corrosive and not reactive. The organic matter content in the soil samples was low and potential acidity high. In the mean, the specific {sup 226}Ra activity in the phosphogypsum samples (252 Bq kg{sup -1}) was below the maximum level recommended by USEPA, which is 370 Bq kg{sup -1} for agricultural use. In addition, this study verified that natural radionuclides and metals concentrations in PG were lower than in the clayey Oxisol of Sete Lagoas, Minas Gerais, Brazil. These results indicated that the application of phosphogypsum as soil amendment in agriculture would not cause a significant impact on the environment. (author)

  6. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

  7. Seven years of radionuclide laboratory at IMC - important achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubý, M; Kučka, J; Pánek, J; Štěpánek, P

    2016-10-20

    For many important research topics in polymer science the use of radionuclides brings significant benefits concerning nanotechnology, polymer drug delivery systems, tissue engineering etc. This contribution describes important achievements of the radionuclide laboratory at Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (IMC) in the area of polymers for biomedical applications. Particular emphasis will be given to water-soluble polymer carriers of radionuclides, thermoresponsive polymer radionuclide carriers, thermoresponsive polymers for local brachytherapy, polymer scaffolds modified with (radiolabeled) peptides and polymer copper chelators for the therapy of Wilson´s disease.

  8. Environmental impact assessment of radionuclide and metal contamination at the former U site at Kadji Sai, Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, O C; Stegnar, P; Tolongutov, B; Rosseland, B O; Strømman, G; Uralbekov, B; Usubalieva, A; Solomatina, A; Gwynn, J P; Lespukh, E; Salbu, B

    2013-09-01

    During 1949-1967, a U mine, a coal-fired thermal power plant and a processing plant for the extraction of U from the produced ash were operated at the Kadji Sai U mining site in Tonsk district, Issyk-Kul County, Kyrgyzstan. The Kadji Sai U legacy site represents a source of contamination of the local environment by naturally occurring radionuclides and associated trace elements. To assess the environmental impact of radionuclides and trace metals at the site, field expeditions were performed in 2007 and 2008 by the Joint collaboration between Norway, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan (JNKKT) project and the NATO SfP RESCA project. In addition to in situ gamma and Rn dose rate measurements, sampling included at site fractionation of water and sampling of water, fish, sediment, soils and vegetation. The concentrations of radionuclides and trace metals in water from Issyk-Kul Lake were in general low, but surprisingly high for As. Uptake of U and As was also observed in fish from the lake with maximum bioconcentration factors for liver of 1.6 and 75, respectively. The concentrations of U in water within the Kadji Sai area varied from 0.01 to 0.05 mg/L, except for downstream from the mining area where U reached a factor of 10 higher, 0.2 mg/L. Uranium concentrations in the drinking water of Kadji Sai village were about the level recommended by the WHO for drinking water. The (234)U/(238)U activity ratio reflected equilibrium conditions in the mining pond, but far from equilibrium outside this area (reaching 2.3 for an artesian well). Uranium, As and Ni were mainly present as low molecular mass (LMM, less than 10 kDa) species in all samples, indicating that these elemental species are mobile and potentially bioavailable. The soils from the mining sites were enriched in U, As and trace metals. Hot spots with elevated radioactivity levels were easily detected in Kadji Sai and radioactive particles were observed. The presence of particles carrying significant amount of

  9. Solubility of {sup 238}U radionuclide from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids using “US in vitro” digestion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok, E-mail: khoo@ukm.edu.my [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    238U radionuclide is a naturally occuring radioactive material that can be found in soil. In this study, the solubility of 238U radionuclide obtained from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids was analysed by “US P in vitro” digestion method. The synthetic gastrointestinal fluids were added to the samples with well-ordered, mixed throughly and incubated according to the human physiology digestive system. The concentration of 238U radionuclide in the solutions extracted from the soil was measured using Induced Coupling Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The concentration of 238U radionuclide from the soil samples in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids showed different values due to different homogenity of soil types and chemical reaction of 238U radionuclide. In general, the solubility of 238U radionuclide in gastric fluid was higher (0.050 – 0.209 ppm) than gastrointestinal fluids (0.024 – 0.050 ppm). It could be concluded that the US P in vitro digestion method is practicle for estimating the solubility of 238U radionuclide from soil materials and could be useful for monitoring and risk assessment purposes applying to environmental, health and contaminated soil samples.

