WorldWideScience

Sample records for terrestrial environment design

  1. Radioecology in terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Teruhisa

    1993-01-01

    There are great concerns about radionuclide behavior in fresh and brackish water regions, especially radionuclide accumulation by fresh water organisms. Safety assessment in aquatic regions is based on the estimation of radionuclide concentrations in aquatic organisms. This paper is thus designed to analyze radionuclide or stable element accumulation by fresh water (including brackish water) organisms by introducing 'concentration factors' that are important environmental parameters for safety assessment. Knowledge of water·electrolyte metabolism involved in osmoregulation in aquatic organisms is outlined. On the basis of the reports of Blaylock et al. and Vanderploeg, factors that influence 'concentration factors' of radionuclides or stable elements in fresh water organisms are explained in terms of the following: habitat form (concentrations of stable elements and coexistant elements in environmental water, physical and chemical form of radionuclides, water temperature, and sediments); and physio-echological factors in aquatic organisms (food habit, element metabolism in organisms, and other biological factors). (N.K.)

  2. Application of Terrestrial Environments in Orion Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Terrestrial and Planetary Environments (TPE) Team support to the NASA Orion space vehicle. The TPE utilizes meteorological data to assess the sensitivities of the vehicle due to the terrestrial environment. The Orion vehicle, part of the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Program, is designed to carry astronauts beyond low-earth orbit and is currently undergoing a series of tests including Exploration Test Flight (EFT) - 1. The presentation describes examples of TPE support for vehicle design and several tests, as well as support for EFT-1 and planning for upcoming Exploration Missions while emphasizing the importance of accounting for the natural environment's impact to the vehicle early in the vehicle's program.

  3. Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. M.; Boutrup, S.; Bijl, L. van der

    , watercourses, lakes and marine waters and the pressures upon them and reviews the monitoring of terrestrial natural habitats and selected plants and animals. The report is based on the annual reports prepared for each subprogramme by the Topic Centres. The latter reports are mainly based on data collected...

  4. MAFF monitoring of the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses the MAFF food surveillance programme, in particular our Terrestrial Radioactivity Monitoring Programme (TRAMP), and the estimation of dietary intake of radionuclides. The MAFF programme exists primarily to demonstrate that authorized discharges of radioactivity to the environment do not result in individuals receiving doses of radiation in excess of accepted limits. The estimation radionuclide intake ensures over estimation rather than underestimation of dose. Improvements in detection limits and absorption level research could lower the calculated dose to man from radionuclides in food without losing their validity. (author)

  5. Terrestrial Applications of Extreme Environment Stirling Space Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger. W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been developing power systems capable of long-term operation in extreme environments such as the surface of Venus. This technology can use any external heat source to efficiently provide electrical power and cooling; and it is designed to be extremely efficient and reliable for extended space missions. Terrestrial applications include: use in electric hybrid vehicles; distributed home co-generation/cooling; and quiet recreational vehicle power generation. This technology can reduce environmental emissions, petroleum consumption, and noise while eliminating maintenance and environmental damage from automotive fluids such as oil lubricants and air conditioning coolant. This report will provide an overview of this new technology and its applications.

  6. Interferometer Designs for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, P. R.; Dumont, P. J.; Colavita, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) is a space-based infrared interferometer that will combine high sensitivity and spatial resolution to detect and characterize planetary systems within 15 pc of our sun. TPF is a key element in NASA's Origins Program and is currently un- der study in its Pre-Project Phase. We review some of the interferometer designs that have been considered for starlight nulling, with particular attention to the architecture and subsystems of the central beam-combiner.

  7. MAFF monitoring of the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the food surveillance programme of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF), in particular the Terrestrial Radioactivity Monitoring Programme (TRAMP) and the estimation of dietary intake of radionuclides. To define the surveillance programme the following issues need to be decided upon: 1) the type of food which should be analysed; 2) the nature of the contaminants which should be analysed; and 3) the geographical location from which the food samples should be taken. (author)

  8. Photovoltaic design optimization for terrestrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    As part of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Low-Cost Solar Array Project, a comprehensive program of module cost-optimization has been carried out. The objective of these studies has been to define means of reducing the cost and improving the utility and reliability of photovoltaic modules for the broad spectrum of terrestrial applications. This paper describes one of the methods being used for module optimization, including the derivation of specific equations which allow the optimization of various module design features. The method is based on minimizing the life-cycle cost of energy for the complete system. Comparison of the life-cycle energy cost with the marginal cost of energy each year allows the logical plant lifetime to be determined. The equations derived allow the explicit inclusion of design parameters such as tracking, site variability, and module degradation with time. An example problem involving the selection of an optimum module glass substrate is presented.

  9. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondietti, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported in terrestrial ecology studies with regard to plutonium in biota from the White Oak Creek forest; comparative distribution of plutonium in two forest ecosystems; an ecosystem model of plutonium dynamics; actinide element metabolism in cotton rats; and crayfish studies. Progress is reported in aquatic studies with regard to transuranics in surface waters, frogs, benthic algae, and invertebrates from pond 3513; and radioecology of transuranic elements in cotton rats bordering waste pond 3513. Progress is also reported in stability of trivalent plutonium in White Oak Lake water; chemistry of plutonium, americium, curium, and uranium in pond water; uranium, thorium, and plutonium in small mammals; and effect of soil pretreatment on the distribution of plutonium

  10. Ecological effects of transuranics in the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter explores the ecological effects of transuranium radionuclides in terrestrial environments. No direct studies that relate the level of transuranic contamination to specific changes in structure or function of ecological systems have been carried out. The only alternative approach presently available is to infer such relationships from observations of biota in contaminated environments and models. Advantages and shortcomings of these observations as well as those of the direct experimental approach are discussed

  11. Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph : technology and mission design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Virginia G.

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) coronagraph study involves exploring the technologies that enable a coronagraph style instrument to image and characterize earth-like planets orbiting nearby stars. Testbeds have been developed to demonstrate the emerging technologies needed for this effort and an architecture study has resulted in designs of a facility that will provide the environment needed for the technology to function in this role. A broad community of participants is involved in this work through studies, analyses, fabrication of components, and participation in the design effort. The scope of activities - both on the technology side and in the architecture study side - will be presented in this paper. The status and the future plans of the activities will be reviewed.

  12. Visualization Design Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomplun, A.R.; Templet, G.J.; Jortner, J.N.; Friesen, J.A.; Schwegel, J.; Hughes, K.R.

    1999-02-01

    Improvements in the performance and capabilities of computer software and hardware system, combined with advances in Internet technologies, have spurred innovative developments in the area of modeling, simulation and visualization. These developments combine to make it possible to create an environment where engineers can design, prototype, analyze, and visualize components in virtual space, saving the time and expenses incurred during numerous design and prototyping iterations. The Visualization Design Centers located at Sandia National Laboratories are facilities built specifically to promote the ''design by team'' concept. This report focuses on designing, developing and deploying this environment by detailing the design of the facility, software infrastructure and hardware systems that comprise this new visualization design environment and describes case studies that document successful application of this environment.

  13. The transfer of radionuclides in the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlenschlaeger, M.

    1991-04-01

    The transfer of radionuclides in the terrestrial environment have been investigated. The thesis is divided into two parts. Part I; Dynamic model for the transfer of radionuclides in the terrestrial environment. The study comprises the development of a compartment model, that simulates the dynamic transport of radioactive pollution in the terrestrial environment. The dynamic processes include, dry and wet deposition, soil resuspension, plant growth, root uptake, foliar interception, animal metabolism, agricultural practice, and production of bread. The ingested amount of radioactivity, by man, is multiplied by a dose conversion factor to yield a dose estimate. The dynamic properties and the predictive accuracy of the model have been tested. The results support the dynamics very well and predicitions within a factor of three, of a hypothetical accident, are likely. Part II; Influence of plant variety on the root transfer of radiocaesium. Studies of genetic differences, in plant uptake of radiocaesium, were concluded with a pot experiment. Four varieties of spring barley and three varieties of rye-grass have been tested in two types of soil. The results for barley showed a significant difference between the four varieties. Analyses of variance confirmed a high root uptake of radiocaesium in the variety Sila and a significantly lower root uptake in the variety Apex in each type of soil. The pattern between the varieties was identical in 1988, 1989 and 1990. Similarly for the grass varieties, one variety, the Italian rye grass, was identified as having the relatively highest uptake of radiocaesium. (author) 22 tabs., 30 ills., 56 refs

  14. Designing Creative Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Cochrane

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing creative learning environments involves not only facilitating student creativity, but also modeling creative pedagogical practice. In this paper we explore the implementation of a framework for designing creative learning environments using mobile social media as a catalyst for redefining both lecturer pedagogical practice, as well as redesigning the curriculum around student generated m-portfolios.

  15. Contaminants in the Greenland terrestrial and freshwater environment. National assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riget, F.; Aastrup, P.; Dietz, R.

    1997-01-01

    The present report reviews the available information on heavy metals, persistent organic pollutants and radioactivity in the Greenland freshwater and terrestrial environments. Levels in lake sediments, soil, humus and organisms are presented, spatial and temporal trends are discussed and where possible also biological effects. Many of the contaminants that occur in the Greenland environment originate from distant sources outside of the region, and are transported to the Arctic via three major pathways - atmospheric, terrestrial/freshwater and marine. The main sources of pollution in Greenland is considered to be the industrialization of Eurasia. Pollutants are mainly. The organochlorine levels in Greenland char are typically in the low range compared to values reported from Canada. The Greenland sediment samples showed all organochlorine values below the detection limits of 0.1 μg/kg dry weight, thus being among the lowest contaminated sediments within the Arctic. The total content of PAH in the Greenland sediment samples ranged between 78-635 μ3 g/kg dry wight, with a geometric mean of 178 μg/kg, comparable to or lower than reported values from other arctic countries. The lowest concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides in the Greenland terrestrial and freshwater environment are found in the northern parts of Greenland and the highest in the south western parts. The main source of anthropogenic radioactivity is nuclear weapons testing in the atmosphere and the fallout from this activity is closely related to the amounts of precipitation. The predominant foodchain in the Arctic with regard to transport of radiocaesium to man is: Lichen-reindeer-man. Although the doses from the terrestrial foodchain are 20 times higher than those received from the marine foodchain, they are not considered to be of any relevance for the human health in Greenland. 4 appendices contain experimental results. (EG)

  16. Po-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial and freshwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjelsvik, Runhild; Brown, Justin (eds.) (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Holm, Elis (Univ. of Lund (Sweden)); Roos, Per (Risoe DTU (Denmark)); Saxen, Ritva; Outola, Iisa (STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    This report provides new information on Po-210 (and where appropriate its grandparent Pb-210) behaviour in environmental systems including humans. This has primarily been achieved through measurements of Po-210 in aquatic and terrestrial environments that has led to the derivation of information on the levels of this radioisotope in plants, animals and the biotic components of their habitat (i.e. water, soil) providing basic information on transfer where practicable. For freshwater environments, Po-210 concentration ratios derived for freshwater benthic fish and bivalve mollusc were substantially different to values collated from earlier review work. For terrestrial environments, activity concentrations of Po-210 in small mammals (although of a preliminary nature because no correction was made for ingrowth from Pb-210) were considerably higher than values derived from earlier data compilations. It was envisaged that data on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides would render underpinning data sets more comprehensive and would thus allow more robust background dose calculations to be performed subsequently. By way of example, unweighted background dose-rates arising from internal distributions of Po-210 were calculated for small mammals in the terrestrial study. The biokinetics of polonium in humans has been studied following chronic and acute oral intakes of selected Po radioisotopes. This work has provided information on gastrointestinal absorption factors and biological retention times thus improving the database upon which committed effective doses to humans are derived. The information generated in the report, in its entirety, should be of direct relevance for both human and non-human impact assessments. (au)

  17. Po-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial and freshwater environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjelsvik, Runhild; Brown, Justin; Roos, Per; Saxen, Ritva; Outola, Iisa

    2009-01-01

    This report provides new information on Po-210 (and where appropriate its grandparent Pb-210) behaviour in environmental systems including humans. This has primarily been achieved through measurements of Po-210 in aquatic and terrestrial environments that has led to the derivation of information on the levels of this radioisotope in plants, animals and the biotic components of their habitat (i.e. water, soil) providing basic information on transfer where practicable. For freshwater environments, Po-210 concentration ratios derived for freshwater benthic fish and bivalve mollusc were substantially different to values collated from earlier review work. For terrestrial environments, activity concentrations of Po-210 in small mammals (although of a preliminary nature because no correction was made for ingrowth from Pb-210) were considerably higher than values derived from earlier data compilations. It was envisaged that data on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides would render underpinning data sets more comprehensive and would thus allow more robust background dose calculations to be performed subsequently. By way of example, unweighted background dose-rates arising from internal distributions of Po-210 were calculated for small mammals in the terrestrial study. The biokinetics of polonium in humans has been studied following chronic and acute oral intakes of selected Po radioisotopes. This work has provided information on gastrointestinal absorption factors and biological retention times thus improving the database upon which committed effective doses to humans are derived. The information generated in the report, in its entirety, should be of direct relevance for both human and non-human impact assessments. (au)

  18. Plant volatiles in extreme terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Steinke, Michael; McGenity, Terry; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding on plant and algal volatile organic compound (VOC) production and emission in extreme environments, where temperature, water availability, salinity or other environmental factors pose stress on vegetation. Here, the extreme environments include terrestrial systems, such as arctic tundra, deserts, CO₂ springs and wetlands, and marine systems such as sea ice, tidal rock pools and hypersaline environments, with mangroves and salt marshes at the land-sea interface. The emission potentials at fixed temperature and light level or actual emission rates for phototrophs in extreme environments are frequently higher than for organisms from less stressful environments. For example, plants from the arctic tundra appear to have higher emission potentials for isoprenoids than temperate species, and hypersaline marine habitats contribute to global dimethyl sulphide (DMS) emissions in significant amounts. DMS emissions are more widespread than previously considered, for example, in salt marshes and some desert plants. The reason for widespread VOC, especially isoprenoid, emissions from different extreme environments deserves further attention, as these compounds may have important roles in stress resistance and adaptation to extremes. Climate warming is likely to significantly increase VOC emissions from extreme environments both by direct effects on VOC production and volatility, and indirectly by altering the composition of the vegetation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. 210Po behaviour in terrestrial environment: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppin, F.; Roussel-Debet, S.

    2004-01-01

    This bibliographical review illustrates the behaviour of 210 polonium in the terrestrial environment. Sources of 210 Po in the atmosphere vary especially with the geographical localization and the occurrence or the absence of mining activities. In soils, polonium, because of its atmospheric origin, is concentrated in the first upper centimeters. 210 Po is rather immobile and adsorbed on mineral surfaces; it can (co)precipitate with metallic (oxi)hydroxides or in the form of sulphide. The main transfer pathway of 210 Po to vegetation is foliar deposit, which is not, or only slightly, followed by incorporation or translocation. 210 Po is transferred to animals mainly by ingestion, with relatively high transfer factors. In fresh waters, 210 Po is generally immobile in the form of insoluble Po(IV) and/or associated with the particulate or colloidal phase. Plankton, invertebrates and fish concentrate the 210 Po, especially in soft tissues. Polonium, which is an omnipresent natural radionuclide, is likely to occasion a significant exposure to man, compared with other natural or artificial radioisotopes. Nearly all studies derive from in situ measurements and are very descriptive, therefore experimental work aiming at a better knowledge and modeling of its behaviour in the terrestrial environment would be useful. (author)

  20. Taste and smell in aquatic and terrestrial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollo, E; Garson, M J; Polese, G; Amodeo, P; Ghiselin, M T

    2017-05-10

    Covering: up to 2017The review summarizes results up to 2017 on chemosensory cues occurring in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. The chemicals are grouped by their physicochemical properties to compare their potential mobility in the different media. In contrast to what is widely asserted in the literature, the report emphasizes that living organisms encounter and sense molecules of various degrees of solubility and volatility both on land and in aquatic environments. The picture that emerges from the review suggests a substantial revision of the traditional definitions of the chemical senses based on their spatial range, which is currently orienting the literature on chemosensory signaling, in favor of a new vision based on the natural products that are the actual mediators of the chemosensory perceptions. According to this perspective, natural product chemistry is a powerful tool with which to explore the evolutionary history of the chemical senses.

  1. Extreme Environment Technologies for Space and Terrestrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Cutts, James A.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Over the next decades, NASA's planned solar system exploration missions are targeting planets, moons and small bodies, where spacecraft would be expected to encounter diverse extreme environmental (EE) conditions throughout their mission phases. These EE conditions are often coupled. For instance, near the surface of Venus and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets, probes would experience high temperatures and pressures. In the Jovian system low temperatures are coupled with high radiation. Other environments include thermal cycling, and corrosion. Mission operations could also introduce extreme conditions, due to atmospheric entry heat flux and deceleration. Some of these EE conditions are not unique to space missions; they can be encountered by terrestrial assets from the fields of defense,oil and gas, aerospace, and automotive industries. In this paper we outline the findings of NASA's Extreme Environments Study Team, including discussions on state of the art and emerging capabilities related to environmental protection, tolerance and operations in EEs. We will also highlight cross cutting EE mitigation technologies, for example, between high g-load tolerant impactors for Europa and instrumented projectiles on Earth; high temperature electronics sensors on Jupiter deep probes and sensors inside jet engines; and pressure vessel technologies for Venus probes and sea bottom monitors. We will argue that synergistic development programs between these fields could be highly beneficial and cost effective for the various agencies and industries. Some of these environments, however, are specific to space and thus the related technology developments should be spear headed by NASA with collaboration from industry and academia.

  2. The corrosion of depleted uranium in terrestrial and marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toque, C.; Milodowski, A.E.; Baker, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Depleted Uranium alloyed with titanium is used in armour penetrating munitions that have been fired in a number of conflict zones and testing ranges including the UK ranges at Kirkcudbright and Eskmeals. The study presented here evaluates the corrosion of DU alloy cylinders in soil on these two UK ranges and in the adjacent marine environment of the Solway Firth. The estimated mean initial corrosion rates and times for complete corrosion range from 0.13 to 1.9 g cm −2 y −1 and 2.5–48 years respectively depending on the particular physical and geochemical environment. The marine environment at the experimental site was very turbulent. This may have caused the scouring of corrosion products and given rise to a different geochemical environment from that which could be easily duplicated in laboratory experiments. The rate of mass loss was found to vary through time in one soil environment and this is hypothesised to be due to pitting increasing the surface area, followed by a build up of corrosion products inhibiting further corrosion. This indicates that early time measurements of mass loss or corrosion rate may be poor indicators of late time corrosion behaviour, potentially giving rise to incorrect estimates of time to complete corrosion. The DU alloy placed in apparently the same geochemical environment, for the same period of time, can experience very different amounts of corrosion and mass loss, indicating that even small variations in the corrosion environment can have a significant effect. These effects are more significant than other experimental errors and variations in initial surface area. -- Highlights: ► In-situ experiments were conducted to evaluate corrosion rates of depleted uranium. ► Samples were corroded in marine sediments, open sea water and two terrestrial soils. ► The depleted uranium titanium alloy corroded fastest in the marine environments. ► Rates of mass loss can vary through time if corrosion products are not removed.

  3. Design and Performance of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary L.; Shaklan, Stuart; Lisman, P. Doulas; Ho, Timothy; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Basinger, Scott; Ledeboer, Bill; Kwack, Eug; Kissil, Andy; Mosier, Gary; hide

    2004-01-01

    Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph, one of two potential architectures, is described. The telescope is designed to make a visible wavelength survey of the habitable zones of at least thirty stars in search of earth-like planets. The preliminary system requirements, optical parameters, mechanical and thermal design, operations scenario and predicted performance is presented. The 6-meter aperture telescope has a monolithic primary mirror, which along with the secondary tower, are being designed to meet the stringent optical tolerances of the planet-finding mission. Performance predictions include dynamic and thermal finite element analysis of the telescope optics and structure, which are used to make predictions of the optical performance of the system.

  4. Investigation of 210Po/210Pb in terrestrial environment of uranium mineralized area of Jaduguda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethy, N.K.; Jha, V.N.; Singh, S.; Sharma, B.D.; Sahoo, S.K.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    Soil is the major components for evaluation of migration characteristics and distribution of radionuclides like 210 Po and 210 Pb in a terrestrial ecosystem. In this study spatial profile of 210 Po in to soil and its equilibrium status with 210 Pb in the terrestrial environment have been studied and correlated with basic soil quality parameters

  5. NOVANA. National Monitering and Assessment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, L. M.; Bijl, L. van der; Boutrup, S.

    This report is Part 2 of the Programme Description of NOVANA - the National Monitoring and Assessment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments. Part 2 comprises a de-tailed description of the nine NOVANA subprogrammes: Background monitoring of air......This report is Part 2 of the Programme Description of NOVANA - the National Monitoring and Assessment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments. Part 2 comprises a de-tailed description of the nine NOVANA subprogrammes: Background monitoring of air...

  6. Designing Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Niels Einar

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this working paper is to present a conceptual model for media integrated communication in virtual learning environments. The model for media integrated communication is very simple and identifies the necessary building blocks for virtual place making in a synthesis of methods...

  7. Future integrated design environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansson, Per; Svidt, Kjeld; Sørensen, Kristian Birch

    2009-01-01

    on the development. Among the most important are missing ontologies both on business and Web/Internet service levels as well as their interrelations, poor user involvement in needs and requirements formulations on new ICT tools as well as in continuous user involvement in design and evaluation of new user...... to be increased. The paper presents a roadmap for development of future Integrated Building Design Systems (IBDS) with end-user participation. Methods for development of tools supporting creative and innovative building design with end-user participation is taking into account, including methods for capture...

  8. Designing environment friendly casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemant, T. [TN International (France)

    2009-06-15

    Environmental protection has become an integral part of the entire cask life cycle: - Design and Fabrication; - Transportation; - Loading, Unloading and Operation; - Maintenance, End of Life Cycle and Dismantling. Three new environmentally-friendly cask concepts were developed: the MX6, the TN112 and the multipurpose Shell. Eco design approach was used to reduce their environmental impacts and address environmental issues such as waste generation and management, greenhouse gases linked to transportation, and scarcity of raw materials, all while improving operating performance. The result is greater responsiveness to the customer and a more comprehensive approach to potential regulatory changes. The cask design optimizes all of the impacting factors, such as raw materials quantity, radiological protection capacity, and the use of more environmentally-friendly materials and fabrication processes. To illustrate, the new MX6 concept may be compared to the standard FS65 concept. In the area of Design and Fabrication, the MX6 requires fewer raw materials and can lower the cask weight/transported assembly weight ratio. An adjustable basket concept was developed. - The new cask is also more effective in terms of radiation protection as a result of improved materials performance. - In the area of fabrication, all waste is transferred to suitable processing systems that promote recycling. In the area of Transportation, shipments are reduced by 33%, thus reducing diesel fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Also, in the area of Operations, the amount of waste generated per assembly shipped is minimized, as are the number of operations and the time spent on them by the operators. In the area of Maintenance and Dismantling, extensive, time-consuming maintenance operations are minimized, as is the waste generated by them. The TN112 cask reduces exposure by 15%, uses fewer raw materials, and has a faster turnaround time due to optimized tooling. For waste subject to

  9. Designing for the global environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document contains papers which were presented at the symposium entitled Designing for the Global Environment. Session topics included policy and the implementation of energy efficient technologies. Individual papers were processed separately for the Department of Energy databases.

  10. Radioisotope power sources in the terrestrial and marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holleman, T.J.; Wahlquist, E.J.

    1976-01-01

    In response to user agency needs, the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), Division of Nuclear Research and Applications (NRA), has undertaken a variety of research and development efforts to insure the availability of highly reliable, long-lived nuclear power sources for special purpose terrestrial missions planned for the late 1970's and early 1980's. One such effort currently being pursued is the development of a 1kW(e) Stirling Radioisotope Power System for integration into an Unmanned Free Swimming Submersible (UFSS) demonstration vehicle now under development by the Naval Research Laboratory. Another important effort which NRA has undertaken is a study to evaluate both isotope fueled and non-isotope fueled unattended power systems in the 2kW(e) range for application in cold regions. In the lower power ranges of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators, NRA continues to support new development efforts and new application areas. The Division is providing assistance to the Navy on a 1 / 2 W(e) RTG for use in various underwater applications. The various efforts are briefly discussed

  11. The corrosion of depleted uranium in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, C; Milodowski, A E; Baker, A C

    2014-02-01

    Depleted Uranium alloyed with titanium is used in armour penetrating munitions that have been fired in a number of conflict zones and testing ranges including the UK ranges at Kirkcudbright and Eskmeals. The study presented here evaluates the corrosion of DU alloy cylinders in soil on these two UK ranges and in the adjacent marine environment of the Solway Firth. The estimated mean initial corrosion rates and times for complete corrosion range from 0.13 to 1.9 g cm(-2) y(-1) and 2.5-48 years respectively depending on the particular physical and geochemical environment. The marine environment at the experimental site was very turbulent. This may have caused the scouring of corrosion products and given rise to a different geochemical environment from that which could be easily duplicated in laboratory experiments. The rate of mass loss was found to vary through time in one soil environment and this is hypothesised to be due to pitting increasing the surface area, followed by a build up of corrosion products inhibiting further corrosion. This indicates that early time measurements of mass loss or corrosion rate may be poor indicators of late time corrosion behaviour, potentially giving rise to incorrect estimates of time to complete corrosion. The DU alloy placed in apparently the same geochemical environment, for the same period of time, can experience very different amounts of corrosion and mass loss, indicating that even small variations in the corrosion environment can have a significant effect. These effects are more significant than other experimental errors and variations in initial surface area. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Azospirillum genomes reveal transition of bacteria from aquatic to terrestrial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Borziak, Kirill; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai; Alexandre, Gladys; Sukharnikov, Leonid O; Wuichet, Kristin; Hurst, Gregory B; McDonald, W Hayes; Robertson, Jon S; Barbe, Valérie; Calteau, Alexandra; Rouy, Zoé; Mangenot, Sophie; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Normand, Philippe; Boyer, Mickaël; Siguier, Patricia; Dessaux, Yves; Elmerich, Claudine; Condemine, Guy; Krishnen, Ganisan; Kennedy, Ivan; Paterson, Andrew H; González, Victor; Mavingui, Patrick; Zhulin, Igor B

    2011-12-01

    Fossil records indicate that life appeared in marine environments ∼3.5 billion years ago (Gyr) and transitioned to terrestrial ecosystems nearly 2.5 Gyr. Sequence analysis suggests that "hydrobacteria" and "terrabacteria" might have diverged as early as 3 Gyr. Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum are associated with roots of terrestrial plants; however, virtually all their close relatives are aquatic. We obtained genome sequences of two Azospirillum species and analyzed their gene origins. While most Azospirillum house-keeping genes have orthologs in its close aquatic relatives, this lineage has obtained nearly half of its genome from terrestrial organisms. The majority of genes encoding functions critical for association with plants are among horizontally transferred genes. Our results show that transition of some aquatic bacteria to terrestrial habitats occurred much later than the suggested initial divergence of hydro- and terrabacterial clades. The birth of the genus Azospirillum approximately coincided with the emergence of vascular plants on land.

  13. Azospirillum genomes reveal transition of bacteria from aquatic to terrestrial environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Wisniewski-Dyé

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fossil records indicate that life appeared in marine environments ∼3.5 billion years ago (Gyr and transitioned to terrestrial ecosystems nearly 2.5 Gyr. Sequence analysis suggests that "hydrobacteria" and "terrabacteria" might have diverged as early as 3 Gyr. Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum are associated with roots of terrestrial plants; however, virtually all their close relatives are aquatic. We obtained genome sequences of two Azospirillum species and analyzed their gene origins. While most Azospirillum house-keeping genes have orthologs in its close aquatic relatives, this lineage has obtained nearly half of its genome from terrestrial organisms. The majority of genes encoding functions critical for association with plants are among horizontally transferred genes. Our results show that transition of some aquatic bacteria to terrestrial habitats occurred much later than the suggested initial divergence of hydro- and terrabacterial clades. The birth of the genus Azospirillum approximately coincided with the emergence of vascular plants on land.

  14. Designing the Knowledge Integration Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Marcia C.

    2000-01-01

    Explains Knowledge Integration Environment (KIE) activities which are designed to promote lifelong science learning. Describes the partnership process that guided the design as well as the Scaffolded Knowledge Integration (SKI) framework that gave the partnership a head start on creating effective materials. (Contains 52 references.) (Author/YDS)

  15. Terrestrial Permafrost as a Model Environment for Bioastronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapin, A.; McDonald, G. D.

    2004-06-01

    The extent to which organisms can survive extended periods of metabolic inactivity in cold environments such as permafrost is one of the key questions in the study of life in extreme environments and for astrobiology. Viable bacteria have been cultured from million year-old Siberian permafrost samples, but the relationship between the age of the bacteria and the age of the sediments remains controversial. In this study we analyze the level of racemization of amino acids in permafrost samples collected from several sites in Northern Siberia. We have shown that even during long exposures to low temperatures (-10°C to -15°C), the bacterial cells in permafrost are not completely dormant, but continue to metabolize and at least partially control the extent of amino acid racemization.

  16. Chlorine cycling and fates of 36Cl in terrestrial environments

    OpenAIRE

    Bastviken, David; Svensson, Teresia; Sandén, Per; Kylin, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine-36 (36Cl), a radioisotope of chlorine (Cl) with a half-life of 301,000 years, is present in some types of nuclear waste and is disposed in repositories for radioactive waste. As the release of 36Cl from such repositories to the near surface environment has to be taken into account it is of interest to predict possible fates of 36Cl under various conditions as a part of the safety assessments of repositories for radioactive waste. This report aims to summarize the state of the art kno...

