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Sample records for terrestrial level ii

  1. Terrestrial Neutrons in West Zone II Building on Ito Campus

    OpenAIRE

    Naher, Kamrun; Ikeda, Nobuo; Fukuda, Hiroaki; Iwamoto, Hiroki; Fukui, Yoshinori; Koba, Yusuke; Imamura, Minoru; Uozumi, Yusuke

    2009-01-01

    Thermal and fast neutrons were measured inside the West Zone II building on Ito Campus for the assessment of terrestrial neutrons in a stand alone concrete building. Ratios of count rate of thermal neutrons to that of fast neutrons were almost constant inside the building. The contribution of fast neutrons across outside wall has been discussed. A simple method to estimate the neutron flux near the outside wall has been proposed.

  2. Marine modification of terrestrial influences on Gulf hypoxia: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines potential marine modification of two classes of terrestrial influence on Gulf hypoxia: (1 the flow of nutrient-rich water from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Basin and (2 the massive physical, hydrological, chemical and biological change associated with the Atchafalaya’s partial capture of the Mississippi River. The latter involves repartitioning of a total flow of about 20 000 m3 sec−1, equal to that of 13 Nile Rivers, and a sediment load of 210 million metric tonnes yr−1,nearly 20 times that delivered by all of the rivers of the East Coast of the USA. Also involved is the loss of hundreds-to-thousands of years of stored nutrients and organic matter to the Gulf from enormous coastal wetland loss. This study found that the oceanography of the Gulf minimises the impact of both classes of terrestrial influence from the Mississippi River and its nearby estuaries on Gulf hypoxia. Oceanographic conditions give events associated with the Atchafalaya River a disproportionately large influence on Gulf hypoxia. A truly holistic environmental approach which includes the full effects of this highly dynamic coastal area is recommended to better understand and control Gulf hypoxia.

  3. Lipids as indicators of paleoclimatic changes, II: terrestrial biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz A. S. Madureira

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the abundance of specific lipid biomarker compounds derived from terrestrial sources are shown to be closely related to past climatic changes. Despite biodegradation processes, which take place mostly at the water column and sediment water interface, these compounds are found well preserved in oceanic sediments. Here, their relative distribution is employed as a tool to assess changes in terrestrial fluxes to the seabed accompanying climatic variations during glacial and interglacial intervals. These changes in biomarker distribution were estimated in two sediment cores taken ttom the eastern North Atlantic, covering the past 210,000 years. Comparisons with other paleoclimate proxies showed good agreement and suggest that some specific groups of biomarkers are important indicators of changes in terrestrial inputs to the sea.A variação na abundância de alguns biomarcadores lipídicos derivados de aportes terrestres pode estar relacionada com mudanças climáticas no passado. Apesar dos processos de biodegradação que, na grande maioria, ocorrem na coluna aquática e na interface sedimento-água, esses compostos são encontrados bem preservados em sedimentos oceânicos. Nesse trabalho, a distribuição relativa desses compostos é empregada como uma ferramenta para avaliar mudanças no transporte de material terrestre para o mar em paralelo às variações climáticas durante os intervalos glaciais e interglaciais. As mudanças na distribuição dos biomarcadores foram estimadas em dois testemunhos coletados ao leste do Atlântico Norte e que correspondem aos últimos 210 mil anos. Os resultados mostraram uma boa correlação entre a distribuição dos biomarcadores e outros parâmetros paleoclimáticos previamente avaliados nos perfis, sugerindo que alguns grupos específicos de compostos orgânicos são importantes indicadores de aporte terrestre para ornar.

  4. Level II Ergonomic Analyses, Dover AFB, DE

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    IERA-RS-BR-TR-1999-0002 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE IERA Level II Ergonomie Analyses, Dover AFB, DE Andrew Marcotte Marilyn Joyce The Joyce...Project (070401881, Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Level II Ergonomie Analyses, Dover...1.0 INTRODUCTION 1-1 1.1 Purpose Of The Level II Ergonomie Analyses : 1-1 1.2 Approach 1-1 1.2.1 Initial Shop Selection and Administration of the

  5. Long-term solar activity and terrestrial connections. Part II: at the beckon of the sun?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Diamantides

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The research task described herein aims at the structuring of an analytical tool that traces the time course of geophysical phenomena, regional or global, and compares it to the course of long-term solar conditions, long-term meaning decades or a few centuries. The model is based on the premise that since in a last analysis the preponderance of atmospheric, hydrospheric, and, possibly, some aspects of geospheric phenomena are, or have been, powered by energy issuing from the sun - either now or in the past - the long-term behavior of such phenomena is ultimately "connected" to long-term changes occurring in the sun itself. Accordingly, the proposed research firstly derives and models a stable surrogate pattern for the long-term solar activity, secondly introduces a transfer-function algorithm for modeling the connection between the surrogate and terrestrial phenomena viewed as partners in the connection, and thirdly probes the connection outcome for episodic or unanticipated effects that may arise due to the fact that in the present context, the connection, should it exist, is very likely nonlinear. Part I of the study presents the theory of the concept, while Part II demonstrates the concept's pertinence to a number of terrestrial phenomena.Key words. Solar activity · Kolmogorov algorithm

  6. Examining predator-prey body size, trophic level and body mass across marine and terrestrial mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Marlee A; Rogers, Tracey L

    2014-12-22

    Predator-prey relationships and trophic levels are indicators of community structure, and are important for monitoring ecosystem changes. Mammals colonized the marine environment on seven separate occasions, which resulted in differences in species' physiology, morphology and behaviour. It is likely that these changes have had a major effect upon predator-prey relationships and trophic position; however, the effect of environment is yet to be clarified. We compiled a dataset, based on the literature, to explore the relationship between body mass, trophic level and predator-prey ratio across terrestrial (n = 51) and marine (n = 56) mammals. We did not find the expected positive relationship between trophic level and body mass, but we did find that marine carnivores sit 1.3 trophic levels higher than terrestrial carnivores. Also, marine mammals are largely carnivorous and have significantly larger predator-prey ratios compared with their terrestrial counterparts. We propose that primary productivity, and its availability, is important for mammalian trophic structure and body size. Also, energy flow and community structure in the marine environment are influenced by differences in energy efficiency and increased food web stability. Enhancing our knowledge of feeding ecology in mammals has the potential to provide insights into the structure and functioning of marine and terrestrial communities. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Examining predator–prey body size, trophic level and body mass across marine and terrestrial mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Marlee A.; Rogers, Tracey L.

    2014-01-01

    Predator–prey relationships and trophic levels are indicators of community structure, and are important for monitoring ecosystem changes. Mammals colonized the marine environment on seven separate occasions, which resulted in differences in species' physiology, morphology and behaviour. It is likely that these changes have had a major effect upon predator–prey relationships and trophic position; however, the effect of environment is yet to be clarified. We compiled a dataset, based on the literature, to explore the relationship between body mass, trophic level and predator–prey ratio across terrestrial (n = 51) and marine (n = 56) mammals. We did not find the expected positive relationship between trophic level and body mass, but we did find that marine carnivores sit 1.3 trophic levels higher than terrestrial carnivores. Also, marine mammals are largely carnivorous and have significantly larger predator–prey ratios compared with their terrestrial counterparts. We propose that primary productivity, and its availability, is important for mammalian trophic structure and body size. Also, energy flow and community structure in the marine environment are influenced by differences in energy efficiency and increased food web stability. Enhancing our knowledge of feeding ecology in mammals has the potential to provide insights into the structure and functioning of marine and terrestrial communities. PMID:25377460

  8. Atmospheric oxygen levels affect mudskipper terrestrial performance: implications for early tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jew, Corey J; Wegner, Nicholas C; Yanagitsuru, Yuzo; Tresguerres, Martin; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2013-08-01

    The Japanese mudskipper (Periophthalmus modestus), an amphibious fish that possesses many respiratory and locomotive specializations for sojourns onto land, was used as a model to study how changing atmospheric oxygen concentrations during the middle and late Paleozoic Era (400-250 million years ago) may have influenced the emergence and subsequent radiation of the first tetrapods. The effects of different atmospheric oxygen concentrations (hyperoxia = 35%, normoxia = 21%, and hypoxia = 7% O2) on terrestrial performance were tested during exercise on a terrestrial treadmill and during recovery from exhaustive exercise. Endurance and elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC; the immediate O2 debt repaid post-exercise) correlated with atmospheric oxygen concentration indicating that when additional oxygen is available P. modestus can increase oxygen utilization both during and following exercise. The time required post-exercise for mudskippers to return to a resting metabolic rate did not differ between treatments. However, in normoxia, oxygen consumption increased above hyperoxic values 13-20 h post-exercise suggesting a delayed repayment of the incurred oxygen debt. Finally, following exercise, ventilatory movements associated with buccopharyngeal aerial respiration returned to their rest-like pattern more quickly at higher concentrations of oxygen. Taken together, the results of this study show that P. modestus can exercise longer and recover quicker under higher oxygen concentrations. Similarities between P. modestus and early tetrapods suggest that increasing atmospheric oxygen levels during the middle and late Paleozoic allowed for elevated aerobic capacity and improved terrestrial performance, and likely led to an accelerated diversification and expansion of vertebrate life into the terrestrial biosphere.

  9. Caspian Sea Level and Cosmo-Geophysical Processes: Satellite and Terrestrial Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaftan, Vladimir; Lebedev, Sergey; Komitov, Boris

    The Caspian Sea basin appears to be a giant water collection of the largest European rivers and underground stream flows. That is exactly why Caspian Sea level changes are revealed as an indicator of regional climate changes. Instrumental tide gauge observations continue about two centuries at the Caspian Sea shore. At the last centuries the changes of the Sea level were going on unpredictably - from the fast shallow (- 5 cm/y.) to the catastrophic rise (12 cm/y.). The end of the last century was finished by unexpected sharp change of the fast rise to the equally fast lowering with the velocity of 1.5 cm/y. Caspian Sea researches about regularities of its level were carried out continuously by using of terrestrial observation techniques. The closed relationships between level changes, solar activity and Earth’s rotation variation were estimated over the period of the last centuries. The last decades are characterized by the intensive development of satellite and space observation techniques. Nowadays the accuracy and spatial-temporal resolution of sea level and cosmo-geophysical processes observation is considerably increased. Now the more informative means of the Caspian Sea level study are satellite altimetry of TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 missions. At the last decades the Earth’s rotation parameters are determining permanently using such recent measurement techniques as GNSS and VLBI. The last of them provides the 10.7 cm solar flux observation. Therefore the large current data amount ensuring the study of cause-and-effect relations between the Caspian Sea level and geophysical processes of global and space scales is collected today. The results of the resent precise observation data analysis with high resolution as well as the long Caspian Sea level time-series combining terrestrial and space observation are proposed to the research community. Spectral characteristics of the Caspian Sea level changes, Earth’s rotation parameters (LOD), solar

  10. Levels and transfer of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in Nordic terrestrial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.E., E-mail: justin.brown@nrpa.n [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, PO Box 55, N-1332, Osteras (Norway); Gjelsvik, R. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, PO Box 55, N-1332, Osteras (Norway); Roos, P. [RISO-DTU P.O. Box 49 DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Kalas, J.A. [Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Tungasletta 2, 7485 Trondheim (Norway); Outola, I. [STUK, Laippatie 4/P.O. BOX 14, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Holm, E. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, PO Box 55, N-1332, Osteras (Norway)

    2011-05-15

    Recent developments regarding environmental impact assessment methodologies for radioactivity have precipitated the need for information on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides within and transfer to wild flora and fauna. The objectives of this study were therefore to determine activity concentrations of the main dose forming radionuclides {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in biota from terrestrial ecosystems thus providing insight into the behaviour of these radioisotopes. Samples of soil, plants and animals were collected at Dovrefjell, Central Norway and Olkiluoto, Finland. Soil profiles from Dovrefjell exhibited an approximately exponential fall in {sup 210}Pb activity concentrations from elevated levels in humus/surface soils to 'supported' levels at depth. Activity concentrations of {sup 210}Po in fauna (invertebrates, mammals, birds) ranged between 2 and 123 Bq kg{sup -1} d.w. and in plants and lichens between 20 and 138 Bq kg{sup -1} d.w. The results showed that soil humus is an important reservoir for {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb and that fauna in close contact with this media may also exhibit elevated levels of {sup 210}Po. Concentration ratios appear to have limited applicability with regards to prediction of activity concentrations of {sup 210}Po in invertebrates and vertebrates. Biokinetic models may provide a tool to explore in a more mechanistic way the behaviour of {sup 210}Po in this system.

  11. Landscape-level terrestrial methane flux observed from a very tall tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankur R. Desai; Ke Xu; Hanqin Tian; Peter Weishampel; Jonathan Thom; Dan Baumann; Arlyn E. Andrews; Druce D. Cook; Jennifer Y. King; Randall. Kolka

    2015-01-01

    Simulating the magnitude and variability of terrestrial methane sources and sinks poses a challenge to ecosystem models because the biophysical and biogeochemical processes that lead to methane emissions from terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems are, by their nature, episodic and spatially disjunct. As a consequence, model predictions of regional methane emissions...

  12. The SMAP Level 4 Carbon PRODUCT for Monitoring Terrestrial Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L. A.; Kimball, J. S.; Madani, N.; Reichle, R. H.; Glassy, J.; Ardizzone, J/

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product provides model estimates of Net Ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) incorporating SMAP soil moisture information as a primary driver. The L4_C product provides NEE, computed as total respiration less gross photosynthesis, at a daily time step and approximate 14-day latency posted to a 9-km global grid summarized by plant functional type. The L4_C product includes component carbon fluxes, surface soil organic carbon stocks, underlying environmental constraints, and detailed uncertainty metrics. The L4_C model is driven by the SMAP Level 4 Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data assimilation product, with additional inputs from the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) weather analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data. The L4_C data record extends from March 2015 to present with ongoing production. Initial comparisons against global CO2 eddy flux tower measurements, satellite Solar Induced Canopy Florescence (SIF) and other independent observation benchmarks show favorable L4_C performance and accuracy, capturing the dynamic biosphere response to recent weather anomalies and demonstrating the value of SMAP observations for monitoring of global terrestrial water and carbon cycle linkages.

  13. Degradation of PVC/HC blends. II. Terrestrial plant growth test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, Mihaela; Agafiţei, Gabriela-Elena; Profire, Lenuţa; Vasile, Cornelia

    2009-01-01

    The behavior at degradation by soil burial of some plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) based blends with a variable content of hydrolyzed collagen (HC) has been followed. The modifications induced in the environment by the polymer systems (pH variation, physiologic state of the plants, assimilatory pigments) were studied. Using the growth test of the terrestrial plants, we followed the development of Triticum (wheat), Helianthus annus minimus (little sunflower), Pisum sativum (pea), and Vicia X hybrida hort, during a vegetation cycle. After the harvest, for each plant, the quantities of chlorophyll and carotenoidic pigments and of trace- and macroelements were determined. It was proved that, in the presence of polymer blends, the plants do not suffer morphological and physiological modifications, the products released in the culture soil being not toxic for the plants growth.

  14. Ground-level observation of a terrestrial gamma ray flash initiated by a triggered lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, B. M.; Uman, M. A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Jordan, D. M.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Caicedo, J. A.; Carvalho, F. L.; Wilkes, R. A.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Gamerota, W. R.; Pilkey, J. T.; Ngin, T. K.; Moore, R. C.; Rassoul, H. K.; Cummer, S. A.; Grove, J. E.; Nag, A.; Betten, D. P.; Bozarth, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on a terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) that occurred on 15 August 2014 coincident with an altitude-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) in North Central Florida. The TGF was observed by a ground-level network of gamma ray, close electric field, distant magnetic field, Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), optical, and radar measurements. Simultaneous gamma ray and LMA data indicate that the upward positive leader of the triggered lightning flash induced relativistic runaway electron avalanches when the leader tip was at about 3.5 km altitude, resulting in the observed TGF. Channel luminosity and electric field data show that there was an initial continuous current (ICC) pulse in the lightning channel to ground during the time of the TGF. Modeling of the observed ICC pulse electric fields measured at close range (100-200 m) indicates that the ICC pulse current had both a slow and fast component (full widths at half maximum of 235 μs and 59 μs) and that the fast component was more or less coincident with the TGF, suggesting a physical association between the relativistic runaway electron avalanches and the ICC pulse observed at ground. Our ICC pulse model reproduces moderately well the measured close electric fields at the ICLRT as well as three independent magnetic field measurements made about 250 km away. Radar and LMA data suggest that there was negative charge near the region in which the TGF was initiated.

  15. The Effect of Oral Feeding of Tribulus terrestris L. on Sex Hormone and Gonadotropin Levels in Addicted Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maleki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opioids can exert adverse effects on the body. Morphine, an opioid drug,reduces hormone levels and fertility, and causes sexual activity disorders. Tribulus terrestris(TT is a traditional herbal medicine used to enhance sexual activities. This studyinvestigates the possible role of TT on sex hormones and gonadotropins with the intent toshow its usefulness in treating fertility disorders in opioid users.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we randomly divided 48 rats intofour groups: i. control, ii. TT-treated, iii. addicted and iv. TT-treated addicted. Watersolublemorphine was administrated orally for 21 days to induce addiction, after whichthe treated groups 2 and 4 received plant-mixed pelleted food (6.25% orally for fourweeks. At the end of the treatment period, the sex hormone and gonadotropin levels of allrats’ sera were determined by radioimmunoassay and Elisa kits. The data obtained werestatistically analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance, followed by post-hoc Tukeytest. P<0.05 was considered significant.Results: The addicted group had a significantly lower luteinizing hormone (LH levelthan the control group (p<0.027. LH levels increased significantly in the TT-treated addictedgroup (p<0.031. The testosterone level in the treated addicted group was lowerthan the treated control group. The addicted group had a significantly low testosteronelevel (p<0.001. The estrogen level was significantly (p<0.002 lower in the addictedgroup than in the control group. In addition, there was a significant difference betweenthe treated addicted group and the treated control group (p<0.048. The treated controlgroup had a significant increase in its progesterone level (p<0.002. Overall, except forfollicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, morphine reduced most of the gonadotropins andsexual hormones. Whereas TT caused a considerable increase (p<0.05 in the hormonesin the treated addicted group, there was only a slight increase in

  16. Belle-II High Level Trigger at SuperKEKB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Higuchi, T.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Won, E.

    2012-12-01

    A next generation B-factory experiment, Belle II, is now being constructed at KEK in Japan. The upgraded accelerator SuperKEKB is designed to have the maximum luminosity of 8 × 1035 cm-2s-1 that is a factor 40 higher than the current world record. As a consequence, the Belle II detector yields a data stream of the event size ~1 MB at a Level 1 rate of 30 kHz. The Belle II High Level Trigger (HLT) is designed to reduce the Level 1 rate to 1/5 by performing the real time full event reconstruction and by applying the physics level event selection as the software trigger. In this paper, the development of the high level trigger system for Belle II and its performance is discussed.

  17. Culture Curriculum for German, Level II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetiker, Rosemary

    This teacher's guide to cultural instruction in a level-2 German course is designed to be used with the text "Deutsch, Erstes Buch, Erster Teil." Instructional observations pertain to the seventh through the 12th lessons and comprise the major portion of this text including: )1) die Eisenbahn, (2) Reisen und Essen in Deutschland, (3) die Familie,…

  18. Comments About a Chameleon Theory: Level I/Level II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, John; Stankov, Lazar

    1982-01-01

    Jensen's ideas about two levels of intellectual abilities are criticized as being oversimplified. More than two levels of intellectual abilities and relationships between variables reflecting more than racial and socioeconomic status (SES) differences are suggested, arguing that Jensen's statements about race and SES differences are not properly…

  19. PAH biotransformation in terrestrial invertebrates--a new phase II metabolite in isopods and springtails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroomberg, Gerard J; Zappey, Herman; Steen, Ruud J C A; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Ariese, Freek; Velthorst, Nel H; van Straalen, Nico M

    2004-06-01

    Soil-living invertebrates are exposed to high concentrations of contaminants accumulating in dead organic matter, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The capacity for PAH biotransformation is not equally developed in all invertebrates. In this paper, we compare three species of invertebrates, Porcellio scaber (Isopoda), Eisenia andrei (Lumbricidae) and Folsomia candida (Collembola), for the metabolites formed upon exposure to pyrene. Metabolic products of pyrene biotransformation in extracts from whole animals or isopod hepatopancreas were compared to those found in fish bile (flounder and plaice). An optimized HPLC method was used with fluorescence detection; excitation/emission spectra were compared to reference samples of 1-hydroxypyrene and enzymatically synthesized conjugates. Enzymatic hydrolysis after fractionation was used to demonstrate that the conjugates originated from 1-hydroxypyrene. All three invertebrates were able to oxidize pyrene to 1-hydroxypyrene, however, isopods and collembolans stood out as more efficient metabolizers compared to earthworms. In contrast to fish, none of the invertebrates produced pyrene-1-glucuronide as a phase II conjugate. Both Collembola and Isopoda produced significant amounts of pyrene-1-glucoside, whereas isopods also produced pyrene-1-sulfate. A third, previously unknown, conjugate was found in both isopods and springtails, and was analysed further using electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry. Based on the obtained mass spectra, a new conjugate is proposed: pyrene-1-O-(6"-O-malonyl)glucoside. The use of glucose-malonate as a conjugant in animal phase II biotransformation has not been described before, but is understandable in the microenvironment of soil-living invertebrates. In the earthworm, three other pyrene metabolites were observed, none of which was shared with the arthropods, although two were conjugates of 1-hydroxypyrene. Our study illustrates the great

  20. Levels of Cd (II, Mn (II, Pb (II, Cu (II, and Zn (II in Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo from Sicily (Italy by Derivative Stripping Potentiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Licata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Mn, and Zn in different organs (liver, kidney, muscle, lung, skin, and feathers of buzzards (Buteo buteo, utilized as a “biological indicator” for environmental contamination, from different areas of Sicily and to investigate the relationships between birds sex, age, and weight and metal levels in these samples. All samples of common buzzards were collected at the “Recovery Center of Wild Fauna” of Palermo, through the Zooprophilactic Institute. Potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA was used to determine the content of Cd(II, Cu(II, Mn(II, Pb(II, and Zn(II in bird tissues. For toxic metals, the highest levels of Pb were in liver and those of Cd in lung; Zn levels were higher than Cu and Mn in all tissues analyzed. The concentrations in liver, lung, kidney, and muscle could be considered as an indicative of chronic exposure to metals while the presence of metals in skin could be consequential to storing and elimination processes. The found concentrations of metals in the studied matrices required a highly sensitive method for their determination and a simple sample preparation procedure, and the proposed method was well suited for this purpose.

  1. A part-time Level II fieldwork program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, L A; Cohn, E S; Baker, R C; Barnes, M A

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an alternative to the traditional Level II fieldwork program for master's degree students in occupational therapy. In this part-time 9-month program, students complete the fieldwork requirement while simultaneously balancing academic responsibilities. One advantage of this program over the traditional 3-month program is that the extended length of time offers students the opportunity to develop clinical skills beyond the technical level.

  2. Multi-Level Effects of Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation on Southern Toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21 mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae. PMID:25927361

  3. Multi-Level Effects of Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation on Southern Toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Stark

    Full Text Available Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris during its pre-terrestrial stages of development -embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later, to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21 mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  4. Predicting sea-level rise vulnerability of terrestrial habitat and wildlife of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Berkowitz, Paul; Courtot, Karen N.; Krause, Crystal M.; Reynolds, Michelle H.; Berkowitz, Paul; Courtot, Karen N.; Krause, Crystal M.

    2012-01-01

    potential losses of nesting habitat from SLR and wave-driven inundation. We observed far greater potential impacts of SLR to wildlife with the dynamic wave-driven modeling approach than with the passive modeling approach. Depending on SLR scenario and coastal orientation, during storms under a +2.00 m SLR scenario, the wave-driven inundation model predicted three times more inundation than the passive model (17.2 percent of total terrestrial area versus 4.6 percent, respectively). Large-wave events generally added 1 m of water height to passive inundation surfaces, therefore our dynamic models (during storm events) forecasted comparable inundation extents earlier than passive models. Although wave-driven water levels were highest in the northwest quadrant of Laysan Island, the greatest extent of inundation occurred in the southeast where coastal dunes less than 3 m above mean sea level provide little protection from wave-driven inundation. When wave-driven inundation was included in the SLR model for Laysan Island greater nesting habitat loss and potential impacts on wildlife population dynamics were predicted. The consequences of habitat loss due to SLR may be worse for species with colonies in the wave-exposed coastal zones (for example, Black-footed Albatross) and for populations already near the island's carrying capacity (for example, Laysan Teal). Species whose peak incubation and chick-rearing periods coincide with seasonally high wave heights also will be increasingly vulnerable, especially those species nesting on the ground in areas vulnerable to inundation, such as Gray-backed Tern and Black-footed Albatross. Other species that have space for population growth, or are not restricted to a narrow range of habitat types on Laysan (for instance, Sooty Terns), may be less sensitive to habitat loss from SLR over the next century. Our assessments of inundation risk, habitat loss, and wildlife species vulnerability synthesize current knowledge about individual islands

  5. Population level differences in thermal sensitivity of energy assimilation in terrestrial salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Timothy A; Gifford, Matthew E

    2017-02-01

    Thermal adaptation predicts that thermal sensitivity of physiological traits should be optimized to thermal conditions most frequently experienced. Furthermore, thermodynamic constraints predict that species with higher thermal optima should have higher performance maxima and narrower performance breadths. We tested these predictions by examining the thermal sensitivity of energy assimilation between populations within two species of terrestrial-lungless salamanders, Plethodon albagula and P. montanus. Within P. albagula, we examined populations that were latitudinally separated by >450km. Within P. montanus, we examined populations that were elevationally separated by >900m. Thermal sensitivity of energy assimilation varied substantially between populations of P. albagula separated latitudinally, but did not vary between populations of P. montanus separated elevationally. Specifically, in P. albagula, the lower latitude population had a higher thermal optimum, higher maximal performance, and narrower performance breadth compared to the higher latitude population. Furthermore, across all individuals as thermal optima increased, performance maxima also increased, providing support for the theory that "hotter is better". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD (II) LEVELS AND LEAD (II) NEUROTOXICITY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafl...

  7. Relations between vegetation and water level in groundwater dependent terrestrial ecosystems (GWDTEs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch Johansen, Ole; Andersen, Dagmar Kappel; Ejrnæs, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    Indicator scores of moisture, pH and nutrients were calculated for each site. The water level correlates with the number of typical fen species of vascular plants, whereas bryophytes are closer connected to the stable water level conditions provided by groundwater seepage. The water level variability...... is proved to be a significant limiting factor for species diversity in wetlands, which should be considered along with the fertility in order to access the habitat quality. The study provides new insight in the water level preferences for GWDTEs which is highly needed in the management and assessment...

  8. Organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in wild terrestrial mammals from Croatia: Interspecies comparison of residue levels and compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg Romanić, Snježana; Klinčić, Darija; Kljaković-Gašpić, Zorana; Kusak, Josip; Reljić, Slaven; Huber, Đuro

    2015-10-01

    In this pilot study, we investigated levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the adipose tissues of two free-ranging terrestrial carnivores from Croatia sampled in 2010 and 2011: the brown bear (Ursus arctos; N=32) and the grey wolf (Canis lupus; N=29). Concentrations of ∑OCPs and ΣPCBs ranged from 0.45 to 4.09 ng g(-1) lipid mass (lm) and from 0.93 to 8.52 ng g(-1) lm in brown bear, and from 1.18 to 5.67 ng g(-1) lm and 2.68 to 48.9 ng g(-1) lm in grey wolf adipose tissues, respectively. PCBs were dominant accounting for over 72% of total analyzed persistent organic pollutants (POPs). The sum of six indicator non-dioxin-like PCBs (Σ6IndNDL PCBs) made up 60-93% and 58-85% of the total congener concentrations in brown bears and wolves, respectively. Although the levels of the measured parameters were significantly higher in grey wolves than in bears, the contaminant profiles of the two species were similar, with γ-HCH, HCB, β-HCH and DDE as major OCP contaminants, and PCB-153>PCB-180≈PCB-170>PCB-138 as the dominant congeners. The sum of hexachlorocyclohexanes (ΣHCHs) and 8 toxicologically relevant dioxin-like PCBs (Σ8ToxDL PCBs) was higher in the males than in the females of the brown bear. Concentrations of ΣDDTs, HCB, ΣOCP, ΣPCBs, Σ6IndNDL PCBs, and toxicologically relevant non-dioxin-like PCBs (ΣToxNDL PCBs) were significantly positively correlated with lipid content in the grey wolf. Concentrations of OCPs and PCBs in brown bears and wolves from Croatia were low and normal for large terrestrial mammals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Levels and transfer of 210Po and 210Pb in Nordic terrestrial ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, J.E.; Gjelsvik, R.; Roos, Per

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments regarding environmental impact assessment methodologies for radioactivity have precipitated the need for information on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides within and transfer to wild flora and fauna. The objectives of this study were therefore to determine activity...

  10. Wavelengths, energy levels and hyperfine structure of Mn II and Sc II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Townley-Smith, Keeley I. M.; Hala, .

    2015-08-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Groups at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Imperial College London (ICL) have measured atomic data of astronomical interest. Our spectrometers include Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at NIST and ICL covering the region 1350 Å to 5.5 μm and a 10.7-m grating spectrometer at NIST covering wavelengths from 300 - 5000 Å. Sources for these spectra include high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) lamps, Penning discharges, and sliding spark discharges. Recent work has focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure (HFS) constants for iron-group elements. The analysis of FT spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn II is being led by ICL and is described in a companion poster [1]. Current work being led by NIST includes the analysis of HFS in Mn II, analysis of Mn II in the vacuum ultraviolet, and a comprehensive analysis of Sc II.Comprehensive HFS constants for Mn II are needed for the interpretation of stellar spectra and incorrect abundances may be obtained when HFS is omitted. Holt et al. [2] have measured HFS constants for 59 levels of Mn II using laser spectroscopy. We used FT spectra of Mn/Ni and Mn/Cu HCLs covering wavelength ranges from 1350 Å to 5.4 μm to confirm 26 of the A constants of Holt et al. and obtain values for roughly 40 additional levels. We aim to obtain HFS constants for the majority of lines showing significant HFS that are observed in chemically-peculiar stars.Spectra of Sc HCLs have been recorded from 1800 - 6700 Å using a vacuum ultraviolet FT spectrometer at NIST. Additional measurements to cover wavelengths above 6700 Å and below 1800 Å are in progress. The spectra are being analyzed by NIST and Alighar Muslim University, India in order to derive improved wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters.This work was partially supported by NASA, the STFC and PPARC (UK), the Royal Society of the UK

  11. The CMS Level-1 Trigger system for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Tapper, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    During LHC Run II the centre-of-mass energy of pp collisions has increased up to 13 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity has progressed towards $2 \\times 10^{34} \\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under these conditions, the CMS trigger system has been upgraded. The upgraded CMS Level-1 trigger is designed to improve performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing. The trigger design, implementation and commissioning are summarised and performance results are described.

  12. Correlated biogeographic variation of magnesium across trophic levels in a terrestrial food chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Sun

    Full Text Available Using samples from eastern China (c. 25 - 41° N and 99 - 123° E and from a common garden experiment, we investigate how Mg concentration varies with climate across multiple trophic levels. In soils, plant tissue (Oriental oak leaves and acorns, and a specialist acorn predator (the weevil Curculio davidi, Mg concentration increased significantly with different slopes from south to north, and generally decreased with both mean annual temperature (MAT and precipitation (MAP. In addition, soil, leaf, acorn and weevil Mg showed different strengths of association and sensitivity with climatic factors, suggesting that distinct mechanisms may drive patterns of Mg variation at different trophic levels. Our findings provide a first step toward determining whether anticipated changes in temperature and precipitation due to climate change will have important consequences for the bioavailability and distribution of Mg in food chain.

  13. Correlated Biogeographic Variation of Magnesium across Trophic Levels in a Terrestrial Food Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Kay, Adam D.; Kang, Hongzhang; Small, Gaston E.; Liu, Guofang; Zhou, Xuan; Yin, Shan; Liu, Chunjiang

    2013-01-01

    Using samples from eastern China (c. 25 – 41° N and 99 – 123° E) and from a common garden experiment, we investigate how Mg concentration varies with climate across multiple trophic levels. In soils, plant tissue (Oriental oak leaves and acorns), and a specialist acorn predator (the weevil Curculio davidi), Mg concentration increased significantly with different slopes from south to north, and generally decreased with both mean annual temperature (MAT) and precipitation (MAP). In addition, soil, leaf, acorn and weevil Mg showed different strengths of association and sensitivity with climatic factors, suggesting that distinct mechanisms may drive patterns of Mg variation at different trophic levels. Our findings provide a first step toward determining whether anticipated changes in temperature and precipitation due to climate change will have important consequences for the bioavailability and distribution of Mg in food chain. PMID:24223807

  14. Analysis of medicine consumption in peacekeeping level II hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lan; Liu, Huiling; Li, Chunfeng; Gao, Guangkai

    2014-01-01

    The peacekeeping military units of contributing countries are unfamiliar with the conditions prevailing in foreign mission areas and therefore have difficulties with medical supplies storage. The aim of this study is to provide reasonable and practical guidance on the maintenance of medical supplies in the peacekeeping military units of contributing countries. A total of 1,972 prescriptions were received by the pharmacy in the peacekeeping level II hospital in the Republic of Sudan from February to July of 2009 including a total of 186 drug categories and 17,713 minimum packing units. Pairwise comparison was performed using the c2 test. When the total number of samples was smaller than 40, the Fisher's exact test was adopted for pairwise comparison. The majority of the consumed medicines mainly belonged to 6 categories, including specialty drugs, anti-microbial drugs, Chinese patent medicines, gastrointestinal drugs, central nervous system drugs, and drugs regulating fluids, electrolytes, and acid-base balance. Altogether, the drugs in the 6 categories accounted for 74% of all consumed medicines that were divided into a total of 20 categories. Medicine consumption in peacekeeping level II hospitals is unique, therefore the drugs used in military medical facilities should be prepared according to their actual needs in the area of peacekeeping operations.

  15. Comparative studies on Pb and Cd levels in parasites of terrestrial and aquatic animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sures, B.; Taraschewski, H. [Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany). Zoologisches Institut-Okologie

    1995-12-31

    Several fish parasites (Acanthocephala, Cestoda, Nematoda) and organs of their respective intermediate and final hosts were analyzed for heavy metals by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS). Pb and Cd were also quantified in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica as well as in different organs of the large intestinal roundworm Ascaris suum. The levels of these heavy metals in the parasites were compared to those of muscle, liver, kidney and intestine of the respective definitive hosts cattle and swine obtained from a slaughter house. Most parasites accumulated significantly higher levels of metals than their final hosts. This was most conspicuous in acanthocephalans which contained up to 3 {times} 10{sup 3} fold more lead than the muscle of their fish hosts and up to 1.1 {times} 10{sup 4} more lead than the water surrounding the fish. In these helminths cadmium was enriched up to 400 fold compared to the muscle of the fish and up to 2.7 {times} 10{sup 4} compared to the water. In contrast to the accumulation capacity of adult acanthocephalans their larvae contained about 30 to 180 times less Pb and Cd. Thus, the predominant accumulation of both metals appears in the adult worms. The cestodes of fish and the liver flukes of cattle accumulated the metals up to 200 fold compared to the muscle of their hosts. The nematodes did not contain higher levels of the metals than their hosts. Thus, parasites, especially acanthocephalans, seem to be sensitive bioindicators of Pb and Cd in their environments.

  16. Zn(II, Pb(II and Cd(II levels in livers and muscles of wild duck (Anas platyrhynchos hunting in El Melah Lagoon (NE Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherif Ensibi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the levels of Zn(II], Pb(II] and Cd(II] in livers and muscles of the wild duck (Anas platyrhynchos hunting in El Melah lagoon in northeastern Tunisia from December 2010. Analysis of variance shows that no significant differences in metals levels were found between samples, but it should be pointed out that the number of samples was small. HSD Tukey test show that the amount of Cd(II], Zn(II] and Pb(II] in the levers was higher than in the muscles. The results obtained suggest the importance of wild ducks as bioindicators of heavy metal pollution.

  17. Higher Trophic Levels Overwhelm Climate Change Impacts on Terrestrial Ecosystem Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelini, Shannon L; Maran, Audrey M; Chen, Angus R; Kaseman, Justine; Crowther, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Forest floor food webs play pivotal roles in carbon cycling, but they are rarely considered in models of carbon fluxes, including soil carbon dioxide emissions (respiration), under climatic warming. The indirect effects of invertebrates on heterotrophic (microbial and invertebrate) respiration through interactions with microbial communities are significant and will be altered by warming. However, the interactive effects of invertebrates and warming on heterotrophic respiration in the field are poorly understood. In this study we combined field and common garden laboratory approaches to examine relationships between warming, forest floor food web structure, and heterotrophic respiration. We found that soil animals can overwhelm the effects of warming (to 5 degrees Celsius above ambient) on heterotrophic respiration. In particular, the presence of higher trophic levels and burrowing detritivores strongly determined heterotrophic respiration rates in temperate forest soils. These effects were, however, context-dependent, with greater effects in a lower-latitude site. Without isolating and including the significant impact of invertebrates, climate models will be incomplete, hindering well-informed policy decisions.

  18. Higher Trophic Levels Overwhelm Climate Change Impacts on Terrestrial Ecosystem Functioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon L Pelini

    Full Text Available Forest floor food webs play pivotal roles in carbon cycling, but they are rarely considered in models of carbon fluxes, including soil carbon dioxide emissions (respiration, under climatic warming. The indirect effects of invertebrates on heterotrophic (microbial and invertebrate respiration through interactions with microbial communities are significant and will be altered by warming. However, the interactive effects of invertebrates and warming on heterotrophic respiration in the field are poorly understood. In this study we combined field and common garden laboratory approaches to examine relationships between warming, forest floor food web structure, and heterotrophic respiration. We found that soil animals can overwhelm the effects of warming (to 5 degrees Celsius above ambient on heterotrophic respiration. In particular, the presence of higher trophic levels and burrowing detritivores strongly determined heterotrophic respiration rates in temperate forest soils. These effects were, however, context-dependent, with greater effects in a lower-latitude site. Without isolating and including the significant impact of invertebrates, climate models will be incomplete, hindering well-informed policy decisions.

  19. The SMAP Level-4 ECO Project: Linking the Terrestrial Water and Carbon Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolassa, J.; Reichle, R. H.; Liu, Qing; Koster, Randal D.

    2017-01-01

    The SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) Level-4 projects aims to develop a fully coupled hydrology-vegetation data assimilation algorithm to generate improved estimates of modeled hydrological fields and carbon fluxes. This includes using the new NASA Catchment-CN (Catchment-Carbon-Nitrogen) model, which combines the Catchment land surface hydrology model with dynamic vegetation components from the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4). As such, Catchment-CN allows a more realistic, fully coupled feedback between the land hydrology and the biosphere. The L4 ECO project further aims to inform the model through the assimilation of Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) brightness temperature observations as well as observations of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR). Preliminary results show that the assimilation of SMAP observations leads to consistent improvements in the model soil moisture skill. An evaluation of the Catchment-CN modeled vegetation characteristics showed that a calibration of the model's vegetation parameters is required before an assimilation of MODIS FPAR observations is feasible.

  20. Effects of the neonicotinoid pesticide thiamethoxam at field-realistic levels on microcolonies of Bombus terrestris worker bumble bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Ian; Cotterell, Katie C; O'Shea-Wheller, Thomas A; Cresswell, James E

    2014-02-01

    Neonicotinoid pesticides are currently implicated in the decline of wild bee populations. Bumble bees, Bombus spp., are important wild pollinators that are detrimentally affected by ingestion of neonicotinoid residues. To date, imidacloprid has been the major focus of study into the effects of neonicotinoids on bumble bee health, but wild populations are increasingly exposed to alternative neonicotinoids such as thiamethoxam. To investigate whether environmentally realistic levels of thiamethoxam affect bumble bee performance over a realistic exposure period, we exposed queenless microcolonies of Bombus terrestris L. workers to a wide range of dosages up to 98 μgkg(-1) in dietary syrup for 17 days. Results showed that bumble bee workers survived fewer days when presented with syrup dosed at 98 μg thiamethoxamkg(-1), while production of brood (eggs and larvae) and consumption of syrup and pollen in microcolonies were significantly reduced by thiamethoxam only at the two highest concentrations (39, 98 μgkg(-1)). In contrast, we found no detectable effect of thiamethoxam at levels typically found in the nectars of treated crops (between 1 and 11 μgkg(-1)). By comparison with published data, we demonstrate that during an exposure to field-realistic concentrations lasting approximately two weeks, brood production in worker bumble bees is more sensitive to imidacloprid than thiamethoxam. We speculate that differential sensitivity arises because imidacloprid produces a stronger repression of feeding in bumble bees than thiamethoxam, which imposes a greater nutrient limitation on production of brood. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Climate-driven uncertainties in modeling terrestrial gross primary production: a site level to global-scale analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Rahul; Jain, Atul K; Liang, Miaoling

    2014-05-01

    We used a land surface model to quantify the causes and extents of biases in terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) due to the use of meteorological reanalysis datasets. We first calibrated the model using meteorology and eddy covariance data from 25 flux tower sites ranging from the tropics to the northern high latitudes and subsequently repeated the site simulations using two reanalysis datasets: NCEP/NCAR and CRUNCEP. The results show that at most sites, the reanalysis-driven GPP bias was significantly positive with respect to the observed meteorology-driven simulations. Notably, the absolute GPP bias was highest at the tropical evergreen tree sites, averaging up to ca. 0.45 kg C m(-2)  yr(-1) across sites (ca. 15% of site level GPP). At the northern mid-/high-latitude broadleaf deciduous and the needleleaf evergreen tree sites, the corresponding annual GPP biases were up to 20%. For the nontree sites, average annual biases of up to ca. 20-30% were simulated within savanna, grassland, and shrubland vegetation types. At the tree sites, the biases in short-wave radiation and humidity strongly influenced the GPP biases, while the nontree sites were more affected by biases in factors controlling water stress (precipitation, humidity, and air temperature). In this study, we also discuss the influence of seasonal patterns of meteorological biases on GPP. Finally, using model simulations for the global land surface, we discuss the potential impacts of site-level reanalysis-driven biases on the global estimates of GPP. In a broader context, our results can have important consequences on other terrestrial ecosystem fluxes (e.g., net primary production, net ecosystem production, energy/water fluxes) and reservoirs (e.g., soil carbon stocks). In a complementary study (Barman et al., ), we extend the present analysis for latent and sensible heat fluxes, thus consistently integrating the analysis of climate-driven uncertainties in carbon, energy, and water fluxes

  2. The CMS Level-1 trigger system for LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadamuro, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 105. During Run II, the LHC has increased the centre-of-mass energy of proton-proton collisions up to 13 TeV and may progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2×1034 cm-2 s-1 or higher. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition system has been upgraded. The upgraded CMS Level-1 (L1) trigger benefits from the recent μTCA technology and is designed to maintain the performance under high instantaneous luminosity conditions. More sophisticated, innovative algorithms are now the core of the first decision layer of CMS: this drastically reduces the trigger rate and improves the trigger efficiency for a wide variety of physics processes. In this document, we present the overall architecture of the upgraded Level-1 trigger system. The performance of single object triggers, measured on collision data recorded during the 2016 running period, are also summarised.

  3. The CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Zabi, Alexandre; Cadamuro, Luca; Davignon, Olivier; Romanteau, Thierry; Strebler, Thomas; Cepeda, Maria Luisa; Sauvan, Jean-baptiste; Wardle, Nicholas; Aggleton, Robin Cameron; Ball, Fionn Amhairghen; Brooke, James John; Newbold, David; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Smith, D; Taylor, Joseph Ross; Fountas, Konstantinos; Baber, Mark David John; Bundock, Aaron; Breeze, Shane Davy; Citron, Matthew; Elwood, Adam Christopher; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory Michiel; Laner Ogilvy, Christian; Penning, Bjorn; Rose, A; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Tapper, Alexander; Durkin, Timothy John; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Williams, Thomas Stephen; Dasu, Sridhara Rao; Dodd, Laura Margaret; Klabbers, Pamela Renee; Levine, Aaron; Ojalvo, Isabel Rose; Ruggles, Tyler Henry; Smith, Nicholas Charles; Smith, Wesley; Svetek, Ales; Forbes, R; Tikalsky, Jesra Lilah; Vicente, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Results from the completed Phase 1 Upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger are presented. The upgrade was completed in two stages, with the first running in 2015 for proton and Heavy Ion collisions and the final stage for 2016 data taking. The Level-1 trigger has been fully commissioned and has been used by CMS to collect over 43 fb-1 of data since the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Run II. The new trigger has been designed to improve the performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing (pile-up). For this purpose it uses a novel design, the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT), which enables the data from an event to be processed by a single trigger processor at full granularity over several bunch crossings. The TMT design is a modular design based on the uTCA standard. The trigger processors are instrumented with Xilinx Virtex-7 690 FPGAs and 10 Gbps optical links. The TMT architecture is flexible and the number of trigger p...

  4. Hydrogen (H) Isotope Composition of Type II Kerogen Extracted by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS: Terrestrial Shale Deposits as Martian Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socki, Richard A.; Pernia, Denet; Evans, Michael; Fu, Qi; Bissada, Kadry K.; Curiale, Joseph A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Described here is a technique for H isotope analysis of organic compounds pyrolyzed from kerogens isolated from gas- and liquids-rich shales. Application of this technique will progress the understanding of the use of H isotopes not only in potential kerogen occurrences on Mars, but also in terrestrial oil and gas resource plays. H isotope extraction and analyses were carried out utilizing a CDS 5000 Pyroprobe connected to a Thermo Trace GC interfaced with a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS. Also, a split of GC-separated products was sent to a DSQ II quadrupole MS to make qualitative and semi-quantitative compositional measurements of these products. Kerogen samples from five different basins (type II and II-S) were dehydrated (heated to 80 C overnight under vacuum) and analyzed for their H isotope compositions by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-TC-IRMS. This technique takes pyrolysis products separated via GC and reacts them in a high temperature conversion furnace (1450 C), which quantitatively forms H2. Samples ranging from 0.5 to 1.0mg in size, were pyrolyzed at 800 C for 30s. and separated on a Poraplot Q GC column. H isotope data from all kerogen samples typically show enrichment in D from low to high molecular weight. H2O average delta D = -215.2 per mille (V-SMOW), ranging from - 271.8 per mille for the Marcellus Shale to -51.9 per mille for a Polish shale. Higher molecular weight compounds like toluene (C7H8) have an average delta D of -89.7 per mille, ranging from -156.0 per mille for the Barnett Shale to -50.0 per mille for the Monterey Shale. We interpret these data as representative of potential H isotope exchange between hydrocarbons and sediment pore water during basin formation. Since hydrocarbon H isotopes readily exchange with water, these data may provide some useful information on gas-water or oil-water interaction in resource plays, and further as a possible indicator of paleoenvironmental conditions. Alternatively, our data may be an indication of H isotope exchange with

  5. Observations of a Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flash at ground level coincident with a current pulse on a triggered lightning channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Brian; Uman, Martin; Dwyer, Joseph; Jordan, Douglas; Caicedo, Jaime; Carvalho, Felipe; Wilkes, Robert; Kotovsky, Daniel; Gamerota, William; Pilkey, John; Ngin, Terry; Moore, Robert; Cummer, Steve; Grove, Eric; Nag, Amitabh; Biggerstaff, Michael; Betten, Daniel; Bozarth, Alan; Rassoul, Hamid

    2017-04-01

    We report on a second terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) detected at ground-level coincident with a rocket-triggered lightning flash. The second TGF was observed in August 2014, while the first was detected in August 2003 and reported by Dwyer et. al. [2004]. Both TGFs occurred during the initial stage of the associated triggered lightning flashes and both TGFs were coincident with large pulses of current on the lightning channel. Modeling of the current pulse from the 2014 TGF and direct measurement of the 2003 pulse indicates that the current pulses during both TGFs had very similar shapes and that each current pulses consisted of two superimposed Gaussian shaped currents. Current measured at the base of the lightning channel in 2003 shows that the two Gaussian current waves had full widths at half maximum of 765 μs and 75 μs, and modeling of electric fields measured in 2014 show that the two Gaussian currents in 2014 had full widths at half maximums of 235 μs and 59 μs. Lightning mapping array data collected during the 2014 TGF indicates that the TGF was initiated when the triggered lightning upward positive leader (UPL) reached an altitude of 3.5 km altitude. A comparison between this altitude and the current modeling shows that the TGF was initiated after the beginning of the longer Gaussian current but suggests that peak TGF flux and peak current amplitude occurred at about the same time at the tip of the UPL, suggesting that the faster Gaussian current and the TGF could have been produced by the same physical source.

  6. Major phylum-level differences between porefluid and host rock bacterial communities in the terrestrial deep subsurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momper, Lily; Kiel Reese, Brandi; Zinke, Laura; Wanger, Greg; Osburn, Magdalena R; Moser, Duane; Amend, Jan P

    2017-10-01

    Earth's deep subsurface biosphere (DSB) is home to a vast number and wide variety of microorganisms. Although difficult to access and sample, deep subsurface environments have been probed through drilling programs, exploration of mines and sampling of deeply sourced vents and springs. In an effort to understand the ecology of deep terrestrial habitats, we examined bacterial diversity in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), the former Homestake gold mine, in South Dakota, USA. Whole genomic DNA was extracted from deeply circulating groundwater and corresponding host rock (at a depth of 1.45 km below ground surface). Pyrotag DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed diverse communities of putative chemolithoautotrophs, aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs, numerous candidate phyla and unique rock-associated microbial assemblage. There was a clear and near-total separation of communities between SURF deeply circulating fracture fluids and SURF host-rocks. Sequencing data from SURF compared against five similarly sequenced terrestrial subsurface sites in Europe and North America revealed classes Clostridia and Betaproteobacteria were dominant in terrestrial fluids. This study presents a unique analysis showing differences in terrestrial subsurface microbial communities between fracture fluids and host rock through which those fluids permeate. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Blood lactic acid level and APACHE II score on prognosis of critically ill elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Bin; Li, Zhi-gang; Sun, Xiao-lin

    2012-04-01

    To analyze the relevance between blood lactic acid level and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score in order to provide guideline for clinical treatment. Retrospective analyses on 537 critically ill elderly patients who were hospitalized in the ICU with their blood lactic acid level tested and APACHE II scores calculated. The overall death rate was 35.75% (192/537) with the APACHE II score as (22.6±12.8), and blood lactic acid level as (6.84±2.01) mmol/L. The blood lactic acid level among deaths was obviously higher than in the control group, with significant differences (PAPACHE II score (r=0.572, PAPACHE II score (r=0.475, PAPACHE II score. Both of them showed good relevance with the prognosis of the disease.

  8. Accelerated Learning Certification: Levels I, II and III

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Alliance for Learning, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this report, the Accelerated Learning Certification Committee presents the results of its efforts to standardize the levels of competency certification for Accelerated Learning. The three levels of competency certification recommended are: (1) The Practitioner level (enables graduates to teach their subject matter with a high level of…

  9. Catalytic spectrophotometric determination of Mn(II) at trace levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The optimum conditions obtained are pH 4.5, 0.1 M acetate buffer solution, 4.0 x 10-4 M KIO4, 4.5 x 10-5 M CB+, 1.0 x 10-4 M Phen, reaction temperature 40 °C and reaction time of 4.0 min at 640 nm. Under the optimized conditions, the method allowed the measurement of Mn(II) in a range of 0.1-5.0 μg L-1 with a detection ...

  10. A Fine Balance of Synaptophysin Levels Underlies Efficient Retrieval of Synaptobrevin II to Synaptic Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Gordon

    Full Text Available Synaptobrevin II (sybII is a vesicular soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE protein that is essential for neurotransmitter release, and thus its correct trafficking to synaptic vesicles (SVs is critical to render them fusion competent. The SV protein synaptophysin binds to sybII and facilitates its retrieval to SVs during endocytosis. Synaptophysin and sybII are the two most abundant proteins on SVs, being present in a 1:2 ratio. Synaptophysin and sybII are proposed to form a large multimeric complex, and the copy number of the proteins in this complex is also in a 1:2 ratio. We investigated the importance of this ratio between these proteins for the localisation and trafficking of sybII in central neurons. SybII was overexpressed in mouse hippocampal neurons at either 1.6 or 2.15-2.35-fold over endogenous protein levels, in the absence or presence of varying levels of synaptophysin. In the absence of exogenous synaptophysin, exogenous sybII was dispersed along the axon, trapped on the plasma membrane and retrieved slowly during endocytosis. Co-expression of exogenous synaptophysin rescued all of these defects. Importantly, the expression of synaptophysin at nerve terminals in a 1:2 ratio with sybII was sufficient to fully rescue normal sybII trafficking. These results demonstrate that the balance between synaptophysin and sybII levels is critical for the correct targeting of sybII to SVs and suggests that small alterations in synaptophysin levels might affect the localisation of sybII and subsequent presynaptic performance.

  11. Aloe Vera Juice Decrease the Amount of Blood Glucose Level in Patient with Diabetic Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Kusnanto Kusnanto; Sriyono Sriyono; Dian Eko Puji Astuti

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Aloe vera is a tropical plant that known can decrease the amount of blood glucose level in patient with diabetic type II. Diabetes mellitus is a disease cause by an increasing amount of blood glucose level that is reduce by conditions of the insulin. The aimed of this study was to analyze the effect of Aloe vera administering on decreasing blood glucose level for Diabetes mellitus type II patient. Method: A quasy experimental non randomized control group pre post test design was...

  12. The CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinthuprasith, Tutanon

    2017-01-01

    The phase-1 upgrades of the CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger have been completed. The Level-1 trigger has been fully commissioned and it will be used by CMS to collect data starting from the 2016 data run. The new trigger has been designed to improve the performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing (pile-up). For this purpose it uses a novel design, the Time Multiplexed Design, which enables the data from an event to be processed by a single trigger processor at full granularity over several bunch crossings. The TMT design is a modular design based on the uTCA standard. The architecture is flexible and the number of trigger processors can be expanded according to the physics needs of CMS. Intelligent, more complex, and innovative algorithms are now the core of the first decision layer of CMS: the upgraded trigger system implements pattern recognition and MVA (Boosted Decision Tree) regression techniques in the trigger processors for pT assignment, pile up subtraction, and isolation requirements for electrons, and taus. The performance of the TMT design and the latency measurements and the algorithm performance which has been measured using data is also presented here.

  13. Factorial validity and measurement invariance across intelligence levels and gender of the overexcitabilities questionnaire-II (OEQ-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Wim; Hofmans, Joeri; Cooremans, Sven; Staels, Eva

    2014-03-01

    The concept of overexcitability, derived from Dabrowski's theory of personality development, offers a promising approach for the study of the developmental dynamics of giftedness. The present study aimed at (a) examining the factorial structure of the Overexcitabilities Questionnaire-II scores (OEQ-II) and (b) testing measurement invariance of these scores across intelligence and gender. A sample of 641 Dutch-speaking adolescents from 11 to 15 years old, 363 girls and 278 boys, participated in this study. Results showed that a model without cross-loadings did not fit the data well (using confirmatory factor analysis), whereas a factor model in which all cross-loadings were included yielded fit statistics that were in support of the factorial structure of the OEQ-II scores (using exploratory structural equation modeling). Furthermore, our findings supported the assumption of (partial) strict measurement invariance of the OEQ-II scores across intelligence levels and across gender. Such levels of measurement invariance allow valid comparisons between factor means and factor relationships across groups. In particular, the gifted group scored significantly higher on intellectual and sensual overexcitability (OE) than the nongifted group, girls scored higher on emotional and sensual OE than boys, and boys scored higher on intellectual and psychomotor OE than girls. 2014 APA

  14. Urotensin-II level and its association with oxidative stress in early diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabur, Suzan; Korkmaz, Hakan; Eren, Mehmet Ali; Oğuz, Elif; Sabuncu, Tevfik; Aksoy, Nurten

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end stage renal failure. Early treatment of diabetic nephropathy depends on understanding the underlying mechanisms of the disease. In this study we investigated the role of U-II in early nephropathy and ıts association with oxidative stress, paraoxonase (PON)-1 and arylesterase. Twenty-three diabetic patients with microalbuminuria, 23 diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria and 25 healthy individuals were enrolled in the study. Serum total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), PON-1, arylesterase, and urotensin-II (U-II) levels were measured. Oxidative stress index (OSI) percent ratio of TOS to TAS level was accepted as OSI. Serum U-II levels were higher in the microalbuminuric diabetes group compared to the normoalbuminuric diabetic group and the healthy control group (p=0.009 and p=0.0001, respectively). Normoalbuminuric diabetic group's U-II levels were significantly higher compared to those of the healthy control group (p=0.0001). Correlation analysis yielded that plasma U-II levels are negatively correlated to TAS, arylesterase, and PON-1 levels (r=-0.395, p=0.001; r=-0.291, p=0.014; and r=-0.279, p=0.018, respectively) and that they had a positive correlation with OSI levels (r=0.312, p=0.008). These associations were confirmed in the multiple regression analysis. The results of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that oxidative stress is important in the development of microalbuminuria. The data of this study reveal that increased serum U-II has a role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. This effect of U-II may be related to high levels oxidative stress parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced Distributed Simulation Technology II (ADST II) High Level Architecture Support Experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the High Level Architecture (HLA) Support Experiments (HSE) project was to perform experimentation and research in HLA technology to support the evolution and further implementation of the HLA specifications...

  16. Contaminants of legacy and emerging concern in terrestrial passerines from a nature reserve in South China: Residue levels and inter-species differences in the accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Tao, Lin; Mo, Ling; Tang, Bin; Zhang, Qiang; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Zou, Fa-Sheng; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge is limited about the bioaccumulation of persistent halogenated compounds (PHCs) in terrestrial wildlife. Several PHCs, including dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites (designated as DDTs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), and stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) were analyzed in the muscle of four terrestrial passerines, Parus major, Copsychus saularis, Pycnonotus sinensis and Pycnonotus jocosus, from a nature reserve in South China. P. major had the highest PHC concentrations, with median values of 1060, 401, 92, 25 and 0.3 ng/g lipid weight for DDTs, PCBs, PBDEs, DBDPE and BTBPE, respectively. Fractions of DDT in P. jocosus and PCBs 153, 118 and 180 in C. saularis were higher compared with the other species. The inter-species differences in PHC concentrations and profiles could be attributed to the differences in trophic level, diet, living habits and metabolic capacity among the birds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Riparian vegetation in the alpine connectome: Terrestrial-aquatic and terrestrial-terrestrial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharescu, Dragos G; Palanca-Soler, Antonio; Hooda, Peter S; Tanase, Catalin; Burghelea, Carmen I; Lester, Richard N

    2017-12-01

    Alpine regions are under increased attention worldwide for their critical role in early biogeochemical cycles, their high sensitivity to environmental change, and as repositories of natural resources of high quality. Their riparian ecosystems, at the interface between aquatic and terrestrial environments, play important geochemical functions in the watershed and are biodiversity hotspots, despite a harsh climate and topographic setting. With climate change rapidly affecting the alpine biome, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of the extent of interactions between riparian surface, lake and catchment environments. A total of 189 glacial - origin lakes were surveyed in the Central Pyrenees to test how key elements of the lake and terrestrial environments interact at different scales to shape riparian plant composition. Secondly, we evaluated how underlying ecotope features drive the formation of natural communities potentially sensitive to environmental change and assessed their habitat distribution. At the macroscale, vegetation composition responded to pan-climatic gradients altitude and latitude, which captured in a narrow geographic area the transition between large European climatic zones. Hydrodynamics was the main catchment-scale factor connecting riparian vegetation with major water fluxes, followed by topography and geomorphology. Lake sediment Mg and Pb, and water Mn and Fe contents reflected local influences from mafic bedrock and soil water saturation. Community analysis identified four keystone ecosystems: (i) damp ecotone, (ii) snow bed-silicate bedrock, (iii) wet heath, and (iv) calcareous substrate. These communities and their connections with ecotope elements could be at risk from a number of environmental change factors including warmer seasons, snow line and lowland species advancement, increased nutrient/metal input and water level fluctuations. The results imply important natural terrestrial-aquatic linkages in the riparian environment

  18. Long-term variations in the geomagnetic activity level Part II: Ascending phases of sunspot cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mussino

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Monthly averages of the Helsinki Ak-values have been reduced to the equivalent aa-indices to extend the aa-data set back to 1844. A periodicity of about five cycles was found for the correlation coefficient (r between geomagnetic indices and sunspot numbers for the ascending phases of sunspot cycles 9 to 22, confirming previous findings based on a minor number of sunspot cycles. The result is useful to researchers in topics related to solar-terrestrial physics, particularly for the interpretation of long-term trends in geomagnetic activity during the past, and to forecast geomagnetic activity levels in the future.

  19. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose (TGRD) levels in northern zone of Jos Plateau, Nigeria: Statistical relationship between dose rates and geological formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, Habu Tela; Hassan, Wan Muhamad Saridan Wan; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Aliyu, Abubakar Sadiq; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi

    2017-11-01

    In- situ measurement of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates (TGRD) was conducted in northern zone of Jos Plateau and a statistical relationship between the TGRD and the underlying geological formations was investigated. The TGRD rates in all the measurements ranged from 40 to 1265 nGy h-1 with a mean value of 250 nGy h-1. The maximum TGDR was recorded on geological type G8 (Younger Granites) at Bisitchi, and the lowest TGDR was recorded on G6 (Basaltic rocks) at Gabia. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical test was used to compared the data. Significantly, the results of this study inferred a strong relationship between TGRD levels with geological structures of a place. An isodose map was plotted to represent exposure rates due to TGRD. The results of this investigation could be useful for multiple public interest such as evaluating public dose for the area.

  20. Do high levels of diffuse and chronic metal pollution in sediments of Rhine and Meuse floodplains affect structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozema, Jelte [Department of Systems Ecology, Institute of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: jelte.rozema@ecology.falw.vu.nl; Notten, Martje J.M.; Aerts, Rien [Department of Systems Ecology, Institute of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van; Hobbelen, Peter H.F. [Department of Animal Ecology, Institute of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hamers, Timo H.M. [Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-12-01

    This paper (re)considers the question if chronic and diffuse heavy metal pollution (cadmium, copper, lead and zinc) affects the structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems of Biesbosch National Park, the floodplain area of rivers Meuse and Rhine. To reach this aim, we integrated the results of three projects on: 1. the origin, transfer and effects of heavy metals in a soil-plant-snail food chain; 2. the impact of bioavailability on effects of heavy metals on the structure and functioning of detritivorous communities; 3. the risk assessment of heavy metals for an herbivorous and a carnivorous small mammal food chain. Metal pollution levels of the Biesbosch floodplain soils are high. The bioavailability of metals in the soils is low, causing low metal levels in plant leaves. Despite this, metal concentrations in soil dwelling detritivores and in land snails at polluted locations are elevated in comparison to animals from 'non-polluted' reference sites. However, no adverse effects on ecosystem structure (species richness, density, biomass) and functioning (litter decomposition, leaf consumption, reproduction) have been found. Sediment metal pollution may pose a risk to the carnivorous small mammal food chain, in which earthworms with elevated metal concentrations are eaten by the common shrew. Additional measurements near an active metal smelter, however, show reduced leaf consumption rates and reduced reproduction by terrestrial snails, reflecting elevated metal bioavailability at this site. Since future management may also comprise reintroduction of tidal action in the Biesbosch area, changes in metal bioavailability, and as a consequence future ecosystem effects, cannot be excluded.

  1. Comparison of Terrestrial Water Storage Variations from GRACE With In-Situ Soil Moisture and Groundwater Level Measurements in Semiarid Irrigated Systems: Case Study High Plains Aquifer, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberg, G.; Scanlon, B. R.; Chambers, D.