  10. Microplastics as an emerging threat to terrestrial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Machado, Anderson Abel; Kloas, Werner; Zarfl, Christiane; Hempel, Stefan; Rillig, Matthias C

    2017-12-15

    Microplastics (plastics microplastics might first interact with biota eliciting ecologically relevant impacts. This article introduces the pervasive microplastic contamination as a potential agent of global change in terrestrial systems, highlights the physical and chemical nature of the respective observed effects, and discusses the broad toxicity of nanoplastics derived from plastic breakdown. Making relevant links to the fate of microplastics in aquatic continental systems, we here present new insights into the mechanisms of impacts on terrestrial geochemistry, the biophysical environment, and ecotoxicology. Broad changes in continental environments are possible even in particle-rich habitats such as soils. Furthermore, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that microplastics interact with terrestrial organisms that mediate essential ecosystem services and functions, such as soil dwelling invertebrates, terrestrial fungi, and plant-pollinators. Therefore, research is needed to clarify the terrestrial fate and effects of microplastics. We suggest that due to the widespread presence, environmental persistence, and various interactions with continental biota, microplastic pollution might represent an emerging global change threat to terrestrial ecosystems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Towards improved understanding of radionuclide transfer in forests and preparedness to handle contaminated forests. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetikko, V.; Rantavaara, A. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)); Aro, L. (Finnish Forest Research Institute (METLA) (Finland)); Plamboeck, A.H. (The Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) (Sweden)); Straalberg, E. (Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) (Norway))

    2009-06-15

    The seminar was planned and arranged by four Nordic organisations and provided a forum for exchange of information for Nordic scientists currently working in the field of forest radioecology or using the data. Presentations of research on nutrient cycling and radionuclide distribution in boreal forests, discussion on the needs for future research and attendance of experts on forestry, forest research and radioecology offered a unique opportunity to disseminate and receive information. The seminar programme was composed of topics of radioecology and forest research, assessment of radionuclide contamination and management of contaminated forests. Also sampling in forests, monitoring and modelling of environmental impact of disposal of spent nuclear fuel, and recent radioecological studies on forests were handled. Future research was emphasised in discussions. Below is a short compilation of these discussions: - Comprehensive planning of research projects contributing to a programme with long-term aims is possible in broadly-based multidisciplinary collaboration. Thereby independent initiatives and less coherent plans can be replaced. - Clear definition of hypotheses, planning and improving the specific methods for sampling and laboratory analyses were found crucial. - Effects of intensive biofuel harvesting on the nutrient and radionuclide flows in forests are major issues in the next decades. - Gaps in knowledge, such as lack of data on processes contributing to radionuclide distributions in forests, and on certain long-lived radionuclides (those of Cl, Tc, Np, etc.) contributing to the environmental impact of final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Topical seminars like the one accomplished are welcome in the future; compiling acute issues of multidisciplinary nature for focussed expert review and discussion can be very rewarding in many ways. To support communication and future collaboration, an informal forest network was launched in the seminar. Information is

  12. Willow wood production on radionuclide polluted areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodkin Oleg I.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: One of the key environmental problems in Belarus is effective use of agricultural lands contaminated by radionuclide due to the Chernobyl disaster. The alternative method to traditional agricultural crops is fast growing willow cultivation. It is possible to use biomass of willow as renewable energy source. The goal of our investigation was the estimation of environmental aspects of willow wood production on polluted areas. The field study experiments (2007-2010 were conducted at Krichev district of Mogilev region in eastern Belarus. This region characterized by high level of Cs-137 contamination as well as high level of heavy metals pollution. In the first stage of experiments, the concentration of cesium-137 in different parts of willow biomass had been measured and transfer factor calculated. The measuring had been done for leaves, roots, and wood. To control cesium-137 accumulation in willow biomass we apply different types (nitrogen N, phosphorus P and potassium K and dose of fertilizer. The experiments show that potassium mineral fertilizer is the key factor for radionuclide accumulation control. The optimal dose of potassium is 90 kg per hectare. On the base of experimental results the model of cesium-137 accumulation in the wood for a 21 year has been developed. In accordance with calculation to the end of willow cultivation (21 year concentration of cesium-137 in wood will not be higher than permitted even with the level of cesium-137 contamination in the soil 1480 kBq/m2 (maximum 140 kqB/m2 with permitted level for firewood is 740 Bq/kg.. The concentration of cesium-137 in the roots increases gradually and get maximum in 21 year (3000 kqB/m2. Our results confirm that in the sum about 0.8 million hectares of radionuclide polluted arable lands partly excluded from agricultural practice in Belarus could be used for willow biomass production.