  17. Testing flat plate photovoltaic modules for terrestrial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, A. R.; Arnett, J. C.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    New qualification tests have been developed for flat plate photovoltaic modules. Temperature cycling, cyclic pressure load, and humidity exposure are especially useful for detecting design and fabrication deficiencies. There is positive correlation between many of the observed field effects, such as power loss, and qualification test induced degradation. The status of research efforts for the development of test methodology for field-related problems is reviewed.

  18. RNEDE: Resilient Network Design Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat Venkatasubramanian, Tanu Malik, Arun Giridh; Craig Rieger; Keith Daum; Miles McQueen

    2010-08-01

    Modern living is more and more dependent on the intricate web of critical infrastructure systems. The failure or damage of such systems can cause huge disruptions. Traditional design of this web of critical infrastructure systems was based on the principles of functionality and reliability. However, it is increasingly being realized that such design objectives are not sufficient. Threats, disruptions and faults often compromise the network, taking away the benefits of an efficient and reliable design. Thus, traditional network design parameters must be combined with self-healing mechanisms to obtain a resilient design of the network. In this paper, we present RNEDEa resilient network design environment that that not only optimizes the network for performance but tolerates fluctuations in its structure that result from external threats and disruptions. The environment evaluates a set of remedial actions to bring a compromised network to an optimal level of functionality. The environment includes a visualizer that enables the network administrator to be aware of the current state of the network and the suggested remedial actions at all times.

  19. Natural formation of vinyl chloride in the terrestrial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Frank; Borchers, Reinhard; Pracht, Jens; Rheinberger, Stefan; Scholer, Heinz F

    2002-06-01

    Vinyl chloride is a highly reactive and toxic substance which is widely used in industry. It is the parent compound of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), one of the most important industrial polymers. Until now, it was thought that vinyl chloride found in the environment is exclusively man-made or results from the degradation of other anthropogenic substances, such as trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. Here, we demonstrate that vinyl chloride also has natural sources. Soil air and ambient air from a rural area in Northern Germany were investigated for volatile chlorinated halocarbons. The concentrations of vinyl chloride in the soil air were significantly enhanced as compared to ambient air, indicating a natural formation of this compound in the soil. A series of laboratory experiments using different soils and model compounds was conducted, which clearly proved that vinyl chloride could be produced during soil processes. We propose that this highly reactive compound can be formed during the oxidative degradation of organic matter in soil, for example, in a reaction between humic substances, chloride ions and an oxidant (ferric ions or hydroxyl radicals). The redox-sensitive aromatic compounds in soil such as catechols and o-quinones can be degraded to CO2, accompanied by the release of vinyl chloride and other volatile chlorinated compounds. This process could have started in the Late Silurian to Early Devonian, 400 million years ago, when the first soils on earth evolved.

  20. Effects of the solar-terrestrial environment on satellite operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    Hot plasma and energetic particle populations in space are known to produce spacecraft operational anomalies. In the inner part of the earth's magnetosphere, these effects are primarily due to durably trapped radiation belt particles, and the integrated doses can be calculated quite accurately for any given orbit. In the outer magnetosphere many spacecraft operational problems appear to be due to intense, transient phenomena. It is shown that three types of naturally-occurring, and highly variable, hostile particle radiation environments are encountered at, or near, the geostationary orbit: (1) high-energy protons due to solar flares; (2) very high energy electrons (2-10 MeV) of unknown origin; and (3) energetic ions and electrons produced by magnetospheric substorms. Present particle sensor systems provide energetic particle detection and assessment capabilities during these kinds of high-energy radiation events. Numerous operational anomalies and subsystem problems have occurred during each type of event period and the association of such upsets is demonstrated in this paper. Methods of prediction of magnetospheric disturbances are discussed, and overall recommendations are made for dealing with this continuing problem

  1. Environment, information divide and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    Design of human environment is to be made with understanding human-human and human-environment relations and environmental behaviors of human beings, artifacts and natural things and overcoming their differences and contradictions. Information divide exists naturally due to various differences of human beings. Many problems in the area of nuclear energy seem to be derived from various differences and contradictions in central-local interests, between the particles concerned and unconcerned and also in human being-artifacts relations. In order to harmonize nuclear energy with the society, it is necessary to vanish differences and solve contradictions with redesigning environments of those problems in their context. Case studies are highly recommended with continuous efforts to develop more universal design methodology. Open access to information and data in science and technology is encouraged in the area of nuclear energy. (T. Tanaka)

  2. GRAPE, Solar Terrestrial Physics in an operational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgiana De Franceschi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available […] The collection of papers that forms this special issue represents the whole amplitude of research that is being conducted in the framework of GRAPE, while also connecting to other initiatives that address the same objectives in regions outside the polar regions, and worldwide, such as the Training Research and Applications Network to Support the Mitigation of Ionospheric Threats (TRANSMIT; www.transmitionosphere.net, a Seventh Framework Programme (FP7 Marie Curie Initial Training Network that is focused on the study of ionospheric phenomena and their effects on systems embedded in our daily life, Near-Earth Space Data Infrastructure for e-Science (ESPAS, an FP7-funded project that aims to provide the e-Infrastructure necessary to support the access to observations, for the modeling and prediction of the near-Earth Space environment, Concept for Ionospheric Scintillation Mitigation for Professional GNSS in Latin America (CIGALA and its follow-up and extension Countering GNSS High-Accuracy Applications Limitations due to Ionospheric Disturbances in Brazil (CALIBRA, both of which are funded by the European Commission in the frame of FP7, for facing the equatorial ionosphere and its impact on GNSS. The main objective of the present Special Issue of Annals of Geophysics is to collect recent reports on work performed in the polar regions and on the datasets collected in time by the instrumentation deployed across various countries. This collection will set the starting point for further research in the field, especially in the perspective of the new and very advanced space system that will be available in the next few years. […

  3. Design for a better environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.A.

    2005-01-01

    The paper discusses part of an ongoing study initiated at the Pakistan Navy Engineering College in Karachi. The study originated from the author's belief that design in this country is influenced by 'factors' other than considerations based on scientific knowledge and logical thinking. The same may be true for selection of materials for a particular application. The key thrust of the work is to explore how plastics and associated products affect the environment and the economy of the country, and the problems these may create. It also explores the role of people, government and industry in this regard. The study was planned to consist of case studies from the automotive sector in Pakistan. It was decided that plastic components manufactured in Pakistan would be studied and engineers and designers involved in 'design' would be interviewed. This paper focuses on the application of conceptual design techniques to the problem of sustainable design of a product in the automotive industry. It also attempts to focus on the role of this industry in the implementation of concepts related to sustainable development in engineering design. (author)

  4. Environmental and radiological safety studies: interaction of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, April 1-June 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlack, G.M.; Patterson, J.H.

    1981-09-01

    The containers for /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources in radioisotope thermoelectric generators are designed with large safety factors to ensure they will withstand reentry from orbit and impact with the earth and safely contain the nuclear fuel until it is recovered. Existing designs have proved more than adequately safe, but the Space and Terrestrial Division of the Department of Energy Office of Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects continually seeks more information about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work discussed here includes studies of the effects on the heat source of terrestrial and aquatic environments to obtain data for design of even safer systems. This report includes data from environmental chamber experiments that simulate terrestrial conditions, experiments to measure PuO/sub 2/ dissolution rates, soil column experiments to measure sorption of plutonium by soils, and several aquatic experiments.

  5. Collaborative design in virtual environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative virtual environments (CVEs) are multi-user virtual realities which actively support communication and co-operation. This book offers a comprehensive reference volume to the state-of-the-art in the area of design studies in CVEs. It is an excellent mix of contributions from over 25 leading researcher/experts in multiple disciplines from academia and industry, providing up-to-date insight into the current research topics in this field as well as the latest technological advancements and the best working examples. Many of these results and ideas are also applicable to other areas su

  6. Innovation in Deep Space Habitat Interior Design: Lessons Learned From Small Space Design in Terrestrial Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew A.; Toups, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Increased public awareness of carbon footprints, crowding in urban areas, and rising housing costs have spawned a 'small house movement' in the housing industry. Members of this movement desire small, yet highly functional residences which are both affordable and sensitive to consumer comfort standards. In order to create comfortable, minimum-volume interiors, recent advances have been made in furniture design and approaches to interior layout that improve both space utilization and encourage multi-functional design for small homes, apartments, naval, and recreational vehicles. Design efforts in this evolving niche of terrestrial architecture can provide useful insights leading to innovation and efficiency in the design of space habitats for future human space exploration missions. This paper highlights many of the cross-cutting architectural solutions used in small space design which are applicable to the spacecraft interior design problem. Specific solutions discussed include reconfigurable, multi-purpose spaces; collapsible or transformable furniture; multi-purpose accommodations; efficient, space saving appliances; stowable and mobile workstations; and the miniaturization of electronics and computing hardware. For each of these design features, descriptions of how they save interior volume or mitigate other small space issues such as confinement stress or crowding are discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided to provide guidance for future designs and identify potential collaborations with the small spaces design community.

  7. Transfer of radionuclides at the uranium and thorium decay chains in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, C.

    1987-04-01

    This report examines the transfer of radionuclides from the uranium and thorium decay chains (U-238, Ra-226, Th-232, Th-230, Po-210 and Pb-210) through the aquatic and terrestrial environment. This transfer is characterized by a transfer coefficient; environmental and experimental factors which cause this coefficient to vary are presented and discussed in this report. Furthermore, based on a literature survey, the report indicates the range of coefficients found for the aquatic sector (that is, sediment and freshwater and marine organisms) and for the terrestrial sector (that is, plants and domestic and wild animals). Afterwards, generalisations are formulated on the transfer of the different radionuclides through the multiple environmental compartments. 75 refs

  8. Black spots for aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems: impact of a perennial cormorant colony on the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimaszyk, Piotr; Brzeg, Andrzej; Rzymski, Piotr; Piotrowicz, Ryszard

    2015-06-01

    The global growth of populations of different cormorant species has raised concern on the consequences of their presence in the environment. This study examined the impact of a perennial colony (160 breeding pairs) of great cormorants on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The deposition of bird-originating nutrients within the area of colony, their accumulation in soils and the fluxed of chemical substances to a nearby lake were investigated. The impact of cormorants on terrestrial vegetation and microbial pollution of the lake were also studied. The soils beneath the colony were found to contain extremely high concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus. The overgrowing vegetation was largely limited with nitrophilous and invasive species being more abundant. Increased loads of organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus were also found in groundwater and particularly, surface runoff. The colony area delivered significant amounts of nutrients to the lake also when the birds were absent. The lake water near colony was also characterized by increased nutrient content and additionally higher number of faecal bacteria. The present results demonstrate the complexity through which the effect of cormorant colonies can be manifested simultaneously in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Interactive Environment Design in Smart City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, DeXiang; Chen, LanSha; Zhou, Xi

    2017-08-01

    The interactive environment design of smart city is not just an interactive progress or interactive mode design, rather than generate an environment such as the “organic” life entity as human beings through interactive design, forming a smart environment with perception, memory, thinking, and reaction.

  10. Surfactants in aquatic and terrestrial environment: occurrence, behavior, and treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardak, K; Drogui, P; Daghrir, R

    2016-02-01

    Surfactants belong to a group of chemicals that are well known for their cleaning properties. Their excessive use as ingredients in care products (e.g., shampoos, body wash) and in household cleaning products (e.g., dishwashing detergents, laundry detergents, hard-surface cleaners) has led to the discharge of highly contaminated wastewaters in aquatic and terrestrial environment. Once reached in the different environmental compartments (rivers, lakes, soils, and sediments), surfactants can undergo aerobic or anaerobic degradation. The most studied surfactants so far are linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), alkylphenol ethoxylate (APEOs), and alcohol ethoxylate (AEOs). Concentrations of surfactants in wastewaters can range between few micrograms to hundreds of milligrams in some cases, while it reaches several grams in sludge used for soil amendments in agricultural areas. Above the legislation standards, surfactants can be toxic to aquatic and terrestrial organisms which make treatment processes necessary before their discharge into the environment. Given this fact, biological and chemical processes should be considered for better surfactants removal. In this review, we investigate several issues with regard to: (1) the toxicity of surfactants in the environment, (2) their behavior in different ecological systems, (3) and the different treatment processes used in wastewater treatment plants in order to reduce the effects of surfactants on living organisms.

  11. Subject-3: Study on migration of radionuclides released into terrestrial and aquatic environment after nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, H.; Matsunaga, T.; Ueno, T.; Nagao, S.; Yanase, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Arkhipov, A.N. [Chernobyl Scientific and Technical Center for International Research (Ukraine); Tkachenko, Yu. [The State Enterprise Regional Monitoring and Domestic Control (RADEC) (Unknown)

    2001-03-01

    Subject-3 has been focused on the migration behavior of long-lived radionuclides in the terrestrial surface environment, especially in connection with their chemical and physical forms. Migration behavior of radionuclides is strongly affected with their chemical and physical forms (for example; Gunten and Benes 1995). One of the two categories in Subject-3 consists of migration from surface soils including aging effects of hot particles, plant uptake from contaminated soils, and resuspension of radionuclides. The other is run off by river system, considering the role of organic materials. (author)

  12. The monitoring of the terrestrial environment around Almirante Alvaro Alberto nuclear power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, P.G.; Souza, R.F.; Cardoso, S.N.M., E-mail: pgtares@eletronuclear.gov.b, E-mail: rfsouza@eletronuclear.gov.b, E-mail: sergion@eletronuclear.gov.b [ELETROBRAS Eletronuclear S.A., Paraty, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Monitoracao Ambiental

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to evaluate the environmental monitoring around Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Station after the beginning the operation of Unit II, in July 2000. The Environmental Monitoring Laboratory (EML) has, for purpose, to monitor the environment around the station to verify if there is a potential impact caused by the operation of the units. The EML collects several environmental samples and analyses radiometrically to determine the presence of artificial radionuclides. The types of the samples are marine samples (sea water, fish, algae, beach sand and sediments), terrestrial (milk, banana, soil, grass, superficial and underground water and river water and sediment) and aerial samples (rain water, airborne for iodine and particulate). This paper only describes the monitoring of terrestrial samples. At the EML, the samples are prepared and analysed following international procedures. The samples of milk, banana, soil, grass, surface and underground water, river water and river sediment are analysed by gamma spectrometry in a multi-channel analyser GENIE-2000 System with High-purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors to determine the activities of the detectable radionuclides. The EML also analyses tritium in surface water by liquid scintillation counting. In addition, analysis of {sup 89}Sr/{sup 90}Sr, by beta counting and {sup 131}I by gamma spectrometry are performed in the processed milk. The results are, then, compared with those obtained in pre-operational time of Angra 1 (1978 - 1982) and those obtained in operational time of the units until 2010. The results show us that, from 1982 until now, there is no impact in terrestrial environment caused by the operation neither of Angra 1 nor both Angra 1 and Angra 2. (author)

  13. Advanced Computer Modeling of the Lunar Plasma Environment in the Dynamic Terrestrial Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, E. M.; Winglee, R. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Porter, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Advanced 3D multi-fluid model in conjunction with Lunar Prospector data is used to quantify the plasma environment when the Moon is in the Earth's magnetotail from quiet to storm conditions. The multi-fluid model incorporates ion cyclotron and multi-ion species effects similar to hybrid codes but the fluid treatment enables grid refinement down to as small as 100 km. This high resolution is unique to the multi-fluid modeling, enabling the model to resolve the lunar near space environment in the context of the global terrestrial magnetosphere. Spectrograms of trajectories near the Moon and through the lunar wake show significant difference in the characteristics of the electrons, the light ions and the heavy ions. This implies that the behaviour of heavy ions can not be inferred from electron measurements. Results will be presented that address the composition, energy, density, and velocity of ions near the Moon for (a) quiet conditions and (b) sub-storm/storm conditions, and the overall geometry of the cavity and wake region of the Moon, specifically noting asymmetries of the wake for different incident terrestrial magnetospheric plasma conditions.

  14. Presence and potential role of thermophilic bacteria in temperate terrestrial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, M C; Santana, M; Gonzalez, J M

    2012-01-01

    Organic sulfur and nitrogen are major reservoirs of these elements in terrestrial systems, although their cycling remains to be fully understood. Both sulfur and nitrogen mineralization are directly related to microbial metabolism. Mesophiles and thermophiles were isolated from temperate environments. Thermophilic isolates were classified within the Firmicutes, belonging to the Geobacillus, Brevibacillus, and Ureibacillus genera, and showed optimum growth temperatures between 50°C and 60°C. Sulfate and ammonium produced were higher during growth of thermophiles both for isolated strains and natural bacterial assemblages. They were positively related to organic nutrient load. Temperature also affected the release of sulfate and ammonium by thermophiles. Quantitative, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction on environmental samples indicated that the examined thermophilic Firmicutes represented up to 3.4% of the total bacterial community RNA. Temperature measurements during summer days showed values above 40°C for more than 10 h a day in soils from southern Spain. These results support a potential role of thermophilic bacteria in temperate terrestrial environments by mineralizing organic sulfur and nitrogen ruled by the existence and length of warm periods.

  15. Initinal and secondary decline of transport of radionuclides in Fukushima in the terrestrial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Yuichi; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Wakiyama, Yoshifumi; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Smith, Hugh; Brake, Will; Iwagami, Sho; Kato, Hiroaki

    2017-04-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident has released massive amount of radiocesium into the terrestrial environment, and the radiocecium have been moved through rainfall and erosional processes. Especially, radiocesium (Cs-137) transfer and flux through river network is important to understand the redistribution of radiocesium in terrestrial environment. An intensive field monitoring campaign has been started including mapping project, immediately after the Fukushima NPP accident including detailed monitoring site in upstream (Yamakiya site), and 30 monitoring sites in downstream river sites. In this presentation, I will present the initial and secondary decline of summary of environmental transfer studies after the Fukushima NPP accident The processes includes forest canopy to ground soil and aquifers, transfer to river and marine. The activity concentration of radiocesium of suspended sediment declining rapidly in rivers until about 1 year after the fallout, then decline slowly, but the tendency of rate of decline differs between rivers. The rate of decline in paddy field and headwater stream is quicker in initial decline followed by slower decline. However, the slow decline of activity concentration of suspend sediment in cropland and decline steadily. We will analyse the difference in initial and secondary decline between rivers using upstream land use and runoff characteristics.

  16. Amphibian populations in the terrestrial environment: Is there evidence of declines of terrestrial forest amphibians in northwestern California?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, H.H.; Fellers, G.M.; Lind, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Amphibian declines have been documented worldwide; however the vast majority are species associated with aquatic habitats. Information on the status and trends of terrestrial amphibians is almost entirely lacking. Here we use data collected across a 12-yr period (sampling from 1984-86 and from 1993-95) to address the question of whether evidence exists for declines among terrestrial amphibians in northwestern California forests. The majority of amphibians, both species and relative numbers, in these forests are direct-developing salamanders of the family Plethodontidae. We examined amphibian richness and evenness, and the relative abundances of the four most common species of plethodontid salamanders. We examined evidence of differences between years in two ecological provinces (coastal and interior) and across young, mature, and late seral forests and with reference to a moisture gradient from xeric to hydric within late seral forests. We found evidence of declines in species richness across years on late seral mesic stands and in the coastal ecological province, but these differences appeared to be caused by differences in the detection of rarer species, rather than evidence of an overall pattern. We also found differences among specific years in numbers of individuals of the most abundant species, Ensatina eschscholtzii, but these differences also failed to reflect a consistent pattern of declines between the two decadal sample periods. Results showing differences in richness, evenness, and relative abundances along both the seral and moisture continua were consistent with previous research. Overall, we found no compelling evidence of a downward trend in terrestrial plethodontid salamanders. We believe that continued monitoring of terrestrial salamander populations is important to understanding mechanisms of population declines in amphibian species. Copyright 2007 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  17. Modeling and Monitoring Terrestrial Primary Production in a Changing Global Environment: Toward a Multiscale Synthesis of Observation and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufen Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a critical need to monitor and predict terrestrial primary production, the key indicator of ecosystem functioning, in a changing global environment. Here we provide a brief review of three major approaches to monitoring and predicting terrestrial primary production: (1 ground-based field measurements, (2 satellite-based observations, and (3 process-based ecosystem modelling. Much uncertainty exists in the multi-approach estimations of terrestrial gross primary production (GPP and net primary production (NPP. To improve the capacity of model simulation and prediction, it is essential to evaluate ecosystem models against ground and satellite-based measurements and observations. As a case, we have shown the performance of the dynamic land ecosystem model (DLEM at various scales from site to region to global. We also discuss how terrestrial primary production might respond to climate change and increasing atmospheric CO2 and uncertainties associated with model and data. Further progress in monitoring and predicting terrestrial primary production requires a multiscale synthesis of observations and model simulations. In the Anthropocene era in which human activity has indeed changed the Earth’s biosphere, therefore, it is essential to incorporate the socioeconomic component into terrestrial ecosystem models for accurately estimating and predicting terrestrial primary production in a changing global environment.

  18. Did the short PETM trigger long-lasting changes in terrestrial environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, H. C.; Clyde, W. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is a well-documented episode of warming where average temperatures increased 5-8 C in both marine and terrestrial settings before returning to pre-PETM values. As a result the PETM is generally thought of as a transient event that is superimposed on a longer-term trend of global change. Nevertheless not all aspects of the climatic-hydrologic-biologic system experienced a transient response to this event. For example, the well-known dispersal of mammals (Artiodactyls, Perrisopdactyls and Primates = APP taxa) at the beginning of the PETM resulted in fundamentally different terrestrial ecosystems dafter the PETM compared to before it. In this case the PETM can be considered not just a transient event, but a triggering, or threshold, event that resulted in long-term biotic change. Here we consider the possibility that the PETM acted as a threshold event for parts of the climatic and hydrologic system as well as the biologic system. A review of terrestrial/fluvial sections from Laramide basins of western North America (Bighorn, Green River, Huerfano/Raton, Piceance Creek, Powder River, San Juan, Tornillo, Uintah, Washakie, Williston, Wind River), reveals a pronounced difference between rocks of Paleocene and of Eocene age. Common differences include absence of lignites/coal beds in the Eocene, and the occurrence of highly oxidized paleosols and relatively fewer organic-rich mudstones compared to the Paleocene. These suggest drier conditions, either a decrease in mean annual precipitation or enhanced seasonal drying. In sections where the PETM can be identified on the basis of biostratigraphic indicators and carbon isotope excursions (Bighorn, Piceance Creek, Powder River and Williston Basins), and where the PETM can be inferred based on carbon isotope data alone (Huerfano/Raton?, Tornillo, Wind River Basins), it is associated with this transition from one long-lasting lithofacies (environment?) to another. This association

  19. Studies of volatiles and organic materials in early terrestrial and present-day outer solar system environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Thompson, W. Reid; Chyba, Christopher F.; Khare, B. N.

    1991-01-01

    A review and partial summary of projects within several areas of research generally involving the origin, distribution, chemistry, and spectral/dielectric properties of volatiles and organic materials in the outer solar system and early terrestrial environments are presented. The major topics covered include: (1) impact delivery of volatiles and organic compounds to the early terrestrial planets; (2) optical constants measurements; (3) spectral classification, chemical processes, and distribution of materials; and (4) radar properties of ice, hydrocarbons, and organic heteropolymers.

  20. Design and management of sustainable built environments

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is believed to be a great challenge to built environment professionals in design and management. An integrated approach in delivering a sustainable built environment is desired by the built environment professional institutions. The aim of this book is to provide an advanced understanding of the key subjects required for the design and management of modern built environments to meet carbon emission reduction targets. In Design and Management of Sustainable Built Environments, an international group of experts provide comprehensive and the most up-to-date knowledge, covering sustainable urban and building design, management and assessment. The best practice case studies of the implementation of sustainable technology and management from the BRE Innovation Park are included. Design and Management of Sustainable Built Environments will be of interest to urban and building designers, environmental engineers, and building performance assessors.  It will be particularly useful as a reference book ...

  1. Design Multilayer Antireflection Coatings for Terrestrial Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the influence of methods to design antireflection coatings (ARCs on reflectivity of broadband solar cells, we provide detailed analyses about the ARC coupled with a window layer and the refractive index dispersion effect of each layer. By multidimensional matrix data simulation, two methods were employed to measure the composite reflection of a SiO2/ZnS double-layer ARC within the spectral ranges of 300–870 nm (dual junction and 300–1850 nm (triple junction under AM1.5 solar radiation. A comparison study, between the results obtained from the commonly used weighted average reflectance method (WAR and that from the introduced effective average reflectance method (EAR, shows that the optimization of ARC by EAR method is convenient and feasible.

  2. Rapid Mission Design for Dynamically Complex Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Designing trajectories in dynamically complex environments is very challenging and easily becomes an intractable problem. More complex planning implies potentially...

  3. Turnover of eroded soil organic carbon after deposition in terrestrial and aquatic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cammeraat, Erik; Kalbitz, Karsten

    The fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) after deposition is a large uncertainty in assessing the impact of soil erosion on C budgets. Globally, large amounts of SOC are transported by erosion and a substantial part is transferred into adjacent inland waters, linking terrestrial and aquatic C...... soil properties (e.g. texture, aggregation, etc.), SOC quantity and quality. In a 16-week incubation experiment, SOC turnover was determined for conditions reflecting downslope soils or inland waters. Moreover, we studied the impact of labile C inputs (‘priming’) on SOC stability using 13C labeled...... cellulose. Physical and chemical soil properties and SOC molecular composition were assessed as potential controls on C turnover. SOC deposition in aquatic environments resulted in upto 3.5 times higher C turnover than deposition on downslope soils. Labile C inputs enlarged total CO2 emissions...

  4. Lower Palaeozoic Alluvial Systems: The Sedimentological Impact of Evolving Vegetation in Terrestrial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, N. S.; Gibling, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    In present-day alluvial environments, the impact of vegetation on sedimentological processes and deposits is well known. A vegetated catchment may decrease sediment yield, sediment erodability, Hortonian overland flow, aeolian winnowing of fines, the proportion of sediment transported as bedload, may increase bank stability, infiltration into substrates, bed roughness, and can promote the production of chemically-weathered clays and soils and the adoption of a meandering style. It is generally understood that, prior to the evolution of terrestrial vegetation during the Lower Palaeozoic, ancient alluvial systems were markedly different from modern systems, with many systems adopting a "sheet-braided" style. This understanding has previously informed the interpretations of many Precambrian pre-vegetation alluvial successions, but there has been relatively little work regarding Lower Palaeozoic alluvial successions that existed during the active terrestrialization of plants. In this study, a comprehensive review of 141 Cambrian to Devonian alluvial successions documented in published literature was combined with original field data from 20 alluvial successions from across Europe and North America, in order to identify changes in the sedimentary style of alluvial strata while vegetation was evolving and colonizing alluvial environments. This approach has established clear trends indicating an increase in mudrocks and sandstone maturity and a decrease in overall sand grain size through the Lower Palaeozoic, suggesting that primitive vegetation cover was able to promote the production and preservation of muds and increase the residence time of sand-grade sediment (and thus sediment reworking) in alluvial systems. It has also enabled the first stratigraphic occurrence of certain vegetation-dependent sedimentary features to be pinpointed and tied directly to the onset of specific evolutionary adaptations recorded in the palaeobotanical fossil record. As such, the first

  5. Migration of radiocesium and radioiodine released by FDNPP accident in the terrestrial environment and its interpretation by their speciation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Fan, Qiaohui; Sakaguchi, Aya; Tanaka, Kazuya; Togo, Yoko S.

    2013-01-01

    Distribution of radiocesium and radioiodine such as vertical profile in soil layer, particulate matter-water distribution in river water, and size distributions in sediments were studied to understand their migration in the terrestrial environment in Fukushima area. In addition, speciation studies on cesium and iodine focusing on (1) the surface complex structure of cesium on clay minerals and (2) formation of organoiodine in soil have been conducted, which can clearly explain the possible chemical processes that control the behavior of these radionuclides in the terrestrial environment. (author)

  6. A Design Framework for Personal Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimi, E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our research was to develop a PLE (personal learning environment) design framework for workplace settings. By doing such, the research has answered this research question, how should a technology-based personal learning environment be designed, aiming at supporting learners to gain

  7. Tracking small mountainous river derived terrestrial organic carbon across the active margin marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, L. B.; Blair, N. E.; Orpin, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Active margins are particularly efficient in the burial of organic carbon due to the close proximity of highland sources to marine sediment sinks and high sediment transport rates. Compared with passive margins, active margins are dominated by small mountainous river systems, and play a unique role in marine and global carbon cycles. Small mountainous rivers drain only approximately 20% of land, but deliver approximately 40% of the fluvial sediment to the global ocean. Unlike large passive margin systems where riverine organic carbon is efficiently incinerated on continental shelves, small mountainous river dominated systems are highly effective in the burial and preservation of organic carbon due to the rapid and episodic delivery of organic carbon sourced from vegetation, soil, and rock. To investigate the erosion, transport, and burial of organic carbon in active margin small mountainous river systems we use the Waipaoa River, New Zealand. The Waipaoa River, and adjacent marine depositional environment, is a system of interest due to a large sediment yield (6800 tons km-2 yr-1) and extensive characterization. Previous studies have considered the biogeochemistry of the watershed and tracked the transport of terrestrially derived sediment and organics to the continental shelf and slope by biogeochemical proxies including stable carbon isotopes, lignin phenols, n-alkanes, and n-fatty acids. In this work we expand the spatial extent of investigation to include deep sea sediments of the Hikurangi Trough. Located in approximately 3000 m water depth 120 km from the mouth of the Waipaoa River, the Hikurangi Trough is the southern extension of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction system. Piston core sediments collected by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA, NZ) in the Hikurangi Trough indicate the presence of terrestrially derived material (lignin phenols), and suggest a continuum of deposition, resuspension, and transport across the margin

  8. Ecological land classification and terrestrial environment effects assessment for the Port Hope and Port Granby projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.; Wittkugel, U.; Kleb, H.