    2007-12-01

    Depletion of groundwater storage in semiarid regions as a result of intensive irrigation is a critical water resource issue. Many of these systems are poorly monitored, such as the North China Plain and western India. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to quantify changes in groundwater storage using detailed monitoring records available for the High Plains aquifer (450,000 km2 area). This study presents a comparison of terrestrial water storage changes derived from GRACE gravity measurements between 2003 and 2006 with in-situ soil moisture and groundwater level measurements covering the High Plains aquifer. Soil moisture measurements from 80 shallow (~1 m depth) mesonet stations from Texas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska, were combined with data from deeper (up to 7 m) monitoring sites to estimate temporal and spatial variations in soil moisture over the High Plains. Anomalies in soil moisture were compared with soil moisture changes simulated by the Noah Land surface model. Groundwater storage variations over the aquifer were estimated by assimilating groundwater level measurements from multiple state and federal agencies. Good correspondence between soil moisture storage from the ground based networks and the Noah land surface model increased confidence in the soil moisture storage variations. Terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes from GRACE compared favorably with TWS (approximated as changes in soil moisture + groundwater storage) from the monitoring networks. Results from this study demonstrate the potential for the GRACE satellites to monitor water storage variations in semiarid irrigated systems, where mining of groundwater resources is a critical issue.

  2. The terrestrial silica pump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna C Carey

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si cycling controls atmospheric CO(2 concentrations and thus, the global climate, through three well-recognized means: chemical weathering of mineral silicates, occlusion of carbon (C to soil phytoliths, and the oceanic biological Si pump. In the latter, oceanic diatoms directly sequester 25.8 Gton C yr(-1, accounting for 43% of the total oceanic net primary production (NPP. However, another important link between C and Si cycling remains largely ignored, specifically the role of Si in terrestrial NPP. Here we show that 55% of terrestrial NPP (33 Gton C yr(-1 is due to active Si-accumulating vegetation, on par with the amount of C sequestered annually via marine diatoms. Our results suggest that similar to oceanic diatoms, the biological Si cycle of land plants also controls atmospheric CO(2 levels. In addition, we provide the first estimates of Si fixed in terrestrial vegetation by major global biome type, highlighting the ecosystems of most dynamic Si fixation. Projected global land use change will convert forests to agricultural lands, increasing the fixation of Si by land plants, and the magnitude of the terrestrial Si pump.

  3. Effect of Cyclosporin A and Angiotensin II on cytosolic calcium levels in primary human gingival fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajitkumar Supraja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the effect of Cyclosporin A (CsA and angiotensin II (Ang II on cytosolic calcium levels in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs. Materials and Methods: Healthy gingival samples from six volunteers were obtained, and primary HGFs were cultured. Cell viability and proliferation assay were performed to identify the ideal concentrations of CsA and Ang II. Cytosolic calcium levels in cultured gingival fibroblasts treated with CsA and Ang II were studied using colorimetric assay, confocal and fluorescence imaging. Statistical analyses were done using SPSS software and GraphPad Prism. Results: Higher levels of cytosolic levels were evident in cells treated with CsA and Ang II when compared to control group and was statistically significant (P < 0.05 in both colorimetric assay and confocal imaging. Fluorescent images of the cultured HGFs revealed the same. Conclusion: Thus calcium being a key player in major cellular functions, plays a major role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival overgrowth.

  4. Pepsinogen I/II ratio is related to glucose, triacylglycerol, and uric acid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Muhei; Fukui, Michiaki; Kuroda, Masaaki; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Goji; Oda, Yohei; Naito, Yuji; Toda, Hitoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Naoto

    2012-04-01

    Under- and overnutrition are associated with a worse prognosis and constitute independent risk factors for morbidity and mortality. It is increasingly important to understand the factors that affect nutritional and metabolic statuses. The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between the pepsinogen I/II ratio and several biochemical markers. A cross-sectional study was performed in 1985 subjects who underwent a health screening test. Subjects had no medications for hyperuricemia, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, or hypertension. All subjects were classified into two groups. Subjects with a pepsinogen I/II ratio below 3 were defined as having atrophic gastritis. The relations between the pepsinogen I/II ratio and several biochemical markers, including total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, uric acid, cholinesterase, and glucose levels, were evaluated. The presence of atrophic gastritis was significantly associated with age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and triacylglycerol, uric acid, cholinesterase, and hemoglobin levels. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the pepsinogen I/II ratio was an independent determinant of glucose level (β = 0.104, P < 0.0001), triacylglycerol level (β = 0.072, P = 0.0014), uric acid level (β = 0.048, P = 0.0138), and hemoglobin (β = 0.037, P = 0.0429) after adjustments for age, sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and body mass index. The pepsinogen I/II ratio was related to glucose, triacylglycerol, and uric acid levels. Such an association fosters the idea that a decreased pepsinogen I/II ratio seems favorable for the prevention of overnutrition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reduced angiotensin II levels cause generalized vascular dysfunction via oxidant stress in hamster cheek pouch arterioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Jessica R C; Buelow, Matthew W; McEwen, Scott T; Weinberg, Brian D; Delaney, Melanie; Balus, Sarah F; Hoeppner, Carlyn; Dondlinger, Lynn; Lombard, Julian H

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effect of suppressing plasma angiotensin II (ANG II) levels on arteriolar relaxation in the hamster cheek pouch. Arteriolar diameters were measured via television microscopy during short-term (3-6days) high salt (HS; 4% NaCl) diet and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with captopril (100mg/kg/day). ACE inhibition and/or HS diet eliminated endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation to acetylcholine, endothelium-independent dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside, the prostacyclin analogs carbacyclin and iloprost, and the KATP channel opener cromakalim; and eliminated arteriolar constriction during KATP channel blockade with glibenclamide. Scavenging of superoxide radicals and low dose ANG II infusion (25ng/kg/min, subcutaneous) reduced oxidant stress and restored arteriolar dilation in arterioles of HS-fed hamsters. Vasoconstriction to topically-applied ANG II was unaffected by HS diet while arteriolar responses to elevation of superfusion solution PO2 were unaffected (5% O2, 10% O2) or reduced (21% O2) by HS diet. These findings indicate that sustained exposure to low levels of circulating ANG II leads to widespread dysfunction in endothelium-dependent and independent vascular relaxation mechanisms in cheek pouch arterioles by increasing vascular oxidant stress, but does not potentiate O2- or ANG II-induced constriction of arterioles in the distal microcirculation of normotensive hamsters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alveolar type II cell transplantation restores pulmonary surfactant protein levels in lung fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; Gay-Jordi, Gemma; Xaubet, Antoni; Peinado, Victor I; Serrano-Mollar, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Alveolar Type II cell transplantation has been proposed as a cell therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Its long-term benefits include repair of lung fibrosis, but its success partly depends on the restoration of lung homeostasis. Our aim was to evaluate surfactant protein restoration after alveolar Type II cell transplantation in an experimental model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Lung fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. Alveolar Type II cells were obtained from healthy animals and transplanted 14 days after bleomycin was administered. Furthermore, one group transplanted with alveolar macrophages and another group treated with surfactant were established to evaluate the specificity of the alveolar Type II cell transplantation. The animals were euthanized at 21 days after bleomycin instillation. Lung fibrosis was confirmed by a histologic study and an evaluation of the hydroxyproline content. Changes in surfactant proteins were evaluated by mRNA expression, Western blot and immunofluorescence studies. The group with alveolar Type II cell transplantation was the only one to show a reduction in the degree of lung fibrosis and a complete recovery to normal levels of surfactant proteins. One of the mechanisms involved in the beneficial effect of alveolar Type II cell transplantation is restoration of lung surfactant protein levels, which is required for proper respiratory function. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A STUDY ON POSTGRADUATE DIDACTIC CERTIFICATION LEVEL II IN ROMANIAN PRE-UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA ELIZA DULAMĂ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the paper analyses the existing legal framework for postgraduate didactic certification level II as established by The National Education Act (2011 and by The Methodology of Continuous Training for Pre-university Teaching Staff (2011. The second part of the paper analyses The Syllabus for Didactic Certification Level II Exam in Geography (2008, and presents some suggestions for future improvement: principles of establishing thematic content and rationale, annual reviewing and updating of suggested bibliography in accordance with content and other specifications.

  8. Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis.

  9. Tropical climates at the last glacial maximum: a new synthesis of terrestrial palaeoclimate data. I. Vegetation, lake-levels and geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrera, I. [USTL, Montpellier (France). Lab. Paleoenvironnements et Palynologie; Harrison, S.P.; Prentice, I.C.; Jolly, D. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, PO Box 10 01 64, D-07701 Jena (Germany); Ramstein, G.; von Grafenstein, U.; Pinot, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, CEA Saclay, Batiment 709, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Guiot, J. [IMEP CNRS, Case 451, Faculte de St Jerome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France); Bartlein, P.J. [Department of Geography, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); Bonnefille, R. [Palynology Laboratory, French Institute of Pondichery, 11 St. Louis Street., P.B. 33, Pondicherry 605 001 (India); Bush, M. [Department of Biological Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Cramer, W. [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Telegrafenberg, P.O. Box 60 12 03, D-14412 Potsdam (Germany); Holmgren, K. [Department of Physical Geography, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Hooghiemstra, H. [Department of Palynology and Paleo/Actuo-ecology, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 318, NL-1098 SM Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hope, G. [Research School of Pacific Studies, Australian National University, Canberra 0200, ACT (Australia); Lauritzen, S.E. [Department of Geology, University of Bergen, Allegaten 41, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Ono, Y. [Laboratory of Geoecology, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060 (Japan); Stute, M. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States); Yu, G. [Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Science, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    1999-11-04

    Palaeodata in synthesis form are needed as benchmarks for the palaeoclimate modelling intercomparison project (PMIP). Advances since the last synthesis of terrestrial palaeodata from the last glacial maximum (LGM) call for a new evaluation, especially of data from the tropics. Here pollen, plant-macrofossil, lake-level, noble gas (from groundwater) and {delta}{sup 18}O (from speleothems) data are compiled for 18{+-}2 ka ({sup 14}C), 32 N-33 S. The reliability of the data was evaluated using explicit criteria and some types of data were reanalysed using consistent methods in order to derive a set of mutually consistent palaeoclimate estimates of mean temperature of the coldest month (MTCO), mean annual temperature (MAT), plant available moisture (PAM) and runoff (P-E). Cold-month temperature (MAT) anomalies from plant data range from -1 to -2 K near sea level in Indonesia and the S Pacific, through -6 to -8 K at many high-elevation sites to -8 to -15 K in S China and the SE USA. MAT anomalies from groundwater or speleothems seem more uniform (-4 to -6 K), but the data are as yet sparse; a clear divergence between MAT and cold-month estimates from the same region is seen only in the SE USA, where cold-air advection is expected to have enhanced cooling in winter. Regression of all cold-month anomalies against site elevation yielded an estimated average cooling of -2.5 to -3 K at modern sea level, increasing to {approx}-6 K by 3000 m. However, Neotropical sites showed larger than the average sea-level cooling (-5 to -6 K) and a nonsignificant elevation effect, whereas W and S Pacific sites showed much less sea-level cooling (-1 K) and a stronger elevation effect. (orig.)

  10. Sea-level changes in the Lopingian (late Permian) of the northwestern Tethys and their effects on the terrestrial palaeoenvironments, biota and fossil preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustatscher, Evelyn; Bernardi, Massimo; Petti, Fabio Massimo; Franz, Matthias; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Johanna H. A.; Kerp, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The Lopingian is characterised by an aridisation trend and substantial sea-level changes. Hence, the fossil record of this time interval is strongly affected by ecological and taphonomic factors inherent to these long-term processes. Integrated sedimentological and palaeontological studies in the Bletterbach Gorge (Dolomites, N-Italy) allow discrimination between biological signals and preservational bias, shedding light on the effect of sea-level changes on the preservation potential of terrestrial associations of plant remains and tetrapod footprints. Flora A, composed of more humid elements with larger leaf/shoot fragments, appears close to a sea-level highstand and is interpreted as a (par-)autochthonous assemblage of an intrazonal riparian vegetation. Flora B, dominated by xerophytic elements documented by smaller fragments, corresponds to an allochthonous assemblage of an azonal vegetation preserved in floodplain fines of a progradational fluvial plain associated with a sea-level lowstand. The distribution of vertebrate footprints mirrors that of the plant-bearing horizons and their abundance and morphological diversity strongly increases in correspondence with marine transgressions. This could be related to a more diverse fauna (more complex food-web related to more humid conditions) or more favourable taphonomic conditions. However, the most diversified fauna, recorded during the early phases of the regressive phase, is in our interpretation best explained by the rapid burial of footprints due to the increasing energy. Our study provides an explanation for the change in distribution and preservation of plant and animal fossils in the Bletterbach section and shows how the fossil content of continental successions is deeply influenced by sea-level changes.

  11. Natural radioactivity levels and associated health hazards from the terrestrial ecosystem in Rosetta branch of the River Nile, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, W M; Diab, H M; El-Kameesy, S U; Salama, E; El-Framawy, S

    2017-08-01

    Twenty soil and 25 sediment samples were collected from the banks and bottom of the River Nile in the surroundings of biggest cities located close to it. Natural radioactivity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K have been evaluated for all samples by means of γ spectrometric analysis. The radioactivity levels of soil and sediment samples fall within the internationally recommended values. Nevertheless, high natural background radiation zones are detected in the Kafr El-Zayat region due to the presence of a fertilizer factory, and in the Rosetta region due to the presence of black sand deposits. The absorbed dose rate, the γ index and excess life time cancer risk are calculated. High values for some of the radiation health parameters are detected in the Kafr El-Zayat and Rosetta regions representing a serious problem to public health because the soil and sediment are used as constructing material for buildings. Furthermore, the isotope analysis of uranium for representative collected sediment samples via α spectrometry showed average specific activities of 18.7 ± 3.6, 0.087 ± 0.0038 and 18.6 ± 3.8 Bq kg(-1) for (234)U, (235)U and (238)U, respectively. In general, these values confirm the balance in the isotopic abundance of U isotopes.

  12. The role of new terrestrial gravity/GPS/levelling data, GRACE geopotential model and SRTM elevations on the earth gravity field modelling and its changes in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam Chavari, Yaghoub; Bayer, Roger; Djamour, Yahya; Vanicek, Petr

    2010-05-01

    In order to model the earth gravity field and its temporal variations, different gravity data with terrestrial, airborne and satellite gathered kinds are necessary. It is possible to recover by them the short, medium and long wavelengths of the gravity field respectively. Terrestrial gravity data, especially for the regions with highly variations, are useful for different purposes, i.e. to estimate the actual gravity range in the country, to extend the gravity calibration line, to study the isostasy status (Aboghasem et al., EGU10), to modify the numerical density models, to ameliorate the local geoid models, to prepare a background for geodynamical researches, and so on. The Multi-purpose Physical Geodesy and Geodynamics Network of Iran has recently established over Iran with 700 stations of 30' by 30' distribution (MPGGNI05, Hatam et al., EGU08). About 2000 precise relative gravity measurements gathered between the neighbour stations are prepared the possibility to compute the accurate, confident and homogeneous gravity values for the mentioned network. The MPGGNI is connected to the new 24-stations established national absolute gravity base network of Iran (NGBI09, Hatam et al., EGU09) to unify the reference system and to strengthen the accuracy and confident over the country. All 6 used relative gravimeters were regularly calibrated by the recently established tele cabin/ land national gravity calibration line (TC/L NGCLI, Hatam et al., EGU07). In addition, precise levelling measurements have tied the MPGGNI stations and have connected the new network to the existed national precise levelling network of Iran. Also, precise GPS measurements have been done at each station of MPGGNI with 24 hours duration. The MPGGNI can be understood typically as a precise gravity and GPS/Levelling network, and by repeating it, it is possible to model the changes of different components of the gravity field. In order to improve the precision of old gravity data, each station of

  13. Trace Metal Levels in Water and Sediment from the Sakumo II and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Ghana. CK Tay, R Asmah, CA Biney. Abstract. Trace metal (Cu, Zn, Pb, Mn, Fe and Cd) levels were determined in water and sediment from the Sakumo II and Muni lagoons and the Mamahuma and Gbagbla Ankonu feeder streams, which ...

  14. GUIDE FOR TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE TO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PUPILS. LEVEL II, PART 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WILSON, ROBERT; AND OTHERS

    THE 55 AUDIO-LINGUAL LESSON UNITS OF "TEACHING ENGLISH EARLY" ARE DESIGNED AS A GUIDE FOR THE TEACHER OF ELEMENTARY GRADE CHILDREN WHO HAVE REACHED LEVEL II IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. AIMED PRIMARILY AT THE SPANISH-SPEAKING (MEXICAN-AMERICAN) CHILD, THIS PRE-READING MATERIAL MAY BE USED WITH OTHER LANGUAGE BACKGROUNDS. (SEE THE FINAL REPORT…

  15. Interactive Journaling as a Brief Intervention for Level-II DUI and DWI Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck, Amy Mary; Hoffmann, Norman G.; Proctor, Steven L.; Couillou,Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a brief alcohol intervention in increasing basic alcohol-related knowledge, and the intention to change high-risk drinking behaviors, among a sample of DUI and DWI offenders. Pre- and post-test data, in addition to program evaluation data, from 872 Level-II DUI and DWI offenders…

  16. Rotator Cuff Repair Rehabilitation: A Level I and II Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Vidal, Armando F; Wright, Rick W

    2009-03-01

    There is no consensus for the optimal postoperative rehabilitation protocol after rotator cuff repairs. To determine if there is sufficient level I or II evidence available in the literature for establishment of a uniform, optimal rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol. A systematic review of level I and II English-language, prospective, randomized controlled trials published between 1966 and 2008 was performed. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and secondary references were appraised for studies that met the inclusion criteria. Search terms included rotator cuff, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres minor, rehab, rehabilitation, physical therapy, and physiotherapy. Inclusion criteria were English-language level I or level II studies, including randomized clinical trials involving the rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. Exclusion criteria were non-English language, level IV or V studies, or studies involving shoulder rehabilitation of diagnoses other than rotator cuff repairs. Three independent reviewers arrived at a consensus for including 4 studies in this review out of 12 studies identified by the literature search. Included studies underwent worksheet quality appraisal independently by each of the 3 authors identifying strengths, weaknesses, and biases. The quality appraisal was then discussed among the authors and consensus reached regarding the strengths, weaknesses, and value of the included studies. Two studies examined the use of continuous passive motion for rotator cuff rehabilitation, and 2 studies compared an unsupervised, standardized rehabilitation program to a supervised, individualized rehabilitation program. These studies did not support the use of continuous passive motion in rotator cuff rehabilitation, and no advantage was shown with a supervised, individualized rehabilitation protocol compared to an unsupervised, standardized home program. Each investigation had weaknesses in study design that

  17. ALOE VERA JUICE DECREASE THE AMOUNT OF BLOOD GLUCOSE LEVEL IN PATIENT WITH DIABETIC TYPE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusnanto Kusnanto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aloe vera is a tropical plant that known can decrease the amount of blood glucose level in patient with diabetic type II. Diabetes mellitus is a disease cause by an increasing amount of blood glucose level that is reduce by conditions of the insulin. The aimed of this study was to analyze the effect of Aloe vera administering on decreasing blood glucose level for Diabetes mellitus type II patient. Method: A quasy experimental non randomized control group pre post test design was used in this study. There were 20 respondents divided into 3 group of treatment. Each group is given 100 gr/day 200 gr/day and 300 gr/day Aloe vera juice respectively. Data were collected by using observation and analyzed by using One way Anova and Paired t-Test with significance level α≤ 0.005. Result: The result showed that Aloe vera juice administering can decrease blood glucose level, with 100 gr/day, 200 gr/day, 300 gr/day (p=0.000.  Discussion: It can be proven that Aloe vera juice administering can decrease blood glucose level, it’s because the content of Aloe vera more complete and effect from alprogen which impede absorption glucose and blood glucose level. Further study are recommended to measure the effect of Aloe vera juice on blood glucose level with more consider on gender, age, total calorie consumption, obesity, activities, and stress.

  18. Review of the Constellation Level II Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Documents during Participation in the Constellation Level II SR&QA Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kenneth D.; Gentz, Steven J.; Beil, Robert J.; Minute, Stephen A.; Currie, Nancy J.; Scott, Steven S.; Thomas, Walter B., III; Smiles, Michael D.; Schafer, Charles F.; Null, Cynthia H.; hide

    2009-01-01

    At the request of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and the Constellation Program (CxP) Safety, Reliability; and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Director, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) participated in the Cx SR&QA Requirements forum. The Requirements Forum was held June 24-26; 2008, at GRC's Plum Brook Facility. The forums purpose was to gather all stakeholders into a focused meeting to help complete the process of refining the CxP to refine its Level II SR&QA requirements or defining project-specific requirements tailoring. Element prime contractors had raised specific questions about the wording and intent of many requirements in areas they felt were driving costs without adding commensurate value. NESC was asked to provide an independent and thorough review of requirements that contractors believed were driving Program costs, by active participation in the forum. This document contains information from the forum.

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 24 (WODSTH00190024) on Town Highway 19, crossing North Bridgewater Brook, Woodstock, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODSTH00190024 on Town Highway 19 crossing North Bridgewater Brook, Woodstock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D.

  20. Supervision of Occupational Therapy Level II Fieldwork Students: Impact on and Predictors of Clinician Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozelie, Rebecca; Janow, Janet; Kreutz, Corinne; Mulry, Mary Kate; Penkala, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether a difference in productivity exists between clinicians supervising and not supervising a Level II occupational therapy student and whether factors including clinician years of experience, practice setting, and clinician productivity without a student could predict clinician productivity while supervising a student. We used paired-sample t tests to examine clinician productivity with and without a student in 109 clinician-student encounters and regression analysis to determine factors predictive of clinician productivity with a student. Results indicated no difference in clinician productivity with or without a student. Clinician years of experience, practice area, and productivity without a student were significant predictors of clinician productivity while supervising a student. Study results contradict the belief that supervising Level II fieldwork students lowers clinicians' productivity. Findings suggest that practice area and productivity without a student are important factors influencing the productivity of clinicians supervising a fieldwork student. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  1. Sorted pulse data (SPD) library—Part II: A processing framework for LiDAR data from pulsed laser systems in terrestrial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Peter; Armston, John; Clewley, Daniel; Lucas, Richard M.

    2013-07-01

    The management and spatial-temporal integration of LiDAR data from different sensors and platforms has been impeded by lack of generic open source tools and standards. This paper presents a new open source software system, the sorted pulse data software library (SPDLib), that provides a processing framework based on an implementation of a new file format for the storage of discrete-return and waveform LiDAR data from terrestrial, airborne and space borne platforms. A python binding and a visualisation tool (SPD Points Viewer), which build on top of the SPDLib and SPD file format have also been provided. The software and source code have recently been made freely available and can be accessed online through an open source code repository. Future developments will focus on the development of advanced waveform processing functionality and optimising IO performance. The software and documentation can be obtained from http://www.spdlib.org.

  2. Electrons and photons at High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin

    2015-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to keep the HLT output rate manageable while maintaining thresholds low enough to cover physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the ingredients that have been successfully applied in the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. Improvements in HLT electron and photon definitions will be presented, focusing in particular on updated clustering algorithm and the energy calibration procedure, new Particle-Flow-based isolation approach and pileup mitigation techniques, a...

  3. Quality assurance plan for the High Level Controller for the CBMS Block II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, R.W.; Robbins, I.F.; Stewart, K.A.; Terry, C.L.; Whitaker, R.A.; Wolf, D.A.; Zager, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    This document establishes the software Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the High Level Controller for the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II (HLC/CBMS-II) project activities under the Computing, Robotics, and Education (CRE) Directorate management. It defines the requirements and assigns responsibilities for ensuring, with a high degree of confidence, that project objectives will be achieved as planned. The CBMS Program was awarded to ORNL by the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to design the next version (Block II) mass spectrometer for the detection and identification of chemical and biological warfare agents, to fabricate four engineering prototypes, and to construct eight preproduction units. Section 1 of this document provides an introduction to the HLC/CBMS-II project QAP. Sections 2 and 3 describe the specific aspects of quality assurance as applicable to the project. Section 4 reviews the project approach to risk management. The Risk Management Matrix given in Appendix A is a tool to assess, prioritize, and prevent problems before they occur; therefore, the matrix will be reviewed and revised on a periodic basis. Appendix B shows the quality assurance criteria of the DOE Order 5700.6C and their applicability to this project.

  4. SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

  5. The CMS Level-1 tau lepton and Vector Boson Fusion triggers for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Amendola, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level triggering system composed of Level-1, instrumented by custom-design hardware boards, and a software High-Level-Trigger. A new Level-1 trigger architecture with improved performance is now being used to maintain the thresholds that were used in LHC Run I for the more challenging luminosity conditions experienced during Run II. The upgrades to the calorimetry trigger will be described along with performance data. The algorithms for the selection of final states with tau leptons, both for precision measurements and for searches of new physics beyond the Standard Model, will be described in detail. The implementation of the first dedicated Vector Boson Fusion trigger algorithm will be presented as well, along with its performance on benchmark physics signals.

  6. Tumor LINE-1 Methylation Level in Association with Survival of Patients with Stage II Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swets, Marloes; Zaalberg, Anniek; Boot, Arnoud; van Wezel, Tom; Frouws, Martine A; Bastiaannet, Esther; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-12-27

    Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation is associated with a worse prognosis in early-stage colorectal cancer. To measure genome-wide DNA methylation levels, long interspersed nucleotide element (LINE-1) repeats are used as a surrogate marker. Cohort studies on the clinical impact of genome-wide DNA methylation level in patients with only early-stage colon cancer, are currently lacking. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic value of LINE-1 methylation in a stage II colon cancer cohort (n = 164). Manual needle microdissection of tumor areas was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue sections followed by DNA extraction. Bisulfite converted DNA was used to assess tumor LINE-1 methylation level by qPCR. Patients with LINE-1 hypomethylated tumors had a significantly worse overall survival compared to patients with a higher level of LINE-1 tumor DNA methylation (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.03-2.75; p = 0.04). This effect was more prominent in patients aged over 65 years (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.13-3.52; p = 0.02), although the test for age interaction was not significant. No significant effect on recurrence-free survival was observed. Based on these results, tumor LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with a worse overall survival in stage II colon cancer. Whether the origin of this causation is cancer-specific or age-related can be debated.

  7. Terrestrial ecosystems under warmer and drier climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Future warmer and drier climates will likely affect many of the world's terrestrial ecosystems. These changes will fundamentally reshape terrestrial systems through their components and across organization levels. However, it is unclear to what extent terrestrial ecosystems would be resilient enough to stay put to increased temperature and water stress by only adjusting carbon fluxes and water balances? And to what extent it would reach the thresholds at which terrestrial ecosystems were forced to alter species compositions and ecosystem structures for adapting to newer climates? The energy balance of terrestrial ecosystems link thermal and water conditions to defines terrestrial carbon processes and feedbacks to climate, which will inevitably change under warmer and drier climates. Recent theoretical studies provide a new framework, suggesting that terrestrial ecosystems were capable of balancing costs of carbon gain and water transport to achieve optimums for functioning and distribution. Such a paradigm is critical for understanding the dynamics of future terrestrial ecosystems under climate changes, and facilitate modeling terrestrial ecosystems which needs generalized principles for formulating ecosystem behaviors. This study aims to review some recent studies that explore responses of terrestrial ecosystems to rather novel climate conditions, such as heat-induced droughts, intending to provide better comprehension of complex carbon-water interactions through plants to an ecosystem, and relevant factors that may alleviate or worsen already deteriorated climates such as elevated CO2 and soil conditions.

  8. Comparison of different assimilation methodologies of groundwater levels to improve predictions of root zone soil moisture with an integrated terrestrial system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjuan; Kurtz, Wolfgang; Kollet, Stefan; Vereecken, Harry; Franssen, Harrie-Jan Hendricks

    2018-01-01

    The linkage between root zone soil moisture and groundwater is either neglected or simplified in most land surface models. The fully-coupled subsurface-land surface model TerrSysMP including variably saturated groundwater dynamics is used in this work. We test and compare five data assimilation methodologies for assimilating groundwater level data via the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to improve root zone soil moisture estimation with TerrSysMP. Groundwater level data are assimilated in the form of pressure head or soil moisture (set equal to porosity in the saturated zone) to update state vectors. In the five assimilation methodologies, the state vector contains either (i) pressure head, or (ii) log-transformed pressure head, or (iii) soil moisture, or (iv) pressure head for the saturated zone only, or (v) a combination of pressure head and soil moisture, pressure head for the saturated zone and soil moisture for the unsaturated zone. These methodologies are evaluated in synthetic experiments which are performed for different climate conditions, soil types and plant functional types to simulate various root zone soil moisture distributions and groundwater levels. The results demonstrate that EnKF cannot properly handle strongly skewed pressure distributions which are caused by extreme negative pressure heads in the unsaturated zone during dry periods. This problem can only be alleviated by methodology (iii), (iv) and (v). The last approach gives the best results and avoids unphysical updates related to strongly skewed pressure heads in the unsaturated zone. If groundwater level data are assimilated by methodology (iii), EnKF fails to update the state vector containing the soil moisture values if for (almost) all the realizations the observation does not bring significant new information. Synthetic experiments for the joint assimilation of groundwater levels and surface soil moisture support methodology (v) and show great potential for improving the representation

  9. Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava level II involvement: curative resection and reconstruction of renal veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava (IVCL) is a rare retroperitoneal tumor. We report two cases of level II (middle level, renal veins to hepatic veins) IVCL, who underwent en bloc resection with reconstruction of bilateral or left renal venous return using prosthetic grafts. In our cases, IVCL is documented to be occluded preoperatively, therefore, radical resection of tumor and/or right kidney was performed and the distal end of inferior vena cava was resected and without caval reconstruction. None of the patients developed edema or acute renal failure postoperatively. After surgical resection, adjuvant radiation therapy was administrated. The patients have been free of recurrence 2 years and 3 months, 9 months after surgery, respectively, indicating the complete surgical resection and radiotherapy contribute to the better survival. The reconstruction of inferior vena cava was not considered mandatory in level II IVCL, if the retroperitoneal venous collateral pathways have been established. In addition to the curative resection of IVCL, the renal vascular reconstruction minimized the risks of procedure-related acute renal failure, and was more physiologically preferable. This concept was reflected in the treatment of the two patients reported on. PMID:22742531

  10. Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava level II involvement: curative resection and reconstruction of renal veins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Quan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leiomyosarcoma of the inferior vena cava (IVCL is a rare retroperitoneal tumor. We report two cases of level II (middle level, renal veins to hepatic veins IVCL, who underwent en bloc resection with reconstruction of bilateral or left renal venous return using prosthetic grafts. In our cases, IVCL is documented to be occluded preoperatively, therefore, radical resection of tumor and/or right kidney was performed and the distal end of inferior vena cava was resected and without caval reconstruction. None of the patients developed edema or acute renal failure postoperatively. After surgical resection, adjuvant radiation therapy was administrated. The patients have been free of recurrence 2 years and 3 months, 9 months after surgery, respectively, indicating the complete surgical resection and radiotherapy contribute to the better survival. The reconstruction of inferior vena cava was not considered mandatory in level II IVCL, if the retroperitoneal venous collateral pathways have been established. In addition to the curative resection of IVCL, the renal vascular reconstruction minimized the risks of procedure-related acute renal failure, and was more physiologically preferable. This concept was reflected in the treatment of the two patients reported on.

  11. Gestational exposure to elevated testosterone levels induces hypertension via heightened vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor signaling in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; More, Amar S; Hankins, Gary D; Yallampalli, Chandra; Sathishkumar, Kunju

    2014-07-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a life-threatening pregnancy disorder whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Plasma testosterone levels are elevated in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia and polycystic ovary syndrome, who often develop gestational hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that increased gestational testosterone levels induce hypertension via heightened angiotensin II signaling. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with vehicle or testosterone propionate from Gestational Day 15 to 19 to induce a 2-fold increase in plasma testosterone levels, similar to levels observed in clinical conditions like pre-eclampsia. A subset of rats in these two groups was given losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist by gavage during the course of testosterone exposure. Blood pressure levels were assessed through a carotid arterial catheter and endothelium-independent vascular reactivity through wire myography. Angiotensin II levels in plasma and angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in mesenteric arteries were also examined. Blood pressure levels were significantly higher on Gestational Day 20 in testosterone-treated dams than in controls. Treatment with losartan during the course of testosterone exposure significantly attenuated testosterone-induced hypertension. Plasma angiotensin II levels were not significantly different between control and testosterone-treated rats; however, elevated testosterone levels significantly increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor protein levels in the mesenteric arteries. In testosterone-treated rats, mesenteric artery contractile responses to angiotensin II were significantly greater, whereas contractile responses to K(+) depolarization and phenylephrine were unaffected. The results demonstrate that elevated testosterone during gestation induces hypertension in pregnant rats via heightened angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated signaling, providing a molecular mechanism linking elevated maternal testosterone levels with gestational

  12. Class II Eplet Mismatch Modulates Tacrolimus Trough Levels Required to Prevent Donor-Specific Antibody Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Chris; Rush, David N; Nevins, Thomas E; Birk, Patricia E; Blydt-Hansen, Tom; Gibson, Ian W; Goldberg, Aviva; Ho, Julie; Karpinski, Martin; Pochinco, Denise; Sharma, Atul; Storsley, Leroy; Matas, Arthur J; Nickerson, Peter W

    2017-11-01

    Despite more than two decades of use, the optimal maintenance dose of tacrolimus for kidney transplant recipients is unknown. We hypothesized that HLA class II de novo donor-specific antibody (dnDSA) development correlates with tacrolimus trough levels and the recipient's individualized alloimmune risk determined by HLA-DR/DQ epitope mismatch. A cohort of 596 renal transplant recipients with 50,011 serial tacrolimus trough levels had HLA-DR/DQ eplet mismatch determined using HLAMatchmaker software. We analyzed the frequency of tacrolimus trough levels below a series of thresholds tacrolimus levels before dnDSA development in the context of HLA-DR/DQ eplet mismatch. HLA-DR/DQ eplet mismatch was a significant multivariate predictor of dnDSA development. Recipients treated with a cyclosporin regimen had a 2.7-fold higher incidence of dnDSA development than recipients on a tacrolimus regimen. Recipients treated with tacrolimus who developed HLA-DR/DQ dnDSA had a higher proportion of tacrolimus trough levels tacrolimus trough levels in the 6 months before dnDSA development were significantly lower than the levels >6 months before dnDSA development in the same patients. Recipients with a high-risk HLA eplet mismatch score were less likely to tolerate low tacrolimus levels without developing dnDSA. We conclude that HLA-DR/DQ eplet mismatch and tacrolimus trough levels are independent predictors of dnDSA development. Recipients with high HLA alloimmune risk should not target tacrolimus levels <5 ng/ml unless essential, and monitoring for dnDSA may be advisable in this setting. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. Terrestrial ecosystems and climatic change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emanuel, W.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Schimel, D.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA). Natural Resources Ecology Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems depend on climate, and in turn, ecosystems influence atmospheric composition and climate. A comprehensive, global model of terrestrial ecosystem dynamics is needed. A hierarchical approach appears advisable given currently available concepts, data, and formalisms. The organization of models can be based on the temporal scales involved. A rapidly responding model describes the processes associated with photosynthesis, including carbon, moisture, and heat exchange with the atmosphere. An intermediate model handles subannual variations that are closely associated with allocation and seasonal changes in productivity and decomposition. A slow response model describes plant growth and succession with associated element cycling over decades and centuries. These three levels of terrestrial models are linked through common specifications of environmental conditions and constrain each other. 58 refs.

  14. Development of High Level Trigger Software for Belle II at SuperKEKB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Mineo, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Belle collaboration has been trying for 10 years to reveal the mystery of the current matter-dominated universe. However, much more statistics is required to search for New Physics through quantum loops in decays of B mesons. In order to increase the experimental sensitivity, the next generation B-factory, SuperKEKB, is planned. The design luminosity of SuperKEKB is 8 x 1035cm-2s-1 a factor 40 above KEKB's peak luminosity. At this high luminosity, the level 1 trigger of the Belle II experiment will stream events of 300 kB size at a 30 kHz rate. To reduce the data flow to a manageable level, a high-level trigger (HLT) is needed, which will be implemented using the full offline reconstruction on a large scale PC farm. There, physics level event selection is performed, reducing the event rate by ~ 10 to a few kHz. To execute the reconstruction the HLT uses the offline event processing framework basf2, which has parallel processing capabilities used for multi-core processing and PC clusters. The event data handling in the HLT is totally object oriented utilizing ROOT I/O with a new method of object passing over the UNIX socket connection. Also under consideration is the use of the HLT output as well to reduce the pixel detector event size by only saving hits associated with a track, resulting in an additional data reduction of ~ 100 for the pixel detector. In this contribution, the design and implementation of the Belle II HLT are presented together with a report of preliminary testing results.

  15. Increased Cerebrospinal Fluid Level of Insulin-like Growth Factor-II in Male Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åberg, Daniel; Johansson, Per; Isgaard, Jörgen; Wallin, Anders; Johansson, Jan-Ove; Andreasson, Ulf; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Åberg, N David; Svensson, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is important for brain development. Although IGF-II is abundant also in adult life, little is known of the role of IGF-II in Alzheimer's disease (AD). This was a cross-sectional study of 60 consecutive patients under primary evaluation of cognitive impairment and 20 healthy controls. The patients had AD dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) diagnosed with AD dementia upon follow-up (n = 32), stable MCI (SMCI, n = 13), or other dementias (n = 15). IGF-II, IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), and IGFBP-2 were analyzed in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Levels of IGF-II, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-2 were similar in all groups in the total study population. Gender-specific analyses showed that in men (n = 40), CSF IGF-II level was higher in AD compared to SMCI and controls (p <  0.01 and p <  0.05, respectively). Furthermore, CSF IGFBP-2 level was increased in AD men versus SMCI men (p <  0.01) and tended to be increased versus control men (p = 0.09). There were no between-group differences in women (n = 40). In the total study population (n = 80) as well as in men (n = 40), CSF levels of IGF-II and IGFBP-2 correlated positively with CSF levels of the AD biomarkers total-tau and phosphorylated tau protein. In men, but not women, in the early stages of AD, CSF IGF-II level was elevated, and CSF IGFBP-2 level tended to be increased, compared to healthy controls.

  16. {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am levels in the terrestrial and aquatic environment of the Loire and Garonne rivers basins (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, G.; Mokili, M.B.; Le Roy, C.; Pagano, V. [SUBATECH/IN2P3 (France); Gontier, G.; Boyer, C. [EDF-DPI-DIN-CIDEN (France); Chardon, P. [CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Hemidy, P.Y. [EDF-DPN-UNIE-GPRE-IEV (France)

    2014-07-01

    Plutonium and americium long-lived alpha emitter isotopes can be found in the environment because of atmospheric global fallout due to thermonuclear tests performed between 1945 and 1980, to the American SNAP 9A satellite explosion in 1964, to the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident,... In France, the nuclear safety authority does not allow the release of artificial alpha emitters from nuclear power plants. Thus, monitoring is performed to verify the absence of these alpha emitters in liquid discharges to respect the limits set by the regulations. These thresholds ensure a very low dosimetric impact to the population compared to other radionuclides. With the objective of environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities, activity measurements of long-lived alpha emitters are carried out to detect the traces of these radionuclides. Analysis of low activity by alpha spectrometry after chemical steps were performed and used to determine the {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am activities on a large set of environmental solid samples likely to be encountered in environmental monitoring as soils, sediments, terrestrial and aquatic bio-indicators. The samples collected in the terrestrial and aquatic environment of the Loire and Garonne rivers basins (France) was investigated for the 2009-2014 period. It was found that the mean activity concentration of the most frequently detected was for the radionuclide {sup 238}Pu: from <0.00031 to 0.0061 Bq/kg dry in terrestrial samples and from <0.00086 to 0.011 Bq/kg dry in aquatic samples; for the radionuclide {sup 239+240}Pu: from 0.00041 to 0.150 Bq/kg dry in terrestrial samples and from 0.0023 to 0.240 Bq/kg dry in aquatic samples and for the radionuclide {sup 241}Am: from <0.00086 to 0.087 Bq/kg dry in terrestrial samples and from 0.0022 to 0.120 Bq/kg dry in aquatic samples. {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am/{sup 239+240}Pu ratios determined are in accordance with an environmental contamination due to

  17. Electron and Photon High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084857

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system. The first level is implemented on custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to contain the HLT rate within the available bandwidth while keeping thresholds low enough to cover the requirements of the physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the improvements that have been applied to the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. We present such changes in the definitions of HLT electrons and photons, focusing in particular on the deployment of a new clustering algorithm allowing pileup mitigation, a new Particle-Flow based isolation replacing th...

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 49 (WODSTH00990049) on Town Highway 99, crossing Gulf Brook, Woodstock, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Scott A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODSTH00990049 on Town Highway 99 crossing the Gulf Brook, Woodstock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (CABOTH00410037) on Town Highway 41, crossing the Winooski River, Cabot, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CABOTH00410037 on Town Highway 41 crossing the Winooski River (also referred to as Coit’s Pond Brook), Cabot, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  20. Decreased plasma levels of factor II + VII + X correlate with increased levels of soluble cytokine receptors in patients with malaria and meningococcal infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I C; Hansen, M B; Rønn, A M

    1997-01-01

    thrombocytes were lowest in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria patients. There was no correlation between factors II + VII + X and thrombocytes, but plasma levels of coagulation factors II + VII + X were found to correlate inversely with levels of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) and soluble tumour...... necrosis factor-I (sTNF-RI) in patients with malaria and meningococcal infections. Elevated sIL-2R and sTNF-RI levels and decreased coagulation factors reverted to normal within 3-5 days after initiation of therapy in P. falciparum patients followed consecutively. Estimation of coagulation factors may...

  1. The CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger for the LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabi, A.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Davignon, O.; Romanteau, T.; Strebler, T.; Cepeda, M.; Sauvan, J. B.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Taylor, J.; Foudas, C.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Breeze, S.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Shtipliyski, A.; Tapper, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Forbes, R.; Gorski, T.; Klabbers, P.; Levine, A.; Ruggles, T.; Smith, N.; Smith, W.; Svetek, A.; Tikalsky, J.; Vicente, M.

    2017-01-01

    Results from the completed Phase 1 Upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger are presented. The upgrade was performed in two stages, with the first running in 2015 for proton and heavy ion collisions and the final stage for 2016 data taking. The Level-1 trigger has been fully commissioned and has been used by CMS to collect over 43 fb-1 of data since the start of the Run II of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The new trigger has been designed to improve the performance at high luminosity and large number of simultaneous inelastic collisions per crossing (pile-up). For this purpose it uses a novel design, the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT), which enables the data from an event to be processed by a single trigger processor at full granularity over several bunch crossings. The TMT design is a modular design based on the μTCA standard. The trigger processors are instrumented with Xilinx Virtex-7 690 FPGAs and 10 Gbps optical links. The TMT architecture is flexible and the number of trigger processors can be expanded according to the physics needs of CMS. Sophisticated and innovative algorithms are now the core of the first decision layer of the experiment. The system has been able to adapt to the outstanding performance of the LHC, which ran with an instantaneous luminosity well above design. The performance of the system for single physics objects are presented along with the optimizations foreseen to maintain the thresholds for the harsher conditions expected during the LHC Run II and Run III periods.

  2. Level-1 trigger selection of electrons and photons with CMS for LHC Run-II.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088114

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment has a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly $10^5$. The first, hardware-level trigger (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all subdetectors. During Run II, the LHC will increase its center of mass energy to 13 or 14 TeV, and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of $2\\times10^{34} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme in this intense environment, the CMS trigger and data acquisition system must be upgraded. The L1 calorimeter trigger hardware and architecture in particular has been redesigned to maintain the current thresholds even in presence of more demanding conditions (e.g., for electrons and photons) and improve the performance for the selection of $\\tau$ leptons. This design benefits from recent $\\mu$TCA technology, allowing sophisticated algorit...

  3. The CMS Level-1 Tau identification algorithm for the LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083962

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 10e5. The first level (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. During Run II, the centre of mass energy of the LHC collisions will be increased up to 13/14 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity will eventually reach 2e34 cm-2s-1. To guarantee a successful and ambitious physics program under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition system must be consolidated. In particular, the L1 calorimeter Trigger hardware and architecture will be upgraded, benefiting from the recent microTCA technology allowing sophisticated algorithms to be deployed, better exploiting the calorimeter granularity and opening the possibility of making correlations between different parts of the detector. Given the enhanced granularity provided by the new system, an opt...

  4. Operating Room Efficiency: Benefits of an Orthopaedic Traumatologist at a Level II Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althausen, Peter L; Kauk, Justin R; Shannon, Steven; Lu, Minggen; O'Mara, Timothy J; Bray, Timothy J

    2016-12-01

    Fellowship-trained orthopaedic traumatologists are presumably taught skill sets leading to "best practice" outcomes and more efficient use of hospital resources. This should result in more favorable economic opportunities when compared with general orthopaedic surgeons (GOSs) providing similar clinical services. The purpose of our study was to compare the operating room utilization and financial data of traumatologists versus GOSs at a level II trauma center. Retrospective review. Level II community-based trauma hospital. Patients who presented to the emergency room at our institution with fractures and orthopaedic conditions requiring surgical intervention from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2011. Operative fracture fixation by members of our orthopaedic trauma panel, including fellowship and nontrauma fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeons. Our institutional database was queried to determine operative times, surgical supply and implant costs, and surgery labor expenses. Patients were stratified according to those treated by our trauma panel's 3 traumatologists and those treated by the 15 GOSs on our trauma panel. These 2 groups were then compared using standard statistical methods. A total of 6449 orthopedic cases were identified and 2076 of these involved fracture care. One thousand one hundred ninety-nine patients were treated by traumatologists and 877 by GOSs. There was no statistical difference detected in American Society of Anesthesiologists score between trauma and nontrauma groups. Overall, the traumatologist group demonstrated significantly decreased procedure times when compared with the GOS group (55.6 vs. 75.8 minutes, P , 0.0001). In 16 of 18 most common procedure types, traumatologists were more efficient. This led to significantly decreased surgical labor costs ($381.4 vs. $484.8; P operative times, surgical labor expenses, and supply and implant costs by the fellowship-trained group represent enhanced control of the design, plan, execution

  5. The CMS Level-1 electron and photon trigger: for Run II of LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, N.; Jessop, C.; Meng, F.; Marinelli, N.; Taroni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Davignon, O.; Romanteau, T.; Strebler, T.; Zabi, A.; Sauvan, J. B.; Marrouche, J.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Taylor, J.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Shtipliyski, A.; Tapper, A.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Xia, F.

    2017-02-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) employs a sophisticated two-level online triggering system that has a rejection factor of up to 105. Since the beginning of Run II of LHC, the conditions that CMS operates in have become increasingly challenging. The centre-of-mass energy is now 13 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity currently peaks at 1.5 ×1034 cm-2s-1. In order to keep low physics thresholds and to trigger efficiently in such conditions, the CMS trigger system has been upgraded. A new trigger architecture, the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT) has been introduced which allows the full granularity of the calorimeters to be exploited at the first level of the online trigger. The new trigger has also benefited immensely from technological improvements in hardware. Sophisticated algorithms, developed to fully exploit the advantages provided by the new hardware architecture, have been implemented. The new trigger system started taking physics data in 2016 following a commissioning period in 2015, and since then has performed extremely well. The hardware and firmware developments, electron and photon algorithms together with their performance in challenging 2016 conditions is presented.

  6. A Non-invasive Technique for Configuring Low Level RF Feedback Loops in PEP-II

    CERN Document Server

    Teytelman, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    The RF system of the PEP-II collider uses two fast feedback loops around each klystron and set of cavities. These loops reduce the impedance of the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities seen by the beam, and are necessary to reduce the growth rates of longitudinal modes within the RF system bandwidth. Operation of the accelerator at high beam currents is very sensitive to the configuration of the low-level RF feedback loops. There are 7 loop control parameters that strongly influence the stability of the feedback loops and the achieved level of longitudinal impedance reduction. Diagnostic techniques for the analysis of the RF feedback via closed-loop system transfer function measurements will be presented. The model is fit to the measured closed-loop transfer function data and the extracted parameters are then used to calculate optimal tuning and corrections to the loop control elements in the physical channel. These techniques allow fine-tuning of RF feedback with stored beam as well as diagnosis of ...

  7. [Level of knowledge of patients with type II diabetes mellitus in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro Chonsa, F; Lara Valdivielso, E; Muñoz Cacho, P; Herrera Plaza, T; Rodríguez Cordero, R; Mayo Alastrey, M A

    1991-01-01

    A personal interview to 148 patients was carried out with the aim of getting to know the level of information of type II diabetic patients at an Urban Health Center in Santander. A validated questionnaire made up of 14 questions on general aspects of diabetis, dietetic habits and capability to handle complications was used. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of questionnaire was 0.69. The correct answer average was 6.3 (IC = 5.9-6.5). Patients were best informed about general aspects and had much less information with regard to the handling of complications and to their diet. The differences among these three sections of questions were significative (p less than 0.001). The patients under diet treatment obtained worse results than those treated with oral hipoglucemiants and insulin. Our results are worse than those reported by other similar populations at a national level. Also, and due to the differences in knowledge within this group, we believe that the establishment of groups and subgroups when educating diabetic patients is possible and also highly recommended.

  8. Performances of the ATLAS Level-1 Muon barrel trigger during the Run-II data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Sessa, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It exploits the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors to generate the trigger signal. The RPCs are placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS experiment: they are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range $|\\eta|<1.05$ for a total surface of more than $4000\\ m^2$ and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates with respect to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing number. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 $\\mu s$. The detailed measurement of the RPC detector efficiencies and of the trigger performance during the ATLAS Run-II data taking is here presented.

  9. Contribution to growth and increment analysis on the Italian CONECOFOR Level II Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio AMORINI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the "Estimation of growth and yield" included in the National Programme on Intensive Monitoring of Forest Ecosystems CONECOFOR Aims of the paper are: i to outline the composition and design of Level II PMPs network, also examining the structural characteristics of forest stands; ii to describe the contents of mensurational surveys carried out in winter 1996/97 and 1999/00; iii to analyse the growth rates in progress at each PMP using selected descriptors. Stand origin (11 high forests and 13 stored coppices and transitory crops and the number of forest types tested are focused as the main discriminants of the PMPs network. This composition, together with irregular forestry practice, results in a number of consequences (prevailing age classes, tree densities and related stand structures, growth patterns which cause a high in-and-between variability of all growth parameters. For the purposes of this analysis, the network of the plots was divided into three main sets: broadleaved high forest (i.e. beech stands, 6 PMPs; coniferous forest (i.e. Norway spruce stands, 5 PMPs; coppice forest (i.e. deciduous and evergreen oaks, beech and hardbeam stands, 13 PMPs. The measurement of basic growth variables (dbh and tree height was used to describe the tree populations in each PMP; the calculation of basal area, mean and top dbh, mean and top height, provided the reference dataset at each inventory. The assessment of social class according to Kraft gave information on vertical stand structure and made it possible to analyse growth according to tree layers. Data comparison provided increments in the interval 1997-2000. The occurrence of natural mortality and ingrowth was also assessed to take into account their combined effect on tree population dynamics. No trend was found, due to limited data availability, but it was possible to have a detailed overview of the stand situation and growth rates in PMPs.

  10. Study of autophagy-related protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II expression levels in thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Lechen; Wang, Jun; Cao, Mingming; Liu, Guodong; Xie, Guangying; Yang, Zhenyu; Li, Yanbo

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid cancers are the most common malignant tumors of the endocrine system. The survival-promoting role of autophagy in tumor cells has been received universally. This study aimed to explore autophagy-related protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II expression levels in thyroid diseases including papillary thyroid cancer. A total of 45 thyroid samples, including 19 samples of papillary thyroid cancer, 7 samples of nodular goiter, 8 samples of Hashimoto thyroiditis and 11 samples of normal thyroid tissue resected during surgery, were selected and divided into pathological groups using light microscope. Levels of autophagy-related protein LC3-II in four different types of thyroid tissue were tested through Western blot. SPSS19 software was utilized to analyze the research data statistically. LC3-II protein levels in papillary thyroid cancer tissues were lower than that in normal thyroid tissues significantly (Pthyroid tissue, expression levels of LC3-II protein were higher in samples of Hashimoto thyroiditis and nodular goiter (Pthyroid cancer, while there was significant variation between patients with and without lymph node metastasis. Compared with patients of thyroid cancer without lymph node metastasis, the level of LC3-II protein was lower in patients of thyroid cancer with lymph node metastasis (Pthyroid diseases may contribute to the clinical diagnosis and provide theoretic basis for the therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The Clinical and Economic Impact of Generic Locking Plate Utilization at a Level II Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcphillamy, Austin; Gurnea, Taylor P; Moody, Alastair E; Kurnik, Christopher G; Lu, Minggen

    2016-12-01

    In today's climate of cost containment and fiscal responsibility, generic implant alternatives represent an interesting area of untapped resources. As patents have expired on many commonly used trauma implants, generic alternatives have recently become available from a variety of sources. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical and economic impact of a cost containment program using high quality, generic orthopaedic locking plates. The implants available for study were anatomically precontoured plates for the clavicle, proximal humerus, distal radius, proximal tibia, distal tibia, and distal fibula. Retrospective review. Level II Trauma center. 828 adult patients with operatively managed clavicle, proximal humerus, distal radius, proximal tibia, tibial pilon, and ankle fractures. Operative treatment with conventional or generic implants. The 414 patients treated with generic implants were compared with 414 patients treated with conventional implants. There were no significant differences in age, sex, presence of diabetes, smoking history or fracture type between the generic and conventional groups. No difference in operative time, estimated blood loss or intraoperative complication rate was observed. No increase in postoperative infection rate, hardware failure, hardware loosening, malunion, nonunion or need for hardware removal was noted. Overall, our hospital realized a 56% reduction in implant costs, an average savings of $1197 per case, and a total savings of $458,080 for the study period. Use of generic orthopaedic implants has been successful at our institution, providing equivalent clinical outcomes while significantly reducing implant expenditures. Based on our data, the use of generic implants has the potential to markedly reduce operative costs as long as quality products are used. Therapeutic Level III.

  12. Serum B12 Levels in Type II Diabetics on Metformin Therapy and its association with Clinical Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    MP, Holay; M, Vyawahare; K, Shekar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Metformin use in type II DM has also been known to cause B12 deficiency in as reported many studies. Iatrogenic neuropathy caused by Metformin induced B12 deficiency can add to burden of peripheral neuropathy that already exists in diabetic patients. Aims and Objectives: 1)To determine the serum vitamin B12 levels in patients of type II DM on metformin therapy and compare it with those not on metformin therapy; 2) To correlate serum vitamin B12 levels with dose and duration of met...

  13. Removal of Trace Levels of Cu(II) from Seawater by Co-precipitation with Humic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Hisanori

    2017-01-01

    To maintain performance related to fuel consumption and maneuverability, the bottom of ships are painted with antifouling paint that contains Cu2O as a biocidal pigment. However, in enclosed coastal areas around dockyards, some of the Cu(II) contained in the paint is eluted into the surrounding water. The present study examined the removal of Cu from seawater by co-precipitation with humic acids (HAs). After precipitating the HA in seawater, the amount of Cu(II) in the supernatant was colorimetrically measured by a colorimetry using bathocuproine. The removal efficiency (RE%) for micromolar Cu(II) increased with increasing initial concentrations of HAs. An RE of 90% was obtained using an HA derived from hardwood bark compost. Aromatic components in the HA that contained highly substituted acidic functional groups appeared to enhance the removal of Cu(II). The findings reported herein indicate that HAs represent a useful material for removing trace levels of Cu from seawater.

  14. [Relationship between blood glucose levels and salivary pH and buffering capacity in type II diabetes patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkafri, I H; Mashlah, A; Shaqifa, A

    2014-03-13

    This study was evaluated the relationship between blood glucose levels and salivary pH and buffering capacity in type II diabetic patients. The sample comprised 210 participants (age ranged 40-60 years). Based on fasting blood glucose levels the participants were divided into 3 groups: controls with normal blood glucose levels; diabetic patients with levels ≤ 200 mg/dL; and diabetic patients with levels > 200 mg/dL. Salivary pH and buffering capacity were determined in a sample of resting (non-stimulated) saliva taken from each participant. Salivary pH levels in diabetic patients with blood glucose levels > 200 mg/dL were lower than in the controls and diabetic patients with levels ≤ 200 mg/dL. Salivary pH levels were comparable in controls and diabetic patients with blood glucose levels ≤ 200 mg/dL. Salivary buffering capacity in the 3 groups was comparable.

  15. Several Cytokines and Protein C Levels with the Apache II Scoring System for Evaluation of Patients with Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Elif Doyuk; Karkaç, Emine; Gülbaş, Zafer; Alpat, Saygın Nayman; Erben, Nurettin; Colak, Ertuğrul

    2012-06-01

    We investigated whether determination IL-6, IL-8, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha at baseline, total protein C (PC) levels at time of admission and 48 hours after initiation could complement the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scoring system to identify patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock for clinical outcome. The study was carried out prospectively. 60 consecutive patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock were included. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and 48 hours after initiation. Cytokines and PC levels in plasma were measured with an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). APACHE II score was calculated on admission. Baseline IL-6 levels and PC levels 48 hours after initiation were predictive of increased mortality (p=0.016, p=0.044 respectively). Baseline IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha baseline levels correlate with the severity of physiologic insult, as determined by the APACHE II score. However, our multiple logistic regression analysis of these did not reveal any predictive value in combination with the APACHE II score. Determination of baseline IL-6 and PC 48 hours after initiation were of predictive value for prognostic evaluation of septic patients, but did not significantly increase predictive power of the APACHE scoring system to identify patients with sepsis for fatal clinical outcome.

  16. Several Cytokines and Protein C Levels with the Apache II Scoring System for Evaluation of Patients with Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurettin Erben

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We investigated whether determination IL-6, IL-8, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha at baseline, total protein C (PC levels at time of admission and 48 hours after initiation could complement the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scoring system to identify patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock for clinical outcome.Material and Methods: The study was carried out prospectively. 60 consecutive patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock were included. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and 48 hours after initiation. Cytokines and PC levels in plasma were measured with an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA. APACHE II score was calculated on admission.Results: Baseline IL-6 levels and PC levels 48 hours after initiation were predictive of increased mortality (p=0.016, p=0.044 respectively. Baseline IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha baseline levels correlate with the severity of physiologic insult, as determined by the APACHE II score. However, our multiple logistic regression analysis of these did not reveal any predictive value in combination with the APACHE II score.Conclusion: Determination of baseline IL-6 and PC 48 hours after initiation were of predictive value for prognostic evaluation of septic patients, but did not significantly increase predictive power of the APACHE scoring system to identify patients with sepsis for fatal clinical outcome.

  17. Introduced Terrestrial Species (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted future potential distributions of terrestrial plants, animals, and pathogens non-native to the Middle-Atlantic region. These data are...

  18. Terrestrial locomotion in arachnids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagna, Joseph C; Peattie, Anne M

    2012-05-01

    In this review, we assess the current state of knowledge on terrestrial locomotion in Arachnida. Arachnids represent a single diverse (>100,000 species) clade containing well-defined subgroups (at both the order and subordinal levels) that vary morphologically around a basic body plan, yet exhibit highly disparate limb usage, running performance, and tarsal attachment mechanisms. Spiders (Araneae), scorpions (Scorpiones), and harvestmen (Opiliones) have received the most attention in the literature, while some orders have never been subject to rigorous mechanical characterization. Most well-characterized taxa move with gaits analogous to the alternating tripod gaits that characterize fast-moving Insecta - alternating tetrapods or alternating tripods (when one pair of legs is lifted from the ground for some other function). However, between taxa, there is considerable variation in the regularity of phasing between legs. Both large and small spiders appear to show a large amount of variation in the distribution of foot-ground contact, even between consecutive step-cycles of a single run. Mechanisms for attachment to vertical surfaces also vary, and may depend on tufts of adhesive hairs, fluid adhesives, silks, or a combination of these. We conclude that Arachnida, particularly with improvements in microelectronic force sensing technology, can serve as a powerful study system for understanding the kinematics, dynamics, and ecological correlates of sprawled-posture locomotion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II. A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial Helium Levels in the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    lar winds which, though highly variable, provide a wealth of data. Evaluations of pr imordial helium levels based on 1 the spectroscopic study of H-II regions and 2 microwav e anisotropy data, re- main highly questionable. Current helium levels, both with in the stars (Robitaille J. C. and Robitaille P.-M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen III. Interca lation and Lattice Exclusion versus Gravitational Settling, and Their Consequences Rel ative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys. , 2013, v. 2, in press and the universe at large, appear to be overstated. A careful con sideration of available ob- servational data suggests that helium abundances are consi derably lower than currently believed.

  20. [Effect of curcumin on the learning, memory and hippocampal Ca+/CaMK II level in senescence-accelerated mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen-you; Qi, Shuang-shuang; Sun, Shu-hong

    2011-03-01

    To explore effect of curcumin in different concentrations on learning and memory of senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) and their possible mechanisms. Mice were randomly divided into six groups: the SAMR1 normal control group, the SAMP8 model control group, the SAMP8 + solvent (the peanut oil) control group, SAMP8 + low, middle and high dose curcumin groups. Mice were gastrogavage for 25 successive days. On the next day of ending the experiment, changes of learning and memory in mice of each group were observed by Morris water maze. The hippocampal [Ca2+] was determined. Expressions of hippocampal calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) and Calmodulin (CaM) mRNA were detected using Western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) respectively. The latency to find the hidden platform was remarkably prolonged, the hippocampal [Ca2+]i was markedly increased, the expression of CaMK II in the hippocampal membrane and the level of hippocampal CaM mRNA were significantly reduced in the SAMP8-model control group (P CaMK II in the hippocampal membrane and the level of hippocampal CaM mRNA obviously increased in the SAMP8 + low, middle and high dose curcumin groups (P CaMK II expression in the hippocampal dose-dependently.