  13. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  14. Radionuclides at Descartes in the central highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Throium, uranium, potassium, aluminium-26, and sodium-22 were measured by nondestructive gamma ray spectrometry in six soil and two rock samples gathered by Apollo 16 in the lunar central highlands. The soil samples probably include both major geologic formations in the vicinity, the Cayley and Descartes Formations, although it is possible that the Descartes Formation is not represented. The rock samples have low concentrations of primordial radionuclides. The Al concentrations were lower than could be expected from the high abundance of alumina in the Apollo 16 soils reported earlier, but this could be due to lower concentrations of target elements in these soils, sampling depth variations, or regolithic mixing (exposure age variations).

  15. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  16. Landscape-level terrestrial methane flux observed from a very tall tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankur R. Desai; Ke Xu; Hanqin Tian; Peter Weishampel; Jonathan Thom; Dan Baumann; Arlyn E. Andrews; Druce D. Cook; Jennifer Y. King; Randall. Kolka

    2015-01-01

    Simulating the magnitude and variability of terrestrial methane sources and sinks poses a challenge to ecosystem models because the biophysical and biogeochemical processes that lead to methane emissions from terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems are, by their nature, episodic and spatially disjunct. As a consequence, model predictions of regional methane emissions...

  17. Monitoring of radionuclides in the vicinities of Finnish nuclear power plants in 1993 and 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemola, S.; Ilus, E.; Ikaeheimonen, T.K

    1998-08-01

    Monitoring of radioactive substances around Finnish nuclear power plants continued in 1993-1994 in accordance with the regular programmes. Some 1000 samples are analysed annually from the terrestrial and aquatic environments of the two power plant sites. Trace amounts of activation products originating from airborne releases from the local power plants were detected in several air, deposition and soil samples. Discharged nuclides were more abundant in the aquatic environment, especially in samples of indicator organisms, sinking matter and sediments. However, the concentrations were so low that they did not significantly increase the radiation burden in the environment. The dominant artificial radionuclides in the vicinity of the power plants remained the cesium isotopes, especially {sup 137}Cs but also {sup 134}Cs, originating from the Chernobyl accident. (orig.) 14 refs.

  18. Trace elements and radionuclides in palm oil, soil, water, and leaves from oil palm plantations: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafisoye, O B; Oguntibeju, O O; Osibote, O A

    2017-05-03

    Oil palm (Elaeisguineensis) is one of the most productive oil producing plant in the world. Crude palm oil is composed of triglycerides supplying the world's need of edible oils and fats. Palm oil also provides essential elements and antioxidants that are potential mediators of cellular functions. Experimental studies have demonstrated the toxicity of the accumulation of significant amounts of nonessential trace elements and radionuclides in palm oil that affects the health of consumers. It has been reported that uptake of trace elements and radionuclides from the oil palm tree may be from water and soil on the palm plantations. In the present review, an attempt was made to revise and access knowledge on the presence of some selected trace elements and radionuclides in palm oil, soil, water, and leaves from oil palm plantations based on the available facts and data. Existing reports show that the presence of nonessential trace elements and radionuclides in palm oil may be from natural or anthropogenic sources in the environment. However, the available literature is limited and further research need to be channeled to the investigation of trace elements and radionuclides in soil, water, leaves, and palm oil from oil palm plantations around the globe.