    2006-01-01

    The Ecological Land Classification system was developed to provide a standardized methodology for describing plant communities and wildlife habitat in southern Ontario. The method employs a hierarchical classification system. It can be applied at different levels of accuracy, i.e., at regional, sub-regional, and local scales with an increasing differentiation of vegetation communities. The standardization of the approach permits a comparison of vegetation communities from different sites and an evaluation of the rarity of these communities within the province. Further, the approach facilitates the monitoring of changes in terrestrial communities with time. These characteristics make Ecological Land Classification mapping a useful tool for environmental assessment such as the ones undertaken for the Port Hope and Port Granby Long-Term Waste Management Projects, which were conducted pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act 1992. In the context of the Environmental Assessment for the Port Hope and Port Granby Projects, an Ecological Land Classification study was undertaken to characterize the terrestrial environment at regional, local and site levels. Vegetation patches (polygons) were delineated on the basis of air photo interpretation. The individual polygons were then visited for detailed inventory and classified to the most detailed level; that is to the vegetation type. Plant communities were then compared with those listed in the Ontario Natural Heritage Information Centre database to determine their rarity and to determine where they rank as Valued Ecosystem Components. Ecological Land Classification mapping results were used in the assessment of effects to Valued Ecosystem Components. A spatial analysis of the digitized vegetation maps showed the geographic extent of habitat losses and impairments due to various project works and activities. Landscape rehabilitation strategies and concepts were subsequently developed based on Ecological Land

  9. Cs-137 in terrestrial environment in Loviisa, Olkiluoto and Maenttae areas (Finland)[Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartti, V.P.; Ikaeheimonen, T.K.; Klemola, S.; Ilus, E.; Mattila, J. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    The aim of the study was to clarify how Cs-137 is accumulated in different biota species in Finnish terrestrial environment. The study was carried out in three different areas. The Maenttae area was one of the areas in Finland with the highest contamination by the Chernobyl fallout. The other areas (Loviisa and Olkiluoto) represent the environs of the Finnish NPPs located in the South and West coast of Finland, respectively (Fig. 1). The sampling was carried out in 2000 in Loviisa, in 2001 in Olkiluoto and in 2003 in Maenttae. Altogether over 120 samples from over 50 species were taken including soil profiles, mushrooms, lichens, mosses, ferns, twigs, needles, leaves and berries. All the samples were dried and homogenized and Cs-137 was measured with HPGe gamma spectrometers. The highest Cs-137 concentrations and Tagg values were found in mushrooms. The Cs-137 concentrations in needles, twigs and ferns were clearly lower than in mushrooms. The activity concentration of Cs-137 in lichens, mosses and leaves were at the same level as in needles and ferns. The concentrations of Cs-137 in berries Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Vaccinium myrtillus and Empetrum nigrum varied from 160 to 1200 Bq/kg d.w. In other berries the concentrations were very low. The best indicator species seemed to be mushrooms. The results of Hypogymnia physodes sampled in Loviisa in 2000 showed that Cs-137 concentrations can vary greatly within a small area. (LN)

  10. Modelling the dynamics of ambient dose rates induced by radiocaesium in the Fukushima terrestrial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Marc-André; Mourlon, Christophe; Calmon, Philippe; Manach, Erwan; Debayle, Christophe; Baccou, Jean

    2017-09-01

    Since the Fukushima accident, Japanese scientists have been intensively monitoring ambient radiations in the highly contaminated territories situated within 80 km of the nuclear site. The surveys that were conducted through mainly carborne, airborne and in situ gamma-ray measurement devices, enabled to efficiently characterize the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of air dose rates induced by Caesium-134 and Caesium-137 in the terrestrial systems. These measurements revealed that radiation levels decreased at rates greater than expected from physical decay in 2011-2012 (up to a factor of 2), and dependent on the type of environment (i.e. urban, agricultural or forest). Unlike carborne measurements that may have been strongly influenced by the depuration of road surfaces, no obvious reason can be invoked for airborne measurements, especially above forests that are known to efficiently retain and recycle radiocaesium. The purpose of our research project is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the data acquired by Japanese, and identify the environmental mechanisms or factors that may explain such decays. The methodology relies on the use of a process-based and spatially-distributed dynamic model that predicts radiocaesium transfer and associated air dose rates inside/above a terrestrial environment (e.g., forests, croplands, meadows, bare soils and urban areas). Despite the lack of site-specific data, our numerical study predicts decrease rates that are globally consistent with both aerial and in situ observations. The simulation at a flying altitude of 200 m indicated that ambient radiation levels decreased over the first 12 months by about 45% over dense urban areas, 15% above evergreen coniferous forests and between 2 and 12% above agricultural lands, owing to environmental processes that are identified and discussed. In particular, we demonstrate that the decrease over evergreen coniferous regions might be due the combined effects of canopy

  11. New insights to the formation of modern dolomite in a terrestrial low-temperature environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zünterl, Andrea; Baldermann, Andre; Boch, Ronny; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Although dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] is a rock-forming mineral in ancient carbonate platforms, its occurrence in modern-marine carbonate-depositing settings and in particular in terrestrial, low-temperature environments is scarce - an enigma that is referred to as the "dolomite problem". At present, it is generally accepted that microbial activity, bacterially-mediated sulfate reduction, high aqueous Mg/Ca ratios and anoxic conditions favour the nucleation and crystal growth of dolomite; albeit the precise reaction paths causing the formation of dolomite at low temperatures remain questionable. Here, we present a novel study about the environmental controls and reaction mechanisms leading to the formation of authigenic Mg-Ca carbonates in (active) fault zones of the Erzberg (Styria, Austria) - Europe's largest iron ore opencast mine. Our petrographic and mineralogical results revealed the presence of ˜2-20 cm thick laminated successions of embedded needle-shaped, radiating aragonite and blocky low-Mg calcite (a repetitive sequence also-called "erzbergite") and subsequently deposited (Ca-rich) non-stoichiometric dolomite, which is clogging former voids and unconsolidated sediment in the heavily deteriorated fault zone. First U-Th age determinations of the respective aragonite layers indicate its formation at ˜19,000-13,000 years BP, also suggesting a "young" age of the sedimentary dolomite. Based on the combination of X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses we identified two types of matrix-replacing dolomite: type 1 dolomite is nearly stoichiometric (˜51 mol% CaCO3) and shows a high degree of cation ordering (0.4-0.6), whereas type 2 dolomite is characterized by Ca-excess (˜55 mol% CaCO3) and a low degree of ordering (types of dolomite grow on the extent of matrix minerals, such as detrital low-Mg calcite, ankerite, siderite, quartz, goethite, chlorite and illitic clay minerals, implying a low-temperature origin of the Ca-excess dolomite and its formation

  12. Design for the Environment Products (Online Search)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains a list of products that carry the Design for the Environment (DfE) label. This mark enables consumers to quickly identify and choose products...

  13. Design for the Environment Products (Raw Data)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains a list of products that carry the Design for the Environment (DfE) label. This mark enables consumers to quickly identify and choose products...

  14. Physiological Integration Affects Expansion of an Amphibious Clonal Plant from Terrestrial to Cu-Polluted Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Zhou, Zhen-Feng

    2017-03-01

    The effects of physiological integration on clonal plants growing in aquatic and terrestrial habitats have been extensively studied, but little is known about the role in the extension of amphibious clonal plants in the heterogeneous aquatic-terrestrial ecotones, especially when the water environments are polluted by heavy metals. Ramets of the amphibious clonal herb Alternanthera philoxeroides were rooted in unpolluted soil and polluted water at three concentrations of Cu. The extension of populations from unpolluted terrestrial to polluted aqueous environments mainly relied on stem elongation rather than production of new ramets. The absorbed Cu in the ramets growing in polluted water could be spread horizontally to other ramets in unpolluted soil via physiological integration and redistributed in different organs. The performances of ramets in both terrestrial and aquatic habitats were negatively correlated with Cu intensities in different organs of plants. It is concluded that physiological integration might lessen the fitness of connected ramets in heterogeneously polluted environments. The mechanical strength of the stems decreased with increasing Cu levels, especially in polluted water. We suggest that, except for direct toxicity to growth and expansion, heavy metal pollution might also increase the mechanical risk in breaking failure of plants.

  15. Environmental and radiological safety studies. Interaction of 238PuO2 heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterbury, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    The containers for 238 PuO 2 heat sources in radioisotope thermoelectric generators are designed with large safety factors to ensure that they will withstand reentry from orbit and impact with the earth and safely contain the nuclear fuel until it is recovered. Existing designs have proved more than adequately safe, but the Space and Terrestrial Division of the Department of Energy Office of Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects continually seeks more information about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work discussed here includes studies of the effects on the heat source of terrestrial and aquatic environments to obtain data for design of even safer systems. The data obtained in several ongoing experiments are presented; these data tables will be updated quarterly. Discussions of experimental details are minimized and largely repetitive in succeeding reports. Compilations of usable data generated in each experiment are emphasized. These compilations include data from environmental chamber experiments that simulate terrestrial conditions, experiments to measure PuO 2 dissolution rates, soil column experiments to measure sorption of plutonium by soils, and several aquatic experiments

  16. Transformation and bioavailability of metal oxide nanoparticles in aquatic and terrestrial environments. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amde, Meseret; Liu, Jing-Fu; Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Bekana, Deribachew

    2017-11-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MeO-NPs) are among the most consumed NPs and also have wide applications in various areas which increased their release into the environmental system. Aquatic (water and sediments) and terrestrial compartments are predicted to be the destination of the released MeO-NPs. In these compartments, the particles are subjected to various dynamic processes such as physical, chemical and biological processes, and undergo transformations which drive them away from their pristine state. These transformation pathways can have strong implications for the fate, transport, persistence, bioavailability and toxic-effects of the NPs. In this critical review, we provide the state-of-the-knowledge on the transformation processes and bioavailability of MeO-NPs in the environment, which is the topic of interest to researchers. We also recommend future research directions in the area which will support future risk assessments by enhancing our knowledge of the transformation and bioavailability of MeO-NPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Severest crisis overlooked—Worst disruption of terrestrial environments postdates the Permian-Triassic mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochuli, Peter A.; Sanson-Barrera, Anna; Schneebeli-Hermann, Elke; Bucher, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Generally Early Triassic floras are believed to be depauperate, suffering from protracted recovery following the Permian-Triassic extinction event. Here we present palynological data of an expanded East Greenland section documenting recovered floras in the basal Triassic (Griesbachian) and a subsequent fundamental floral turnover, postdating the Permian-Triassic boundary extinction by about 500 kyrs. This event is marked by a swap in dominating floral elements, changing from gymnosperm pollen-dominated associations in the Griesbachian to lycopsid spore-dominated assemblages in the Dienerian. This turnover coincides with an extreme δ13Corg negative shift revealing a severe environmental crisis, probably induced by volcanic outbursts of the Siberian Traps, accompanied by a climatic turnover, changing from cool and dry in the Griesbachian to hot and humid in the Dienerian. Estimates of sedimentation rates suggest that this environmental alteration took place within some 1000 years. Similar, coeval changes documented on the North Indian Margin (Pakistan) and the Bowen Basin (Australia) indicate the global extent of this crisis. Our results evidence the first profound disruption of the recovery of terrestrial environments about 500kyrs after the Permian-Triassic extinction event. It was followed by another crisis, about 1myrs later thus, the Early Triassic can be characterised as a time of successive environmental crises.

  18. MEASURING AIR AND TERRESTRIAL TRANSPORT COMPANY REPUTATION: TOURISM INTANGIBLES EXPRESSED IN THE DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia M.Q. Ramos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The reputation of companies within the transport industry is influenced by competitive dynamics within the sector: low-cost flights, the attractiveness of destinations, online user-generated content about users’ experiences, and more. At the same time, social media provides a means for companies to manage issues of tourism intangibles. Thus, it is relevant to analyse transport reputation in the digital environment, taking into consideration the resources for managing these intangibles. This paper presents a method for measuring transport reputation based on an analysis of tourism consumers’ digital opinions and passengers’ comments about their experiences with these firms. The use of social media, such as TripAdvisor and Facebook, conjugated with business intelligence tools and complemented by data mining techniques, can contribute to the development of metrics that consider intangibles like emotions and experiences, with the aim of measuring, analysing, and visualizing the complex relationships between these intangibles and transport companies’ reputations. The results present the impacts of these intangibles through clusters and positioning maps focusing on these issues. This investigation contributes to our knowledge about airlines and terrestrial transport companies that seek to differentiate their positioning in tourism markets through their reputations.

  19. Are Free Ion Activity Models Sufficient Alternatives to Biotic Ligand Models in Evaluating Metal Toxic Impacts in Terrestrial Environments?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Larsen, Henrik Fred

    Metal partitioning between solid and aqueous phases and speciation in soil pore water control the bioavailability of toxic forms of metals, while protons and base cations can mitigate metal ecotoxicity by competitive interactions with biotic ligands. e employment of BLMs to evaluate toxicity...... potential of metals in soils results in site-specic toxicity scores due to large variability of soil properties and dierences in ionic composition. Unfortunately, terrestrial BMLs are available only for few metals and few organisms, thus their applicability to hazard ranking or toxic impact assessment...... is low and alternatives must be found. In this study, we compared published terrestrial BLMs and their potential alternatives such as free ion activity models (FIAM), for applicability in addressing metal toxic impacts in terrestrial environments. A set of 1300 soils representative for the whole world...

  20. TAME - the terrestrial-aquatic model of the environment: model definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, R.A.; Mueller-Lemans, H.; Dorp, F. van; Gribi, P.

    1996-10-01

    TAME - the Terrestrial-Aquatic Model of the Environment is a new computer model for use in assessments of the radiological impact of the release of radionuclides to the biosphere, following their disposal in underground waste repositories. Based on regulatory requirements, the end-point of the calculations is the maximum annual individual dose to members of a hypothetical population group inhabiting the biosphere region. Additional mid- and end-points in the TAME calculations are dose as function of time from eleven exposure pathways, foodstuff concentrations and the distribution of radionuclides in the modelled biosphere. A complete description of the mathematical representations of the biosphere in TAME is given in this document, based on a detailed review of the underlying conceptual framework for the model. Example results are used to illustrate features of the conceptual and mathematical models. The end-point of dose is shown to be robust for the simplifying model assumptions used to define the biosphere for the example calculations. TAME comprises two distinct sub-models - one representing the transport of radionuclides in the near-surface environment and one for the calculation of dose to individual inhabitants of that biosphere. The former is the result of a detailed review of the modelling requirements for such applications and is based on a comprehensive consideration of all features, events and processes (FEPs) relevant to Swiss biospheres, both in the present-day biosphere and in potential future biosphere states. Representations of the transport processes are derived from first principles. Mass balance for water and solid material fluxes is used to determine the rates of contaminant transfer between components of the biosphere system. The calculation of doses is based on existing representations of exposure pathways and draws on experience both from Switzerland and elsewhere. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  1. TAME - the terrestrial-aquatic model of the environment: model definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klos, R.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Mueller-Lemans, H. [Tergoso AG fuer Umweltfragen, Sargans (Switzerland); Dorp, F. van [Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung Radioaktiver Abfaelle (NAGRA), Baden (Switzerland); Gribi, P. [Colenco AG, Baden (Switzerland)

    1996-10-01

    TAME - the Terrestrial-Aquatic Model of the Environment is a new computer model for use in assessments of the radiological impact of the release of radionuclides to the biosphere, following their disposal in underground waste repositories. Based on regulatory requirements, the end-point of the calculations is the maximum annual individual dose to members of a hypothetical population group inhabiting the biosphere region. Additional mid- and end-points in the TAME calculations are dose as function of time from eleven exposure pathways, foodstuff concentrations and the distribution of radionuclides in the modelled biosphere. A complete description of the mathematical representations of the biosphere in TAME is given in this document, based on a detailed review of the underlying conceptual framework for the model. Example results are used to illustrate features of the conceptual and mathematical models. The end-point of dose is shown to be robust for the simplifying model assumptions used to define the biosphere for the example calculations. TAME comprises two distinct sub-models - one representing the transport of radionuclides in the near-surface environment and one for the calculation of dose to individual inhabitants of that biosphere. The former is the result of a detailed review of the modelling requirements for such applications and is based on a comprehensive consideration of all features, events and processes (FEPs) relevant to Swiss biospheres, both in the present-day biosphere and in potential future biosphere states. Representations of the transport processes are derived from first principles. Mass balance for water and solid material fluxes is used to determine the rates of contaminant transfer between components of the biosphere system. The calculation of doses is based on existing representations of exposure pathways and draws on experience both from Switzerland and elsewhere. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  2. Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP)

  3. Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W. [and others

    1996-03-01

    In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP).

  4. Collection, Processing, and Accuracy of Mobile Terrestrial Lidar Survey Data in the Coastal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 7- 5 Coastal Field Data Collection Program Collection, Processing , and Accuracy of Mobile Terrestrial Lidar Survey...water resources, and environmental sciences for the Army, the Department of Defense, civilian agencies, and our nation’s public good. Find out more at...default. Coastal Field Data Collection Program ERDC/CHL TR-17-5 April 2017 Collection, Processing , and Accuracy of Mobile Terrestrial Lidar

  5. Terrestrial Feedbacks Incorporated in Global Vegetation Models through Observed Trait-Environment Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodegom, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    Most global vegetation models used to evaluate climate change impacts rely on plant functional types to describe vegetation responses to environmental stresses. In a traditional set-up in which vegetation characteristics are considered constant within a vegetation type, the possibility to implement and infer feedback mechanisms are limited as feedback mechanisms will likely involve a changing expression of community trait values. Based on community assembly concepts, we implemented functional trait-environment relationships into a global dynamic vegetation model to quantitatively assess this feature. For the current climate, a different global vegetation distribution was calculated with and without the inclusion of trait variation, emphasizing the importance of feedbacks -in interaction with competitive processes- for the prevailing global patterns. These trait-environmental responses do, however, not necessarily imply adaptive responses of vegetation to changing conditions and may locally lead to a faster turnover in vegetation upon climate change. Indeed, when running climate projections, simulations with trait variation did not yield a more stable or resilient vegetation than those without. Through the different feedback expressions, global and regional carbon and water fluxes were -however- strongly altered. At a global scale, model projections suggest an increased productivity and hence an increased carbon sink in the next decades to come, when including trait variation. However, by the end of the century, a reduced carbon sink is projected. This effect is due to a downregulation of photosynthesis rates, particularly in the tropical regions, even when accounting for CO2-fertilization effects. Altogether, the various global model simulations suggest the critical importance of including vegetation functional responses to changing environmental conditions to grasp terrestrial feedback mechanisms at global scales in the light of climate change.

  6. Communicating Sustainability through Design within Retail Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hendry, Daniel; Silcox, Lawrence; Yokoyama, Nobuko

    2007-01-01

    This thesis uses a systematic understanding of sustainability informed by human needs, learning and design theory to explore ways in which small retail environments can effectively communicate sustainability concepts. The envisioned outcome of successfully communicating and implementing sustainability within retail environments is a lasting change in people’s daily behaviors. The methods of literature review, surveys, human needs investigation and professional validation are used to develop a...

  7. Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph 2005: Overview of Technology Development and System Design Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Virginia G.

    2005-01-01

    Technology research, design trades, and modeling and analysis guide the definition of a Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph Mission that will search for and characterize earth-like planets around near-by stars. Operating in visible wavebands, this mission will use coronagraphy techniques to suppress starlight to enable capturing and imaging the reflected light from a planet orbiting in the habitable zone of its parent star. The light will be spectrally characterized to determine the presence of life-indicating chemistry in the planet atmosphere.

  8. An Experiential Exercise in Service Environment Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kendra; Bridges, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    A new experiential exercise affords marketing students the opportunity to learn to design service environments. The exercise is appropriate for a variety of marketing courses and is especially beneficial in teaching services marketing because the proposed activity complements two other exercises widely used in this course. Service journal and…

  9. Molecular phylogeny of Enchytraeidae (Oligochaeta) indicates separate invasions of the terrestrial environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent; Glenner, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    segregations of the two genera Enchytraeus and Lumbricillus leaving the remaining genera included in this study as a later segregated major monophyletic branch. Extant members of the two former genera dominate in decaying seaweed in the littoral zone along the sea although members of in particular the genus...... Enchytraeus have also invaded other habitats. Historically the littoral zone of the sea is undoubtedly the first terrestrial or semi-terrestrial habitat where dead plant material accumulates to any greater extent and Enchytraeus and Lumbricillus may represent early successful attempts to exploit this resource...... terrestrial branch and this may represent an adaptation to the unpredictable littoral zone compared to the more stable nature of inland habitats. In the older literature the genus Mesenchytraeus is considered to have a basic position within the entire family but our molecular data do not support...

  10. Strong climate coupling of terrestrial and marine environments in the Miocene of northwest Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, T.H.; Weijers, J.W.H.; Munsterman, D.K.; Kloosterboer-van Hoeve, M.L.; Buckles, L.K.; Pancost, R.D.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2009-01-01

    A palynological and organic geochemical record from a shallow marine paleoenvironmental setting in SE Netherlands documents the coupled marine and terrestrial climate evolution from the late Burdigalian (∼ 17 Ma) through the early Zanclean (∼ 4.5 Ma). Proxy climate records show several coeval

  11. Design of supply chain in fuzzy environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kandukuri Narayana; Subbaiah, Kambagowni Venkata; Singh, Ganja Veera Pratap

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays, customer expectations are increasing and organizations are prone to operate in an uncertain environment. Under this uncertain environment, the ultimate success of the firm depends on its ability to integrate business processes among supply chain partners. Supply chain management emphasizes cross-functional links to improve the competitive strategy of organizations. Now, companies are moving from decoupled decision processes towards more integrated design and control of their components to achieve the strategic fit. In this paper, a new approach is developed to design a multi-echelon, multi-facility, and multi-product supply chain in fuzzy environment. In fuzzy environment, mixed integer programming problem is formulated through fuzzy goal programming in strategic level with supply chain cost and volume flexibility as fuzzy goals. These fuzzy goals are aggregated using minimum operator. In tactical level, continuous review policy for controlling raw material inventories in supplier echelon and controlling finished product inventories in plant as well as distribution center echelon is considered as fuzzy goals. A non-linear programming model is formulated through fuzzy goal programming using minimum operator in the tactical level. The proposed approach is illustrated with a numerical example.

  12. Designing Lesson Content in Adaptive Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Danijela Milosevic

    2006-01-01

    Online learning is widely spreading and adaptive learning environments are increasing its potentials. We present a scenario of adapting learning content towards individual student characteristics taking into consideration his/her learning style type and subject matter motivation level. We use an ontology based student model for storing student information. The scenario of designing lesson content tailored to individual student needs is presented as a cross section of learning style and motiva...

  13. Polonium-210 and lead-210 in the terrestrial environment: a historical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Bertil R.R., E-mail: bertil_r.persson@med.lu.s [Dept. of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Barngatan 2, SE-221 85 Lund (Sweden); Holm, Elis [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Osteras (Norway)

    2011-05-15

    The radionuclides {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb widely present in the terrestrial environment are the final long-lived radionuclides in the decay of {sup 238}U in the earth's crust. Their presence in the atmosphere is due to the decay of {sup 222}Rn diffusing from the ground. The range of activity concentrations in ground level air for {sup 210}Po is 0.03-0.3 Bq m{sup -3} and for {sup 210}Pb 0.2-1.5 Bq m{sup -3}. In drinking water from private wells the activity concentration of {sup 210}Po is in the order of 7-48 mBq l{sup -1} and for {sup 210}Pb around 11-40 mBq l{sup -1}. From water works, however, the activity concentration for both {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb is only in the order of 3 mBq l{sup -1}. Mosses, lichens and peat have a high efficiency in capturing {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb from atmospheric fallout and exhibit an inventory of both {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in the order of 0.5-5 kBq m{sup -2} in mosses and in lichens around 0.6 kBq m{sup -2}. The activity concentrations in lichens lies around 250 Bq kg{sup -1}, dry mass. Reindeer and caribou graze lichen which results in an activity concentration of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb of about 1-15 Bq kg{sup -1} in meat from these animals. The food chain lichen-reindeer or caribou, and Man constitutes a unique model for studying the uptake and retention of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in humans. The effective annual dose due to {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in people with high consumption of reindeer/caribou meat is estimated to be around 260 and 132 {mu}Sv a{sup -1} respectively. In soils, {sup 210}Po is adsorbed to clay and organic colloids and the activity concentration varies with soil type and also correlates with the amount of atmospheric precipitation. The average activity concentration levels of {sup 210}Po in various soils are in the range of 20-240 Bq kg{sup -1}. Plants become contaminated with radioactive nuclides both by absorption from the soil (supported Po) and by deposition of radioactive

  14. Copper in the terrestrial environment: Verification of a laboratory-derived terrestrial biotic ligand model to predict earthworm mortality with toxicity observed in field soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Marijke; Groot, Arthur de; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2006-01-01

    This study was set up for validation of a regression model to predict mortality in the terrestrial earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa following exposure to copper. This model was derived from a terrestrial biotic ligand model and incorporates the protective effects of H+ and Na+ on copper toxicity.

  15. Design of shipping packages to transport varying radioisotopic source materials for future space and terrestrial missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barklay, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    The exploration of space will begin with manned missions to the moon and to Mars, first for scientific discoveries, then for mining and manufacturing. Because of the great financial costs of this type of exploration, it can only be accomplished through an international team effort. This unified effort must include the design, planning and, execution phases of future space missions, extending down to such activities as isotope processing, and shipping package design, fabrication, and certification. All aspects of this effort potentially involve the use of radioisotopes in some capacity, and the transportation of these radioisotopes will be impossible without a shipping package that is certified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission or the U.S. Department of Energy for domestic shipments, and the U.S. Department of Transportation or the International Atomic Energy Agency for international shipments. To remain without the international regulatory constraints, and still support the needs of new and challenging space missions conducted within ever-shrinking budgets, shipping package concepts must be innovative. A shipping package must also be versatile enough to be reconfigured to transport the varying radioisotopic source materials that may be required to support future space and terrestrial missions. One such package is the Mound USA/9516/B(U)F. Taking into consideration the potential need to transport specific types of radioisotopes, approximations of dose rates at specific distances were determined taking into account the attenuation of dose rate with distance for varying radioisotopic source materials. As a result, it has been determined that the shipping package requirements that will be demanded by future space (and terrestrial) missions can be met by making minor modifications to the USA/9516/B(U)F. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  16. Crime: impacts of urban design and environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Santana

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The criminal research has confirmed that there are clear patterns of crime, with concentrations in specific places at specific times. That is to say, incidence of crime are not distributed randomly; rather, there are certain areas in cities that are relatively small, but where crimes occur much more frequently than elsewhere (the so-called “hotspots”, making them highly vulnerable and predictable. Urban design and environment may play a part in the decision of whether or not to commit a crime; for example, the lack of natural vigilance, poor lighting and other variables mean that a small area may easily be transformed into a potential crime hotspot. The relationship between specific aspects of urban design and the formation of “hotspots” is present in the theory of “Crime Prevention through Environmental Design” (CPTED. This paper examines the relationship between the “hotspots” and the characteristics of the environment, in accordance with CPTED Index, in one city from the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (Amadora. The results highlight the need to reassess specific elements of urban design. This fact has drawn attention to the study of localities and urban design.