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 45 (CHELTH00440045) on Town Highway 44, crossing first Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHELTH00440045 on town highway 44 crossing the First Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Chelsea. The 32.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have low to moderate woody vegetation coverage except for the upstream right bank, which is grass covered. The immediate vicinity of the site is suburban and the overbank areas are occupied by houses, driveways, and lawn areas. The upstream right bank area is a dirt parking lot for a small auto repair garage. In the study area, the First Branch White River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 41 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel (D50 is 43.1 mm or 0.141 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 17, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 44 crossing of the First Branch White Riveris a 31-ft-long, two-lane

  2. The influence of APACHE II score on the average noise level in an intensive care unit: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Munhum; Vos, Pieter; Vlaskamp, Björn N S; Kohlrausch, Armin; Oldenbeuving, Annemarie W

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in hospitals, especially in intensive care units (ICUs) are known to be high, potentially affecting not only the patients' well-being but also their clinical outcomes. In an observational study, we made a long-term measurement of noise levels in an ICU, and investigated the influence of various factors on the noise level, including the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score. The average noise level was continuously measured for three months in all (eight) patient rooms in an ICU, while the patient data were also registered, including the APACHE II score. The 24-hour trend of the noise level was obtained for the patients of length-of-stay (LOS) ≥1 day, which was compared to the timeline of the ICU routine events. For the patients with LOS ≥4 days, the average noise levels in the first four days were analyzed, and regression models were established using the stepwise search method based on the Akaike information criterion. Features identified in the 24-hour trends (n = 55) agreed well with the daily routine events in the ICU, where regular check-ups raised the 10-minute average noise level by 2~3 dBA from the surrounding values at night, and the staff shift changes consistently increased the noise level by 3~5 dBA. When analyzed in alignment with the patient's admission (n=22), the daytime acoustic condition improved from Day 1 to 2, but worsened from Day 2 to 4, most likely in relation to the various phases of patient's recovery. Regression analysis showed that the APACHE II score, room location, gender, day of week and the ICU admission type could explain more than 50% of the variance in the daily average noise level, LAeq,24h. Where these factors were argued to have causal relations to LAeq,24h, the APACHE II score was found to be most strongly correlated: LAeq,24h increased by 1.3~1.5 dB when the APACHE II score increased by 10 points. Patient's initial health condition is one important factor that influences the

  3. Inhibition of biliverdin reductase increases ANG II-dependent superoxide levels in cultured renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Shelby C; Storm, Megan V; Speed, Joshua S; Kelsen, Silvia; Tiller, Chelsea V; Vera, Trinity; Drummond, Heather A; Stec, David E

    2009-11-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the renal medulla increases carbon monoxide and bilirubin production and decreases ANG II-mediated superoxide production. The goal of this study was to determine the importance of increases in bilirubin to the antioxidant effects of HO-1 induction in cultured mouse thick ascending loop of Henle (TALH) and inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD3) cells. Bilirubin levels were decreased by using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeted to biliverdin reductase (BVR), which is the cellular enzyme responsible for the conversion of biliverdin to bilirubin. Treatment of cultured TALH or IMCD-3 cells with BVR siRNA (50 or 100 nM) resulted in an 80% decrease in the level of BVR protein and decreased cellular bilirubin levels from 46 +/- 5 to 23 +/- 4 nM (n = 4). We then determined the effects of inhibition of BVR on ANG II-mediated superoxide production. Superoxide production induced by ANG II (10(-9) M) significantly increased in both TALH and IMCD-3 cells. Treatment of TALH cells with BVR siRNA resulted in a significant increase in ouabain-sensitive rubidium uptake from 95 +/- 6 to 122 +/- 5% control (n = 4, P < 0.05). Lastly, inhibition of BVR with siRNA did not prevent the decrease in superoxide levels observed in cells pretreated with the HO-1 inducer, hemin. We conclude that decreased levels of cellular bilirubin increase ANG II-mediated superoxide production and sodium transport; however, increases in bilirubin are not necessary for HO-1 induction to attenuate ANG II-mediated superoxide production.

  4. Relationship between Disease Activity and Circulating Level of Collagen II C-Telopeptide Fragments in Papain Induced Osteoarthritis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Majeed Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a progressive degeneration of articular cartilage leading to failure in functional mobility of joints. It is characterized by morphological, biochemical and molecular changes in histology of cartilage. Different biological markers are used as indicators to precisely predict the stage of cartilage destruction of joints in OA patients and to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of drugs used for OA. The present research was chalked out to establish relationship between disease activity and serum level of C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II in experimentally induced OA rat model. Out of 30 male Wistar rats, 25 were used to induce OA by injecting papain (10mg/0.5mL of 0.05M sodium acetate in right knee joints whereas five (control were injected with sterile normal saline solution on day 0. Blood samples (5mL each were collected on weekly basis up to 28th days of post papain injection. Sera were separated and subjected to perform ELISA for estimating CTX-II fragments as cartilage biomarker (CartiLaps ® ELISA kit in experimental groups. Maximum level of CTX–II (pg/mL (40.44±3.07 was observed in sera samples of day 14 post papain injection followed by days 21 (40.22±2.01, 28 (36.82±3.81, 7 (34.48±4.17, 1 (15.08±4.22 and day 0 (2.55±0.10. The early changes in serum CTX-II from day 0 to 14 showed significant association with cartilage damage. Later on, no significant difference was observed in CTX-II level on day 14, 21 and 28 post papain injection. It is concluded that elevation in serum CTX-II level was concomitant with the onset of disease and degradation of cartilage. Moreover, CTX-II is a sensitive diagnostic biomarker to monitor joint disorder severity in papain induced OA rat experimental model on different days. These findings may be used as base line for early diagnosis of disease and initiation of therapy for successful outcome.

  5. Increased Resistin Levels in Intra-abdominal Sepsis: Correlation with proinflammatory cytokines & Acute Physiology & Chronic Health Evaluation II scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonguç U. Yilmaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Resistin, a hormone secreted from adipocytes and considered to be a likely cause of insulin resistance, has recently been accepted as a proinflammatory cytokine. This study aimed to determine the correlation between resistin levels in patients with intra-abdominal sepsis and mortality. Methods: Of 45 patients with intraabdominal sepsis, a total of 35 adult patients were included in the study. This study was undertaken from December 2011 to December 2012 and included patients who had no history of diabetes mellitus and who were admitted to the general surgery intensive care units of Gazi University and Bülent Ecevit University School of Medicine, Turkey. Evaluations were performed on 12 patients with sepsis, 10 patients with severe sepsis, 13 patients with septic shock and 15 healthy controls. The patients’ plasma resistin, interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, procalcitonin, lactate and glucose levels and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores were studied daily for the first five days after admission. A correlation analysis of serum resistin levels with cytokine levels and APACHE II scores was performed. Results: Serum resistin levels in patients with sepsis were significantly higher than in the healthy controls (P <0.001. A significant correlation was found between serum resistin levels and APACHE II scores, serum IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, procalcitonin, lactate and glucose levels. Furthermore, a significant correlation was found between serum resistin levels and all-cause mortality (P = 0.02. Conclusion: The levels of resistin were significantly positively correlated with the severity of disease and were a possible mediator of a prolonged inflammatory state in patients with intra-abdominal sepsis.

  6. COURSE OUTLINE FOR FIRST SIX WEEKS FOR SCIENCE-LEVEL II, TALENT PRESERVATION CLASSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston Independent School District, TX.

    THE FIRST 6-WEEK UNIT CONCERNS ANIMAL LIFE, AND TOPICS INCLUDE PROTOZOA, INVERTEBRATES, AND VERTEBRATES. UNIT II, "THE HUMAN BODY", INCLUDES BODY SYSTEMS, HEALTH, AND SAFETY. TEXTBOOK REFERENCES, CONTENT OUTLINE, TEACHING SUGGESTIONS, REFERENCE READINGS, AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS ARE GIVEN UNDER EACH TOPIC. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT FIRST…

  7. Terrestrial and extraterrestrial fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heymann, D.; Jenneskens, L.W.; Jehlicka, J; Koper, C.; Vlietstra, E. [Rice Univ, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Science

    2003-07-01

    This paper reviews reports of occurrences of fullerenes in circumstellar media, interstellar media, meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), lunar rocks, hard terrestrial rocks from Shunga (Russia), Sudbury (Canada) and Mitov (Czech Republic), coal, terrestrial sediments from the Cretaceous-Tertiary-Boundary and Pennian-Triassic-Boundary, fulgurite, ink sticks, dinosaur eggs, and a tree char. The occurrences are discussed in the context of known and postulated processes of fullerene formation, including the suggestion that some natural fullerenes might have formed from biological (algal) remains.

  8. Apolipoprotein A-II influences apolipoprotein E-linked cardiovascular disease risk in women with high levels of HDL cholesterol and C-reactive protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Corsetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a previous report by our group, high levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE were demonstrated to be associated with risk of incident cardiovascular disease in women with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP in the setting of both low (designated as HR1 subjects and high (designated as HR2 subjects levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. To assess whether apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II plays a role in apoE-associated risk in the two female groups. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL: Outcome event mapping, a graphical data exploratory tool; Cox proportional hazards multivariable regression; and curve-fitting modeling were used to examine apoA-II influence on apoE-associated risk focusing on HDL particles with apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I without apoA-II (LpA-I and HDL particles with both apoA-I and apoA-II (LpA-I:A-II. Results of outcome mappings as a function of apoE levels and the ratio of apoA-II to apoA-I revealed within each of the two populations, a high-risk subgroup characterized in each situation by high levels of apoE and additionally: in HR1, by a low value of the apoA-II/apoA-I ratio; and in HR2, by a moderate value of the apoA-II/apoA-I ratio. Furthermore, derived estimates of LpA-I and LpA-I:A-II levels revealed for high-risk versus remaining subjects: in HR1, higher levels of LpA-I and lower levels of LpA-I:A-II; and in HR2 the reverse, lower levels of LpA-I and higher levels of LpA-I:A-II. Results of multivariable risk modeling as a function of LpA-I and LpA-I:A-II (dichotomized as highest quartile versus combined three lower quartiles revealed association of risk only for high levels of LpA-I:A-II in the HR2 subgroup (hazard ratio 5.31, 95% CI 1.12-25.17, p = 0.036. Furthermore, high LpA-I:A-II levels interacted with high apoE levels in establishing subgroup risk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that apoA-II plays a significant role in apoE-associated risk of incident CVD in women with high levels of HDL-C and CRP.

  9. Source levels and call parameters of harbor seal breeding vocalizations near a terrestrial haulout site in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Leanna P; Parks, Susan E; Fournet, Michelle E H; Gabriele, Christine M; Womble, Jamie N; Klinck, Holger

    2017-03-01

    Source levels of harbor seal breeding vocalizations were estimated using a three-element planar hydrophone array near the Beardslee Islands in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska. The average source level for these calls was 144 dBRMS re 1 μPa at 1 m in the 40-500 Hz frequency band. Source level estimates ranged from 129 to 149 dBRMS re 1 μPa. Four call parameters, including minimum frequency, peak frequency, total duration, and pulse duration, were also measured. These measurements indicated that breeding vocalizations of harbor seals near the Beardslee Islands of Glacier Bay National Park are similar in duration (average total duration: 4.8 s, average pulse duration: 3.0 s) to previously reported values from other populations, but are 170-220 Hz lower in average minimum frequency (78 Hz).

  10. Sea-level changes in the Lopingian (late Permian) of the northwestern Tethys and their effects on the terrestrial palaeoenvironments, biota and fossil preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kustatscher, Evelyn; Bernardi, Massimo; Petti, Fabio Massimo; Franz, Matthias; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Johanna H.A.; Kerp, Hans

    The Lopingian is characterised by an aridisation trend and substantial sea-level changes. Hence, the fossil record of this time interval is strongly affected by ecological and taphonomic factors inherent to these long-term processes. Integrated sedimentological and palaeontological studies in the

  11. Several Cytokines and Protein C Levels with the Apache II Scoring System for Evaluation of Patients with Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Nurettin Erben; Saygın Nayman Alpat; Zafer Gülbaş; Emine Karkaç; Elif Doyuk Kartal; Ertuğrul Çolak

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether determination IL-6, IL-8, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha at baseline, total protein C (PC) levels at time of admission and 48 hours after initiation could complement the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scoring system to identify patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock for clinical outcome. Material and Methods: The study was carried out prospectively. 60 consecutive patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock were in...

  12. Several Cytokines and Protein C Levels with the Apache II Scoring System for Evaluation of Patients with Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Kartal, Elif Doyuk; Karkaç, Emine; Gülbaş, Zafer; Alpat, Saygın Nayman; Çolak, Ertuğrul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether determination IL-6, IL-8, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha at baseline, total protein C (PC) levels at time of admission and 48 hours after initiation could complement the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scoring system to identify patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock for clinical outcome. Material and Methods: The study was carried out prospectively. 60 consecutive patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock were i...

  13. Level II Documentation of Launch Complex 31/32, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    stations when the satellite passed close enough overhead. The second type of satellite featured a “recoverable” system in which a capsule loaded with...project. NASA used a modified Titan II as the booster for Project Gemini capsules and a Mercury capsule – twice the size of earlier capsules was used...large inhabitable structure into orbit around the earth for use in collecting scientific data. Apollo- Soyuz was a cooperative project between the

  14. Batteries for terrestrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulin, T.M.

    1998-07-01

    Extensive research has been conducted in the design and manufacture of very long life vented and sealed maintenance free nickel-cadmium aircraft batteries. These batteries have also been used in a number of terrestrial applications with good success. This study presents an overview of the Ni-Cd chemistry and technology as well as detailed analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the Ni-Cd couple for terrestrial applications. The performance characteristics of both sealed and vented Ni-Cd's are presented. Various charge algorithms are examined and evaluated for effectiveness and ease of implementation. Hardware requirements for charging are also presented and evaluated. The discharge characteristics of vented and sealed Ni-Cd's are presented and compared to other battery chemistries. The performance of Ni-Cd's under extreme environmental conditions is also compared to other battery chemistries. The history of various terrestrial applications is reviewed and some of the lessons learned are presented. Applications discussed include the NASA Middeck Payload Battery, Raytheon Aegis Missile System Battery, THAAD Launcher battery, and the Titan IV battery. The suitability of the Ni-Cd chemistry for other terrestrial applications such as electric vehicles and Uninterruptible Power Supply is discussed.

  15. Terrestrial planet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids.

  16. Arsenic, antimony, gold, and mercury levels in the soft tissues of intertidal and terrestrial molluscs and trace element composition of their shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiokwere, C L

    1983-03-01

    The concentration levels of As, Au, Hg, and Sb in the fleshy tissues of the giant African land snails (Archachatina Marginata) and periwinkles (Littorina littorea) have been measured by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Post-irradiation separation of 76As, 198Au, 197Hg, and 122Sb as bromides after wet-ashing the samples in a concentrated H2SO4-HBr medium was employed. The concentration ranges of 0.015 approximately 2.48, 0.037 approximately 0.091, 0.018 approximately 0.072, and less than 0.01 approximately 0.25 microgram/g wet weight were determined for As, Au, Hg, and Sb, respectively. The periwinkles showed higher concentrations of As, Au, and Hg than the snails. The concentrations of 16 elements, Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Eu, Fe, K, La, Mn, S, Sc, Si, Sm, Sr, and Zn also have been determined in the calcareous shells of these molluscs.

  17. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  18. Salivary glucose levels and oral candidal carriage in type II diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashikumar, Radhika; Kannan, Ranganathan

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to detect salivary glucose levels in diabetic and nondiabetic subjects, to study the relationship between salivary glucose levels and salivary candidal carriage, and to determine if salivary glucose levels could be used as a noninvasive tool to monitor glycemic control in diabetics. A total of 150 adults, 100 with type 2 diabetes and 50 without diabetes (control subjects), aged 40-60 years, participated in the study. Diabetic status was determined by estimation of random nonfasting plasma glucose levels and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. Both unstimulated and stimulated saliva were collected and investigated for glucose levels and colony-forming units (CFU) of Candida. Salivary glucose levels were measured using the glucose-oxidase method. Salivary glucose levels were significantly higher in diabetics than nondiabetics. There was a significant positive correlation between salivary and plasma glucose levels. Candidal CFUs were significantly higher in diabetic subjects and showed a significant positive correlation with salivary (unstimulated and stimulated) glucose levels. These results show that salivary glucose concentration is a potentially useful noninvasive tool to monitor glycemic control in diabetic patients. Increased salivary glucose is associated with increased prevalence of oral Candida in these subjects. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arsenic, antimony, gold, and mercury levels in the soft tissues of intertidal and terrestrial molluscs and trace element composition of their shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndiokwere, C.L.

    1983-03-01

    The concentration levels of As, Au, Hg, and Sb in the fleshy tissues of the giant African land snails (Archachatina Marginata) and periwinkles (Littorina littorea) have been measured by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Post-irradiation separation of 76As, 198Au, 197Hg, and 122Sb as bromides after wet-ashing the samples in a concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-HBr medium was employed. The concentration ranges of 0.015 approximately 2.48, 0.037 approximately 0.091, 0.018 approximately 0.072, and less than 0.01 approximately 0.25 microgram/g wet weight were determined for As, Au, Hg, and Sb, respectively. The periwinkles showed higher concentrations of As, Au, and Hg than the snails. The concentrations of 16 elements, Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Eu, Fe, K, La, Mn, S, Sc, Si, Sm, Sr, and Zn also have been determined in the calcareous shells of these molluscs.

  20. Solar-Terrestrial Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    satellite for polar cap passes during large SEP events to determine the experimental geographic cutoff latitudes for the two energy ranges. 9 These...E. Lamanna, Societa Italiana di Fisica , Bologna, Italy, 1997.) Shea, M.A., and D.F. Smart, Overview of the Effects of Solar Terrestrial Phenomena...Conference, Invited, Rapporteurs, & Highlight Papers, edited by N. Iucci and E. Lamanna, Societa Italiana di Fisica , Bologna, Italy, 1997.) 27

  1. Teaching Games Level Design Using the StarCraft II Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetser, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    Level design is often characterised as "where the rubber hits the road" in game development. It is a core area of games design, alongside design of game rules and narrative. However, there is a lack of literature dedicated to documenting teaching games design, let alone the more specialised topic of level design. Furthermore, there…

  2. Comparative Climatology of Terrestrial Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackwell, Stephen J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Harder, Jerald W.; Bullock, Mark A.

    to a future volume. Our authors have taken on the task to look at climate on the terrestrial planets in the broadest sense possible — by comparing the atmospheric processes at work on the four terrestrial bodies, Earth, Venus, Mars, and Titan (Titan is included because it hosts many of the common processes), and on terrestrial planets around other stars. These processes include the interactions of shortwave and thermal radiation with the atmosphere, condensation and vaporization of volatiles, atmospheric dynamics, chemistry and aerosol formation, and the role of the surface and interior in the long-term evolution of climate. Chapters herein compare the scientific questions, analysis methods, numerical models, and spacecraft remote sensing experiments of Earth and the other terrestrial planets, emphasizing the underlying commonality of physical processes. We look to the future by identifying objectives for ongoing research and new missions. Through these pages we challenge practicing planetary scientists, and most importantly new students of any age, to find pathways and synergies for advancing the field. In Part I, Foundations, we introduce the fundamental physics of climate on terrestrial planets. Starting with the best studied planet by far, Earth, the first chapters discuss what is known and what is not known about the atmospheres and climates of the terrestrial planets of the solar system and beyond. In Part II, Greenhouse Effect and Atmospheric Dynamics, we focus on the processes that govern atmospheric motion and the role that general circulation models play in our current understanding. In Part III, Clouds and Hazes, we provide an in-depth look at the many effects of clouds and aerosols on planetary climate. Although this is a vigorous area of research in the Earth sciences, and very strongly influences climate modeling, the important role that aerosols and clouds play in the climate of all planets is not yet well constrained. This section is intended to

  3. Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuixiang Yi; Daniel Ricciuto; Runze Li; John Wolbeck; Xiyan Xu; Mats Nilsson; John Frank; William J. Massman

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between climate and carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems is critical to predict future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of the potential accelerating effects of positive climate-carbon cycle feedbacks. However, directly observed relationships between climate and terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere across biomes...

  4. Level II contamiant survey of the Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuge, Quitman, Tallahatchie, and Grenada Counties, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report contains findings of tissue and sediment samples for organic and inorganic contaminants as part of a preaquistion survey for Tallahatchie NWR. Elevated levels...

  5. Molecular structure of phthalocyaninatotin(II) studied by gas-phase electron diffraction and high-level quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strenalyuk, Tatyana; Samdal, Svein; Volden, Hans Vidar

    2008-10-09

    The molecular structure of phthalocyaninatotin(II), Sn(II)Pc, is determined by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) calculations using various basis sets and gas-phase electron diffraction (GED). The quantum chemical calculations show that Sn(II)Pc has C4V symmetry, and this symmetry is consistent with the structure obtained by GED at 427 degrees C. GED locates the Sn atom at h(Sn) ) 112.8(48) pm above the plane defined by the four isoindole N atoms, and a N-Sn bond length of 226.0(10) pm is obtained. Calculation at the B3LYP/ccpVTZ/cc-pVTZ-PP(Sn) level of theory gives h(Sn) ) 114.2 pm and a N-Sn bond length of 229.4 pm. The phthalocyanine (Pc) macrocycle has a slightly nonplanar structure. Generally, the GED results are in good agreement with the X-ray structures and with the computed structure; however, the comparability between these three methods has been questioned. The N-Sn bond lengths determined by GED and X-ray are significantly shorter than those from the B3LYP predictions. Similar trends have been found for C-Sn bonds for conjugated organometallic tin compounds. Computed vibrational frequencies give five low frequencies in the range of 18-54 cm-1, which indicates a flexible molecule.

  6. PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, D.E.; Emerson, C.J.; Chester, R.O.; Little, C.A.; Hiromoto, G.

    1986-04-01

    PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios considered include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses, as well as doses to the intruder and farmer, may be calculated. Cumulative health effects in terms of cancer deaths are calculated for the population over the 1000-year period using a life-table approach. Data are included for three example sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. A code listing and example input for each of the three sites are included in the appendices to this report.

  7. Restoring testosterone levels by adding dehydroepiandrosterone to a drospirenone containing combined oral contraceptive : II. Clinical effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, Y.; Foidart, J. M.; Pintiaux, A.; Minon, J. M.; Fauser, B. C J M; Cobey, K.; Coelingh Bennink, H. J T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) decrease androgen levels, including testosterone (T), which may be associated with sexual dysfunction and mood complaints in some women. We have shown that 'co-administration' of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to a drospirenone (DRSP)-containing COC

  8. Evidence-Based Dental Practice: Part II. Levels And Quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For questions related to diagnosis, prognosis or causation, other study designs such as longitudinal studies, cohort studies or case-control studies are more appropriate. The present article discusses the levels and quality of evidence, and basic concepts of clinical research design in evidence-based dental practice based ...

  9. Reactivity II: A Second Foundation-Level Course in Integrated Organic, Inorganic, and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; McIntee, Edward J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Johnson, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    A foundation-level course is described that integrates material related to reactivity in organic, inorganic, and biochemistry. Designed for second-year students, the course serves majors in chemistry, biochemistry, and biology, as well as prehealth-professions students. Building on an earlier course that developed concepts of nucleophiles and…

  10. Modern Standard Arabic: Intermediate Level, Part II, Lessons 14-30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Peter; And Others

    This volume, the second of three texts for use in intermediate Arabic language courses, contains 17 lessons, each consisting of five main parts. Lessons 11 to 20 do not provide English translations for full sentences. The remaining lessons (21-30) are devoted to developing reading skills and bringing the student to the advanced level. The lessons…

  11. Terrestrial Steering Group. 2014. Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aastrup, Peter; Aronsson, Mora; Barry, Tom

    implementation of the Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan for the next two years. Identify expert networks required for successful implementation of the plan. Identify key gaps and opportunities for the TSG related to plan implementation and identify near-term next steps to address gaps.......The Terrestrial Steering Group (TSG), has initiated the implementation phase of the CBMP Terrestrial Plan. The CBMP Terrestrial Steering Group, along with a set of invited experts (see Appendix A for a participants list), met in Iceland from February 25-27th to develop a three year work plan...... to guide implementation of the CBMP-Terrestrial Plan. This report describes the outcome of that workshop. The aim of the workshop was to develop a three year work plan to guide implementation of the CBMP-Terrestrial Plan. The participants were tasked with devising an approach to both (a) determine what...

  12. Isoelectronic Studies of the Lifetimes of the Twelve 4d^95p Fine Structure Levels of Ag II, Cd III, and In IV, and Measurements of the Lifetimes of the Tl II 5s5p ^3P1 and the Bi II 6p_1/27s ^3P1 Levels using Beam Foil Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Murray; Curtis, Lorenzo J.; Martinson, Indrek

    1996-05-01

    The beam foil technique has been used to study the lifetimes of the 4d^95p levels in Ag II, Cd III, and In IV in the Pd isoelectronic sequence. The latest work in In IV confirms general isoelectronic trends in the lifetimes of the 4d^95p levels exhibited by the ions studied earlier. The In IV system was studied at 480 keV, made possible by the Toledo 330 keV heavy ion accelerator, coupled with a doubly ionized In beam. The Tl II level was studied at 520 keV by similar means; higher energy was used to minimize beam divergence and extend the foil life as much as possible. Similar techniques have been applied to Bi II. *Supported by the US DoE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences.

  13. A study of the human immune response to Lolium perenne (rye) pollen and its components, Lol p I and Lol p II (Rye I and Rye II). II. Longitudinal variation of antibody levels in relation to symptomatology and pollen exposure and correction of seasonally elevated antibody levels to basal values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidhoff, L R; Ehrlich-Kautzky, E; Meyers, D A; Marsh, D G

    1987-11-01

    This study used a standardized, dialyzed, Lolium perenne (ryegrass) pollen extract and two of its well-characterized components, Lol p I (Rye I) and Lol p II (Rye II), to characterize the longitudinal variation of both IgE and IgG antibody (Ab) levels, as well as total serum IgE levels, in 20 grass-allergic subjects followed for 13 months. Ab levels declined toward a basal level just before, and increased just after, the grass-pollination season, returning to the same basal level just before the next grass-pollination season. The least complex allergen, Lol II, demonstrated the most uniform pattern of variation in both IgE and IgG Ab levels. Total serum IgE levels demonstrated the least regular pattern of variation. Grass-pollen counts were strongly correlated with symptom-medication scores for these subjects (rs = 0.87). Initial values were correlated with the rise in total IgE and IgE Ab to Lol II across the grass-pollen season. Skin test results were correlated with initial IgE Ab levels for L. perenne pollen extract and Lol II. Finally, a procedure for correcting IgE Ab levels to basal values was proposed and tested. The correction procedure, for each IgE Ab, was based on the average rise during the grass-pollination season (or average decline after the grass-pollination season) observed for all subjects with that IgE Ab.

  14. Increased Serum Pepsinogen II Level as a Marker of Pangastritis and Corpus-Predominant Gastritis in Gastric Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarrat, Sadegh; Haj-Sheykholeslami, Arghavan

    2016-02-01

    Serum pepsinogen I and II are considered as indicators of changes in gastric morphology. Important publications from the last decades are reviewed with regard to the serum level of these biomarkers for the diagnosis of normal gastric mucosa, diffuse gastritis and its change to atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia as well as gastric cancer. Due to the low sensitivity of serum biomarkers for diagnosis of gastric cancer, especially at its early stage and the poor prognosis of the tumor at the time of diagnosis, its prevention by eradication of H. pylori remains the mandatory strategy. On the other hand, the severity of regression and non-reversibility of precancerous lesions and intestinal metaplasia in gastric mucosa through eradication of H. pylori make it necessary to diagnose diffuse gastritis at its early stage. Increased serum pepsinogen II compared to normal serum pepsinogen I seems to indicate the presence of diffuse gastritis without precancerous lesions suitable for eradication of H. pylori infection, when it is serologically positive. A diagram illustrates the strategy of this therapeutic measure depending on the age of people and the level of serum biomarkers in areas with high gastric cancer prevalence.

  15. A level set approach for computing solutions to incompressible two- phase flow II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Fatemi, E.; Osher, S. [Univ. of California , Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Math; Smereka, P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Math

    1995-06-01

    A level set method for capturing the interface between two fluids is combined with a variable density projection method to allow for computation of two-phase flow where the interface can merge/break and the flow can have a high Reynolds number. A distance function formulation of the level set method enables one to compute flows with large density ratios (1000/1) and flows that are surface tension driven; with no emotional involvement. Recent work has improved the accuracy of the distance function formulation and the accuracy of the advection scheme. We compute flows involving air bubbles and water drops, to name a few. We validate our code against experiments and theory.

  16. Student nurse satisfaction levels with their courses: Part II--effects of academic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ansari, Walid

    2002-02-01

    The degree of student satisfaction with their educational experiences is an important dimension in the assessment of institutional effectiveness. All nursing education teams are currently working on ways to improve the quality of their educational provision and increase the satisfaction of their students. This is the second of a two-part article on the factors that influence student satisfaction with their courses. Part I examined how the four demographic features of gender, disability, ethnicity and age influenced student satisfaction and their performance on nursing modules. This paper complements Part I by examining the effects of three educational factors (academic level of the module, mode of study, and the qualification aim) on the accomplishment and satisfaction levels of 460 students attending multidisciplinary health care modules at the School of Health Care, Oxford Brookes University, 2000/2001. The study found that in contrast to Level 1 students, Level 3 participants felt the need for modules to stimulate more interest, that module teams be more skilled and knowledgeable and that library resources be more abundant. The findings also suggested that part-time students required significantly more attention than full-time participants in terms of the need for smaller seminar groups that would facilitate contributions and decrease inhibitions among students, and were more concerned with the utility and relevance of their learning in relation to their chosen professions. Diploma participants had the highest satisfaction followed by the BA and then the BSc students. The findings raise issues which are of interest to academic staff and nursing students, and the implications for nurse education and curriculum design are discussed within the context of student nurse satisfaction and quality issues of learning and teaching in higher education. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior across the High-Level Waste Evaporator System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jackson, D. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shah, H. B. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Jain, V. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-17

    The Mercury Program team’s effort continues to develop more fundamental information concerning mercury behavior across the liquid waste facilities and unit operations. Previously, the team examined the mercury chemistry across salt processing, including the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU), and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheets. This report documents the data and understanding of mercury across the high level waste 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  18. Level-1 Data Driver Card of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Upgrade Compatible with the Phase II 1 MHz Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Level-1 Data Driver Card (L1DDC) will be designed for the needs of the future upgrades of the innermost stations of the ATLAS end-cap muon spectrometer. The L1DDC is a high speed aggregator board capable of communicating with a large number of front-end electronics. It collects the Level-1 data along with monitoring data and transmits them to a network interface through a single bidirectional fiber link. In addition, the L1DDC board distributes trigger, time and configuration data coming from the network interface to the front-end boards. The L1DDC is fully compatible with the Phase II upgrade where the trigger rate is expected to reach 1 MHz. This paper describes the overall scheme of the data acquisition process and especially the L1DDC board. Finally, the electronics layout on the chamber is also mentioned

  19. High-Risk Prehospital Mechanisms in Tier II Trauma Codes: An Analysis of Under-Triage at a Level II Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyr, Sergey; Ponce, Santa; Feramisco, Hope; Pakula, Andrea; Skinner, Ruby

    2017-10-01

    Under-triage is used as a surrogate for trauma quality. We sought to analyze factors that may impact under-triage at our institution by a detailed analysis of prehospital mechanisms and patient factors that were associated with the need for invasive intervention, intensive care unit monitoring, or death. Patients admitted to our Level II trauma center who met the criteria for under-triage using the Cribari method were studied, n = 160, and prominent mechanisms were motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). Patient demographics, detailed mechanism characteristics, ED vital signs, operative intervention, and outcomes were studied. The age of the study group and injury severity score were 42 ± 20 and 22 ± 6, respectively. Alcohol or drug use was common as were high-speed frontal collisions. Overall, 38 per cent of patients required surgery, and a monitored bed was required in 60 per cent of patients. Logistic regression identified drug use as predictive of mortality and MVC speeds ≥40 mph as predictive of intensive care unit admission. Patients requiring surgery had a high incidence of frontal collisions, 40 per cent. MVCs were predominant in under-triaged trauma patients. Operative intervention, intensive care unit monitoring, and deaths were associated with frontal impacts, high speeds, and drug use. Further study is warranted to assess the incorporation of high-risk injury patterns in triage algorithms aimed at enhancing trauma quality.

  20. Sleep Dependent Synaptic Down-Selection (II: Single Neuron Level Benefits for Matching, Selectivity, and Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atif eHashmi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In a companion paper (Nere et al., this volume, we used computer simulations to show that a strategy of activity-dependent, on-line net synaptic potentiation during wake, followed by off-line synaptic depression during sleep, can provide a parsimonious account for several memory benefits of sleep at the systems level, including the consolidation of procedural and declarative memories, gist extraction, and integration of new with old memories. In this paper, we consider the theoretical benefits of this two-step process at the single neuron level and employ the theoretical notion of Matching between brain and environment to measure how this process increases the ability of the neuron to capture regularities in the environment and model them internally. We show that down-selection during sleep is beneficial for increasing or restoring Matching after learning, after integrating new with old memories, and after forgetting irrelevant material. By contrast, alternative schemes, such as additional potentiation in wake, potentiation in sleep, or synaptic renormalization in wake, decrease Matching. We also argue that, by selecting appropriate loops through the brain that tie feedforward synapses with feedback ones in the same dendritic domain, different subsets of neurons can learn to specialize for different contingencies and form sequences of nested perception-action loops. By potentiating such loops when interacting with the environment in wake, and depressing them when disconnected from the environment in sleep, neurons can learn to match the long-term statistical structure of the environment while avoiding spurious modes of functioning and catastrophic interference. Finally, such a two-step process has the additional benefit of desaturating the neuron's ability to learn and of maintaining cellular homeostasis. Thus, sleep-dependent synaptic renormalization offers a parsimonious account for both cellular and systems-level effects of sleep on learning

  1. Low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration with up-regulation of dynamin II expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chung Tsai

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is commonly used to treat sports-related tendinopathy or tendon injury. Tendon healing requires tenocyte migration to the repair site, followed by proliferation and synthesis of the extracellular matrix. This study was designed to determine the effect of laser on tenocyte migration. Furthermore, the correlation between this effect and expression of dynamin 2, a positive regulator of cell motility, was also investigated. Tenocytes intrinsic to rat Achilles tendon were treated with low-level laser (660 nm with energy density at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 J/cm(2. Tenocyte migration was evaluated by an in vitro wound healing model and by transwell filter migration assay. The messenger RNA (mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were determined by reverse transcription/real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR and Western blot analysis respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was used to evaluate the dynamin 2 expression in tenocytes. Tenocytes with or without laser irradiation was treated with dynasore, a dynamin competitor and then underwent transwell filter migration assay. In vitro wound model revealed that more tenocytes with laser irradiation migrated across the wound border to the cell-free zone. Transwell filter migration assay confirmed that tenocyte migration was enhanced dose-dependently by laser. Real-time PCR and Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were up-regulated by laser irradiation dose-dependently. Confocal microscopy showed that laser enhanced the expression of dynamin 2 in cytoplasm of tenocytes. The stimulation effect of laser on tenocytes migration was suppressed by dynasore. In conclusion, low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration in a process that is mediated by up-regulation of dynamin 2, which can be suppressed by dynasore.

  2. Microstructure of terrestrial catastrophism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clube, S.V.M. (Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astrophysics); Napier, W.M. (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (UK))

    1984-12-15

    The theory of evolution involving episodic terrestrial catastrophism predicts that the Oort cloud is disturbed by close encounters with massive nebulae. Each disturbance generates bombardment pulses of a few million years duration, the pulse frequencies being determined by the Sun's passage through the spiral arms and central plane of the Galaxy where nebulae concentrate. The structure within a pulse is shown here to be dominated by a series of 'spikes' of approx. 0.01-0.1 Myr duration separated by approx. 0.1-1.0 Myr, each caused by the arrival in circumterrestrial space of the largest comets followed by their disintegration into short-lived Apollo asteroids. Evidence is presented that a bombardment pulse was induced 3-5 Myr ago and that a 'spike' in the form of debris from a Chiron-like progenitor of Encke's comet has dominated the terrestrial environment for the last 0.02 Myr.

  3. Performances of the ATLAS RPC Level-1 Muon trigger during the Run-II data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Alberghi, Gian Luigi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Its input stage consists of an array of processors receiving the full granularity of data from Resistive Plate Chambers in the central area of the ATLAS detector ("Barrel"). The RPCs, placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS detector, are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range |η|<1.05 for a total surface of more than 4000 m2 and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates with respect to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing number. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 μs. We illustrate the selections, strategy and validation for an unbiased determination of the efficiency and timing of the RPC and the L1 from data; and show the results w...

  4. Modular data and Verlinde formulae for fractional level WZW models II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzig, Thomas; Ridout, David

    2013-10-01

    This article gives a complete account of the modular properties and Verlinde formula for conformal field theories based on the affine Kac-Moody algebra slˆ(2) at an arbitrary admissible level k. Starting from spectral flow and the structure theory of relaxed highest weight modules, characters are computed and modular transformations are derived for every irreducible admissible module. The culmination is the application of a continuous version of the Verlinde formula to deduce non-negative integer structure coefficients which are identified with Grothendieck fusion coefficients. The Grothendieck fusion rules are determined explicitly. These rules reproduce the well-known "fusion rules" of Koh and Sorba, negative coefficients included, upon quotienting the Grothendieck fusion ring by a certain ideal.

  5. Use of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles for enhanced interlibrary loan, part II: Network application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, V M; Dell, E Y

    1993-07-01

    The Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery, and Union List Task Force of the Health Sciences Libraries Consortium (HSLC) accepted the charge of maximizing use of the advanced features of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles. A pilot project was initiated to address the task force's recommendation to the HSLC Board that all nonrush interlibrary loan (ILL) documents be transmitted to participants within forty-eight hours of request receipt. This paper describes the project, which tests a network application for unattended, overnight transmission of documents. In determining whether this technology could be used as the primary medium for ILL of photocopies, the following criteria were used: the percentage of ILL requests filled by telefacsimile; the speed, quality, and reliability of service; and the impact of telefacsimile on document delivery costs. The article discusses the project history, optimal use of equipment features for library applications, full-scale implementation, and operational issues that affect ILL policy.

  6. Terrestrial Plume Impingement Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Masten Space Systems proposes to create a terrestrial plume impingement testbed for generating novel datasets for extraterrestrial robotic missions. This testbed...

  7. In situ determination of manganese(II) speciation in Deinococcus radiodurans by high magnetic field EPR: detection of high levels of Mn(II) bound to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabares, Leandro C; Un, Sun

    2013-02-15

    High magnetic field high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance techniques were used to measure in situ Mn(II) speciation in Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacteria capable of accumulating high concentrations of Mn(II). It was possible to identify and quantify the evolution of Mn(II) species in intact cells at various stages of growth. Aside from water, 95-GHz high field electron nuclear double resonance showed that the Mn(II) ions are bound to histidines and phosphate groups, mostly from fructose-1,6-bisphosphate but also inorganic phosphates and nucleotides. During stationary growth phase, 285-GHz continuous wave EPR measurements showed that histidine is the most common ligand to Mn(II) and that significant amounts of cellular Mn(II) in D. radiodurans are bound to peptides and proteins. As much as 40% of the total Mn(II) was in manganese superoxide dismutase, and it is this protein and not smaller manganese complexes, as has been suggested recently, that is probably the primary defense against superoxide.

  8. Conservation at a slow pace: terrestrial gastropods facing fast-changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Annegret; Ansart, Armelle

    2017-01-01

    The climate is changing rapidly, and terrestrial ectotherms are expected to be particularly vulnerable to changes in temperature and water regime, but also to an increase in extreme weather events in temperate regions. Physiological responses of terrestrial gastropods to climate change are poorly studied. This is surprising, because they are of biodiversity significance among litter-dwelling species, playing important roles in ecosystem function, with numerous species being listed as endangered and requiring efficient conservation management. Through a summary of our ecophysiological work on snail and slug species, we gained some insights into physiological and behavioural responses to climate change that we can organize into the following four threat categories. (i) Winter temperature and snow cover. Terrestrial gastropods use different strategies to survive sub-zero temperatures in buffered refuges, such as the litter or the soil. Absence of the insulating snow cover exposes species to high variability in temperature. The extent of specific cold tolerance might influence the potential of local extinction, but also of invasion. (ii) Drought and high temperature. Physiological responses involve high-cost processes that protect against heat and dehydration. Some species decrease activity periods, thereby reducing foraging and reproduction time. Related costs and physiological limits are expected to increase mortality. (iii) Extreme events. Although some terrestrial gastropod communities can have a good resilience to fire, storms and flooding, an increase in the frequency of those events might lead to community impoverishment. (iv) Habitat loss and fragmentation. Given that terrestrial gastropods are poorly mobile, landscape alteration generally results in an increased risk of local extinction, but responses are highly variable between species, requiring studies at the population level. There is a great need for studies involving non-invasive methods on the

  9. Dynamical structure of center-of-pressure trajectories with and without functional taping in children with cerebral palsy level I and II of GMFCS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavão, Silvia Leticia; Ledebt, Annick; Savelsbergh, Geert J.P.; Rocha, Nelci Adriana C.F.

    2017-01-01

    Postural control during quiet standing was examined in typical children (TD) and children with cerebral palsy (CP) level I and II of GMFCS. The immediate effect on postural control of functional taping on the thighs was analyzed. We evaluated 43 TD, 17 CP children level I, and 10 CP children level

  10. The FERRUM project: Experimental lifetimes and transition probabilities from highly excited even 4d levels in Fe ii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report lifetime measurements of the 6 levels in the 3d6(5D)4d e6G term in Fe ii at an energy of 10.4 eV, and f-values for 14 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions in a laser-produced plasma. The high excitation energy, and the fact that the levels have the same parity as the the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, necessitated the use of a two-photon excitation scheme. The probability for this process is greatly enhanced by the presence of the 3d6(5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy difference. The f-values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode discharge lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer. The data is important for benchmarking atomic calculations of astrophysically important quantities and useful for spectroscopy of hot stars.

  11. Improving Limit Surface Search Algorithms in RAVEN Using Acceleration Schemes: Level II Milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The RAVEN code is becoming a comprehensive tool to perform Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA); Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and Propagation; and Verification and Validation (V&V). The RAVEN code is being developed to support the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway by developing an advanced set of methodologies and algorithms for use in advanced risk analysis. The RISMC approach uses system simulator codes applied to stochastic analysis tools. The fundamental idea behind this coupling approach to perturb (by employing sampling strategies) timing and sequencing of events, internal parameters of the system codes (i.e., uncertain parameters of the physics model) and initial conditions to estimate values ranges and associated probabilities of figures of merit of interest for engineering and safety (e.g. core damage probability, etc.). This approach applied to complex systems such as nuclear power plants requires performing a series of computationally expensive simulation runs. The large computational burden is caused by the large set of (uncertain) parameters characterizing those systems. Consequently, exploring the uncertain/parametric domain, with a good level of confidence, is generally not affordable, considering the limited computational resources that are currently available. In addition, the recent tendency to develop newer tools, characterized by higher accuracy and larger computational resources (if compared with the presently used legacy codes, that have been developed decades ago), has made this issue even more compelling. In order to overcome to these limitations, the strategy for the exploration of the uncertain/parametric space needs to use at best the computational resources focusing the computational effort in those regions of the uncertain/parametric space that are “interesting” (e.g., risk-significant regions of the input space) with respect the targeted Figures Of Merit (FOM): for example, the failure of the system

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8 (STAMVT01000008) on State Highway 100, crossing the North Branch of the Hoosic River, Stamford, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure STAMVT01000008 on Vermont Highway 100 crossing the North Branch of the Hoosic River, Stamford, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  13. Were early pterosaurs inept terrestrial locomotors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P. Witton

    2015-06-01

    antungual sesamoids, which occur in the manus and pes anatomy of many early pterosaur species, and only occur elsewhere in terrestrial reptiles, possibly developing through frequent interactions of large claws with firm substrates. It is argued that characteristics possibly associated with terrestriality are deeply nested within Pterosauria and not restricted to Pterodactyloidea as previously thought, and that pterodactyloid-like levels of terrestrial competency may have been possible in at least some early pterosaurs.

  14. Were early pterosaurs inept terrestrial locomotors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witton, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    sesamoids, which occur in the manus and pes anatomy of many early pterosaur species, and only occur elsewhere in terrestrial reptiles, possibly developing through frequent interactions of large claws with firm substrates. It is argued that characteristics possibly associated with terrestriality are deeply nested within Pterosauria and not restricted to Pterodactyloidea as previously thought, and that pterodactyloid-like levels of terrestrial competency may have been possible in at least some early pterosaurs.

  15. Comparison of Insulin Expression Levels in White Blood Cells of infants with and without Family History of Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Mazhari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type II diabetes is known as one of the most important, prevalent, and expensive diseases of mankind. Late diagnosis and subsequent delayed initiation of treatment or surveillance of patients create a variety of problems for affected individuals. This has raised increasing concerns for public health authorities throughout the world. In the current study, we aimed to find a new approach for early identification of high-risk individuals at initial months of their life. This allows us to take preventive measures as early as possible.Materials and Methods: In our study, 102 infants - from one to six months - were selected and placed in two case and control groups. The case group contained 52 babies with at least one of their parents identified as a type II diabetic patient. The control group comprised 50 babies with no family history of type II diabetes in paternal and maternal first-degree relatives. Afterwards, the expression level of insulin gene was analyzed in white blood cells of both groups. Information related to infants - referred to outpatient and inpatient wards of three main pediatric hospitals placed in Tehran - and their parents were collected through questionnaires within a two-year period. The study inclusion criteria for infants were confirmed type II diabetes in at least one of their parents, the absence of any metabolic disorder, and the absence of any disturbing vital signs. After drawing 2 ml of babies’ peripheral blood, total RNA of white blood cells (WBC was extracted, and used for cDNA synthesis. Real-Time PCR was then applied to quantitatively evaluate the expression levels of insulin gene. The results of Real-Time PCR were statistically analyzed by non-parametric tests of Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis.Results: The expression of insulin gene was observed in white blood cells of all samples. However, there was a significant difference in expression levels between case and control groups (p<0.05. There was a

  16. Vertex finding performance studies for the Phase II CMS Level-1 Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Udrescu, Silviu Marian

    2017-01-01

    At the HL-LHC, a significant increase in the luminosity delivered to CMS will result in a pileup per bunch crossing of 140-200. This provides a difficult environment to obtain reliable physics results and keep trigger rates manageable. In order to mitigate this problem, tracker information will be used, for the first time, at the Level-1 (L1) trigger. This will allow the primary vertex reconstruction at L1. In this report, an investigation into the vertex finding performance of a potential algorithm is presented. The vertex finding efficiency was measured as a function of several variables, such as the percentage of tracks associated to the primary vertex within the barrel and the pT of the tracks. The efficiency was found to not depend significantly on the pileup for the samples analyzed, however, a strong dependence was observed on the number of tracks associated with the primary vertex.

  17. I.I. Rabi Prize Talk: Artificial gauge fields in multi-level atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Ian

    2015-05-01

    We used Raman lasers to induce artificial gauge fields or spin-orbit coupling in the three-level system formed by the f=1 electronic ground state manifold of rubidium-87. In this colloquium I will report on two effects of this laser-coupling. I will explore the itinerant magnetic phases present in a spin-1 spin-orbit coupled atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC); in this system, itinerant ferromagnetic order is stabilized by the spin-orbit coupling, vanishing in its absence. We first located a second-order phase transition that continuously stiffens until, at a tricritical point, it transforms into a first-order transition. These measurements are all in agreement with theory. We engineered a two-dimensional magnetic lattice in an elongated strip geometry, with effective per-plaquette flux about 4/3 times the flux quanta. We imaged the localized edge and bulk states of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in this strip, with single lattice-site resolution along the narrow direction. Further, we observed both the skipping orbits of excited atoms traveling down our system's edges, analogues to edge magnetoplasmons in 2-D electron systems. Our lattice's long direction consisted of the sites of an optical lattice and its narrow direction consisted of the internal atomic spin states: a synthetic dimension.

  18. The level and nature of autistic intelligence II: what about Asperger syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulières, Isabelle; Dawson, Michelle; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Mottron, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    A distinctively uneven profile of intelligence is a feature of the autistic spectrum. Within the spectrum, Asperger individuals differ from autistics in their early speech development and in being less likely to be characterized by visuospatial peaks. While different specific strengths characterize different autistic spectrum subgroups, all such peaks of ability have been interpreted as deficits: isolated, aberrant, and irreconcilable with real human intelligence. This view has recently been challenged by findings of autistic strengths in performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), an important marker of general and fluid intelligence. We investigated whether these findings extend to Asperger syndrome, an autistic spectrum subgroup characterized by verbal peaks of ability, and whether the cognitive mechanisms underlying autistic and Asperger RPM performance differ. Thirty-two Asperger adults displayed a significant advantage on RPM over Wechsler Full-Scale and Performance scores relative to their typical controls, while in 25 Asperger children an RPM advantage was found over Wechsler Performance scores only. As previously found with autistics, Asperger children and adults achieved RPM scores at a level reflecting their Wechsler peaks of ability. Therefore, strengths in RPM performance span the autistic spectrum and imply a common mechanism advantageously applied to different facets of cognition. Autistic spectrum intelligence is atypical, but also genuine, general, and underestimated.

  19. The level and nature of autistic intelligence II: what about Asperger syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Soulières

    Full Text Available A distinctively uneven profile of intelligence is a feature of the autistic spectrum. Within the spectrum, Asperger individuals differ from autistics in their early speech development and in being less likely to be characterized by visuospatial peaks. While different specific strengths characterize different autistic spectrum subgroups, all such peaks of ability have been interpreted as deficits: isolated, aberrant, and irreconcilable with real human intelligence. This view has recently been challenged by findings of autistic strengths in performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM, an important marker of general and fluid intelligence. We investigated whether these findings extend to Asperger syndrome, an autistic spectrum subgroup characterized by verbal peaks of ability, and whether the cognitive mechanisms underlying autistic and Asperger RPM performance differ. Thirty-two Asperger adults displayed a significant advantage on RPM over Wechsler Full-Scale and Performance scores relative to their typical controls, while in 25 Asperger children an RPM advantage was found over Wechsler Performance scores only. As previously found with autistics, Asperger children and adults achieved RPM scores at a level reflecting their Wechsler peaks of ability. Therefore, strengths in RPM performance span the autistic spectrum and imply a common mechanism advantageously applied to different facets of cognition. Autistic spectrum intelligence is atypical, but also genuine, general, and underestimated.

  20. ["Analysis of fate" in psychiatry and psychotherapy. II. Correlations withe the level of general psychopathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünner, O

    1976-07-01

    We demonstrated in a group of 166 psychiatric patients, with disorders of schizophrenic and cyclothymic circle and with neuroses too, significant relations between the results of the projection test of Szondi and between the greatness of total psychopathology, evaluated by means of the Minnesota Multiphasic Inquiry (M.M.P.I.). We could ascertain, that the patients with the higher level of total psychopathology (evaluated by means of M.M.P.I.) have also a greater number of abnormal results according to the projection test of Szondi. At these patients we saw significantly more "valve groups", which witness to the irresolution in the instinctive motivations of behaviour. At these patients we could ascertain further the greater number of those personalities, which according to the projection test of Szondi suffered from a lack of breaking and self-critical elements in their behaviour. Subjects with heightened values of M.M.P.I. have significantly more results with abnormal relations of masculinity and of feminity according to the sexual index of Szondi test. The choices and the selection from the set of 48 fixed photographies, which the patient realises at the Szondi test in teen repeated sessions, form so a significant relation not only to the psychiatric diagnoses, as was ascertained in the first part of this work, but also to the height of total psychopathology, evaluated by means of the M.M.P.I. The familial subconsciousness influences so significantly the consciousness of personality and can participate substantially in the development of psychopathologic symptoms.

  1. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Ryu, Youngryel; Keenan, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO 2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO 2 , temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions). The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y -1 ) with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y -1 ), and

  2. Microporous Cd(II) metal-organic framework as fluorescent sensor for nitroaromatic explosives at the sub-ppm level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-Po; Han, Lu-Lu; Wang, Zhi; Guo, Ling-Yu; Sun, Di

    2016-03-01

    A novel Cd(II) metal-organic framework (MOF) based on a rigid biphenyltetracarboxylic acid, [Cd4(bptc)2(DMA)4(H2O)2·4DMA] (1) was successfully synthesized under the solvothermal condition and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and further consolidated by elemental analyses, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), infrared spectra (IR) and luminescent measurements. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that compound 1 is 4-connected PtS (Point symbol: {42·84}) network based on [Cd2(COO)4] secondary building units (SBUs). Its inherent porous and emissive characteristics make them to be a suitable fluorescent probe to sense small solvents and nitroaromatic explosives. Compound 1 shows obviously solvent-dependent emissive behaviors, especially for acetone with very high fluorescence quenching effect. Moreover, compound 1 displays excellent sensing of nitroaromatic explosives at sub-ppm level, giving a detection limit of 0.43 ppm and 0.37 ppm for nitrobenzene (NB) and p-nitrotoluene (PNT), respectively. This shows this Cd(II) MOF can be used as fluorescence probe for the detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

  3. Dynamical structure of center-of-pressure trajectories with and without functional taping in children with cerebral palsy level I and II of GMFCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavão, Silvia Leticia; Ledebt, Annick; Savelsbergh, Geert J P; Rocha, Nelci Adriana C F

    2017-08-01

    Postural control during quiet standing was examined in typical children (TD) and children with cerebral palsy (CP) level I and II of GMFCS. The immediate effect on postural control of functional taping on the thighs was analyzed. We evaluated 43 TD, 17 CP children level I, and 10 CP children level II. Participants were evaluated in two conditions (with and without taping). The trajectories of the center of pressure (COP) were analyzed by means of conventional posturography (sway amplitude, sway-path-length) and dynamic posturography (degree of twisting-and-turning, sway regularity). Both CP groups showed larger sway amplitude than the TD while only the CP level II showed more regular COP trajectories with less twisting-and-turning. Functional taping didn't affect sway amplitude or sway-path-length. TD children exhibited more twisting-and-turning with functional taping, whereas no effects on postural sway dynamics were observed in CP children. Functional taping doesn't result in immediate changes in quiet stance in CP children, whereas in TD it resulted in faster sway corrections. Children level II invest more attention in postural control than level I, and TD. While quiet standing was more automatized in children level I than in level II, both CP groups showed a less stable balance than TD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Elevated levels of shed type II IL-1 receptor in sepsis. Potential role for type II receptor in regulation of IL-1 responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giri, JG; Wells, J; Dower, SK; McCall, CE; Guzman, RN; Slack, J; Bird, TA; Shanebeck, K; Grabstein, KH; Sims, JE

    1994-01-01

    .... Neutrophils isolated from patients with sepsis have greatly enhanced expression of type II IL-1R mRNA and cell surface receptors and are therefore a likely source for the shed receptors in serum...

  5. Early and exudative age-related macular degeneration is associated with increased plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Carsten; Jehs, Tina; Juel, Helene Baek; Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger; Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2015-05-01

    We have recently identified homeostatic alterations in the circulating T cells of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In cultures of retinal pigment epithelial cells, we have demonstrated that T-cell-derived cytokines induced the upregulation of complement, chemokines and other proteins implicated in AMD pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to test whether increased plasma levels of cytokines were present in patients with AMD. We conducted a case-control study. Age-related macular degeneration status was assessed using standardized multimodal imaging techniques. Plasma was isolated from freshly drawn peripheral venous blood samples and analysed for interleukin (IL)15, IL18, interferon (IFN)γ, soluble tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor II (sTNFRII) and complement factor H (CFH) Y402H genotype. We included 136 individuals with early or late forms of AMD and 74 controls. Significantly increased levels of sTNFRII were observed in patients with early or exudative AMD (p age, sex and smoking history, the level of sTNFRII remained a significant predictor for prevalence of AMD with odds ratios at 3.0 in the middle and 3.6 in the highest tertiles. Levels of IL15, IL18 and IFNγ were low and not associated with AMD. Increased plasma level of sTNFRII is found to be associated with AMD. The data supports the observations of low-grade, systemic inflammatory alterations in patients with AMD. However, it remains to be determined whether increased levels of TNFα can be found, which directly reflects an increased activity of macrophages and T cells. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature......, ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species. Further, we analyze rates of measured emission of aerobically produced CH4 in pectin and in plant tissues from different studies and argue that pectin is very far from the sole contributing precursor. Hence, scaling up of aerobic CH4 emission needs to take...... the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  7. Space Weather: Terrestrial Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulkkinen Tuija

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Space weather effects arise from the dynamic conditions in the Earth’s space environment driven by processes on the Sun. While some effects are influenced neither by the properties of nor the processes within the Earth’s magnetosphere, others are critically dependent on the interaction of the impinging solar wind with the terrestrial magnetic field and plasma environment. As the utilization of space has become part of our everyday lives, and as our lives have become increasingly dependent on technological systems vulnerable to space weather influences, understanding and predicting hazards posed by the active solar events has grown in importance. This review introduces key dynamic processes within the magnetosphere and discusses their relationship to space weather hazards.

  8. Mycobacterium massiliense Type II genotype leads to higher level of colony forming units and TNF-α secretion from human monocytes than Type I genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung-Jun; Shim, Tae Sun; Yi, Su-Yeon; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Kim, Bo-Ram; Lee, So-Young; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-10-01

    Recently, we introduced a novel Mycobacterium massiliense Type II genotype from Korean patients, in which all isolates showed only a rough (R) colony morphotype. In this study, we sought to compare clinical factors and virulence potentials of two genotypes of M. massiliense, Type I and Type II. Patients infected with Type II tend to be younger at infection than those infected with Type I (56.7 vs 62.3, p = 0.051). Type II was more significantly related to R colony type than Type I (34.1% vs 94.1%, p < 0.001). The Type II strain showed significantly more colony forming units (CFUs) and higher levels of TNF-α secretion in infection of human monocytes than the Type I strain. The challenge of extracted glycopeptidolipid (GPL) into human monocytes indicated that the loss of GPL from the cell wall of the Type II genotype led to a higher level of TNF-α secretion in a toll-like receptor 2(TLR2)-dependent manner. Taken together, our data suggest that the M. massiliense Type II genotype shows higher virulence than Type I, which may be due to the induction of TNF-α via the loss of GPL from the Type II cell wall. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Modulating the level of the Rpb7 subunit of RNA polymerase II affects cell separation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Sharma, Nimisha

    2015-01-01

    The rpb7(+) gene encodes the seventh largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and is essential for survival of yeast cells. To gain insight into its functions, we expressed rpb7(+) under the control of the nmt1 promoter and investigated its role in regulating multiple phenotypes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We observed that low rpb7(+) levels resulted in slow growth of cells under optimum growth conditions. However, no growth defect was observed under different stress conditions tested in this study. Our results also showed that the most prominent phenotype of cells expressing reduced rpb7(+) is a defect in cell separation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis further revealed that the transcription of specific cell septation genes was significantly reduced in these cells. Collectively, results presented in this study highlight the distinct role of Rpb7p in regulating cell separation in S. pombe. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Low level laser therapy (Classes I, II and III) for treating rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, L; Robinson, V; Wells, G; Debie, R; Gam, A; Harman, K; Morin, M; Shea, B; Tugwell, P

    2005-10-19

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects a large proportion of the population. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) was introduced as an alternative non-invasive treatment for RA about ten years ago. LLLT is a light source that generates extremely pure light, of a single wavelength. The effect is not thermal, but rather related to photochemical reactions in the cells. The effectiveness of LLLT for rheumatoid arthritis is still controversial. This review is an update of the original review published in October 1998. To assess the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of RA. We initially searched MEDLINE, EMBASE (from 1998), the registries of the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group and the field of Rehabilitation and Related Therapies as well as the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) up to June 2001. This search has now been updated to include articles published up to June 2005. Following an a priori protocol, only randomized controlled trials of LLLT for the treatment of patients with a clinical diagnosis of RA were eligible. Abstracts were excluded unless further data could be obtained from the authors. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, then extracted data and assessed quality using predetermined forms. Heterogeneity was tested using chi-squared. A fixed effects model was used throughout for continuous variables, except where heterogeneity existed, in which case, a random effects model was used. Results were analyzed as weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), where the difference between the treated and control groups was weighted by the inverse of the variance. Dichotomous outcomes were analyzed with relative risks. A total of 222 patients were included in the five placebo-controlled trials, with 130 randomized to laser therapy. Relative to a separate control group, LLLT reduced pain by 1.10 points (95% CI: 1.82, 0.39) on visual analogue scale relative to placebo, reduced morning stiffness duration by 27

  11. Low level laser therapy (classes I, II and III) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, L; Welch, V; Wells, G; deBie, R; Gam, A; Harman, K; Morin, M; Shea, B; Tugwell, P

    2000-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects a large proportion of the population. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) was introduced as an alternative non-invasive treatment for RA about 10 years ago. LLLT is a light source that generates extremely pure light, of a single wavelength. The effect is not thermal, but rather related to photochemical reactions in the cells. The effectiveness of LLLT for rheumatoid arthritis is still controversial. To assess the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of RA. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the registries of the Cochrane Musculoskeletal group and the field of Rehabilitation and Related Therapies as well as the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to January 30, 2000. Following an a priori protocol, we selected only randomized controlled trials of LLLT for the treatment of patients with a clinical diagnosis of RA were eligible. Abstracts were excluded unless further data could be obtained from the authors. Two reviewers independently select trials for inclusion, then extracted data and assessed quality using predetermined forms. Heterogeneity was tested with Cochran's Q test. A fixed effects model was used throughout for continuous variables, except where heterogeneity existed, in which case, a random effects model was used. Results were analyzed as weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), where the difference between the treated and control groups was weighted by the inverse of the variance. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated by dividing the difference between treated and control by the baseline variance. SMD were used when different scales were used to measure the same concept (e.g. pain). Dichotomous outcomes were analyzed with odds ratios. A total of 204 patients were included in the five placebo-controlled trials, with 112 randomized to laser therapy. Relative to a separate control group, LLLT reduced pain by 70% relative to placebo and reduced morning stiffness duration by 27.5 minutes (95

  12. Relationship of serum S1P and HC-II levels with vasoactive substances and cytokines in patients with cerebral vascular restenosis after stent implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the relationship of serum sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P and heparin cofactor II (HCII levels with vasoactive substances and cytokines in patients with cerebral vascular restenosis after stent implantation. Methods: 52 patients who received cerebrovascular stent implantation and developed restenosis in our hospital between May 2012 and December 2015 were collected as observation group, and 40 healthy patients with cerebrovascular stent implantation who had re-examination in our hospital during the same period were selected as control group. ELISA method was used to detect serum S1P and HC-II levels as well as vasoactive substance and inflammatory factor contents. Spearman correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationship of serum S1P and HC-II levels with vasoactive substances and inflammatory factors. Results: Serum S1P and HC-II levels of observation group were lower than those of control group (P<0.05; serum vasoactive substances endothelin (ET, angiotensin II (AngII and thromboxane B2 (TXB2 contents of observation group were higher than those of control group while nitric oxide (NO content was lower than that of control group (P<0.05; serum inflammatory factors hypersensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-11 contents of observation group were higher than those of control group (P<0.05. Serum S1P and HC-II levels in patients with cerebral vascular restenosis after stent implantation were directly correlated with vasoactive substance and inflammatory factor contents. Conclusion: Serum S1P and HC-II levels decrease in patients with cerebral vascular restenosis after stent implantation, and it is an important cause of cerebral vascular dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response.

  13. Impact on the display of power cheerleading ability of university students I-II levels of accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Kryvoruchko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Reflects the dynamics of indicators of the level of development of power abilities of students under the influence of specially selected exercises cheerleading. The study involved 385 students (age 15-17 years. The level of the forces will determine by tests: flexion-extension hand-ups, lifting the torso in the saddle for 1 minute, jumping on one leg with the progress, carpal dynamometry. Revealed low levels of manifestation of the power in the first stage. Most significantly improved the results of flexion-extension hand-ups (I course to 32,28%, II course at 21,77%, III course for 25.60%;. According to the results of the lifting body in the saddle improved results of 12.41%, 10.80%, 11.98%, respectively. According to the results of the hops on one foot with the progress - by 5.78%, 4.70%, 4.97%, respectively. According to the wrist of the dynamometer, at 6.31%, 5.36%, 5.89% respectively. The most significant growth results have been observed mainly at students aged 15 years.

  14. Effects of Botulinum Toxin-A and Goal-Directed Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy GMFCS Levels I & II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwing, Kristina; Thews, Karin; Haglund-Åkerlind, Yvonne; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate short and long-term effects of botulinum toxin-A combined with goal-directed physiotherapy in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A consecutive selection of 40 children, ages 4-12 years, diagnosed with unilateral or bilateral CP, and classified in GMFCS levels I-II. During the 24 months, 9 children received one BoNT-A injection, 10 children two injections, 11 children three injections, and 10 children received four injections. 3D gait analysis, goal-attainment scaling, and body function assessments were performed before and at 3, 12, and 24 months after initial injections. A significant but clinically small long-term improvement in gait was observed. Plantarflexor spasticity was reduced after three months and remained stable, while passive ankle dorsiflexion increased after 3 months but decreased slightly after 12 months. Goal-attainment gradually increased, reached the highest levels at 12 months, and levels were maintained at 24 months. The treatments' positive effect on spasticity reduction was identified, but did not relate to improvement in gait or goal-attainment. No long-term positive change in passive ankle dorsiflexion was observed. Goal attainment was achieved in all except four children. The clinical significance of the improved gait is unclear. Further studies are recommended to identify predictors for positive treatment outcome.