  19. Confinement and migration of radionuclides in deep geological disposal; Confinement et migration des radionucleides en stockage geologique profond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, Ch

    2007-07-15

    Disposing high level nuclear waste in deep disposal repository requires to understand and to model the evolution of the different repository components as well as radionuclides migration on time-frame which are well beyond the time accessible to experiments. In particular, robust and predictive models are a key element to assess the long term safety and their reliability must rely on a accurate description of the actual processes. Within this framework, this report synthesizes the work performed by Ch. Poinssot and has been prepared for the defense of his HDR (French university degree to Manage Research). These works are focused on two main areas which are (i) the long term evolution of spent nuclear fuel and the development of radionuclide source terms models, and (ii) the migration of radionuclides in natural environment. (author)

  20. Differences in predatory pressure on terrestrial snails by birds and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The evolution of shell polymorphism in terrestrial snails is a classic textbook example of the effect of natural selection in which avian and mammalian predation represents an important selective force on gene frequency. However, many questions about predation remain unclear, especially in the case of mammals.

  1. Enchytraeids as indicator organisms for chemical stress in terrestrial ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didden, W.; Römbke, J.

    2001-01-01

    This review article surveys the available data on enchytraeid sensitivity toward chemical stress, and the effects of chemical stress on enchytraeid communities in terrestrial ecosystems. The factors affecting bioavailability of stressors to enchytraeids and the nature of direct and indirect effects

  2. Geoquímica de radionuclídeos naturais em solos de áreas circunvizinhas a uma Unidade de Mineração e Atividade de Urânio Geochemistry of natural radionuclide in soils surrounding a Mining and Plant Uranium Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gildevan Viana Cardoso

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Os impactos ambientais advindos da exploração e do beneficiamento de U são, em grande parte, idênticos àqueles causados por atividades minero-extrativistas em geral. Este trabalho teve o objetivo de determinar a partição geoquímica dos radionuclídeos naturais 238U, 226Ra e 210Pb em áreas circunvizinhas à Unidade de Mineração e Atividade de Urânio (URA das Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A., localizada na Província Uranífera de Lagoa Real, no município de Caetité, na região sudoeste do Estado da Bahia. Foram coletadas amostras de solo em cinco áreas circunvizinhas à URA, representando as principais classes de solos da região, na profundidade de 0-20 cm. Nas cinco áreas, foram determinados o teor de atividade total e o fracionamento geoquímico nas frações: F1 - levemente ácida, F2 - reduzível, F3 - oxidável, F4 - alcalina e F5 - residual. As atividades totais médias foram, em Bq kg-1 de solo, de 50 para 238U, 51 para 226Ra e 159 para 210Pb. Os extraídos na fase potencialmente biodisponível (F1 foram: 11 % para 238U, 13 % para 226Ra e 3 % para 210Pb. O 238U apresentou maior biodisponibilidade nos solos mais ácidos e maior afinidade pelos óxidos de Fe, o que não ocorreu para o 226Ra, tendo este apresentado a maior biodisponibilidade. O 210Pb apresentouse predominantemente associado a F5. As percentagens elevadas de 238U, 226Ra e 210Pb na fração geoquímica F5 indicam que as atividades observadas nos cinco solos estão, predominantemente, associadas ao material que deu origem a esses solos, e não a um processo de contaminação artificial em função da atividade da URA.The environmental impacts resulting from uranium exploration and processing are to a great extent identical to those caused by extractive mining activities in general. This study aimed to determine the geochemical partitioning of the natural radionuclides 238U, 226Ra and 210Pb in areas surrounding the Uranium Mining and Concentration Plant (URA

  3. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  4. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agool, Ali [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Center Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vellenga, Edo [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Hematology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Noninvasive imaging techniques have been used in the past for visualization the functional activity of the bone marrow compartment. Imaging with radiolabelled compounds may allow different bone marrow disorders to be distinguished. These imaging techniques, almost all of which use radionuclide-labelled tracers, such as {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid, {sup 99m}Tc-sulphur colloid, {sup 111}In-chloride, and radiolabelled white blood cells, have been used in nuclear medicine for several decades. With these techniques three separate compartments can be recognized including the reticuloendothelial system, the erythroid compartment and the myeloid compartment. Recent developments in research and the clinical use of PET tracers have made possible the analysis of additional properties such as cellular metabolism and proliferative activity, using {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-FLT. These tracers may lead to better quantification and targeting of different cell systems in the bone marrow. In this review the imaging of different bone marrow targets with radionuclides including PET tracers in various bone marrow diseases are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Radionuclide studies in paediatric nephro-urology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepsz, Amy E-mail: amypiepsz@yahoo.com