  17. Environmental survey near a decommissioning nuclear facility: example of tritium monitoring in the terrestrial environment of Creys-Malville - Environmental survey near a nuclear facility undergoing decommissioning: example of tritium monitoring in the terrestrial environment of Creys-Malville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, C.; Gontier, G.; Chauveau, J.L. [EDF CIDEN, Division Environnement, 154 Avenue Thiers, 69458 Lyon (France); Pourcelot, L.; Roussel-Debet, S.; Cossonnet, P.C. [IRSN, LERCM Cadarache and LMRE Orsay (France); Jean-Baptiste, P. [LSCE, UMR 1572-CEA/CNRS/UVQS, 91198 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2014-07-01

    As part of the regulatory environmental monitoring around its nuclear power plants (NPP) in France, EDF carries out more than 40.000 measurements of radionuclides in the environment every year. In addition, EDF performs more detailed radioecological surveys on all of its sites. The purposes of these surveys are: 1/ to control that radioactive discharge limits prescribed by the regulatory authority are respected, 2/ to monitor the environment of the NPPs to verify normal plant operation and to detect all possible failures in power station operation at an early stage and 3/ to establish if there is any increase of radionuclides of anthropogenic origin in the environment and to determine whether this build-up can be attributed to plant operations. Radioecological surveys are conducted in the environment surrounding each of EDF's NPPs. Samples are collected in surrounding ecosystems (terrestrial and aquatic) where the radioactive releases are discharged (liquid and gaseous discharges). These surveys results enable the examination of the spatial distribution and temporal variability of radionuclide activity in the environment throughout the reactors life, from the first fuel load to the decommissioning of the plant. The results from this monitoring have shown that EDF's nuclear power plants have only a minor effect on radionuclide levels in the environment. These results highlight the efficiency of EDF's efforts to minimise its impacts on the environment via an efficient waste management system and high operating standards of its plants. In particular, tritium is subject to special monitoring for more than 30 years; concentrations of free tritium and organically bound tritium in major environmental compartments are therefore well-known in the vicinity of French NPPs. At the end of a reactor's life, EDF has collected a large amount of reference data before decommissioning operations start. During these operations, EDF pursue the radioecological survey

  18. Designing powerplants for today's competitive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makansi, J.

    1994-01-01

    Deregulation continues to unfold. Certainty about what the impact will be is as scarce as new US powerplant development opportunities. But one thing industry observers seem clear on is that the priorities for powerplant design will shift as competitive forces are rolled out. Powerplants will have to be developed, designed, and operated as a bottom-line business, not as part of a regulated industry. Thus, the design must enable the facility to accomplish this goal. In the emerging fully competitive environment, that bottom line applies to both the kilowatt and the kilowatt-hour. The entrepreneurial and business skills and talents of the independent power producer (IPP) have mostly been brought to bear on capital costs and project development thus far, with electricity sold under long-term power-purchase agreements. If retail wheeling takes hold, future plants must also be designed to merchandise power to a variety of customers scattered around the grid. This article provides insight into how powerplant design will accommodate new priorities

  19. Terrestrial mollusk records from Chinese loess sequences and changes in the East Asian monsoonal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Naiqin; Li, Fengjiang; Rousseau, Denis-Didier

    2018-04-01

    The terrestrial mollusk fossils found in Chinese loess strata have been studied for over one hundred years. However, the greatest progress in these studies has been made only in the last two decades. In this paper, we review the advancements, advantages and limitations of terrestrial mollusk studies in Chinese loess deposits. Improvements in research methods and approaches have allowed the extraction of more detailed paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic information from mollusk assemblages. The broadened research scope and content have yielded many new findings and results. The mollusk record has thus become one of the most important proxies in the paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic reconstruction of loess-paleosol sequences in China. The greatest progress in the studies of terrestrial mollusks in Chinese loess sequences can be summarized as follows: (1) modern mollusk assemblages can be classified into four ecotypes, based on their temperature and humidity requirements, including eurytopic, semi-aridiphilous and sub-humidiphilous, cold-aridiphilous, and thermo-humidiphilous types; (2) Quaternary mollusk assemblages can be modified into the following three ecological types: glacial loess, interglacial paleosol, and interstadial weakly-developed paleosol assemblages; (3) mollusk records successfully reveal long-term climatic and environmental changes reflective of the history of East Asian monsoonal variations since the Late Cenozoic, and the succession of mollusk species also indicate short-term environmental changes such as millennial climate variability during Last Glacial Maximum and unstable climatic fluctuations during glacial and interglacial periods; and (4) more recently, new analytical approaches have offered increased research potential in areas such as paleotemperature reconstruction using the isotopic compositions of modern and fossil mollusk shells, combined with higher accuracy 14C dating of Quaternary loess deposits, which will greatly improve

  20. Approaches to Integrated Building Design Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Susanne C; Andersen, Tom

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses functional requirements and specification which needs to be defined and fulfilled to initiate development of an integrated building design environment. The purpose is to outline specifications for further discussion and development. The report documents the first phase...... in an ongoing project at the Technical University of Denmark. The overall project objective is to provide a theoretically well-founded prototype of an integrated IT-system which can serve as a device of feedback from practice and as a test-bed for the developed concept and architecture....

  1. Copper in the terrestrial environment: Verification of a laboratory-derived terrestrial biotic ligand model to predict earthworm mortality with toxicity observed in field soils

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, Marijke; Groot, Arthur de; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2006-01-01

    This study was set up for validation of a regression model to predict mortality in the terrestrial earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa following exposure to copper. This model was derived from a terrestrial biotic ligand model and incorporates the protective effects of H+ and Na+ on copper toxicity. Three soil sets were used for the experiments, all of which had a different copper contamination history over more than 20 years and were considered to be aged field soils. The soils were characteri...

  2. SES cupola interactive display design environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Bang Q.; Kirkhoff, Kevin R.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Simulator, located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, is tasked with providing a real-time simulator for developing displays and controls targeted for the Space Station Freedom. These displays and controls will exist inside an enclosed workstation located on the space station. The simulation is currently providing the engineering analysis environment for NASA and contractor personnel to design, prototype, and test alternatives for graphical presentation of data to an astronaut while he performs specified tasks. A highly desirable aspect of this environment is to have the capability to rapidly develop and bring on-line a number of different displays for use in determining the best utilization of graphics techniques in achieving maximum efficiency of the test subject fulfilling his task. The Systems Engineering Simulator now has available a tool which assists in the rapid development of displays for these graphic workstations. The Display Builder was developed in-house to provide an environment which allows easy construction and modification of displays within minutes of receiving requirements for specific tests.

  3. Water for Two Worlds: Designing Terrestrial Applications for Exploration-class Sanitation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Constance; Andersson, Ingvar; Feighery, John

    2004-01-01

    At the United Nations Millennium Summit in September of 2000, the world leaders agreed on an ambitious agenda for reducing poverty and improving lives: the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), a list of issues they consider highly pernicious, threatening to human welfare and, thereby, to global security and prosperity. Among the eight goals are included fundamental human needs such as the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger, the promotion of gender equality, the reduction of child mortality and improvement of maternal health, and ensuring the sustainability of our shared environment. In order to help focus the efforts to meet these goals, the United Nations (UN) has established a set of eighteen concrete targets, each with an associated schedule. Among these is Target 10: "By 2015, reduce by half the proportion of people without access to safe drinking water." A closely related target of equal dignity was agreed at the World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, September 2002): "By 2015, reduce by half the proportion of people without access to basic sanitation." One of the greatest successes in the development of Exploration-class technologies for closed-loop, sustainable support of long-duration human space missions has been the work both ESA and NASA have done in bioregenerative water reclamation (WRS), and secondarily, in solid-waste management. Solid-waste and WRS systems tend to be combined in the commercial world into the field of sanitation, although as we will see, the most essential principles of sustainable terrestrial sanitation actually insist upon the separation of solid and liquid excreta. Seeing the potential synergy between the space program ALS technologies developed for Mars and the urgent needs of hundreds of millions of people for secure access to clean water here on Earth, we set out to organize the adaptation of these technologies to help the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) meet Target 10. In this paper, we will

  4. An analysis of long-term exposure pathways in the terrestrial environment following the release of radioactive materials to atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsley, G.S.; Simmonds, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Time-dependent models have been used to investigate the relative importance of the routes by which man may be exposed to radiation from deposited activity in the terrestrial environment. The pathways for exposure were ingestion of foodstuffs, external irradiation from ground deposits and inhalation of resuspended activity. The resulting doses due to each of these exposure pathways have been compared as a function of time after deposition for each of several nuclides known to be important in accidental releases; they are 90 Sr, 106 Ru, 131 I, 137 Cs and 239 Pu. The importance of the ingestion route of exposure is shown to vary markedly depending upon the season of the year in which radionuclides are deposited. The approach has been applied to the examination of the relative importance of terrestrial exposure routes following accidental releases to atmosphere from a light-water reactor. The dominant role of 134 Cs and 137 Cs beyond the period of the first year after the release in both ingestion and external irradiation exposure routes is evident in all sequences considered. (author)

  5. Terrestrial ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The main effort of the Terrestrial Ecology Division has been redirected to a comprehensive study of the Espiritu Santo Drainage Basin located in northeastern Puerto Rico. The general objective are to provide baseline ecological data for future environmental assessment studies at the local and regional levels, and to provide through an ecosystem approach data for the development of management alternatives for the wise utilization of energy, water, and land resources. The interrelationships among climate, vegetation, soils, and man, and their combined influence upon the hydrologic cycle will be described and evaluated. Environmental management involves planning and decision making, and both require an adequate data base. At present, little is known about the interworkings of a complete, integrated system such as a drainage basin. A literature survey of the main research areas confirmed that, although many individual ecologically oriented studies have been carried out in a tropical environment, few if any provide the data base required for environmental management. In view of rapidly changing socio-economic conditions and natural resources limitations, management urgently requires data from these systems: physical (climatological), biological, and cultural. This integrated drainage basin study has been designed to provide such data. The scope of this program covers the hydrologic cycle as it is affected by the interactions of the physical, biological, and cultural systems

  6. Mixing of Marine and Terrestrial Sources of Strontium in Coastal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Saskia; Crowley, Quentin; Deegan, Eileen; Snoeck, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    87Sr/86Sr from bulk soils, soil extracts and plant material have been used to investigate and quantify the extent of marine-derived Sr in the terrestrial biosphere. Samples were collected along coastal transects and 87Sr/86Sr biosphere values (plant and soil) converge to marine values with increasing proximity to the coast. R2values indicate highly significant trends in certain regions. The National Soils Database (NSDB), TELLUS and TELLUS Border datasets, all of which are geochemical surveys have been employed to further test the extent of marine elemental contribution. Collectively these data cover all of Ireland and Northern Ireland, with varying degrees of sampling density. A strong spatial correlation exists between the Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA; (Al2O3-(CaO*+Na2O)-K2O)) in topsoil (CIA marine geochemical contribution. Topsoil CIA can therefore be used to identify areas likely to feature significant marine inputs and identify regions where the 87Sr/86Sr budget may deviate from bedrock values.

  7. Nanomaterials in the Environment: Perspectives on in Vivo Terrestrial Toxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique C. P. Mendonça

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, engineered nanomaterials (NMs brought a revolutionary development in many sectors of human life including electronics, paints, textiles, food, agriculture, and health care. However, the exponential growth in the number of NMs applications resulted in uncertainties regarding their environmental impacts. Currently, the common approach for assessing the toxicity of NMs such as, carbon—(fullerenes, single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, mineral—(gold and silver nanoparticles, cerium and zinc oxide, silicon and titanium dioxide, and organic-based NMs (dendrimers includes standard guidelines applied to all chemical compounds. Nevertheless, NMs differ from traditional materials as their physicochemical and surface properties influence the toxic rather than their composition alone. Considering such NMs specificities, adaptations in some methods are necessary to ensure that environmental and human health risks are accurately investigated. In this context, the focus of this mini-review is to summarize the current knowledge in nanotoxicology regarding relevant organisms and experimental assays for assessing the terrestrial toxicity of NMs.

  8. Transfer factors of radionuclides and elements in the terrestrial and fresh water environment of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, A.G.; Hemalatha, P.; Desai, M.V.M.

    2004-04-01

    This document presents the transfer factor values such as Bioaccumulation factors B p , Transfer coefficient K d , Soil to plant transfer coefficient B v etc. generated in the terrestrial and fresh water environmental matrices of India. This attempt is made with a view to provide site and species specific values in comparison with IAEA default values from Safety Series(SS) No.57 and IAEA Technical Report Series (TRS) No.364. Our recommended B p values for 137 Cs and 90 Sr are matching well with IAEA reported values. B p value for 228 Ra also match well with IAEA values. While the freshwater sediment K d values for 137 Cs is 5000 which is closer to TRS 364 value, 90 Sr K d value is lower than IAEA value. Natural radionuclides Ra, Th and U values are also found to be higher than IAEA values which indicates the site specificity. B p values for stable elements such as Cu, Pb, Mn and Cd are comparable with IAEA whereas the recommended K d value for Zn is higher than IAEA reported value. Transfer factors for cereals, pulses and vegetables are also tabulated in this report in comparison with IAEA reported values. (author)

  9. Effects of design on cost of flat-plate solar photovoltaic arrays for terrestrial central station power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, P.; Stolte, W.

    1978-01-01

    The paper examines the impact of module and array designs on the balance-of-plant costs for flat-plate terrestrial central station power applications. Consideration is given to the following types of arrays: horizontal, tandem, augmented, tilt adjusted, and E-W tracking. The life-cycle cost of a 20-year plant life serves as the costing criteria for making design and cost tradeoffs. A tailored code of accounts is developed for determining consistent photovoltaic power plant costs and providing credible photovoltaic system cost baselines for flat-plate module and array designs by costing several varying array design approaches.

  10. A review on the toxicity and non-target effects of macrocyclic lactones in terrestrial and aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumaret, Jean-Pierre; Errouissi, Faiek; Floate, Kevin; Römbke, Jörg; Wardhaugh, Keith

    2012-05-01

    The avermectins, milbemycins and spinosyns are collectively referred to as macrocyclic lactones (MLs) which comprise several classes of chemicals derived from cultures of soil micro-organisms. These compounds are extensively and increasingly used in veterinary medicine and agriculture. Due to their potential effects on non-target organisms, large amounts of information on their impact in the environment has been compiled in recent years, mainly caused by legal requirements related to their marketing authorization or registration. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present knowledge about the acute and chronic ecotoxicological effects of MLs on organisms, mainly invertebrates, in the terrestrial and aquatic environment. Detailed information is presented on the mode-of-action as well as the ecotoxicity of the most important compounds representing the three groups of MLs. This information, based on more than 360 references, is mainly provided in nine tables, presenting the effects of abamectin, ivermectin, eprinomectin, doramectin, emamectin, moxidectin, and spinosad on individual species of terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates as well as plants and algae. Since dung dwelling organisms are particularly important non-targets, as they are exposed via dung from treated animals over their whole life-cycle, the information on the effects of MLs on dung communities is compiled in an additional table. The results of this review clearly demonstrate that regarding environmental impacts many macrocyclic lactones are substances of high concern particularly with larval instars of invertebrates. Recent studies have also shown that susceptibility varies with life cycle stage and impacts can be mitigated by using MLs when these stages are not present. However information on the environmental impact of the MLs is scattered across a wide range of specialised scientific journals with research focusing mainly on ivermectin and to a lesser extent on abamectin

  11. The origin of terrestrial pisoliths and pisolitic iron ore deposits: Raindrops and sheetwash in a semi-arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascelles, Desmond F.

    2016-07-01

    Ooliths evidently form by chemical precipitation in limnic, paralic, fluvial and marine environments, pisoliths, however, appear to be restricted to terrestrial environments. Typically composed of iron, aluminium and manganese sesquioxides with minor admixtures of quartz and kaolinite, they are widely distributed in tropical to subtropical regions overlying deeply weathered soil profiles. Although iron-, aluminium- and manganese-rich end members are important sources of these metals, their genesis is still enigmatic; their formation has never been observed or produced experimentally and current models for their origin are little more than guesses. A new model is presented based on a unique personal observation in which pisoliths are formed by the action of charged raindrops during thunderstorms impacting on dry deeply weathered powdery soils. The pisoliths are transported across pediments by sheetwash, accumulating as thick deposits in the valley floors. Pisolites are characteristically unfossiliferous and typically clearly pedogenic. The absence of fine depositional layering, fossil seeds, leaves and pollen in pisolites is explained by bioturbation and the action of soil organisms during extended pedogenesis while the major coarse bedding features derive from erosional and depositional events in the evolution of the pediment. Pisolitic iron ores (aka channel iron deposits, CID) are a special case of transported pisolitic ferricrust that form an important resource of medium grade iron ore (57-60 wt% Fe) in the Pilbara Region of Western Australia. Apart from minor deposits in the northern Yilgarn Province of Western Australia, they have not been found elsewhere. They differ from normal transported ferricrust and terrestrial pisolites not only in the exceptionally high iron and low alumina and silica content but also in containing abundant fossilised wood particles.

  12. A Review on the Toxicity and Non-Target Effects of Macrocyclic Lactones in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumaret, Jean-Pierre; Errouissi, Faiek; Floate, Kevin; Römbke, Jörg; Wardhaugh, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The avermectins, milbemycins and spinosyns are collectively referred to as macrocyclic lactones (MLs) which comprise several classes of chemicals derived from cultures of soil micro-organisms. These compounds are extensively and increasingly used in veterinary medicine and agriculture. Due to their potential effects on non-target organisms, large amounts of information on their impact in the environment has been compiled in recent years, mainly caused by legal requirements related to their marketing authorization or registration. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present knowledge about the acute and chronic ecotoxicological effects of MLs on organisms, mainly invertebrates, in the terrestrial and aquatic environment. Detailed information is presented on the mode-of-action as well as the ecotoxicity of the most important compounds representing the three groups of MLs. This information, based on more than 360 references, is mainly provided in nine tables, presenting the effects of abamectin, ivermectin, eprinomectin, doramectin, emamectin, moxidectin, and spinosad on individual species of terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates as well as plants and algae. Since dung dwelling organisms are particularly important non-targets, as they are exposed via dung from treated animals over their whole life-cycle, the information on the effects of MLs on dung communities is compiled in an additional table. The results of this review clearly demonstrate that regarding environmental impacts many macrocyclic lactones are substances of high concern particularly with larval instars of invertebrates. Recent studies have also shown that susceptibility varies with life cycle stage and impacts can be mitigated by using MLs when these stages are not present. However information on the environmental impact of the MLs is scattered across a wide range of specialised scientific journals with research focusing mainly on ivermectin and to a lesser extent on abamectin

  13. Mammalian hair as an accumulative bioindicator of metal bioavailability in Australian terrestrial environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, Christopher M. [Ecology and Ecotoxicology Laboratory, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW Australia (Australia); Centre for the Risk Management of Bushfires, Institute for Conservation Biology and Law, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Koller, Claudia E. [Ecology and Ecotoxicology Laboratory, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW Australia (Australia); Rodger, John C. [Marsupial Research Laboratory, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW Australia (Australia); MacFarlane, Geoff R., E-mail: geoff.macfarlane@newcastle.edu.au [Ecology and Ecotoxicology Laboratory, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW Australia (Australia)

    2009-05-15

    The current study represents the first investigation of the suitability of marsupial and eutherian mammalian hair as indicator tissue for metal exposure and accumulation within contaminated Australian terrestrial ecosystems. A soil metal contamination gradient was established across 22 sites at increasing distances from a decommissioned Lead/Zinc smelter in NSW, Australia. Within each site, soil and small mammal populations were sampled. An Australian native marsupial, the insectivorous Brown Antechinus, Antechinus stuartii: Dasyuridae, and introduced rodents, the omnivorous Brown or Norway Rat, Rattus norvegicus: Muridae and the Black Rat, Rattus rattus: Muridae were assessed for hair concentrations of Cadmium (Cd), Copper (Cu), Lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn). Metals in soil were most elevated at sites within close proximity to the smelter, with soil metal concentrations decreasing with distance from the smelter. The non-essential metals Pb and Cd were accumulated in hair, both metals exhibiting positive linear relationships with environmental exposure (soil metal concentrations). When the variables of weight and snout-vent length were considered, no further contribution in terms of explaining the variability in hair Cd or Pb was observed for all species examined. The essential metals Cu and Zn were regulated in hair, remaining similar across the metal contamination gradient. A significant negative correlation between snout-vent length and hair Cu concentration was found for the Brown Rat; greater hair Cu concentrations were found in smaller individuals of this species. Accumulation of Pb to hair was similar among species while concentrations of Cd in Brown Rat hair were higher than both Black Rat and Brown Antechinus hair. As each of the three aforementioned species exhibit similar bioaccumulation relationships for Pb, we suggest that sampling hair from introduced rodents (pest species) may provide a suitable proxy for the assessment of Pb bioavailability for a range of

  14. Interaction of a 238Pu fueled-sphere assembly with a simulated terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkruger, F.J.; Patterson, J.H.; Herrera, B.; Nelson, G.B.; Matlack, G.M.; Waterbury, G.R.; Pavone, D.

    1981-02-01

    A 238 Pu fueled sphere assembly (FSA) was exposed to a simulated humid environment on sandy soil for 3 y. After a 70-week exposure, plutonium was first detected in measurable quantities in rain and condensate samples. A core sample taken in the ninety-third week contained 302 ng of plutonium. Examination of the FSA after exposure revealed a hole in the bottom of the graphite impact shell (GIS) and a leaking weld on the vent assembly of the postimpact containment shell (PICS). These two openings may be the pathways for plutonium entry into the environment from the FSA

  15. Terrestrial Gamma Radiation Exposure Measurement and Risk Estimates in the Environments of Major Industries In Ota, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abodunrin Oluwasayo Peter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available When fast estimates are required, the in-situ method is more appropriate as this allows for quick results; preventing further exposure of the public and permitting quick intervention. Measurements of the terrestrial gamma radiation exposure have been carried out in the environments of major industries in Ota using a portable survey meter. The motivation for this study resulted from the uncertainty in the general public opinion on the effect of the presence, and activities of some of these industries in their environment. Measurements were taken twice daily within the vicinity of each industry to determine the dose levels. The mean values obtained range from 0.11 – 1.80 µSv/h. These values are within the results obtained from normal background areas except for site number 10. Annual effective dose values range from 0.25 – 5.21 mSv with a mean value of 1.21 mSv. Routine activities in some of these environments may have contributed significantly to the ambient natural background radiation resulting in high values as obtained in some of these locations. The total risks disparately estimated for cancer and genetic effects resulting from the results obtained range from 0.17 x 10-4 – 3.80 x 10-4 with a mean value of 0.94 x 10-4. These levels are within the range of the average annual risk for accidental death for all industries.

  16. Microplastics in the aquatic and terrestrial environment: sources (with a specific focus on personal care products), fate and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duis, Karen; Coors, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Due to the widespread use and durability of synthetic polymers, plastic debris occurs in the environment worldwide. In the present work, information on sources and fate of microplastic particles in the aquatic and terrestrial environment, and on their uptake and effects, mainly in aquatic organisms, is reviewed. Microplastics in the environment originate from a variety of sources. Quantitative information on the relevance of these sources is generally lacking, but first estimates indicate that abrasion and fragmentation of larger plastic items and materials containing synthetic polymers are likely to be most relevant. Microplastics are ingested and, mostly, excreted rapidly by numerous aquatic organisms. So far, there is no clear evidence of bioaccumulation or biomagnification. In laboratory studies, the ingestion of large amounts of microplastics mainly led to a lower food uptake and, consequently, reduced energy reserves and effects on other physiological functions. Based on the evaluated data, the lowest microplastic concentrations affecting marine organisms exposed via water are much higher than levels measured in marine water. In lugworms exposed via sediment, effects were observed at microplastic levels that were higher than those in subtidal sediments but in the same range as maximum levels in beach sediments. Hydrophobic contaminants are enriched on microplastics, but the available experimental results and modelling approaches indicate that the transfer of sorbed pollutants by microplastics is not likely to contribute significantly to bioaccumulation of these pollutants. Prior to being able to comprehensively assess possible environmental risks caused by microplastics a number of knowledge gaps need to be filled. However, in view of the persistence of microplastics in the environment, the high concentrations measured at some environmental sites and the prospective of strongly increasing concentrations, the release of plastics into the environment should be

  17. (210)Pb as a tracer of soil erosion, sediment source area identification and particle transport in the terrestrial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matisoff, Gerald

    2014-12-01

    Although (137)Cs has been used extensively to study soil erosion and particle transport in the terrestrial environment, there has been much less work using excess or unsupported (210)Pb ((210)Pbxs) to study the same processes. Furthermore, since (137)Cs activities in soils are decreasing because of radioactive decay, some locations have an added complication due to the addition of Chernobyl-derived (137)Cs, and the activities of (137)Cs in the southern hemisphere are low, there is a need to develop techniques that use (210)Pbxs to provide estimates of rates of soil erosion and particle transport. This paper reviews the current status of (210)Pbxs methods to quantify soil erosion rates, to identify and partition suspended sediment source areas, and to determine the transport rates of particles in the terrestrial landscape. Soil erosion rates determined using (210)Pbxs are based on the unsupported (210)Pb ((210)Pbxs) inventory in the soil, the depth distribution of (210)Pbxs, and a mass balance calibration ('conversion model') that relates the soil inventory to the erosion rate using a 'reference site' at which neither soil erosion nor soil deposition has occurred. In this paper several different models are presented to illustrate the effects of different model assumptions such as the timing, depth and rates of the surface soil mixing on the calculated erosion rates. The suitability of model assumptions, including estimates of the depositional flux of (210)Pbxs to the soil surface and the post-depositional mobility of (210)Pb are also discussed. (210)Pb can be used as one tracer to permit sediment source area identification. This sediment 'fingerprinting' has been extended far beyond using (210)Pb as a single radioisotope to include numerous radioactive and stable tracers and has been applied to identifying the source areas of suspended sediment based on underlying rock type, land use (roads, stream banks, channel beds, cultivated or uncultivated lands, pasture lands

  18. Influence of aluminium on the restoration potential of a terrestrial vascular plant, Portulaca Oleracea L. as a biomonitoring tool of fresh water aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandi, S; Thangavel, P; Subburam, V

    2002-08-01

    In the present study, the influence of aluminium on the regeneration potential of leaf and stem-cuttings of Portulaca oleracea was studied in order to identify a terrestrial plant species as an alternate biomonitoring tool of fresh water environment. The leaves and stem cuttings of the terrestrial plant, P. oleracea grew well in the distilled water producing adventitious and lateral roots. The aluminium treated leaves and stem cuttings showed a reduction in the growth of the adventitious and lateral roots and increase in the decay of leaves and stem cuttings with increasing aluminium concentration. The tolerance index calculated for the leaves and the stem cuttings showed that the leaves were more sensitive than stems to aluminium. Since all the parameters studied showed concentration dependent changes, the terrestrial plant, P oleracea can be considered a suitable 'biomonitoring tool' of fresh water environment besides its usage in the Al toxicity testing.

  19. Designing Environment for Teaching Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simic, Konstantin; Vujin, Vladimir; Labus, Aleksandra; Stepanic, Ðorde; Stevanovic, Mladen

    2014-01-01

    One of the new topics taught at technical universities is Internet of Things. In this paper, a workshop for organizing a lab in academic environment for the subject Internet of Things is described. The architecture of the platform, scenario and a description of components used for creating the environment for learning Internet of things are also…

  20. Constraints on the Early Terrestrial Surface UV Environment Relevant to Prebiotic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Sasselov, Dimitar D

    2017-03-01

    The UV environment is a key boundary condition to abiogenesis. However, considerable uncertainty exists as to planetary conditions and hence surface UV at abiogenesis. Here, we present two-stream multilayer clear-sky calculations of the UV surface radiance on Earth at 3.9 Ga to constrain the UV surface fluence as a function of albedo, solar zenith angle (SZA), and atmospheric composition. Variation in albedo and latitude (through SZA) can affect maximum photoreaction rates by a factor of >10.4; for the same atmosphere, photoreactions can proceed an order of magnitude faster at the equator of a snowball Earth than at the poles of a warmer world. Hence, surface conditions are important considerations when computing prebiotic UV fluences. For climatically reasonable levels of CO 2 , fluence shortward of 189 nm is screened out, meaning that prebiotic chemistry is robustly shielded from variations in UV fluence due to solar flares or variability. Strong shielding from CO 2 also means that the UV surface fluence is insensitive to plausible levels of CH 4 , O 2 , and O 3 . At scattering wavelengths, UV fluence drops off comparatively slowly with increasing CO 2 levels. However, if SO 2 and/or H 2 S can build up to the ≥1-100 ppm level as hypothesized by some workers, then they can dramatically suppress surface fluence and hence prebiotic photoprocesses. H 2 O is a robust UV shield for λ levels of other atmospheric gases, fluence ≲198 nm is only available for cold, dry atmospheres, meaning sources with emission ≲198 (e.g., ArF excimer lasers) can only be used in simulations of cold environments with low abundance of volcanogenic gases. On the other hand, fluence at 254 nm is unshielded by H 2 O and is available across a broad range of [Formula: see text], meaning that mercury lamps are suitable for initial studies regardless of the uncertainty in primordial H 2 O and CO 2 levels. Key Words: Radiative transfer-Origin of life-Planetary environments

  1. Realistic assessment of the radiological impact due to radionuclide releases to the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proehl, G.

    2007-01-01

    Radioecological models are inherently associated with uncertainties, since ecological parameters are subject to a more or less pronounced variability; furthermore, the knowledge of the exposure conditions is - even in the best case - incomplete. To keep models simple and widely applicable and to avoid at the same time underestimations, parameters are selected with a conservative bias. However, conservative results are not appropriate for decision making and optimisation. To discuss the prevention of overly conservative models, in this paper, some selected processes are analysed that are involved in the transfer of radionuclides in the environment as e.g. interception of radionuclides deposited during precipitation by vegetation, systemic transport of radionuclides, migration of radionuclides in soil and speciation in soil. These processes are characterized, and it is discussed which factors should be integrated in modelling to achieve more realistic results. (author)

  2. Microbial Fossils from Terrestrial Subsurface Hydrothermal Environments: Examples and Implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Beda A.; Farmer, Jack; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The recognition of biological signatures in ancient epithermal deposits has special relevance for studies of early blaspheme evolution and in exploring for past life on Mars. Recently, proposals for the existence of an extensive subsurface blaspheme on Earth, dominated by chemoautotrophic microbial life, has gained prominence. However, reports of fossilized microbial remains, or biosedimentary structures (e.g. stromatolites) from the deposits of ancient subsurface systems, are rare. Microbial preservation is favoured where high population densities co-exist with rapid mineral precipitation. Near-surface epithetical systems with strong gradients in temperature and redox are good candidates for the abundant growth and fossilization of microorganisms, and are also favorable environments for the precipitation of ore minerals. Therefore, we might expect microbial remain, to be particularly well preserved in various kinds of hydrothermal and diagenetic mineral precipitates that formed below the upper temperature limit for life (approx. 120 C).