  15. Effect of angiotensin II receptor blockers, candesartan, on osteoprotegerin level in hypertensive patients: Link between bone and RAAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, H; Gavish, D; Hass, A; Shargorodsky, M

    2015-09-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has recently been considered as a possible link between bone and vascular disease. The present study was designed to determine the effect of the angiotensin II receptor blocker candesartan on circulating osteoprotegerin (OPG) in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 69 hypertensive patients were randomized to two groups: Group 1 included patients treated with oral candesartan in doses of 16 mg to 32 mg per day in addition to routine standard of care (routine care + ARB), and Group 2 included patients who received routine standard of care other than ARBs or ACEIs, with no change to their treatment (routine care). Patients were evaluated for lipid profile, HbA1C, insulin, C-peptide, CRP, aldosterone, renin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and OPG. Baseline OPG levels did not differ significantly by treatment group. Post-treatment serum OPG levels were marginally lower in Group1 compared with Group 2; however, this decrease did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.077). In the present study, treatment with the ARB candesartan had no significant effect on circulating OPG levels in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to estimate an effect of candesartan on bone remodeling marker such as OPG. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Frontal Plane Motion of the Pelvis and Hip during Gait Stance Discriminates Children with Diplegia Levels I and II of the GMFCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Renata Noce; Franco, Rosa de Lourdes Lima Dias; Furtado, Sheyla Cavalcanti; Barela, Ana Maria Forti; Deluzio, Kevin John; Mancini, Marisa Cotta

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine if gait waveform could discriminate children with diplegic cerebral palsy of the GMFCS levels I and II. Patients. Twenty-two children with diplegia, 11 classified as level I and 11 as level II of the GMFCS, aged 7 to 12 years. Methods. Gait kinematics included angular displacement of the pelvis and lower limb joints during the stance phase. Principal components (PCs) analyses followed by discriminant analysis were conducted. Results. PC1s of the pelvis and hip in the frontal plane differ significantly between groups and captured 80.5% and 86.1% of the variance, respectively. PC1s captured the magnitude of the pelvic obliquity and hip adduction angle during the stance phase. Children GMFCS level II walked with reduced pelvic obliquity and hip adduction angles, and these variables could discriminate the groups with a cross-validation of 95.5%. Conclusion. Reduced pelvic obliquity and hip adduction were observed between children GMFCS level II compared to level I. These results could help the classification process of mild-to-moderate children with diplegia. In addition, it highlights the importance of rehabilitation programs designed to improve pelvic and hip mobility in the frontal plane of diplegic cerebral palsy children level II of the GMFCS.

  17. Severity and prognosis of acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning are indicated by C-reactive protein and copeptin levels and APACHE II score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinkuan; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Yuelei; Guan, Qinglong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and copeptin, in addition to the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, in patients with acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning (AOPP). A total of 100 patients with AOPP were included and divided into mild, moderate and severe groups according to AOPP diagnosis and classification standards. Blood samples were collected from all patients on days 1, 3 and 7 following AOPP. The concentrations of CRP and copeptin in the plasma were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All AOPP patients underwent APACHE II scoring and the diagnostic value of these scores was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs). On days 1, 3 and 7 after AOPP, the levels of CRP and copeptin were increased in correlation with the increase in AOPP severity, and were significantly higher compared with the control groups. Furthermore, elevated CRP and copeptin plasma levels were detected in patients with severe AOPP on day 7, whereas these levels were reduced in patients with mild or moderate AOPP. APACHE II scores, blood lactate level, acetylcholine esterase level, twitch disappearance time, reactivating agent dose and inability to raise the head were the high-risk factors that affected the prognosis of AOPP. Patients with plasma CRP and copeptin levels higher than median values had worse prognoses. The areas under curve for ROCs were 0.89, 0.75 and 0.72 for CRP levels, copeptin levels and APACHE II scores, respectively. In addition, the plasma contents of CRP and copeptin are increased according to the severity of AOPP. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that CRP and copeptin levels and APACHE II scores may be used for the determination of AOPP severity and the prediction of AOPP prognosis.

  18. Challenges of deriving a complete biosphere greenhouse gas balance through integration of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peichl, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Past research efforts have mostly focused on separately investigating the exchange of greenhouse gases (GHGs) within the limits of different terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem types. More recently however, it has been recognized that GHG exchanges and budgets are not limited to boundaries of the terrestrial or aquatic biosphere components and instead are often tightly linked amongst the different ecosystem types. Primarily the aquatic production and export of GHGs due to substrate supply or discharge from surrounding terrestrial ecosystems play a major role in regional GHG budgets. Understanding the mechanisms and drivers of this connectivity between different terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem GHG exchanges is therefore necessary to develop landscape-level GHG budgets and to understand their sensitivity to disturbances of the biosphere. Moreover, the exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) as the most important GHG species has been the primary research objective with regards to obtaining better estimates of the carbon sequestration potential of the biosphere. However, methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions may offset CO2 sinks and considerably affect the complete GHG balance in both terrestrial and aquatic systems. Including their contribution and improved knowledge on the dynamics of these two gas species is therefore essential for complete GHG budget estimates. At present, the integration of terrestrial and aquatic GHG exchanges toward landscape GHG budgets poses numerous challenges. These include the need for a better knowledge of i) the contribution of CH4 and N2O to the GHG budgets within contrasting terrestrial (forests, peatlands, grasslands, croplands) and aquatic (lake, streams) ecosystems when integrated over a full year, ii) the effect of ecosystem properties (e.g. age and/or development stage, size of water body) on the GHG balance, iii) the impact of management effects (e.g. nitrogen fertilizer application), iv) differences among climate regions and v

  19. Effect of Age-Related Cartilage Turnover on Serum C-Telopeptide of Collagen Type II and Osteocalcin Levels in Growing Rabbits with and without Surgically Induced Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Cheng Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effect of age-related cartilage turnover on the serum C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II and osteocalcin (OC levels in growing rabbits with and without surgically induced osteoarthritis. Twenty-four New Zealand male 3-month-old rabbits were randomized into three operated groups (n = 6 per group, with surgically induced osteroarthritis in the right knee; after blood sampling, the knees were harvested following euthanization at 2, 3, and 6 months after surgery and a control group (n = 6, blood samples were obtained monthly between 3 and 15 months. Histomorphologically, the medial femoral condyles, particularly the central parts, harbored the most severe osteoarthritic changes among the operated rabbits. The serum levels of CTX-II and OC decreased in the controls from 3 to 11 months and then remained stable. No significant differences in the serum CTX-II and OC levels between the osteoarthritic rabbits and controls were observed. The osteoarthritic-to-normal ratios (ONRs, the ratios of serum CTX-II or OC levels in osteoarthritic rabbits to those of the controls at same ages enabled an overall assessment of osteoarthritis and age-related cartilage turnover. Elevated CTX-II ONRs were observed in rabbits with mild to advanced osteoarthritis. However, the OC ONRs were unhelpful in assessing osteoarthritic growing rabbits.

  20. Increased Glycated Hemoglobin Level is Associated With SYNTAX Score II in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoyun, Süleyman; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Rencüzoğulları, İbrahim; Karabağ, Yavuz; Altıntaş, Bernas; Topçu, Selim; Lazoğlu, Zakir; Tanboğa, İbrahim Halil; Sevimli, Serdar

    2016-04-01

    SYNTAX score II (SS II) uses 2 anatomical and 6 clinical variables for the prediction of mortality after coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous coronary intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), and SYNTAX Score (SS) and SS II in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease (CAD). We enrolled 215 consecutive diabetic patients with stable angina pectoris who underwent coronary angiography. The SS II was calculated using a nomogram that was based on the findings of a previous study. There was a moderate correlation between HbA1c and SS (r = .396, P II (r = .535, P II. A better correlation has been detected between HbA1c and SS II compared to the correlation between HbA1c and SS. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Possible climates on terrestrial exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, F; Leconte, J

    2014-04-28

    What kind of environment may exist on terrestrial planets around other stars? In spite of the lack of direct observations, it may not be premature to speculate on exoplanetary climates, for instance, to optimize future telescopic observations or to assess the probability of habitable worlds. To begin with, climate primarily depends on (i) the atmospheric composition and the volatile inventory; (ii) the incident stellar flux; and (iii) the tidal evolution of the planetary spin, which can notably lock a planet with a permanent night side. The atmospheric composition and mass depends on complex processes, which are difficult to model: origins of volatiles, atmospheric escape, geochemistry, photochemistry, etc. We discuss physical constraints, which can help us to speculate on the possible type of atmosphere, depending on the planet size, its final distance for its star and the star type. Assuming that the atmosphere is known, the possible climates can be explored using global climate models analogous to the ones developed to simulate the Earth as well as the other telluric atmospheres in the solar system. Our experience with Mars, Titan and Venus suggests that realistic climate simulators can be developed by combining components, such as a 'dynamical core', a radiative transfer solver, a parametrization of subgrid-scale turbulence and convection, a thermal ground model and a volatile phase change code. On this basis, we can aspire to build reliable climate predictors for exoplanets. However, whatever the accuracy of the models, predicting the actual climate regime on a specific planet will remain challenging because climate systems are affected by strong positive feedbacks. They can drive planets with very similar forcing and volatile inventory to completely different states. For instance, the coupling among temperature, volatile phase changes and radiative properties results in instabilities, such as runaway glaciations and runaway greenhouse effect.

  2. High Levels of Circulating Type II Collagen Degradation Marker (CTx-II Are Associated with Specific VDR Polymorphisms in Patients with Adult Vertebral Osteochondrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Cauci

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Both vitamin D and collagen have roles in osteocartilaginous homeostasis. We evaluated the association between the circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD type I and II collagen degradation products (CTx-I, and CTx-II, and four vitamin D receptor gene (VDR polymorphisms, in Italian males affected by low back pain (LBP due to herniation/discopathy and/or vertebral osteochondrosis. FokI, BsmI, ApaI, and TaqI VDR-polymorphisms were detected through PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP, and circulating 25(OHD, CTx-I and CTx-II were measured by immunoassays in 79 patients (of which 26 had osteochondrosis and 79 age-, sex- and body mass index (BMI-matched healthy controls. Among all 158 subjects, carriers of FF and Ff genotypes showed lower 25(OHD than ff, which suggested a higher depletion of vitamin D in F allele carriers. Higher CTx-I concentrations were observed in TT versus Tt among controls, and Tt versus tt among LBP cases, which suggested a higher bone-cartilaginous catabolism in subjects bearing the T allele. Higher CTx-II concentrations were observed in patients with osteochondrosis bearing FF, bb, TT, or Aa genotypes in comparison with hernia/discopathy patients and healthy controls. Vertebral osteochondrosis shows peculiar genotypic and biochemical features related to vitamin D and the osteocartilaginous metabolism. Vitamin D has roles in the pathophysiology of osteochondrosis.

  3. Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. M.; Boutrup, S.; Bijl, L. van der

    This report presents the 2004 results of the Danish National Monitoring and Assess-ment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments (NOVANA). 2004 was the first year in which terrestrial nature was included in the monitoring pro-gramme. The report reviews the state of the groundwater......, watercourses, lakes and marine waters and the pressures upon them and reviews the monitoring of terrestrial natural habitats and selected plants and animals. The report is based on the annual reports prepared for each subprogramme by the Topic Centres. The latter reports are mainly based on data collected...

  4. Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

    1987-10-01

    A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. A calibration of the production rate ratio P-21/P-26 by low energy secondry neutrons: Identification of Ne spallation components at the 10(exp 6) atoms/g level in terrestrial samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, TH.; Niedermann, S.; Marti, K.

    1993-01-01

    The spallation ratio (Ne-22/Ne-21)(sub c) from Si was determined as 1.243 plus or minus 0.022 in a terrestrial quartz sample. We carried out a calibration of the in-situ production rate ratio P-21/P-26 in quartz samples for which Be-10 and Al-26 production rates were previously measured. A ratio P-21/P-26 of 0.67 plus or minus 0.12 is obtained.

  6. Coronal mass ejection (CME) activity of low mass M stars as an important factor for the habitability of terrestrial exoplanets. II. CME-induced ion pick up of Earth-like exoplanets in close-in habitable zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Kulikov, Yuri N; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Terada, N; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Biernat, Helfried K; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Ribas, Ignasi; Penz, Thomas; Selsis, Franck

    2007-02-01

    Atmospheric erosion of CO2-rich Earth-size exoplanets due to coronal mass ejection (CME)-induced ion pick up within close-in habitable zones of active M-type dwarf stars is investigated. Since M stars are active at the X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) wave-lengths over long periods of time, we have applied a thermal balance model at various XUV flux input values for simulating the thermospheric heating by photodissociation and ionization processes due to exothermic chemical reactions and cooling by the CO2 infrared radiation in the 15 microm band. Our study shows that intense XUV radiation of active M stars results in atmospheric expansion and extended exospheres. Using thermospheric neutral and ion densities calculated for various XUV fluxes, we applied a numerical test particle model for simulation of atmospheric ion pick up loss from an extended exosphere arising from its interaction with expected minimum and maximum CME plasma flows. Our results indicate that the Earth-like exoplanets that have no, or weak, magnetic moments may lose tens to hundreds of bars of atmospheric pressure, or even their whole atmospheres due to the CME-induced O ion pick up at orbital distances exoplanet is protected by a "magnetic shield" with its boundary located at 1 Earth radius above the surface. Furthermore, our study indicates that magnetic moments of tidally locked Earth-like exoplanets are essential for protecting their expanded upper atmospheres because of intense XUV radiation against CME plasma erosion. Therefore, we suggest that larger and more massive terrestrial-type exoplanets may better protect their atmospheres against CMEs, because the larger cores of such exoplanets would generate stronger magnetic moments and their higher gravitational acceleration would constrain the expansion of their thermosphere-exosphere regions and reduce atmospheric escape.

  7. Terrestrial Impack Cratering Chronology : A Preliminary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Kyu Moon

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available We have recently compiled a database of the properties of 192 impact craters, which supercedes previous compilations. Using our database, the impact structures found in North America, Europe and Australia have been examined; these cratonic areas have been relatively stable for considerably long geological periods, and thus have been best preserved. It is confirmed that there is a close correlation between the geological epoch boundaries, the epochs of mass extinctions, and the ``timing'' of impacts. In addition, the terrestrial cumulative flux of objects >20km is found to be 1.77×10-15km-2yr-1, over the last 120 Myr, which is much smaller than the published values in McEwen et al. (1997 and Shoemaker (1998 (5.6±2.8×10-15km-2yr-1. For terrestrial impact structures with D>50 km, the apparent cumulative flux over the last 2450 Myr is ~50 times smaller than the corresponding value for the Moon. If we assume that the Earth and the Moon suffered the same level of bombardment over this time, this would mean that the actual flux of impacting bodies, capable of making craters with D>50 km, was ~ 50 times larger than the apparent flux estimated from the currently known terrestrial records.

  8. Comportamento espectral dos solos na paisagem a partir de dados coletados por sensores terrestre e orbital Spectral response of soils in the landscape based on terrestrial and orbital data acquisition levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Geraldo de Abreu Sousa Junior

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Parte da variabilidade dos índices de produção agrícola está associada com as características do solo e da paisagem. Dessa forma, práticas de manejo, como a adubação, devem levar em consideração esta variabilidade. O sensoriamento remoto é uma ferramenta que pode fornecer, de maneira rápida, informações para o manejo do solo, pois relaciona a radiação eletromagnética com os atributos do solo. Assim, este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o comportamento espectral, em dois níveis de aquisição de dados (terrestre e orbital, de diferentes classes de solos ao longo de toposseqüências na região de São Carlos e Ibaté, SP. Para isso, amostras de terra georreferenciadas foram coletadas em 319 pontos, em três profundidades. Em seguida, obtiveram-se os dados radiométricos em laboratório, na faixa espectral entre 450 e 2.500 nm. Os mesmos locais amostrados na camada superficial, no campo, foram avaliados na imagem de satélite. A partir dos resultados obtidos, pode-se concluir que: (a teores de areia grossa, argila e matéria orgânica, e cor tiveram relação com a reflectância dos solos; (b ao longo das vertentes ocorrem variações nos dados espectrais dos solos; e (c solos da mesma ordem taxonômica, porém com classes texturais diferentes, apresentam diferentes comportamentos espectrais, podendo ser discriminados por sensoriamento remoto.Part of agricultural production index variability is associated with soil and landscape characteristics. Management practices such as fertilizer application should therefore take the soil spatial variability into account. Remote sensing is a tool that can provide faster information for soil management because it relates electromagnetic radiation with soil attributes. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating the spectral response, at two data acquisition levels (terrestrial and orbital, of different soil classes across toposequences in the region of São Carlos and Ibaté, SP. For this

  9. Symptomatic Hypoglycemia Related to Inappropriately High IGF-II Serum Levels in a Patient with Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Fernandes Barra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year old man was diagnosed with desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT with involvement of the peritoneum and pelvis. Disease progression was observed despite systemic chemotherapy. Six months after diagnosis, he developed severe hypoglycemia presented with seizures. He received intravenous glucose infusion and hydrocortisone with poor glycemic control, but with seizures resolution. The investigation excluded insulinoma, adrenal, liver and GH deficiencies. Laboratory showed slight rise of IGF-II and significant increase of the ratio IGF-II : IGF-I, which is pathognomonic of non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH. He received the diagnoses of NICTH related to IGF-II inappropriate production by DSRCT. Despite the attempt to control tumor mass and hypoglycemia, the patient died 9 months after diagnosis. NICTH related to inappropriate IGF-II secretion should be investigated in all cancer patients with refractory hypoglycemia whom insulinoma and other metabolic abnormalities were excluded from.

  10. Formation of copper(I) from trace levels of copper(II) as an artifactual impurity in the HPLC analysis of olanzapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertschi, Steven W; Olsen, Bernard A; Wozniak, Timothy J; Toltl, Nick; O'Shea, Colette; Jansen, Patrick J

    2016-06-05

    An analytical artifact peak appearing to be an impurity was observed intermittently among several laboratories performing HPLC analyses of olanzapine drug substance and formulation samples. The artifact peak was identified as Cu(I) that was formed from the reaction of trace amounts of Cu(II) with olanzapine in the sample solution. Unlike Cu(II), Cu(I) was retained under the ion-pairing HPLC conditions used for analysis. A reaction mechanism was postulated whereby Cu(II) present in the sample solution oxidizes olanzapine to a radical-cation, resulting in formation of Cu(I) and three oxidation products of olanzapine including a previously unknown oxidation product that was identified as hydroxy-olanzapine. Acetonitrile in the sample solution was necessary for the reaction to occur. As little as 100 ppb Cu(II) in the sample solution produced a Cu(I) peak, that by peak area, corresponded to about 0.1% relative to the olanzapine peak. The hydroxy-olanzapine oxidation product was also detectable, but the relative peak area was much smaller. To prevent formation of the Cu(I) artifact peak, EDTA was added to the sample solvent to complex any trace Cu(II) that might be present. The addition of EDTA was shown to prevent Cu(I) formation when Cu(II) was present at levels of 4ppm in the sample solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. WWII GI Bill and Its Effect on Low Education Levels: Did the World War II GI Bill Have an Effect on High School Completion, Poverty, and Employment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Megan D.

    2017-01-01

    Did the World War II (WWII) GI Bill increase the probability of completing high school and further affect the probability of poverty and employment for the cohorts for whom it benefited? This paper studies whether the GI Bill, one of the largest public financial aid policies for education, affected low education levels in addition to its…

  12. Assessment of the effects of scaling and root planing on blood glucose levels in type II diabetes patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Rieyazulhuq Shaikh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the effect of the scaling and root planing of some blood glucose levels in Type II Diabetes patients. Study Population and Methods: The clinical study was conducted in 15 Type II diabetic patients of Dr. D Y Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pimpri, Pune. All the participants underwent a baseline examination for periodontal status using the community periodontal index of treatment needs and also estimation of fasting and post-prandial blood sugar levels. The participants received the intervention of scaling and root planing, as also routine oral hygiene instructions, and were recalled after one month for a final periodontal examination and blood sugar level investigation. The significance of difference between the means of the baseline and the final examination was tested using the paired ′t′ test. Results and Conclusion: There was no significant change in the fasting and post-prandial blood glucose levels in patients treated with scaling and root planing.

  13. Renin inhibition improves metabolic syndrome, and reduces angiotensin II levels and oxidative stress in visceral fat tissues in fructose-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chu-Lin; Lin, Heng; Chen, Jin-Shuen; Fang, Te-Chao

    2017-01-01

    Renin-angiotensin system in visceral fat plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome in fructose-fed rats. However, the effects of renin inhibition on visceral adiposity in metabolic syndrome are not fully investigated. We investigated the effects of renin inhibition on visceral adiposity in fructose-fed rats. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats were divided into 4 groups for 8-week experiments: Group Con (standard chow diet), Group Fru (high-fructose diet; 60% fructose), Group FruA (high-fructose diet and concurrent aliskiren treatment; 100 mg/kg body weight [BW] per day), and Group FruB (high-fructose diet and subsequent, i.e. 4 weeks after initiating high-fructose feeding, aliskiren treatment; 100 mg/kg BW per day). The high-fructose diet induced metabolic syndrome, increased visceral fat weights and adipocyte sizes, and augmented angiotensin II (Ang II), NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoforms expressions, oxidative stress, and dysregulated production of adipocytokines from visceral adipose tissues. Concurrent and subsequent aliskiren administration ameliorated metabolic syndrome, dysregulated adipocytokines, and visceral adiposity in high fructose-fed hypertensive rats, and was associated with reducing Ang II levels, NOX isoforms expressions and oxidative stress in visceral fat tissues. Therefore, this study demonstrates renin inhibition could improve metabolic syndrome, and reduce Ang II levels and oxidative stress in visceral fat tissue in fructose-fed rats, and suggests that visceral adipose Ang II plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome in fructose-fed rats.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-α Agonist Slows the Progression of Hypertension, Attenuates Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Renal Inflammatory Markers in Angiotensin II Infused Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Justin L; Duan, Rong; El-Marakby, Ahmed; Alhashim, Abdulmohsin; Lee, Dexter L

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR-α plays an important role in attenuating hypertension. The current study determines the anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory role of PPAR-α agonist during a slow-pressor dose of Ang II (400 ng/kg/min). Ten to twelve week old male PPAR-α KO mice and their WT controls were implanted with telemetry devices and infused with Ang II for 12 days. On day 12 of Ang II infusion, MAP was elevated in PPAR-α KO mice compared to WT (161 ± 4 mmHg versus 145 ± 4 mmHg) and fenofibrate (145 mg/kg/day) reduced MAP in WT + Ang II mice (134 ± 7 mmHg). Plasma IL-6 levels were higher in PPAR-α KO mice on day 12 of Ang II infusion (30 ± 4 versus 8 ± 2 pg/mL) and fenofibrate reduced plasma IL-6 in Ang II-treated WT mice (10 ± 3 pg/mL). Fenofibrate increased renal expression of CYP4A, restored renal CYP2J expression, reduced the elevation in renal ICAM-1, MCP-1 and COX-2 in WT + Ang II mice. Our results demonstrate that activation of PPAR-α attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension through up-regulation of CYP4A and CYP2J and an attenuation of inflammatory markers such as plasma IL-6, renal MCP-1, renal expression of ICAM-1 and COX-2.

  15. Loetschberg low-level tunnel: thermal use of tunnel water at the south portal - Feasibility study, phase II; Waermenutzung Tunnelwasser Basistunnel Loetschberg, Suedportal. Machbarkeitsstudie Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dups, Ch.

    2004-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the results obtained from phase II of a feasibility study on the thermal use of drainage water from the Loetschberg basis railway tunnel under the Swiss Alps. The potential for the use of the drainage water is discussed and the possible use of the heat in the industrial estates in Raron and Niedergesteln is looked at. The report recommends the further investigation of the use of the water as a source of heat for heat-pumps and its treatment for further use as drinking water. Other possible uses examined include the heating of greenhouses, in fish farms, as a water supply for a gravel and concrete works and for keeping local roads and motorways frost-free.

  16. GNIS: Natural Terrestrial Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) actively seeks data from and partnerships with Government agencies at all levels and other interested organizations....

  17. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Most people think of groundwater as a resource, but it is also a useful indicator of climate variability and human impacts on the environment. Groundwater storage varies slowly relative to other non-frozen components of the water cycle, encapsulating long period variations and trends in surface meteorology. On seasonal to interannual timescales, groundwater is as dynamic as soil moisture, and it has been shown that groundwater storage changes have contributed to sea level variations. Groundwater monitoring well measurements are too sporadic and poorly assembled outside of the United States and a few other nations to permit direct global assessment of groundwater variability. However, observational estimates of terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations from the GRACE satellites largely represent groundwater storage variations on an interannual basis, save for high latitude/altitude (dominated by snow and ice) and wet tropical (surface water) regions. A figure maps changes in mean annual TWS from 2009 to 2010, based on GRACE, reflecting hydroclimatic conditions in 2010. Severe droughts impacted Russia and the Amazon, and drier than normal weather also affected the Indochinese peninsula, parts of central and southern Africa, and western Australia. Groundwater depletion continued in northern India, while heavy rains in California helped to replenish aquifers that have been depleted by drought and withdrawals for irrigation, though they are still below normal levels. Droughts in northern Argentina and western China similarly abated. Wet weather raised aquifer levels broadly across western Europe. Rains in eastern Australia caused flooding to the north and helped to mitigate a decade long drought in the south. Significant reductions in TWS seen in the coast of Alaska and the Patagonian Andes represent ongoing glacier melt, not groundwater depletion. Figures plot time series of zonal mean and global GRACE derived non-seasonal TWS anomalies (deviation from the mean of

  18. Brucellosis in terrestrial wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroid, J; Garin-Bastuji, B; Saegerman, C; Blasco, J M

    2013-04-01

    The epidemiological link between brucellosis in wildlife and brucellosis in livestock and people is widely recognised. When studying brucellosis in wildlife, three questions arise: (i) Is this the result of a spillover from livestock or a sustainable infection in one or more host species of wildlife? (ii) Does wildlife brucellosis represent a reservoir of Brucella strains for livestock? (iii) Is it of zoonotic concern? Despite their different host preferences, B. abortus and B. suis have been isolated from a variety of wildlife species, whereas B. melitensis is rarely reported in wildlife. The pathogenesis of Brucella spp. in wildlife reservoirs is not yet fully defined. The prevalence of brucellosis in some wildlife species is very low and thus the behaviour of individual animals, and interactions between wildlife and livestock, may be the most important drivers for transmission. Since signs of the disease are non-pathognomonic, definitive diagnosis depends on laboratory testing, including indirect tests that can be applied to blood or milk, as well as direct tests (classical bacteriology and methods based on the polymerase chain reaction [PCR]). However, serological tests cannot determine which Brucella species has induced anti-Brucella antibodies in the host. Only the isolation of Brucella spp. (or specific DNA detection by PCR) allows a definitive diagnosis, using classical or molecular techniques to identify and type specific strains. There is as yet no brucellosis vaccine that demonstrates satisfactory safety and efficacy in wildlife. Therefore, controlling brucellosis in wildlife should be based on good management practices. At present, transmission of Brucella spp. from wildlife to humans seems to be linked to the butchering of meat and dressing of infected wild or feral pig carcasses in thedeveloped world, and infected African buffalo in the developing world. In the Arctic, the traditional consumption of raw bone marrow and the internal organs of freshly

  19. Lifetime measurements using two-step laser excitation for high-lying even-parity levels and improved theoretical oscillator strengths in Y ii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Lundberg, H.; Engström, L.; Nilsson, H.; Hartman, H.

    2017-10-01

    We report new time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence lifetime measurements for 22 highly excited even-parity levels in singly ionized yttrium (Y ii). To populate these levels belonging to the configurations 4d6s, 5s6s 4d5d, 5p2, 4d7s and 4d6d, a two-step laser excitation technique was used. Our previous pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock model (Biémont et al. 2011) was improved by extending the configuration interaction up to n = 10 to reproduce the new experimental lifetimes. A set of semi-empirical oscillator strengths extended to transitions falling in the spectral range λλ194-3995 nm, depopulating these 22 even-parity levels in Y ii, is presented and compared to the values found in the Kurucz's data base (Kurucz 2011).

  20. Teppeki, selective insecticide about Bombus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanigliulo, Angela; Filì, Vittorio; Pacella, Rosa; Comes, Soccorsa; Crescenzi, Aniello

    2009-01-01

    per plant were observed, for a total of 200 flowers per plot. The measurements were made on the 3rd (I relief) and 8th day (II relief) after treatment. Statistical analysis was performed by the use of XLSTAT data analysis and statistical software. The analysis of collected data shows that flonicamid has a minor effect of interference with the activity of pollination by B. terrestris, compared to the standard used. 14 days after treatment, 3 hives per thesis were inspected in order to verify the status of the colonies (adults, larvae, eggs, pollen). The colonies appeared generally homogeneous as concerning the number of alive adults--100 for each--all at the end of the development cycle. There was no dead adult. Two colonies, one for thesis, presented evidence of eggs. All colonies had low stocks of pollen. Ultimately, treatment with Teppeki has not given any acute effect on B. terrestris, nor any effect of interference in respect of its pollination activity.

  1. Ontogenetic shifts in terrestrial reliance of stream-dwelling brown trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sánchez-Hernández

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on terrestrial reliance of brown trout (Salmo trutta and compared it to the potential prey available (macrozoobenthos and drifting invertebrates in three temperate rivers (Galicia, NW Spain, with special emphasis on variations in terrestrial energy intake through the ontogeny of brown trout. Additionally, we paid particular attention to individual variation of terrestrial resource use within and between age classes. Prey items were grouped in four categories: i aquatic invertebrates; ii imagoes of aquatic invertebrates; iii terrestrial invertebrates; and iv fish prey. Next, energy composition was measured according to dry weight-energy equations for each individual in line with above-mentioned prey categories. Our findings illustrate that terrestrial invertebrates appeared to be scarce in the environment, whereas aquatic food resources were rather abundant and accessible. The use of terrestrial invertebrates tended to increase with age, but with a high degree of inter-individual variation in resource use. In fact, the individual reliance of brown trout on terrestrial invertebrates may vary considerably (between 0% and 76.9%. Besides, the frequency of terrestrial foragers, i.e., individuals with terrestrial invertebrates in their stomachs, increased with age, except in one population which had the maximum value in the age-2 class. The acquisition of terrestrial invertebrates thus appears to be a process strongly dependent upon the actual food availability in the environment, but with a high degree of individual variance in resource use within the same age class. Finally, we discuss that terrestrial invertebrates may largely contribute to cover the energy intake of the species, highlighting the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and thereby the importance of riparian canopy cover as a key factor for food supply of stream-dwelling salmonids species.

  2. The Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi from Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo show different binding activity level to human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Khai Lone; Amir, Amirah; Lau, Yee Ling; Fong, Mun Yik

    2017-08-11

    The zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi is a major cause of human malaria in Malaysia. This parasite uses the Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) to interact with the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) receptor on human and macaque erythrocytes to initiate invasion. Previous studies on P. knowlesi have reported distinct Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo PkDBPαII haplotypes. In the present study, the differential binding activity of these haplotypes with human and macaque (Macaca fascicularis) erythrocytes was investigated. The PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo were expressed on the surface of COS-7 cells and tested with human and monkey erythrocytes, with and without anti-Fy6 (anti-Duffy) monoclonal antibody treatment. Binding activity level was determined by counting the number of rosettes formed between the transfected COS-7 cells and the erythrocytes. Anti-Fy6 treatment was shown to completely block the binding of human erythrocytes with the transfected COS-7 cells, thus verifying the specific binding of human DARC with PkDBPαII. Interestingly, the PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia displayed a higher binding activity with human erythrocytes when compared with the Malaysian Borneo PkDBPαII haplotype (mean number of rosettes formed = 156.89 ± 6.62 and 46.00 ± 3.57, respectively; P studies need to be carried out to determine whether this differential binding level can be associated with severity of knowlesi malaria in human.

  3. Femtomole level photoelectrochemical aptasensing for mercury ions using quercetin-copper(II) complex as the DNA intercalator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbo; Xue, Yan; Wang, Wei

    2014-04-15

    An ultrasensitive and selective photoelectrochemical (PEC) aptasensor for mercury ions was first fabricated based on perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic acid/graphene oxide (PTCA/GO) heterojunction using quercetin-copper(II) complex intercalated into the poly(dT)-poly(dA) duplexes. Both the PTCA/GO heterojunction and the quercetin-copper(II) complex are in favor of the sensitivity for the fabricated PEC aptasensor due to band alignment and strong reduction capability, respectively. And they efficiently promote the separation of photoexcited carriers and enhance the photocurrent. The formation of thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine coordination chemistry resulted in the dehybridization of poly(dT)-poly(dA) duplexes and then the intercalator quercetin-copper(II) complex broke away from the surface of the PEC aptasensor. As the concentration of mercury ions increased, the photocurrent gradually decreased. The electrode response for mercury ions detection was in the linear range from 0.01 pmol L(-1) to 1.00 pmol L(-1) with the detection limit of 3.33 fmol L(-1). The label-free PEC aptasensor has excellent performances with ultrasensitivity and good selectivity besides the advantage of economic and facile fabrication. The strategy of quercetin-copper(II) complex as a novel DNA intercalator paves a new way to improve the performances for PEC sensors. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Terrestrial ecosystems and their change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatoly Z. Shvidenko; Eric Gustafson; A. David McGuire; Vjacheslav I. Kharuk; Dmitry G. Schepaschenko; Herman H. Shugart; Nadezhda M. Tchebakova; Natalia N. Vygodskaya; Alexander A. Onuchin; Daniel J. Hayes; Ian McCallum; Shamil Maksyutov; Ludmila V. Mukhortova; Amber J. Soja; Luca Belelli-Marchesini; Julia A. Kurbatova; Alexander V. Oltchev; Elena I. Parfenova; Jacquelyn K. Shuman

    2012-01-01

    This chapter considers the current state of Siberian terrestrial ecosystems, their spatial distribution, and major biometric characteristics. Ongoing climate change and the dramatic increase of accompanying anthropogenic pressure provide different but mostly negative impacts on Siberian ecosystems. Future climates of the region may lead to substantial drying on large...

  5. Ibuprofen does not affect levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor types I and II in Gabonese children with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsiegui, Pierre-Blaise; Missinou, Michel A; Issifou, Saadou; Necek, Magdalena; Mavoungou, Elie

    2007-12-01

    We assessed the ability of ibuprofen to modulate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type I (sTNFR-I), and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type II (sTNFR-II) responses during the treatment of fever in uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, in a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study of 50 pediatric patients in Lambaréné, Gabon. Treatment of the malaria involved the patients receiving intravenous quinine (12 mg/kg of quinine dihydrochloride every 12 h for 72 h) followed by a single dose of oral sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (25 mg and 1.25 mg/kg). Fever was treated by mechanical treatment plus either ibuprofen (7 mg/kg every 8 h) or placebo during the hospitalization period. We determined serum concentrations of TNF-alpha, sTNFR-I, and sTNFR-II in peripheral blood throughout the treatment period in the two groups: ibuprofen and placebo groups. TNF-alpha levels were found to be positively correlated with body temperature. In contrast, TNF receptors levels did not differ between the two groups and the antipyretic effect of ibuprofen was not correlated with specific changes in sTNFR-I and sTNFR-II production. Our data suggest that TNF-alpha is involved in malarial fever, but soluble TNF receptors play no major role in fever modulation.

  6. The effect of resveratrol on angiotensin II levels and the rate of transcription of its receptors in the rat cardiac hypertrophy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorri Mashhadi, Fahimeh; Zavvar Reza, Javad; Jamhiri, Mohabbat; Hafizi, Zeinab; Zare Mehrjardi, Fatemeh; Safari, Fatemeh

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of resveratrol on serum and cardiac levels of angiotensin II and transcription of its main receptors following pressure overload induced-hypertrophy. Rats were divided into untreated (Hyp) and resveratrol treated hypertrophied groups (H + R). Intact animals served as the control (Ctl). Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by abdominal aortic banding. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded via left carotid artery cannula. Fibrosis was confirmed by Masson trichrome staining. Angiotensin II level was measured using an ELIZA test. Gene expression was assessed by a real time PCR (RT-PCR) technique. We observed that in the H + R group BP and heart weight/body weight were decreased significantly (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, respectively vs Hyp). The cardiac levels of angiotensin II and AT1a mRNA were increased in the Hyp group (p < 0.01 vs Ctl). In the H + R group the AT1a mRNA level was decreased significantly (p < 0.05 vs Hyp). It could be concluded that resveratrol protects the heart against hypertrophy progression in part by affecting cardiac AT1a transcription.

  7. Enzyme immunoassay of serum beta-2-microglobulin levels in various histological forms of leprosy with special reference to its elevation in type I and type II lepra reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, K; Bhatnagar, A; Sharma, V K; Chakrabarty, A K

    1985-04-01

    The mean beta-2-microglobulin level in serum (3,362 +/- 2,494 micrograms/liter) for 76 leprosy patients, including 9 borderline-tuberculoid, 8 borderline-borderline, 9 borderline-lepromatous, and 16 lepromatous-lepromatous patients and 34 patients with type I or type II lepra reactions, was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) than that (2,122 +/- 1,844 micrograms/liter) for 35 normal subjects. It decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) as the disease glided down from borderline tuberculoid (3,173 +/- 899 micrograms/liter) to the lepromatous end (1,813 +/- 1,391 micrograms/liter). At the onset of type I or type II reaction, the mean beta-2-microglobulin level in serum increased (4,447 +/- 2,863 micrograms/liter), and it remained unchanged (4,433 +/- 2,623 micrograms/liter) after clinical remission. The beta-2-microglobulin level in serum decreased in 55.5% of the patients tested after subsidence of reaction. The level was significantly higher in patients with type II reactions (5,433 +/- 3,299 micrograms/liter) than in patients with type I reactions (3,558 +/- 2,171 micrograms/liter).

  8. Effect of oral-transmucosal midazolam sedation on anxiety levels of 3-4 years old children during a Class II restorative procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Kapur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A double-blind randomized control trial was conducted to assess the effect of oral-transmucosal midazolam sedation on changes in anxiety levels of precooperative children during a Class II amalgam restorative procedure. Methodology: A sample of 40 healthy, American Society of Anesthesiologists I, children aged 3-4 years having at least one carious primary mandibular molar requiring a Class II amalgam restoration with no previous dental history were randomly divided into experimental and control groups comprising of 20 children each. The children in the experimental group (Group I received 0.5 mg/kg body weight of midazolam mixed in strawberry syrup and those in the control group (Group II received the same syrup mixed in saline, 15 min prior to the restorative procedure. Routine nonpharmacological behavior management techniques were used in both groups. The anxiety levels were recorded using Venham′s anxiety scale at the start and end of each procedural step. Results: There was a significant (P < 0.001 reduction in the anxiety levels of children in the experimental group on entry into the operatory compared with the control group. Introduction of each fear evoking stimuli showed a somewhat similar increase in anxiety levels in the two groups. In spite of a similar trend, the anxiety levels remained much lower in Group I than in Group II. Conclusion: Midazolam in conjunction with behavior management is more helpful in relaxing the child initially than behavior management alone, thus increasing the chances of successful and easy accomplishment of further treatment steps.

  9. Robot-assisted Level II-III Inferior Vena Cava Tumor Thrombectomy: Step-by-Step Technique and 1-Year Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sameer; Simone, Giuseppe; Metcalfe, Charles; de Castro Abreu, Andre Luis; Nabhani, Jamal; Ferriero, Mariaconsiglia; Bove, Alfredo Maria; Sotelo, Rene; Aron, Monish; Desai, Mihir M; Gallucci, Michele; Gill, Inderbir S

    2017-08-01

    Level II-III inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombectomy for renal cell carcinoma is among the most challenging urologic oncologic surgeries. In 2015, we reported the initial series of robot-assisted level III caval thrombectomy. To describe our University of Southern California technique in a step-by-step fashion for robot-assisted IVC level II-III tumor thrombectomy. Twenty-five selected patients with renal neoplasm and level II-III IVC tumor thrombus underwent robot-assisted surgery with a minimum 1-yr follow-up (July 2011 to March 2015). Our standardized anatomic-based "IVC-first, kidney-last" technique for robot-assisted IVC thrombectomy focuses on minimizing the chances of an intraoperative tumor thromboembolism and major hemorrhage. Baseline demographics, pathology data, 90-d and 1-yr complications, and oncologic outcomes at last follow-up were assessed. Robot-assisted IVC thrombectomy was successful in 24 patients (96%) (level III: n=11; level II: n=13); one patient was electively converted to open surgery for failure to progress. Median data included operative time of 4.5h, estimated blood loss was 240ml, hospital stay 4 d; five patients (21%) received intraoperative blood transfusion. All surgical margins were negative. Complications occurred in four patients (17%): two were Clavien 2, one was Clavien 3a, and one was Clavien 3b. All patients were alive at a 16-mo median follow-up (range: 12-39 mo). Robotic IVC tumor thrombectomy is feasible for level II-III thrombi. To maximize intraoperative safety and chances of success, a thorough understanding of applied anatomy and altered vascular collateral flow channels, careful patient selection, meticulous cross-sectional imaging, and a highly experienced robotic team are essential. We present the detailed operative steps of a new minimally invasive robot-assisted surgical approach to treat patients with advanced kidney cancer. This type of surgery can be performed safely with low blood loss and excellent

  10. Low levels of activated protein C in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus do not relate to lupus anticoagulants but to low levels of factor II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmelink, Marleen J A; Fernández, José A; Derksen, Ronald H W M; Griffin, John H; de Groot, Philip G

    2002-06-01

    The presence of lupus anticoagulants (LAC) in plasma is a major risk factor for thrombosis. An attractive hypothesis to explain a LAC-mediated thrombotic tendency is that LAC interfere with activation of protein C, a natural antithrombotic in plasma. We investigated the relationship between LAC and protein C activation in vivo. We selected 20 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with LAC (and not using oral anticoagulants), 36 patients with SLE without LAC and 25 healthy volunteers. In these, we measured circulating levels of activated protein C (APC), prothrombin (FII), free protein S, C4BP, protein C, and antibodies to protein C, protein S, FII and beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2GPI). In SLE patients (n = 56), mean levels of APC, FII and free protein S were significantly (P LAC. Levels of APC were correlated with both FII levels and protein C levels. Decreased levels of APC, FII, protein C and free protein S were related to the presence of anti-FII antibodies. None of the patients had antibodies against protein C or protein S. In conclusion, although the mean levels of APC, FII and free protein S were significantly decreased in SLE patients, no correlation with LAC was found. However, anti-FII antibodies were related to decreased levels of APC, FII, protein C, free protein S and C4BP. As FII levels, and not protein C levels, were decreased in SLE patients and correlated with APC levels, we conclude that the decreased FII levels are responsible for the low levels of APC.

  11. Interactive roles of NPR1 gene-dosage and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels inmutantmice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Di; Das, Subhankar; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to elucidate the interactive roles of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) gene (Npr1) and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokines levels in Npr1 gene-targeted (1-copy, 2-copy, 3-copy, 4-copy) mice. Methods Npr1 genotypes included 1-copy gene-disrupted heterozygous (+/−), 2-copy wild-type (+/+), 3-copy gene-duplicated heterozygous (++/+) and 4-copy gene-duplicated homozygous (++/++) mice. Animals were fed low, normal and high-salt diets. Plasma and cardiac levels of ANG II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined. Results With a high-salt diet, cardiac ANG II levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (13.7 ± 2.8 fmol/mg protein, 111%) compared with 2-copy mice (6.5 ± 0.6), but decreased (−) in 4-copy (4.0 ± 0.5, 38%) mice. Cardiac aldosterone levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (80 ± 4 fmol/mg protein, 79%) compared with 2-copy mice (38 ± 3). Plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha was increased (+) in 1-copy mice (30.27 ± 2.32 pg/ml, 38%), compared with 2-copy mice (19.36 ± 2.49, 24%), but decreased (−) in 3-copy (11.59 ± 1.51, 12%) and 4-copy (7.13 ± 0.52, 22%) mice. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1α levels were also significantly increased (+) in 1-copy compared with 2-copy mice but decreased (−) in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. Conclusion These results demonstrate that a high-salt diet aggravates cardiac ANG II, aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokine levels in Npr1 gene-disrupted 1-copy mice, whereas, in Npr1 gene-duplicated (3-copy and 4-copy) mice, high salt did not render such elevation, suggesting the potential roles of Npr1 against salt loading. PMID:23188418

  12. Terrestrial hyperspectral image shadow restoration through fusion with terrestrial lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Preston J.; Glennie, Craig L.; Finnegan, David C.; Hauser, Darren L.

    2017-05-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technology have expanded the acquisition and fusion of active lidar and passive hyperspectral imagery (HSI) from exclusively airborne observations to include terrestrial modalities. In contrast to airborne collection geometry, hyperspectral imagery captured from terrestrial cameras is prone to extensive solar shadowing on vertical surfaces leading to reductions in pixel classification accuracies or outright removal of shadowed areas from subsequent analysis tasks. We demonstrate the use of lidar spatial information for sub-pixel HSI shadow detection and the restoration of shadowed pixel spectra via empirical methods that utilize sunlit and shadowed pixels of similar material composition. We examine the effectiveness of radiometrically calibrated lidar intensity in identifying these similar materials in sun and shade conditions and further evaluate a restoration technique that leverages ratios derived from the overlapping lidar laser and HSI wavelengths. Simulations of multiple lidar wavelengths, i.e., multispectral lidar, indicate the potential for HSI spectral restoration that is independent of the complexity and costs associated with rigorous radiometric transfer models, which have yet to be developed for horizontal-viewing terrestrial HSI sensors. The spectral restoration performance of shadowed HSI pixels is quantified for imagery of a geologic outcrop through improvements in spectral shape, spectral scale, and HSI band correlation.

  13. Terrestrial Subsurface Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2015-10-15

    The Earth’s crust is a solid cool layer that overlays the mantle, with a varying thickness of between 30-50 km on continental plates, and 5-10 km on oceanic plates. Continental crust is composed of a variety of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks that weather and re-form over geologic cycles lasting millions to billions of years. At the crust surface, these weathered minerals and organic material combine to produce a variety of soils types that provide suitable habitats and niches for abundant microbial diversity (see Chapter 4). Beneath this soil zone is the subsurface. Once thought to be relatively free of microorganisms, recent estimates have calculated that between 1016-1017 g C biomass (2-19% of Earth’s total biomass) may be present in this environment (Whitman et al., 1998;McMahon and Parnell, 2014). Microbial life in the subsurface exists across a wide range of habitats: in pores associated with relatively shallow unconsolidated aquifer sediments to fractures in bedrock formations that are more than a kilometer deep, where extreme lithostatic pressures and temperatures are encountered. While these different environments contain varying physical and chemical conditions, the absence of light is a constant. Despite this, diverse physiologies and metabolisms enable microorganisms to harness energy and carbon for growth in water-filled pore spaces and fractures. Carbon and other element cycles are driven by microbial activity, which has implications for both natural processes and human activities in the subsurface, e.g., bacteria play key roles in both hydrocarbon formation and degradation. Hydrocarbons are a major focus for human utilization of the subsurface, via oil and gas extraction and potential geologic CO2 sequestration. The subsurface is also utilized or being considered for sequestered storage of high-level radioactive waste from nuclear power generation and residual waste from past production of weapons grade nuclear materials. While our

  14. [Pharmacological influences on the brain level and transport of GABA. II) Effect of various psychoactive drugs on brain level and uptake of GABA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabana, M A; Varotto, M; Saladini, M; Zanchin, G; Battistin, L

    1981-04-30

    The effects of some psychoactive drugs on the level and uptake of GABA in the mouse brain was studied using well standardized procedures, mainely the silica-gel cromatography for determining the GABA content and the brain slices for measuring GABA uptake. It was found that levomepromazine, sulpiride, haloperidol and amytryptiline were without effects on the cerebral level of GABA; it was also found that these drugs do not influence the rates of uptake of GABA by mouse brain slices. Such results do indicate that the psychoactive drugs studied are without effects on the level and uptake of GABA in the brain.

  15. TerrPlant Version 1.2.2 User's Guide for Pesticide Exposure to Terrestrial Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tier 1 model for screening-level assessments of pesticides. TerrPlant provides screening-level estimates of exposure to terrestrial plants from single pesticide applications. It does not consider exposures to plants from multiple pesticide applications.

  16. Mars : a small terrestrial planet

    OpenAIRE

    Mangold, N.; Baratoux, David; Witasse, O.; Encrenaz, T.; Sotin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Mars is characterized by geological landforms familiar to terrestrial geologists. It has a tenuous atmosphere that evolved differently from that of Earth and Venus and a differentiated inner structure. Our knowledge of the structure and evolution of Mars has strongly improved thanks to a huge amount of data of various types (visible and infrared imagery, altimetry, radar, chemistry, etc) acquired by a dozen of missions over the last two decades. In situ data have provided ground truth for rem...

  17. Using a terrestrial laser scanner to characterize vegetation-induced flow resistance in a controlled channel

    CERN Document Server

    Vinatier, Fabrice; Belaud, Gilles; Combemale, David

    2016-01-01

    Vegetation characteristics providing spatial heterogeneity at the channel reach scale can produce complex flow patterns and the relationship between plant patterns morphology and flow resistance is still an open question (Nepf 2012). Unlike experiments in laboratory, measuring the vegetation characteristics related to flow resistance on open channel in situ is difficult. Thanks to its high resolution and light weight, scanner lasers allow now to collect in situ 3D vegetation characteristics. In this study we used a 1064 nm usual Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) located 5 meters at nadir above a 8 meters long equipped channel in order to both i) characterize the vegetation structure heterogeneity within the channel form a single scan (blockage factor, canopy height) and ii) to measure the 2D water level all over the channel during steady flow within a few seconds scan. This latter measuring system was possible thanks to an additive dispersive product sprinkled at the water surface. Vegetation characteristics an...

  18. Home Return After Surgery in Patients Aged over 85 Years is Associated with Preoperative Albumin Levels, the Type of Surgery, and APACHE II Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bora; Na, Sungwon; Park, Miran; Ham, Sungyeon; Kim, Jeongmin

    2017-04-01

    Owing to an aging society, both the number of operations for patients aged >85 years and the average age of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) are rapidly increasing. However, mortality is not an appropriate outcome measurement in patients aged >85 years; a more important outcome is home return (HR), because quality of life is valuable to these patients. We identified predictors for HR of patients aged >85 years admitted to the ICU after surgery. Retrospective analysis of medical records was conducted at a university hospital. Patients aged > 85 years, admitted to the ICU after surgery from March 2006 to June 2015 (n = 187), were divided into a HR group (patients who returned home after discharge) and non-HR group (deceased or transferred to nursing facilities). Perioperative data and outcome were assessed and compared. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify independent predictors. The average age of patients was 88 years. HR occurred in 61% of patients, and mortality was 9%. The HR group had higher preoperative albumin level than did the non-HR group. More patients in the non-HR group experienced hip surgery than in the HR group (51 vs. 12%, P APACHE II score was higher (P APACHE II score were independent predictors of HR. Predictors of HR of surgical critically ill elderly patients included preoperative albumin level, hip surgery, and APACHE II score on ICU admission.

  19. The differences in temperament–character traits, suicide attempts, impulsivity, and functionality levels of patients with bipolar disorder I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izci F

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Filiz Izci,1 Ebru Kanmaz Findikli,2 Serkan Zincir,3 Selma Bozkurt Zincir,4 Merve Iris Koc4 1Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Istanbul Bilim University, Istanbul, 2Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras, 3Department of Psychiatry, Kocaeli Gölcük Military Hospital, Kocaeli, 4Department of Psychiatry, Erenköy Training and Research Hospital for Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders, Istanbul, Turkey Background: The primary aim of this study was to compare the differences in temperament-character traits, suicide attempts, impulsivity, and functionality levels of patients with bipolar disorder I (BD-I and bipolar disorder II (BD-II.Methods: Fifty-two BD-I patients and 49 BD-II patients admitted to Erenköy Mental and Neurological Disease Training and Research Hospital psychiatry clinic and fifty age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. A structured clinical interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition Axis I Disorders, Temperament and Character Inventory, Barrett Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11, Hamilton Depression Inventory Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Bipolar Disorder Functioning Questionnaire (BDFQ were administered to patients and to control group.Results: No statistically significant difference in sociodemographic features existed between the patient and control groups (P>0.05. Thirty-eight subjects (37.62% in the patient group had a suicide attempt. Twenty-three of these subjects (60.52% had BD-I, and 15 of these subjects (39.47% had BD-II. Suicide attempt rates in BD-I and II patients were 60.52% and 39.47%, respectively (P<0.05. Comparison of BD-I and II patients with healthy control subjects revealed that cooperativeness (C, self-directedness (Sdi, and self-transcendence (ST scores were lower and novelty seeking (NS1 and NS2, harm avoidance (HA4, and reward dependence (RD2 subscale scores

  20. Influence of multiple global change drivers on terrestrial carbon storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Kai; Fornara, Dario A; Yang, Wanqin

    2017-01-01

    The interactive effects of multiple global change drivers on terrestrial carbon (C) storage remain poorly understood. Here, we synthesise data from 633 published studies to show how the interactive effects of multiple drivers are generally additive (i.e. not differing from the sum...... of their individual effects) rather than synergistic or antagonistic. We further show that (1) elevated CO2 , warming, N addition, P addition and increased rainfall, all exerted positive individual effects on plant C pools at both single-plant and plant-community levels; (2) plant C pool responses to individual...... additive effects of multiple global change drivers into future assessments of the C storage ability of terrestrial ecosystems....

  1. The effects of aerobic exercises and 25(OH D supplementation on GLP1 and DPP4 level in Type II diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Rahimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week aerobic exercise and supplementation of 25(OHD3 on GLP1 and DDP4 levels in men with type II diabetes. Methods: In this semiexperimental research, among 40–60-year-old men with type II diabetes who were referred to the diabetic center of Isabn-E Maryam hospital in Isfahan; of whom, 48 patients were voluntarily accepted and then were randomly divided into 4 groups: aerobic exercise group, aerobic exercise with 25(OH D supplement group, 25(OH D supplement group, and the control group. An aerobic exercise program was conducted for 8 weeks (3 sessions/week, each session 60 to75 min with 60–80% HRmax. The supplement user group received 50,000 units of oral Vitamin D once weekly for 8 weeks. The GLP1, DPP4, and 25(OH D levels were measured before and after the intervention. At last, the data were statistically analyzed using the ANCOVA and post hoc test of least significant difference. Results: The results of ANCOVA showed a significant difference between the GLP1 and DPP4 levels in aerobic exercise with control group while these changes were not statistically significant between the 25(OH D supplement group with control group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Aerobic exercises have resulted an increase in GLP1 level and a decrease in DPP4 level. However, consumption of Vitamin D supplement alone did not cause any changes in GLP1and DPP4 levels but led to an increase in 25-hydroxy Vitamin D level.

  2. Towards improved diagnostics in terrestrial and solar spectropolarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, Thomas Ryan

    The dissertation focuses on developing new technologies in sensitive spectropolarimetry, applied to observations of (I) the polarized sky, aurorae, and (II) solar photosphere. In Part I, I demonstrate the need for accurate daytime sky polarization measurements for use in calibrating large aperture telescopes. We have developed an instrument (WAASP) capable of measuring the complete full-sky polarization vector over visible/near-infrared broad bands with a 1% polarimetric sensitivity in the time frame of constant sky illumination patterns. Observations also assist to characterize the background polarization above Haleakala, strongly dependent on such effects as multiple-scattering, aerosols, and time-dependent cloud formations. A first analysis of the polarization properties of the local daytime sky are presented. The instrument is also used to measure the full-sky polarization of Earth aurorae, to an extent which had not yet been achieved, demonstrating it as a new tool for potential thermospheric weather diagnostics. Finally, such terrestrial observations allow validation of atomic scattering and high-altitude polarization models. In Part II, I detail an effort to measure the infrared polarized solar spectrum at the limb at the 0.01% level. At this sensitivity, spectropolarimetric signatures appear due to coherent scattering processes in the upper solar atmosphere, but can be difficult to detect due to instrument and seeing-induced polarization crosstalk. We have developed an infrared fiber spectropolarimeter that, coupled with improved guiding on the SOLARC coronagraph, can achieve 1E-4 polarimetric sensitivity for moderate spectral resolution (R=30,000). We employ new techniques that can flat-field and remove residual seeing-induced crosstalk, using the actual data frames. These methods allow, for example, a 1E-4 sensitivity of limb polarization at a wavelength of 1 micron in roughly 15 minute integrations. The theoretical interpretation of certain

  3. ISLSCP II IGBP NPP Output from Terrestrial Biogeochemistry Models

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains modeled annual net primary production (NPP) for the land biosphere from seventeen different global models. Annual NPP is defined as the net...

  4. ISLSCP II IGBP NPP Output from Terrestrial Biogeochemistry Models

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains modeled annual net primary production (NPP) for the land biosphere from seventeen different global models. Annual NPP is defined as...

  5. Palmyra Atoll Quickbird II Terrestrial Mosaic (1.8m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of Pamyra Atoll were created by visual interpretation of remotely sensed imagery. The objective of this...

  6. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: II. Organism and population-level endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Filipe O; Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to test the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in chronic sediment toxicity tests. It constitutes part of a multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments, integrating organism and population-level endpoints with biochemical markers responses. Here we account for organism and population-level effects, while biomarker responses were reported in a companion article. Five moderately contaminated sediments from Sado and Tagus estuaries were tested, comprising 3 muddy and 2 sandy sediments. These sediments either did not show acute toxicity or were diluted with control sediment as much as required to remove acute toxicity. Subsequent chronic tests consisted of 28-day exposures with survival, individual growth and reproductive traits as endpoints. Two of the muddy sediments induced higher growth rates in the amphipods, and improved reproductive traits. This was understood to be a consequence of the amount of organic matter in the sediment, which was nutritionally beneficial to the amphipods, while concurrently decreasing contaminant bioavailability. Biomarker responses did not reveal toxicant-induced stress in amphipods exposed to these sediments. One of the sandy sediments was acutely toxic at 50% dilution, but in contrast stimulated amphipod growth when diluted 75%. This was presumed to be an indication of a hormetic response. Finally the two remaining contaminated sediments showed pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting survival and reproduction. The sex ratio of survivors was highly biased towards females, and offspring production was severely impaired. The particulars of the responses of this amphipod were examined, as well as strengths versus limitations of the sediment test. This study illustrates the utility of this chronic test for toxicity assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments, with potential application all along Atlantic Europe.

  7. Thromboplastin-thrombomodulin-mediated time: a new global test sensitive to protein S deficiency and increased levels of factors II, V, VII and X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Montserrat; Llobet, Dolors; Ortín, Rosa; Felices, Rosa; Vallvé, Cristina; Mateo, José; Souto, Joan; Fontcuberta, Jordi

    2002-04-01

    A new test for screening the procoagulant capacity of plasma is described and evaluated. This test is based on the coagulation of plasma initiated by thromboplastin (Tp) in the presence of thrombomodulin (TM). In a previous paper we reported that this test had a significant phenotypic and genetic correlation with thrombosis susceptibility. The present report describes the characteristics of the test and its sensitivity to the concentration of some hemostasis factors. Plasma from normal subjects, from individuals with various disorders of hemostasis and plasma with different concentrations of factors II, V, VII, VIII, X, fibrinogen, protein C and protein S were studied. The thromboplastin-thrombomodulin-mediated time (Tp-TMT) is measured after mixing 100 mL of plasma diluted 1/10 at 37 C with 100 mL of a solution composed of 2 parts of thromboplastin, 1 part of thrombomodulin at 30 U/mL and 1 part of Owren's buffer. The results are expressed as the ratio of the patient's clotting time to that of the control. Values were compared with Student's t test and the Mann-Whitney test. Differences were considered statistically significant when p<0.05. In the control group women showed significantly lower values than men. Raised levels of factors II, V, VII and X reduced the coagulation time obtained with Tp-TM. Elevated concentrations of fibrinogen and factor VIII did not influence the test. The Tp-TMT was sensitive to protein S deficiencies, but not to protein C deficiencies. These results indicate that the effect of protein S on the test is through its anti-prothrombinase activity. Tp-TMT, which is correlated with thrombosis susceptibility, is sensitive to raised levels of factors II, V, VII and X, as well as to low levels of protein S, and may be an indicator of thrombosis risk.

  8. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial water storage (TWS) comprises groundwater, soil moisture, surface water, snow,and ice. Groundwater typically varies more slowly than the other TWS components because itis not in direct contact with the atmosphere, but often it has a larger range of variability onmultiannual timescales (Rodell and Famiglietti, 2001; Alley et al., 2002). In situ groundwaterdata are only archived and made available by a few countries. However, monthly TWSvariations observed by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE; Tapley et al.,2004) satellite mission, which launched in 2002, are a reasonable proxy for unconfinedgroundwater at climatic scales.

  9. Consumer Control of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, D.

    2012-12-01

    More than half of the earth's terrestrial surface is grazed by large herbivores and their effects on plant and soil carbon and nitrogen processes are large and widespread. Yet the large effects of these animals on terrestrial processes have largely been ignored in global change models. This presentation will explore the many pathways that consumers affect short and long time-scale terrestrial nitrogen and carbon processes. Large herbivores influence the quality of soil organic matter and the size of the active (i.e., labile) pool of soil carbon and nitrogen in several ways. Herbivory leads to greater abundance of species producing low quality material in forest and dry grassland, via feeding preferentially on high quality forage, and high quality material in mesic grassland habitat, via the high quality of material that regrows after a plant is grazed. Defoliation stimulates the rate of root exudation that enhances rhizospheric processes and the availability of nitrogen in the plant rhizosphere. Herbivores also change the species composition of mycorrhizae fungal associates that influence plant growth and affect soil structure and the turnover rate of soil carbon. Recent radiocarbon measurements have revealed that herbivores also markedly affect the turnover dynamics of the large pool of old soil carbon. In Yellowstone Park, ungulates slow the mean turnover of the relatively old (i.e., slow and passive) 0 - 20 cm deep soil organic carbon by 350 years in upland, dry grassland and speed up that rate in slope-bottom, mesic grassland by 300 years. This represents a 650 year swing in the turnover period of old soil carbon across the Yellowstone landscape. By comparison, mean turnover time for the old pool of 0 - 10 cm deep soil organic carbon shifts by about 300 years across the steep climatic gradient that includes tropical, temperate, and northern hardwood forest, and tallgrass, shortgrass and desert grassland. This large body of evidence suggests consumers play a

  10. Early and exudative age-related macular degeneration is associated with increased plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Carsten; Jehs, Tina; Juel, Helene Baek

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have recently identified homeostatic alterations in the circulating T cells of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In cultures of retinal pigment epithelial cells, we have demonstrated that T-cell-derived cytokines induced the upregulation of complement, chemokines...... and other proteins implicated in AMD pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to test whether increased plasma levels of cytokines were present in patients with AMD. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study. Age-related macular degeneration status was assessed using standardized multimodal imaging...... forms of AMD and 74 controls. Significantly increased levels of sTNFRII were observed in patients with early or exudative AMD (p age, sex and smoking history, the level of sTNFRII remained a significant predictor for prevalence of AMD with odds ratios...

  11. European network infrastructures of observatories for terrestrial Global Change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, H.; Bogena, H.; Lehning, M.