    2002-08-01

    The main tool of radionuclide techniques applied to paediatric uro-nephrology is the quantitation of function, which is an information not easily obtained by other diagnostic modalities. The radiation burden is low. Drug sedation is only rarely needed, whatever the age of the patient. Accurate determination of glomerular filtration rate can be obtained by means of an intravenous injection of Cr-51 EDTA and one or two blood samples. Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy is an accurate method for evaluation of regional cortical impairment during acute pyelonephritis and later on, for detection of permanent scarring. Tc-99m MAG3 renography is nowadays a well-standardized method for accurate estimation of the split renal function and of renal drainage with or without furosemide challenge. This technique is particularly indicated in uni- or bilateral uropathies with or without renal and/or ureteral dilatation. Direct and indirect radionuclide cystography are two alternative modalities for X-ray MCUG. Their relative place in the strategy of management of vesicoureteral reflux is discussed.

  6. Radionuclide assessment of pulmonary microvascular permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, A.B.J. [Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-04-01

    The literature has been reviewed to evaluate the technique and clinical value of radionuclide measurements of microvascular permeability and oedema formation in the lungs. Methodology, modelling and interpretation vary widely among studies. Nevertheless, most studies agree on the fact that the measurement of permeability via pulmonary radioactivity measurements of intravenously injected radiolabelled proteins versus that in the blood pool, the so-called pulmonary protein transport rate (PTR), can assist the clinician in discriminating between permeability oedema of the lungs associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and oedema caused by an increased filtration pressure, for instance in the course of cardiac disease, i.e. pressure-induced pulmonary oedema. Some of the techniques used to measure PTR are also able to detect subclinical forms of lung microvascular injury not yet complicated by permeability oedema. This may occur after cardiopulmonary bypass and major vascular surgery, for instance. By paralleling the clinical severity and course of the ARDS, the PTR method may also serve as a tool to evaluate new therapies for the syndrome. Taken together, the currently available radionuclide methods, which are applicable at the bedside in the intensive care unit, may provide a gold standard for detecting minor and major forms of acute microvascular lung injury, and for evaluating the severity, course and response to treatment. (orig.). With 2 tabs.

  7. Long-term environmental behaviour of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechignac, F.; Moberg, L.; Suomela, M

    2000-04-01

    The radioactive pollution of the environment results from the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing (during the mid-years of twentieth century), from the development of the civilian nuclear industry and from accidents such as Chernobyl. Assessing the resulting radiation that humans might receive requires a good understanding of the long-term behaviour of radionuclides in the environment. This document reports on a joint European effort to advance this understanding, 3 multinational projects have been coordinated: PEACE, EPORA and LANDSCAPE. This report proposes an overview of the results obtained and they are presented in 6 different themes: (i) redistribution in the soil-plant system, (ii) modelling, (iii) countermeasures, (iv) runoff (v) spatial variations, and (vi) dose assessment. The long term behaviour of the radionuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239-240}Pu is studied through various approaches, these approaches range from in-situ experiments designed to exploit past contamination events to laboratory simulations. A broad scope of different ecosystems ranging from arctic and boreal regions down to mediterranean ones has been considered. (A.C.)

  8. Regional survey of radionuclides in the marine environment of the French Mediterranean coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thebault, Herve; Arnaud, Mireille; Duffa, Celine; Charmasson, Sabine; Dimeglio, Yves [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire/PRP-ENV/SESURE/LERCM/ARM c/o Ifremer, CS 20330 Zone Portuaire de Bregaillon, 83507 La Seyne sur Mer Cedex (France)