  3. Cosmogenic radionuclides. Theory and applications in the terrestrial and space environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Juerg [Eidgenoessische Anstalt fuer Wasserversorgung, Abwasserreinigung und Gewaesserschutz, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Steiger, Rudolf von [International Space Science Insitute, Bern (Switzerland); McCracken, Ken [Maryland Univ., College Park (United States). IPST

    2012-07-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are radioactive isotopes which are produced by natural processes and distributed within the Earth system. With a holistic view of the environment the authors show in this book how cosmogenic radionuclides can be used to trace and to reconstruct the history of a large variety of processes. They discuss the way in which cosmogenic radionuclides can assist in the quantification of complex processes in the present-day environment. The book aims to demonstrate to the reader the strength of analytic tools based on cosmogenic radionuclides, their contribution to almost any field of modern science, and how these tools may assist in the solution of many present and future problems that we face here on Earth. The book provides a comprehensive discussion of the basic principles behind the applications of cosmogenic (and other) radionuclides as environmental tracers and dating tools. The second section of the book discusses in some detail the production of radionuclides by cosmic radiation, their transport and distribution in the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, their storage in natural archives, and how they are measured. The third section of the book presents a number of examples selected to illustrate typical tracer and dating applications in a number of different spheres (atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, biosphere, solar physics and astronomy). At the same time the authors have outlined the limitations of the use of cosmogenic radionuclides. Written on a level understandable by graduate students without specialist skills in physics or mathematics, the book addresses a wide audience, ranging from archaeology, biophysics, and geophysics, to atmospheric physics, hydrology, astrophysics and space science.

  4. Technetium-99 behavior in the terrestrial environment. Field observations and radiotracer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Keiko

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining data on 99 Tc in the rice paddy field environment is important because Tc is a redox sensitive element. The behavior of Tc is expected to be different under upland field and rice paddy field conditions since the redox conditions in the soil environment differ. However, most of the data on the nuclide behavior in soil were obtained under upland field conditions. To understand the global fallout 99 Tc distributions in soil samples collected in Japan, a simple and rapid separation method was developed in order to determine low-levels of 99 Tc in soil samples by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Also, radiotracer experiments using soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were carried out to clarify the Tc behavior under paddy field conditions. The results of determination of global fallout 99 Tc in Japanese soils indicated that the radionuclide had been accumulating in rice paddy fields. The mechanisms can be explained by the immobilization of Tc in soil under anaerobic conditions. From the radiotracer experiments, it was clear that under waterlogged conditions, the highly mobile TcO 4 - in soil was readily changed to other immobilized forms, such as TcO 2 , TcS 2 and organically bound forms. To this immobilization, the microbial activity seemed to have an important role in Tc sorption reactions. When the soil, which was once kept in anaerobic conditions, was air-dried again and kept in aerobic conditions, the chemical forms of immobilized Tc did not change remarkably. Interestingly, the similar Tc behavior was observed in a real wet forest near the Chernobyl Reactor. (author)

  5. PROCEEDINGS AND SUMMARY REPORT: WORKSHOP ON THE FATE, TRANSPORT, AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY IN AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS, MAY 8-10, 2001, WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Workshop on the Fate, Transport, and Transformation of Mercury in Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments was held on May 8-10, 2001 in West Palm Beach, Florida. The workshop was conducted by the USEPA's Office of Research and Development and cosponsored by the U.S. Geological S...

  6. Designing Learning Resources in Synchronous Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rene B

    2015-01-01

    of learning sessions - developing a repository of online asynchronous learning resources. In the course of developing a design several important restraints of CMC were identified that had significant impact on the design choices made. Among these were the need to design sessions as sequences and identifying...

  7. Effects of Screen Designs in CBI Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegulu, Patricia R.

    This article focuses on the effectiveness of computer-based instruction (CBI) screen designs, including their benefits and limitations, as well as human constraints in designing effective CBI. The paper begins with an overview of what comprises an effective CBI screen design, including characteristics of human factors, how information must be…

  8. Supporting design reviews with pre-meeting virtual reality environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Marc Casper; Hartmann, Timo; de Graaf, Robin S.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how design reviews can be supported with pre-meeting virtual reality environments. Previous research has not systematically investigated how virtual environments can be used to communicate the design intent (to clients) and to communicate feedback (to design

  9. Identifying the plant-associated microbiome across aquatic and terrestrial environments: the effects of amplification method on taxa discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackrel, Sara L. [Department of Ecology and Evolution, The University of Chicago, 1101 E 57th Street Chicago IL 60637 USA; Owens, Sarah M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Gilbert, Jack A. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; The Microbiome Center, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Ave Chicago IL 60637 USA; Pfister, Catherine A. [Department of Ecology and Evolution, The University of Chicago, 1101 E 57th Street Chicago IL 60637 USA

    2017-01-25

    Plants in terrestrial and aquatic environments contain a diverse microbiome. Yet, the chloroplast and mitochondria organelles of the plant eukaryotic cell originate from free-living cyanobacteria and Rickettsiales. This represents a challenge for sequencing the plant microbiome with universal primers, as ~99% of 16S rRNA sequences may consist of chloroplast and mitochondrial sequences. Peptide nucleic acid clamps offer a potential solution by blocking amplification of host-associated sequences. We assessed the efficacy of chloroplast and mitochondria-blocking clamps against a range of microbial taxa from soil, freshwater and marine environments. While we found that the mitochondrial blocking clamps appear to be a robust method for assessing animal-associated microbiota, Proteobacterial 16S rRNA binds to the chloroplast-blocking clamp, resulting in a strong sequencing bias against this group. We attribute this bias to a conserved 14-bp sequence in the Proteobacteria that matches the 17-bp chloroplast-blocking clamp sequence. By scanning the Greengenes database, we provide a reference list of nearly 1500 taxa that contain this 14-bp sequence, including 48 families such as the Rhodobacteraceae, Phyllobacteriaceae, Rhizobiaceae, Kiloniellaceae and Caulobacteraceae. To determine where these taxa are found in nature, we mapped this taxa reference list against the Earth Microbiome Project database. These taxa are abundant in a variety of environments, particularly aquatic and semiaquatic freshwater and marine habitats. To facilitate informed decisions on effective use of organelle-blocking clamps, we provide a searchable database of microbial taxa in the Greengenes and Silva databases matching various n-mer oligonucleotides of each PNA sequence.

  10. Radioactive pollution from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the terrestrial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazoe, H; Hosoda, M; Sorimachi, A; Nakata, A; Yoshida, M A; Tokonami, S; Yamada, M

    2012-11-01

    Major contaminants from venting and hydrogen explosions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors between 12 and 15 March 2011 were transported northwestward and deposited on soil and plants via precipitation. Surface soils and plant leaves were sampled at 64 sites in the Fukushima Prefecture. The highest concentrations of (134)Cs (84.4 kBq kg(-1)) and (137)Cs (82.0 kBq kg(-1)) in surface soils were observed at Nagadoro in Iidate village located 32 km northwest from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Furthermore, (131)I, (129)Te, (129 m)Te, (110 m)Ag and (140)La were detected in the same samples. Outer surface of plant leaves, such as bamboo, cabbage and grasses were highly contaminated at the high-dose rate areas of Tsushima and Minami-Tsushima in Namie town. Mugwort leaves that grew after the pollution event had extremely low concentration of radionuclides; however, the plant/soil radiocaesium ratio was 0.023 ± 0.006. It is anticipated that decomposition of fallen leaves will promote recycling of radionuclides in the environment.

  11. Quantification of radionuclide transfer in terrestrial and freshwater environments for radiological assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    For more than thirty years, the IAEA has published a set of documents aimed at the limitation of the radiation exposure of the population from various nuclear activities. In particular, in 1994 the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 364, Handbook of Parameter Values for the Prediction of Radionuclide Transfer in Temperate Environments. Over the years, it has proved to be a valuable reference for radioecologists, modellers and authorities in Member States, and has been quoted in numerous impact assessments. Technical Reports Series No. 364 was based on a review of available data up to the end of 1992. However, a number of high quality critical reviews have been produced in recent years for some of the transfer parameter values which merit consideration. Thus, it was assumed that there is sufficient new information available to warrant reconsideration of a significant proportion of the values given in Technical Reports Series No. 364 and to initiate an updating of Technical Reports Series No. 364 in the framework of the IAEA EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety) project. It is expected that the revision of Technical Reports Series No. 364 will initiate further updating of related IAEA publications, and international and national radiological models. The present IAEA-TECDOC is intended to be a support to the update of Technical Reports Series No. 364, overcoming the limitations of the former, and comprises both revised transfer parameter values, as well as missing data, key transfer processes, concepts and models that were found to be important for radiation safety

  12. Radiocesium retention in the aquatic, terrestrial and urban environment: a quantitative and unifying analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preter, P. de

    1990-01-01

    The frayed edges of 10 A phyllosilicates (micaceous minerals), responsible for the highly selective sorption of poorly hydrated alkali cations (Cs, Rb, K) in NH$/sb4$, are quantitatively characterized by masking the planar sites with silver-thiourea. Both the capacity of the frayed edge sites (FES) and the Cs-to-K selectivity coefficient of these sites can be measured. The loading dependence of the Cs-to-K selectivity coefficient in the FES of 4 micaceous minerals demonstrates a pronounced degree of heterogeneity. Only a small fraction of the FES ($<$10%) exhibits extremely high Cs preference. For studying complex mineralogical systems (soils, sediments, rocks and ceramics) a new parameter is introduced: the ''radiocesium interception potential'', defined as the product of FES capacity and the Cs-to-K (or NH$/sb4$) selectivity coefficient in the FES at ''zero'' Cs loading. This parameter is a powerful tool in describing and predicting the highly selective sorption processes in the FES. Under freshwater conditions the radiocesium distribution coefficient can be quantitatively predicted by considering a competition with K and NH$/sb4$ in the FES. In a marine environment Na, and to a lesser extent Ca and Mg, also have to be taken into account. Finally, evidences for a redistribution process are given: sorbed Cs ions diffuse to the interlayers of the clay particles. This phenomenon explains the increasing ''fixation'' of radiocesium with time

  13. Laboratory and Field Evidence for Long-Term Starvation Survival of Microorganisms in Subsurface Terrestrial Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, T.L. [Biology Dept., New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Murphy, E.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Amy, P.S.; Haldeman, D.L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringelberg, D. B. [Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND NUTRIENT FLUX IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS INDICATES THAT INHABITANT MICROORGANISMS EXPERIENCE SEVERE NUTRIENT LIMITATION. USING LABORATORY AND FIELD METHODS, WE HAVE BEEN TESTING STARVATION SURVIVAL IN SUBSURFACE MICROORGANISMS. IN MICROCOSM EXPERIMENTS, WE HAVE SHOWN THAT STRAINS OF TWO COMMONLY ISOLATED SUBSURFACE GENERA, ARTHROBACTER AND PSEUDOMONAS, ARE ABLE TO MAINTAIN VIABILITY IN LOW-NUTRIENT, NATURAL SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS FOR OVER ONE YEAR. THESE NON-SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA UNDERGO RAPID INITIAL MINIATURIZATION FOLLOWED BY A STABILIZATION OF CELL SIZE. MEMBRANE LIPID PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID (PLFA) PROFILES OF THE PSEUDOMONAS ARE CONSISTENT WITH ADAPTATION TO NUTRIENT STRESS; ARTHROBACTER APPARENTLY RESPONDS TO NUTRIENT DEPRIVATION WITHOUT ALTERING MEMBRANE PLFA. TO TEST SURVIVABILITY OF MICROORGANISMS OVER A GEOLOGIC TIME SCALE, WE CHARACTERIZED MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES IN A SEQUENCE OF UNSATURATED SEDIMENTS RANGING IN AGE FROM MODEM TO {gt}780,000 years. Sediments were relatively uniform silts in Eastern Washington State. Porewater ages at depth (measured by the chloride mass-balance approach) were as old as 3,600 years. Microbial abundance, biomass, and activities (measured by direct counts, culture counts, total PLFAs, and radiorespirometry) declined with sediment age. The pattern is consistent with laboratory microcosm studies of Microbial survival: rapid short-term change followed by long-term survival of a proportion of cells. Even the oldest sediments evinced a small but viable Microbial community. Microbial survival appeared to be a function of sediment age. Porewater age appeared to influence the markup of surviving communities, as indicated by PLFA profiles. Sites with different Porewater recharge rates and patterns of Pleistocene flooding had different communities.

  14. Integrated environment for architecture design of C4ISR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Aimin; Luo, Xueshan; Zhang, Yaohong; Xiu, Shenglong

    2004-09-01

    Architecture design of C4ISR system is the foundation for system integration. Based on C4ISR architecture framework, this paper analyzed the characters of architecture products, classified the design tools of architecture into different kinds and defined functions of design tools, proposed the architecture design integrate framework, and then realized architecture design tools and integrated environment.

  15. Design of New Food Technology: Social Shaping of Working Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole

    2000-01-01

    A five-year design process of a continuous process wok has been studied with the aim of elucidating the conditions for integrating working environment aspects. The design process is seen as a network building activity and as a social shaping process of the artefact. A working environment log...... is suggested as a tool designers can use to integrate considerations of future operators' working environment....

  16. Dynamics of land use and common-resource pressures in terrestrial-aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, E.; Bell, K. P.

    2010-12-01

    Common-pool resource problems can arise in aquatic systems such as lakes, rivers, and open coastlines where individual land-use decisions produce collective, emergent effects at the watershed scale. A body of highly generalized modeling experiments has illustrated ways in which simple, opposing tendencies among individuals—imitative versus self-initiated actions, for example—can result in richly complex behaviors. If the dynamics of those opposing tendencies are translated into different land uses (development, extraction, working land, conservation), each entailing a different environmental consequence, then feedbacks between land-use decisions and resulting changes to the physical environment (which in turn influence subsequent land-use decisions) cause the environmental and social systems of the watershed to become coupled. We present the early results of an exploratory, spatially-extended model that couples a simplified riparian system to a hypothetical group of landowners, each of whom can choose between property development, placing property under a conservation easement, or taking no action and effectively maintaining the property's status quo. As in the generalized experiments, landowner behavior depends on two sets of opposing tendencies, one of which is imitation versus self-initiation. The other is a preference for property consolidation or subdivision; large property holdings can be subdivided into smaller parcels, and small parcels can be bought up by an owner to amass a larger property. Land-use decisions taken by landowners in the model affect the riparian system in process-based ways (sedimentation, eutrophication, water quality) that then inform subsequent social interactions and decisions. Isolating the basic dynamics of this kind of socio-environmental system allows us to pursue a number of questions relevant to resource management. What social and environmental circumstances in this framework result in continuous conservation corridors as

  17. Multi-Disciplinary Multi-Fidelity Design Environment, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phoenix Integration will develop a collaborative simulation and design environment that will seamlessly integrate the people, data, and tools required for analyzing...

  18. Designing Learning Environments That Integrate Curricular and Cocurricular Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Charles C.; Hurst, James C.

    1996-01-01

    Uses different learning models to provide the conceptual framework for three interventions that illustrate methods for designing effective learning environments at the macroinstitutional and microinstitutional levels. (Author)

  19. The Right Amount of Glue: Technologies and Standards Relevant to a Future Solar-Terrestrial Data Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, J. B.; Dimitoglou, G.; Bogart, R.; Tian, K. Q.; Hill, F.; Wampler, S.; Martens, P. C.; Davey, A. R.

    2002-01-01

    In order to meet the challenge of developing a new system science, we will need to employ technology that enables researchers to access data from fields with which they are at least initially unfamiliar as well as from sources they use more regularly. At the same time, the quantity of data to be obtained by missions such as the Solar Dynamics Observatory demands ease and simplicity of data access. These competing demands must in turn fit within severely constrained funding for data analysis in such projects. Based on experience in only a single discipline but with a diversity of data types and sources, we will give examples of technology that have made a significant difference in the way people do science. Similarly, we will show how adoption of a well-documented data format has made it easier for one community to search, reduce, and analyze data. We will also describe a community-supported data reduction and analysis software tree with useful features. We will attempt to generalize the lessons learned in these instances to features the broader, solar-terrestrial community might find compelling, while avoiding overdesign of a common data environment.

  20. Radioactivity in the terrestrial environment; review of UK research 1993-1996 and recommendations for future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The national Radioactivity Research and Environmental Monitoring Committee (RADREM) provides a forum for liaison on UK research and monitoring in the radioactive substances and radioactive waste management fields. It is subscribed to by Government departments, national regulatory bodies, the UK nuclear industry and other bodies with relevant research sponsorship and monitoring interests. A key function of the RADREM committee is to ensure that there is no unnecessary overlap between or significant omission from the research sponsored by the organisations represented upon it. To this end periodic reviews of research sector programmes are carried out. This report covers a review which was carried out by the Terrestrial Environment Sub-Committee (TESC) of RADREM for the period 1993-1996. In particular possible future research requirements are considered and evaluated. Such omissions are as identified do not reflect Sub-Committee views on the adequacy of any individual organisations research programme. Rather they should be seen as areas where gaps in knowledge may exist, which all organisations are free to consider and prioritise in the formulation of their future research requirements. (author)

  1. Long-term exposure of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ to a terrestrial environment. Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.C.; Patterson, J.H.; Steinkruger, F.J.; Coffelt, K.P.

    1985-02-01

    A plutonium oxide source consisting of a single piece of 83% /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ and weighing 38 g was exposed for 2.9 years to a humid, temperate terrestrial environment in an environmental simulation chamber. The soil tray of the chamber was divided into four compartments so that different soil types could be studied under identical conditions. Soils examined in this experiment included loam, silt loam, sand, and humus. Plutonium released into the soils, the soil drainages, and the condensates from the dehumidifier was monitored throughout the experiment. The total plutonium release rate from the PuO/sub 2/ source was approximately 2 ng/m/sup 2//s. The generation of short-ranged airborne plutonium, able to travel from a few centimeters to half a meter, was one of the most significant release pathways. The amount of plutonium released in this way was 10 times that washed directly off the source by rainwater and 20 times that from the fully airborne (longer ranged) release. Of the 200 ..mu..g of plutonium deposited in the soils, less than 0.1 ..mu..g was released into the soil percolates. In fact, the soil percolates constituted the least significant release pathway. Within the uncertainties in deriving the plutonium inventories of the soil compartments, we found no discernible differences among the behaviors of the four soil types towards plutonium. There was little or no seasonal effect on the release of plutonium from the soil.

  2. Design research, participation and the built school environment

    OpenAIRE

    McKenney, Susan

    2014-01-01

    McKenney, S. (2013). Design research, participation and the built school environment. Invited presentation to the advisory board of the AHRC-NWO project on Participatory Design of the Future Building School. December 2-3, London.

  3. Architectural design and the collaborative research environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Roger N

    2006-10-20

    Given that science is a collaborative endeavor, architects are striving to design new research buildings that not only provide a more pleasant work space but also facilitate interactions among researchers.

  4. Robot design for a vacuum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinski, S.; Trento, W.; Imani-Shikhabadi, R.; Hackwood, S.

    1987-01-01

    The cleanliness requirements for many processing and manufacturing tasks are becoming ever stricter, resulting in a greater interest in the vacuum environment. Researchers discuss the importance of this special environment, and the development of robots which are physically and functionally suited to vacuum processing tasks. Work is in progress at the Center for robotic Systems in Microelectronics (CRSM) to provide a robot for the manufacture of a revolutionary new gyroscope in high vacuum. The need for vacuum in this and other processes is discussed as well as the requirements for a vacuum-compatible robot. Finally, researchers present details on work done at the CRSM to modify an existing clean-room compatible robot for use at high vacuum.

  5. Knowledge management in the engineering design environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    2006-01-01

    The Aerospace and Defense industry is experiencing an increasing loss of knowledge through workforce reductions associated with business consolidation and retirement of senior personnel. Significant effort is being placed on process definition as part of ISO certification and, more recently, CMMI certification. The process knowledge in these efforts represents the simplest of engineering knowledge and many organizations are trying to get senior engineers to write more significant guidelines, best practices and design manuals. A new generation of design software, known as Product Lifecycle Management systems, has many mechanisms for capturing and deploying a wider variety of engineering knowledge than simple process definitions. These hold the promise of significant improvements through reuse of prior designs, codification of practices in workflows, and placement of detailed how-tos at the point of application.

  6. Design Milieux for Learning Environments in African Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duveskog, Marcus; Sutinen, Erkki; Cronje, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    During the years 2002 to 2009, five African settings were used as foundation for designing different learning environments. While the content and target group for each learning environment varied, all of their design settings, or milieux, shared one implicit expectation: the milieu should facilitate the production of a change-making learning…

  7. A Well Designed School Environment Facilitates Brain Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tak Cheung; Petrie, Garth

    2000-01-01

    Examines how school design facilitates learning by complementing how the brain learns. How the brain learns is discussed and how an artistic environment, spaciousness in the learning areas, color and lighting, and optimal thermal and acoustical environments aid student learning. School design suggestions conclude the article. (GR)

  8. Design of energy markets and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birk Mortensen, J.; Olsen, O.J.; Skytte, K.

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of competition in electricity and gas markets has necessitated the creation of new markets, power pools and financial markets. Such markets are well known from other industries (e.g. oil) but have not been applied for the gas and electricity industries during the monopoly era. To which extent can market design applied elsewhere be transferred to gas and electricity and to which extent must they be modified? The interest in new market designs has recently been extended to environmentally goals, but existing policies to encourage them are considered inefficient and a burden for the state budget. This conference brings some of these subjects into focus. (au)

  9. Radioactivity in terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queirazza, G.; Guzzi, L.

    1987-01-01

    The investigation demonstrated that in the first stage the contamination affected only the foliage; therefore, the concentration ratios observed were by several orders of magnitude higher than the transfer factors. The effect of direct contamination tends to diminish gradually as observed in the radiometric data relating to two subsequent mowings of alfalfa and a meadow of miscellaneous plants. For same vegetables of alimentary value (tomatoes, rice, barley and maize) it was ascertained due to soil-to-plant transfer alone, which normally represent a very small fraction on the amount present in the soil

  10. Creative Environment Formation in Design Professional Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, Venera G.; Purik, Elza E.

    2016-01-01

    The current interest to the issue of this work lies in the fact that a professional competence of a designer needs highly developed abilities to create new and different projects of high aesthetic value in compliance with the current regulations. Image visualization abilities development needs special conditions encouraging personal creativity.…

  11. Considerations for Designing Instructional Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennen, Vanessa Paz; Branch, Robert C.

    Virtual reality is an immersive, interactive medium that manipulates the senses in order provide users with simulated experiences in computer-generated worlds. The visual design of virtual reality is an important issue, but literature has tended to stress the medium's instructional potential rather than setting forth a protocol for designing…

  12. NASA Astronaut Occupational Surveillance Program and Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health, LSAH, Astronaut Exposures and Risk in the Terrestrial and Spaceflight Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keprta, Sean R.; Tarver, William; Van Baalen, Mary; McCoy, Torin

    2015-01-01

    United States Astronauts have a very unique occupational exposure profile. In order to understand these risks and properly address them, the National Aeronautics and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, originally created the Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health, LSAH. The first LSAH was designed to address a variety of needs regarding astronaut health and included a 3 to 1 terrestrial control population in order to compare United States "earth normal" disease and aging to that of a microgravity exposed astronaut. Over the years that program has been modified, now termed Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health, still LSAH. Astronaut spaceflight exposures have also changed, with the move from short duration shuttle flights to long duration stays on international space station and considerable terrestrial training activities. This new LSAH incorporates more of an occupational health and medicine model to the study of occupationally exposed astronauts. The presentation outlines the baseline exposures and monitoring of the astronaut population to exposures, both terrestrial, and in space.

  13. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northern California: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for small mammals and elk in Northern California. Vector polygons in this data set represent terrestrial...

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare/sensitive species occurrences of terrestrial mammals in Central California. Vector polygons in...

  15. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for small terrestrial mammals (woodrats, myotis, muskrat, mink) for the Hudson River. Vector polygons in...

  16. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: South Florida: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for State and Federally threatened and endangered terrestrial mammals in [for] South Florida. Vector...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Upper Coast of Texas: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for terrestrial mammals for the Upper Coast of Texas. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  18. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Southern California: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare and threatened/endangered terrestrial mammals in Southern California. Vector polygons in this data...

  19. The Palaeoclimate and Terrestrial Exoplanet Radiative Transfer Model Intercomparison Project (PALAEOTRIP: experimental design and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Goldblatt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate radiative transfer calculation is fundamental to all climate modelling. For deep palaeoclimate, and increasingly terrestrial exoplanet climate science, this brings both the joy and the challenge of exotic atmospheric compositions. The challenge here is that most standard radiation codes for climate modelling have been developed for modern atmospheric conditions and may perform poorly away from these. The palaeoclimate or exoclimate modeller must either rely on these or use bespoke radiation codes, and in both cases rely on either blind faith or ad hoc testing of the code. In this paper, we describe the protocols for the Palaeoclimate and Terrestrial Exoplanet Radiative Transfer Model Intercomparison Project (PALAEOTRIP to systematically address this. This will compare as many radiation codes used for palaeoclimate or exoplanets as possible, with the aim of identifying the ranges of far-from-modern atmospheric compositions in which the codes perform well. This paper describes the experimental protocol and invites community participation in the project through 2017–2018.

  20. A Distributed Feature-based Environment for Collaborative Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Dong Li

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a client/server design environment based on 3D feature-based modelling and Java technologies to enable design information to be shared efficiently among members within a design team. In this environment, design tasks and clients are organised through working sessions generated and maintained by a collaborative server. The information from an individual design client during a design process is updated and broadcast to other clients in the same session through an event-driven and call-back mechanism. The downstream manufacturing analysis modules can be wrapped as agents and plugged into the open environment to support the design activities. At the server side, a feature-feature relationship is established and maintained to filter the varied information of a working part, so as to facilitate efficient information update during the design process.

  1. Reconfiguring Course Design in Virtual Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael; Zupancic, Tadeja

    2007-01-01

    Although many administrators and educators are familiar with e-learning programs, learning management systems and portals, fewer may have experience with virtual distributed learning environments and their academic relevance. The blended learning experience of the VIPA e-learning project...... for architectural students offers some innovative insights into experientially oriented educational interfaces. A comparative analysis of VIPA courses and project results are presented in the paper. Special attention in the discussion is devoted to the improvements of e-learning solutions in architecture....... The criterion of the relation between the actual applicability of selected e-learning solutions and elements of collaborative educational interfaces with VR are taken into account. A system of e-learning applicability levels in program and course development and implementation of architectural tectonics...

  2. Encoder designed to work in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toop, L.

    2007-05-15

    Dynapar has developed the Acuro AX71 absolute encoder for use on offshore or land-based oil rig operations. It provides feedback on the operation of automated systems such as draw works, racking systems, rotary tables and top drives. By ensuring that automated systems function properly, this encoder responds to a need by the oil and gas industry to keep workers safe and improve efficiency, particularly for operations in rugged situations. The encoder provides feedback from motor systems to controllers, giving information about position and speed of downhole drill bits. This newly developed encoder is better than commonly used incremental encoders which are not precise in strong electrical noise environments. Rather, the absolute encoder uses a different method of reporting to the controller. A digital signal is transmitted constantly as the device operates. It is less susceptible to noise issues. It is highly accurate, tolerant of noise and is not affected by power outages. However, the absolute encoder is generally more delicate in drilling applications with high ambient temperatures and shock levels. Dynapar addressed this issue by developing compact stainless steel housing that is useful for corrosion resistance in marine applications. The AX71 absolute encoder can withstand up to 100 G of mechanical shock and ambient temperatures of up to 60 degrees C. The encoder is ATEX certified without barriers, and offers the high resolution feedback of 4,000 counts of multiturn rotation and 16,000 counts of position. 1 fig.

  3. A DBR Framework for Designing Mobile Virtual Reality Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Thomas Donald; Cook, Stuart; Aiello, Stephen; Christie, Duncan; Sinfield, David; Steagall, Marcus; Aguayo, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a design based research (DBR) framework for designing mobile virtual reality learning environments. The application of the framework is illustrated by two design-based research projects that aim to develop more authentic educational experiences and learner-centred pedagogies in higher education. The projects highlight the first…

  4. The Curriculum Design and Development in MOOCs Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Du, Jing; Li, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The paper selects over 20 online courses and analyses the subjects, organization, the way to show the content of the courses, the use of media, and design of the teaching in the case study of Chinese popular MOOC platform. On this basis, the paper summarizes the principles of curriculum design and design models in MOOC environment, such as…

  5. Designing safer living environments support for local government

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, K

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the built environment, the opportunities it presents for crime and the role city planners and urban designers have to play in the design of safer cities and towns. City planners and urban designers can play a role...

  6. Analysis by Monte Carlo simulations of the sensitivity to single event upset of SRAM memories under spatial proton or terrestrial neutron environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, D.

    2006-07-01

    Electronic systems in space and terrestrial environments are subjected to a flow of particles of natural origin, which can induce dysfunctions. These particles can cause Single Event Upsets (SEU) in SRAM memories. Although non-destructive, the SEU can have consequences on the equipment functioning in applications requiring a great reliability (airplane, satellite, launcher, medical, etc). Thus, an evaluation of the sensitivity of the component technology is necessary to predict the reliability of a system. In atmospheric environment, the SEU sensitivity is mainly caused by the secondary ions resulting from the nuclear reactions between the neutrons and the atoms of the component. In space environment, the protons with strong energies induce the same effects as the atmospheric neutrons. In our work, a new code of prediction of the rate of SEU has been developed (MC-DASIE) in order to quantify the sensitivity for a given environment and to explore the mechanisms of failures according to technology. This code makes it possible to study various technologies of memories SRAM (Bulk and SOI) in neutron and proton environment between 1 MeV and 1 GeV. Thus, MC-DASIE was used with experiment data to study the effect of integration on the sensitivity of the memories in terrestrial environment, a comparison between the neutron and proton irradiations and the influence of the modeling of the target component on the calculation of the rate of SEU. (author)

  7. DEFACTO: A Design Environment for Adaptive Computing Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Mary

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the DEFACTO project, a Design Environment for Adaptive Computing Technology funded under the DARPA Adaptive Computing Systems and Just-In-Time-Hardware programs...

  8. ASPECTS OF EFFECTIVE USER INTERFACE DESIGN OF DEMONSTRATION ENVIRONMENT COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Maksimovich

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed question of the studying course "Basics of algorithmization and programming". We propose to study material by using program demonstration environment. We described the perspectives of effective design of software application in the future.