    2009-04-01

    The earth's climate is significantly changing (e.g. IPCC, 2007) and thus directly affecting the terrestrial systems. The number and intensity hydrological extremes, such as floods and droughts, are continually increasing, resulting in major economical and social impacts. Furthermore, the land cover in Europe has been modified fundamentally by conversions for agriculture, forest and for other purposes such as industrialisation and urbanisation. Additionally, water resources are more than ever used for human development, especially as a key resource for agricultural and industrial activities. As a special case, the mountains of the world are of significant importance in terms of water resources supply, biodiversity, economy, agriculture, traffic and recreation but particularly vulnerable to environmental change. The Alps are unique because of the pronounced small scale variability they contain, the high population density they support and their central position in Europe. The Alps build a single coherent physical and natural environment, artificially cut by national borders. The scientific community and governmental bodies have responded to these environmental changes by performing dedicated experiments and by establishing environmental research networks to monitor, analyse and predict the impact of Global Change on different terrestrial systems of the Earths' environment. Several European network infrastructures for terrestrial Global Change research are presently immerging or upgrading, such as ICOS, ANAEE, LifeWatch or LTER-Europe. However, the strongest existing networks are still operating on a regional or national level and the historical growth of such networks resulted in a very heterogeneous landscape of observation networks. We propose therefore the establishment of two complementary networks: The NetwOrk of Hydrological observAtories, NOHA. NOHA aims to promote the sustainable management of water resources in Europe, to support the prediction of

  12. Regional terrestrial ecosystem dynamics and their interactions with the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, D.; Schimel, D.; Parton, W.; McKeown, R.

    2003-04-01

    Integration of land use with human dimensions, biological, atmospheric and hydrological processes is necessary for us to estimate net carbon exchange from the terrestrial biota. However, proper handling of scale across a set of divergent processes interconnecting the atmosphere and the biosphere is critical to the success of this analysis. Development of the new IGBP “Land” Project will develop a structure to better integrate research that has advanced during the past decade. Our understanding of the long term changes in the terrestrial biosphere will provide greater insight to the environmental sustainability under different stresses and provide an indication of how different regions may respond to changes in climate, disturbance regimes, and land use. This insight will provide a framework to better develop earth system science over the coming decade and to better incorporate the human-environmental system perspective. Our understanding of the biological controls of carbon fluxes between the atmosphere and the land surface (referring to the soil, vegetation, water system) is critical to our estimation of net terrestrial carbon fluxes and the connection of key natural resources (e.g., water, vegetation, soils, etc) to climate and land use changes. Terrestrial biological processes respond strongly to atmospheric temperature, humidity, CO2 levels, N-deposition, precipitation, and radiative transfers. The development of this integrated science perspective to understand the scope of effects human activities on land are affecting the feedbacks to the earth system and the impacts on the terrestrial human-environment system. The presentation will focus on the development of this framework and highlight recent advances in our observational and analytical components of terrestrial biosphere research.

  13. A sow replacement model using Bayesian updating in a three-level hierarchic Markov process. II. Optimization model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders Ringgaard; Søllested, Thomas Algot

    2004-01-01

    Recent methodological improvements in replacement models comprising multi-level hierarchical Markov processes and Bayesian updating have hardly been implemented in any replacement model and the aim of this study is to present a sow replacement model that really uses these methodological improveme...

  14. Phobic anxiety in 11 nations : part II. Hofstede's dimensions of national cultures predict national-level variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrindell, WA; Eisemann, M; Oei, TPS; Caballo, VE; Sanavio, E; Sica, C; Bages, N; Feldman, L; Torres, B; Iwawaki, S; Hatzichristou, C; Castro, J; Canalda, G; Furnham, A; van der Ende, J

    Hofstede's dimensions of national cultures termed Masculinity-Femininity (MAS) and Uncertainty Avoidance (UAI) (Hofstede, 2001) are proposed to be of relevance for understanding national-level differences in self-assessed fears. The potential predictive role of national MAS was based on the

  15. Tectonic evolution of terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W.; Solomon, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The tectonic style of each terrestrial planet, referring to the thickness and division of its lithosphere, can be inferred from surface features and compared to models of planetary thermal history. Factors governing planetary tectonic evolution are planet diameter, chemistry, and external and internal heat sources, all of which determine how a planet generates and rids itself of heat. The earth is distinguished by its distinct, mobile plates, which are recycled into the mantle and show large-scale lateral movements, whereas the moon, Mars, and Mercury are single spherical shells, showing no evidence of destruction and renewal of the lithospheric plates over the latter 80% of their history. Their smaller volume to surface area results in a more rapid cooling, formation, and thickening of the lithosphere. Vertical tectonics, due to lithospheric loading, is controlled by the local thickness and rheology of the lithosphere. Further studies of Venus, which displays both the craterlike surface features of the one-plate planets, and the rifts and plateaus of earth, may indicate which factors are most important in controlling the tectonic evolution of terrestrial planets.

  16. The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in Earth and planetary science, by conducting innovative research using space technology. The Laboratory's mission and activities support the work and new initiatives at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The Laboratory's success contributes to the Earth Science Directorate as a national resource for studies of Earth from Space. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at the GSFC in Greenbelt, MD. The Directorate itself is comprised of the Global Change Data Center (GCDC), the Space Data and Computing Division (SDCD), and four science Laboratories, including Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, Laboratory for Atmospheres, and Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes all in Greenbelt, MD. The fourth research organization, Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), is in New York, NY. Relevant to NASA's Strategic Plan, the Laboratory ensures that all work undertaken and completed is within the vision of GSFC. The philosophy of the Laboratory is to balance the completion of near term goals, while building on the Laboratory's achievements as a foundation for the scientific challenges in the future.

  17. The police-based crisis intervention team (CIT) model: II. Effects on level of force and resolution, referral, and arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Michael T; Bakeman, Roger; Broussard, Beth; Hankerson-Dyson, Dana; Husbands, Letheshia; Krishan, Shaily; Stewart-Hutto, Tarianna; D'Orio, Barbara M; Oliva, Janet R; Thompson, Nancy J; Watson, Amy C

    2014-04-01

    The crisis intervention team (CIT) model is a widely implemented police-based program to improve officers' responses to individuals with behavioral disorders. The authors examined levels of force used by officers with or without CIT training and disposition decisions in a large sample of encounters with individuals whom they suspected of having a serious mental illness, a drug or an alcohol problem, or a developmental disability. A total of 180 officers (91 with CIT training and 89 without) in six departments reported on 1,063 encounters, including level of force and disposition (resolution at the scene, referral or transport to services, or arrest). CIT training status was generally not predictive of level of force, although CIT-trained officers were significantly more likely to report verbal engagement or negotiation as the highest level of force used (odds ratio [OR]=2.00, p=.016). For CIT-trained officers, referral or transport was a more likely outcome (OR=1.70, p=.026) and arrest was less likely (OR=.47, p=.007) than for officers without CIT training; these findings were most pronounced when physical force was necessary. Analyses of disposition differences by officers' perceptions of subjects' primary problem (for example, mental illness only versus a drug or an alcohol problem) found some effects of CIT training status. CIT training appears to increase the likelihood of referral or transport to mental health services and decrease the likelihood of arrest during encounters with individuals thought to have a behavioral disorder. Research should address subject- and system-level outcomes that complement this early evidence of successful prebooking jail diversion.

  18. Phase I/II Trial of 5-Fluorouracil and a Noncytotoxic Dose Level of Suramin in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Saby; Dreicer, Robert; Au, Jessie J. L.; Shen, Tong; Rini, Brian I.; Roman, Susan; Cooney, Matthew M.; Mekhail, Tarek; Elson, Paul; Wientjes, Guillaume M.; Ganapathi, Ram; Bukowski, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is recognized as a neoplasm resistant to chemotherapy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that suramin, at noncytotoxic doses, enhanced the activity of chemotherapy including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in xenograft models. Patients and Methods A phase I/II trial of noncytotoxic suramin in combination with weekly 5-FU in patients with metastatic RCC was conducted. The treatment consisted of intravenous (I.V.) suramin followed by a 500 mg/m2 I.V. bolus of 5-FU given 4.5 hours after starting suramin. In the phase I portion, a cohort of 6 patients received a suramin dose calculated to achieve a plasma level of 10–50 μmol/L. Therapy was administered once weekly for 6 doses, followed by 2 weeks off. This was followed by a phase II portion in which the primary goal was to determine the objective response rate. Results Twenty-three patients were enrolled in the study: 6 in the phase I portion and 17 in phase II. Seventy-eight percent of patients were men, the mean age was 58.8 years, 96% had previous nephrectomy, and 70% had received previous systemic therapy. Histologic subtype was clear cell in 91%. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 of 6 patients (grade 3 hypersensitivity related to suramin infusion). The suramin dosing nomogram used in phase I and II portions of the trial yielded the desired plasma level of 10–50 μmol/L from 4.5 hours to 48 hours after infusion in 94 of 115 treatments. No objective responses were noted, and the median time to treatment failure was 2.5 months. The major toxicities (all grades) were fatigue (83%), nausea/vomiting (78%), diarrhea (61%), and chills (61%). Conclusion Suramin levels expected to reverse fibroblast growth factor–induced resistance can be achieved with the dosing regimen used in this study. The toxicity observed with suramin and 5-FU was acceptable. The combination does not have clinical activity in patients with metastatic RCC. PMID:18824429

  19. One-level modeling for diagnosing surface winds over complex terrain. II - Applicability to short-range forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P.; Getenio, B.; Zak-Rosenthal, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Alpert and Getenio (1988) modification of the Mass and Dempsey (1985) one-level sigma-surface model was used to study four synoptic events that included two winter cases (a Cyprus low and a Siberian high) and two summer cases. Results of statistical verification showed that the model is not only capable of diagnosing many details of surface mesoscale flow, but might also be useful for various applications which require operative short-range prediction of the diurnal changes of high-resolution surface flow over complex terrain, for example, in locating wildland fires, determining the dispersion of air pollutants, and predicting changes in wind energy or of surface wind for low-level air flights.

  20. Level-1 Data Driver Card of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Upgrade Compatible with the Phase II 1 MHz Readout Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)756498; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Level-1 Data Driver Card (L1DDC) will be fabricated for the needs of the future upgrades of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. Specifically, these upgrades will be performed in the innermost stations of the muon spectrometer end-caps. The L1DDC is a high speed aggregator board capable of communicating with a large number of front-end electronics. It collects the Level-1 along with monitoring data and transmits them to a network interface through a single bidirectional fiber link. Finally, the L1DDC board distributes trigger, time and configuration data coming from the network interface to the front-end boards. The L1DDC is fully compatible with phase II upgrade where the trigger rate is 1 MHz. This paper describes the overall scheme of the data acquisition process and especially the L1DDC board for the upgrade of the New Small Wheel. Finally, the electronics layout on the chamber is also mentioned.

  1. Level-1 Data Driver Card of the ATLAS New Small Wheel upgrade compatible with the Phase II 1 MHz readout scheme

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00549793; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Level-1 Data Driver Card (L1DDC) will be designed for the needs of the future upgrades of the innermost stations of the ATLAS end-cap muon spectrometer. The L1DDC is a high speed aggregator board capable of communicating with a large number of front-end electronics. It collects the Level-1 data along with monitoring data and transmits them to a network interface through a single bidirectional fiber link. In addition, the L1DDC board distributes trigger, time and configuration data coming from the network interface to the front-end boards. The L1DDC is fully compatible with the Phase II upgrade where the trigger rate is expected to reach 1 MHz. This paper describes the overall scheme of the data acquisition process and especially the three different L1DDC boards that will be fabricated. Moreover the L1DDC prototype-1 is also described.

  2. IgG antibody subclasses, tumor necrosis factor and IFN-gamma levels in patients with type II lepra reaction on thalidomide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partida-Sanchez, S; Favila-Castillo, L; Pedraza-Sanchez, S; Gomez-Melgar, M; Saul, A; Estrada-Parra, S; Estrada-Garcia, I

    1998-05-01

    A group of 9 Mexican lepromatous leprosy patients was studied at the beginning of a type II reaction (erythema nodosum leprosum, ENL) and after 1 or 2 months of thalidomide treatment. ENL patients at the onset of the reaction had slightly higher amounts of anti-Mycobacterium leprae IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies, compared to similar lepromatous patients that did not develop ENL. Neither these antibody levels nor IgM and the other IgG subclasses were importantly modified after thalidomide treatment. Serum TNF was significantly higher in the patients that developed ENL compared to those that did not develop the reaction. TNF levels were slightly decreased after 1 month of thalidomide treatment and significantly decreased after 2 months of treatment. Serum IFN-gamma was significantly lower in patients at the onset of ENL and was increased after 1 and 2 months of thalidomide treatment.

  3. Experimental evidence of coupling between sheared-flow development and an increase in the level of turbulence in the TJ-II stellarator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, C; Pedrosa, M A; García, L; Ware, A

    2004-12-01

    The link between the development of sheared flows and the structure of turbulence has been investigated in the plasma boundary region of the TJ-II stellarator. The development of the naturally occurring velocity shear layer requires a minimum plasma density. Near this critical density, the level of edge turbulent transport and the turbulent kinetic energy significantly increases in the plasma edge. The resulting shearing rate in the phase velocity of fluctuations is comparable to the one required to trigger a transition to improved confinement regimes with reduction of edge turbulence, suggesting that spontaneous sheared flows and fluctuations keep themselves near marginal stability. These findings provide the experimental evidence of coupling between sheared flows development and increasing in the level of edge turbulence. The experimental results are consistent with the expectations of second-order transition models of turbulence-driven sheared flows.

  4. Relationship between cardiac rhythm disorders, serum urotensin ІІ and angiotensin ІІ levels in patients with stage ii hypertension and carotid atherosclerosis in dynamics of treatment with candesartan and lercanidipine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Demidenko,

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension is one of the most common diseases of the cardiovascular system. Objective – to study dynamics of cardiac rhythm disorders, serum urotensin II and angiotensin II levels in patients with stage II hypertension associated with carotid atherosclerosis during treatment with candesartan and lercanidipine. Methods of the study. Under our observation there were 122 patients with stage 2 hypertension aged between 36–75 years. Average age of the patients was 51.52±1.27 years, including men – 52 (43 %, women – 70 (57 %. Cardiac arrhythmias and conduction disorders were detected by means of Holter ECG. Serum urotensin II and angiotensin II levels in the blood serum were determined by use of an immunoenzymatic method. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Statistica® 6.0 for Windows (StatSoft Inc. software using parametric and nonparametric methods. Results. It was found that the receiving of lercanidipine and candesartan showed unidirectional positive effect on cardiac rhythm disorders in most patients with stage II hypertension. The use of candesartan statistically insignificantly increased levels of angiotensin II in patients of the first group of observation by 20.8 % compared with baseline values (p>0.05. However, as a result of candesartan treatment serum angiotensin II levels in patients with stage II hypertension without carotid atherosclerosis reliably increased by 47.1 % (p<0.05. Unlike candesartan, the use of lercanidipine leads to a statistically significant decrease in the concentration of urotensin II by 30.8 % (p<0.05 in patients with stage II hypertension associated with carotid atherosclerosis. Conclusions. Lercanidipine can be recommended as a first line antihypertensive drug in case of simultaneous hypertension and atherosclerotic lesion of brachiocephalic arteries.

  5. No association of plasma levels of adiponectin and c-peptide with risk of aggressive prostate cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Victoria L; Jacobs, Eric J; Sun, Juzhong; Gapstur, Susan M

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is associated with a higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer and alters circulating levels of insulin and adiponectin, two hormones that influence biologic processes implicated in carcinogenesis. Results of some studies showed associations of circulating levels of adiponectin, insulin, and c-peptide (a marker of insulin secretion) with aggressive prostate cancer, but the size of these studies was limited. A nested case-control study of 272 aggressive prostate cancer cases [Gleason score ≥ 7 (4+3) or T3-T4] and 272 age- and race-matched controls from the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort was conducted to determine the associations of prediagnostic plasma levels of c-peptide and adiponectin with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Neither circulating adiponectin nor c-peptide was associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. In analyses of the highest-risk aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥ 8 or T3-T4), the highest quartile of c-peptide, compared with the lowest, was associated with an OR of 1.41 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72-2.78]. Our findings provide no support for the hypothesis that adiponectin is associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer but a possible association of high levels of c-peptide with particularly high-risk prostate cancer cannot be ruled out. These results indicate that changes in circulating levels of adiponectin and c-peptide do not play an important role in risk of aggressive prostate cancer. ©2014 AACR.

  6. Changes in size of populations and level of conflict since World War II: implications for health and health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Richard M; Polonsky, Jonathan; Burkle, Frederick M

    2012-10-01

    Armed conflicts include declared cross-border and internal wars and political, ethnic, and religious hostilities. The number of conflicts worldwide and their level of intensity have varied widely during the last 5 decades. Tracking conflicts throughout this period has focused predominantly on the number of individuals killed or displaced from these hostilities through count-based estimation systems, or establishing rates of excess mortality from demographic surveys. This report focuses on people living in areas with conflict by applying an estimated level of conflict intensity to data on the population of each territory with hostilities during 1946 to 2007. Data from the Uppsala Conflict Data Program/Peace Research Institute Oslo (UCDP/PRIO) Armed Conflict project database on 324 conflicts of any type in countries with populations greater than 500 000 were combined with conflict-intensity estimates from the Center for Systemic Peace and population data from the US Census Bureau International Data Base. More than half a billion people lived in conflict-affected areas in 2007. An increasing proportion of those affected by conflict lived in early postconflict areas, where hostilities were judged or declared during the last 5 years. In the past 2 decades, the average intensity of conflict among those living in areas with a current conflict has gradually declined. A burgeoning population lives in areas where conflict has recently ended, yet most of the world's large-scale medical responses to emergencies focus on high-intensity conflicts. Effective emergency and reconstruction activities in the health sector will depend on reorganizing services to increasingly focus on and transition to low-level and postconflict environments.

  7. Sleep-Dependent Synaptic Down-Selection (II): Single-Neuron Level Benefits for Matching, Selectivity, and Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Atif; Nere, Andrew; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    In a companion paper (1), we used computer simulations to show that a strategy of activity-dependent, on-line net synaptic potentiation during wake, followed by off-line synaptic depression during sleep, can provide a parsimonious account for several memory benefits of sleep at the systems level, including the consolidation of procedural and declarative memories, gist extraction, and integration of new with old memories. In this paper, we consider the theoretical benefits of this two-step process at the single-neuron level and employ the theoretical notion of Matching between brain and environment to measure how this process increases the ability of the neuron to capture regularities in the environment and model them internally. We show that down-selection during sleep is beneficial for increasing or restoring Matching after learning, after integrating new with old memories, and after forgetting irrelevant material. By contrast, alternative schemes, such as additional potentiation in wake, potentiation in sleep, or synaptic renormalization in wake, decrease Matching. We also argue that, by selecting appropriate loops through the brain that tie feedforward synapses with feedback ones in the same dendritic domain, different subsets of neurons can learn to specialize for different contingencies and form sequences of nested perception-action loops. By potentiating such loops when interacting with the environment in wake, and depressing them when disconnected from the environment in sleep, neurons can learn to match the long-term statistical structure of the environment while avoiding spurious modes of functioning and catastrophic interference. Finally, such a two-step process has the additional benefit of desaturating the neuron's ability to learn and of maintaining cellular homeostasis. Thus, sleep-dependent synaptic renormalization offers a parsimonious account for both cellular and systems level effects of sleep on learning and memory.

  8. Effect of magnesium treatment and glucose levels on delayed cerebral ischemia in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage : A substudy of the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage trial (MASH-II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijenaar, Jolien F.; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818828; Algra, Ale|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07483472X; van den Bergh, Walter M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/272886157; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/085712000

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnesium treatment did not improve outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage II trial. We hypothesized that high glucose levels may have offset a potential beneficial effect to prevent delayed cerebral ischemia.

  9. Computerized system to measure interproximal alveolar bone levels in epidemiologic, radiographic investigations. II. Intra- and inter-examinar variation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouters, F.R.; Frithiof, L.; Soeder, P.Oe.; Hellden, L.; Lavstedt, S.; Salonen, L.

    1988-01-01

    The study was aimed at analyzing intra- and inter-examiner variations in computerized measurement and in non-measurability of alveolar bone level in a cross-sectional, epidemiologic material. At each interproximal tooth surface, alveolar bone height in percentage of root length (B/R) and tooth length (B/T) were determined twice by one examiner and once by a second examiner from X5-magnified periapical radiographs. The overall intra- and inter-examiner variations in measurement were 2.85% and 3.84% of root length and 1.97% and 2.82% of tooth length, respectively. The varations were different for different tooth groups and for different degrees of severity of marginal periodontitis. The overall proportions on non-measurable tooth surfaces varied with examiner from 32% to 39% and from 43% to 48% of the available interproximal tooth surfaces for B/R and B/T, respectively. With regard to the level of reliability, the computerized method reported is appropriate to cross-sectional, epidemiologic investigations from radiographs.

  10. Selective consumption and metabolic allocation of terrestrial and algal carbon determine allochthony in lake bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, François; Leigh McCallister, S; Del Giorgio, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    Here we explore strategies of resource utilization and allocation of algal versus terrestrially derived carbon (C) by lake bacterioplankton. We quantified the consumption of terrestrial and algal dissolved organic carbon, and the subsequent allocation of these pools to bacterial growth and respiration, based on the δ(13)C isotopic signatures of bacterial biomass and respiratory carbon dioxide (CO2). Our results confirm that bacterial communities preferentially remove algal C from the terrestrially dominated organic C pool of lakes, but contrary to current assumptions, selectively allocate this autochthonous substrate to respiration, whereas terrestrial C was preferentially allocated to biosynthesis. The results provide further evidence of a mechanism whereby inputs of labile, algal-derived organic C may stimulate the incorporation of a more recalcitrant, terrestrial C pool. This mechanism resulted in a counterintuitive pattern of high and relatively constant levels of allochthony (~76%) in bacterial biomass across lakes that otherwise differ greatly in productivity and external inputs.

  11. Depositional and sea-level history from MIS 6 (Termination II) to MIS 3 on the southern continental shelf of South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthra, H. C.; Jacobs, Z.; Compton, J. S.; Fisher, E. C.; Karkanas, P.; Marean, C. W.

    2018-02-01

    Pleistocene shoreline deposits comprised of calcified shallow marine (palaeobeach) and aeolian (palaeodune) facies found along mid-latitude coastlines can be useful indicators of past sea levels. Here, we describe a succession of such deposits that are presently exposed both above (subaerial) and below (submerged) mean sea level along the southern Cape coast of South Africa, 18 km east of the town of Mossel Bay. The submerged units provide a window on Late Pleistocene coastal processes, as palaeoshoreline deposits in this study extend to water depths of up to 55 m on the mid-shelf. Five sedimentary facies were identified in the strata and were compared to modern depositional environments of the local littoral zone, which include aeolian dune, upper shoreface, foreshore, intertidal swash and back-barrier settings. Twenty-two geological units were observed and mapped. Some of these units were directly dated with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. OSL ages were obtained for ten samples from the subaerial and twelve samples from the submerged deposits. Those geological units not directly dated were interpreted based on sedimentology and field/stratigraphic relationships to dated units. The stratigraphy and chronology of the succession indicates a record of initial deposition during Termination II (T-II) meltwater events, preceding and leading to marine isotope stage (MIS) 5e. Indicators for multiple sea-level fluctuations between MIS 5d and MIS 4, and sediment deposition at the end of MIS 4 and start of MIS 3 are also found. Both regressive and transgressive depositional cycles are well-preserved in the succession. We propose that palaeodune and palaeobeach deposits along the South Coast of South Africa have no clear preference for deposition during sea-level transgressions or regressions. Sediment deposition more closely mirrors the rate of sea level change, with deposition and preservation either during times of rapid sea-level movement, or oscillation

  12. Future hotspots of terrestrial mammal loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Piero; Pressey, Robert L.; Giorgini, Daniele; Maiorano, Luigi; Bakkenes, Michel; Boitani, Luigi; Alkemade, Rob; Falcucci, Alessandra; Chiozza, Federica; Rondinini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Current levels of endangerment and historical trends of species and habitats are the main criteria used to direct conservation efforts globally. Estimates of future declines, which might indicate different priorities than past declines, have been limited by the lack of appropriate data and models. Given that much of conservation is about anticipating and responding to future threats, our inability to look forward at a global scale has been a major constraint on effective action. Here, we assess the geography and extent of projected future changes in suitable habitat for terrestrial mammals within their present ranges. We used a global earth-system model, IMAGE, coupled with fine-scale habitat suitability models and parametrized according to four global scenarios of human development. We identified the most affected countries by 2050 for each scenario, assuming that no additional conservation actions other than those described in the scenarios take place. We found that, with some exceptions, most of the countries with the largest predicted losses of suitable habitat for mammals are in Africa and the Americas. African and North American countries were also predicted to host the most species with large proportional global declines. Most of the countries we identified as future hotspots of terrestrial mammal loss have little or no overlap with the present global conservation priorities, thus confirming the need for forward-looking analyses in conservation priority setting. The expected growth in human populations and consumption in hotspots of future mammal loss mean that local conservation actions such as protected areas might not be sufficient to mitigate losses. Other policies, directed towards the root causes of biodiversity loss, are required, both in Africa and other parts of the world. PMID:21844048

  13. Terrestrial pathways of radionuclide particulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, F.W. (Allied-General Nuclear Services, Barnwell, SC (USA)); Ng, Y.C. (California Univ., Livermore (USA). Lawrence Livermore National Lab.); Palms, J.M. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1981-11-01

    Formulations are developed for computing potential human intake of 13 radionuclides via the terrestrial food chains. The formulations are an extension of the NRC methodology. Specific regional crop and livestock transfer and fractional distribution data from the southern part of the U.S.A. are provided and used in the computation of comparative values with those computed by means of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 formulations. In the development of the model, emphasis was also placed on identifying the various time-delay compartments of the food chains and accounting for all of the activity initially deposited. For all radionuclides considered, except /sup 137/Cs, the new formulations predict lower potential intakes from the total of all food chains combined than do the comparable Regulatory Guide formulations by as much as a factor of 40. For /sup 137/Cs the new formulations predict 10% higher potential intakes.

  14. Terrestrial atmosphere, water and astrobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coradini M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Primitive life, defined as a chemical system capable to transfer its molecular information via self-replication and also capable to evolve, originated about 4 billion years ago from the processing of organic molecules by liquid water. Terrestrial atmosphere played a key role in the process by allowing the permanent presence of liquid water and by participating in the production of carbon-based molecules. Water molecules exhibit specific properties mainly due to a dense network of hydrogen bonds. The carbon-based molecules were either home made in the atmosphere and/or in submarine hydrothermal systems or delivered by meteorites and micrometeorites. The search for possible places beyond the earth where the trilogy atmosphere/water/life could exist is the main objective of astrobiology. Within the Solar System, exploration missions are dedicated to Mars, Europa, Titan and the icy bodies. The discovery of several hundreds of extrasolar planets opens the quest to the whole Milky Way.

  15. Extreme solar-terrestrial events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Lago, A.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Echer, E.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Rockenbach, M.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2017-10-01

    Extreme solar-terrestrial events are those in which very energetic solar ejections hit the earth?s magnetosphere, causing intense energization of the earth?s ring current. Statistically, their occurrence is approximately once per Gleissberg solar cycle (70-100yrs). The solar transient occurred on July, 23rd (2012) was potentially one of such extreme events. The associated coronal mass ejection (CME), however, was not ejected towards the earth. Instead, it hit the STEREO A spacecraft, located 120 degrees away from the Sun-Earth line. Estimates of the geoeffectiveness of such a CME point to a scenario of extreme Space Weather conditions. In terms of the ring current energization, as measured by the Disturbance Storm-Time index (Dst), had this CME hit the Earth, it would have caused the strongest geomagnetic storm in space era.

  16. Crenarchaeota colonize terrestrial plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, H M; Dodsworth, J A; Goodman, R M

    2000-10-01

    Microorganisms that colonize plant roots are recruited from, and in turn contribute substantially to, the vast and virtually uncharacterized phylogenetic diversity of soil microbiota. The diverse, but poorly understood, microorganisms that colonize plant roots mediate mineral transformations and nutrient cycles that are central to biosphere functioning. Here, we report the results of epifluorescence microscopy and culture-independent recovery of small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences showing that members of a previously reported clade of soil Crenarchaeota colonize both young and senescent plant roots at an unexpectedly high frequency, and are particularly abundant on the latter. Our results indicate that non-thermophilic members of the Archaea inhabit an important terrestrial niche on earth and direct attention to the need for studies that will determine their possible roles in mediating root biology.

  17. Synthetic spectra of simulated terrestrial atmospheres containing possible biomarker gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, T. L.; Kasting, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's proposed Terrestrial Planet Finder, a space-based interferometer, will eventually allow spectroscopic analyses of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Such analyses would provide information about the existence of life on these planets. One strategy in the search for life is to look for evidence of O3 (and hence O2) in a planet's atmosphere; another is to look for gases that might be present in an atmosphere analogous to that of the inhabited early Earth. In order to investigate these possibilities, we have calculated synthetic spectra for several hypothetical terrestrial-type atmospheres. The model atmospheres represent four different scenarios. The first two, representing inhabited terrestrial planets, are an Earth-like atmosphere containing variable amounts of oxygen and an early Earth-type atmosphere containing methane. In addition, two cases representing Mars-like and early Venus-like atmospheres were evaluated, to provide possible "false positive" spectra. The calculated spectra suggest that ozone could be detected by an instrument like Terrestrial Planet Finder if the O2 concentration in the planet's atmosphere is > or = 200 ppm, or 10(-3) times the present atmospheric level. Methane should be observable on an early-Earth type planet if it is present in concentrations of 100 ppm or more. Methane has both biogenic and abiogenic sources, but concentrations exceeding 1000 ppm, or 0.1% by volume, would be difficult to produce from abiogenic sources alone. High methane concentrations in a planet's atmosphere are therefore another potential indicator for extraterrestrial life.

  18. Hepatoprotective and Antioxidant Activities of Tribulus Terrestris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harraz, Fathalla M; Ghazy, Nabila M; Hammoda, Hala M; Nafeaa, Abeer A.; Abdallah, Ingy I.

    2015-01-01

    Tribulus terrestris L. has been used in folk medicine throughout history. The present study examined the acute toxicity of the total ethanolic extract of T. Terrestris followed by investigation of the hepatoprotective activity of the total ethanolic extract and different fractions of the aerial

  19. Branching Fractions and log(gf)s for Weak Lines of Co II connected to the Ground and Low Metastable Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James Edward; Feigenson, Thomas; Sneden, Chris; Cowan, John J.

    2018-01-01

    New branching fraction (BF) measurements and log(gf)s of Highly Reliable Lines (HRLs) of Co II are reported. Our measurements test and confirm earlier work by Salih et al. [1985] and Mullman et al. [1998] and expand the earlier BF measurements to include more weak and very weak HRLs. HRLs are UV lines that connect to the population reservoir levels including the ground and low metastable levels of Co+. Such levels contain most of the cobalt in the photospheres of typical F, G, and K stars used in abundance studies. HRLs are essentially immune to departures from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) because they connect to the primary reservoir levels. Lightly-populated high-lying levels of the ion and essentially all levels of the neutral atom have some possibility of being pulled out of LTE through various reactions. Weak and very weak HRLs are needed to determine Co abundances in higher metallicity stars while dominant branches are useful in low metallicity stars of abundance surveys. A large set of HRLs with reliable log(gf)s is desired to avoid blending and saturation problems in photospheric studies. The relative abundance of Fe-peak elements changes as a function of metallicity [e.g. Henry et al. 2010, Sneden et al. 2016] but contributions to the trends from nuclear physics effects in early stars need to be cleanly separated from effect due to limitations of classic photospheric models based on One Dimensional (1D) and LTE approximations. The 1D/LTE approximations of classic photospheric models, which work in well in metal rich dwarf stars such as the Sun, are a source of some concern in Metal Poor (MP) giant stars due to much lower electron and atom pressures. Our new measurements on HRLS of Co II are applied to determine stellar abundances in MP stars.Henry, R. B. C., Cowan, J. J., & Sobeck, J, 2010, ApJ 709, 715Mullman, K. L., Cooper, J. C., & Lawler, J. E. 1998, ApJ, 495, 503Salih, S., Lawler, J. E., & Whaling, W. 1985, PhRvA, 31, 744Sneden et al. 2016

  20. Modulation of coffee aroma via the fermentation of green coffee beans with Rhizopus oligosporus: II. Effects of different roast levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Liang Wei; Cheong, Mun Wai; Curran, Philip; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan

    2016-11-15

    This study aims to evaluate how changes of the volatile and non-volatile profiles of green coffees induced by Rhizopus oligosporus fermentation of green coffee beans (Part I) translated to changes in the volatile and aroma profiles of light, medium and dark roasted coffees and non-volatile profile of roasted coffee where fermentation effects were most distinctive (light roast). R. oligosporus fermentation resulted in 1.7-, 1.5- and 1.3-fold increases in pyrazine, 2-methylpyrazine and 2-ethylpyrazine levels in coffees of all roast degrees, respectively. This corresponded with the greater extent of amino acids degradation in light roasted fermented coffee. Ethyl palmitate was detected exclusively in medium and dark roasted fermented coffees. The sweet attribute of light and dark roasted coffees were increased following fermentation along with other aroma profile changes that were roast degree specific. This work aims to develop a direct but novel methodology for coffee aroma modulation through green coffee beans fermentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hardware Demonstrator of a Level-1 Track Finding Algorithm with FPGAs for the Phase II CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090481

    2016-01-01

    At the HL-LHC, proton bunches collide every 25\\,ns, producing an average of 140 pp interactions per bunch crossing. To operate in such an environment, the CMS experiment will need a Level-1 (L1) hardware trigger, able to identify interesting events within a latency of 12.5\\,$\\mu$s. This novel L1 trigger will make use of data coming from the silicon tracker to constrain the trigger rate. Goal of this new \\textit{track trigger} will be to build L1 tracks from the tracker information. The architecture that will be implemented in future to process tracker data is still under discussion. One possibility is to adopt a system entirely based on FPGA electronic. The proposed track finding algorithm is based on the Hough transform method. The algorithm has been tested using simulated pp collision data and it is currently being demonstrated in hardware, using the ``MP7'', which is a $\\mu$TCA board with a powerful FPGA capable of handling data rates approaching 1 Tb/s. Two different implementations of the Hough tran...

  2. Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the claim that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity, might play a role in triggering earthquakes. We count the number of earthquakes having magnitudes that exceed chosen thresholds in calendar years, months, and days, and we order these counts by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure the statistical significance of the difference between the earthquake-number distributions below and above the median of the solar-terrestrial averages by χ2 and Student's t tests. Across a range of earthquake magnitude thresholds, we find no consistent and statistically significant distributional differences. We also introduce time lags between the solar-terrestrial variables and the number of earthquakes, but again no statistically significant distributional difference is found. We cannot reject the null hypothesis of no solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes.

  3. Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Processes in the Lower Columbia River: II. Water Level Models, Floodplain Wetland Inundation, and System Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay, David A.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2016-04-26

    Spatially varying water-level regimes are a factor controlling estuarine and tidal-fluvial wetland vegetation patterns. As described in Part I, water levels in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) are influenced by tides, river flow, hydropower operations, and coastal processes. In Part II, regression models based on tidal theory are used to quantify the role of these processes in determining water levels in the mainstem river and floodplain wetlands, and to provide 21-year inundation hindcasts. Analyses are conducted at 19 LCRE mainstem channel stations and 23 tidally exposed floodplain wetland stations. Sum exceedance values (SEVs) are used to compare wetland hydrologic regimes at different locations on the river floodplain. A new predictive tool is introduced and validated, the potential SEV (pSEV), which can reduce the need for extensive new data collection in wetland restoration planning. Models of water levels and inundation frequency distinguish four zones encompassing eight reaches. The system zones are the wave- and current-dominated Entrance to river kilometer (rkm) 5; the Estuary (rkm-5 to 87), comprised of a lower reach with salinity, the energy minimum (where the turbidity maximum normally occurs), and an upper estuary reach without salinity; the Tidal River (rkm-87 to 229), with lower, middle, and upper reaches in which river flow becomes increasingly dominant over tides in determining water levels; and the steep and weakly tidal Cascade (rkm-229 to 234) immediately downstream from Bonneville Dam. The same zonation is seen in the water levels of floodplain stations, with considerable modification of tidal properties. The system zones and reaches defined here reflect geological features and their boundaries are congruent with five wetland vegetation zones

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 32 (FERRTH00190032) on Town Highway 19, crossing the South Slang Little Otter Creek, Ferrisburgh, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure FERRTH00190032 on Town Highway 19 crossing the South Slang Little Otter Creek (Hawkins Slang Brook), Ferrisburg, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Champlain section of the St. Lawrence Valley physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 8.00-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of wetlands upstream and downstream of the bridge with trees and pasture on the wide flood plains. In the study area, the South Slang Little Otter Creek has a meandering channel with essentially no channel slope, an average channel top width of 932 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from clay to sand. Sieve analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the sample is coarse silt and clay and thus a medium grain size by use of sieve analysis was indeterminate. The median grain size was assumed to be a course silt with a size (D50) of 0.061mm (0.0002 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 2, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 19 crossing of the South Slang Little Otter Creek is a 45-ft-long, twolane bridge consisting of one 42-foot concrete box-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 11, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face

  5. Estimating Exposure of Terrestrial Wildlife to Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents a general model for exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants (Sect. 2), methods for estimating parameters of the model (Sect. 3), species specific parameters for endpoint species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Sect. 4), and a sample application (Sect. 5). Exposure can be defined as the coincidence in both space and time of a receptor and a stressor, such that the receptor and stressor come into contact and interact (Risk Assessment Forum 1992). In the context of ecological risk assessment, receptors include all endpoint species or communities identified for a site [see Suter (1989) and Suter et al. (1994) for discussions of ecological endpoints for waste sites]. In the context of waste site assessments, stressors are chemical contaminations, and the contact and interaction are uptake of the contaminant by the receptor. Without sufficient exposure of the receptor to the contaminants, there is no ecological risk. Unlike some other endpoint assemblages, terrestrial wildlife are significantly exposed to contaminants in multiple media. They may drink or swim in contaminated water, ingest contaminated food and soil, and breath contaminated air. In addition, because most wildlife are mobile, moving among and within habitats, exposure is not restricted to a single location. They may integrate contamination from several spatially discrete sources. Therefore, exposure models for terrestrial wildlife must include multiple media. This document provides models and parameters for estimating exposure of birds and mammals. Reptiles and amphibians are not considered because few data exist with which to assess exposure to these organisms. In addition, because toxicological data are scarce for both classes, evaluation of the significance of exposure estimates is problematic. However, the general exposure estimation procedure developed herein for birds and mammals is applicable to reptiles and amphibians. Exposure models must be appropriate to the

  6. Taiwan's industrial heavy metal pollution threatens terrestrial biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, M.J. [Department of Biological Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Selvaraj, K. [Institute of Marine Geology and Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Agoramoorthy, G. [Department of Pharmacy, Tajen University, Yanpu, Pingtung 907, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: agoram@mail.tajen.edu.tw

    2006-09-15

    The bioconcentration levels of essential (Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn) and non-essential (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Sn) elements have been investigated in different terrestrial biota such as fungi, plant, earthworm, snail, crab, insect, amphibian, lizard, snake, and bat including the associated soil, to investigate the ecosystem health status in Kenting National Park, Taiwan. High bioconcentrations of Cd, Hg, and Sn in snail, earthworm, crab, lizard, snake, and bat indicated a contaminated terrestrial ecosystem. High concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Sn in plant species, effective bioaccumulation of Cd by earthworm, snail, crab and bat, as well as very high levels of Hg found in invertebrates, amphibians, and reptiles revealed a strong influence from industrial pollution on the biotic community. This study for the first time presents data on the impact of heavy metal pollution on various terrestrial organisms in Taiwan. - Metal effects occur at any terrestrial levels in Taiwan.

  7. Comparative study of two purified inulinases from thermophile Thielavia Terrestris NRRL 8126 and mesophile Aspergillus Foetidus NRRL 337 grown on Cichorium Intybus l

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Mohamed Fawzi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thirty fungal species grown on Cichorium intybus L. root extract as a sole carbon source, were screened for the production of exo-inulinase activities. The thermophile Thielavia terrestris NRRL 8126 and mesophile Aspergillus foetidus NRRL 337 gave the highest production levels of inulinases I & II at 50 and 24 ºC respectively. Yeast extract and peptone were the best nitrogen sources for highest production of inulinases I & II at five and seven days of incubation respectively. The two inulinases I & II were purified to homogeneity by gel-filtration and ion-exchange chromatography with 66.0 and 42.0 fold of purification respectively. The optimum temperatures of purified inulinases I & II were 75 and 50 ºC respectively. Inulinase I was more thermostable than the other one. The optimum pH for activity was found to be 4.5 and 5.5 for inulinases I & II respectively. A comparatively lower Michaelis-Menten constant (2.15 mg/ml and higher maximum initial velocity (115 µmol/min/mg of protein for inulinase I on inulin demonstrated the exoinulinase's greater affinity for inulin substrate. These findings are significant for its potential industrial application. The molecular mass of the inulinases I & II were estimated to be 72 & 78 kDa respectively by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  8. VALUING THE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    ALAN KRUPNICK; DAVID McLAUGHLIN

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is already having impacts on terrestrial ecosystem services and such impacts are only expected to broaden and worsen as greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) continue at their historic levels. To set appropriate policies for reducing GHG emissions, economists recommend the use of cost-benefit analysis. To perform such analyses, the predominant approach has been to use integrated assessment models. There is a need for more targeted valuation studies to serve as further evidence about ...

  9. The effect of Tribulus terrestris extract on motility and viability of human sperms after cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadmobini, Atefeh; Bakhtiari, Mitra; Khaleghi, Sara; Esmaeili, Farzaneh; Mostafaei, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Semen cryopreservation produces significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may lead to impairment of sperm morphology, function, and ultimately, male fertility. Since Tribulus terrestris has antioxidant and free-radical-scavenging properties, this study aims to reveal the effect of the Tribulus terrestris extract on motility and vitality of human sperms after cryopreservation. Semen specimens from 80 healthy volunteers were divided into eight groups: fresh control (group I), freeze control (group II), groups III, IV, and V, which had 20, 40, and 50 μg/mL doses of Tribulus terrestris extract added before cryopreservation, and groups VI, VII, and VIII, which were supplemented by these extract doses after the freeze-thaw process. To evaluate the effects of the Tribulus terrestris extract, the semen samples were incubated with the extract and evaluated with a light microscope for motility and viability. After cryopreservation, a significant improvement in spermatozoa viability was observed in group VII. In groups VII and VIII, motility, according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, increased considerably (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference among groups III, IV, and V. The present study demonstrated that the protective effects of Tribulus terrestris, which improves human sperm motility and viability, may be due to its antioxidant properties. On the basis of the results, the researchers concluded that Tribulus terrestris can be used as a safe therapeutic alternative to current modalities for the management of motility dysfunction in males. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The terrestrial biosphere in the SFR region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerling, L.; Isaeus, M. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Botany; Lanneck, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physical Geography; Lindborg, T.; Schueldt, R. [Danish Nature Council, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2001-03-01

    This report is a part of the SKB project 'SAFE' (Safety Assessment of the Final Repository of Radioactive Operational Waste). The aim of project SAFE is to update the previous safety analysis of SFR-1.SFR-1 is a facility for disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste, which is situated in bedrock beneath the Baltic Sea, one km off the coast near the Forsmark nuclear power plant in Northern Uppland. A part of the SAFE-analysis aims at analysing the transport of radionuclides in the ecosystems.To do so one has to build a model that includes a large amount of information concerning the biosphere.The first step is to collect and compile descriptions of the biosphere.This report is a first attempt to characterise the terrestrial environment of the SFR area of Forsmark. In the first part of the report the terrestrial environment, land class distribution and production of the area is described. The primary production in different terrestrial ecosystems is estimated for a model area in the Forsmark region. The estimations are based on the actual land class distribution and the values for the total primary production (d.w. above ground biomass)and the amount carbon produced, presented as g/m{sup 2} for each land class respectively. An important aspect of the biosphere is the vegetation and its development. The future development of vegetation is of interest since production,decomposition and thus storage of organic material, vary strongly among vegetation types and this has strong implications for the transport of radionuclides.Therefore an attempt to describe the development of terrestrial vegetation has been made in the second part. Any prediction of future vegetation is based on knowledge of the past together with premises for the future development.The predictions made, thus, becomes marred with errors enforced by the assumptions and incomplete information of the past. The assumptions made for the predictions in this report are crude and results

  11. Does terrestrial epidemiology apply to marine systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Hamish I.; Kuris, Armand M.; Harvell, C. Drew; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Smith, Garriet W.; Porter, James

    2004-01-01

    Most of epidemiological theory has been developed for terrestrial systems, but the significance of disease in the ocean is now being recognized. However, the extent to which terrestrial epidemiology can be directly transferred to marine systems is uncertain. Many broad types of disease-causing organism occur both on land and in the sea, and it is clear that some emergent disease problems in marine environments are caused by pathogens moving from terrestrial to marine systems. However, marine systems are qualitatively different from terrestrial environments, and these differences affect the application of modelling and management approaches that have been developed for terrestrial systems. Phyla and body plans are more diverse in marine environments and marine organisms have different life histories and probably different disease transmission modes than many of their terrestrial counterparts. Marine populations are typically more open than terrestrial ones, with the potential for long-distance dispersal of larvae. Potentially, this might enable unusually rapid propagation of epidemics in marine systems, and there are several examples of this. Taken together, these differences will require the development of new approaches to modelling and control of infectious disease in the ocean.

  12. A molecular palaeobiological exploration of arthropod terrestrialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Fernandez, Jesus; Carton, Robert; Tanner, Alastair R; Puttick, Mark N; Blaxter, Mark; Vinther, Jakob; Olesen, Jørgen; Giribet, Gonzalo; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Pisani, Davide

    2016-07-19

    Understanding animal terrestrialization, the process through which animals colonized the land, is crucial to clarify extant biodiversity and biological adaptation. Arthropoda (insects, spiders, centipedes and their allies) represent the largest majority of terrestrial biodiversity. Here we implemented a molecular palaeobiological approach, merging molecular and fossil evidence, to elucidate the deepest history of the terrestrial arthropods. We focused on the three independent, Palaeozoic arthropod terrestrialization events (those of Myriapoda, Hexapoda and Arachnida) and showed that a marine route to the colonization of land is the most likely scenario. Molecular clock analyses confirmed an origin for the three terrestrial lineages bracketed between the Cambrian and the Silurian. While molecular divergence times for Arachnida are consistent with the fossil record, Myriapoda are inferred to have colonized land earlier, substantially predating trace or body fossil evidence. An estimated origin of myriapods by the Early Cambrian precedes the appearance of embryophytes and perhaps even terrestrial fungi, raising the possibility that terrestrialization had independent origins in crown-group myriapod lineages, consistent with morphological arguments for convergence in tracheal systems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. A molecular palaeobiological exploration of arthropod terrestrialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Robert; Edgecombe, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding animal terrestrialization, the process through which animals colonized the land, is crucial to clarify extant biodiversity and biological adaptation. Arthropoda (insects, spiders, centipedes and their allies) represent the largest majority of terrestrial biodiversity. Here we implemented a molecular palaeobiological approach, merging molecular and fossil evidence, to elucidate the deepest history of the terrestrial arthropods. We focused on the three independent, Palaeozoic arthropod terrestrialization events (those of Myriapoda, Hexapoda and Arachnida) and showed that a marine route to the colonization of land is the most likely scenario. Molecular clock analyses confirmed an origin for the three terrestrial lineages bracketed between the Cambrian and the Silurian. While molecular divergence times for Arachnida are consistent with the fossil record, Myriapoda are inferred to have colonized land earlier, substantially predating trace or body fossil evidence. An estimated origin of myriapods by the Early Cambrian precedes the appearance of embryophytes and perhaps even terrestrial fungi, raising the possibility that terrestrialization had independent origins in crown-group myriapod lineages, consistent with morphological arguments for convergence in tracheal systems. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325830

  14. Mars: a small terrestrial planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, N.; Baratoux, D.; Witasse, O.; Encrenaz, T.; Sotin, C.

    2016-11-01

    Mars is characterized by geological landforms familiar to terrestrial geologists. It has a tenuous atmosphere that evolved differently from that of Earth and Venus and a differentiated inner structure. Our knowledge of the structure and evolution of Mars has strongly improved thanks to a huge amount of data of various types (visible and infrared imagery, altimetry, radar, chemistry, etc) acquired by a dozen of missions over the last two decades. In situ data have provided ground truth for remote-sensing data and have opened a new era in the study of Mars geology. While large sections of Mars science have made progress and new topics have emerged, a major question in Mars exploration—the possibility of past or present life—is still unsolved. Without entering into the debate around the presence of life traces, our review develops various topics of Mars science to help the search of life on Mars, building on the most recent discoveries, going from the exosphere to the interior structure, from the magmatic evolution to the currently active processes, including the fate of volatiles and especially liquid water.

  15. Evaluation of the MERIS terrestrial Chlorophyll Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, J.; Curran, P.

    The MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), one of the payloads on Envisat, has fine spectral resolution, moderate spatial resolution and a three day repeat cycle. This makes MERIS a potentially valuable sensor for the measurement and monitoring of terrestrial environments at regional to global scales. The red edge, which results from an abrupt change in reflectance in red and near-infrared wavelengths has a location that is related directly to the chlorophyll content of vegetation. A new index called the MERIS terrestrial chlorophyll index (MTCI) uses data in three red and NIR wavebands centred at 681.25nm, 705nm and 753.75nm (bands 8, 9 and 10 in the MERIS standard band setting). The MTCI is easy to calculate and can be automated. Preliminary indirect evaluation using model, field and MERIS data suggested its sensitivity, notably to high values of chlorophyll content and its limited sensitivity to spatial resolution and atmospheric effects. As a result this index is now a standard level-2 product of the European Space Agency. For direct MTCI evaluation two different approaches were used. First, the MTCI/chlorophyll content relationship were determined using a surrogate of chlorophyll content for sites in southern Vietnam and second, the MTCI/chlorophyll relationship was determined using actual chlorophyll content for sites in the New Forest, UK and for plots in a greenhouse. Forests in southern Vietnam were contaminated heavily with Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. The contamination levels were so high that it led to a long term decrease in chlorophyll content within forests that have long since regained full canopy cover. In this approach the amount of Agent Orange dropped onto the forest between 1965 and 1971 was used as a surrogate for contemporary chlorophyll content and was related to current MTCI at selected forest sites. The resulting relationship was positive. Further per pixel investigation of the MTCI/Agent Orange concentration relationship

  16. A molecular palaeobiological exploration of arthropod terrestrialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano-Fernandez, Jesus; Carton, Robert; Tanner, Alastair R.

    2016-01-01

    amolecular palaeobiological approach, merging molecular and fossil evidence, to elucidate the deepest history of the terrestrial arthropods. We focused on the three independent, Palaeozoic arthropod terrestrialization events (those of Myriapoda, Hexapoda and Arachnida) and showed that a marine route...... to the colonization of land is the most likely scenario.Molecular clock analyses confirmed an origin for the three terrestrial lineages bracketed between the Cambrian and the Silurian. While molecular divergence times for Arachnida are consistent with the fossil record,Myriapoda are inferred to have colonized land...

  17. Terrestrial Microgravity Model and Threshold Gravity Simulation using Magnetic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    What is the threshold gravity (minimum gravity level) required for the nominal functioning of the human system? What dosage is required? Do human cell lines behave differently in microgravity in response to an external stimulus? The critical need for such a gravity simulator is emphasized by recent experiments on human epithelial cells and lymphocytes on the Space Shuttle clearly showing that cell growth and function are markedly different from those observed terrestrially. Those differences are also dramatic between cells grown in space and those in Rotating Wall Vessels (RWV), or NASA bioreactor often used to simulate microgravity, indicating that although morphological growth patterns (three dimensional growth) can be successfully simulated using RWVs, cell function performance is not reproduced - a critical difference. If cell function is dramatically affected by gravity off-loading, then cell response to stimuli such as radiation, stress, etc. can be very different from terrestrial cell lines. Yet, we have no good gravity simulator for use in study of these phenomena. This represents a profound shortcoming for countermeasures research. We postulate that we can use magnetic levitation of cells and tissue, through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients, as a terrestrial microgravity model to study human cells. Specific objectives of the research are: 1. To develop a tried, tested and benchmarked terrestrial microgravity model for cell culture studies; 2. Gravity threshold determination; 3. Dosage (magnitude and duration) of g-level required for nominal functioning of cells; 4. Comparisons of magnetic levitation model to other models such as RWV, hind limb suspension, etc. and 5. Cellular response to reduced gravity levels of Moon and Mars. The paper will discuss experiments md modeling work to date in support of this project.

  18. Terrestrial Microgravity Model and Threshold Gravity Simulation sing Magnetic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    What is the threshold gravity (minimum gravity level) required for the nominal functioning of the human system? What dosage is required? Do human cell lines behave differently in microgravity in response to an external stimulus? The critical need for such a gravity simulator is emphasized by recent experiments on human epithelial cells and lymphocytes on the Space Shuttle clearly showing that cell growth and function are markedly different from those observed terrestrially. Those differences are also dramatic between cells grown in space and those in Rotating Wall Vessels (RWV), or NASA bioreactor often used to simulate microgravity, indicating that although morphological growth patterns (three dimensional growth) can be successiblly simulated using RWVs, cell function performance is not reproduced - a critical difference. If cell function is dramatically affected by gravity off-loading, then cell response to stimuli such as radiation, stress, etc. can be very different from terrestrial cell lines. Yet, we have no good gravity simulator for use in study of these phenomena. This represents a profound shortcoming for countermeasures research. We postulate that we can use magnetic levitation of cells and tissue, through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients, as a terrestrial microgravity model to study human cells. Specific objectives of the research are: 1. To develop a tried, tested and benchmarked terrestrial microgravity model for cell culture studies; 2. Gravity threshold determination; 3. Dosage (magnitude and duration) of g-level required for nominal functioning of cells; 4. Comparisons of magnetic levitation model to other models such as RWV, hind limb suspension, etc. and 5. Cellular response to reduced gravity levels of Moon and Mars.

  19. Clinical significance of pretreatment serum levels of VEGF and its receptors, IL- 8, and their prognostic value in type I and II endometrial cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Kotowicz

    Full Text Available The study aimed to assess the usefulness of the determination of cytokines: IL-8, VEGF and its soluble receptors: VEGF-R1, VEGF-R2 in patients with endometrial cancer (EC.The study group consisted of 118 patients with EC subjected to surgical treatment. Before the treatment we determined the serum levels of cytokines IL-8, and VEGF as well as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 receptors. For comparison, the concentration of CA 125 was also measured. VEGFR1 and CA 125 were determined in the COBAS e601 system using Roche Diagnostics kits, while IL-8, VEGF and VEGFR2 were measured by ELISA assay using R&D Systems kits.The concentrations of IL-8, VEGF, VEGFR1 and CA 125 allowed to distinguish patients for the control group. The highest diagnostic sensitivity has been shown for the concentrations of VEGF (AUC = 0.904 and IL-8 (AUC = 0.818. Among all studied parameters only CA125 concentrations increased with the clinical stage; being significantly higher in patients in FIGO III-IV, than FIGO I-IB. In patients at the FIGO stage I-IB, complementary determinations of CA 125 and VEGF resulted in the largest increase of diagnostic sensitivity. Patients with metastases to the para-aortic lymph nodes had significantly higher levels of VEGF compared to subjects without such lesions. The concentrations of IL-8 were an independent prognostic factor in the assessment of overall survival in patients with type I endometrial cancer, while the concentrations of VEGFR2 in those with type II.In patients with endometrial cancer, the clinical usefulness of IL-8 and VEGFR2 measurements as the potential prognostic factors has been demonstrated. In type I, the concentrations of IL-8 determined before treatment can be helpful in predicting overall survival. In patients qualified to type II EC, the concentrations of VEGFR2 have the value of an independent prognostic factor for overall survival, this requires research on larger groups of patients. The increased levels of VEGF may be useful

  20. A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patchett, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lo, Li - Ta [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mr Marle, David [KITWARE INC.; Brownlee, Carson [UNIV OF UTAH

    2011-01-24

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider

  1. Towards a long-term dataset of ELBARA-II measurements assisting SMOS level-3 land product and algorithm validation at the Valencia Anchor Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fernandez-Moran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission was launched on 2nd November 2009 with the objective of providing global estimations of soil moisture and sea salinity. The main activity of the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS is currently to assist in a long-term validation of SMOS land products. This study focus on a level 3 SMOS data validation with in situ measurements carried out in the period 2010-2012 over the VAS. ELBARA-II radiometer is placed in the VAS area, observing a vineyard field considered as representative of a major proportion of an area of 50×50 km, enough to cover a SMOS footprint. Brightness temperatures (TB acquired by ELBARA-II have been compared to those observed by SMOS at the same dates and time. They were also used for the L-MEB model inversion to retrieve soil moisture (SM, which later on have been compared to those provided by SMOS as level 3 data. A good correlation between both TB datasets was found, improving year by year, mainly due to the decrease of precipitations in the analyzed period and the mitigation of radio frequency interferences at L-band. The larger homogeneity of the radiometer footprint as compared to SMOS explains the higher variability of its TB. Periods of more intense precipitation (spring and autumn also presented higher SM, which corroborates the consistency of SM retrieved from ELBARA-II’s observations. However, the results show that SMOS level 3 data underestimate SM as compared to ELBARA-II’s, probably due to the influence of the small soil fraction which is not cultivated in vineyards. SMOS estimations in descending orbit (6 pm had better quality (higher correlation, lower RMSE and bias than the ones in ascending orbit (6 am, when there is a higher soil moisture. Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso

  2. The standard tangential fields used for breast irradiation do not allow optimal coverage and dose distribution in axillary levels I-II and the sentinel node area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkacemi, Y; Allab-Pan, Q; Bigorie, V; Khodari, W; Beaussart, P; Totobenazara, J-L; Mège, J-P; Caillet, P; Pigneur, F; Dao, T-H; Salmon, R; Calitchi, E; Bosc, R

    2013-08-01

    Recent data from ACOSOG Z0011 and NSABP B32 trials suggested no need for axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in patients with micrometastatic involvement of the sentinel lymph node (SLN). The low rate of axillary recurrence was attributed to the axilla coverage by the tangential fields (TgFs) irradiation and systemic therapy. This study aimed to evaluate dose distribution and coverage of the axilla levels I-II and the SLN area. One hundred and nine patients were analyzed according to three groups: group 1 (50 Gy; n = 18), group 2 (60 Gy; n = 34) and group 3 (66 Gy; n = 57). Patients were treated using the standard (STgF; n = 22) or high (HTgF; n = 87) TgF. The median doses delivered to level I using HTgF versus STgF were 33 and 20 Gy (P = 0.0001). The mean dose delivered to the SLN area was only 28 Gy. Additionally, the SLN area was totally included in the HTgF in 1 out of 12 patients who had intraoperative clip placement in the SNL area. TgFs provide a limited coverage of the axilla and the SNLB area. This information should be considered when only TgFs are planned to target the axilla in patients with a positive SLN without ALND. Standardization of locoregional radiotherapy in this situation is urgently needed.

  3. Japan-Australia Co-operative Program on research and development of technology for the management of high level radioactive wastes: phase II (1990-1995)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banba, Tsunetaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hart, K.P. [eds.

    1996-05-01

    The major activities associated with Japan-Australia Co-operative Program were the preparation, characterization and subsequent testing of both Cm-doped Synroc containing PW-4b simulated waste and Cm-doped single-phase zirconolite and perovskite, and the initiation of studies on naturally-occurring zirconolites to study the long-term durability of this mineral phase over geological time. The preparation of the Cm-doped samples was carried out in JAERI`s WASTEF facility at Tokai, with technical information and assistance provided by ANSTO where necessary. The experiments were designed to induce accelerated radiation damage in Synroc samples that would correspond to periods of Synroc storage of up to 100,000 years. The results are of considerable importance in evaluating the potential of the Synroc process as a means of dealing with HLW waste streams and represent a significant contribution to the understanding of the ability of Synroc to immobilize HLW elements. Overall the Phase II Co-operative Program has continued the excellent co-operative working relationship between the staff at the two institutions, and provided a better understanding of the potential advantages and limitations of Synroc as a second generation waste form. The work has shown the need for additional studies to be carried out on the effect of the levels of Cm-doping on the Cm leach rate, extension of natural analogue studies to define the geological conditions under which zirconolite is stable and development of models to provide long-term predictions of releases of HLW elements from Synroc under a range of repository conditions. It is strongly recommended that the program carried out in Phase II of the Co-operative Agreement be extended for a further three years to allow additional information on the above areas to be collected and reported in a document providing an overview of the Co-operative Program and recommendations on HLW management strategies. (J.P.N.).

  4. Late Permian (Lopingian) terrestrial ecosystems : A global comparison with new data from the low-latitude Bletterbach Biota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardi, M.; Massimo Petti, Fabio; Kustatscher, E.; Franz, M.; Hartkopf-Fröder, C.; Labandeira, Conrad C.; Wappler, Torsten; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Johanna H.A.; Peecook, Brandon R.; Angielczyk, Kenneth D.

    2017-01-01

    The late Palaeozoic is a pivotal period for the evolution of terrestrial ecosystems. Generalised warming and aridification trends resulted in profound floral and faunal turnover as well as increased levels of endemism. The patchiness of well-preserved, late Permian terrestrial ecosystems, however,

  5. Soil microbial responses to disturbance events and consequences for carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Holden, Sandra Robin

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the response of soil microbial communities and decomposition to global environmental changes is central to our ability to accurately forecast future terrestrial carbon (C) storage and atmospheric CO2 levels. Increases in the frequency and severity of disturbance events are one element of global change in terrestrial ecosystems. The goal of this dissertation was to measure the response of soil microbial communities and decomposition to disturbance events and to examine the mechan...

  6. Terrestrial Ecosystems of the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) modeled the distribution of terrestrial ecosystems for the contiguous United States using a standardized, deductive approach to...

  7. Terrestrial Radiodetermination Potential Users and Their Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-01

    The report summarizes information gathered during a preliminary study of the application of electronic techniques to geographical position determination on land and on inland waterways. Systems incorporating such techniques have been called terrestri...

  8. Transfer of terrestrial technology for lunar mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert A.; Green, Patricia A.

    The functions, operational procedures, and major items of equipment that comprise the terrestrial mining process are characterized. These data are used to synthesize a similar activity on the lunar surface. Functions, operations, and types of equipment that can be suitably transferred to lunar operation are identified. Shortfalls, enhancements, and technology development needs are described. The lunar mining process and what is required to adapt terrestrial equipment are highlighted. It is concluded that translation of terrestrial mining equipment and operational processes to perform similar functions on the lunar surface is practical. Adequate attention must be given to the harsh environment and logistical constraints of the lunar setting. By using earth-based equipment as a forcing function, near- and long-term benefits are derived (i.e., improved terrestrial mining in the near term vis-a-vis commercial production of helium-3 in the long term.

  9. The Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program Terrestrial Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tom; Payne, J.; Doyle, M.

    The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), the biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council, established the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP) to address the need for coordinated and standardized monitoring of Arctic environments in terrestrial, marine, freshwater...... and coastal environments. The CBMP Terrestrial Plan is a framework to focus and coordinate monitoring of terrestrial biodiversity across the Arctic. The goal of the plan is to improve the collective ability of Arctic traditional knowledge (TK) holders, northern communities, and scientists to detect......, understand and report on long-term change in Arctic terrestrial ecosystems and biodiversity, and to identify knowledge gaps and priorities. This poster will outline the key management questions the plan aims to address and the proposed nested, multi-scaled approach linking targeted, research based monitoring...

  10. The circumpolar biodiversity monitoring program - Terrestrial plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tom; Payne, J.; Doyle, M.

    and attributes to monitor in the plan related to soil invertebrates. Focal Ecosystem Components (FECs) of the soil decomposer system include the soil living invertebrates such as microarthropods, enchytraeids and earthworms and the functions performed by microorganisms such as nitrification, decomposition......The Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program, CBMP, Terrestrial Plan, www.caff.is/terrestrial, is a framework to focus and coordinate monitoring of terrestrial biodiversity across the Arctic. The goal of the plan is to improve the collective ability of Arctic traditional knowledge (TK) holders......, northern communities, and scientists to detect, understand and report on long-term change in Arctic terrestrial ecosystems and biodiversity. This presentation will outline the key management questions the plan aims to address and the proposed nested, multi-scaled approach linking targeted, research based...