    2014-07-01

    The French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) runs a continuous monitoring program of the marine environment as a mandatory task. For the French Mediterranean coast, this monitoring activity focuses on two bio-indicators species: the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and the red mullet (Mullus sp.) sampled on a regular basis from natural populations at ten locations along the coast. Radionuclides are measured using direct low-level gamma spectrometry as a routine technique. In addition to this long-lasting monitoring, a broad survey of radionuclide baseline levels is conducted on all compartments of the coastal zone: water, sediments and a large selection of fish species among those most currently fished and marketed. This extended data collection is necessary to fulfill the information requirements of the UE Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) and its implementation by member states. This information is also essential for impact assessment of any incident or accident, included from a remote source. Levels of less commonly measured radionuclides like {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 210}Po and U, Pu isotopes are investigated. Fish sampling relies mostly on scientific stock assessment campaigns. Mussel sampling is complemented by transplanted mussels on 40 specific sites. This regional survey also focuses on two possibly impacted areas: the Rhone river mouth coastal zone, with inputs from nuclear power plants along the river and the Bay of Toulon sheltering Navy harbor of nuclear-powered sub-marines and aircraft-carrier. First results show that the activity levels of artificial radionuclides are very low for most bio-indicator species, in accordance with previous monitoring trends. {sup 137}Cs is the only artificial radionuclide regularly detected by gamma spectrometry in mussel and fish samples at a level below 1 Bg.kg{sup -1} of dry weight. Values of {sup 3}H (organically bound Tritium) in the same samples lies under

  9. Studies on groundwater flow and radionuclide migration at underground environments. Final report of collaboration research between JAERI and AECL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Hiromichi; Nagao, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) conducted a collaboration program Phase II with the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) from 1994 to 1998. The program was started to contribute the establishment of safety assessment methodology for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes on the basis of the results from the Phase I program (1987-1993). The Phase II program consisted of following experimental items: (1) radionuclide migration experiments for quarried blocks (1m x 1m x 1m) of granite with natural fracture under in-situ geochemical conditions at 240 m level of Underground Research Laboratory of AECL; (2) study on the effects of dissolved organic materials extracted from natural groundwaters on radionuclide migration; (3) study on groundwater flow using environmental isotopes at two different geologic environments; (4) development of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model for heterogeneous geological media. The mobility of radionuclides was retarded in the fracture by the deep geological conditions and the fracture paths. The groundwater humic substances with high molecular size were enhanced for the mobility of radionuclides in the sand and granitic media due to the complexation. The application of {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I for the analysis on the long-term groundwater flow can be validated on the basis of investigation at the URL site. Moreover, the geostatistical model for the analysis on groundwater flow and radionuclide migration was developed, and was able to describe the groundwater flow and the migration of environmental tracers at AECL sites. This report summaries the results of the Phase II program between JAERI and AECL. (author)

  10. Radionuclide release from research reactor spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtius, H., E-mail: h.curtius@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Energieforschung, IEF-6 Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Geb. 05.3, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kaiser, G.; Mueller, E.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Energieforschung, IEF-6 Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Geb. 05.3, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    Numerous investigations with respect to LWR fuel under non oxidizing repository relevant conditions were performed. The results obtained indicate slow corrosion rates for the UO{sub 2} fuel matrix. Special fuel-types (mostly dispersed fuels, high enriched in {sup 235}U, cladded with aluminium) are used in German research reactors, whereas in German nuclear power plants, UO{sub 2}-fuel (LWR fuel, enrichment in {sup 235}U up to 5%, zircaloy as cladding) is used. Irradiated research reactor fuels contribute less than 1% to the total waste volume. In Germany, the state is responsible for fuel operation and for fuel back-end options. The institute for energy research (IEF-6) at the Research Center Juelich performs investigation with irradiated research reactor spent fuels under repository relevant conditions. In the study, the corrosion of research reactor spent fuel has been investigated in MgCl{sub 2}-rich salt brine and the radionuclide release fractions have been determined. Leaching experiments in brine with two different research reactor fuel-types were performed in a hot cell facility in order to determine the corrosion behaviour and the radionuclide release fractions. The corrosion of two dispersed research reactor fuel-types (UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) was studied in 400 mL MgCl{sub 2}-rich salt brine in the presence of Fe{sup 2+} under static and initially anoxic conditions. Within these experimental parameters, both fuel types corroded in the experimental time period of 3.5 years completely, and secondary alteration phases were formed. After complete corrosion of the used research reactor fuel samples, the inventories of Cs and Sr were