  9. User Interactive Guided Search Design Environment, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phoenix Integration's vision is to create an intuitive human-in-the-loop engineering design environment called Guided Search that leverages recent advances in...

  10. Designing an Interactive Multimedia Environment for Learning and Aiding Troubleshooting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolodner, Janet

    1997-01-01

    .... However troubleshooting is a complex process both to learn and perform. This report examines the prospects for designing an interactive learning environment that helps users acquire and engage in effective troubleshooting...

  11. Understanding and Designing Military Organizations for a Complex Dynamic Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hicks, Christopher E

    2008-01-01

    .... The two theories will be used to describe the external environment and how it relates to DoD organizations, current DoD organizational structures, and transformational concepts related to organizational design...

  12. Designing a network of critical zone observatories to explore the living skin of the terrestrial Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Susan L.; McDowell, William H.; Dietrich, William E.; White, Timothy S.; Kumar, Praveen; Anderson, Suzanne P.; Chorover, Jon; Lohse, Kathleen Ann; Bales, Roger C.; Richter, Daniel D.; Grant, Gordon; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2017-12-01

    activities can only be accomplished with observatories. Here we review the CZO enterprise in the United States and identify how such observatories could operate in the future as a network designed to generate critical scientific insights. Specifically, we recognize the need for the network to study network-level questions, expand the environments under investigation, accommodate both hypothesis testing and monitoring, and involve more stakeholders. We propose a driving question for future CZ science and a hubs-and-campaigns model to address that question and target the CZ as one unit. Only with such integrative efforts will we learn to steward the life-sustaining critical zone now and into the future.

  13. Designing a network of critical zone observatories to explore the living skin of the terrestrial Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Brantley

    2017-12-01

    of these activities can only be accomplished with observatories. Here we review the CZO enterprise in the United States and identify how such observatories could operate in the future as a network designed to generate critical scientific insights. Specifically, we recognize the need for the network to study network-level questions, expand the environments under investigation, accommodate both hypothesis testing and monitoring, and involve more stakeholders. We propose a driving question for future CZ science and a hubs-and-campaigns model to address that question and target the CZ as one unit. Only with such integrative efforts will we learn to steward the life-sustaining critical zone now and into the future.

  14. Designing user models in a virtual cave environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hudson, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gokhale, N. [Madge Networks, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, the results of a first study into the use of virtual reality for human factor studies and design of simple and complex models of control systems, components, and processes are described. The objective was to design a model in a virtual environment that would reflect more characteristics of the user`s mental model of a system and fewer of the designer`s. The technology of a CAVE{trademark} virtual environment and the methodology of Neuro Linguistic Programming were employed in this study.

  15. Standardization of green building technologies for environment design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benuzh Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the structure and field of standardization ISO / TC 205 “Building environment design”, provides examples of green building technologies. The main purpose of the article is to show the interaction between international ISO / TC 205 “Building environment design” and created in Russia in 2016 the Technical Committee of Standardization № 366 “Green technology of the build environment and green innovative products”. Both of these technical committees promote green building technologies for environment design, thereby deal with the negative impact on the environment and the reasons of global warming. Instead of buildings that attempt to suppress and overcome nature, why not design buildings that integrate with the environment, on every possible level? The international standardization work which ISO/TC 205 “Building environment design” performs seeks, in addition to lowering trade barriers for engineering design, to promote and facilitate the design of high performance buildings: higher performing as economic assets for their owners, higher performing as buildings that provide amenable indoor environment for their occupants, and higher performing with respect to resource utilization and environmental impact.

  16. CASTE Revisited: Principles of Course Design in a Hypertext Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    Describes CASTE (Course Assembly System and Tutorial Environment) that was developed to help students choose appropriate learning strategies in a hypertext environment. Highlights include the need for principles of course design; resource-based learning and computer-aided learning; conversation theory; and a comparison to other approaches.…

  17. SLS-SPEC-159 Cross-Program Design Specification for Natural Environments (DSNE) Revision D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2015-01-01

    as a definition of operational models or operational constraints, nor is it adequate, alone, for ground facilities which may have additional requirements (for example, building codes and local environmental constraints). "Natural environments," as the term is used here, refers to the environments that are not the result of intended human activity or intervention. It consists of a variety of external environmental factors (most of natural origin and a few of human origin) which impose restrictions or otherwise impact the development or operation of flight vehicles and destination surface systems. These natural environments include the following types of environments: Terrestrial environments at launch, abort, and normal landing sites (winds, temperatures, pressures, surface roughness, sea conditions, etc.); Space environments (ionizing radiation, orbital debris, meteoroids, thermosphere density, plasma, solar, Earth, and lunar-emitted thermal radiation, etc.); Destination environments (Lunar surface and orbital, Mars atmosphere and surface, near Earth asteroids, etc.). Many of the environmental specifications in this document are based on models, data, and environment descriptions contained in the CxP 70044, Constellation Program Natural Environment Definition for Design (NEDD). The NEDD provides additional detailed environment data and model descriptions to support analytical studies for ESD Programs. For background information on specific environments and their effects on spacecraft design and operations, the environment models, and the data used to generate the specifications contained in the DSNE, the reader is referred to the NEDD paragraphs listed in each section of the DSNE. Also, most of the environmental specifications in this document are tied specifically to the ESD DRMs in ESD-10012, Revision B, Exploration Systems Development Concept of Operations (ConOps). Coordination between these environment specifications and the DRMs must be maintained. This

  18. Urban Environment Development based on Universal Design Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsritanto, Bangun Ir

    2018-02-01

    Universal Design is a design which facilitated full range of human diversity. By applying Universal design principles, urban environment can be more functional and more user-friendly for everyone. This study examined five urban streets of South Korea as a country experienced on developing various urban street designs based on universal design. This study aimed to examine and compare the South Korea cases using seven principles of universal design. The research methods of this study are literature study, case study, and site observation. The results of this study are: South Korea cases are good practices, urgency of implementing the direction into local regulations; and change of urban development paradigm.

  19. Designing Prediction Tasks in a Mathematics Software Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunström, Mats; Fahlgren, Maria

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognised need in mathematics teaching for new kinds of tasks which exploit the affordances provided by new technology. This paper focuses on the design of prediction tasks to foster student reasoning about exponential functions in a mathematics software environment. It draws on the first iteration of a design based research study…

  20. Project Selection in the Design Studio: Absence of Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Inci

    2010-01-01

    Project selection is an essential matter of design teaching. Based on observations of a specific curriculum, the author claims that a wide repertoire of subjects including offices, restaurants, hotels, and other public places are used to prepare design students, but that schools and other "learning environments/ schools" are similarly…

  1. Designing Learning Environments to Teach Interactive Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Sonia M. Gomez; Swagten, Henk J. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at describing and analysing systematically an interactive learning environment designed to teach Quantum Physics, a second-year physics course. The instructional design of Quantum Physics is a combination of interactive lectures (using audience response systems), tutorials and self-study in unit blocks, carried out with small…

  2. The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntzinger, D.N. [Northern Arizona University; Schwalm, C. [Northern Arizona University; Michalak, A.M [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford; Schaefer, K. [National Snow and Ice Data Center; King, A.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wei, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jacobson, A. [National Snow and Ice Data Center; Liu, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cook, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Post, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berthier, G. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE); Hayes, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ito, A. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; Lei, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lu, C. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Mao, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, C.H. [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences; Peng, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE); Poulter, B. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE); Riccuito, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shi, X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tian, H. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Wang, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field; Zeng, N. [University of Maryland; Zhao, F. [University of Maryland; Zhu, Q. [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

  3. Comparison of four nonstationary hydrologic design methods for changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Xiong, Lihua; Guo, Shenglian; Xu, Chong-Yu; Xia, Jun; Du, Tao

    2017-08-01

    The hydrologic design of nonstationary flood extremes is an emerging field that is essential for water resources management and hydrologic engineering design to cope with changing environment. This paper aims to investigate and compare the capability of four nonstationary hydrologic design strategies, including the expected number of exceedances (ENE), design life level (DLL), equivalent reliability (ER), and average design life level (ADLL), with the last three methods taking into consideration the design life of the project. The confidence intervals of the calculated design floods were also estimated using the nonstationary bootstrap approach. A comparison of these four methods was performed using the annual maximum flood series (AMFS) of the Weihe River basin, Jinghe River basin, and Assunpink Creek basin. The results indicated that ENE, ER and ADLL yielded the same or very similar design values and confidence intervals for both increasing and decreasing trends of AMFS considered. DLL also yields similar design values if the relationship between DLL and ER/ADLL return periods is considered. Both ER and ADLL are recommended for practical use as they have associated design floods with the design life period of projects and yield reasonable design quantiles and confidence intervals. Furthermore, by assuming that the design results using either a stationary or nonstationary hydrologic design strategy should have the same reliability, the ER method enables us to solve the nonstationary hydrologic design problems by adopting the stationary design reliability, thus bridging the gap between stationary and nonstationary design criteria.

  4. Computer-aided design development transition for IPAD environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, H. G.; Mock, W. D.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship of federally sponsored computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) programs to the aircraft life cycle design process, an overview of NAAD'S CAD development program, an evaluation of the CAD design process, a discussion of the current computing environment within which NAAD is developing its CAD system, some of the advantages/disadvantages of the NAAD-IPAD approach, and CAD developments during transition into the IPAD system are discussed.

  5. Design research and the globalization of healthcare environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Song, Yilin

    2014-01-01

    Global healthcare practice has expanded in the past 20 years. At the same time the incorporation of research into the design process has gained prominence as a best practice among architects. The authors of this study investigated the status of design research in a variety of international settings. We intended to answer the question, "how pervasive is healthcare design research outside of the United States?" The authors reviewed the international literature on the design of healthcare facilities. More than 500 international studies and conference proceedings were incorporated in this literature review. A team of five research assistants searched multiple databases comparing approximately 16 keywords to geographic location. Some of those keywords included: evidence-based design, salutogenic design, design research, and healthcare environment. Additional articles were gathered by contacting prominent researchers and asking for their personal assessment of local health design research studies. While there are design researchers in most parts of the world, the majority of studies focus on the needs of populations in developed countries and generate guidelines that have significant cost and cultural implications that prohibit their implementation in developing countries. Additionally, the body of literature discussing the role of culture in healthcare environments is extremely limited. Design researchers must address the cultural implications of their studies. Additionally, we need to expand our research objectives to address healthcare design in countries that have not been previous considered. © 2014 Vendome Group, LLC.

  6. Designing for Learning : Studying learning environments in higher professional education from a design perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitter, I.I.

    2010-01-01

    Designing authentic, project-based learning environments in higher professional education is far from clear-cut yet and can be a difficult task for teachers. The research question driving our research was: How can we design and improve project-based, ICT-supported learning environments in higher

  7. Instructional Design Practices in the Design and Development of Digital Humanities Virtual Environments (DH-VEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Valerie Hunter

    2011-01-01

    Virtual environments, virtual worlds, simulations, 3D models are loaded with potential, promise, and problems. While learning in virtual settings is still being researched, instructional designers are challenged as to which instructional design practices are best suited for virtual environments (VEs). The problem is there is a lack of a conceptual…

  8. Using software interoperability to achieve a virtual design environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, G. Groot; Koshel, R. John

    2005-09-01

    A variety of simulation tools, including optical design and analysis, have benefited by many years of evolution in software functionality and computing power, thus making the notion of virtual design environments a reality. To simulate the optical characteristics of a system, one needs to include optical performance, mechanical design and manufacturing aspects simultaneously. To date, no single software program offers a universal solution. One approach to achieve an integrated environment is to select tools that offer a high degree of interoperability. This allows the selection of the best tools for each aspect of the design working in concert to solve the problem. This paper discusses the issues of how to assemble a design environment and provides an example of a combination of tools for illumination design. We begin by offering a broad definition of interoperability from an optical analysis perspective. This definition includes aspects of file interchange formats, software communications protocols and customized applications. One example solution is proposed by combining SolidWorks1 for computer-aided design (CAD), TracePro2 for optical analysis and MATLAB3 as the mathematical engine for tolerance analysis. The resulting virtual tool will be applied to a lightpipe design task to illustrate how such a system can be used.

  9. Creating Learning Environment Connecting Engineering Design and 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikkarainen, Ari; Salminen, Antti; Piili, Heidi

    Engineering education in modern days require continuous development in didactics, pedagogics and used practical methods. 3D printing provides excellent opportunity to connect different engineering areas into practice and produce learning by doing applications. The 3D-printing technology used in this study is FDM (Fused deposition modeling). FDM is the most used 3D-printing technology by commercial numbers at the moment and the qualities of the technology makes it popular especially in academic environments. For achieving the best result possible, students will incorporate the principles of DFAM (Design for additive manufacturing) into their engineering design studies together with 3D printing. This paper presents a plan for creating learning environment for mechanical engineering students combining the aspects of engineering design, 3D-CAD learning and AM (additive manufacturing). As a result, process charts for carrying out the 3D printing process from technological point of view and design process for AM from engineering design point of view were created. These charts are used in engineering design education. The learning environment is developed to work also as a platform for Bachelor theses, work-training environment for students, prototyping service centre for cooperation partners and source of information for mechanical engineering education in Lapland University of Applied Sciences.

  10. Designing low cost autonomous robots in unknown environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alouani, Ali T.; Sri, Aravind M.

    2008-04-01

    This paper documents the design and development of a low cost robot capable of autonomous navigation in unknown indoor environments. The proposed design uses only two complementary rotating sensors for navigation. The use of real time mapping allows for detection and avoidance of obstacles. The fusion of the sensors data helped improve accuracy of the online map of the robot environment. The robot builds an online map of its environment, and then automatically plans its navigation path. The feedback control keeps the robot moving along its planned path. The robot has been successfully tested in a cluttered environment in the Advanced Systems Lab. Preliminary tests carried out have shown the success of the robot in navigating autonomously.

  11. The role of environment design in an educational Multi-User Virtual Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papachristos, Nikiforos; Vrellis, Ioannis; Natsis, Antonios

    2014-01-01

    , learning outcomes and the overall experience of the students. Two different educational virtual environments (a traditional university auditorium and an open-air setting) were designed and presented to different groups of students (n = 51). Results indicate that students' experience from the educational...... activities, their attitudes toward the environment and the induced sense of presence are not affected by the design of the educational setting. Learning outcomes seem to be slightly better in virtual educational settings that replicate traditional educational settings. Experience shows that undergraduate...... university classes can be successfully taught in Second Life and such environments elicit satisfaction, positive experiences and attitudes and high levels of social presence from the participants. Course design in a Multi-User Virtual Environment (MUVE) should take into account the time and training...

  12. Interactive design environment transportation channel of relativistic charged particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchuk, I. O.; Averyanov, G. P.; Budkin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Considered a modern implementation of a computer environment for the design of channels of transportation of high-energy charged particle beams. The environment includes a software package for the simulation of the dynamics of charged particles in the channel, operating means for changing parameters of the channel, the elements channel optimization and processing of the output characteristics of the beam with the graphical output the main output parameters.

  13. Ward design: creating a healing patient-environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biley, F

    The drive for cost-effectiveness in hospital design over the decades has meant that minimal thought has been given to the effect of environments on patients' health. The author draws on research evidence to demonstrate how the appearance and ambience of patient areas can have profound effects on recovery patterns, and suggests that the creation of environments more conducive to healing need not incur heavy expense in time or money.

  14. Design of Feedback in Interactive Multimedia Language Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vehbi Türel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In interactive multimedia environments, different digital elements (i. e. video, audio, visuals, text, animations, graphics and glossary can be combined and delivered on the same digital computer screen (TDM 1997: 151, CCED 1987, Brett 1998: 81, Stenton 1998: 11, Mangiafico 1996: 46. This also enables effectively provision and presentation of feedback in pedagogically more efficient ways, which meets not only the requirement of different teaching and learning theories, but also the needs of language learners who vary in their learning-style preferences (Robinson 1991: 156, Peter 1994: 157f.. This study aims to bring out the pedagogical and design principles that might help us to more effectively design and customise feedback in interactive multimedia language learning environments. While so doing, some examples of thought out and customized computerised feedback from an interactive multimedia language learning environment, which were designed and created by the author of this study and were also used for language learning purposes, will be shown.

  15. The RHIC/AGS Online Model Environment: Design and Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satogata, T.; Brown, K.; Pilat, F.; Tafti Alai, A.; Tepikian, S.; Vanzeijtz

    1999-01-01

    An integrated online modeling environment is currently under development for use by AGS and RHIC physicists and commissioners. This environment combines the modeling efforts of both groups in a CDEV[1] client-server design, providing access to expected machine optics and physics parameters based on live and design machine settings. An abstract modeling interface has been designed as a set of adapters[2] around core computational modeling engines such as MAD and UAL/Teapot++[3]. This approach allows us to leverage existing survey, lattice, and magnet infrastructure, as well as easily incorporate new model engine developments. This paper describes the architecture of the RHIC/AGS modeling environment, including the application interface through CDEV and general tools for graphical interaction with the model using Tcl/Tk. Separate papers at this conference address the specifics of implementation and modeling experience for AGS and RHIC

  16. {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am levels in the terrestrial and aquatic environment of the Loire and Garonne rivers basins (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, G.; Mokili, M.B.; Le Roy, C.; Pagano, V. [SUBATECH/IN2P3 (France); Gontier, G.; Boyer, C. [EDF-DPI-DIN-CIDEN (France); Chardon, P. [CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Hemidy, P.Y. [EDF-DPN-UNIE-GPRE-IEV (France)

    2014-07-01

    Plutonium and americium long-lived alpha emitter isotopes can be found in the environment because of atmospheric global fallout due to thermonuclear tests performed between 1945 and 1980, to the American SNAP 9A satellite explosion in 1964, to the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident,... In France, the nuclear safety authority does not allow the release of artificial alpha emitters from nuclear power plants. Thus, monitoring is performed to verify the absence of these alpha emitters in liquid discharges to respect the limits set by the regulations. These thresholds ensure a very low dosimetric impact to the population compared to other radionuclides. With the objective of environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities, activity measurements of long-lived alpha emitters are carried out to detect the traces of these radionuclides. Analysis of low activity by alpha spectrometry after chemical steps were performed and used to determine the {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am activities on a large set of environmental solid samples likely to be encountered in environmental monitoring as soils, sediments, terrestrial and aquatic bio-indicators. The samples collected in the terrestrial and aquatic environment of the Loire and Garonne rivers basins (France) was investigated for the 2009-2014 period. It was found that the mean activity concentration of the most frequently detected was for the radionuclide {sup 238}Pu: from <0.00031 to 0.0061 Bq/kg dry in terrestrial samples and from <0.00086 to 0.011 Bq/kg dry in aquatic samples; for the radionuclide {sup 239+240}Pu: from 0.00041 to 0.150 Bq/kg dry in terrestrial samples and from 0.0023 to 0.240 Bq/kg dry in aquatic samples and for the radionuclide {sup 241}Am: from <0.00086 to 0.087 Bq/kg dry in terrestrial samples and from 0.0022 to 0.120 Bq/kg dry in aquatic samples. {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am/{sup 239+240}Pu ratios determined are in accordance with an environmental contamination due to

  17. Thermal regulation in terrestrial environment using a two-phase fluid loop with capillary pumping; Regulation thermique en environnement terrestre par boucle fluide diphasique a pompage capillaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butto, C. [Universite Paul Sabatier, LESETH, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1996-12-31

    Two-phase fluid loops with capillary pumping are particularly interesting silent devices which allow energy savings and do not create any noise pollution (no mechanical vibrations). In terrestrial environment, the gravity field, when judiciously used, allows to improve their performances and thus, their use in thermal regulation of big computers, power electronic components, transformers, etc, is particularly interesting. In this study, the main results concerning the functioning of such a loop in the gravity field are presented and used to highlight the conditions that allow to take advantage of this field and the improvements obtained. (J.S.) 5 refs.

  18. Influence of Natural Environments in Spacecraft Design, Development, and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft are growing in complexity and sensitivity to environmental effects. The spacecraft engineer must understand and take these effects into account in building reliable, survivable, and affordable spacecraft. Too much protections, however, means unnecessary expense while too little will potentially lead to early mission loss. The ability to balance cost and risk necessitates an understanding of how the environment impacts the spacecraft and is a critical factor in its design. This presentation is intended to address both the space environment and its effects with the intent of introducing the influence of the environment on spacecraft performance.

  19. Simulation Environment for Orion Launch Abort System Control Design Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMinn, J. Dana; Jackson, E. Bruce; Christhilf, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The development and use of an interactive environment to perform control system design and analysis of the proposed Crew Exploration Vehicle Launch Abort System is described. The environment, built using a commercial dynamic systems design package, includes use of an open-source configuration control software tool and a collaborative wiki to coordinate between the simulation developers, control law developers and users. A method for switching between multiple candidate control laws and vehicle configurations is described. Aerodynamic models, especially in a development program, change rapidly, so a means for automating the implementation of new aerodynamic models is described.

  20. Trajectory Design for the Phobos and Deimos & Mars Environment Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Loucks, Michel E.; Yang, Fan Yang; Lee, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The presented trajectory design and analysis was performed for the Phobos and Deimos & Mars Environment (PADME) mission concept as part of a NASA proposal submission managed by NASA Ames Research Center in the 2014-2015 timeframe. The PADME spacecraft would be a derivative of the successfully flown Lunar Atmosphere & Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft. While LADEE was designed to enter low-lunar orbit, the PADME spacecraft would instead enter an elliptical Mars orbit of 2-week period. This Mars orbit would pass by Phobos near periapsis on successive orbits and then raise periapsis to yield close approaches of Deimos every orbit thereafter.

  1. Design and Decorative Art in Shaping of Architectural Environment Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalina, N. M.

    2017-11-01

    The relevance of the topic is determined by the dynamic development of the promising branch, i.e. the architectural environment design, which requires, on the one hand, consideration of the morphology and typology of this art form, on the other hand, the specificity of the architectural environment artistic image. The intensive development of innovative computer technologies and materials in modern engineering, improvement of the information communications forms in their totality has led to the application of new methods in design and construction which, in their turn, have required the development of additional methods for content and context analysis in the integrated assessment of socially significant architectural environments. In the modern culture, correlative processes are steadily developing leading us to a new understanding of the interaction of architecture, decorative art and design. Their rapprochement at the morphological level has been noted which makes it possible to reveal a specific method of synthesis and similarity. The architecture of postmodern styles differs in its bionic form becoming an interactive part of the society and approaching its structural qualities with painting, sculpture, and design. In the modern world, these processes acquire multi-valued semantic nuances, expand the importance of associativity and dynamic processuality in the perception of environmental objects and demand the development of new approaches to the assessment of the architectural design environment. Within the framework of the universal paradigm of modern times the concept of the world develops as a set of systems that live according to the self-organization laws.

  2. Living closer to the environment: Housing design concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosorić Vesna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main idea of this design concept is to strengthen the relationship and understanding between a man - resident and his environment. Residents are separated from the outdoor environment by glazing, which enables constant observation of environment from nearly all points of indoor space, encouraging positive feelings towards external world and understanding of the fragility of biosphere. Care for the environment should become a part of a man's nature and way of living, and it is the people who are expected to become the driving force of positive global changes towards sustainable development. The semisphere-like single family house of 14m in diameter has a multifunctional, multi-layer 'active' facade envelope. The envelope ensures constant visual contact of residents with the whole surroundings, while still providing comfort. The living space of the house reflects natural shapes which are organic rather than rectangular. Such indoor space becomes a part of the environment, rather than being protected, distanced and isolated from it. The house is designed to use solar energy 'passively' by absorption through insulated glazed envelope and 'actively' by outer skin layer on the first floor, made of stripes of flat semi-transparent polycrystalline photovoltaic (PV panels. In addition to its constructive role, the concrete core of the house acts as thermal mass and enables absorption and accumulation of thermal energy. The developed housing concept is applicable in different urban-design units and sets.

  3. Design and analysis issues in gene and environment studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chen-yu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both nurture (environmental and nature (genetic factors play an important role in human disease etiology. Traditionally, these effects have been thought of as independent. This perspective is ill informed for non-mendelian complex disorders which result as an interaction between genetics and environment. To understand health and disease we must study how nature and nurture interact. Recent advances in human genomics and high-throughput biotechnology make it possible to study large numbers of genetic markers and gene products simultaneously to explore their interactions with environment. The purpose of this review is to discuss design and analytic issues for gene-environment interaction studies in the “-omics” era, with a focus on environmental and genetic epidemiological studies. We present an expanded environmental genomic disease paradigm. We discuss several study design issues for gene-environmental interaction studies, including confounding and selection bias, measurement of exposures and genotypes. We discuss statistical issues in studying gene-environment interactions in different study designs, such as choices of statistical models, assumptions regarding biological factors, and power and sample size considerations, especially in genome-wide gene-environment studies. Future research directions are also discussed.

  4. Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fuhua, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents" reports on the most recent advances in agent technologies for distributed learning. Chapters are devoted to the various aspects of intelligent software agents in distributed learning, including the methodological and technical issues on where and how intelligent agents…

  5. Territories of Engagement in the Design of Ecohumanist Healthcare Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Terri; Verderber, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, architectural and allied designers, engineers, and healthcare facility administrators are being challenged to demonstrate success in adroitly identifying and contextualizing ever-shifting and expanding spheres of knowledge with respect to the role of energy conservation and carbon neutrality in healthcare treatment environments and their immediate exterior environs. This calls for making sense of an unprecedented volume of information on building energy usage and interdigitizing complex and at times contradictory goals with the daily requirements of building occupants. Ecohumanist Design Strategies: In response, a multidimensional framework is put forth with the aim of advancing theory and practice in the realm of designers', direct caregivers', and administrators' engagement with ecohumanist design strategies in the creation of ecohumanist healthcare environments. Ten territories for engagement are presented that both individually and collectively express salient themes and streams of inquiry in theory and practice, within an operative framework placing the patient, the patient's significant others, and the caregiver at the center of the relationship between the built environment and occupant well-being.

  6. Designing a Virtual-Reality-Based, Gamelike Math Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinhao; Ke, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the design issues related to a virtual-reality-based, gamelike learning environment (VRGLE) developed via OpenSimulator, an open-source virtual reality server. The researchers collected qualitative data to examine the VRGLE's usability, playability, and content integration for math learning. They found it important…

  7. Design of Education Methods in a Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavich, Roman; Starichenko, Boris

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the presented article is to review existing approaches to modern training methods design and to create a variant of its technology in virtual educational environments in order to develop general cultural and professional students' competence in pedagogical education. The conceptual modeling of a set of methods for students' training…

  8. Virtual Worlds; Real Learning: Design Principles for Engaging Immersive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu (u. Sjarpm)

    2012-01-01

    The EMDT master's program at Full Sail University embarked on a small project to use a virtual environment to teach graduate students. The property used for this project has evolved our several iterations and has yielded some basic design principles and pedagogy for virtual spaces. As a result, students are emerging from the program with a better grasp of future possibilities.

  9. DESIGN ENGINEERING OF PRESCHOOL SUBJECT-DEVELOPING ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Lilia Nikolaevna Latipova

    2017-01-01

    The article examines the problems associated with design-engineering of preschool developing environment. The copyrights (authors) technologies are considered as an intensive method of adaptation and preparation of children for school. Purpose is to publicize innovative educational project implementing of Yelabuga Institute of Kazan (Volga) Federal University International Laboratory “Innovative technologies in the field of multicultural education” with distributed participation. Meth...

  10. The Mystery Tour; Exploring the Designed Environment with Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Richard C.; St. Clair, Alison Igo

    The Mystery Tour is a multi-sensory approach to the man-made environment. It is designed to acquaint children with historical significance of buildings and architecture and thus prepare them to participate in decisions concerning historical preservation. Developed through a grant from the national Endowment for the Arts, the Mystery Tour guides…

  11. Instructional Design Issues in a Distributed Collaborative Engineering Design (CED) Instructional Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Wu, Yiyan

    2010-01-01

    Changes in engineering practices have spawned changes in engineering education and prompted the use of distributed learning environments. A distributed collaborative engineering design (CED) course was designed to engage engineering students in learning about and solving engineering design problems. The CED incorporated an advanced interactive…

  12. Tracing Organic Carbon from the Terrestrial to Marine Environment via Coupled Stable Carbon Isotope and Lignin Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, L. B.; Blair, N. E.; Leithold, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Waipaoa sedimentary system of New Zealand offers an opportunity to study the impacts of tectonic, climatic and anthropogenic forcings on the export of organic carbon from land and its preservation in the seabed. The dominant sources of organic carbon from the watershed are sedimentary rocks, aged soils, and flora. Marine C is added to sediment mid-shelf. Differential export and burial of the organic C from the different sources provides an organic geochemical record of changes in terrestrial and marine processes. Analyses of four marine sediment cores collected near the mouth of the Waipaoa River by the MATACORE in 2006 reveal both downcore (temporal) as well as across shelf (spatial) trends in carbon isotope and lignin parameters. These trends, coupled with measurements from soil profiles, rocks and riverine suspended sediments reveal changes in organic carbon sources that relate to terrestrial mass wasting processes and plant succession. As examples, approximately 4 kyr ago an event characterized by increased woody gymnosperm input was captured. This event may have been initiated by extensive landsliding of forested terrain. Upcore from that interval, a shift to non-woody angiosperms is documented. This succession coincides with a period of volcanic eruptions and later, human intrusion.

  13. Designing presence for real locomotion in immersive virtual environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchet, Luca

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for designing systems for real locomotion in virtual environments (VEs) in order to achieve an intense sense of presence. The main outcome of the present research is a list of design features that the virtual reality technology should have in order to achieve...... that allows VE designers to evaluate the maturity of their systems and to pinpoint directions for future developments. A survey analysis was performed using the proposed framework, which involved three case studies to determine how many features of the proposed framework were present and their status...