  11. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borran, Mina; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris) could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Materials and Methods: Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o.) and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p.) to different groups of mice (n=6). Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p.) of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. Results: T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o.) and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p.) reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. Conclusion: These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration. PMID:28748172

  12. Patterns of taxonomic diversity among terrestrial isopods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Sfendourakis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The publication of the world catalog of terrestrial isopods some ten years ago by Schmalfuss has facilitated research on isopod diversity patterns at a global scale. Furthermore, even though we still lack a comprehensive and robust phylogeny of Oniscidea, we do have some useful approaches to phylogenetic relationships among major clades which can offer additional insights into isopod evolutionary dynamics. Taxonomic diversity is one of many approaches to biodiversity and, despite its sensitiveness to biases in taxonomic practice, has proved useful in exploring diversification dynamics of various taxa. In the present work, we attempt an analysis of taxonomic diversity patterns among Oniscidea based on an updated world list of species containing 3,710 species belonging to 527 genera and 37 families (data till April 2014. The analysis explores species diversity at the genus and family level, as well as the relationships between species per genera, species per families, and genera per families. In addition, we consider the structure of isopod taxonomic system under the fractal perspective that has been proposed as a measure of a taxon’s diversification. Finally, we check whether there is any phylogenetic signal behind taxonomic diversity patterns. The results can be useful in a more detailed elaboration of Oniscidea systematics.

  13. Mapping and Quantifying Terrestrial Vertebrate Biodiversity at ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability to assess, report, map, and forecast functions of ecosystems is critical to our capacity to make informed decisions to maintain the sustainable nature of our environment. Because of the variability among living organisms and levels of organization (e.g. genetic, species, ecosystem), biodiversity has always been difficult to measure precisely, especially within a systematic manner and over multiple scales. In answer to this challenge, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has created a partnership with other Federal agencies, academic institutions, and Non-Governmental Organizations to develop the EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas), an online national Decision Support Tool that allows users to view and analyze the geographical description of the supply and demand for ecosystem services, as well as the drivers of change. As part of the EnviroAtlas, an approach has been developed that uses deductive habitat models for all terrestrial vertebrates of the conterminous United States and clusters them into biodiversity metrics that relate to ecosystem service-relevant categories. Metrics, such as species and taxon richness, have been developed and integrated with other measures of biodiversity. Collectively, these metrics provide a consistent scalable process from which to make geographic comparisons, provide thematic assessments, and to monitor status and trends in biodiversity. The national biodiversity component operates across approximatel

  14. Sampling supraglacial debris thickness using terrestrial photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Lindsey; Mertes, Jordan

    2017-04-01

    The melt rate of debris-covered ice differs to that of clean ice primarily as a function of debris thickness. The spatial distribution of supraglacial debris thickness must therefore be known in order to understand how it is likely to impact glacier behaviour, and meltwater contribution to local hydrological resources and global sea level rise. However, practical means of determining debris cover thickness remain elusive. In this study we explore the utility of terrestrial photogrammetry to produce high resolution, scaled and texturized digital terrain models of debris cover exposures above ice cliffs as a means of quantifying and characterizing debris thickness. Two Nikon D5000 DSLRs with Tamron 100mm lenses were used to photograph a sample area of the Ngozumpa glacier in the Khumbu Himal of Nepal in April 2016. A Structure from Motion workflow using Agisoft Photoscan software was used to generate a surface models with manual point measurements along the same clifftops. We conclude that sufficiently high resolution photogrammetry, with precise scaling information, provides a useful means to determine debris thickness at clifftop exposures. The resolution of the possible measurements depends on image resolution, the accuracy of the ground control points and the computational capacity to generate centimetre scale surface models. Application of such techniques to sufficiently high resolution imagery from UAV-borne cameras may offer a powerful means of determining debris thickness distribution patterns over debris covered glacier termini.

  15. [The value of Ranson and APACHE II scoring systems, and serum levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in the early diagnosis of the severity of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürleyik, Günay; Zahidullahoğlu Cirpici, Oya; Aktekin, Ali; Sağlam, Abdullah

    2004-04-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of scoring systems, acute inflammation and acute phase responses in the early diagnosis of the severity of acute pancreatitis. In a prospective design, we determined Ranson and APACHE II scores, and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in 30 patients (21 females, 9 males; mean age 56 years; range 28 to 82 years) with acute pancreatitis. The patients were divided into two groups as mild and severe pancreatitis according to the clinical, biochemical, and computed tomography findings. Ranson and APACHE II scores were determined after 48 hours, IL-6 levels within 24 hours, and CRP levels after 24, 48, and 72 hours of admission. Ranson scores of 4 or above, APACHE II scores of 8 or above, baseline serum IL-6 and CRP levels of 50 pg/ml and 150 mg/L, respectively, were regarded as strong predictors of acute pancreatitis. Severe pancreatitis was diagnosed in six patients (20%), one of whom died due to multiple organ failure. Biliary symptoms were the most common presenting signs in both groups. The mean Ranson (p=0.004) and APACHE II (p=0.001) scores, serum IL-6 (p=0.001) and CRP levels at 24, 48, and 72 hours (p=0.02) were significantly high in patients with severe pancreatitis. The sensitivity was found as 66.6%, 83.3%, 100%, and 83.3%; the specificity as 87.5%, 91.7%, 87.5% and 71%; and the accuracy as 83.3%, 90%, 90%, and 73.3% for Ranson and APACHE II scores, IL-6 and CRP levels, respectively. Ranson and APACHE II scores, CRP and, in particular, serum IL-6 levels are strong predictors of severe pancreatitis.

  16. The Virtual Solar-Terrestrial Observatory; access to and use of diverse solar and solar- terrestrial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, P.; McGuinness, D.; Cinquini, L.; West, P.; Garcia, J.; Zednik, S.; Benedict, J.

    2008-05-01

    This presentation will demonstrate how users and other data providers can utilize the Virtual Solar-Terrestrial Observatory (VSTO) to find, access and use diverse data holdings from the disciplines of solar, solar-terrestrial and space physics. VSTO provides a web portal, web services and a native applications programming interface for various levels of users. Since these access methods are based on semantic web technologies and refer to the VSTO ontology, users also have the option of taking advantage of value added services when accessing and using the data. We present example of both conventional use of VSTO as well as the advanced semantics use. Finally, we present our future directions for VSTO and semantic data frameworks in general.

  17. The measuring of real state of the residential complex Vlčince II in Žilina by using of TLS technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Pukanská

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Construction of blocks of flats Vlčince II in Žilina, realized by the building company Doprastav a.s., consists from two blocksA and B. For measuring of real status construction was used terrestrial laser scanner Leica ScanStation. Processing of measured datawas applicated in software Cyclone Scan, Register and Cloudworx for Microstation. Through measured objects was created horizontalsections in more high levels. Founded deviations are presented in attached tables.

  18. The implications of the discovery of extra-terrestrial life for religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ted

    2011-02-13

    This paper asks about the future of religion: (i) Will confirmation of extra-terrestrial intelligence (ETI) cause terrestrial religion to collapse? 'No' is the answer based upon a summary of the 'Peters ETI Religious Crisis Survey'. Then the paper examines four specific challenges to traditional doctrinal belief likely to be raised at the detection of ETI: (ii) What is the scope of God's creation? (iii) What can we expect regarding the moral character of ETI? (iv) Is one earthly incarnation in Jesus Christ enough for the entire cosmos, or should we expect multiple incarnations on multiple planets? (v) Will contact with more advanced ETI diminish human dignity? More than probable contact with extra-terrestrial intelligence will expand the Bible's vision so that all of creation--including the 13.7 billion year history of the universe replete with all of God's creatures--will be seen as the gift of a loving and gracious God.

  19. Terrestrial radiation level in selected asphalt plants in Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An environmental radiation survey in asphalt processing plants in Rivers State was been carried out using a well calibrated Radalert survey meter. Measurements were carried out in four different locations of asphalt processing plants at different strategic points. Measured average values of 0.0223 ± 0.0017 mR/hr, 0.0225 ...

  20. Volcanism and soil mercury on Mars - Consequences for terrestrial microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, B. Z.; Siegel, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    An earth-Mars depletion formula proposed by Anders and Owen for volatiles is used to calculate a range of putative Hg levels for Martian volcanic soils based upon analyzed samples from Hawaii. The range is about 50-150 microgram per kg. When applied either in conventional or special media (e.g., basalt powder), these levels of Hg are effective inhibitors of the growth of earth microorganisms. Taken together with other hostile chemical and physical factors, volcanic toxicants would appear to provide a further deterrent to the accidental establishment of terrestrial microbiota on Mars.

  1. Simultaneous trace-levels determination of Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions in various samples using a modified carbon paste electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a new synthesized Schiff base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afkhami, Abbas, E-mail: afkhami@basu.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Hasan [Department of Chemistry, Takestan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Takestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshsafar, Hosein [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabatabaee, Masoumeh [Department of Chemistry, Yazd Branch, Islamic Azad University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirzadmehr, Ali [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new chemically modified carbon paste electrode was constructed and used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new Schiff base and multi-walled carbon nanotube was used as a modifier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrochemical properties of the modified electrode were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrode was used to the simultaneous determination of Pb{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+}. - Abstract: A modified carbon paste electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and 3-(4-methoxybenzylideneamino)-2-thioxothiazolodin-4-one as a new synthesized Schiff base was constructed for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of Hg(II) and Pb(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The modified electrode showed an excellent selectivity and stability for Hg(II) and Pb(II) determinations and for accelerated electron transfer between the electrode and the analytes. The electrochemical properties and applications of the modified electrode were studied. Operational parameters such as pH, deposition potential and deposition time were optimized for the purpose of determination of traces of metal ions at pH 3.0. Under optimal conditions the limits of detection, based on three times the background noise, were 9.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} {mu}mol L{sup -1} for Hg(II) and Pb(II) with a 90 s preconcentration, respectively. In addition, the modified electrode displayed a good reproducibility and selectivity, making it suitable for the simultaneous determination of Hg(II) and Pb(II) in real samples such as sea water, waste water, tobacco, marine and human teeth samples.

  2. High-level expression, refolding and probing the natural fold of the human voltage-dependent anion channel isoforms I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Harald; Meins, Thomas; Poynor, Melissa; Adams, Volker; Nussberger, Stephan; Welte, Wolfram; Zeth, Kornelius

    2007-04-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the major protein found in the outer membrane of mitochondria. The channel is responsible for the exchange of ATP/ADP and the translocation of ions and other small metabolites over the membrane. In order to obtain large amounts of pure and suitably folded human VDAC for functional and structural studies, the genes of the human isoforms I and II (HVDAC1 and HVDAC2) were cloned in Escherichia coli. High-level expression led to inclusion body formation. Both proteins could be refolded in vitro by adding denatured protein to a solution of zwitterionic or nonionic detergents. A highly efficient and fast protocol for refolding was developed that yielded more than 50 mg of pure human VDACs per liter of cell culture. The native and functional state of the refolded porins was probed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to determine the secondary structure composition and by electrophysiological measurements, demonstrating the pore-forming activity of HVDAC1. Furthermore, binding of HVDAC1 to immobilized ATP was demonstrated. Limited proteolysis of HVDAC1 protein embedded in detergent micelles in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometric analysis was applied to identify micelle-exposed regions of the protein and to develop an improved topology model. Our analysis strongly suggests a 16-stranded, antiparallel beta-barrel with one large and seven short loops and turns. Initial crystallization trials of the protein yielded crystals diffracting to 8 Angstrom resolution.

  3. A First-Level Muon Trigger Based on the ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Chambers With High Momentum Resolution for LHC Phase II

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, R; The ATLAS collaboration; Ott, S; Kortner, O; Fras, M; Gabrielyan, V; Danielyan, V; Fink, D; Nowak, S; Schwegler, P; Abovyan, S

    2014-01-01

    The Level-1 (L1) trigger for muons with high transverse momentum (pT) in ATLAS is based on chambers with excellent time resolution, able to identify muons coming from a particular beam crossing. These trigger chambers also provide a fast pT-measurement of the muons, the accuracy of the measurement being limited by the moderate spatial resolution of the chambers along the deflecting direction of the magnetic field (eta-coordinate). The higher luminosity foreseen for Phase-II puts stringent limits on the L1 trigger rates, and a way to control these rates would be to improve the spatial resolution of the triggering system, drastically sharpening the turn-on curve of the L1 trigger. To do this, the precision tracking chambers (MDT) can be used in the L1 trigger, provided the corresponding trigger latency is increased as foreseen. The trigger rate reduction is accomplished by strongly decreasing the rate of triggers from muons with pT lower than a predefined threshold (typically 20 GeV), which would otherwise trig...

  4. Differences in strength and conditioning coach self-perception of leadership style behaviors at the National Basketball Association, Division I-A, and Division II levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusen, Marshall J

    2010-06-01

    Leader behaviors have been found to vary by competitive level (6,9,11,26). Similar differences based on the competitive environment have been reported with strength coaches and their training emphases (15,28) but not their leadership style behaviors. This latter area is important to explore because strength coach leader behaviors may result in enhanced cooperation, improved communication, and improved athlete psychological and emotional well-being (14,23,25,27). Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to examine the differences in self-perceived leadership styles of National Basketball Association, Division I-A (DI-A) men's basketball, and Division II (DII) men's basketball strength and conditioning coaches. The self-perceived leadership styles of 145 men's basketball strength coaches (National Basketball Association [NBA]=22, DI-A=92, and DII=31) were obtained using the Revised Leadership Scale for Sport (26,41). Frequency data about demographics and training methods were also collected. No significant differences were reported for positive feedback. Otherwise, NBA strength coaches reported more democratic leadership style behaviors than DI-A strength coaches. Division I-A strength coaches were found to be more autocratic than NBA or DII strength coaches. Both NBA and DI-A strength coaches indicated a higher level of training and instruction than did DII strength coaches. National Basketball Association strength coaches also reported engaging in more situational and socially supportive leader behaviors than DI-A and DII strength coaches. Leader behaviors can positively and negatively impact an athlete (23); thus, strength coaches need to evaluate their competitive environment and reflect on the impact of their behaviors and how their approach to leading athletes may need to vary based on the situation.

  5. Microplastics in the terrestrial ecosystem: Implications for Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza; Gertsen, H.F.; Gooren, H.; Peters, P.D.; Salanki, T.E.; Ploeg, van der M.J.C.; Besseling, E.; Koelmans, A.A.; Geissen, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plastic debris is widespread in the environment, but information on the effects of microplastics on terrestrial fauna is completely lacking. Here, we studied the survival and fitness of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) exposed to microplastics (Polyethylene, <150 μm)

  6. Numerical simulations for terrestrial planets formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji J.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the formation of terrestrial planets in the late stage of planetary formation using two-planet model. At that time, the protostar has formed for about 3 Myr and the gas disk has dissipated. In the model, the perturbations from Jupiter and Saturn are considered. We also consider variations of the mass of outer planet, and the initial eccentricities and inclinations of embryos and planetesimals. Our results show that, terrestrial planets are formed in 50 Myr, and the accretion rate is about 60%–80%. In each simulation, 3–4 terrestrial planets are formed inside “Jupiter” with masses of 0.15–3.6 M⊕. In the 0.5–4 AU, when the eccentricities of planetesimals are excited, planetesimals are able to accrete material from wide radial direction. The plenty of water material of the terrestrial planet in the Habitable Zone may be transferred from the farther places by this mechanism. Accretion may also happen a few times between two giant planets only if the outer planet has a moderate mass and the small terrestrial planet could survive at some resonances over time scale of 108 yr.

  7. Predictability of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiqi; Keenan, Trevor F; Smith, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems sequester roughly 30% of anthropogenic carbon emission. However this estimate has not been directly deduced from studies of terrestrial ecosystems themselves, but inferred from atmospheric and oceanic data. This raises a question: to what extent is the terrestrial carbon cycle intrinsically predictable? In this paper, we investigated fundamental properties of the terrestrial carbon cycle, examined its intrinsic predictability, and proposed a suite of future research directions to improve empirical understanding and model predictive ability. Specifically, we isolated endogenous internal processes of the terrestrial carbon cycle from exogenous forcing variables. The internal processes share five fundamental properties (i.e., compartmentalization, carbon input through photosynthesis, partitioning among pools, donor pool-dominant transfers, and the first-order decay) among all types of ecosystems on the Earth. The five properties together result in an emergent constraint on predictability of various carbon cycle components in response to five classes of exogenous forcing. Future observational and experimental research should be focused on those less predictive components while modeling research needs to improve model predictive ability for those highly predictive components. We argue that an understanding of predictability should provide guidance on future observational, experimental and modeling research. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Phytolith carbon sequestration in global terrestrial biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhaoliang; Liu, Hongyan; Strömberg, Caroline A E; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2017-12-15

    Terrestrial biogeochemical carbon (C) sequestration is coupled with the biogeochemical silicon (Si) cycle through mechanisms such as phytolith C sequestration, but the size and distribution of the phytolith C sink remain unclear. Here, we estimate phytolith C sequestration in global terrestrial biomes. We used biome data including productivity, phytolith and silica contents, and the phytolith stability factor to preliminarily determine the size and distribution of the phytolith C sink in global terrestrial biomes. Total phytolith C sequestration in global terrestrial biomes is 156.7±91.6TgCO2yr-1. Grassland (40%), cropland (35%), and forest (20%) biomes are the dominant producers of phytolith-based carbon; geographically, the main contributors are Asia (31%), Africa (24%), and South America (17%). Practices such as bamboo afforestation/reforestation and grassland recovery for economic and ecological purposes could theoretically double the above phytolith C sink. The potential terrestrial phytolith C sequestration during 2000-2099 under such practices would be 15.7-40.5PgCO2, equivalent in magnitude to the C sequestration of oceanic diatoms in sediments and through silicate weathering. Phytolith C sequestration contributes vitally to the global C cycle, hence, it is essential to incorporate plant-soil silica cycling in biogeochemical C cycle models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Extraterrestrial and terrestrial outdoor applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Junior, P.A. de

    2004-07-01

    Chapter 2 describes basic concepts of {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy, as well as some effects that can be investigated by this technique. The portable and miniaturized Moessbauer spectrometer (MIMOS II), developed by the group in Main z lead by Dr. Goestar Klingelhoefer, is presented in detail in chapter 3. The calibration procedures, functionality, and operational features are also presented. The analysis of a Moessbauer spectrum is described in detail in chapter 4. In this chapter the proposed analysis using genetic algorithms, fuzzy set theory, and artificial neural networks are discussed and some examples are demonstrated. The motivation of this development is to make a data analysis package available for fast fitting of the Moessbauer spectrum, and precise identification of minerals from Moessbauer parameters. In chapter 5 some outdoor terrestrial applications of MIMOS II are proposed. The chapter starts presenting the use of MIMOS II for in situ air pollution investigation in Vitoria, ES, Brazil. The instrument was adapted for the characterization of airborne particles in an industrial urban area. This chapter contains surface analysis of painted figures on ancient pottery, of fragments of Chinese wall paintings, and of a 'miniature' from the fifteenth century; and the characterization of a Celtic helmet knob to determine whether it was burned in sacrifices. The authenticity of fragments of a Roman mask is verified with the Moessbauer spectrum obtained with MIMOS II. The characterization of corrosion products in archaeological artifacts is also reported. For this characterization it was necessary to supplement data from X-ray diffraction and SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device). Chapter 6 is devoted to extraterrestrial applications, starting with the results on Moessbauer characterization of some meteorites. Detailed discussion of data obtained by MIMOS II onboard of the rover Spirit at the Mars surface and comparison of

  10. USAF advanced terrestrial energy study. Volume 2: Technology handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, E. J.; Yudow, B. D.; Donakowski, T. D.

    1983-04-01

    This report presents the results of the USAF Advanced Terrestrial Energy Study. The objective of that study was to develop a data base of key parameters of selected energy conversion and energy storage technologies. The data base includes present and expected (through 2000) performance goals of the systems. The data base was established through an extensive literature search, surveys of manufacturers and researchers, and statistical and qualitative analyses of the available input data. The results of the study are reported in four documents: (1) Project Summary; (2) Technology Handbook; (3) Parameter Survey; (4) Analysis, Data, Bibliography. Contents (Volume II): Diesels, Gas Turbines, Stirlings, Organic Rankine Cycle, Fuel Cells, Photovoltaic Energy Conversion System, Wind Turbines, Batteries, Thermal Energy Storage System.

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor- α Agonist Slows the Progression of Hypertension, Attenuates Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Renal Inflammatory Markers in Angiotensin II Infused Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Justin L.; Duan, Rong; El-Marakby, Ahmed; Alhashim, Abdulmohsin; Lee, Dexter L.

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR- α plays an important role in attenuating hypertension. The current study determines the anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory role of PPAR- α agonist during a slow-pressor dose of Ang II (400 ng/kg/min). Ten to twelve week old male PPAR- α KO mice and their WT controls were implanted with telemetry devices and infused with Ang II for 12 days. On day 12 of Ang II infusion, MAP was elevated in PPAR- α KO mice compared to WT (161 ± 4 mmHg versus 145 ± ...

  12. Biological control of the terrestrial carbon sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.-D. Schulze

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This lecture reviews the past (since 1964 when the International Biological Program began and the future of our understanding of terrestrial carbon fluxes with focus on photosynthesis, respiration, primary-, ecosystem-, and biome-productivity. Photosynthetic capacity is related to the nitrogen concentration of leaves, but the capacity is only rarely reached under field conditions. Average rates of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance are closely correlated and operate near 50% of their maximal rate, with light being the limiting factor in humid regions and air humidity and soil water the limiting factor in arid climates. Leaf area is the main factor to extrapolate from leaves to canopies, with maximum surface conductance being dependent on leaf level stomatal conductance. Additionally, gas exchange depends also on rooting depth which determines the water and nutrient availability and on mycorrhizae which regulate the nutrient status. An important anthropogenic disturbance is the nitrogen uptake from air pollutants, which is not balanced by cation uptake from roots and this may lead to damage and breakdown of the plant cover. Photosynthesis is the main carbon input into ecosystems, but it alone does not represent the ecosystem carbon balance, which is determined by respiration of various kinds. Plant respiration and photosynthesis determine growth (net primary production and microbial respiration balances the net ecosystem flux. In a spruce forest, 30% of the assimilatory carbon gain is used for respiration of needles, 20% is used for respiration in stems. Soil respiration is about 50% the carbon gain, half of which is root respiration, half is microbial respiration. In addition, disturbances lead to carbon losses, where fire, harvest and grazing bypass the chain of respiration. In total, the carbon balance at the biome level is only about 1% of the photosynthetic carbon input, or may indeed become negative. The recent observed increase in

  13. Biological control of the terrestrial carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, E.-D.

    2006-03-01

    This lecture reviews the past (since 1964 when the International Biological Program began) and the future of our understanding of terrestrial carbon fluxes with focus on photosynthesis, respiration, primary-, ecosystem-, and biome-productivity. Photosynthetic capacity is related to the nitrogen concentration of leaves, but the capacity is only rarely reached under field conditions. Average rates of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance are closely correlated and operate near 50% of their maximal rate, with light being the limiting factor in humid regions and air humidity and soil water the limiting factor in arid climates. Leaf area is the main factor to extrapolate from leaves to canopies, with maximum surface conductance being dependent on leaf level stomatal conductance. Additionally, gas exchange depends also on rooting depth which determines the water and nutrient availability and on mycorrhizae which regulate the nutrient status. An important anthropogenic disturbance is the nitrogen uptake from air pollutants, which is not balanced by cation uptake from roots and this may lead to damage and breakdown of the plant cover. Photosynthesis is the main carbon input into ecosystems, but it alone does not represent the ecosystem carbon balance, which is determined by respiration of various kinds. Plant respiration and photosynthesis determine growth (net primary production) and microbial respiration balances the net ecosystem flux. In a spruce forest, 30% of the assimilatory carbon gain is used for respiration of needles, 20% is used for respiration in stems. Soil respiration is about 50% the carbon gain, half of which is root respiration, half is microbial respiration. In addition, disturbances lead to carbon losses, where fire, harvest and grazing bypass the chain of respiration. In total, the carbon balance at the biome level is only about 1% of the photosynthetic carbon input, or may indeed become negative. The recent observed increase in plant growth has

  14. Biogeochemical cycling at the aquatic-terrestrial interface is linked to parafluvial hyporheic zone inundation history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Amy E.; Graham, Emily B.; Crump, Alex R.; Kennedy, David W.; Romero, Elvira B.; Anderson, Carolyn G.; Dana, Karl L.; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Stegen, James C.

    2017-09-01

    The parafluvial hyporheic zone combines the heightened biogeochemical and microbial interactions indicative of a hyporheic region with direct atmospheric/terrestrial inputs and the effects of wet-dry cycles. Therefore, understanding biogeochemical cycling and microbial interactions in this ecotone is fundamental to understanding biogeochemical cycling at the aquatic-terrestrial interface and to creating robust hydrobiogeochemical models of dynamic river corridors. We aimed to (i) characterize biogeochemical and microbial differences in the parafluvial hyporheic zone across a small spatial domain (6 lateral meters) that spans a breadth of inundation histories and (ii) examine how parafluvial hyporheic sediments respond to laboratory-simulated re-inundation. Surface sediment was collected at four elevations along transects perpendicular to flow of the Columbia River, eastern WA, USA. The sediments were inundated by the river 0, 13, 127, and 398 days prior to sampling. Spatial variation in environmental variables (organic matter, moisture, nitrate, glucose, % C, % N) and microbial communities (16S and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rRNA gene sequencing, qPCR) were driven by differences in inundation history. Microbial respiration did not differ significantly across inundation histories prior to forced inundation in laboratory incubations. Forced inundation suppressed microbial respiration across all histories, but the degree of suppression was dramatically different between the sediments saturated and unsaturated at the time of sample collection, indicating a binary threshold response to re-inundation. We present a conceptual model in which irregular hydrologic fluctuations facilitate microbial communities adapted to local conditions and a relatively high flux of CO2. Upon rewetting, microbial communities are initially suppressed metabolically, which results in lower CO2 flux rates primarily due to suppression of fungal respiration. Following prolonged inundation

  15. Biogeochemical cycling at the aquatic–terrestrial interface is linked to parafluvial hyporheic zone inundation history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Goldman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The parafluvial hyporheic zone combines the heightened biogeochemical and microbial interactions indicative of a hyporheic region with direct atmospheric/terrestrial inputs and the effects of wet–dry cycles. Therefore, understanding biogeochemical cycling and microbial interactions in this ecotone is fundamental to understanding biogeochemical cycling at the aquatic–terrestrial interface and to creating robust hydrobiogeochemical models of dynamic river corridors. We aimed to (i characterize biogeochemical and microbial differences in the parafluvial hyporheic zone across a small spatial domain (6 lateral meters that spans a breadth of inundation histories and (ii examine how parafluvial hyporheic sediments respond to laboratory-simulated re-inundation. Surface sediment was collected at four elevations along transects perpendicular to flow of the Columbia River, eastern WA, USA. The sediments were inundated by the river 0, 13, 127, and 398 days prior to sampling. Spatial variation in environmental variables (organic matter, moisture, nitrate, glucose,  % C,  % N and microbial communities (16S and internal transcribed spacer (ITS rRNA gene sequencing, qPCR were driven by differences in inundation history. Microbial respiration did not differ significantly across inundation histories prior to forced inundation in laboratory incubations. Forced inundation suppressed microbial respiration across all histories, but the degree of suppression was dramatically different between the sediments saturated and unsaturated at the time of sample collection, indicating a binary threshold response to re-inundation. We present a conceptual model in which irregular hydrologic fluctuations facilitate microbial communities adapted to local conditions and a relatively high flux of CO2. Upon rewetting, microbial communities are initially suppressed metabolically, which results in lower CO2 flux rates primarily due to suppression of fungal respiration

  16. Regional assimilation of CO2 and δ13C surface data to assess terrestrial biosphere models under drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, I. R.; Miller, J. B.; Alden, C. B.; Andrews, A. E.; Schaefer, K. M.; Peters, W.; Tans, P. P.; Vaughn, B. H.; White, J. W. C.

    2016-12-01

    Observed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and the ratios of its stable isotopologue 13CO2/12CO2 (δ13C) contain unique signals of large-scale drought stress that affect the biosphere. When plants experience physiological stress due to heat and drought at leaf level they respond by closing their stomata. This is a safety mechanism that prevents excessive water loss at the expense of carbon uptake, and it changes the overall water-use efficiency. During photosynthesis, 12CO2 is preferentially assimilated over 13CO2, leaving the atmosphere enriched in 13CO2. Water stress slightly changes the ratio of 13CO2 and 12CO2 molecules being removed from the atmosphere, i.e., a reduction of canopy isotope discrimination (Δ), and its changes are evident in atmospheric δ13C.To improve our understanding of the coupled vegetation-atmosphere system we are developing an ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of high precision measurements of CO2 and δ13C from air samples collected over North America. It uses footprints provided by WRF-STILT that allows for efficient atmospheric transport simulations on a much higher horizontal resolution than with a global Eulerian transport model. To force consistency with atmospheric CO2 and δ13C observations we will optimize regional net terrestrial CO2 exchange (NEE) and Δ from a terrestrial biosphere model. We will carefully evaluate the sensitivity of the optimized parameters to uncertainties in the terrestrial biosphere fluxes, observations, time/space aggregation methods, and boundary conditions. Our main questions are: (i) what signal-to-noise in the data, as interpreted by the model, is large enough to robustly estimate Δ and NEE? and (ii) how do the optimized NEE and Δ that are based on the atmospheric constraint compare with the predicted NEE and Δ that are based on biophysical parameterizations? Our ability to accurately predict the responses of the terrestrial biosphere to changing humidity and soil moisture regimes is currently

  17. Effect of magnesium treatment and glucose levels on delayed cerebral ischemia in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage : a substudy of the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage trial (MASH-II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijenaar, Jolien F.; Mees, Sanne M. Dorhout; Algra, Ale; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundMagnesium treatment did not improve outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage II trial. We hypothesized that high glucose levels may have offset a potential beneficial effect to prevent delayed cerebral ischemia. We

  18. Terrestrial propagation of long electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Galejs, Janis; Fock, V A

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial Propagation of Long Electromagnetic Waves deals with the propagation of long electromagnetic waves confined principally to the shell between the earth and the ionosphere, known as the terrestrial waveguide. The discussion is limited to steady-state solutions in a waveguide that is uniform in the direction of propagation. Wave propagation is characterized almost exclusively by mode theory. The mathematics are developed only for sources at the ground surface or within the waveguide, including artificial sources as well as lightning discharges. This volume is comprised of nine chapte

  19. Angiotensin 1-7 receptor and angiotensin ii receptor 2 blockades prevent the increased serum and kidney nitric oxide levels in response to angiotensin ii administration: Gender-related difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Safari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The renal vasculature of male rats may provide more response to Ang II administration-induced NO, which is dependent on masR and AT2R. During dual masR + AT2R blockades, the kidney NO formation wasreduced in a non-gender related manner.

  20. Terrestrial chemical cues help coral reef fish larvae locate settlement habitat surrounding islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, Danielle L; Jones, Geoffrey P; Munday, Philip L; Pratchett, Morgan S; Srinivasan, Maya; Planes, Serge; Thorrold, Simon R

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the degree of connectivity between coastal and island landscapes and nearby coral reefs is vital to the integrated management of terrestrial and marine environments in the tropics. Coral reef fish are capable of navigating appropriate settlement habitats following their pelagic larval phase, but the mechanisms by which they do this are unclear. The importance of olfactory cues in settlement site selection has been demonstrated, and there is increasing evidence that chemical cues from terrestrial sources may be important for some species. Here, we test the olfactory preferences of eight island-associated coral reef fish recruits and one generalist species to discern the capacity for terrestrial cue recognition that may aid in settlement site selection. A series of pairwise choice experiments were used to evaluate the potential role that terrestrial, water-borne olfactory cues play in island-reef recognition. Olfactory stimuli tested included near-shore water, terrestrial rainforest leaf litter, and olfactory cues collected from different reef types (reefs surrounding vegetated islands, and reefs with no islands present). All eight island-associated species demonstrated high levels of olfactory discrimination and responded positively toward olfactory cues indicating the presence of a vegetated island. We hypothesize that although these fish use a suite of cues for settlement site recognition, one mechanism in locating their island/reef habitat is through the olfactory cues produced by vegetated islands. This research highlights the role terrestrial olfactory cues play in large-scale settlement site selection and suggests a high degree of ecosystem connectivity.

  1. Energy-Efficient Optimal Power Allocation in Integrated Wireless Sensor and Cognitive Satellite Terrestrial Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shengchao; Li, Guangxia; An, Kang; Gao, Bin; Zheng, Gan

    2017-09-04

    This paper proposes novel satellite-based wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which integrate the WSN with the cognitive satellite terrestrial network. Having the ability to provide seamless network access and alleviate the spectrum scarcity, cognitive satellite terrestrial networks are considered as a promising candidate for future wireless networks with emerging requirements of ubiquitous broadband applications and increasing demand for spectral resources. With the emerging environmental and energy cost concerns in communication systems, explicit concerns on energy efficient resource allocation in satellite networks have also recently received considerable attention. In this regard, this paper proposes energy-efficient optimal power allocation schemes in the cognitive satellite terrestrial networks for non-real-time and real-time applications, respectively, which maximize the energy efficiency (EE) of the cognitive satellite user while guaranteeing the interference at the primary terrestrial user below an acceptable level. Specifically, average interference power (AIP) constraint is employed to protect the communication quality of the primary terrestrial user while average transmit power (ATP) or peak transmit power (PTP) constraint is adopted to regulate the transmit power of the satellite user. Since the energy-efficient power allocation optimization problem belongs to the nonlinear concave fractional programming problem, we solve it by combining Dinkelbach's method with Lagrange duality method. Simulation results demonstrate that the fading severity of the terrestrial interference link is favorable to the satellite user who can achieve EE gain under the ATP constraint comparing to the PTP constraint.

  2. Synthesis of volumetric ring antenna array for terrestrial coverage pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Alberto; Panduro, Marco A; Del Rio Bocio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction.

  3. Synthesis of Volumetric Ring Antenna Array for Terrestrial Coverage Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Reyna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction.

  4. Nitrogen-induced terrestrial eutrophication: cascading effects and impacts on ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher M. Clark; Michael D. Bell; James W. Boyd; Jana E. Compton; Eric A. Davidson; Christine Davis; Mark E. Fenn; Linda Geiser; Laurence Jones; Tamara F. Blett

    2017-01-01

    Human activity has significantly increased the deposition of nitrogen (N) on terrestrial ecosystems over pre-industrial levels leading to a multitude of effects including losses of biodiversity, changes in ecosystem functioning, and impacts on human well-being. It is challenging to explicitly link the level of deposition on an ecosystem to the cascade of...

  5. Determination of heavy metals at sub-ppm levels in seawater and dialysis solutions by FAAS after tetrakis(pyridine)-nickel(II)bis(thiocyanate) coprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Uğur; Kartal, Senol; Ulgen, Ahmet

    2008-06-01

    A coprecipitation method has been developed for the determination of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in aqueous samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) with the combination of pyridine, nickel(II) as a carrier element and potassium thiocyanate as an auxiliary complexing agent. The obtained coprecipitates were dissolved with nitric acid and measured by FAAS. The coprecipitation conditions, such as the effect of the pH, amounts of nickel, pyridine and potassium thiocyanate, sample volume, and the standing time of the precipitate formation were examined in detail. It was found that the metal ions studied were quantitatively coprecipitated with tetrakis(pyridine)-nickel(II)bis(thiocyanate) precipitate (TP-Ni-BT) in the pH range of 9.0 - 10.5. The reliability of the results was evaluated by recovery tests, using synthetic seawater solutions spiked with the analyte metal ions. The obtained recoveries ranged from 96 to 101% for all of the metal ions investigated. The proposed method was validated by analyses of two certified reference materials (NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and HPS Certified Waste Water Trace Metals Lot #D532205). It was also successfully applied to seawater and dialysis solution samples. The detection limits (n = 25, 3s) were in the range of 0.01-2.44 microg l(-1) for the studied elements and the relative standard deviations were < or =6%, which indicated that this method could fully satisfy the requirements for analysis of such samples as seawater and dialysis solution having high salt contents.

  6. Invasive European bird cherry disrupts stream-riparian linkages: effects on terrestrial invertebrate prey subsidies for juvenile coho salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roon, David A.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Wurtz, Tricia L.; Blanchard, Arny L.

    2016-01-01

    The spread of invasive species in riparian forests has the potential to affect both terrestrial and aquatic organisms linked through cross-ecosystem resource subsidies. However, this potential had not been explored in regards to terrestrial prey subsidies for stream fishes. To address this, we examined the effects of an invasive riparian tree, European bird cherry (EBC, Prunus padus), spreading along urban Alaskan salmon streams, by collecting terrestrial invertebrates present on the foliage of riparian trees, their subsidies to streams, and their consumption by juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Riparian EBC supported four to six times less terrestrial invertebrate biomass on its foliage and contributed two to three times lower subsidies relative to native deciduous trees. This reduction in terrestrial invertebrate biomass was consistent between two watersheds over 2 years. In spite of this reduction in terrestrial prey resource input, juvenile coho salmon consumed similar levels of terrestrial invertebrates in stream reaches bordered by EBC. Although we did not see ecological effects extending to stream salmonids, reduced terrestrial prey subsidies to streams are likely to have negative consequences as EBC continues to spread.

  7. Effect of Gu Tong Xian capsule on expression level of type I, II collagen and BMP-2 mRNA in rabbits with fracture during long-distance running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to analyze and investigate the effects of Gu Tong Xian Capsule on the expression level of type I, II collagen and BMP-2 mRNA in rabbits with fracture during long-distance running. 60 adult healthy rabbits were selected as research objects, and then randomly divided into three groups including model group, positive control group and treatment group, each containing 20 rabbits. The three groups were treated with saline gastric lavage, powder for fracture and trauma, and Gu Tong Xian capsule, respectively. The rabbits of the three groups were respectively sacrificed at 1st week, 2nd weeks and 4th week after operation for sample collection. After that, the expression levels of bone collagen type I, II and BMP-2 of three groups were measured and compared with each other. At all stages, the transcriptional level of type I collagen mRNA in the treatment group were significantly higher than that in the positive control group and model group (p < 0.05; Transcriptional level of type II collagen mRNA in the treatment group increased significantly in the first week, then gradually declined in the 2nd and 4th week, with significantly difference to the model group and the positive control group (p < 0.05. In addition, the transcriptional level of bone morphogenetic protein BMP-2 mRNA at fracture site of the treatment group was higher than that of model group and positive control group (p < 0.05. Gu Tong Xian Capsule can significantly promote fracture healing of experiment rabbits and reduce fracture healing time. Moreover, it can well regulate the expression levels of type I, II collagen and transcriptional level ofBMP-2 mRNA in experiment rabbits with fracture.

  8. Evidence for Prohypertensive, Proinflammatory Effect of Interleukin-10 During Chronic High Salt Intake in the Condition of Elevated Angiotensin II Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Purnima; Castillo, Alexander; Islam, M Toriqul; Majid, Dewan S A

    2017-10-01

    IL-10 (interleukin-10) has been suggested to play a protective role in angiotensin II (AngII)-induced cardiovascular disorders. This study examined the role of endogenous IL-10 in salt-sensitive hypertension and renal injury induced by AngII. Responses to chronic AngII (400 ng/min per kilogram body weight; osmotic minipump) infusion were evaluated in IL-10 gene knockout mice fed with either normal salt diet (0.3% NaCl) or high salt (HS; 4% NaCl) diet, and these responses were compared with those in wild-type mice. Normal salt diets or HS diets were given alone for the first 2 weeks and then with AngII treatment for an additional 2 weeks (n=6 in each group). Arterial pressure was continuously monitored by implanted radio-telemetry, and a 24-hour urine collection was performed by metabolic cages on the last day of the experimental period. Basal mean arterial pressure was lower in IL-10 gene knockout mice than in wild-type (98±3 versus 113±3 mm Hg) mice. Mean arterial pressure responses to normal salt/HS alone or to the AngII+normal salt treatment were similar in both strains. However, the increase in mean arterial pressure induced by the AngII+HS treatment was significantly lower in IL-10 gene knockout mice (15±5% versus 37±3%) compared with wild-type mice. Renal tissue endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression (≈3-folds) and urinary excretion of nitric oxide metabolites, nitrate/nitrite (1.2±0.1 versus 0.2±0.02 µmol/L/24 hours) were higher in IL-10 gene knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. These results indicate that an increase in nitric oxide production helps to mitigate salt-sensitive hypertension induced by AngII and suggest that a compensatory interaction between IL-10 and nitric oxide exists in modulating AngII-induced responses during HS intake. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. High efficiency, long life terrestrial solar panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.; Khemthong, S.; Ling, R.; Olah, S.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a high efficiency, long life terrestrial module was completed. It utilized 256 rectangular, high efficiency solar cells to achieve high packing density and electrical output. Tooling for the fabrication of solar cells was in house and evaluation of the cell performance was begun. Based on the power output analysis, the goal of a 13% efficiency module was achievable.

  10. Forest inventory with terrestrial LiDAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauwens, Sébastien; Bartholomeus, Harm; Calders, Kim; Lejeune, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The application of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in forest inventories is becoming more effective. Nevertheless, the occlusion effect is still limiting the processing efficiency to extract forest attributes. The use of a mobile laser scanner (MLS) would reduce this occlusion. In this

  11. Dental anomaly in Tapirus terrestris (L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijer, D.A.

    1961-01-01

    A male skull of Tapirus terrestris (L.) originating from Dutch Guiana (Leiden Museum, reg. no. 11632), received from the Rotterdam Zoological Garden through the kind intermediary of Mr. F. J. APPELMAN on July 15, 1952, is remarkable for the abnormal development of its right P1. The full permanent

  12. Strategies for monitoring terrestrial animals and habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Holthausen; Raymond L. Czaplewski; Don DeLorenzo; Greg Hayward; Winifred B. Kessler; Pat Manley; Kevin S. McKelvey; Douglas S. Powell; Leonard F. Ruggiero; Michael K. Schwartz; Bea Van Horne; Christina D. Vojta

    2005-01-01

    This General Technical Report (GTR) addresses monitoring strategies for terrestrial animals and habitats. It focuses on monitoring associated with National Forest Management Act planning and is intended to apply primarily to monitoring efforts that are broader than individual National Forests. Primary topics covered in the GTR are monitoring requirements; ongoing...

  13. Ethnopharmacological Studies of Tribulus Terrestris (Linn). in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synergism and antagonism impact of different plant metabolites present in crude fruit extract of Tribulus terrestris 'the herbal Viagra' have been studied. Variability in plant composition, biomass and metabolites concentration in different modules was significantly contributed by spatial factor. However the edhaphic ...

  14. Po-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial and freshwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjelsvik, Runhild; Brown, Justin (eds.) (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Holm, Elis (Univ. of Lund (Sweden)); Roos, Per (Risoe DTU (Denmark)); Saxen, Ritva; Outola, Iisa (STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    This report provides new information on Po-210 (and where appropriate its grandparent Pb-210) behaviour in environmental systems including humans. This has primarily been achieved through measurements of Po-210 in aquatic and terrestrial environments that has led to the derivation of information on the levels of this radioisotope in plants, animals and the biotic components of their habitat (i.e. water, soil) providing basic information on transfer where practicable. For freshwater environments, Po-210 concentration ratios derived for freshwater benthic fish and bivalve mollusc were substantially different to values collated from earlier review work. For terrestrial environments, activity concentrations of Po-210 in small mammals (although of a preliminary nature because no correction was made for ingrowth from Pb-210) were considerably higher than values derived from earlier data compilations. It was envisaged that data on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides would render underpinning data sets more comprehensive and would thus allow more robust background dose calculations to be performed subsequently. By way of example, unweighted background dose-rates arising from internal distributions of Po-210 were calculated for small mammals in the terrestrial study. The biokinetics of polonium in humans has been studied following chronic and acute oral intakes of selected Po radioisotopes. This work has provided information on gastrointestinal absorption factors and biological retention times thus improving the database upon which committed effective doses to humans are derived. The information generated in the report, in its entirety, should be of direct relevance for both human and non-human impact assessments. (au)

  15. Biogenic manganese oxides as reservoirs of organic carbon and proteins in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, E R; Andeer, P F; Nordlund, D; Wankel, S D; Hansel, C M

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides participate in a range of interactions with organic carbon (OC) that can lead to either carbon degradation or preservation. Here, we examine the abundance and composition of OC associated with biogenic and environmental Mn oxides to elucidate the role of Mn oxides as a reservoir for carbon and their potential for selective partitioning of particular carbon species. Mn oxides precipitated in natural brackish waters and by Mn(II)-oxidizing marine bacteria and terrestrial fungi harbor considerable levels of organic carbon (4.1-17.0 mol OC per kg mineral) compared to ferromanganese cave deposits which contain 1-2 orders of magnitude lower OC. Spectroscopic analyses indicate that the chemical composition of Mn oxide-associated OC from microbial cultures is homogeneous with bacterial Mn oxides hosting primarily proteinaceous carbon and fungal Mn oxides containing both protein- and lipopolysaccharide-like carbon. The bacterial Mn oxide-hosted proteins are involved in both Mn(II) oxidation and metal binding by these bacterial species and could be involved in the mineral nucleation process as well. By comparison, the composition of OC associated with Mn oxides formed in natural settings (brackish waters and particularly in cave ferromanganese rock coatings) is more spatially and chemically heterogeneous. Cave Mn oxide-associated organic material is enriched in aliphatic C, which together with the lower carbon concentrations, points to more extensive microbial or mineral processing of carbon in this system relative to the other systems examined in this study, and as would be expected in oligotrophic cave environments. This study highlights Mn oxides as a reservoir for carbon in varied environments. The presence and in some cases dominance of proteinaceous carbon within the biogenic and natural Mn oxides may contribute to preferential preservation of proteins in sediments and dominance of protein-dependent metabolisms in the subsurface biosphere.

  16. Anthropomorphism in the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence - The limits of cognition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlmann, Ulrike M.; Bürger, Moritz J. F.

    2018-02-01

    The question "Are we alone?" lingers in the human mind since ancient times. Early human civilisations populated the heavens above with a multitude of Gods endowed with some all too human characteristics - from their outer appearance to their innermost motivations. En passant they created thereby their own cultural founding myths on which they built their understanding of the world and its phenomena and deduced as well rules for the functioning of their own society. Advancing technology has enabled us to conduct this human quest for knowledge with more scientific means: optical and radio-wavelengths are being monitored for messages by an extra-terrestrial intelligence and active messaging attempts have also been undertaken. Scenarios have been developed for a possible detection of extra-terrestrial intelligence and post-detection guidelines and protocols have been elaborated. The human responses to the whole array of questions concerning the potential existence, discovery of and communication/interaction with an extra-terrestrial intelligence share as one clear thread a profound anthropomorphism, which ascribes classical human behavioural patterns also to an extra-terrestrial intelligence in much the same way as our ancestors attributed comparable conducts to mythological figures. This paper aims at pinpointing this thread in a number of classical reactions to basic questions related to the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence. Many of these reactions are based on human motives such as curiosity and fear, rationalised by experience and historical analogy and modelled in the Science Fiction Culture by literature and movies. Scrutinising the classical hypothetical explanations of the Fermi paradox under the angle of a potentially undue anthropomorphism, this paper intends to assist in understanding our human epistemological limitations in the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence. This attempt is structured into a series of questions: I. Can we be alone? II

  17. Some effects of pollutants in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, W.H.; McIntyre, A.D.; Mills, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    occur when persistent chemicals enter organisms that eliminate them poorly. However, loss of chemicals in the food chain must be more common than accumulation. The great concentration from water to aquatic organism is chiefly a physical phenomenon, not a food chain effect, but it affords high starting levels for these chains. Terrestrial food chains often start at a high level with heavily contaminated, struggling prey. Litter feeders are another important base. Vegetation may be contaminated enough to be dangerous to animals that eat it. Dermal and respiratory routes of intoxication occur in the wild, but the oral route is far more important at most times and places. The organisms that govern soil fertility and texture are affected more by cultivation than by pesticides. Above ground, growing knowledge of resistance, species differences, and biological controls is leading to integrated control, in which use of chemicals is limited and specific. We do not know what is happening to most nontarget invertebrates. Amphibians and reptiles may be killed by applications of insecticides, but are not highly sensitive and can carry large residues. Effects of these residues on reproduction are little known. Heavy kills of birds by pesticides still occur in the field. Fish-eating and bird-eating birds also undergo shell thinning and related reproductive troubles in many areas, sometimes to the point of population decline and local or regional extermination. DDE most often correlates with shell thinning in the wild and in experiments. No other known chemical approaches DDE in causing severe and lasting shell thinning. Herbivorous birds seem to be largely immune to this effect. It is uncertain how much dieldrin and PCBs contribute to embryotoxicity in carnivorous birds. Mammals may be killed by the more toxic pesticides, but some of the commonest small rodents are so resistant, and lose their residues so rapidly, that they are of little

  18. Pacific Remote Islands MNM: Initial Survey Instructions for Terrestrial Arthropods

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purposes of the terrestrial arthropod surveys are to: develop a species list of native and non-native terrestrial arthropods on land portions of the refuge;...

  19. 77 FR 18271 - Terrestrial Environmental Studies for Nuclear Power Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... COMMISSION Terrestrial Environmental Studies for Nuclear Power Stations AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 4.11, ``Terrestrial Environmental Studies for Nuclear Power Stations... environmental studies and analyses supporting licensing decisions for nuclear power reactors. ADDRESSES: Please...

  20. Louisiana ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for terrestrial mammals in Louisiana. Vector polygons in this data set represent terrestrial mammal...

  1. Extra-terrestrial construction processes - Advancements, opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sungwoo; Prabhu, Vibha Levin; Anand, Mahesh; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2017-10-01

    Government space agencies, including NASA and ESA, are conducting preliminary studies on building alternative space-habitat systems for deep-space exploration. Such studies include development of advanced technologies for planetary surface exploration, including an in-depth understanding of the use of local resources. Currently, NASA plans to land humans on Mars in the 2030s. Similarly, other space agencies from Europe (ESA), Canada (CSA), Russia (Roscosmos), India (ISRO), Japan (JAXA) and China (CNSA) have already initiated or announced their plans for launching a series of lunar missions over the next decade, ranging from orbiters, landers and rovers for extended stays on the lunar surface. As the Space Odyssey is one of humanity's oldest dreams, there has been a series of research works for establishing temporary or permanent settlement on other planetary bodies, including the Moon and Mars. This paper reviews current projects developing extra-terrestrial construction, broadly categorised as: (i) ISRU-based construction materials; (ii) fabrication methods; and (iii) construction processes. It also discusses four categories of challenges to developing an appropriate construction process: (i) lunar simulants; (ii) material fabrication and curing; (iii) microwave-sintering based fabrication; and (iv) fully autonomous and scaled-up construction processes.

  2. High levels of microRNA-21 in the stroma of colorectal cancers predict short disease-free survival in stage II colon cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jørgensen, Stine; Fog, Jacob Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    with disease-free survival was observed in the stage II rectal cancer group. In multivariate analysis both TB and TBR estimates were independent of other clinical parameters (age, gender, total leukocyte count, K-RAS mutational status and MSI). We conclude that miR-21 is primarily a stromal microRNA, which......Approximately 25% of all patients with stage II colorectal cancer will experience recurrent disease and subsequently die within 5 years. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is upregulated in several cancer types and has been associated with survival in colon cancer. In the present study we developed a robust...... in situ hybridization assay using high-affinity Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) probes that specifically detect miR-21 in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples. The expression of miR-21 was analyzed by in situ hybridization on 130 stage II colon and 67 stage II rectal cancer specimens. The mi...

  3. Phosphorescence parameters for platinum (II) organometallic chromophores: A study at the non-collinear four-component Kohn–Sham level of theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Patrick; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical characterization of the phosphorescence decay traces of a prototypical platinum (II) organic chromophore has been conducted. The phosphorescence wavelength and radiative lifetime are predicted to equal 544 nm and 160 μs, respectively. The third triplet state is assigned as participa...

  4. Terrestrial forest management plan for Palmyra Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Stacie A.; McEachern, Kathryn; Fisher, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    This 'Terrestrial Forest Management Plan for Palmyra Atoll' was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for The Nature Conservancy (TNC) Palmyra Program to refine and expand goals and objectives developed through the Conservation Action Plan process. It is one in a series of adaptive management plans designed to achieve TNC's mission toward the protection and enhancement of native wildlife and habitat. The 'Terrestrial Forest Management Plan for Palmyra Atoll' focuses on ecosystem integrity and specifically identifies and addresses issues related to assessing the status and distribution of resources, as well as the pressures acting upon them, most specifically nonnative and potentially invasive species. The plan, which presents strategies for increasing ecosystem integrity, provides a framework to implement and track the progress of conservation and restoration goals related to terrestrial resources on Palmyra Atoll. The report in its present form is intended to be an overview of what is known about historical and current forest resources; it is not an exhaustive review of all available literature relevant to forest management but an attempt to assemble as much information specific to Palmyra Atoll as possible. Palmyra Atoll is one of the Northern Line Islands in the Pacific Ocean southwest of the Hawai`ian Islands. It consists of many heavily vegetated islets arranged in a horseshoe pattern around four lagoons and surrounded by a coral reef. The terrestrial ecosystem consists of three primary native vegetation types: Pisonia grandis forest, coastal strand forest, and grassland. Among these vegetation types, the health and extent of Pisonia grandis forest is of particular concern. Overall, the three vegetation types support 25 native plant species (two of which may be extirpated), 14 species of sea birds, six shore birds, at least one native reptile, at least seven native insects, and six native land crabs. Green and hawksbill turtles forage at Palmyra Atoll

  5. Convergence of broad-scale migration strategies in terrestrial birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Sorte, Frank A; Fink, Daniel; Hochachka, Wesley M; Kelling, Steve

    2016-01-27

    Migration is a common strategy used by birds that breed in seasonal environments. Selection for greater migration efficiency is likely to be stronger for terrestrial species whose migration strategies require non-stop transoceanic crossings. If multiple species use the same transoceanic flyway, then we expect the migration strategies of these species to converge geographically towards the most optimal solution. We test this by examining population-level migration trajectories within the Western Hemisphere for 118 migratory species using occurrence information from eBird. Geographical convergence of migration strategies was evident within specific terrestrial regions where geomorphological features such as mountains or isthmuses constrained overland migration. Convergence was also evident for transoceanic migrants that crossed the Gulf of Mexico or Atlantic Ocean. Here, annual population-level movements were characterized by clockwise looped trajectories, which resulted in faster but more circuitous journeys in the spring and more direct journeys in the autumn. These findings suggest that the unique constraints and requirements associated with transoceanic migration have promoted the spatial convergence of migration strategies. The combination of seasonal atmospheric and environmental conditions that has facilitated the use of similar broad-scale migration strategies may be especially prone to disruption under climate and land-use change. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Time/Frequency Analysis of Terrestrial Impack Crater Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon-Young Chang

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial impact cratering record recently has been examined in the time domain by Chang & Moon (2005. It was found that the ˜ 26 Myr periodicity in the impact cratering rate exists over the last ˜ 250 Myrs. Such a periodicity can be found regardless of the lower limit of the diameter up to D ˜ 35 km. It immediately called pros and cons. The aim of this paper is two-fold: (1 to test if reported periodicities can be obtained with an independent method, (2 to see, as attempted earlier, if the phase is modulated. To achieve these goals we employ the time/frequency analysis and for the first time apply this method to the terrestrial impact cratering records. We have confirmed that without exceptions noticeable peaks appear around ˜ 25 Myr, corresponding to a frequency of ˜ 0.04 (Myr^{-1}. We also find periodicities in the data base including small impact craters, which are longer. Though the time/frequency analysis allows us to observe directly phase variations, we cannot find any indications of such changes. Instead, modes display slow variations of power in time. The time/frequency analysis shows a nonstationary behavior of the modes. The power can grow from just above the noise level and then decrease back to its initial level in a time of order of 10 Myrs.

  7. Cosmogenic He in terrestrial rocks: The summit lavas of Maui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, H; Poreda, R J

    1986-04-01

    We have identified terrestrial cosmic rayproduced (3)He in three lava flows on the crest of Haleakala Volcano on Maui, 3 km above sea level, and approximately 0.5 million years old. Although these lavas, like all oceanic basalts, contain primordial (3)He from the mantle, the "cosmogenic" component ((3)He(C)) can be identified unambiguously because it is extractable only by high-temperature vacuum fusion. In contrast, a large fraction of the mantle helium resides in fluid inclusions and can be extracted by vacuum crushing, leaving a residual component with (3)He/(4)He ratios as high as 75x those in the atmosphere, which can be liberated by melting the crushed grains. Cosmogenic (3)He is present in both olivines and clinopyroxenes at 0.8-1.2 x 10(-12) ml(STP)/g and constitutes 75% +/- 5% of the total (3)He present. The observed (3)He(C) levels require a cosmic ray exposure age of only some 64,000 years, much less than the actual age of the lavas, if there is no erosion. Using a model that includes effects of uplift or submergence as well as erosion, we calculate an apparent "erosion rate" of the order of 8.5 m/10(6) years for the western rim of the summit crater, as an example of the application of measurements of cosmogenic rare gases to terrestrial geological problems.

  8. Can Terrestrial Microbes Grow on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The theme for AbSciCon 2012 is "Exploring Life: Past and Present, Near and Far." The conference will address our current understanding of life - from processes at the molecular level to those which operate at planetary scales. Studying these aspects of life on Earth provides an essential platform from which to examine the potential for life on other worlds, both within our solar system and beyond. Mars exhibits a variety of extreme environments characterized by high UV and ionizing radiation flux, low pressure anoxic atmosphere, scarce or absent liquid water, extreme low temperatures, etc. The ability of terrestrial microorganisms to survive and adapt to the Mars environment has profound implications for astrobiology, planetary protection, and Mars life detection missions. At the NASA Ames Synthetic Biology Initiative, we believe that synthetic biology has the potential to revolutionize human space exploration. As such, the initiative is dedicated to applying the tools and techniques of synthetic biology to space exploration and astrobiology. Biological solutions will be invaluable for space exploration because they are not resource intensive, and they are versatile and self-renewing. An understanding of how to work with DNA in an unfavorable environment is paramount to utilizing biological tools on space missions. Furthermore, the ability to adjust life to the parameters of Mars is vital both to discovering what life on Mars might look like, and to using biological tools under such conditions. As a first step, we need an energy-efficient, low cost means of transporting, storing, and protecting genomic DNA, DNA parts, and whole microbial strains. Our goal is to develop and demonstrate viable and superior alternatives to standard DNA storage methods, which can be optimized to the conditions of space exploration, using synthetic biology as a tool. This includes protocols and kit designs for easy and repeatable DNA and strain recovery from protective storage

  9. Space and Terrestrial Photovoltaics: Synergy and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Raffaelle, Ryne; Emery, Keith

    2002-01-01

    A historical view of the research and development in photovoltaics from the perspective of both the terrestrial and the space communities is presented from the early days through the '70s and '80s and the '90s and beyond. The synergy of both communities in the beginning and once again in the present and hopefully future are highlighted, with examples of the important features in each program. The space community which was impressed by the light-weight and reliability of photovoltaics drove much of the early development. Even up to today, nearly every satellites and other scientific space probe that has been launched has included some solar power. However, since the cost of these power systems were only a small fraction of the satellite and launch cost, the use of much of this technology for the terrestrial marketplace was not feasible. It was clear that the focus of the terrestrial community would be best served by reducing costs. This would include addressing a variety of manufacturing issues and raising the rate of production. Success in these programs and a resulting globalization of effort resulted in major strides in the reduction of PV module costs and increased production. Although, the space community derived benefit from some of these advancements, its focus was on pushing the envelope with regard to cell efficiency. The gap between theoretical efficiencies and experimental efficiencies for silicon, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide became almost non-existent. Recent work by both communities have focused on the development thin film cells of amorphous silicon, CuInSe2 and CdTe. These cells hold the promise of lower costs for the terrestrial community as well as possible flexible substrates, better radiation resistance, and higher specific power for the space community. It is predicted that future trends in both communities will be directed toward advances through the application of nanotechnology. A picture is emerging in which the space and

  10. MODIS-derived terrestrial primary production [chapter 28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maosheng Zhao; Steven Running; Faith Ann Heinsch; Ramakrishna Nemani

    2011-01-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in terrestrial biological productivity have a large impact on humankind because terrestrial ecosystems not only create environments suitable for human habitation, but also provide materials essential for survival, such as food, fiber and fuel. A recent study estimated that consumption of terrestrial net primary production (NPP; a list of...

  11. Grene-Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project in Arctic (GTMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, K.; Miyazaki, S.; Mori, J.; Ise, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Arakida, H.

    2014-12-01

    The GTMIP, a part of the terrestrial branch on Japan-funded Arctic Climate Change Research (GRENE-TEA), aims to 1) enhance communications and understanding of the "mind and hands" between the modeling and field scientists, and 2) assess the uncertainty and variations stemmed from the model implementation/designation, and the variability due to climatic and historical conditions among the Arctic terrestrial regions. The target metrics cover both physics and biogeochemistry such as snow, permafrost, hydrology, and carbon budget. The MIP consists of two stages: one-dimensional, historical GRENE-TEA site evaluations (stage 1) and circumpolar evaluations using projected climate change data from GCM outputs (stage 2). At the current stage 1, forcing and validation data are prepared, taking maximum advantage of the observation data taken at GRENE-TEA sites (e.g., Fairbanks in Alaska, Yakutsk and Tiksi in Russia, and Kevo in Finland), to evaluate the inter-model and inter-site variations. Since the observation data are prone to missing or lack of the consistency, and not ready to drive the numerical model directly, we create continuous forcing data (called version 0) derived from the reanalysis product (i.e. ERA-interim) with monthly bias corrections using the CRU (for temperature) and GPCP (for precipitation) datasets taken from the respectively nearest grid to the GRENE-TEA sites. Then, it is modified to reflect the local characteristics (version 1), and, in addition, replaced with the observed data (version 1 with obs). These data are partly open at Arctic Data Archive System. The project is open to any modelers who are interested, and welcomes participation of wide range of the terrestrial models possibly with different levels of complexity and philosophy.

  12. Terrestrial freshwater lenses: Unexplored subterranean oases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laattoe, Tariq; Werner, Adrian D.; Woods, Juliette A.; Cartwright, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Freshwater lenses are lenticular bodies of fresh (TDS lenses in coastal aquifers, the formation, location and persistence of freshwater lenses in terrestrial settings are poorly understood. This is despite inland aquifers commonly containing saline groundwater, particularly in arid and semi-arid climates, and the local occurrences of freshwater being critical for ecosystems and human endeavour. We identify and classify known terrestrial freshwater lenses (TFLs) using four formation categories, namely topography, geology, groundwater-surface water interaction and recharge mechanisms. The resulting typology highlights the importance of buoyancy in the formation of TFLs in otherwise unlikely situations, implying that TFLs may be more prevalent than previously thought. TFLs represent some of the most vulnerable and precious freshwater resources on Earth that require considerably more research into mechanisms of formation and threats to their existence.