  14. Design Of Robots For Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roston, Gerald P.

    1990-01-01

    Report discusses design of robots for use in zero gravity and vacuum, with attention to differences between requirements imposed on designs by outer space and by terrestrial applications. Terrestrial robots designed for multiple purposes and for minimal cost. Outer-space robots designed specialized to one task where cost has relatively low priority. Design optimal in one environment unlikely optimal in another.

  15. Landscape-scale conservation design across biotic realms: sequential integration of aquatic and terrestrial landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Paul B; Baldwin, Robert F; Hanks, R Daniel

    2017-11-06

    Systematic conservation planning has been used extensively throughout the world to identify important areas for maintaining biodiversity and functional ecosystems, and is well suited to address large-scale biodiversity conservation challenges of the twenty-first century. Systematic planning is necessary to bridge implementation, scale, and data gaps in a collaborative effort that recognizes competing land uses. Here, we developed a conservation planning process to identify and unify conservation priorities around the central and southern Appalachian Mountains as part of the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (App LCC). Through a participatory framework and sequential, cross-realm integration in spatial optimization modeling we highlight lands and waters that together achieve joint conservation goals from LCC partners for the least cost. This process was driven by a synthesis of 26 multi-scaled conservation targets and optimized for simultaneous representation inside the program Marxan to account for roughly 25% of the LCC geography. We identify five conservation design elements covering critical ecological processes and patterns including interconnected regions as well as the broad landscapes between them. Elements were then subjected to a cumulative threats index for possible prioritization. The evaluation of these elements supports multi-scaled decision making within the LCC planning community through a participatory, dynamic, and iterative process.

  16. ELISA, a demonstrator environment for information systems architecture design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panem, Chantal

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an approach of reusability of software engineering technology in the area of ground space system design. System engineers have lots of needs similar to software developers: sharing of a common data base, capitalization of knowledge, definition of a common design process, communication between different technical domains. Moreover system designers need to simulate dynamically their system as early as possible. Software development environments, methods and tools now become operational and widely used. Their architecture is based on a unique object base, a set of common management services and they host a family of tools for each life cycle activity. In late '92, CNES decided to develop a demonstrative software environment supporting some system activities. The design of ground space data processing systems was chosen as the application domain. ELISA (Integrated Software Environment for Architectures Specification) was specified as a 'demonstrator', i.e. a sufficient basis for demonstrations, evaluation and future operational enhancements. A process with three phases was implemented: system requirements definition, design of system architectures models, and selection of physical architectures. Each phase is composed of several activities that can be performed in parallel, with the provision of Commercial Off the Shelves Tools. ELISA has been delivered to CNES in January 94, currently used for demonstrations and evaluations on real projects (e.g. SPOT4 Satellite Control Center). It is on the way of new evolutions.

  17. DESIGN COORDINATION IN DISTRIBUTED ENVIRONMENTS USING VIRTUAL REALITY SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusdi HA

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research project, which investigates the use of virtual reality and computer communication technology to facilitate building design coordination in distributed environments. The emphasis of the system, called VR-based DEsign COordination (VRDECO is providing a communication tool that can be used by remote designers for settling ideas before they fully engage in concurrent engineering environments. VRDECO provides the necessary design tools, library of building elements and communication procedures, for designers from remote places to perform and coordinate their initial tasks. It has been implemented using available commercial software packages, and is used in designing a simple house. VRDECO facilitates the creation a preliminary design and simple communication with the client. There are, however, some difficulties in the development of the full version of VRDECO, i.e.: creating an adequate number of building elements, building specification database with a sufficient number of choices, and establishing a systematic rule to determine the parts of a building that are updateable.

  18. Designing equipment for use in gamma radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergriff, K.U.

    1990-05-01

    High levels of gamma radiation are known to cause degradation in a variety of materials and components. When designing systems to operate in a high radiation environment, special precautions and procedures should be followed. This report (1) outlines steps that should be followed in designing equipment and (2) explains the general effects of radiation on various engineering materials and components. Much information exists in the literature on radiation effects upon materials. However, very little information is available to give the designer a step-by-step process for designing systems that will be subject to high levels of gamma radiation, such as those found in a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In this report, many radiation effect references are relied upon to aid in the design of components and systems. 11 refs., 4 tabs

  19. Designing Equipment for Use in Gamma Radiation Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandergriff, K.U.

    1990-01-01

    High levels of gamma radiation are known to cause degradation in a variety of materials and components. When designing systems to operate in a high radiation environment, special precautions and procedures should be followed. This report (1) outlines steps that should be followed in designing equipment and (2) explains the general effects of radiation on various engineering materials and components. Much information exists in the literature on radiation effects upon materials. However, very little information is available to give the designer a step-by-step process for designing systems that will be subject to high levels of gamma radiation, such as those found in a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In this report, many radiation effect references are relied upon to aid in the design of components and systems.

  20. Terrestrial service environments for selected geographic locations. Final report. [1965--1974 data; to define solar array environment to aid in encapsulation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.E.; Carmichael, D.C.

    1976-06-24

    This report contains results obtained from analyses of climatic, precipitation, air pollution, and other environmental data for the years 1965 to 1974 at nine widely different geographic locations in the United States (Albuquerque, N.M.; Bismarck, N.D.; Boston, Mass.; Brownsville, TX.; Cleveland, OH; Fairbanks, AK; Los Angeles, CA; Miami, FL; and Phoenix, AZ). In addition to descriptive and diurnal statistics for 24 individual climatic variables, ''environmental cell'' statistics were computed to obtain the frequencies, durations, and transitions for the simultaneous occurrence of various combinations of environmental variables. Results are presented for the simultaneous occurrence of specific levels of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and insolation, in addition to representative results obtained for other combinations of variables. The results characterize the environmental conditions to which terrestrial solar arrays would be exposed over a 20-year lifetime, and serve to identify environmental factors and levels that can be used in testing candidate encapsulation materials and systems for such terrestrial exposures. An innovative methodology was applied to obtain these results for combinations of environmental variables. Because of its generality and demonstrated feasibility, it is concluded that the methodology also has broad applications to other testing programs.

  1. The Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA): Design and architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, John A., E-mail: turnerja@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Clarno, Kevin; Sieger, Matt; Bartlett, Roscoe; Collins, Benjamin [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Pawlowski, Roger; Schmidt, Rodney; Summers, Randall [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, is the system of physics capabilities being developed and deployed by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). CASL was established for the modeling and simulation of commercial nuclear reactors. VERA consists of integrating and interfacing software together with a suite of physics components adapted and/or refactored to simulate relevant physical phenomena in a coupled manner. VERA also includes the software development environment and computational infrastructure needed for these components to be effectively used. We describe the architecture of VERA from both software and numerical perspectives, along with the goals and constraints that drove major design decisions, and their implications. We explain why VERA is an environment rather than a framework or toolkit, why these distinctions are relevant (particularly for coupled physics applications), and provide an overview of results that demonstrate the use of VERA tools for a variety of challenging applications within the nuclear industry.

  2. A Design of Decentralized Control System in Unstructured Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daiki; Kageyama, Takashi; Suzuki, Jun; Tsuji, Toshiaki; Morisawa, Mitsuharu; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    Motion control is developed in control of industrial machines. However, some kind of machines working in an open environment are required in our future society. Then it is necessary to design general methodology for motion controller in open environment. In this paper, decentralized control system is applied as a motion controller for this purpose. This paper is constructed from two parts roughly: the first is a method to abstract environmental mode from environmental information, and the second is a method to design the motion controller with the environmental information. This paper applied this method to biped robot as a model case. The effectiveness of proposed method is confirmed by several simulation and experimental results.

  3. Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tom; Payne, J.; Doyle, M.

    The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), the biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council, established the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP) to address the need for coordinated and standardized monitoring of Arctic environments. The CBMP includes an international...... on developing and implementing long-term plans for monitoring the integrity of Arctic biomes: terrestrial, marine, freshwater, and coastal (under development) environments. The CBMP Terrestrial Expert Monitoring Group (CBMP-TEMG) has developed the Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan (CBMP......-Terrestrial Plan/the Plan) as the framework for coordinated, long-term Arctic terrestrial biodiversity monitoring. The goal of the CBMP-Terrestrial Plan is to improve the collective ability of Arctic traditional knowledge (TK) holders, northern communities, and scientists to detect, understand and report on long...

  4. Design of plant safety model in plant enterprise engineering environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbar, Hossam A.; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Shimada, Yukiyasu

    2001-01-01

    Plant enterprise engineering environment (PEEE) is an approach aiming to manage the plant through its lifecycle. In such environment, safety is considered as the common objective for all activities throughout the plant lifecycle. One approach to achieve plant safety is to embed safety aspects within each function and activity within such environment. One ideal way to enable safety aspects within each automated function is through modeling. This paper proposes a theoretical approach to design plant safety model as integrated with the plant lifecycle model within such environment. Object-oriented modeling approach is used to construct the plant safety model using OO CASE tool on the basis of unified modeling language (UML). Multiple views are defined for plant objects to express static, dynamic, and functional semantics of these objects. Process safety aspects are mapped to each model element and inherited from design to operation stage, as it is naturally embedded within plant's objects. By developing and realizing the plant safety model, safer plant operation can be achieved and plant safety can be assured

  5. GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE): A Concurrent Engineering Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Melissa L.; Kunkel, Matthew R.; Smith, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE) is a client-server software application purpose-built to mitigate issues associated with real time data sharing in concurrent engineering environments and to facilitate discipline-to-discipline interaction between multiple engineers and researchers. GLIDE is implemented in multiple programming languages utilizing standardized web protocols to enable secure parameter data sharing between engineers and researchers across the Internet in closed and/or widely distributed working environments. A well defined, HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) based Application Programming Interface (API) to the GLIDE client/server environment enables users to interact with GLIDE, and each other, within common and familiar tools. One such common tool, Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation), paired with its add-in API for GLIDE, is discussed in this paper. The top-level examples given demonstrate how this interface improves the efficiency of the design process of a concurrent engineering study while reducing potential errors associated with manually sharing information between study participants.

  6. Collaborative virtual reality environments for computational science and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papka, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    The authors are developing a networked, multi-user, virtual-reality-based collaborative environment coupled to one or more petaFLOPs computers, enabling the interactive simulation of 10 9 atom systems. The purpose of this work is to explore the requirements for this coupling. Through the design, development, and testing of such systems, they hope to gain knowledge that allows computational scientists to discover and analyze their results more quickly and in a more intuitive manner

  7. Designing discovery learning environments: process analysis and implications for designing an information system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Julius Marie; Limbach, R.; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the design process of authors of (simulation based) discovery learning environments was carried out. The analysis aimed at identifying the design activities of authors and categorising knowledge gaps that they experience. First, five existing studies were systematically

  8. COVE: a visual environment for ocean observatory design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grochow, K; Lazowska, E; Stoermer, M; Kelley, D; Delaney, J

    2008-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological ocean processes play a crucial role in determining Earth's environment. Unfortunately, our knowledge of these processes is limited because oceanography is carried out today largely the way it was a century ago: as expeditionary science, going to sea in ships and measuring a relatively small number of parameters (e.g., temperature, salinity, and pressure) as time and budget allow. The NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative is a US$330 million project that will help transform oceanography from a data-poor to a data-rich science. A cornerstone of this project is the deep water Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) that will be installed off the coasts of Washington and Oregon. The RSN will include 1500 km of fiber optic cable providing power and bandwidth to the seafloor and throughout the water column. Thousands of sensors will be deployed to stream data and imagery to shore, where they will be available in real time for ocean scientists and the public at large. The design of the RSN is a complex undertaking, requiring a combination of many different interactive tools and areas of visualization: geographic visualization to see the available seafloor bathymetry, scientific visualization to examine existing geospatially located datasets, layout tools to place the sensors, and collaborative tools to communicate across the team during the design. COVE, the Common Observatory Visualization Environment, is a visualization environment designed to meet all these needs. COVE has been built by computer scientists working closely with the engineering and scientific teams who will build and use the RSN. This paper discusses the data and activities of cabled observatory design, the design of COVE, and results from its use across the team

  9. Thermal insulating concrete wall panel design for sustainable built environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ao; Wong, Kwun-Wah; Lau, Denvid

    2014-01-01

    Air-conditioning system plays a significant role in providing users a thermally comfortable indoor environment, which is a necessity in modern buildings. In order to save the vast energy consumed by air-conditioning system, the building envelopes in envelope-load dominated buildings should be well designed such that the unwanted heat gain and loss with environment can be minimized. In this paper, a new design of concrete wall panel that enhances thermal insulation of buildings by adding a gypsum layer inside concrete is presented. Experiments have been conducted for monitoring the temperature variation in both proposed sandwich wall panel and conventional concrete wall panel under a heat radiation source. For further understanding the thermal effect of such sandwich wall panel design from building scale, two three-story building models adopting different wall panel designs are constructed for evaluating the temperature distribution of entire buildings using finite element method. Both the experimental and simulation results have shown that the gypsum layer improves the thermal insulation performance by retarding the heat transfer across the building envelopes.

  10. Multifunctional design of footwear for hot environment condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragcevic, Z.; Vujasinovic, E.; Hursa Sajatovic, A.

    2017-10-01

    For some time design of a new product is not connected only with aesthetic, artistic appearance but moreover with functionality and engineering (from rightful selection of materials, construction, and technological concept to prototyping). One good example of this is design of multifunctional footwear as well as hiking footwear, footwear for soldiers, police officers, first responders etc. All mentioned kinds of footwear have lot of specific requirements to fulfil starting from maintaining and enhancing mobility to maximizing protection and eliminating or minimizing the risk for the wearer. Therefore, designing appropriate footwear represents a great challenge not only for designers but for engineers as well. Having that entire in mind few years ago, Faculty of Textile Technology University of Zagreb started the research with the aim to develop 21st century multifunctional footwear for e.g. military, police, first respondents or any special human forces for different weather environment. The paper presents how it was done in the case of boots for hot environment conditions

  11. Evaluation of Standard Concepts Design of Library Interior Physical Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debri Harindya Putri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the function of a room is not only used as a shelter, the function of the room itself to be increased as a refreshing or relaxation area for users to follow the development of creativity and technology in the field of design. The comfortable factor becomes the main factor that indicates a successful process of creating a space. No exception library. The nature of library seemed stiff because of its function as a place to read, now can be developed and made into more dynamic with the special design concepts or color patterns used. Libraries can be created a special concept that suits the characteristics of the users themselves. Most users of the library, especially in college libraries are teenagers. Naturally, teenagers like to gather with their friends and we have to facilitate this activity in our library design concept. In addition we can also determine the needs of users through research by questionnaire method. The answers of users can be mapped and drawn conclusions. To explore the research, the author reviewed some literature about library interior design and observed the library of Ma Chung University as a case study. The combined results of the method can be concluded and the discovery of ideal standards of physical environment. So, the library can be made as a comfortable reading environment so as to increased interest in reading behavior and the frequent visits of students in the library

  12. Thermal Insulating Concrete Wall Panel Design for Sustainable Built Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ao; Wong, Kwun-Wah

    2014-01-01

    Air-conditioning system plays a significant role in providing users a thermally comfortable indoor environment, which is a necessity in modern buildings. In order to save the vast energy consumed by air-conditioning system, the building envelopes in envelope-load dominated buildings should be well designed such that the unwanted heat gain and loss with environment can be minimized. In this paper, a new design of concrete wall panel that enhances thermal insulation of buildings by adding a gypsum layer inside concrete is presented. Experiments have been conducted for monitoring the temperature variation in both proposed sandwich wall panel and conventional concrete wall panel under a heat radiation source. For further understanding the thermal effect of such sandwich wall panel design from building scale, two three-story building models adopting different wall panel designs are constructed for evaluating the temperature distribution of entire buildings using finite element method. Both the experimental and simulation results have shown that the gypsum layer improves the thermal insulation performance by retarding the heat transfer across the building envelopes. PMID:25177718

  13. Synthesis of the available information about the radioactive contamination of the Japanese terrestrial environment caused by the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident - May 25, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) collects and analyses regularly the published data concerning the contamination of the Japanese terrestrial environment caused by the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant accident. This synthesis presents a status of the data recently obtained since the previous similar note of April 12. The note presents a mapping of 137 Cs and 134 Cs cumulated deposits in a 80 km area around the damaged power plant, an estimation of the cumulated atmospheric precipitations during March 15-16 night, the evolution of the gamma dose rates in the ambient air of several towns of the Fukushima district, the evolution of the 134 Cs+ 137 Cs and 131 I contamination of agriculture food products and of surface and drinking waters. (J.S.)

  14. Technical progress report of biological research on the Volcanic Island Surtsey and environment for the year 1976. [Recovery of terrestrial ecosystem on volcanic island following volcano eruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridriksson, S.

    1976-01-01

    The study involves the terrestrial biological research on the volcanic island, Surtsey, off the coast of Iceland and the neighbouring islands and environs of the Westman Islands, which are situated on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. An eruption of the volcano in 1973 is studied. The topographical changes on Surtsey were studied in August 1976. It is evident that the southwestern side is constantly being eroded and that the island decreases in area of some 7.5 hectares per year. Results are reported from studies of microorganisms, algae, lichens, moss, vascular plants, insects, birds, and soil, and the nitrogen cycle. Emphasis was placed on revegetation and recolonization of plants, insects, and sea birds.

  15. User-centered virtual environment design for virtual rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzo Albert A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As physical and cognitive rehabilitation protocols utilizing virtual environments transition from single applications to comprehensive rehabilitation programs there is a need for a new design cycle methodology. Current human-computer interaction designs focus on usability without benchmarking technology within a user-in-the-loop design cycle. The field of virtual rehabilitation is unique in that determining the efficacy of this genre of computer-aided therapies requires prior knowledge of technology issues that may confound patient outcome measures. Benchmarking the technology (e.g., displays or data gloves using healthy controls may provide a means of characterizing the "normal" performance range of the virtual rehabilitation system. This standard not only allows therapists to select appropriate technology for use with their patient populations, it also allows them to account for technology limitations when assessing treatment efficacy. Methods An overview of the proposed user-centered design cycle is given. Comparisons of two optical see-through head-worn displays provide an example of benchmarking techniques. Benchmarks were obtained using a novel vision test capable of measuring a user's stereoacuity while wearing different types of head-worn displays. Results from healthy participants who performed both virtual and real-world versions of the stereoacuity test are discussed with respect to virtual rehabilitation design. Results The user-centered design cycle argues for benchmarking to precede virtual environment construction, especially for therapeutic applications. Results from real-world testing illustrate the general limitations in stereoacuity attained when viewing content using a head-worn display. Further, the stereoacuity vision benchmark test highlights differences in user performance when utilizing a similar style of head-worn display. These results support the need for including benchmarks as a means of better

  16. Interaction Design in the Built Environment: Designing for the 'Universal User'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Concepts of responsive architecture have to date largely involved response to environmental context, in order to mediate ambient environmental factors and modify internal conditions for the comfort of users, with energy efficiency and sustainability as the main impetus. 'Smart' buildings often address little other than technically functional issues, with any ideas of 'design' as a unifying factor being disregarded. At the same time, music and performance art have been in the vanguard of creating digital interaction that intimately involves the user in aesthetic outcomes, in the creation of what Umberto Eco describes as an 'Open Work'. Environments made responsive through embedment of computational technologies can similarly extend usability and user-centred design towards universality, through careful consideration of the relationship between person, context and activity, and of the continuous and ultimately transactional nature of human occupation of built environment. Truly 'smart' environments will learn from and through usage, and can be conceived and designed so as to maximise environmental 'fit' for a wider variety of users, including people described as being 'neurodiverse'. Where user response becomes a significant component in managing a smart environment, the transactional relationship between user and environment is made explicit, and can ultimately be used to drive interaction that favours ease-of-use and personalisation. Inclusion of affective computing in human interaction with built environment offers significant potential for extending the boundaries of Universal Design to include people with autism, people with intellectual disability, and users with acquired cognitive impairment, including that arising from dementia. The same users frequently have issues with sensory-perceptual sensitivity and processing. The resulting mismatch between their individual needs and abilities, and the environments they typically occupy, can give rise to states of

  17. A framework for designing and improving learning environments fostering creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Ishii

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a framework for designing and improving learning environment for creativity in engineering. The framework consists of the following three components: instructional design based on knowledge from psychology, development of systems for supporting creative activities, and objective evaluation of learning results related to creativity. Based on that framework, we design and practice course based in the programation of a robot at a Japan University in the 2004 academic year. As a result, we confirm the following two advantages of our framework: learners' idea generation skills were improved and their meta-cognitive activities were also activated. In the 2005 academic year, we improve the course based on 2004 results. As a result, we confirm that the number of uploads of activity data from students have increased in the 2005 course, students' reflection sheets have become more detailed, and their volume of information have also increased.

  18. The distribution of tritium in the terrestrial and aquatic environments of the Creys-Malville nuclear power plant (2002-2005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Baptiste, P.; Baumier, D.; Fourre, E.; Dapoigny, A.; Clavel, B.

    2007-01-01

    The Creys-Malville nuclear plant, located on the left bank of the Rhone, was shut down in 1998. The facilities are currently in their initial stage of dismantling. In order to establish a baseline for tritium in the vicinity of the site prior to the main dismantling phase, we carried out a monitoring program between 2002 and 2005 in the main terrestrial and aquatic compartments of the local environment. Tritium levels in the groundwaters and in the Rhone waters correspond to the regional tritium concentration in precipitation. The data obtained for the terrestrial environment are also in good agreement with the regional background and do not show any specific signature linked to the nuclear plant. The various aquatic compartments of the Rhone (fish, plant, sediment) are significantly enriched in tritium both upstream and downstream of the power plant: although Tissue-Free Water Tritium concentrations are in equilibrium with the river water, the non-exchangeable fraction of organic bound tritium in plants and fishes shows values which outpace the river water background by one to two orders of magnitude, and up to four to five orders of magnitude in the sediments. This tritium anomaly is not related to the nuclear plant, as it is already present at the Swiss border 100 km upstream of the site. Although fine particles of tritiated polystyrene entering the composition of the luminous paints used by the clock industry have been suspected on several occasions, the exact nature and the origin of this tritium source remain unknown and require further investigations

  19. Design of marine structures with improved safety for environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanac, Alan; Varsta, Petri

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes a method for design of marine structures with increased safety for environment, considering also the required investment costs as well as the aspects of risk distribution onto the maritime stakeholders. Practically, the paper seeks to answer what is the optimal amount that should be invested into certain safety measure for any given vessel. Due to the uneven distribution of risk, as well as the differing impact of costs emerging from safety improvements, stakeholders experience conflicting ranking of alternatives. To solve this multi-stakeholder decision-making problem, in which each stakeholder is a decision-maker, the method applies concepts of group decision-making theory, namely the Game Theory. The method fosters axiomatic definition of the optimum solution, arguing that the solution, or the final selected design, should satisfy the non-dominance, efficiency, and fairness. These three are thoroughly discussed in terms of structural design, especially the latter. Considering the coupling of environmental risk and structural design, the method also builds on the preference structure of four maritime stakeholders: yards, owners, oil receivers and the public, who either share the risks or directly influence structural design. Method is presented on a practical study of structural design of a tanker with a crashworthy side structure that is capable of reducing the risk of collision. The outcome of this study outlines a number of possibilities for successful improvement of tanker safety that can benefit, concurrently, all maritime stakeholders.

  20. Inferring Large-Scale Terrestrial Water Storage Through GRACE and GPS Data Fusion in Cloud Computing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rude, C. M.; Li, J. D.; Gowanlock, M.; Herring, T.; Pankratius, V.

    2016-12-01

    Surface subsidence due to depletion of groundwater can lead to permanent compaction of aquifers and damaged infrastructure. However, studies of such effects on a large scale are challenging and compute intensive because they involve fusing a variety of data sets beyond direct measurements from groundwater wells, such as gravity change measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) or surface displacements measured by GPS receivers. Our work therefore leverages Amazon cloud computing to enable these types of analyses spanning the entire continental US. Changes in groundwater storage are inferred from surface displacements measured by GPS receivers stationed throughout the country. Receivers located on bedrock are anti-correlated with changes in water levels from elastic deformation due to loading, while stations on aquifers correlate with groundwater changes due to poroelastic expansion and compaction. Correlating linearly detrended equivalent water thickness measurements from GRACE with linearly detrended and Kalman filtered vertical displacements of GPS stations located throughout the United States helps compensate for the spatial and temporal limitations of GRACE. Our results show that the majority of GPS stations are negatively correlated with GRACE in a statistically relevant way, as most GPS stations are located on bedrock in order to provide stable reference locations and measure geophysical processes such as tectonic deformations. Additionally, stations located on the Central Valley California aquifer show statistically significant positive correlations. Through the identification of positive and negative correlations, deformation phenomena can be classified as loading or poroelastic expansion due to changes in groundwater. This method facilitates further studies of terrestrial water storage on a global scale. This work is supported by NASA AIST-NNX15AG84G (PI: V. Pankratius) and Amazon.

  1. Application of Terrestrial Ecosystem Monitoring under the CAFF Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program: Designing and Implementing Terrestrial Monitoring to Establish the Canadian High Arctic Research Station as a Flagship Arctic Environmental Monitoring Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, D.; Kehler, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) is scheduled for completion in July 2017 and is the northern science component of Polar Knowledge Canada (POLAR). A mandated goal for POLAR is to establish the adjacent Experimental and Reference Area (ERA) as an Arctic Flagship monitoring site that will track change in Arctic terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. Situated in the community of Cambridge Bay, CHARS provides the opportunity to draw on the Indigenous Knowledge of local residents to help design and conduct the monitoring, and to operate 12 months a year. Monitoring at CHARS will be linked to networks nationally and internationally, and is being designed so that change in key indicators can be understood in terms of drivers and processes, modeled and scaled up regionally, and used to predict important changes in critical indicators. As a partner in the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP), the monitoring design for terrestrial ecosystems follows approaches outlined by the CBMP Terrestrial Expert Monitoring Group, who have listed key monitoring questions and identified a list of important Focal Ecosystem Components (FECs). To link drivers to FECs we are proposing a multi-scaled approach: 1) an Intensive Monitoring Area to establish replicated monitoring plots that track change in snow depth and condition, active layer depth, soil temperature, soil moisture, and soil solution chemistry that are spatially and temporally linked to changes in microbiological activity, CO2/CH4 net ecosystem flux, vegetation relative frequency, species composition, growth and foliar nutrient concentration, arthropod abundance, lemming abundance and health, and shorebird/songbird abundance and productivity. 2) These intensive observations are supported by watershed scale measures that will monitor, during the growing season, lemming winter nest abundance, songbird, shorebird and waterfowl staging and nesting, and other observations; in the winter we will

  2. Terrestrial Analogs to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.; Arcone, S.; Arvidson, R. W.; Baker, V.; Barlow, N. G.; Beaty, D.; Bell, M. S.; Blankenship, D. D.; Bridges, N.; Briggs, G.; Bulmer, M.; Carsey, F.; Clifford, S. M.; Craddock, R. A.; Dickerson, P. W.; Duxbury, N.; Galford, G. L.; Garvin, J.; Grant, J.; Green, J. R.; Gregg, T. K. P.; Guinness, E.; Hansen, V. L.; Hecht, M. H.; Holt, J.; Howard, A.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Lee, P.; Lanagan, P. D.; Lentz, R. C. F.; Leverington, D. W.; Marinangeli, L.; Moersch, J. E.; Morris-Smith, P. A.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Olhoeft, G. R.; Ori, G. G.; Paillou, P.; Reilly, J. F., II; Rice, J. W., Jr.; Robinson, C. A.; Sheridan, M.; Snook, K.; Thomson, B. J.; Watson, K.; Williams, K.; Yoshikawa, K.

    2002-08-01

    It is well recognized that interpretations of Mars must begin with the Earth as a reference. The most successful comparisons have focused on understanding geologic processes on the Earth well enough to extrapolate to Mars' environment. Several facets of terrestrial analog studies have been pursued and are continuing. These studies include field workshops, characterization of terrestrial analog sites, instrument tests, laboratory measurements (including analysis of Martian meteorites), and computer and laboratory modeling. The combination of all these activities allows scientists to constrain the processes operating in specific terrestrial environments and extrapolate how similar processes could affect Mars. The Terrestrial Analogs for Mars Community Panel has considered the following two key questions: (1) How do terrestrial analog studies tie in to the Mars Exploration Payload Assessment Group science questions about life, past climate, and geologic evolution of Mars, and (2) How can future instrumentation be used to address these questions. The panel has considered the issues of data collection, value of field workshops, data archiving, laboratory measurements and modeling, human exploration issues, association with other areas of solar system exploration, and education and public outreach activities.

  3. Design of the Resources and Environment Monitoring Website in Kashgar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z; Lin, Q Z; Wang, Q J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the development of the web geographical information system (web GIS), many useful spatial analysis functions are ignored in the system implementation. As Kashgar is rich in natural resources, it is of great significance to monitor the ample natural resource and environment situation in the region. Therefore, with multiple uses of spatial analysis, resources and environment monitoring website of Kashgar was built. Functions of water, vegetation, ice and snow extraction, task management, change assessment as well as thematic mapping and reports based on TM remote sensing images were implemented in the website. The design of the website was presented based on database management tier, the business logic tier and the top-level presentation tier. The vital operations of the website were introduced and the general performance was evaluated

  4. Design requirements for ubiquitous computing environments for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bång, Magnus; Larsson, Anders; Eriksson, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing environments can support clinical administrative routines in new ways. The aim of such computing approaches is to enhance routine physical work, thus it is important to identify specific design requirements. We studied healthcare professionals in an emergency room and developed the computer-augmented environment NOSTOS to support teamwork in that setting. NOSTOS uses digital pens and paper-based media as the primary input interface for data capture and as a means of controlling the system. NOSTOS also includes a digital desk, walk-up displays, and sensor technology that allow the system to track documents and activities in the workplace. We propose a set of requirements and discuss the value of tangible user interfaces for healthcare personnel. Our results suggest that the key requirements are flexibility in terms of system usage and seamless integration between digital and physical components. We also discuss how ubiquitous computing approaches like NOSTOS can be beneficial in the medical workplace.