  13. Effect factors for terrestrial acidification in Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crespo Mendes, Natalia; Laurent, Alexis; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    conditions, which is an essential approach considering countries like Brazil, with high biodiversity. Previous studies have assessed the impacts of terrestrial acidification from the estimations of the potential losses of vascular plants species richness as a result of exposure to acidifying substances...... for 13 biomes, with 2409 species addressed for whole world. In this context this work aims to provide spatially-differentiated effect factors (EF) for terrestrial acidification in Brazil and support the development of spatially-differentiated characterization factors for Brazil. In order to maintain...... in Brazil, represented by 33167 species, indicating that this is a comprehensive study. Maps of soil pH in Brazil were extracted at 1-km resolution and pH values were extracted for the depth range of 0-30cm. For each ecoregion, species richness was plotted against soil pH and the exposure-response curves...

  14. Spiral arms, comets and terrestrial catastrophism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clube, S.V.M.; Napier, W.M. (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (UK))

    1982-03-01

    A review is presented of an hypothesis of terrestrial catastrophism in which comets grow in molecular clouds and are captured by the Sun as it passes through the spiral arms of the Galaxy. Assuming that comets are a major supplier of the Earth-crossing (Appollo) asteroid population, the latter fluctuates correspondingly and leads to episodes of terrestrial bombardment. Changes in the rotational momentum of core and mantle, generated by impacts, lead to episodes of magnetic field reversal and tectonic activity, while surface phenomena lead to ice-ages and mass extinctions. An episodic geophysical history with an interstellar connection is thus implied. If comets in spiral arms are necessary intermediaries in the process of star formation, the theory also has implications relating to early solar system history and galactic chemistry. These aspects are briefly discussed with special reference to the nature of spiral arms.

  15. Innovative Technologies for Terrestrial Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Aplin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing and monitoring terrestrial, or land, surface features, such as forests, deserts, and cities, are fundamental and continuing goals of Earth Observation (EO. EO imagery and related technologies are essential for increasing our scientific understanding of environmental processes, such as carbon capture and albedo change, and to manage and safeguard environmental resources, such as tropical forests, particularly over large areas or the entire globe. This measurement or observation of some property of the land surface is central to a wide range of scientific investigations and industrial operations, involving individuals and organizations from many different backgrounds and disciplines. However, the process of observing the land provides a unifying theme for these investigations, and in practice there is much consistency in the instruments used for observation and the techniques used to map and model the environmental phenomena of interest. There is therefore great potential benefit in exchanging technological knowledge and experience among the many and diverse members of the terrestrial EO community. [...

  16. The overlooked terrestrial impacts of mountaintop mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, James; Wood, Petra Bohall; Nicholson, Matthew C.; Jenkins, William; Druckenbrod, Daniel; Suter, Glenn W.; Strager, Michael P.; Mazzarella, Christine; Galloway, Walter; Amos, John

    2013-01-01

    Ecological research on mountaintop mining has been focused on aquatic impacts because the overburden (i.e., the mountaintop) is disposed of in nearby valleys, which leads to a wide range of water-quality impacts on streams. There are also numerous impacts on the terrestrial environment from mountaintop mining that have been largely overlooked, even though they are no less wide ranging, severe, and multifaceted. We review the impacts of mountaintop mining on the terrestrial environment by exploring six broad themes: (1) the loss of topographic complexity, (2) forest loss and fragmentation, (3) forest succession and soil loss, (4) forest loss and carbon sequestration, (5) biodiversity, and (6) human health and well-being.

  17. Terrestrial imaging of military test centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Steven D.

    2010-04-01

    Military test centers require detailed site descriptions. Test agencies demand significant written and visual information of test sites in order to facilitate successful test preparation and execution. New terrestrial imaging techniques (360 degree FOV collection) have recently become feasible to collect in the field. Combined with GIS and mapping applications, image and video data is now provided to test agencies for their use. Test sites for this study include locations in Alaska and Panama with planned image data collection in Arizona and Maryland.

  18. Terrestrial analogues for lunar impact melt flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, C. D.; Hamilton, C. W.; Hughes, S. S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, W. B.; Skok, J. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Schaefer, E.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Osinski, G. R.; Lim, D.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Lunar impact melt deposits have unique physical properties. They have among the highest observed radar returns at S-Band (12.6 cm wavelength), implying that they are rough at the decimeter scale. However, they are also observed in high-resolution optical imagery to be quite smooth at the meter scale. These characteristics distinguish them from well-studied terrestrial analogues, such as Hawaiian pāhoehoe and ´a´ā lava flows. The morphology of impact melt deposits can be related to their emplacement conditions, so understanding the origin of these unique surface properties will help to inform us as to the circumstances under which they were formed. In this work, we seek to find a terrestrial analogue for well-preserved lunar impact melt flows by examining fresh lava flows on Earth. We compare the radar return and high-resolution topographic variations of impact melt flows to terrestrial lava flows with a range of surface textures. The lava flows examined in this work range from smooth Hawaiian pāhoehoe to transitional basaltic flows at Craters of the Moon (COTM) National Monument and Preserve in Idaho to rubbly and spiny pāhoehoe-like flows at the recent eruption at Holuhraun in Iceland. The physical properties of lunar impact melt flows appear to differ from those of all the terrestrial lava flows studied in this work. This may be due to (a) differences in post-emplacement modification processes or (b) fundamental differences in the surface texture of the melt flows due to the melts' unique emplacement and/or cooling environment. Information about the surface properties of lunar impact melt deposits will be critical for future landed missions that wish to sample these materials.

  19. Tidally driven evolution of differentiated terrestrial exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterova, M.; Behounkova, M.

    2017-09-01

    We present a numerical model of tidally driven orbital evolution based on the solution of continuum mechanics equations for a differentiated spherical body, whose mantle is governed by either the Maxwell or the Andrade viscoelastic rheology. The model enables generally heterogeneous structure of the mantle, making thus possible the analysis of coupling between the internal and the orbital evolution of terrestrial exoplanets or icy moons.

  20. WOODS, THE MOST COMPLEX TERRESTRIAL ECOSISTEM

    OpenAIRE

    BLAJ Robert; SAND Camelia; Gligor CIORTEA

    2012-01-01

    A forest ecosystem is a terrestrial unit of living organisms (plants, animals and microorganisms), all interacting among themselves and with the environment (soil, climate, water and light) in which they live. The environmental "common denominator" of that forest ecological community is a tree, who most faithfully obeys the ecological cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A forest ecosystem would be considered having boundaries and would include a forest of trees out to the limit of ...

  1. Zyflamend, a polyherbal mixture, down regulates class I and class II histone deacetylases and increases p21 levels in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, E-Chu; Zhao, Yi; Chen, Guoxun; Baek, Seung Joon; McEntee, Michael F; Minkin, Steven; Biggerstaff, John P; Whelan, Jay

    2014-02-21

    Zyflamend, a mixture containing extracts of ten herbs, has shown promise in a variety of preclinical cancer models, including prostate cancer. The current experiments were designed to investigate the effects of Zyflamend on the expression of class I and II histone deacetylases, a family of enzymes known to be over expressed in a variety of cancers. CWR22Rv1 cells, a castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell line, were treated with Zyflamend and the expression of class I and II histone deacetylases, along with their downstream target the tumor suppressor gene p21, was investigated. Involvement of p21 was confirmed with siRNA knockdown and over expression experiments. Zyflamend down-regulated the expression of all class I and II histone deacetylases where Chinese goldthread and baikal skullcap (two of its components) appear to be primarily responsible for these results. In addition, Zyflamend up regulated the histone acetyl transferase complex CBP/p300, potentially contributing to the increase in histone 3 acetylation. Expression of the tumor suppressor gene p21, a known downstream target of histone deacetylases and CBP/p300, was increased by Zyflamend treatment and the effect on p21 was, in part, mediated through Erk1/2. Knockdown of p21 with siRNA technology attenuated Zyflamend-induced growth inhibition. Over expression of p21 inhibited cell growth and concomitant treatment with Zyflamend enhanced this effect. Our results suggest that the extracts of this polyherbal combination increase histone 3 acetylation, inhibit the expression of class I and class II histone deacetylases, increase the activation of CBP/p300 and inhibit cell proliferation, in part, by up regulating p21 expression.

  2. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockade decreases vasopressin-induced water reabsorption and AQP2 levels in NaCl-restricted rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Nielsen, Jakob; Knepper, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin and ANG II, which are known to play a major role in renal water and sodium reabsorption, are mainly coupled to the cAMP/PKA and phosphoinositide pathways, respectively. There is evidence for cross talk between these intracellular signaling pathways. We therefore hypothesized...... that vasopressin-induced water reabsorption could be attenuated by ANG II AT1 receptor blockade in rats. To address this, three protocols were used: 1) DDAVP treatment (20 ng/h sc for 7 days, n = 8); 2) DDAVP (20 ng/h sc for 7 days) and candesartan (1 mg·kg−1·day−1 sc for 7 days) cotreatment (n = 8); and 3...... receptor blockade in DDAVP-treated rats was associated with decreased urine concentration and decreased AQP2 and AQP1 expression. Moreover, FENa was increased in parallel with decreased expression of NHE3, NCC, and Na-K-ATPase. These results suggest that ANG II AT1 receptor activation plays a significant...

  3. Obliquity and Eccentricity Constraints for Terrestrial Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Torres, Stephanie M.

    2017-11-01

    Exoplanet discoveries over recent years have shown that terrestrial planets are exceptionally common. Many of these planets are in compact systems that result in complex orbital dynamics. A key step toward determining the surface conditions of these planets is understanding the latitudinally dependent flux incident at the top of the atmosphere as a function of orbital phase. The two main properties of a planet that influence the time-dependent nature of the flux are the obliquity and orbital eccentricity of the planet. We derive the criterion for which the flux variation due to obliquity is equivalent to the flux variation due to orbital eccentricity. This equivalence is computed for both the maximum and average flux scenarios, the latter of which includes the effects of the diurnal cycle. We apply these calculations to four known multi-planet systems (GJ 163, K2-3, Kepler-186, and Proxima Centauri), where we constrain the eccentricity of terrestrial planets using orbital dynamics considerations and model the effect of obliquity on incident flux. We discuss the implications of these simulations on climate models for terrestrial planets and outline detectable signatures of planetary obliquity.

  4. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  5. [Diversity of crenarchaeota in terrestrial hot springs and their surrounding environments in Kamchatka, Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhaoqi; Wang, Li; Chen, Jinquan; Zhou, Enmin; Zhang, Chuanlun; Li, Wenjun

    2013-06-04

    Crenarchaeota is a major archaeal lineage in terrestrial hot springs and important in biogeochemical cycles of life-essential elements. In this study, we investigated the diversity of Crenarchaeota in hot springs and the surrounding environments in Kamchatka, Russia. In addition, we compared crenarchaeotal community structures in Kamchatka, Russia and Yunnan province, China. Crenarchaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed and the sequences and abundances of representational clone were obtained. Phylogenetic analysis was then performed and the community structures in different samples were compared. The high temperature spring Burlyashi Liza (BSL, 89 degrees C) comprised Thermoprotei. The moderate temperature spring TF Vent 2 (TFV, 49 degrees C) harbored unidentified Thermoprotei group, unidentified crenarchaeal group, HWCG-II (hot water crenarchaeotal group II), and Group1. 1b (one thaumarchaeotal subgroup). Most of sequences that obtained from surrounding environments ( Crenarchaeota in Kamchatka hot springs are somewhat different from those in Yunnan province. Terrestrial hot springs obviously affect the crenarchaeotal communities in surrounding environments. Temperature is the major factor controlling the community structure in terrestrial hot springs.

  6. Biomarkers in terrestrial invertebrates for ecotoxicological soil risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammenga, J E; Dallinger, R; Donker, M H; Köhler, H R; Simonsen, V; Triebskorn, R; Weeks, J M

    2000-01-01

    This review has served to present the most recent information on a selected series of biomarker studies undertaken on soil invertebrates during two extensive European-funded scientific consortia, BIOPRINT and BIOPRINT-II. The goals were to develop and validate methods for the analysis of markers of stress in a range of soil-dwelling organisms. We have discussed the potential and limitations of the following invertebrate biomarkers for soil risk assessment purposes: heat shock proteins, histological and ultrastructural markers, metallothioneins and metal-binding proteins, esterases, lysosomal integrity, and the novel biomarker histidine. The hsp response in soil invertebrates is especially suitable to indicate the effects of exposure to comparatively low concentrations for a range of toxicants and can be regarded as a biomarker of general stress. The application of MTs and other metal-binding proteins as biomarkers for exposure in soil invertebrates has been well described, and new methods are being developed for analyzing MT induction both at the protein and molecular level, and reliable and reproducible methods are now available. (Cd)-MT is well characterized for the springtails and its MT concentration is a useful biomarker for exposure as well as for effect. For snails, (Cd)-MT can accumulate in the midgut gland over extended periods of time and therefore its concentration is a biomarker not only for recent intoxication but also for events of cadmium exposure that snails may have experienced a long time before the measurement took place. Cellular and histological alterations can be regarded as reflecting the "health" state of a cell, which may be a measure for the presence of toxicants. Histopathological work on terrestrial invertebrates, however, is still scarce. Isozymes have been poorly studied in soil invertebrates despite their promising role as potential biomarkers in aquatic organisms. Among the large diversity of isozymes, the most well studied are

  7. DIET OF THE SOUTHERN TOAD (BUFO TERRESTRIS) FROM THE SOUTHERN EVERGLADES

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the diet of a February-May sample of the southern toad (Bufo terrestris) from the Everglades National Park. Above the familial level, 13 taxa were consumed, but ants (Hymenoptera) and beetles (Coleoptera) were consumed most by, and in the greatest number of sto...

  8. Characterisation of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in a terrestrial ecosystem near a fluorochemical plant in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Hollander, W.; De Bruyn, L.; Hagenaars, A; de Voogt, P.; Bervoets, L.

    2014-01-01

    Bioaccumulation of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in a restricted terrestrial food chain was investigated with the omnivorous wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) on top of the studied food chain. The levels detected are very high compared with literature as a result of the presence of fluorochemical

  9. Carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration, and water use efficiency of terrestrial ecosystems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingfeng Xiao; Ge Sun; Jiquan Chen; Hui Chen; Shiping Chen; Gang Dong

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude, spatial patterns, and controlling factors of the carbon and water fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems in China are not well understood due to the lack of ecosystem-level flux observations. We synthesized flux and micrometeorological observations from 22 eddy covariance flux sites across China,and examined the carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration (ET), and...

  10. Proterozoic oxygen rise linked to shifting balance between seafloor and terrestrial weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Benjamin; Lenton, Timothy M; Watson, Andrew J

    2014-06-24

    A shift toward higher atmospheric oxygen concentration during the late Proterozoic has been inferred from multiple indirect proxies and is seen by many as a prerequisite for the emergence of complex animal life. However, the mechanisms controlling the level of oxygen throughout the Proterozoic and its eventual rise remain uncertain. Here we use a simple biogeochemical model to show that the balance between long-term carbon removal fluxes via terrestrial silicate weathering and ocean crust alteration plays a key role in determining atmospheric oxygen concentration. This balance may be shifted by changes in terrestrial weatherability or in the generation rate of oceanic crust. As a result, the terrestrial chemical weathering flux may be permanently altered--contrasting with the conventional view that the global silicate weathering flux must adjust to equal the volcanic CO2 degassing flux. Changes in chemical weathering flux in turn alter the long-term supply of phosphorus to the ocean, and therefore the flux of organic carbon burial, which is the long-term source of atmospheric oxygen. Hence we propose that increasing solar luminosity and a decrease in seafloor spreading rate over 1,500-500 Ma drove a gradual shift from seafloor weathering to terrestrial weathering, and a corresponding steady rise in atmospheric oxygen. Furthermore, increased terrestrial weatherability during the late Neoproterozoic may explain low temperature, increases in ocean phosphate, ocean sulfate, and atmospheric oxygen concentration at this time.

  11. Temporal changes in cutaneous bacterial communities of terrestrial- and aquatic-phase newts (Amphibia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino-Pinto, Joana; Galán, Pedro; Rodríguez, Silvia; Bletz, Molly C; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert; Jarek, Michael; Vences, Miguel

    2017-08-01

    Animal-associated bacterial communities play essential roles for their host's ecology, physiology and health. Temporal dynamics of these communities are poorly understood, but might be of high relevance for amphibians with a well-expressed biphasic biology of adults where the structure of their skin changes drastically between the aquatic and terrestrial phases. Here, we investigated the temporal dynamics of cutaneous bacterial communities of Lissotriton boscai and Triturus marmoratus by monthly sampling populations from a pond and surrounding terrestrial habitats near A Coruña, Spain. These communities were characterized by 16S rRNA gene amplicons from DNA isolated from skin swabs. Newt bacterial communities displayed variation at three levels: between larvae and aquatic adults, between adult life phases (terrestrial versus aquatic), and temporally within life phases. The skin bacterial communities tended to differ to a lesser extent temporally and between larvae and adults, and more strongly between life phases. Larvae had a higher proportion of reads associated with antifungal taxa compared with adults, while no differences were found among adult life phases. Terrestrial specimens exhibited the highest community diversity. The regular transitions of adult newts between aquatic and terrestrial environments might contribute to the diversity of their skin microbiota and could increase disease resistance. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Mars Ascent Vehicle Test Requirements and Terrestrial Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Cathey, Henry M.; Smith, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars robotic sample return mission has been a potential flagship mission for NASA s science mission directorate for decades. The Mars Exploration Program and the planetary science decadal survey have highlighted both the science return of the Mars Sample Return mission, but also the need for risk reduction through technology development. One of the critical elements of the MSR mission is the Mars Ascent Vehicle, which must launch the sample from the surface of Mars and place it into low Mars orbit. The MAV has significant challenges to overcome due to the Martian environments and the Entry Descent and Landing system constraints. Launch vehicles typically have a relatively low success probability for early flights, and a thorough system level validation is warranted. The MAV flight environments are challenging and in some cases impossible to replicate terrestrially. The expected MAV environments have been evaluated and a first look of potential system test options has been explored. The terrestrial flight requirements and potential validation options are presented herein.

  13. Lunar precursor effects in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Poppe, A. R.; Farrell, W. M.; Delory, G. T.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Plaschke, F.; Roux, A.; Ergun, R. E.

    2012-05-01

    The two ARTEMIS probes observe significant precursor activity upstream from the Moon, when magnetically connected to the dayside lunar surface. The most common signature consists of high levels of whistler wave activity near half of the electron cyclotron frequency. This precursor activity extends to distances of many thousands of km, in both the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosphere. In the magnetosphere, electrons reflect from a combination of magnetic and electrostatic fields above the lunar surface, forming loss cone distributions. In the solar wind they generally form conics, as a result of reflection from an obstacle moving with respect to the plasma frame (just as at a shock). The anisotropy associated with these reflected electrons provides the free energy source for the whistlers, with cyclotron resonance conditions met between the reflected source population and Moonward-propagating waves. These waves can in turn affect incoming plasma, and we observe significant perpendicular electron heating and plasma density depletions in some cases. In the magnetosphere, we also observe broadband electrostatic modes driven by beams of secondary electrons and/or photoelectrons accelerated outward from the surface. We also occasionally see waves near the ion cyclotron frequency in the magnetosphere. These lower frequency waves, which may result from the presence of ions of lunar origin, modulate the whistlers described above, as well as the electrons. Taken together, our observations suggest that the presence of the Moon leads to the formation of an upstream region analogous in many ways to the terrestrial electron foreshock.

  14. Unifying principles of the deep terrestrial and deep marine biospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Smith, Richard P.

    Recent estimates of the amount of microbial biomass in the combined marine and terrestrial subsurface boost this portion of the biosphere to a level which needs to be considered when integrating where life exists on our planet. Additionally, the subsurface serves practical needs associated with groundwater, waste disposal, and resource recovery. Although our view of this isolated ecosystem is restricted by technologies used to access samples, we are learning more about places where life thrives in the subsurface and where life is severely repressed. Until studies of hyperthermophiles provide different information, a thermal boundary to life exists at the 120°C isotherm. Other locations in the subsurface are barren where they are impoverished by low fluid flux to supply electron donors and acceptors or by limited pore space in which microorganisms can reside. Examples of such locations include deep vadose zones and igneous rock masses with limited fractures. In contrast, subsurface locations that show evidence of gaseous or liquid flux are the most likely to yield higher numbers of microorganisms. Locations that have marine and terrestrial hydrothermal convection cells, active methane venting, solid-liquid-gas phase changes, as well as zones of salinity and porosity contrasts are all examples of demonstrated or potential subsurface oases. Our ability to conceptualize and quantify the subsurface biosphere will be accelerated by new sampling tools and molecular characterization methods for microbes. The merging of disparate disciplines such as microbiology, geophysics, and tectonic research will extend our ability to fully comprehend the deep biosphere.

  15. Preferential sequestration of terrestrial organic matter in boreal lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, François; von Wachenfeldt, Eddie; Kothawala, Dolly N.; Bastviken, David; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2017-04-01

    The molecular composition and origin has recently been demonstrated to play a critical role in the persistence of organic matter in lake water, but it is unclear to what degree chemical attributes and sources may also control settling and burial of organic matter in lake sediments. Here we compared the annual contribution of allochthonous and autochthonous sources to the organic matter settling in the water column and present in the sediments of 12 boreal lakes. We used the fluorescence properties and elemental composition of the organic matter to trace its origin and found a consistent pattern of increasing contribution of terrestrial compounds in the sediments as compared to the settling matter, with an annual average allochthony of 87% and 57%, respectively. Seasonal data revealed a predominance of in-lake-produced compounds sinking in the water column in summer. Yet only a slight concurrent decrease in the contribution of terrestrial C to lake sediments was observed during the same period, and sediment allochthony increased again to high levels in autumn. Our results reveal a preferential preservation of allochthonous matter in the sediments and highlight the role of lakes as sequesters of organic carbon primarily originating from the surrounding landscape.

  16. Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation frequency and antithrombin activity levels in 120 of deep venous thrombosis and 150 of cerebral infarction patients in a single center in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-sen; Tang, Yang-ming; Tang, Mei-qing; Qing, Zi-Ju; Shu, Chang; Tang, Xiang-qi; Deng, Ming-yang; Tan, Li-ming

    2010-09-01

    Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation shows a relatively high frequency in western population. Some studies suggest that the mutation is an independent genetic risk factor both for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and for arterial thrombosis, but whether the mutation has racial difference or has a general significance for thrombophilia remains unclear. In this study we performed an analysis of the prevalence of the mutation in Chinese southern population; Also, the antithrombin activity levels were evaluated in each investigated individual. The studies included 120 patients with DVT, 150 patients with cerebral infarction, and 110 controls. The mutation was detected using polymerase chain reaction/PvuII restrictive fragment length polymorphism procedures. Antithrombin activity assay was done using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that no antithrombin Cambridge II mutation was detected in all three groups (DVT, cerebral infarction and controls), the incidence was 0/380. Plasma antithrombin activity was 91.37% +/- 16.15% in the DVT patients and 102.68% +/- 13.10% in the controls; the antithrombin activity was significantly reduced in the DVT group (P Cambridge II mutation has a racial difference, and may not be a valuable risk factor of thrombophilia in Asian population, and antithrombin deficiency remains a major genetic risk factor for DVT patients in China.

  17. Rapid Prototyping — A Tool for Presenting 3-Dimensional Digital Models Produced by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho-Pekka Virtanen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid prototyping has received considerable interest with the introduction of affordable rapid prototyping machines. These machines can be used to manufacture physical models from three-dimensional digital mesh models. In this paper, we compare the results obtained with a new, affordable, rapid prototyping machine, and a traditional professional machine. Two separate data sets are used for this, both of which were acquired using terrestrial laser scanning. Both of the machines were able to produce complex and highly detailed geometries in plastic material from models based on terrestrial laser scanning. The dimensional accuracies and detail levels of the machines were comparable, and the physical artifacts caused by the fused deposition modeling (FDM technique used in the rapid prototyping machines could be found in both models. The accuracy of terrestrial laser scanning exceeded the requirements for manufacturing physical models of large statues and building segments at a 1:40 scale.

  18. Emergence of two types of terrestrial planet on solidification of magma ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Keiko; Abe, Yutaka; Genda, Hidenori

    2013-05-30

    Understanding the origins of the diversity in terrestrial planets is a fundamental goal in Earth and planetary sciences. In the Solar System, Venus has a similar size and bulk composition to those of Earth, but it lacks water. Because a richer variety of exoplanets is expected to be discovered, prediction of their atmospheres and surface environments requires a general framework for planetary evolution. Here we show that terrestrial planets can be divided into two distinct types on the basis of their evolutionary history during solidification from the initially hot molten state expected from the standard formation model. Even if, apart from their orbits, they were identical just after formation, the solidified planets can have different characteristics. A type I planet, which is formed beyond a certain critical distance from the host star, solidifies within several million years. If the planet acquires water during formation, most of this water is retained and forms the earliest oceans. In contrast, on a type II planet, which is formed inside the critical distance, a magma ocean can be sustained for longer, even with a larger initial amount of water. Its duration could be as long as 100 million years if the planet is formed together with a mass of water comparable to the total inventory of the modern Earth. Hydrodynamic escape desiccates type II planets during the slow solidification process. Although Earth is categorized as type I, it is not clear which type Venus is because its orbital distance is close to the critical distance. However, because the dryness of the surface and mantle predicted for type II planets is consistent with the characteristics of Venus, it may be representative of type II planets. Also, future observations may have a chance to detect not only terrestrial exoplanets covered with water ocean but also those covered with magma ocean around a young star.

  19. Microplastics in the Terrestrial Ecosystem: Implications for Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza; Gertsen, Hennie; Gooren, Harm; Peters, Piet; Salánki, Tamás; van der Ploeg, Martine; Besseling, Ellen; Koelmans, Albert A; Geissen, Violette

    2016-03-01

    Plastic debris is widespread in the environment, but information on the effects of microplastics on terrestrial fauna is completely lacking. Here, we studied the survival and fitness of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) exposed to microplastics (Polyethylene, microplastics in the litter than at 7% w/w and in the control (0%). Growth rate was significantly reduced at 28, 45, and 60% w/w microplastics, compared to the 7% and control treatments. Due to the digestion of ingested organic matter, microplastic was concentrated in cast, especially at the lowest dose (i.e., 7% in litter) because that dose had the highest proportion of digestible organic matter. Whereas 50 percent of the microplastics had a size of microplastics in the casts was microplastic in terrestrial ecosystems.

  20. Effects of life-long caloric restriction and voluntary exercise on age-related changes in levels of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes and angiotensin II receptors in the rat adrenal medulla and hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdös, Benedek; Broxson, Christopher S; Landa, Tessa; Scarpace, Philip J; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Zhang, Yi; Tümer, Nihal

    2007-08-01

    We examined if life-long mild caloric restriction (CR) alone or with voluntary exercise prevents the age-related changes in catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme levels in the adrenal medulla and hypothalamus. Ten-week-old Fisher-344 rats were assigned to: sedentary; sedentary+8% CR; or 8% CR+wheel running. Rats were euthanized at 6 or 24 months of age. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression was 4.4-fold higher in the adrenal medullae and 60% lower in the hypothalamus of old sedentary rats compared to young (pwheel running decreased AT(1) levels by 50% (pwheel running increased its level by 42% (pfood intake can avert age-related changes in catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme levels in the adrenal medulla and hypothalamus, possibly through affecting angiotensin II signaling.

  1. NEON Airborne Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Karpowicz, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is the continental-scale research platform that will collect information on ecosystems across the United States to advance our understanding and ability to forecast environmental change at the continental scale. One of NEON's observing systems, the Airborne Observation Platform (AOP), will fly an instrument suite consisting of a high-fidelity visible-to-shortwave infrared imaging spectrometer, a full waveform small footprint LiDAR, and a high-resolution digital camera on a low-altitude aircraft platform. NEON AOP is focused on acquiring data on several terrestrial Essential Climate Variables including bioclimate, biodiversity, biogeochemistry, and land use products. These variables are collected throughout a network of 60 sites across the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico via ground-based and airborne measurements. Airborne remote sensing plays a critical role by providing measurements at the scale of individual shrubs and larger plants over hundreds of square kilometers. The NEON AOP plays the role of bridging the spatial scales from that of individual organisms and stands to the scale of satellite-based remote sensing. NEON is building 3 airborne systems to facilitate the routine coverage of NEON sites and provide the capacity to respond to investigator requests for specific projects. The first NEON imaging spectrometer, a next-generation VSWIR instrument, was recently delivered to NEON by JPL. This instrument has been integrated with a small-footprint waveform LiDAR on the first NEON airborne platform (AOP-1). A series of AOP-1 test flights were conducted during the first year of NEON's construction phase. The goal of these flights was to test out instrument functionality and performance, exercise remote sensing collection protocols, and provide provisional data for algorithm and data product validation. These test flights focused the following questions: What is the optimal remote

  2. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  3. Stochasticity and predictability in terrestrial planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Volker; Grimm, Simon L.; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    Terrestrial planets are thought to be the result of a vast number of gravitational interactions and collisions between smaller bodies. We use numerical simulations to show that practically identical initial conditions result in a wide array of final planetary configurations. This is a result of the chaotic evolution of trajectories which are highly sensitive to minuscule displacements. We determine that differences between systems evolved from virtually identical initial conditions can be larger than the differences between systems evolved from very different initial conditions. This implies that individual simulations lack predictive power. For example, there is not a reproducible mapping between the initial and final surface density profiles. However, some key global properties can still be extracted if the statistical spread across many simulations is considered. Based on these spreads, we explore the collisional growth and orbital properties of terrestrial planets, which assemble from different initial conditions (we vary the initial planetesimal distribution, planetesimal masses, and giant planet orbits.). Confirming past work, we find that the resulting planetary systems are sculpted by sweeping secular resonances. Configurations with giant planets on eccentric orbits produce fewer and more massive terrestrial planets on tighter orbits than those with giants on circular orbits. This is further enhanced if the initial mass distribution is biased to the inner regions. In all cases, the outer edge of the system is set by the final location of the ν6 resonance and we find that the mass distribution peaks at the ν5 resonance. Using existing observations, we find that extrasolar systems follow similar trends. Although differences between our numerical modelling and exoplanetary systems remain, we suggest that CoRoT-7, HD 20003 and HD 20781 may host undetected giant planets.

  4. Evolution of ore deposits on terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Ore deposits on terrestrial planets materialized after core formation, mantle evolution, crustal development, interactions of surface rocks with the hydrosphere and atmosphere, and, where life exists on a planet, the involvement of biological activity. Core formation removed most of the siderophilic and chalcophilic elements, leaving mantles depleted in many of the strategic and noble metals relative to their chondritic abundances. Basaltic magma derived from partial melting of the mantle transported to the surface several metals contained in immiscible silicate and sulfide melts. Magmatic ore deposits were formed during cooling, fractional crystallization and density stratification from the basaltic melts. Such ore deposits found in earth's Archean rocks were probably generated during early histories of all terrestrial planets and may be the only types of igneous ores on Mars. Where plate tectonic activity was prevalent on a terrestrial planet, temporal evolution of ore deposits took place. Repetitive episodes of subduction modified the chemical compositions of the crust and upper mantles, leading to porphyry copper and molybdenum ores in calc-alkaline igneous rocks and granite-hosted tin and tungsten deposits. Such plate tectonic-induced mineralization in relatively young igneous rocks on earth may also have produced hydrothermal ore deposits on Venus in addition to the massive sulfide and cumulate chromite ores associated with Venusian mafic igneous rock. Sedimentary ore deposits resulting from mechanical and chemical weathering in reducing atmospheres in Archean earth included placer deposits (e.g., uraninite, gold, pyrite ores). Chromite, ilmenite, and other dense unreactive minerals could also be present on channel floors and in valley networks on Mars, while banded iron formations might underlie the Martian northern plains regions. As oxygen evolved in earth's atmosphere, so too did oxide ores. By analogy, gossans above sulfide ores probably occur on Mars

  5. Global analytic treatment of terrestrial photogrammetric networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mayoud, M

    1980-01-01

    In order to solve certain special CERN metrology problems, analytical terrestrial photogrammetry may have some advantages which are first discussed along with their drawbacks and limitations. In this application, it is necessary to carry out a rigorous and global adjustment of the observations and simultaneously process all the perspective ray bundles. The basic principles, the least squares solution and the stochastic analysis of the results are presented. However, for the CERN project, one wonders if the production of digital theodolites is going to reduce the advantages of the photogrammetric method. (12 refs).

  6. Handbook of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Kamide, Y

    2007-01-01

    The Handbook of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment is a unique compendium. Recognized international leaders in their field contribute chapters on basic topics of solar physics, space plasmas and the Earth's magnetosphere, and on applied topics like the aurora, magnetospheric storms, space weather, space climatology and planetary science. This book will be of highest value as a reference for researchers working in the area of planetary and space science. However, it is also written in a style accessible to graduate students majoring in those fields.

  7. Terrestrial exoplanets: diversity, habitability and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selsis, Franck [CRAL: Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (CNRS), Universite de Lyon, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 allee d' Italie, F-69007 Lyon (France); Kaltenegger, Lisa [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Paillet, Jimmy [ESTEC SCI-SA, Keplerlaan 1, PO Box 299, 2200AG Noordwijk (Netherlands)], E-mail: franck.selsis@ens-lyon.fr, E-mail: lkaltene@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jpaillet@rssd.esa.int

    2008-08-15

    After a decade rich in giant exoplanet detections, observation techniques have now reached the sensitivity to gain information on the physical structure and chemical content of some of the detected planets and also to find planets of less than 10 M{sub +}. The detection and characterization of Earth-like planets is approaching rapidly and dedicated space observatories are already in operation (CoRoT) or in the development phase (Kepler, Darwin and TPF-I/C). In this paper, we explore the domain of terrestrial planets, emphasizing habitable worlds. We discuss the possibility of performing a spectral characterization of their properties using the next generation of astronomical instruments.

  8. Halogens in chondritic meteorites and terrestrial accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Patricia L.; Burgess, Ray; Busemann, Henner; Ruzié-Hamilton, Lorraine; Joachim, Bastian; Day, James M. D.; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2017-11-01

    Volatile element delivery and retention played a fundamental part in Earth’s formation and subsequent chemical differentiation. The heavy halogens—chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br) and iodine (I)—are key tracers of accretionary processes owing to their high volatility and incompatibility, but have low abundances in most geological and planetary materials. However, noble gas proxy isotopes produced during neutron irradiation provide a high-sensitivity tool for the determination of heavy halogen abundances. Using such isotopes, here we show that Cl, Br and I abundances in carbonaceous, enstatite, Rumuruti and primitive ordinary chondrites are about 6 times, 9 times and 15-37 times lower, respectively, than previously reported and usually accepted estimates. This is independent of the oxidation state or petrological type of the chondrites. The ratios Br/Cl and I/Cl in all studied chondrites show a limited range, indistinguishable from bulk silicate Earth estimates. Our results demonstrate that the halogen depletion of bulk silicate Earth relative to primitive meteorites is consistent with the depletion of lithophile elements of similar volatility. These results for carbonaceous chondrites reveal that late accretion, constrained to a maximum of 0.5 ± 0.2 per cent of Earth’s silicate mass, cannot solely account for present-day terrestrial halogen inventories. It is estimated that 80-90 per cent of heavy halogens are concentrated in Earth’s surface reservoirs and have not undergone the extreme early loss observed in atmosphere-forming elements. Therefore, in addition to late-stage terrestrial accretion of halogens and mantle degassing, which has removed less than half of Earth’s dissolved mantle gases, the efficient extraction of halogen-rich fluids from the solid Earth during the earliest stages of terrestrial differentiation is also required to explain the presence of these heavy halogens at the surface. The hydropilic nature of halogens, whereby they track

  9. International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, R.; Muhonen, D.; Sizemore, K. O.

    1991-01-01

    The International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program is a large, multi-national program involving three space agencies and up to eight spacecraft. NASA, together with the Institute of Space and Astronomical Science (ISAS) and the European Space Agency (ESA), has agreed in principle to coordinate their efforts in investigating the Sun and the Earth. Each agency is planning to construct and operate different spacecraft as part of this cooperative venture: Geotail provided by ISAS, the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and Cluster (four spacecraft) contributed by ESA, and Wind and Polar by NASA. A general description of the program is presented.

  10. Digital terrestrial television broadcasting technology and system

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Now under massive deployment worldwide, digital terrestrial television broadcasting (DTTB) offers one of the most attractive ways to deliver digital TV over the VHF/UHF band. Written by a team of experts for specialists and non-specialists alike, this book serves as a comprehensive guide to DTTB. It covers the fundamentals of channel coding and modulation technologies used in DTTB, as well as receiver technology for synchronization, channel estimation, and equalization. It also covers the recently introduced Chinese DTTB standard, using the SFN network in Hong Kong as an example.

  11. Apolipoprotein A-II Influences Apolipoprotein E-Linked Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Women with High Levels of HDL Cholesterol and C-Reactive Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corsetti, James P.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Sparks, Charles E.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In a previous report by our group, high levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) were demonstrated to be associated with risk of incident cardiovascular disease in women with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the setting of both low (designated as HR1 subjects) and high (designated as

  12. Integrated genome-wide analysis of transcription factor occupancy, RNA polymerase II binding and steady-state RNA levels identify differentially regulated functional gene classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokry, M.; Hatzis, P.; Schuijers, J.; Lansu, N.; Ruzius, F.P.; Clevers, H.; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Routine methods for assaying steady-state mRNA levels such as RNA-seq and micro-arrays are commonly used as readouts to study the role of transcription factors (TFs) in gene expression regulation. However, cellular RNA levels do not solely depend on activity of TFs and subsequent transcription by

  13. How lichens impact on terrestrial community and ecosystem properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Johan; Wardle, David A

    2017-08-01

    Lichens occur in most terrestrial ecosystems; they are often present as minor contributors, but in some forests, drylands and tundras they can make up most of the ground layer biomass. As such, lichens dominate approximately 8% of the Earth's land surface. Despite their potential importance in driving ecosystem biogeochemistry, the influence of lichens on community processes and ecosystem functioning have attracted relatively little attention. Here, we review the role of lichens in terrestrial ecosystems and draw attention to the important, but often overlooked role of lichens as determinants of ecological processes. We start by assessing characteristics that vary among lichens and that may be important in determining their ecological role; these include their growth form, the types of photobionts that they contain, their key functional traits, their water-holding capacity, their colour, and the levels of secondary compounds in their thalli. We then assess how these differences among lichens influence their impacts on ecosystem and community processes. As such, we consider the consequences of these differences for determining the impacts of lichens on ecosystem nutrient inputs and fluxes, on the loss of mass and nutrients during lichen thallus decomposition, and on the role of lichenivorous invertebrates in moderating decomposition. We then consider how differences among lichens impact on their interactions with consumer organisms that utilize lichen thalli, and that range in size from microfauna (for which the primary role of lichens is habitat provision) to large mammals (for which lichens are primarily a food source). We then address how differences among lichens impact on plants, through for example increasing nutrient inputs and availability during primary succession, and serving as a filter for plant seedling establishment. Finally we identify areas in need of further work for better understanding the role of lichens in terrestrial ecosystems. These include

  14. Factors influencing DOC leaching from terrestrial ecosystems: a database analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camino Serrano, M.; Janssens, I.; Luyssaert, S.; Ciais, P.; Gielen, B.

    2012-04-01

    The lateral transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important process linking terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Neglecting these fluxes can lead to biased of eddy covariance-based estimates of terrestrial ecosystem carbon sequestration. The necessity for integrating DOC leaching in carbon cycle models is thus clear, especially in view of future model development aiming at directly linking terrestrial, freshwater and ocean carbon cycles. However, to achieve this goal, more accurate information is needed in order to better understand and predict dissolved organic carbon dynamics. DOC concentrations mainly vary by geographical location, soil and vegetation types, topography, season and climate. Within this framework, we developed a database on DOC concentrations and fluxes with the aim of better understanding how those parameters determine DOC variations. This database compiles DOC concentrations and fluxes in soil solution and creeks at site or catchment level for different ecosystems around the world, but with special focus on the Northern Hemisphere and on peatland ecosystems. The database currently includes information from around 120 sites, gathered from published literature and datasets accessible on the internet. The database contains annual, seasonal and monthly data on DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and also includes other meta-data related to the site, such as land cover, soil properties, climate, annual water balance and other soil solution parameters. This compiled dataset allows to study the influence of several physical factors that determine DOC production in soils. We will present the observed relationships between drivers, such as precipitation, drainage flows, soil pH, soil texture, and DOC concentration/ DOC fluxes at different levels, ecosystem types, temporal scales (monthly versus annual or seasonal), and soil depths. The same relations will be analysed

  15. Terrestrial Permafrost Models of Martian Habitats and Inhabitants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilichinsky, D.

    2011-12-01

    The terrestrial permafrost is the only rich depository of viable ancient microorganisms on Earth, and can be used as a bridge to possible Martian life forms and shallow subsurface habitats where the probability of finding life is highest. Since there is a place for water, the requisite condition for life, the analogous models are more or less realistic. If life ever existed on Mars, traces might have been preserved and could be found at depth within permafrost. The age of the terrestrial isolates corresponds to the longevity of the frozen state of the embedding strata, with the oldest known dating back to the late Pliocene in Arctic and late Miocene in Antarctica. Permafrost on Earth and Mars vary in age, from a few million years on Earth to a few billion years on Mars. Such a difference in time scale would have a significant impact on the possibility of preserving life on Mars, which is why the longevity of life forms preserved within terrestrial permafrost can only be an approximate model for Mars. 1. A number of studies indicate that the Antarctic cryosphere began to develop on the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, after the isolation of the continent. Permafrost degradation is only possible if mean annual ground temperature, -28°C now, rise above freezing, i.e., a significant warming to above 25°C is required. There is no evidence of such sharp temperature increase, which indicates that the climate and geological history was favorable to persistence of pre-Pliocene permafrost. These oldest relics (~30Myr) are possibly to be found at high hypsometric levels of ice-free areas (Dry Valleys and nearby mountains). It is desirable to test the layers for the presence of viable cells. The limiting age, if one exists, within this ancient permafrost, where the viable organisms were no longer present, could be established as the limit for life preservation below 0oC. Positive results will extend the known temporal limits of life in permafrost. 2. Even in this case, the age of

  16. Baseline mercury and zinc concentrations in terrestrial and coastal organisms of Admiralty Bay, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues dos Santos, Isaac [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24020-007 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Silva-Filho, Emmanoel Vieira [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24020-007 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: geoemma@vm.uff.br; Schaefer, Carlos [Departamento de Solos, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, 36570-000 Vicosa, MG (Brazil); Maria Sella, Silvia [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24020-007 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Carlos A. [Departamento de Geoquimica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24020-007 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Gomes, Vicente [Instituto Oceanografico, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Passos, Maria Jose de A.C.R. [Instituto Oceanografico, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Phan Van Ngan [Instituto Oceanografico, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2006-03-15

    This paper provides the first quantitative information on mercury in soil, coastal sediment, and in characteristic organisms of terrestrial and shallow coastal marine ecosystems from Admiralty Bay (King George Island, Antarctica). As expected for a remote area, mercury content is low in abiotic components of the ecosystem, and probably similar to natural levels. Mercury also occurs in very low concentrations in the vegetation, invertebrates and fish. These low mercury levels may be due to sulphide formation in reducing sediments of this environment. Higher concentrations of mercury occurred in bird feathers and mammal hair, indicating biomagnification. This was not found for Zinc. These results may be useful as a reference background to detect future inputs of trace elements in this remote area of the earth. Terrestrial vegetation and bird feathers are suggested as target regional biomonitors. - Low levels of mercury and zinc occurred in soil and plant samples from Antarctica, but high levels occurred in birds and mammals.

  17. Evaluation of the effect of self-care education based on VARK learning style on HbA1c and FBS levels in patients with type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Saleh Moghadam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with type II diabetes mostly struggle with increased fasting blood sugar (FBS and glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c, which are associated with irrecoverable complications. Self-care education and different types of learning among patients are regarded as some of the most important issues in this regard. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of self-care education based on VARK learning style on HbA1c and FBS in patients with type II diabetes. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on patients with type II diabetes referring to Parsian Clinic in Mashhad, Iran in 2015. In total, 72 samples were selected through randomized convenience sampling and divided into two control and intervention groups of 36 cases. Subjects of the intervention group were also divided into subgroups of visual, aural, read/write and kinesthetic based on the results of VARK questionnaire. Self-care education was carried out for the intervention group in two 60-minute sessions once every two weeks, tailored to learning styles of the patients. Meanwhile, routine conferences were held for the control group. HbA1c and FBS levels were evaluated in all the participants before and a month and a half after the intervention to assess the self-care of patients. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 21 using Mann-Whitney U, Chi-square, independent t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: In this study, mean score of HbA1c level was decreased from 7.7±0.8 to 7.0±5.7 (P<0.062, whereas mean score of FBS level was alleviated from 176.1±33.5 to 147.7±32.8 (P<0.001, which was only significant regarding the level of FBS (P=0.002. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, application of VARK learning style led to a reduction in HbA1c and FBS levels, contributing to improved self-care in patients with type II diabetes. Therefore, it is suggested that learning style of patients be determined using VARK questionnaire before their

  18. VLBI telescopes' gravitational deformations investigated with terrestrial surveying methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, P.; Abbondanza, C.; Negusini, M.; Vittuari, L.

    2008-09-01

    Large VLBI telescopes undergo gravitational deformations which affect both geodetic and astronomic observations. In order to assess the extent and magnitude of such deformations and to evaluate their effect on telescopes' performances, terrestrial surveying methods can be applied to monitor the telescopes' structure at different pointing elevations. Finite Element Model analysis, laser scanner surveying, trilateration and triangulation have been applied on the telescope in Medicina to estimate i) the deformations of the primary mirror and to monitor ii) the position of the feed horn located at the primary focus and iii) the position of the vertex of the paraboloid. If detectable, these deformations modify the position of the primary focus and the signal path length and may therefore reduce the antenna gain and bias the phase of the incoming signal. We are presenting the investigations performed on the Medicina VLBI telescope, quantifying the magnitude of the deformations of the primary dish, the quadrupode and the vertex and we are also presenting an elevation dependent model for signal path corrections.

  19. Age and residence time of terrestrial source water in the northwest Atlantic shelf seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, R.; Todd, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal river mouths and bays are the junctions where terrestrial-source water meets and mixes with water from the open ocean. Once the riverine water reaches the coastal ocean, its eventual fate is largely unknown and difficult to trace. Rivers that flow into the ocean may contain high levels of nutrients and organic matter, so understanding the fate of terrestrial source water is important for a variety of biogeochemical processes that occur in the shelf seas. The fate of this terrestrial source water may be described in terms of its mean age (the time since it reached the ocean) and its residence time (the time it remains on the continental shelf). Using a high-resolution ocean model, we apply the constituent-oriented age and residence time (CART) theory to a large region encompassing the northwest Atlantic shelf seas to calculate the mean age of terrestrial source water and its residence time. For this application, 196 river mouths are used as sources of terrestrial water from South America to Nova Scotia. We investigate the spatial and seasonal variability of the water's mean age and compute the residence time within four different shelf regions: the Carribean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, the South Atlantic Bight, and the Mid-Atlantic Bight/Gulf of Maine. From the estimates of mean age and residence time, we describe the impact of the coastal circulation on the eventual fate of terrestrial waters, and provide conjecture on how varying transport time scales may affect the general biogeochemical processes in the coastal ocean.

  20. Tectonic evolution of the terrestrial planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J W; Solomon, S C

    1981-07-03

    The style and evolution of tectonics on the terrestrial planets differ substantially. The style is related to the thickness of the lithosphere and to whether the lithosphere is divided into distinct, mobile plates that can be recycled into the mantle, as on Earth, or is a single spherical shell, as on the moon, Mars, and Mercury. The evolution of a planetary lithosphere and the development of plate tectonics appear to be influenced by several factors, including planetary size, chemistry, and external and internal heat sources. Vertical tectonic movement due to lithospheric loading or uplift is similar on all of the terrestrial planets and is controlled by the local thickness and rheology of the lithosphere. The surface of Venus, although known only at low resolution, displays features both similar to those on Earth (mountain belts, high plateaus) and similar to those on the smaller planets (possible impact basins). Improved understanding of the tectonic evolution of Venus will permit an evaluation of the relative roles of planetary size and chemistry in determining evolutionary style.

  1. Grazers: biocatalysts of terrestrial silica cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandevenne, Floor Ina; Barão, Ana Lúcia; Schoelynck, Jonas; Smis, Adriaan; Ryken, Nick; Van Damme, Stefan; Meire, Patrick; Struyf, Eric

    2013-12-07

    Silica is well known for its role as inducible defence mechanism countering herbivore attack, mainly through precipitation of opaline, biogenic silica (BSi) bodies (phytoliths) in plant epidermal tissues. Even though grazing strongly interacts with other element cycles, its impact on terrestrial silica cycling has never been thoroughly considered. Here, BSi content of ingested grass, hay and faeces of large herbivores was quantified by performing multiple chemical extraction procedures for BSi, allowing the assessment of chemical reactivity. Dissolution experiments with grass and faeces were carried out to measure direct availability of BSi for dissolution. Average BSi and readily soluble silica numbers were higher in faeces as compared with grass or hay, and differences between herbivores could be related to distinct digestive strategies. Reactivity and dissolvability of BSi increases after digestion, mainly due to degradation of organic matrices, resulting in higher silica turnover rates and mobilization potential from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems in non-grazed versus grazed pasture systems (2 versus 20 kg Si ha(-1) y(-1)). Our results suggest a crucial yet currently unexplored role of herbivores in determining silica export from land to ocean, where its availability is linked to eutrophication events and carbon sequestration through C-Si diatom interactions.

  2. Toward a model for assessing level of personality functioning in DSM-5, part II: empirical articulation of a core dimension of personality pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morey, L.C.; Berghuis, H.; Bender, D.S.; Verheul, R.; Krueger, R.F.; Skodol, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    The extensive comorbidity among Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) personality disorders might be compelling evidence of essential commonalities among these disorders reflective of a general level of personality

  3. "Feeling good in your own skin" part II: Idiomatic expressions--the way language connects to the primary levels of mental organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufman, Ravit; Yigael, Yoav

    2011-03-01

    After describing the role of sensations in the primary levels of mental organization, this part of the article suggests viewing somatic idioms as the language's way to connect with these levels. We seek to exemplify the qualities, meanings and functioning of idioms, since they serve as a basic key in investigating the different layers of the mind. Examples taken from clinical cases, as well as from universal literary products, such as fairy tales, provide useful contributions to this argument.

  4. Landscape heterogeneity and marine subsidy generate extensive intrapopulation niche diversity in a large terrestrial vertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darimont, Chris T; Paquet, Paul C; Reimchen, Thomas E

    2009-01-01

    1. Inquiries into niche variation within populations typically focus on proximate ecological causes such as competition. Here we examine how landscape heterogeneity and allochthonous (marine) subsidy might ultimately generate intrapopulation niche diversity. 2. Using stable isotope analysis, we detected extensive terrestrial-marine isotopic niche variation among subpopulations, social groups, and individual grey wolves (Canis lupus) that occupy a spatially heterogeneous landscape in coastal British Columbia comprising a mainland area and adjacent archipelago. 3. The inner island subpopulation exhibited the widest isotopic niche in the population, consuming extensive terrestrial and marine resources. Mainland and outer island subpopulations occupied comparatively narrow and primarily terrestrial, and primarily marine, niches respectively. Within these biogeographical subpopulations, social groups also diverged in niche. 4. To support examination at the individual level, we used an isotopic approach to test Van Valen's (1965) niche variation hypothesis. Consistent with the hypothesis, we observed that among-individual variation increased with subpopulation niche width. 5. Patterns at all levels related to how a spatially heterogeneous coastal landscape structured the competitive environment, which in turn mediated the availability and use of terrestrial and marine resources. Broadly, our results suggest that spatial heterogeneity and allochthonous subsidy--both widespread but commonly subject to contemporary anthropogenic change--might provide novel opportunities for examination and conservation of ecological variation within populations.

  5. SUITS/SWUSV: a Solar-Terrestrial Space Weather & Climate Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The SUITS/SWUSV (Solar Ultraviolet Influence on Troposphere/Stratosphere, a Space Weather & Ultraviolet Solar Variability mission) microsatellite mission is developed on one hand to determine the origins of the Sun's activity, understand the flaring process (high energy flare characterization) and onset (forecasting) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and, on the other hand, to determine the dynamics and coupling of Earth's atmosphere and its response to solar variability (in particular UV) and terrestrial inputs. It therefore includes the prediction and detection of major eruptions and CMEs (Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging 200-220 nm), the solar forcing on the climate through radiation, and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance 170-400 nm and ozone measurements). SUITS/SWUSV includes a 8 instruments model payload with, in particular for Space Weather and Climate, SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability), SOLSIM (Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor), a spectrometer with 0.65 nm spectral resolution from 170 to 340 nm, SUPR (Solar Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with UV filter radiometers at Lyman-Alpha, Herzberg, MgII, CN bandhead and UV bands coverage up to 400 nm, and ERBO (Earth Radiative Budget and Ozone), NADIR oriented to measure ozone (6 bands) and 0.1-100 μm ERB. Example of accommodation of the payload has been performed on a new PROBA type platform very nicely by Qinetic. Heritage is important both for instruments and platform leading to high TRL levels. SUITS/SWUSV is designed in view of ESA Small Mission Calls and other possible CNES/NASA opportunities in the near future (Heliophysics, Earth Observation, etc.).

  6. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    ABSTRACT: A Schiff base was prepared from the reaction of 2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid and 2, 4 - pentanedione. The reaction of the prepared Schiff base with ethanolic solution of copper (II) chloride formed diaquo bis( N – 2 – amino – 3 - methylbutyl - 2, 4 - pentanedionato) copper (II) complex. The Schiff base is ...

  7. The rise of the mine water level in the area of the former Kohinoor II mine and the influence on the surrounding aquifer systems of abandoned mines in the central part of the North Bohemian Brown Coal Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Milan Mikoláš; Jiří Varady; Jaroslav Bažant; František Žoček

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate the process of terminating the mine water pumping after the liquidation of the Kohinoor II coal mine, situated in the central part of the North Bohemian Brown Coal Basin (NBB) and the subsequent resumption of pumping from the surface after the mine water rise in the area of the former mine to the desired level. We analyzed previously known data, particularly the amount of mine water pumped from the mine area and the surrounding abandoned mines in the pas...

  8. Terrestrial quarantine considerations for unmanned sample return missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, A. R.; Stavro, W.; Miller, L. W.; Taylor, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    For the purpose of understanding some of the possible implications of a terrestrial quarantine constraint on a mission and for developing a basic approach which can be used to demonstrate compliance beyond that developed for Apollo, a terrestrial quarantine study was performed. It is shown that some of the basic tools developed and used by the planetary quarantine community have applicability to terrestrial quarantine analysis. By using these tools, it is concluded that: (1) the method of biasing the earth aiming point when returning from the planet is necessary but, by itself, may not satisfy terrestrial quarantine constraints; and (2) spacecraft and container design significantly influence contamination transfer.

  9. Preconcentration, separation and spectrophotometric determination of aluminium(III) in water samples and dialysis concentrates at trace levels with 8-hydroxyquinoline-cobalt(II) coprecipitation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Volkan Numan; Arslan, Deniz; Ozdes, Duygu; Soylak, Mustafa; Tufekci, Mehmet

    2010-10-15

    A separation-preconcentration procedure was developed for the determination of trace amounts of aluminium in water samples and dialysis concentrates by UV-vis Spectrophotometry after coprecipitation using 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as a chelating agent and Co(II) as a carrier element. This procedure is based on filtration of the solution containing precipitate on a cellulose nitrate membrane filter following aluminium(III) coprecipitation with Co/8-HQ and then the precipitates together with membrane filter were dissolved in concentrated nitric acid. The metal contents of the final solution were determined by UV-vis Spectrophotometry with Erio Chrome Cyanine-R standard method. Several parameters including pH of sample solution, amount of carrier element and reagent, standing time, sample volume for precipitation and the effects of diverse ions were examined. The enrichment factor was calculated as 50 and the detection limits, corresponding to three times the standard deviation of the blank (N: 10), was found to be 0.2 microg L(-1). The accuracy of the method was tested with standard reference material (CRM-TMDW-500) and spiked addition. Determination of aluminium(III) was carried out in sea water, river water, tap water and haemodialysis fluids samples. The recoveries were >95%. The relative standard deviations of determination were less than 6%. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of protein C and protein S levels in patients with diabetes mellitus receiving therapy with statins and ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş, Şerife; Uçak, Sema; Kurt, Fatma; Taşdemir, Mehmet; Kutlu, Orkide; Eker, Pınar

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate protein C, protein S level in patients with diabetes mellitus receiving statin and ACE inhibitor/ARB therapy. 95 patients were included in the study and divided into four groups depending on the use of statin and ACE inhibitor/ARB therapy. Group 1 comprised of patients receiving statin therapy (n = 15), Group 2 comprised of patients receiving ACE inhibitor/ARB therapy (n = 31), Group 3 comprised of patients receiving statin and ACE inhibitor/ARB therapy (n = 23), and Group 4 comprised of patients who did not receive either statin or ACE inhibitor/ARB therapy (n = 26). These four groups were compared with respect to protein C, protein S, fibrinogen, D-dimer, INR, and aPTT levels. There were statistically significant differences with respect to protein C levels. Group 1 and group 2 had higher protein C levels compared with group 4. (p ACE inhibitor/ARB therapy had higher protein C levels. Use of statin and ACE inhibitor/ARB therapy in diabetic patients decrease hypercoagulability and therefore could reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of heat from the drainage water at the southern end of the Gotthard low-level rail tunnel - Feasibility study, phase II; Waermenutzung Tunnelwasser Basistunnel Gotthard, Suedportal. Machbarkeitsstudie Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dups, Ch.

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the possibilities of using the drainage water at the southern end of the Gotthard low-level railway tunnel in Switzerland as a source of heat for several possible projects. The drainage water, estimated at 80 - 460 litres per second at a temperature of 30 - 35 {sup o}C, could possibly be used for heating greenhouses, providing a combined tropical greenhouse and fish farm, heating a wellness-spa, or for district heating or the heating of particular buildings. The thermal use of the water and its further use as drinking water is also considered. Figures on energy yields and costs are presented and estimates of the savings in fossil fuels and carbon dioxide emissions are quoted.

  12. Decreased admission serum albumin level is an independent predictor of long-term mortality in hospital survivors of acute myocardial infarction. Soroka Acute Myocardial Infarction II (SAMI-II) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakht, Ygal; Gilutz, Harel; Shiyovich, Arthur

    2016-09-15

    Decreased serum albumin level (SAL) was reported to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events and short term-mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To evaluate the association between SAL and long-term mortality in AMI hospital survivors. Retrospective analysis of patients admitted in a tertiary medical center for AMI 2002-2012 and discharged alive. active infections, inflammatory diseases, significant liver or kidney failure, malignancy, ejection-fraction 4.1g/dL. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality for up-to 10-years post-AMI. Out of 12,535 patients, 8750 were included. Patients with reduced SAL were older, higher rate of women, increased prevalence of severe left ventricular dysfunction, chronic renal failure, diabetes mellitus and ST-elevation AMI, 3-vessel coronary artery disease, and in-hospital complications. While the prevalence of chronic ischemic coronary disease, dyslipidemia, smokers and obesity, was lower. Mortality rates throughout the follow-up period increased as SAL decreased with 17.6%, 24%, 28.5%, 38.6%, and 57.5% for SAL of >4.1, 3.9-4.1, 3.7-3.9, 3.4-3.7 and 4.1g/dL as the reference group, Adjusted Hazard Ratio values were 1.14 (p=0.107), 1.23 (p=0.007), 1.39 (p<0.001) and 1.70 (p<0.001) for the SAL categories of 3.9-4.1, 3.7-3.9, 3.4-3.7 and <3.4g/dL respectively. Decreased SAL on admission, including levels within "normal" clinical range, is significantly associated with long-term all-cause mortality in hospital survivors of AMI with a "dose-response" type association. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Workshop on Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Oxygen in the Terrestrial Planets, July 20-23,2004, Santa Fe, New Mexico. The contents include: 1) Experimental Constraints on Oxygen and Other Light Element Partitioning During Planetary Core Formation; 2) In Situ Determination of Fe(3+)/SigmaFe of Spinels by Electron Microprobe: An Evaluation of the Flank Method; 3) The Effect of Oxygen Fugacity on Large-Strain Deformation and Recrystallization of Olivine; 4) Plagioclase-Liquid Trace Element Oxygen Barometry and Oxygen Behaviour in Closed and Open System Magmatic Processes; 5) Core Formation in the Earth: Constraints from Ni and Co; 6) Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of the Terrestrial Planets; 7) The Effect of Oxygen Fugacity on Electrical Conduction of Olivine and Implications for Earth s Mantle; 8) Redox Chemical Diffusion in Silicate Melts: The Impact of the Semiconductor Condition; 9) Ultra-High Temperature Effects in Earth s Magma Ocean: Pt and W Partitioning; 10) Terrestrial Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Variations: Primordial Values, Systematics, Subsolidus Effects, Planetary Comparisons, and the Role of Water; 11) Redox State of the Moon s Interior; 12) How did the Terrestrial Planets Acquire Their Water?; 13) Molecular Oxygen Mixing Ratio and Its Seasonal Variability in the Martian Atmosphere; 14) Exchange Between the Atmosphere and the Regolith of Mars: Discussion of Oxygen and Sulfur Isotope Evidence; 15) Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Systematics of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Meteoric Waters: Evidence from North Texas; 16) Implications of Isotopic and Redox Heterogeneities in Silicate Reservoirs on Mars; 17) Oxygen Isotopic Variation of the Terrestrial Planets; 18) Redox Exchanges in Hydrous Magma; 19) Hydrothermal Systems on Terrestrial Planets: Lessons from Earth; 20) Oxygen in Martian Meteorites: A Review of Results from Mineral Equilibria Oxybarometers; 21) Non-Linear Fractionation of Oxygen Isotopes Implanted in

  14. Near-Field Acoustic Power Level Analysis of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Cruise Conditions, Technical Report II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Near-field acoustic power level analysis of F31A31 open rotor model has been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated cruise flight conditions. The non-proprietary parts of the test data obtained from experiments in the 8x6 supersonic wind tunnel were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center. The tone and broadband components of total noise have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, freestream Mach number, and input shaft power, with different blade-pitch setting angles at simulated cruise flight conditions, are presented and discussed. Empirical equations relating models acoustic power level and input shaft power have been developed. The near-field acoustic efficiency of the model at simulated cruise conditions is also determined. It is hoped that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  15. An ecological model of the habitat mosaic in estuarine nursery areas: Part II – Projecting effects of sea level rise on fish production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the response of fish populations to habitat change mediated by sea level rise (SLR) is a key component of ecosystem-based management. Yet, no direct link has been established between habitat change due to SLR and fish population production. Here we take a coupled ...

  16. The association of daily sulfur dioxide air pollution levels with hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Europe (The Aphea-II study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunyer, J; Ballester, F; Le Tertre, A; Atkinson, R; Ayres, JG; Forastiere, F; Forsberg, B; Vonk, JM; Bisanti, L; Tenias, JM; Medina, S; Schwartz, J; Katsouyvanni, K

    The objective of this study is to assess the short-term effect of sulfur dioxide (SO2) air pollution levels on hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases. Daily mean hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases, ischemic heart diseases (IHDs), and stroke in seven European areas (the cities

  17. The effect of ultraviolet radiation from a novel portable fluorescent lamp on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels in healthy adults with Fitzpatrick skin types II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabai, Nicholas S; Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Holick, Michael F

    2012-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) B irradiation may provide a safe and effective method to treat vitamin D deficiency. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a novel Sperti D/UV-Fluorescent lamp in converting 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) to previtamin D(3) in vitro and in raising serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) [25(OH)D(3) ] in healthy adults. The lamp was assessed in vitro using a 7-DHC solution and a human skin sample. In a prospective cohort study, five healthy adults with skin types II and III were exposed to a 0.75 minimal erythemal dose of UV radiation over ≈ 9% of body surface area three times a week for 4 weeks. The main outcomes were percentage of conversion from 7-DHC to previtamin D(3) in vitro and changes in serum 25(OH)D(3) after irradiation in vivo. A dose response between UV irradiation time and conversion of 7-DHC to previtamin D(3) was seen in the 7-DHC solution and surgically obtained human skin. The subjects had a significant increase in mean 25(OH)D(3) from 18.4 ± 8.2 to 27.3 ± 7.6 ng/ml (P < 0.001) after 4 weeks of irradiation. No adverse events occurred. The Sperti D/UV-Fluorescent lamp is effective in converting 7-DHC to previtamin D(3) in vitro and in raising serum 25(OH)D(3) in healthy adults. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. THE EFFECT OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FROM A NOVEL PORTABLE FLUORESCENT LAMP ON SERUM 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D3 LEVELS IN HEALTHY ADULTS WITH FITZPATRICK SKIN TYPES II AND III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabai, Nicholas S.; Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Holick, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Background/purpose Ultraviolet B irradiation may provide a safe and effective method to treat vitamin D deficiency. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a novel Sperti D/UV-Fluorescent lamp in converting 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) to previtamin D3 in vitro and in raising serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] in healthy adults. Methods The lamp was assessed in vitro using a 7-DHC solution and a human skin sample. In a prospective cohort study, five healthy adults with skin types II and III were exposed to a 0.75 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UV radiation over ~9% of body surface area 3 times/week for 4 weeks. The main outcomes were percentage of conversion from 7-DHC to previtamin D3 in vitro and changes in serum 25(OH)D3 after irradiation in vivo. Results A dose-response between UV irradiation time and conversion of 7-DHC to previtamin D3 was seen in the 7-DHC solution and surgically obtained human skin. The subjects had a significant increase in mean 25(OH)D3 from 18.4±8.2 to 27.3±7.6 ng/mL (P<0.001) after 4 weeks of irradiation. No adverse events occurred. Conclusion The Sperti D/UV-Fluorescent lamp is effective in converting 7-DHC to previtamin D3 in vitro and in raising serum 25(OH)D3 in healthy adults. PMID:23126292

  19. Association between fasting serum glucose levels and incidence of colorectal cancer in Korean men: the Korean Cancer Prevention Study-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Young; Jung, Keum Ji; Linton, John A; Jee, Sun Ha

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is steadily increasing worldwide. Numerous studies have demonstrated that diabetes mellitus is related to an increased risk of CRC; however, the association between impaired fasting glucose and CRC is unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the correlation between fasting serum glucose (FSG) levels and the incidence of CRC, which can be used to develop novel methods for preventing CRC. A total of 175,677 individuals from the Korean Metabolic Syndrome Research Initiative study were enrolled between 2004 and 2011. The incidence of CRC was assessed during a mean follow-up of 4.7 years. Hazard ratios (HR) for CRC according to FSG levels were calculated with the Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and regular exercise. The risk of developing CRC in subjects with high FSG was significant (HR, 1.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.90), and the risk was higher in men (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.12-2.05). The HR of rectal cancer, but not colon cancer, was significantly higher both in the total population and in men in the high FSG group. The incidence of CRC positively correlated with FSG levels in men. Rectal cancer incidence was especially correlated with high FSG in the site-specific analysis. Therefore, serum glucose levels maybe a potential marker of colorectal cancer. Early detection and intervention for controlling elevated glucose levels may be indicated as a way to prevent carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Verification of Space Weather Forecasts using Terrestrial Weather Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, E.; Murray, S.; Pope, E.; Stephenson, D.; Sharpe, M.; Bingham, S.; Jackson, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Met Office Space Weather Operations Centre (MOSWOC) provides a range of 24/7 operational space weather forecasts, alerts, and warnings, which provide valuable information on space weather that can degrade electricity grids, radio communications, and satellite electronics. Forecasts issued include arrival times of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and probabilistic forecasts for flares, geomagnetic storm indices, and energetic particle fluxes and fluences. These forecasts are produced twice daily using a combination of output from models such as Enlil, near-real-time observations, and forecaster experience. Verification of forecasts is crucial for users, researchers, and forecasters to understand the strengths and limitations of forecasters, and to assess forecaster added value. To this end, the Met Office (in collaboration with Exeter University) has been adapting verification techniques from terrestrial weather, and has been working closely with the International Space Environment Service (ISES) to standardise verification procedures. We will present the results of part of this work, analysing forecast and observed CME arrival times, assessing skill using 2x2 contingency tables. These MOSWOC forecasts can be objectively compared to those produced by the NASA Community Coordinated Modelling Center - a useful benchmark. This approach cannot be taken for the other forecasts, as they are probabilistic and categorical (e.g., geomagnetic storm forecasts give probabilities of exceeding levels from minor to extreme). We will present appropriate verification techniques being developed to address these forecasts, such as rank probability skill score, and comparing forecasts against climatology and persistence benchmarks. As part of this, we will outline the use of discrete time Markov chains to assess and improve the performance of our geomagnetic storm forecasts. We will also discuss work to adapt a terrestrial verification visualisation system to space weather, to help

  1. Global carbon export from the terrestrial biosphere controlled by erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, Valier; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-05-14

    Riverine export of particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean affects the atmospheric carbon inventory over a broad range of timescales. On geological timescales, the balance between sequestration of POC from the terrestrial biosphere and oxidation of rock-derived (petrogenic) organic carbon sets the magnitude of the atmospheric carbon and oxygen reservoirs. Over shorter timescales, variations in the rate of exchange between carbon reservoirs, such as soils and marine sediments, also modulate atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The respective fluxes of biospheric and petrogenic organic carbon are poorly constrained, however, and mechanisms controlling POC export have remained elusive, limiting our ability to predict POC fluxes quantitatively as a result of climatic or tectonic changes. Here we estimate biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes for a suite of river systems representative of the natural variability in catchment properties. We show that export yields of both biospheric and petrogenic POC are positively related to the yield of suspended sediment, revealing that POC export is mostly controlled by physical erosion. Using a global compilation of gauged suspended sediment flux, we derive separate estimates of global biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes of 157(+74)(-50) and 43(+61)(-25) megatonnes of carbon per year, respectively. We find that biospheric POC export is primarily controlled by the capacity of rivers to mobilize and transport POC, and is largely insensitive to the magnitude of terrestrial primary production. Globally, physical erosion rates affect the rate of biospheric POC burial in marine sediments more strongly than carbon sequestration through silicate weathering. We conclude that burial of biospheric POC in marine sediments becomes the dominant long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide sink under enhanced physical erosion.

  2. Unexpected terrestrial hand posture diversity in wild mountain gorillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nathan E; Ostrofsky, Kelly R; McFarlin, Shannon C; Robbins, Martha M; Stoinski, Tara S; Almécija, Sergio

    2018-01-18

    Gorillas, along with chimpanzees and bonobos, are ubiquitously described as 'knuckle-walkers.' Consequently, knuckle-walking (KW) has been featured pre-eminently in hypotheses of the pre-bipedal locomotor behavior of hominins and in the evolution of locomotor behavior in apes. However, anecdotal and behavioral accounts suggest that mountain gorillas may utilize a more complex repertoire of hand postures, which could alter current interpretations of African ape locomotion and its role in the emergence of human bipedalism. Here we documented hand postures during terrestrial locomotion in wild mountain gorillas to investigate the frequency with which KW and other hand postures are utilized in the wild. Multiple high-speed cameras were used to record bouts of terrestrial locomotion of 77 habituated mountain gorillas at Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (Uganda) and Volcanoes National Park (Rwanda). We captured high-speed video of hand contacts in 8% of the world's population of mountain gorillas. Our results reveal that nearly 40% of these gorillas used "non-KW" hand postures, and these hand postures constituted 15% of all hand contacts. Some of these "non-KW" hand postures have never been documented in gorillas, yet match hand postures previously identified in orangutans. These results highlight a previously unrecognized level of hand postural diversity in gorillas, and perhaps great apes generally. Although present at lower frequencies than KW, we suggest that the possession of multiple, versatile hand postures present in wild mountain gorillas may represent a shared feature of the African ape and human clade (or even great ape clade) rather than KW per se. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Exoskeletal chitin scales isometrically with body size in terrestrial insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lease, Hilary M; Wolf, Blair O

    2010-06-01

    The skeletal system of animals provides the support for a variety of activities and functions. For animals such as mammals, which have endoskeletons, research has shown that skeletal investment (mass) scales with body mass to the 1.1 power. In this study, we ask how exoskeletal investment in insects scales with body mass. We measured the body mass and mass of exoskeletal chitin of 551 adult terrestrial insects of 245 species, with dry masses ranging from 0.0001 to 2.41 g (0.0002-6.13 g wet mass) to assess the allometry of exoskeletal investment. Our results showed that exoskeletal chitin mass scales isometrically with dry body mass across the Insecta as M(chitin) = a M(dry) (b), where b = 1.03 +/- 0.04, indicating that both large and small terrestrial insects allocate a similar fraction of their body mass to chitin. This isometric chitin-scaling relationship was also evident at the taxonomic level of order, for all insect orders except Coleoptera. We additionally found that the relative exoskeletal chitin investment, indexed by the coefficient, a, varies with insect life history and phylogeny. Exoskeletal chitin mass tends to be proportionally less and to increase at a lower rate with mass in flying than in nonflying insects (M(flying insect chitin) = -0.56 x M(dry) (0.97); M(nonflying insect chitin) = -0.55 x M(dry) (1.03)), and to vary with insect order. Isometric scaling (b = 1) of insect exoskeletal chitin suggests that the exoskeleton in insects scales differently than support structures of most other organisms, which have a positive allometry (b > 1) (e.g., vertebrate endoskeleton, tree secondary tissue). The isometric pattern that we document here additionally suggests that exoskeletal investment may not be the primary limit on insect body size.

  4. A new map of standardized terrestrial ecosystems of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Roger G.; Comer, Patrick; Hak, Jon; Josse, Carmen; Bow, Jacquie; Warner, Harumi; Larwanou, Mahamane; Kelbessa, Ensermu; Bekele, Tamrat; Kehl, Harald; Amena, Ruba; Andriamasimanana, Rado; Ba, Taibou; Benson, Laurence; Boucher, Timothy; Brown, Matthew; Cress, Jill J.; Dassering, Oueddo; Friesen, Beverly A.; Gachathi, Francis; Houcine, Sebei; Keita, Mahamadou; Khamala, Erick; Marangu, Dan; Mokua, Fredrick; Morou, Boube; Mucina, Ladislav; Mugisha, Samuel; Mwavu, Edward; Rutherford, Michael; Sanou, Patrice; Syampungani, Stephen; Tomor, Bojoi; Vall, Abdallahi Ould Mohamed; Vande Weghe, Jean Pierre; Wangui, Eunice; Waruingi, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems and vegetation of Africa were classified and mapped as part of a larger effort and global protocol (GEOSS – the Global Earth Observation System of Systems), which includes an activity to map terrestrial ecosystems of the earth in a standardized, robust, and practical manner, and at the finest possible spatial resolution. To model the potential distribution of ecosystems, new continental datasets for several key physical environment datalayers (including coastline, landforms, surficial lithology, and bioclimates) were developed at spatial and classification resolutions finer than existing similar datalayers. A hierarchical vegetation classification was developed by African ecosystem scientists and vegetation geographers, who also provided sample locations of the newly classified vegetation units. The vegetation types and ecosystems were then mapped across the continent using a classification and regression tree (CART) inductive model, which predicted the potential distribution of vegetation types from a suite of biophysical environmental attributes including bioclimate region, biogeographic region, surficial lithology, landform, elevation and land cover. Multi-scale ecosystems were classified and mapped in an increasingly detailed hierarchical framework using vegetation-based concepts of class, subclass, formation, division, and macrogroup levels. The finest vegetation units (macrogroups) classified and mapped in this effort are defined using diagnostic plant species and diagnostic growth forms that reflect biogeographic differences in composition and sub-continental to regional differences in mesoclimate, geology, substrates, hydrology, and disturbance regimes (FGDC, 2008). The macrogroups are regarded as meso-scale (100s to 10,000s of hectares) ecosystems. A total of 126 macrogroup types were mapped, each with multiple, repeating occurrences on the landscape. The modeling effort was implemented at a base spatial resolution of 90 m. In

  5. Terrestrial nitrogen cycles: Some unanswered questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen is generally considered to be the element which most often limits the growth of plants in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. It regulates plant growth because photosynthetic rates are strongly dependent on the concentration of nitrogen in leaves, and because relatively large mounts of protein are required for cell division and growth. Yet nitrogen is abundant in the biosphere - the well-mixed pool in the atmosphere is considered inexhaustible compared to biotic demand, and the amount of already fixed organic nitrogen in soils far exceeds annual plant uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. In regions where natural vegetation is not nitrogen limited, continuous cultivation induces nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen loss from cultivated lands is more rapid than that of other elements, and nitrogen fertilization is generally required to maintain crop yield under any continuous system. The pervasiveness of nitrogen deficiency in many natural and most managed sites is discussed.

  6. The origin of modern terrestrial life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2007-01-01

    The study of the origin of life covers many areas of expertise and requires the input of various scientific communities. In recent years, this research field has often been viewed as part of a broader agenda under the name of “exobiology” or “astrobiology.” In this review, we have somewhat narrowed this agenda, focusing on the origin of modern terrestrial life. The adjective “modern” here means that we did not speculate on different forms of life that could have possibly appeared on our planet, but instead focus on the existing forms (cells and viruses). We try to briefly present the state of the art about alternative hypotheses discussing not only the origin of life per se, but also how life evolved to produce the modern biosphere through a succession of steps that we would like to characterize as much as possible. PMID:19404443

  7. Geology and Habitability of Terrestrial Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Fishbaugh, Kathryn E; Raulin, François; Marais, David J; Korablev, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Given the fundamental importance of and universal interest in whether extraterrestrial life has developed or could eventually develop in our solar system and beyond, it is vital that an examination of planetary habitability goes beyond simple assumptions such as, "Where there is water, there is life." This book has resulted from a workshop at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland (5-9 September 2005) that brought together planetary geologists, geophysicists, atmospheric scientists, and biologists to discuss the multi-faceted problem of how the habitability of a planet co-evolves with the geology of the surface and interior, the atmosphere, and the magnetosphere. Each of the six chapters has been written by authors with a range of expertise so that each chapter is itself multi-disciplinary, comprehensive, and accessible to scientists in all disciplines. These chapters delve into what life needs to exist and ultimately to thrive, the early environments of the young terrestrial pl...

  8. Terrestrial plant methane production and emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature, ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species. Further, we analyze rates of measured emission of aerobically produced CH4 in pectin and in plant tissues from different studies and argue that pectin is very far from the sole......In this minireview, we evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants and plant. Clearly, despite much uncertainty and skepticism, we conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce...... aerobic CH4 into a global budget is inadequate. Thus it is too early to draw the line under the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  9. Cornice Monitoring with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Alexander; Hancock, Holt

    2017-04-01

    Cornice failure poses a threat to infrastructure and human life in central Svalbard, where cornice fall avalanches comprise a significant portion of all observed avalanche activity. Cornice accretion occurs seasonally on the plateau edges of the mountains that border Longyearbyen - Svalbard's primary settlement - where snow entrained over the long fetches of the plateau summits is deposited by the prevailing winds. Here, we present the preliminary results from our first season regularly monitoring these cornice systems with the Riegl VZ-6000 terrestrial laser scanner. We demonstrate the applicability of TLS data acquisition for monitoring cornice system dynamics and discuss the utility of such measurements for hazard management purposes. Finally, we show how this unique high spatial resolution data will act as a reference dataset for modeling exercises to improve the process understanding of cornice development and failure - in arctic environments and throughout the world.

  10. The Digital Dividend of Terrestrial Broadcasting

    CERN Document Server

    Beutler, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The “digital revolution” of the last two decades has pervaded innumerable aspects of our daily lives and changed our planet irreversibly. The shift from analog to digital broadcasting has facilitated a seemingly infinite variety of new applications—audience interactivity being but one example. The greater efficiency and compression of digital media have endowed broadcasters with a “digital dividend” of spare transmission capacity over and above the requirements of terrestrial broadcasting. The question is, who will use it, and how? Comparing the European experience with that of broadcasters elsewhere in the world, the author sketches the current status of international frequency management, quantifies the value of the “dividend” itself, analyzes the details of the analog-to-digital switchovers already completed, and posits what the future holds for the sector. As we grapple with new devices, inconceivable a mere generation ago, that allow us to access digital media instantly, anywhere and at any...

  11. Nonlinear Waves in the Terrestrial Quasiparallel Foreshock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Kolotkov, D. Y.; O'Connell, D.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Rowlands, G.

    2016-12-01

    We provide strongly conclusive evidence that the cubic nonlinearity plays an important part in the evolution of the large amplitude magnetic structures in the terrestrial foreshock. Large amplitude nonlinear wave trains at frequencies above the proton cyclotron frequency are identified after nonharmonic slow variations are filtered out by applying the empirical mode decomposition. Numerical solutions of the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation, predicted analytically by the use of a pseudopotential approach, are found to be consistent with the observed wave forms. The approximate phase speed of these nonlinear waves, indicated by the parameters of numerical solutions, is of the order of the local Alfvén speed. We suggest that the feedback of the large amplitude fluctuations on background plasma is reflected in the evolution of the pseudopotential.

  12. Grazing livestock are exposed to terrestrial cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGorum, Bruce C; Pirie, R Scott; Glendinning, Laura; McLachlan, Gerry; Metcalf, James S; Banack, Sandra A; Cox, Paul A; Codd, Geoffrey A

    2015-02-25

    While toxins from aquatic cyanobacteria are a well-recognised cause of disease in birds and animals, exposure of grazing livestock to terrestrial cyanobacteria has not been described. This study identified terrestrial cyanobacteria, predominantly Phormidium spp., in the biofilm of plants from most livestock fields investigated. Lower numbers of other cyanobacteria, microalgae and fungi were present on many plants. Cyanobacterial 16S rDNA, predominantly from Phormidium spp., was detected in all samples tested, including 6 plant washings, 1 soil sample and ileal contents from 2 grazing horses. Further work was performed to test the hypothesis that ingestion of cyanotoxins contributes to the pathogenesis of some currently unexplained diseases of grazing horses, including equine grass sickness (EGS), equine motor neuron disease (EMND) and hepatopathy. Phormidium population density was significantly higher on EGS fields than on control fields. The cyanobacterial neurotoxic amino acid 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) was detected in plant washings from EGS fields, but worst case scenario estimations suggested the dose would be insufficient to cause disease. Neither DAB nor the cyanobacterial neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-L-alanine and N-(2-aminoethyl) glycine were detected in neural tissue from 6 EGS horses, 2 EMND horses and 7 control horses. Phormidium was present in low numbers on plants where horses had unexplained hepatopathy. This study did not yield evidence linking known cyanotoxins with disease in grazing horses. However, further study is warranted to identify and quantify toxins produced by cyanobacteria on livestock fields, and determine whether, under appropriate conditions, known or unknown cyanotoxins contribute to currently unexplained diseases in grazing livestock.

  13. Can space ties on board GNSS satellites replace terrestrial ties in the implementation of Terrestrial Reference Frames?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Sara; Zerbini, Susanna; Altamimi, Zuheir; Rebischung, Paul; Errico, Maddalena; Santi, Efisio

    2016-04-01

    The realization of Terrestrial Reference Frames (TRFs) must be periodically updated in order to account for newly acquired observations and for upgrades in data analysis procedures and/or combination techniques. Any innovative computation strategy should ameliorate the definition of the frame physical parameters, upon which a number of scientific applications critically rely. On the basis of the requirements of scientific cutting edge studies, the geodetic community has estimated that the present day challenge in the determination of TRFs is to provide a frame that is accurate and long-term stable at the level of 1 mm and 0.1 mm/y respectively. This work aims at characterizing the frame realized by a combination of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations via their co-location on board GNSS spacecrafts. In particular, it is established how such a frame compares to the traditional ITRF computation and what is the impact on the realization of the frame origin and scale. Four years of data from a global network encompassing about one hundred GNSS stations and all SLR sites have been analyzed. In order to ensure the highest possible consistency, the raw data of both techniques are treated with the same analysis Software (Bernese GNSS Software 5.2) following IERS2010 Conventions. Both weekly and long term solutions are carried out exploiting either the Bernese or the Combination and Analysis of Terrestrial Reference Frames (CATREF) Software packages. We present the results of a combination study involving GNSS data and SLR observations to the two LAGEOS and to the GNSS satellites equipped with retroreflector arrays. The latter type of measurements is currently not included in the computation of the official ITRF solutions. The assessment of the benefit that they could provide to the definition of the origin and scale of the ITRF is however worth investigating, as such data provide the potential for linking the GNSS and

  14. The rise of the mine water level in the area of the former Kohinoor II mine and the influence on the surrounding aquifer systems of abandoned mines in the central part of the North Bohemian Brown Coal Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Mikoláš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to evaluate the process of terminating the mine water pumping after the liquidation of the Kohinoor II coal mine, situated in the central part of the North Bohemian Brown Coal Basin (NBB and the subsequent resumption of pumping from the surface after the mine water rise in the area of the former mine to the desired level. We analyzed previously known data, particularly the amount of mine water pumped from the mine area and the surrounding abandoned mines in the past. Further the evaluation of known surrounding abandoned mines aquifer systems, accumulated in the coal seam (underground accumulation of water and the evaluation of the effect of increasing the water level in the Kohinoor II mine, focusing on the enlargement of the central mine aquifers and the evaluation of the effects of changes in the way of pumping on the surrounding coal seam and its mining with continued safe brown coal mining at the nearby Bílina mine, that can be ensured for at least another 25 years.

  15. Skill Training Analysis--Phase II: The Linkage of Unit Level Skill Training and Maintenance Productivity in Air Force F-16 Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-13

    sod IIN)OW a’ Manangement Consulting & Research, Inc. (MCR) had the task of developing a linkage between training received at installation-level...and parts availability can change the results achieved. However, intuitively, training must have an effect on maintenance productivity and, if a large...1980. 11-2 - -: . .’., .:. Jb . I.-_ . .. ...... NE- 16. a 19 1 -11- information is recorded each time there is a change in any of the ,-. columns A

  16. The role of terrestrial vegetation in mercury deposition: fate of stable mercury isotopes applied to upland and wetland forest canopies during the METAALICUS experiment (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graydon, J. A.; St. Louis, V. L.; Lindberg, S. E.; Sandilands, K.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Tate, M. T.; Harris, R.; Emmerton, C. A.; Richardson, M.; Asmath, H.

    2009-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an organic, neurotoxic form of mercury (Hg) that is responsible for fish consumption advisories in North American freshwaters. It is generally believed that increases in anthropogenic Hg emissions have resulted in high MeHg concentrations of fish. However, a direct relationship between deposition of inorganic Hg(II) and concentrations of MeHg in fish has been difficult to demonstrate because of our inability to distinguish newly-deposited Hg from Hg accumulated historically in ecosystems. The Mercury Experiment to Assess Atmospheric Loading In Canada and the US (METAALICUS) increased atmospheric inputs of mercury (Hg) to a small lake and its watershed to levels comparable to those in more industrialized regions. Between 2001 and 2006, three different enriched stable isotopes of Hg (spikes) were loaded to the watershed, one each to the surface of the lake (200Hg), the wetland (198Hg) and the forested upland (202Hg) areas of the catchment to determine the relative contribution of these sources to fish MeHg concentrations. Terrestrial vegetation often represents the first landscape compartment that new atmospheric Hg contacts upon deposition, and plants act as conduits of atmospheric Hg to the landscape. We will present pools and fluxes of spike Hg within upland and wetland canopy and ground vegetation compartments. Our Geographical Information Systems-based modeling approach to calculating spike pools used aircraft spray tracks, regressions between spike application rate and concentrations of spike in vegetation, a LiDAR-derived Leaf Area Index (LAI) map and relationships between LAI and canopy biomass. We observed that 30-50% of spike Hg applied to the upland and wetland was initially intercepted by the forest canopy. Average half lives of spike Hg on deciduous (110±30 days) and coniferous (180±40 days) forest canopy and ground vegetation (890±620 days) indicated that retention of new atmospheric Hg(II) on terrestrial vegetation delays

  17. A first-principles study of carbon-related energy levels in GaN. II. Complexes formed by carbon and hydrogen, silicon or oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Masahiko; Bellotti, Enrico

    2017-05-01

    This work presents an in-depth investigation of the properties of complexes composed of hydrogen, silicon, or oxygen with carbon, which are the major unintentional impurities in undoped GaN. This manuscript is a complement to our previous work on carbon-carbon and carbon-vacancy complexes. We have employed a first-principles method using Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functionals within the framework of generalized Kohn-Sham density functional theory. Two H-C, four Si-C, and five O-C complexes in different charge states have been considered. After full geometry relaxations, formation energies, binding energies, and both thermal and optical transition levels were obtained. The calculated energy levels have been systematically compared with the experimentally observed carbon related trap levels. Furthermore, we computed vibrational frequencies for selected defect complexes and defect concentrations were estimated in the low, mid, and high carbon doping scenarios considering two different cases where electrically active defects: (a) only carbon and vacancies and (b) not only carbon and vacancies but also hydrogen, silicon, and oxygen. We confirmed that CN is a dominant acceptor in GaN. In addition to it, a substantial amount of SiGa-CN complex exists in a neutral form. This complex is a likely candidate for the unknown form of carbon observed in undoped n-type GaN.

  18. Condensed-phase relaxation of multilevel quantum systems. II. Comparison of path integral calculations and second-order relaxation theory for a nondegenerate three-level system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Simone; Evans, Deborah G; Coalson, Rob D

    2006-09-28

    An exactly solvable model of multisite condensed-phase vibrational relaxation was studied in Paper I (Peter, S.; Evans, D. G.; Coalson, R. D. J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 18758.), where it was shown that long-time steady-state site populations of a degenerate N-level system are not equal (hence, they are non-Boltzmann) and depend on the initial preparation of the system and the number of sites that it comprises. Here we consider a generalization of the model to the case of a nondegenerate three-level system coupled to a high-dimensional bath: such a model system has direct relevance to a large class of donor-bridge-acceptor electron transfer processes. Because the quantum dynamics of this system cannot be computed analytically, we compare numerically exact path integral calculations to the predictions of second-order time-local relaxation theory. For modest system-bath coupling strengths, the two sets of results are in excellent agreement. They show that non-Boltzmann long-time steady-state site populations are obtained when the level splitting is small but nonzero, whereas at larger values of the system bias (asymmetry) these populations become Boltzmann distributed.

  19. Differences in metabolic costs of terrestrial mobility in two closely related species of albatross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Alexander P; Phillips, Richard A; Croxall, John P; Butler, Patrick J

    2007-08-01

    Black-browed albatrosses Thalassarche melanophrys typically colonise steeper habitats than grey-headed albatrosses T. chrysostoma. The present study investigated the effect of colony philopatry on terrestrial locomotory ability in these two species, to determine: (1) if there is a difference in terrestrial locomotory ability between these two closely related species, and (2) what physiological or behavioural adaptations may account for any differences identified. We examined the metabolic cost, mechanical efficiency on an incline, and gait characteristics of terrestrial locomotion of these two species on both level and inclined planes. T. chrysostoma were able to perform at a significantly greater speed than T. melanophrys without reaching a significantly different maximal rate of oxygen consumption (V(O(2))). Conversely, T. melanophrys were able to move up a significantly steeper incline than T. chrysostoma while maintaining a similar maximal V(O(2)). Each species demonstrates stride length, force production (behavioural) and leg length (morphological) adaptations that minimise the cost of traversing their chosen colonies, indicating a clear relationship between terrestrial performance and local topography. However, it is not possible to determine if the difference in locomotory ability results from differences in colony topography, or if choice of colony site is dictated by the ability of the species to traverse different terrain.

  20. A dual use case study of space technologies for terrestrial medical applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozmuta, Ioana

    2017-05-01

    Many challenges exist in understanding the human body as a whole, its adaptability, its resilience, its immunological response, its healing and regeneration power. New knowledge is usually obtained by exploring unique conditions and environments and space is one such variable. Primarily, these attributes have been studied in space for the purpose of understanding the effect of the space environment on long duration space travel. However a myriad of lessons learned have emerged that are important for terrestrial medicine problems such as cardiovascular changes, intracranial pressure changes, vision changes, reduced immunity, etc. For medical study purposes, the changes induced by the space environment on the human body are in general fast and predictable; they persist while in the space environment but also revert to the initial pre-flight healthy state upon return to Earth. This provides a unique cycle to study wellness and disease prediction as well as to develop more effective countermeasures for the benefit of people on earth. At a scientific level, the environment of space can be used to develop new lines of investigations and new knowledge to push the terrestrial state of the art (i.e. study of phase diagrams, identification of new system's states, etc). Moreover, the specialized requirements for space medicine have driven advances in terrestrial medical technologies in areas such as monitoring, diagnostic, prevention and treatment. This talk will provide an overview of compelling examples in key areas of interest for terrestrial medical applications.

  1. Coming down from the trees: Is terrestrial activity in Bornean orangutans natural or disturbance driven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancrenaz, Marc; Sollmann, Rahel; Meijaard, Erik; Hearn, Andrew J.; Ross, Joanna; Samejima, Hiromitsu; Loken, Brent; Cheyne, Susan M.; Stark, Danica J.; Gardner, Penny C.; Goossens, Benoit; Mohamed, Azlan; Bohm, Torsten; Matsuda, Ikki; Nakabayasi, Miyabi; Lee, Shan Khee; Bernard, Henry; Brodie, Jedediah; Wich, Serge; Fredriksson, Gabriella; Hanya, Goro; Harrison, Mark E.; Kanamori, Tomoko; Kretzschmar, Petra; Macdonald, David W.; Riger, Peter; Spehar, Stephanie; Ambu, Laurentius N.; Wilting, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The orangutan is the world's largest arboreal mammal, and images of the red ape moving through the tropical forest canopy symbolise its typical arboreal behaviour. Records of terrestrial behaviour are scarce and often associated with habitat disturbance. We conducted a large-scale species-level analysis of ground-based camera-trapping data to evaluate the extent to which Bornean orangutans Pongo pygmaeus come down from the trees to travel terrestrially, and whether they are indeed forced to the ground primarily by anthropogenic forest disturbances. Although the degree of forest disturbance and canopy gap size influenced terrestriality, orangutans were recorded on the ground as frequently in heavily degraded habitats as in primary forests. Furthermore, all age-sex classes were recorded on the ground (flanged males more often). This suggests that terrestrial locomotion is part of the Bornean orangutan's natural behavioural repertoire to a much greater extent than previously thought, and is only modified by habitat disturbance. The capacity of orangutans to come down from the trees may increase their ability to cope with at least smaller-scale forest fragmentation, and to cross moderately open spaces in mosaic landscapes, although the extent of this versatility remains to be investigated. PMID:24526001

  2. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cascading effects of induced terrestrial plant defences on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackrel, Sara L; Wootton, J Timothy

    2015-04-22

    Herbivores induce plants to undergo diverse processes that minimize costs to the plant, such as producing defences to deter herbivory or reallocating limited resources to inaccessible portions of the plant. Yet most plant tissue is consumed by decomposers, not herbivores, and these defensive processes aimed to deter herbivores may alter plant tissue even after detachment from the plant. All consumers value nutrients, but plants also require these nutrients for primary functions and defensive processes. We experimentally simulated herbivory with and without nutrient additions on red alder (Alnus rubra), which supplies the majority of leaf litter for many rivers in western North America. Simulated herbivory induced a defence response with cascading effects: terrestrial herbivores and aquatic decomposers fed less on leaves from stressed trees. This effect was context dependent: leaves from fertilized-only trees decomposed most rapidly while leaves from fertilized trees receiving the herbivory treatment decomposed least, suggesting plants funnelled a nutritionally valuable resource into enhanced defence. One component of the defence response was a decrease in leaf nitrogen leading to elevated carbon : nitrogen. Aquatic decomposers prefer leaves naturally low in C : N and this altered nutrient profile largely explains the lower rate of aquatic decomposition. Furthermore, terrestrial soil decomposers were unaffected by either treatment but did show a preference for local and nitrogen-rich leaves. Our study illustrates the ecological implications of terrestrial herbivory and these findings demonstrate that the effects of selection caused by terrestrial herbivory in one ecosystem can indirectly shape the structure of other ecosystems through ecological fluxes across boundaries. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Divergent apparent temperature sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing Song; Shuli Niu; Ruise Luo; Yiqi Luo; Jiquan Chen; Guirui Yu; Janusz Olejnik; Georg Wohlfahrt; Gerard Kiely; Ako Noormets; Leonardo Montagnani; Alessandro Cescatti; Vincenzo Magliulo; Beverly Elizabeth Law; Magnus Lund; Andrej Varlagin; Antonio Raschi; Matthias Peichl; Mats B. Nilsson; Lutz Merbold

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies revealed convergent temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration (Re) within aquatic ecosystems and between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We do not know yet whether various terrestrial ecosystems have consistent or divergent temperature sensitivity. Here, we synthesized 163 eddy covariance flux sites across the world and...

  5. Water use efficiency of net primary production in global terrestrial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Water use efficiency; global terrestrial ecosystems; MODIS; net primary production; evapotranspiration;. Köppen–Geiger climate classification. ... Terrestrial plants fix or trap carbon dioxide via photosynthesis to produce the material ...... S W 2007 Evaluating water stress controls on primary production in biogeochemical and ...

  6. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der I.R.; Bloom, J.; Exbrayat, J.; Feng, L.; Williams, M.

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle

  7. Estimation of evapotranspiration over the terrestrial ecosystems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianglan Li; Shunlin Liang; Wenping Yuan; Guirui Yu; Xiao Cheng; Yang Chen; Tianbao Zhao; Jinming Feng; Zhuguo Ma; Mingguo Ma; Shaomin Liu; Jiquan Chen; Changliang Shao; Shenggong Li; Xudong Zhang; Zhiqiang Zhang; Ge Sun; Shiping Chen; Takeshi Ohta; Andrej Varlagin; Akira Miyata; Kentaro Takagi; Nobuko Saiqusa; Tomomichi Kato

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying regional evapotranspiration (ET) and environmental constraints are particularly important for understanding water and carbon cycles of terrestrial ecosystems. However, a large uncertainty in the regional estimation of ET still remains for the terrestrial ecosystems in China. This study used ET measurements of 34 eddy covariance sites within China and...

  8. Plant reproductive organs and the origin of terrestrial insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgy V. Stadnitsky

    1991-01-01

    It is widely believed that plants facilitated the evolution of terrestrial insects (Southwood 1973). However, the mechanisms by which this evolution occurred are not yet fully understood. I therefore propose a hypothesis about one possible mode of formation of terrestrial insects and fauna. The soil, warm shallow lagoons, tidal zones, and accumulations of detritus are...

  9. Water use efficiency of net primary production in global terrestrial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The carbon and water cycles of terrestrial ecosystems, which are strongly coupled via water use efficiency (WUE), are influenced by global climate change. To explore the relationship between the carbon and water cycles and predict the effect of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems, it is necessary to study the WUE in ...

  10. The early evolution of the atmospheres of terrestrial planets

    CERN Document Server

    Raulin, François; Muller, Christian; Nixon, Conor; Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings : Volume 35

    2013-01-01

    “The Early Evolution of the Atmospheres of Terrestrial Planets” presents the main processes participating in the atmospheric evolution of terrestrial planets. A group of experts in the different fields provide an update of our current knowledge on this topic. Several papers in this book discuss the key role of nitrogen in the atmospheric evolution of terrestrial planets. The earliest setting and evolution of planetary atmospheres of terrestrial planets is directly associated with accretion, chemical differentiation, outgassing, stochastic impacts, and extremely high energy fluxes from their host stars. This book provides an overview of the present knowledge of the initial atmospheric composition of the terrestrial planets. Additionally it includes some papers about the current exoplanet discoveries and provides additional clues to our understanding of Earth’s transition from a hot accretionary phase into a habitable world. All papers included were reviewed by experts in their respective fields. We are ...

  11. Terrestrial short-term ecotoxicity of a green formicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiepo, Erasmo N; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Resgalla, Charrid; Cotelle, Sylvie; Férard, Jean-François; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2010-07-01

    When ants become annoying, large quantities of formicide are applied to terrestrial ecosystems in tropical regions, but awareness of the health and environmental impacts related to the use of synthetic pesticides has been increasing. The use of green pesticides to combat target organisms could reduce these impacts. In this regard, terrestrial ecotoxicity tests with higher plants (Brassica olaracea, Lactuca sativa and Mucuna aterrima), annelids (Eisenia foetida), Collembola (Folsomia candida) and soil enzyme activity analysis (diacetate fluorescein hydrolysis) were used to evaluate short-term terrestrial ecotoxicity of a green pesticide prepared from naturally-occurring organic compounds. At the highest formicide concentration tested in these experiments (i.e., 50 g kg(-1) soil) no toxicity toward terrestrial organisms was observed. The lack of short-term terrestrial ecotoxicity suggest that this green formicide can be classed as an environmentally friendly product as compared to the ecotoxicity of the most commonly used commercialized formicides. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. II. Rare-gas plasmas and Ar-molecular gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffard, John B., E-mail: jboffard@wisc.edu; Lin, Chun C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Culver, Cody [Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold [Applied Materials Inc., Gloucester, Massachusetts 01939 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emissions from excited plasma species can play a variety of roles in processing plasmas, including damaging the surface properties of materials used in semiconductor processing. Depending on their wavelength, VUV photons can easily transmit thin upper dielectric layers and affect the electrical characteristics of the devices. Despite their importance, measuring VUV fluxes is complicated by the fact that few materials transmit at VUV wavelengths, and both detectors and windows are easily damaged by plasma exposure. The authors have previously reported on measuring VUV fluxes in pure argon plasmas by monitoring the concentrations of Ar(3p{sup 5}4s) resonance atoms that produce the VUV emissions using noninvasive optical emission spectroscopy in the visible/near-infrared wavelength range [Boffard et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 32, 021304 (2014)]. Here, the authors extend this technique to other rare-gases (Ne, Kr, and Xe) and argon-molecular gas plasmas (Ar/H{sub 2}, Ar/O{sub 2}, and Ar/N{sub 2}). Results of a model for VUV emissions that couples radiation trapping and the measured rare-gas resonance level densities are compared to measurements made with both a calibrated VUV photodiode and a sodium salicylate fluorescence detection scheme. In these more complicated gas mixtures, VUV emissions from a variety of sources beyond the principal resonance levels of the rare gases are found to contribute to the total VUV flux.

  13. Melatonin and colon carcinogenesis. II. Intestinal melatonin-containing cells and serum melatonin level in rats with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V N; Kvetnoy, I M; Chumakova, N K; Kvetnaya, T V; Molotkov, A O; Pogudina, N A; Popovich, I G; Popuchiev, V V; Zabezhinski, M A; Bartsch, H; Bartsch, C

    1999-01-01

    Two-month-old outbred female LIO rats were injected weekly with a single dose of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH; 21 mg/kg of body weight) administered s.c. for 15 consecutive weeks. From the day of the 1st injection of the carcinogen the part of rats were given five days a week during the night time (from 18.00 h to 08.00 h) melatonin dissolved in tap water, 20 mg/l. The experiment was terminated in 6 months after the first injection of the carcinogen. The concentration of melatonin in the serum was estimated by radioimmunoassay in rats exposed to DMH alone or in intact control rats in the morning (between 10.00 and 11.00 hours) and night (between 24.00 and 01.00 hours) time. Number of melatonin-containing cells (M-cells) and their optical density were estimated by immunohistology in normal mucosa of glandular stomach, duodenum, ileum and descending colon of tumor-bearing animals from groups exposed to DMH or DMH+melatonin. It was shown that serum melatonin levels in rats with colon tumors was increased as compared with controls. However there was no diurnal rhythm of serum melatonin of colon tumor-bearing animals as compared to intact controls. The number of M-cells was decreased in all tissues studied in rats with DMH-induced colon tumors in comparison to corresponding controls: by 2.0 times in stomach, by 1.8 time in duodenum, by 1.3 times in ileum, and by 1.8 times in colon. In ileum and colon of rats treated with DMH+melatonin the number of M-cells was similar to control level whereas in stomach and duodenum this number was significantly higher than that in rats treated with DMH alone, but less than in corresponding controls. Relative content of melatonin in enterochromaffin cells of all parts of gastrointestinal tract evaluated as optical density of the cells and was decreased in rats exposed with DMH alone in comparison to the controls and was normalized and similar to the norm level in rats treated with DMH+melatonin. Thus, exogenous melatonin prevent a

  14. High-resolution spectroscopy of 32P . (II). Level density and primary transition strengths observed after thermal neutron capture in 31P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, S.; Winter, Ch.; Lieb, K. P.; Krusche, B.; Robinson, S.; Von Egidy, T.

    1989-09-01

    The -γ-ray spectrum emitted after thermal neutron capture in 31P was studied at the ILL high flux reactor with a pair spectrometer and an intrinsic Ge detector. A total of 212 transitions were assigned to the decay of 32P and 155 of these, representing 96.7% of the observed flux, were placed in a level scheme of 38 states. The neutron binding energy was determined as 7935.74 (16) keV. The densities of states observed in this reaction and in a recent (d, p) study are analyzed in the constant temperature Fermi-gas model. The primary E1 and M1 transition strengths in 32P are discussed and are compared to other sd-shell nuclei.

  15. Geologic and hydrologic characterization and evaluation of the Basin and Range Province relative to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste: Part II, Geologic and hydrologic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Kenneth A.; Bedinger, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The geology and hydrology of the Basin and Range Province of the western conterminous United States are characterized in a series of data sets depicted in maps compiled for evaluation of prospective areas for further study of geohydrologic environments for isolation of high-level radioactive waste. The data sets include: (1) Average precipitation and evaporation; (2) surface distribution of selected rock types; (3) tectonic conditions; and (4) surface- and ground -water hydrology and Pleistocene lakes and marshes.Rocks mapped for consideration as potential host media for the isolation of high-level radioactive waste are widespread and include argillaceous rocks, granitic rocks, tuffaceous rocks, mafic extrusive rocks, evaporites, and laharic breccias. The unsaturated zone, where probably as thick as 150 meters (500 feet), was mapped for consideration as an environment for isolation of high-level waste. Unsaturated rocks of various lithologic types are widespread in the Province.Tectonic stability in the Quaternary Period is considered the key to assessing the probability of future tectonism with regard to high-level radioactive waste disposal. Tectonic conditions are characterized on the basis of the seismic record, heat-flow measurements, the occurrence of Quaternary faults, vertical crustal movement, and volcanic features. Tectonic activity, as indicated by seismicity, is greatest in areas bordering the western margin of the Province in Nevada and southern California, the eastern margin of the Province bordering the Wasatch Mountains in Utah and in parts of the Rio Grande valley. Late Cenozoic volcanic activity is widespread, being greatest bordering the Sierra Nevada in California and Oregon, and bordering the Wasatch Mountains in southern Utah and Idaho.he arid to semiarid climate of the Province results in few perennial streams and lakes. A large part of the surface drainage is interior and the many closed basins commonly are occupied by playas or dry lake

  16. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle : Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle

  17. TEODOOR, a blueprint for distributed terrestrial observation data infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Ralf; Sorg, Jürgen; Abbrent, Martin; Borg, Erik; Gasche, Rainer; Kolditz, Olaf; Neidl, Frank; Priesack, Eckart; Stender, Vivien

    2017-04-01

    TERENO (TERrestrial ENvironmental Observatories) is an initiative funded by the large research infrastructure program of the Helmholtz Association of Germany. Four observation platforms to facilitate the investigation of consequences of global change for terrestrial ecosys-tems and the socioeconomic implications of these have been implemented and equipped from 2007 until 2013. Data collection, however, is planned to be performed for at least 30 years. TERENO provides series of system variables (e.g. precipitation, runoff, groundwater level, soil moisture, water vapor and trace gases fluxes) for the analysis and prognosis of global change consequences using integrated model systems, which will be used to derive efficient prevention, mitigation and adaptation strategies. Each platform is operated by a different Helmholtz-Institution, which maintains its local data infrastructure. Within the individual observatories, areas with intensive measurement programs have been implemented. Different sensors provide information on various physical parameters like soil moisture, temperatures, ground water levels or gas fluxes. Sensor data from more than 900 stations are collected automatically with a frequency of 20 s-1 up to 2 h-1, summing up to about 2,500,000 data values per day. In addition, three weather radar devices create raster data with a frequency of 12 to 60 h-1. The data are automatically imported into local relational database systems using a common data quality assessment framework, used to handle processing and assessment of heterogeneous environmental observation data. Starting with the way data are imported into the data infrastructure, custom workflows are developed. Data levels implying the underlying data processing, stages of quality assessment and data ac-cessibility are defined. In order to facilitate the acquisition, provision, integration, management and exchange of heterogeneous geospatial resources within a scientific and non-scientific environment

  18. GGSP: Realisation and maintenance of the Galileo Terrestrial Reference Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ggsp Prototype Team; Gendt, G.; Altamimi, Z.; Dach, R.; Söhne, W.; Springer, T.; GGSP Prototype Team

    2011-01-01

    The realisation and maintenance of a Galileo Terrestrial Reference Frame (GTRF) is the main function of the Galileo Geodetic Service Provider (GGSP). The GTRF shall be compatible with the latest International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) within a precision level of 3 cm (2 sigma). The connection to the ITRF is realized and validated by stations of the International GNSS Service (IGS) and by geodetic local ties to stations equipped with other geodetic techniques. It is demonstrated that this GTRF can be maintained by including the Galileo Signal-in-Space data, once Galileo reaches its operational stage.The GGSP will also provide additional products, such as Earth Rotation Parameters, satellites orbits, clock corrections for satellites and stations, which will be offered to the Galileo user community to have most precise access to the GTRF and will be used to monitor the accuracy of the corresponding Galileo Mission Segment.The GGSP was built up in time, and for a final demonstration the full system was operated for an interval of 6 months. During that time also microwave data from the two active GIOVE satellites were used.The GGSP Consortium followed the most up to date IGS standards of weekly processing during seven monthly campaigns (November 2006 to June 2008) and a continuous processing from September 2008 to February 2009 delivering several versions of the GTRF. The latest GTRF solution (GTRF09v01) has an RMS position difference with respect to the ITRF2005 computed over the 71 common stations of 1.1 and 2.9 mm in the horizontal and vertical components, respectively. The RMS velocity differences are 0.3 and 0.6 mm/y, respectively. The GGSP GPS satellite orbits and clock corrections agree with the IGS Final products at a level of 5-11 mm and 0.02-0.03 ns, respectively.The quality of the GIOVE orbits is at a level of 20-30 cm. The Hydrogen-Maser on board of GIOVE-B is nearly one order of magnitude better than the GPS satellite clocks.

  19. Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards: Part II. Validation of satellite-derived Volcanic Sulphur Dioxide Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukouli, MariLiza; Balis, Dimitris; Dimopoulos, Spiros; Clarisse, Lieven; Carboni, Elisa; Hedelt, Pascal; Spinetti, Claudia; Theys, Nicolas; Tampellini, Lucia; Zehner, Claus

    2014-05-01

    The eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in the spring of 2010 turned the attention of both the public and the scientific community to the susceptibility of the European airspace to the outflows of large volcanic eruptions. The ash-rich plume from Eyjafjallajökull drifted towards Europe and caused major disruptions of European air traffic for several weeks affecting the everyday life of millions of people and with a strong economic impact. This unparalleled situation revealed limitations in the decision making process due to the lack of information on the tolerance to ash of commercial aircraft engines as well as limitations in the ash monitoring and prediction capabilities. The European Space Agency project Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards, was introduced to facilitate the development of an optimal End-to-End System for Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring and Prediction. This system is based on comprehensive satellite-derived ash plume and sulphur dioxide [SO2] level estimates, as well as a widespread validation using supplementary satellite, aircraft and ground-based measurements. The validation of volcanic SO2 levels extracted from the sensors GOME-2/MetopA and IASI/MetopA are shown here with emphasis on the total column observed right before, during and after the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruptions. Co-located ground-based Brewer Spectrophotometer data extracted from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre, WOUDC, were compared to the different satellite estimates. The findings are presented at length, alongside a comprehensive discussion of future scenarios.

  20. Body weight loss in beef cows: II. Increased antioxidant messenger ribonucleic acid levels in skeletal muscle but not erythrocyte antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, K M; Terry, E N; Michal, J J; Kincaid, R L; Johnson, K A

    2009-09-01

    Twenty-six Angus-cross cows were used to examine the effect of BW loss (WL) on skeletal muscle and erythrocyte markers of oxidative stress. Serum NEFA concentrations, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured during WL and BW maintenance. Real-time reverse-transcription-PCR was used to determine mRNA levels of antioxidant genes during both periods to assess skeletal muscle response to WL. Body weight loss resulted in elevated serum NEFA concentrations but no change in erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. During WL, mRNA levels of the antioxidant genes glutathione peroxidase 4, mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, thioredoxin reductase 1, and selenoprotein W increased. Abundance of mRNA of genes involved in antioxidant signaling, specifically, PPARgamma coactivator-1 alpha, nuclear respiratory factor 1, estrogen-related receptor alpha, and tumor protein 53, was also increased. In summary, during WL cows had no change in peripheral antioxidant enzyme activity, but mRNA abundance of proteins involved in protecting the body from oxidative stress increased in skeletal muscle. During times when NEFA are used as a fuel source, signals such as mild reactive oxygen species production or increased concentration of lipid by-products activate the transcription of nuclear signaling molecules such as PPARgamma gamma coactivator-1 alpha, nuclear respiratory factor 1, estrogen-related receptor alpha, and tumor protein 53. These genes work to activate antioxidant genes such as mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase 4, and thioredoxin reductase 1 to aid in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species. These data suggest an important role for antioxidant genes to protect cattle that are mobilizing body fat.

  1. Combined terrestrial and marine biomarker records from an Icelandic fjord: insights into Holocene climate drivers and marine/ terrestrial responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moossen, H. M.; Seki, O.; Quillmann, U.; Andrews, J. T.; Bendle, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Holocene climate change has affected human cultures throughout at least the last 4000 years (D'Andrea et al., 2011). Today, studying Holocene climate variability is important, both to constrain the influence of climate change on ancient cultures and to place contemporary climate change in a historic context. Organic geochemical biomarkers are an ideal tool to study how climatic changes have affected terrestrial and marine ecosystems, as a host of different biomarker based climate proxies have emerged over recent years. Applying the available biomarker proxies on sediment cores from fjordic environments facilitates the study of how climate has affected terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and how these ecosystems have interacted. Ìsafjardardjúp fjord in Northwest Iceland is an ideal location to study North Atlantic Holocene climate change because the area is very sensitive to changes in the oceanic and atmospheric current systems (Hurrell, 1995; Quillmann et al., 2010). In this study we present high resolution (1 sample/30 calibrated years) terrestrial and marine biomarker records from a 38 m sediment core from Ìsafjardardjúp fjord covering the Holocene. We reconstruct sea surface temperature variations using the alkenone derived UK'37 proxy. Air temperature changes are reconstructed using the GDGT derived MBT/CBT palaeothermometer. We use the average chain length (ACL) variability of n-alkanes derived from terrestrial higher plant leaf waxes to reconstruct changing precipitation regimes. The relationship between ACL and precipitation is confirmed by comparing it with the δD signature of the C29 n-alkane and soil pH changes inferred by the CBT proxy. The combined sea surface and air temperature and precipitation records indicate that different climate changing drivers were dominant at different stages of the Holocene. Sea surface temperatures were strongly influenced by the melting of the remaining glaciers from the last glacial maximum throughout the early

  2. Polyurethane on titanium unconstrained disc arthroplasty versus anterior discectomy and fusion for the treatment of cervical disc disease: a review of level I-II randomized clinical trials including clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonés, María; Hevia, Eduardo; Barrios, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    To contrast the clinical and radiologic outcomes and adverse events of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with a single cervical disc arthroplasty design, the polyurethane on titanium unconstrained cervical disc (PTUCD). This is a systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCT) with evidence level I-II reporting clinical outcomes. After a search on different databases including PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Ovid MEDLINE, a total of 10 RCTs out of 51 studies found were entered in the study. RTCs were searched from the earliest available records in 2005 to November 2014. Out of a total of 1101 patients, 562 were randomly assigned into the PTUCD arthroplasty group and 539 into the ACDF group. The mean follow-up was 30.9 months. Patients undergoing arthroplasty had lower Neck Disability Index, and better SF-36 Physical component scores than ACDF patients. Patients with PTUCD arthroplasty had also less radiological degenerative changes at the upper adjacent level. Overall adverse events were twice more frequent in patients with ACDF. The rate of revision surgery including both adjacent and index level was slightly higher in patients with ACDF, showing no statistically significant difference. According to this review, PTUCD arthroplasty showed a global superiority to ACDF in clinical outcomes. The impact of both surgical techniques on the cervical spine (radiological spine deterioration and/or complications) was more severe in patients undergoing ACDF. However, the rate of revision surgeries at any cervical level was equivalent for ACDF and PTUCD arthroplasty.

  3. Clinical and biochemical comparison of guided tissue regeneration versus guided tissue regeneration plus low-level laser therapy in the treatment of class II furcation defects: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Gülnihal Emrem; Aksoy, Hülya; Demir, Turgut; Laloğlu, Esra; Özyıldırım, Ercan; Sağlam, Ebru; Akçay, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to compare the clinical and biochemical effectiveness of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) alone and combined with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) application in the treatment of furcation II periodontal defects, over a period of 6 months. Thirty-three furcation defects were included in the study. Seventeen of these defects were treated with GTR plus LLLT, and sixteen of them were treated with GTR alone. Probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), horizontal probing depth (HPD), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OC) levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were recorded at baseline and at postoperative 3rd and 6th months. Healing was uneventful in all cases. At the 3rd and 6th months, both treatment modalities-GTR and GTR plus LLLT--showed improved PPD, CAL, and HPD values compared to their baseline values. ALP and OC levels in GCF increased after the treatment in both groups (p < 0.05). When compared the two groups, at the 6th month, PPD, CAL, HPD, and ALP values showed significantly more improvement in laser group than non-laser group (p < 0.05). The results of this study showed that both treatments led to significantly favorable clinical improvements in furcation periodontal defects. LLLT plus GTR may be a more effective treatment modality compared to GTR alone.

  4. Average [O II]nebular emission associated with Mg II absorbers: Dependence on Fe II absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ravi; Srianand, Raghunathan; Petitjean, Patrick; Noterdaeme, Pasquier

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the effect of Fe II equivalent width (W2600) and fibre size on the average luminosity of [O II]λλ3727,3729 nebular emission associated with Mg II absorbers (at 0.55 ≤ z ≤ 1.3) in the composite spectra of quasars obtained with 3 and 2 arcsec fibres in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We confirm the presence of strong correlations between [O II] luminosity (L_{[O II]}) and equivalent width (W2796) and redshift of Mg II absorbers. However, we show L_{[O II]} and average luminosity surface density suffers from fibre size effects. More importantly, for a given fibre size the average L_{[O II]} strongly depends on the equivalent width of Fe II absorption lines and found to be higher for Mg II absorbers with R ≡W2600/W2796 ≥0.5. In fact, we show the observed strong correlations of L_{[O II]} with W2796 and z of Mg II absorbers are mainly driven by such systems. Direct [O II] detections also confirm the link between L_{[O II]} and R. Therefore, one has to pay attention to the fibre losses and dependence of redshift evolution of Mg II absorbers on W2600 before using them as a luminosity unbiased probe of global star formation rate density. We show that the [O II] nebular emission detected in the stacked spectrum is not dominated by few direct detections (i.e., detections ≥3σ significant level). On an average the systems with R ≥0.5 and W2796 ≥2Å are more reddened, showing colour excess E(B - V) ˜ 0.02, with respect to the systems with R <0.5 and most likely traces the high H I column density systems.

  5. The Valanginian terrestrial carbon-isotope record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocke, D. R.; Price, G. D.; Baraboshkin, E.; Mutterlose, J.; Ruffell, A. H.

    2003-04-01

    A stratigraphic, biostratigraphic and isotopic investigation has been performed on a Crimean section located on the Kacha River, Verkhorechie Village, SW Crimea. This clastic-dominated succession consists of a series of bioturbated inter-bedded shallow-marine silty sands, claystones and some oolitic sands. A published detailed study of the ammonite fauna has been undertaken and has revealed that the succession can be compared to standard Tethyan schemes. The lower part of the succession is dated on the basis of the ammonite fauna as Early Valanginian (otopeta-campylotoxus ammonite Zones), although this latter zone is highly condensed. A more expanded Late Valanginian is present (verrucosum, callidiscus and tauricum ammonite Zones), and is overlain by sand-dominated sediments of Early Hauterivian age. Throughout this section woody plant matter ranging in preservation from charcoal to coal has been collected and analyzed for stable carbon-isotope ratios. There is no correlation between state of preservation and carbon-isotope ratios. Carbon-isotope ratios range in the Early Valanginian from -24 ppm to -22 ppm, and in the mid-verrucosum Zone values shift abruptly towards more positive values and peak at -18 ppm in the lower callidiscus Zone. Wood carbon-isotope ratios decrease gradually through the remainder of the callidiscus Zone and return to pre-excursion values in the tauricum Zone. The remaining Hauterivian values fluctuate between -24 ppm to -21 ppm. The structure, magnitude and timing of the terrestrial carbon-isotope curve is very similar to the marine carbonate curve (from +1 ppm to +3 ppm) for the Valanginian. This would indicate, based on a delta-delta relationship between organic matter and carbonate, that there was very little change in atmospheric CO_2 concentrations during the Valanginian, and that the isotopic composition of the global carbon reservoir shifted. Future research on an Early Cretaceous (Valanginian-Hauterivian) interval from the Yatria

  6. Wavelength dependence of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage as determined by laser irradiation suggests that cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the principal DNA lesions produced by terrestrial sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Yoon, Jae-in; Schroeder, Christi; Bradforth, Stephen E.; Cockburn, Myles; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the involvement of specific ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths in solar mutagenesis, we used a laser system to investigate the induction of DNA damage, both in the overall genome and at the nucleotide resolution level, in the genomic DNA of transgenic Big Blue mouse fibroblasts irradiated with a series of UV wavelengths, inclusive of UVC (λ320 nm). Subsequently, we sought correlation between the locations of UV-induced DNA lesions in the cII transgene of irradiated DNA samples and the frequency distribution and codon position of the induced cII mutations in counterpart mouse cells irradiated with simulated sunlight. Using a combination of enzymatic digestion assays coupled with gel electrophoresis, immunodot blot assays, and DNA footprinting assays, we demonstrated a unique wavelength-dependent formation of photodimeric lesions, i.e., cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6–4) photoproducts [(6–4)PPs], based on direct UV absorption of DNA, in irradiated mouse genomic DNA, which could partially explain the induction of mutations in mouse cells irradiated with simulated sunlight. Most notably, there was a divergence of CPD and (6–4)PP formation at an irradiation wavelength of 296 nm in mouse genomic DNA. Whereas substantial formation of (6–4)PPs was detectable in samples irradiated at this wavelength, which intensified as the irradiation wavelength decreased, only small quantities of these lesions were found in samples irradiated at wavelengths of 300–305 nm, with no detectable level of (6–4)PPs in samples irradiated with longer wavelengths. Although CPD formation followed the same pattern of increase with decreasing wavelengths of irradiation, there were substantial levels of CPDs in samples irradiated with UVB wavelengths borderlined with UVA, and small but detectable levels of these lesions in samples irradiated with longer wavelengths. Because the terrestrial sunlight spectrum rolls off sharply at wavelengths ∼300 nm, our findings

  7. Carbon Isotope Composition of Mysids at a Terrestrial-Marine Ecotone, Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkins, L. M.; Jelinski, D. E.; Karagatzides, J. D.; Carr, A.

    2002-04-01

    The relative contribution of summertime terrestrial versus marine carbon to an estuary on coastal British Columbia, Canada was explored using stable carbon isotopic (δ 13C values) analysis of mysid crustaceans (Malacostraca: Peracarida: Mysidacea). We hypothesized that landscape linkages between the forested upland and adjacent inshore marine waters, via river, groundwater and overland flows, may influence carbon content and metabolism in the coastal zone. We sampled 14 stations spatially distributed in a grid and found δ 13C compositions of mysids ranged from -15·2 to -18·4‰. There was, however, no obvious spatial distribution of δ 13C values relative to the estuarine gradient in Cow Bay. Heavy tidal mixing is suggested to disperse marine and terrestrial carbon throughout the entire bay. From a temporal perspective however, mysid δ 13C signatures became enriched over the sampling period (mid-July to mid-August), which is representative of a stronger marine influence. This may arise because mysids are exposed to greater marine-derived carbon sources later in the summer, a decrease in freshwater input (and hence terrestrial carbon), changes in phytoplankton or macrophyte community structure, or that mysids preferentially feed on marine food sources. Overall, the recorded isotopic values are characteristic of marine organic carbon signatures suggesting that in summer, despite the proximity to shore, little or no terrestrial carbon penetrates the food web at the trophic level of mysids. This notwithstanding we believe there is a strong need for additional study of carbon flows at the marine-terrestrial interface, especially for disturbed watersheds.

  8. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01

    relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local

  9. Influence of Cadmium(II Ions and Brewery Sludge on Metallothionein Level in Earthworms (Eisenia fetida – Bio- transforming of Toxic Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Metallothioneins belong to a group of intracellular, high molecular andcysteine-rich proteins whose content in an organism increase with increasing concentrationof a heavy metal. The aim of this work was to apply the electrochemical analysis for theanalysis of metallothioneins in earthworms exposed to cadmium ions and brewery sludge.Here we utilized adsorptive transfer technique coupled with differential pulse voltammetryBrdicka reaction to determine metallothionein in different biological samples. By meansthis very sensitive technique it was possible to analyze metallothionein in concentrationsbelow 1 μmol.l-1 with the standard deviation of 4-5%. We found out that the average MTlevel in the non-treated earthworms oscillated between 19 and 48 μmol.l-1. When weanalysed samples of earthworms treated by cadmium, we observed that the MT contentincreased with the exposition length and increase dose of cadmium ions. Finally, weattempted to study and compare the toxicity of the raw sludge and its leach by using ofearthworms. The raw brewery sludge caused the death of the earthworms quickly.Earthworms held in the presence of leach from brewery sludge increased their weight of147 % of their original weight because they ingested the nutrients from the sludge. Themetallothionein level changes markedly with increasing time of exposition and applieddose of toxic compound. It clearly follows from the obtained results that the MT synthesisis insufficient in the first hours of the exposition and increases after more than 24 h.

  10. Optimisation of resistant starch II and III levels in durum wheat pasta to reduce in vitro digestibility while maintaining processing and sensory characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Nisha; Sissons, Mike; Fellows, Christopher M; Blazek, Jaroslav; Gilbert, Elliot P

    2013-01-15

    Foods with elevated levels of resistant starch (RS) may have beneficial effects on human health. Pasta was enriched with commercial resistant starches (RSII, Hi Maize™ 1043; RSIII, Novelose 330™) at 10%, 20% and 50% substitution of semolina for RSII and 10% and 20% for RSIII and compared with pasta made from 100% durum wheat semolina to investigate technological, sensory, in vitro starch digestibility and structural properties. The resultant RS content of pasta increased from 1.9% to ∼21% and was not reduced on cooking. Significantly, the results indicate that 10% and 20% RSII and RSIII substitution of semolina had no significant effects on pasta cooking loss, texture and sensory properties, with only a minimal reduction in pasta yellowness. Both RS types lowered the extent of in vitro starch hydrolysis compared to that of control pasta. X-ray diffraction and small-angle scattering verified the incorporation of RS and, compared to the control sample, identified enhanced crystallinity and a changed molecular arrangement following digestion. These results can be contrasted with the negative impact on pasta resulting from substitution with equivalent amounts of more traditional dietary fibre such as bran. The study suggests that these RS-containing formulations may be ideal sources for the preparation of pasta with reduced starch digestibility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.