  5. Design for the environment - do we get the focus right?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Jeswiet, Jack; Alting, Leo

    2004-01-01

    Sometimes, products resulting from design for environment (DFE) endeavours are sub-optimisations from an environmental perspective, because the tool determines the process and not vice versa. For a more systematic way of getting the focus right, a hierarchy of focusing is introduced: 1. What...... is the function provided and what is the optimal way of providing it while making a business out of it? Which product should the company then produce? 2. Where are the “environmental hot spots” in the life cycle of this product? 3. Which DFE tool supports optimisation of the product by reducing these hot spots?...

  6. Strategic implementation of design for environment at Embraer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; Grandi, Carlos M.; Rozenfeld, Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Design for Environment (or ecodesign) has become increasingly important in the aircraft industry. Embraer, one of the world’s leading aircraft manufacturers, is committed to improve the environmental performance of the developed aircrafts. The roadmap for the strategic implementation of Df......E at Embraer, developed based on the application of the Ecodesign Maturity Model (EcoM2), is presented and further discussed in this paper. The paper describes the main projects and activities carried out at the company so to develop robust processes for the development of products with a better environmental...

  7. A Review on the Toxicity and Non-Target Effects of Macrocyclic Lactones in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Lumaret, Jean-Pierre; Errouissi, Faiek; Floate, Kevin; Römbke, Jörg; Wardhaugh, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The avermectins, milbemycins and spinosyns are collectively referred to as macrocyclic lactones (MLs) which comprise several classes of chemicals derived from cultures of soil micro-organisms. These compounds are extensively and increasingly used in veterinary medicine and agriculture. Due to their potential effects on non-target organisms, large amounts of information on their impact in the environment has been compiled in recent years, mainly caused by legal requirements related to their ma...

  8. Design and Implementation of an Extensible Learner-Adaptive Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Nakabayashi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and implementation of a flexible architecture that is capable of extending the functions of a learner-adaptive self-learning environment. A “courseware object”, which is a program module that is used to implement various educational functionalities, has been newly introduced to ensure both function extensibility as well as content reusability. A prototype system was designed and implemented to investigate the feasibility of the proposed architecture and to identify the core behavior and interaction schema of courseware objects. The results from this trial indicated that several learner-adaptive functionalities including the SCORM 2004 standard specifications will be able to be successfully implemented into the proposed architecture.

  9. Designing Collaborative E-Learning Environments Based upon Semantic Wiki: From Design Models to Application Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Dong, Mingkai; Huang, Ronghuai

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge society requires life-long learning and flexible learning environment that enables fast, just-in-time and relevant learning, aiding the development of communities of knowledge, linking learners and practitioners with experts. Based upon semantic wiki, a combination of wiki and Semantic Web technology, this paper designs and develops…

  10. Architectural Design and the Learning Environment: A Framework for School Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gislason, Neil

    2010-01-01

    This article develops a theoretical framework for studying how instructional space, teaching and learning are related in practice. It is argued that a school's physical design can contribute to the quality of the learning environment, but several non-architectural factors also determine how well a given facility serves as a setting for teaching…

  11. Designing and Improving a Blended Synchronous Learning Environment: An Educational Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiyun; Lang Quek, Choon; Hu, Xiaoyong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a blended synchronous learning environment (BSLE) was created to support a group of graduate students when they were taking a course. Instruction was delivered to both face-to-face (F2F) and online students simultaneously. The purpose of this paper is to present how this BSLE was gradually designed, implemented, and improved by…

  12. The transfer of radionuclides in the terrestrial environments. Recent research results in monsoon tropical condition of Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Y, Truong; Sieu, Le Nhu; Ngo, Nguyen Trong; Phuc, Nguyen Van; Huong, Mai Thi; Quang, Nguyen Hao; Nhan, Dang Duc

    2003-01-01

    The data on Radionuclide transfer parameters in the environments, which are used in radioecological models, are very necessary for setting release limits of radioactive effluent and assessing the radiation dose to Man related to the releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities. They strongly depend on climatic, geographic, environmental and pedological conditions. For temperate environments, they are abundant and have been established fairly well. Meanwhile the literature data are still scare and dispersal for Tropical and Sub-tropical zones. Besides, the improvement of Environmental Transfer Models and Parameters is an important problem so that they may be adapted for Southeast Asian countries including Japan as environmental conditions and foodstuffs in this Region are significantly different from those in Europe and North America. The paper presents measurements results of the dry deposition velocities of atmospheric aerosols carrying 7 Be, 137 Cs radionuclides and measurements results of soil to plant transfer factors (TF) for 60 Co, 65 Zn, 85 ASr and 134 Cs resulted from the out door radiotracer experiments with large pots. The selected soil types (Podzolic, Ferralitic, Ferralic Acrisols, Eutric Fluvisols and Orthi-thionic Fluvisols soil) and the plants (rice, black bean, cabbage, lettuce, tomato, cucumber, carrot, white radish, potato) used for the research are the most common in Vietnam. The measured Vg values (cm/s) are in the range of 0.01 - 1.84 for 7 Be and 1.95 - 49.77 for 137 Cs. An analysis of the associated meteorological parameters showed some correlations between 7 Be Vg with humidity and 137 Cs Vg with wind velocity. More than 400 TF (edible part) values were determined and their dependences on some soil parameters have been shown. (author)

  13. Great Expectations - Does worker participation in design enhance the integration of working environment and work life issues into design?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Iben Posniak

    Does worker participation in design enhance the integration of working environment and work life aspects into design? The interrelation between worker participation in design and the integration of working environment or work life aspects have been studied for decades within different traditions. I...... in the design process and the object of design have not been computer artefacts or systems but workplace design and redesign of product series. The design process in the two cases has included physical working environment aspects but contrary to participatory ergonomics, psychosocial working environment...... and work life aspects have been included in the participatory design processes. Perhaps the most important difference between the participatory design process in the two cases and the three traditions is that working environment and work life aspects were implicit at the agenda of the participatory design...

  14. Ethics, design and planning of the built environment

    CERN Document Server

    Moroni, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The book proposes a set of original contributions in research areas shared by planning theory, architectural research, design and ethical inquiry. The contributors gathered in 2010 at the Ethics of the Built Environment seminar organized by the editors at Delft University of Technology. Both prominent and emerging scholars presented their researches in the areas of aesthetics, technological risks, planning theory and architecture. The scope of the seminar was highlighting shared lines of ethical inquiry among the themes discussed, in order to identify perspectives of innovative interdisciplinary research. After the seminar all seminar participants have elaborated their proposed contributions. Some of the most prominent international authors in the field were subsequently invited to join in with this inquiry. Claudia Basta teaches "Network Infrastructures and Mobility" at Wageningen University. Between 2009 and 2011 she worked as Coordinator of the 3TU Centre of Excellence for Ethics and Technology of Delft Un...

  15. Design and Testing of Electronic Devices for Harsh Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Nico, Costantino

    This thesis reports an overview and the main results of the research activity carried out within the PhD programme in Information Engineering of the University of Pisa (2010-2012). The research activity has been focused on different fields, including Automotive and High Energy Physics experiments, according to a common denominator: the development of electroni c devices and systems operating in harsh environments. There are many applications that forc e the adoption of design methodologies and strategies focused on this type of envir onments: military, biom edical, automotive, industrial and space. The development of solutions fulfilling specific operational requirements, therefore represents an interesting field of research. The first research activity has been framed within the ATHENIS project, funded by the CORDIS Commission of the European Community, and aiming at the development of a System-on-Chip, a r egulator for alternators employed on vehicles, presenting both configurability an d t...

  16. Exascale Co-design for Modeling Materials in Extreme Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germann, Timothy C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-08

    Computational materials science has provided great insight into the response of materials under extreme conditions that are difficult to probe experimentally. For example, shock-induced plasticity and phase transformation processes in single-crystal and nanocrystalline metals have been widely studied via large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, and many of these predictions are beginning to be tested at advanced 4th generation light sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). I will describe our simulation predictions and their recent verification at LCLS, outstanding challenges in modeling the response of materials to extreme mechanical and radiation environments, and our efforts to tackle these as part of the multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx). ExMatEx has initiated an early and deep collaboration between domain (computational materials) scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and hardware architects, in order to establish the relationships between algorithms, software stacks, and architectures needed to enable exascale-ready materials science application codes within the next decade. We anticipate that we will be able to exploit hierarchical, heterogeneous architectures to achieve more realistic large-scale simulations with adaptive physics refinement, and are using tractable application scale-bridging proxy application testbeds to assess new approaches and requirements. Such current scale-bridging strategies accumulate (or recompute) a distributed response database from fine-scale calculations, in a top-down rather than bottom-up multiscale approach.

  17. Designing for Change: Interoperability in a scaling and adapting environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth Science cyberinfrastructure landscape is constantly changing. Technologies advance and technical implementations are refined or replaced. Data types, volumes, packaging, and use cases evolve. Scientific requirements emerge and mature. Standards shift while systems scale and adapt. In this complex and dynamic environment, interoperability remains a critical component of successful cyberinfrastructure. Through the resource- and priority-driven iterations on systems, interfaces, and content, questions fundamental to stable and useful Earth Science cyberinfrastructure arise. For instance, how are sociotechnical changes planned, tracked, and communicated? How should operational stability balance against 'new and shiny'? How can ongoing maintenance and mitigation of technical debt be managed in an often short-term resource environment? The Arctic Data Explorer is a metadata brokering application developed to enable discovery of international, interdisciplinary Arctic data across distributed repositories. Completely dependent on interoperable third party systems, the Arctic Data Explorer publicly launched in 2013 with an original 3000+ data records from four Arctic repositories. Since then the search has scaled to 25,000+ data records from thirteen repositories at the time of writing. In the final months of original project funding, priorities shift to lean operations with a strategic eye on the future. Here we present lessons learned from four years of Arctic Data Explorer design, development, communication, and maintenance work along with remaining questions and potential directions.

  18. Contaminant exposure in terrestrial vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Philip N.; Cobb, George P.; Godard-Codding, Celine; Hoff, Dale; McMurry, Scott T.; Rainwater, Thomas R.; Reynolds, Kevin D.

    2007-01-01

    Here we review mechanisms and factors influencing contaminant exposure among terrestrial vertebrate wildlife. There exists a complex mixture of biotic and abiotic factors that dictate potential for contaminant exposure among terrestrial and semi-terrestrial vertebrates. Chemical fate and transport in the environment determine contaminant bioaccessibility. Species-specific natural history characteristics and behavioral traits then play significant roles in the likelihood that exposure pathways, from source to receptor, are complete. Detailed knowledge of natural history traits of receptors considered in conjunction with the knowledge of contaminant behavior and distribution on a site are critical when assessing and quantifying exposure. We review limitations in our understanding of elements of exposure and the unique aspects of exposure associated with terrestrial and semi-terrestrial taxa. We provide insight on taxa-specific traits that contribute, or limit exposure to, transport phenomenon that influence exposure throughout terrestrial systems, novel contaminants, bioavailability, exposure data analysis, and uncertainty associated with exposure in wildlife risk assessments. Lastly, we identify areas related to exposure among terrestrial and semi-terrestrial organisms that warrant additional research. - Both biotic and abiotic factors determine chemical exposure for terrestrial vertebrates

  19. Automated design synthesis of robotic/human workcells for improved manufacturing system design in hazardous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Joshua M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-12

    Manufacturing tasks that are deemed too hazardous for workers require the use of automation, robotics, and/or other remote handling tools. The associated hazards may be radiological or nonradiological, and based on the characteristics of the environment and processing, a design may necessitate robotic labor, human labor, or both. There are also other factors such as cost, ergonomics, maintenance, and efficiency that also effect task allocation and other design choices. Handling the tradeoffs of these factors can be complex, and lack of experience can be an issue when trying to determine if and what feasible automation/robotics options exist. To address this problem, we utilize common engineering design approaches adapted more for manufacturing system design in hazardous environments. We limit our scope to the conceptual and embodiment design stages, specifically a computational algorithm for concept generation and early design evaluation. In regard to concept generation, we first develop the functional model or function structure for the process, using the common 'verb-noun' format for describing function. A common language or functional basis for manufacturing was developed and utilized to formalize function descriptions and guide rules for function decomposition. Potential components for embodiment are also grouped in terms of this functional language and are stored in a database. The properties of each component are given as quantitative and qualitative criteria. Operators are also rated for task-relevant criteria which are used to address task compatibility. Through the gathering of process requirements/constraints, construction of the component database, and development of the manufacturing basis and rule set, design knowledge is stored and available for computer use. Thus, once the higher level process functions are defined, the computer can automate the synthesis of new design concepts through alternating steps of embodiment and function structure

  20. Understanding Creative Design Processes by Integrating Sketching and CAD Modelling Design Environments: A Preliminary Protocol Result from Architectural Designers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Teng Shih

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a preliminary protocol study of the cognitive behaviour of architectural designers during the design process. The aim is to better understand the similarities and differences in cognitive behaviour using Sequential Mixed Media (SMM and Alternative Mixed Media (AMM approaches, and how switching between media may impact on design processes. Two participants with at least one-year’s professional design experience and a Bachelor of Design degree, and competence in both sketching and computer-aid design (CAD modelling participated in the study. Video recordings of participants working on different projects were coded using the Function-Behaviour-Structure (FBS coding scheme. Participants were also interviewed and their explanations about their switching behaviours were categorised into three types: S→C, S/C↹R and C→S. Preliminary results indicate that switching between media may influence how designers identify problems and develop solutions. In particular, two design issues were identified.  These relate to the FBS coding scheme, where structure (S and behaviour derived from structure (Bs, change to documentation (D after switching from sketching to CAD modelling (S→C. These switches make it possible for designers to integrate both approaches into one design medium and facilitate their design processes in AMM design environments.

  1. Synthesis of the available information about the radioactive contamination of the Japanese terrestrial environment caused by the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident - July 13, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) collects and analyses regularly the published data concerning the contamination of the Japanese terrestrial environment caused by the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant accident. This synthesis presents a status of the data recently obtained since the previous similar notes of April 12 and May 25. The note presents the detailed activity analysis of several surface soil samples (Iitate Maeda, Namie, Hirono, Fukushima..), a mapping of 137 Cs and 134 Cs cumulated deposits in a 80 km area around the damaged power plant, the evolution of radioactive deposits since March 2011 in different places (Fukushima, Hitachinaka, Saitama, Utsunomiya), the evolution of the 134 Cs+ 137 Cs and 131 I contamination of agriculture food products and of drinking water. The IRSN has detected also a significant contamination of some tea samples imported from the Omaezaki region and intercepted by the French customs. Some information about tea and bamboo shoots cultivation and processing in Japan is added in appendix. (J.S.)

  2. Game Design Narrative for Learning: Appropriating Adventure Game Design Narrative Devices and Techniques for the Design of Interactive Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual analysis is to investigate how contemporary video and computer games might inform instructional design by looking at how narrative devices and techniques support problem solving within complex, multimodal environments. Specifically, this analysis presents a brief overview of game genres and the role of narrative in…

  3. Factors related to the design and implementation of an 'design for environment' process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skelton, Kristen; Knitl, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, Siemens AG has systematically built up the topic of environmental protection within its core functions. The company is currently expanding its focus by including additional product and supply related environmental activities to enable strategic and inclusive decisions. Most...... recently, the Energy Sector of Siemens AG developed a Design for Environment (DfE) process based on ISO/TR 14062 to integrate environmental issues into product design and development. This paper briefly presents the DfE process and the feedback that was gathered from engineers as input to improve...

  4. Terrestrial magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, D.C.; Agarwal, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a review about terrestrial magnetosphere. During the last few years considerable investigation have been carried out about the properties of Solar Wind and its interaction with planetary magnetic fields. It is therefore of high importance to accumulate all the investigations in a comprehensive form. The paper reviews the property of earth's magnetosphere, magnetosheath, magneto pause, polar cusps, bow shook and plasma sheath. (author)

  5. Review of Opinions of Math Teachers Concerning the Learning Environment That They Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bünyamin; Yavuz, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Design of appropriate learning environment has a significant importance in creation of aims of the math teaching. In the design of learning environments, teachers play a significant role. The aim of this study is determination of opinions of the math teachers concerning the learning environment that they design. In accordance with this aim, an…

  6. Working group 4: Terrestrial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    A working group at a Canada/USA symposium on climate change and the Arctic identified major concerns and issues related to terrestrial resources. The group examined the need for, and the means of, involving resource managers and users at local and territorial levels in the process of identifying and examining the impacts and consequences of climatic change. Climatic change will be important to the Arctic because of the magnitude of the change projected for northern latitudes; the apparent sensitivity of its terrestrial ecosystems, natural resources, and human support systems; and the dependence of the social, cultural, and economic welfare of Arctic communities, businesses, and industries on the health and quality of their environment. Impacts of climatic change on the physical, biological, and associated socio-economic environment are outlined. Gaps in knowledge needed to quantify these impacts are listed along with their relationships with resource management. Finally, potential actions for response and adaptation are presented

  7. A Formal Approach to Domain-Oriented Software Design Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael; Philpot, Andrew; Pressburger, Thomas; Underwood, Ian; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a formal approach to domain-oriented software design environments, based on declarative domain theories, formal specifications, and deductive program synthesis. A declarative domain theory defines the semantics of a domain-oriented specification language and its relationship to implementation-level subroutines. Formal specification development and reuse is made accessible to end-users through an intuitive graphical interface that guides them in creating diagrams denoting formal specifications. The diagrams also serve to document the specifications. Deductive program synthesis ensures that end-user specifications are correctly implemented. AMPHION has been applied to the domain of solar system kinematics through the development of a declarative domain theory, which includes an axiomatization of JPL's SPICELIB subroutine library. Testing over six months with planetary scientists indicates that AMPHION's interactive specification acquisition paradigm enables users to develop, modify, and reuse specifications at least an order of magnitude more rapidly than manual program development. Furthermore, AMPHION synthesizes one to two page programs consisting of calls to SPICELIB subroutines from these specifications in just a few minutes. Test results obtained by metering AMPHION's deductive program synthesis component are examined. AMPHION has been installed at JPL and is currently undergoing further refinement in preparation for distribution to hundreds of SPICELIB users worldwide. Current work to support end-user customization of AMPHION's specification acquisition subsystem is briefly discussed, as well as future work to enable domain-expert creation of new AMPHION applications through development of suitable domain theories.

  8. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  9. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10-23 Hz-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  10. Solid waste deposits as a significant source of contaminants of emerging concern to the aquatic and terrestrial environments - A developing country case study from Owerri, Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arukwe, Augustine, E-mail: arukwe@bio.ntnu.no [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Hogskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Eggen, Trine [Bioforsk, Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Postveien 213, N-4353 Klepp St. (Norway); Moeder, Monika [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research UFZ, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    isomers), metabolites of non-ionic surfactants (nonylphenol-polyethoxylates), UV-filter compound ethyl methoxy cinnamate (EHMC) and bisphenol A (BPA) were particularly determined in the sediment samples at high {mu}g/kg dry weight concentration. Measuring contaminants in such areas will help in increasing governmental, societal and industrial awareness on the extent and seriousness of the contamination both at waste disposal sites and surrounding terrestrial and aquatic environments. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid waste management in developing countries Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid waste as a significant source of contaminants of emerging concern Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contaminant leaching from solid waste to surrounding environment Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection of several contaminants of emerging concern and with endocrine-disrupting activities Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phthalates are the dominant contaminant group with concentrations that are comparable with other countries.

  11. Methodology for Determining the Acceptability of Given Designs in Uncertain Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.; Pierreval, H.; Zhang, J.

    2009-01-01

    Managers wish to verify that a particular engineering design meets their require- ments. This design's future environment will differ from the environment assumed during the design. Therefore it is crucial to determine which variations in the envi- ronment may make this design unacceptable. The

  12. Restorative Virtual Environment Design for Augmenting Nursing Home Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Serafin, Stefania; Kofoed, Lise

    2016-01-01

    do, but more studies on content and design of proper custom designs for RVEs is necessary. This paper reviews the background for RVE design, describes four custom RVE designs for recreational VE exploration and presents user preferences among nursing home users concerning content and other pivotal...... design considerations....

  13. A social sustainability approach to birth environment design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jangaard, Karin; Folmer, Mette Blicher

    RESEARCH PROCESS Measuring on welness, lifequality and experience of user involvement in all processes. DESIGN PROCESS Research and design thinking USERINVOLVEMENT Ownership of design solutions CARE MODEL / ORGANISATION Humanity, vison for care and tre...

  14. On public space design for Chinese urban residential area based on integrated architectural physics environment evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J. Y.; Cheng, W.; Ma, C. P.; Tan, Y. T.; Xin, L. S.

    2017-04-01

    The residential public space is an important part in designing the ecological residence, and a proper physics environment of public space is of greater significance to urban residence in China. Actually, the measure to apply computer aided design software into residential design can effectively avoid an inconformity of design intent with actual using condition, and a negative impact on users due to bad architectural physics environment of buildings, etc. The paper largely adopts a design method of analyzing architectural physics environment of residential public space. By analyzing and evaluating various physics environments, a suitability assessment is obtained for residential public space, thereby guiding the space design.

  15. The Response of Eastern African Terrestrial Environments to the Mid-Pleistocene Climate Transition: Paleosol Isotopic Evidence from the Turkana Basin, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, R.; Lepre, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Heightened aridity and C4 grass expansion are recorded in Africa during the Mid-Pleistocene Climate Transition (MPCT, 1.3-0.7 Ma), potentially as consequences of decreasing atmospheric CO2. Whether all of Africa responded to the MPCT in the same manner is unclear. Recent studies of a Malawi Basin lake core and paleosols show abundant C3 flora across the MPCT. African climate change is often suggested as a primary cause of hominin speciation, extinction, and technological innovations. Competing environmental-based evolutionary hypotheses propose increased aridity, humidity pulses, and climatic variability as influences of water availability and vegetation structure in Plio-Pleistocene hominin habitats. The Turkana Basin in northern Kenya preserves a rich fossil record of hominins from 4.3-0.7 Ma and offers high-resolution age control via paleomagnetic stratigraphy, isotopic geochronology, and tephrostratigraphy. Turkana's large paleosol isotopic database demonstrates a gradual increase in C4 grass abundance and aridity from 4-1 Ma. Faunal evidence for increasing abundances of C4 grazers corroborates the spread of C4 grasslands from 2-1 Ma. However, there is a dearth of terrestrial environmental records after 1.5 Ma and through the MPCT at Turkana, during which time eastern Africa witnessed the extinction of Paranthropus and the disperal of genus Homo. Here we report a stable isotopic (δ13C, δ18O) record of paleosol carbonates from the Turkana Basin from 1.4 to 0.7 Ma. Based on our findings and comparisons with comparable datasets from other hominin locales, we suggest that eastern African environments responded to the MPCT in a phased shift from south to north, possibly as a consequence of the compression of the ITCZ during glacial maxima and/or to changes to the Indian Ocean Dipole.

  16. Task modelling for ambient intelligent environments: design support for situated task executions

    OpenAIRE

    LUYTEN, Kris; VANDERVELPEN, Chris; CONINX, Karin

    2005-01-01

    The design of interactive systems for an ambient intelligent environment poses many challenges because of the great diversity in devices the user has control of and the user's situation imposed by the environment. Although task-centered interface design is an established approach for traditional form-based and even for multi-device user interfaces, this design approach is, in its current form, not ready for the design of user interfaces for ambient intelligent environments. In this paper we p...

  17. Application of mechatronic design approach in a reconfigurable manufacturing environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Xing, B

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available design. By utilizing this approach, a full scale reconfigurable machining tool has been design. This RMT has a modular mechanical structure and modular control system. The mechanical design and control system design both are discussed in this paper...

  18. Universal Design and Its Applications in Educational Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Joan M.; Scott, Sally S.; Shaw, Stan F.

    2006-01-01

    Universal design (UD), a concept from the field of architecture, is increasingly evident in discussions of approaches to enhance educational access for students with disabilities. Several emerging models of educational applications of UD--Universal Design for Learning, Universal Design for Instruction, and Universal Instructional Design--are…

  19. Solid waste deposits as a significant source of contaminants of emerging concern to the aquatic and terrestrial environments - a developing country case study from Owerri, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arukwe, Augustine; Eggen, Trine; Möder, Monika

    2012-11-01

    isomers), metabolites of non-ionic surfactants (nonylphenol-polyethoxylates), UV-filter compound ethyl methoxy cinnamate (EHMC) and bisphenol A (BPA) were particularly determined in the sediment samples at high μg/kg dry weight concentration. Measuring contaminants in such areas will help in increasing governmental, societal and industrial awareness on the extent and seriousness of the contamination both at waste disposal sites and surrounding terrestrial and aquatic environments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Terrestrial radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmomo, Yoichiro

    1992-01-01

    Environmental radioecology is a science of studying radionuclide transfer and distribution in the environmental ecosystem and the effects of radiation of the ecosystem. This review highlights radionuclide transfer to crops. There is, however, limited data available on this field in Japan. Therefore, a history of environmental radioecological study in Japan is briefly mentioned: radioecological study has been reflected by social backgrounds, including nuclear explosion and peaceful application of radionuclides. In view of the relationship between siting of nuclear installations and dietary habits for Japanese, research on hydrological radioecology has actually preceded that of terrestrial radioecology. Transfer parameters are discussed in terms of deposition velosity, interception fraction, environmental halftimes, and transfer coefficients from soils to crops. (N.K.) 50 refs

  1. Multi-Disciplinary Multi-Fidelity Design Environment, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To meet the design challenges of tomorrow, NASA and industry require advancements in the state-of-the-art for physics-based design and analysis frameworks. In...

  2. Interactive tool that empowers structural understanding and enables FEM analysis in a parametric design environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Thøger; Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces an interactive tool developed to integrate structural analysis in the architectural design environment from the early conceptual design stage. The tool improves exchange of data between the design environment of Rhino Grasshopper and the FEM analysis of Autodesk Robot...

  3. An intelligent simulation environment for control system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently assisting in the development of advanced control systems for the next generation of nuclear power plants. This paper presents a prototype interactive and intelligent simulation environment being developed to support this effort. The environment combines tools from the field of Artificial Intelligence; in particular object-oriented programming, a LISP programming environment, and a direct manipulation user interface; with traditional numerical methods for simulating combined continuous/discrete processes. The resulting environment is highly interactive and easy to use. Models may be created and modified quickly through a window oriented direct manipulation interface. Models may be modified at any time, even as the simulation is running, and the results observed immediately via real-time graphics. 8 refs., 3 figs

  4. A Software Environment for the Design of Organizational Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shlapak, Yuriy; Luo, Jie; Levchuk, Georgiy M; Tu, Fang; Pattipati, Krishna R

    2000-01-01

    ...) building an organizational hierarchy. In addition, basic modules for dynamic adaptation of organizational strategies and structures in the face of changing mission environment and/or resources are being added...

  5. Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, A.D.; Turnbull, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the hydrocarbon resources of the North Sea has resulted in both offshore and onshore environmental repercussions, involving the existing physical attributes of the sea and seabed, the coastline and adjoining land. The social and economic repercussions of the industry were equally widespread. The dramatic and speedy impact of the exploration and exploitation of the northern North Sea resources in the early 1970s, on the physical resources of Scotland was quickly realised together with the concern that any environmental and social damage to the physical and social fabric should be kept to a minimum. To this end, a wide range of research and other activities by central and local government, and other interested agencies was undertaken to extend existing knowledge on the marine and terrestrial environments that might be affected by the oil and gas industry. The outcome of these activities is summarized in this paper. The topics covered include a survey of the marine ecosystems of the North Sea, the fishing industry, the impact of oil pollution on seabirds and fish stocks, the ecology of the Scottish coastline and the impact of the petroleum industry on a selection of particular sites. (author)

  6. Coupling the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM v. 2.0) to Environment and Climate Change Canada's greenhouse gas forecast model (v.107-glb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Bakr; Polavarapu, Saroja; Jones, Dylan B. A.; Deng, Feng; Neish, Michael; Melton, Joe R.; Nassar, Ray; Arora, Vivek K.

    2018-02-01

    The Canadian Land Surface Scheme and the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CLASS-CTEM) together form the land surface component in the family of Canadian Earth system models (CanESMs). Here, CLASS-CTEM is coupled to Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC)'s weather and greenhouse gas forecast model (GEM-MACH-GHG) to consistently model atmosphere-land exchange of CO2. The coupling between the land and the atmospheric transport model ensures consistency between meteorological forcing of CO2 fluxes and CO2 transport. The procedure used to spin up carbon pools for CLASS-CTEM for multi-decadal simulations needed to be significantly altered to deal with the limited availability of consistent meteorological information from a constantly changing operational environment in the GEM-MACH-GHG model. Despite the limitations in the spin-up procedure, the simulated fluxes obtained by driving the CLASS-CTEM model with meteorological forcing from GEM-MACH-GHG were comparable to those obtained from CLASS-CTEM when it is driven with standard meteorological forcing from the Climate Research Unit (CRU) combined with reanalysis fields from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) to form CRU-NCEP dataset. This is due to the similarity of the two meteorological datasets in terms of temperature and radiation. However, notable discrepancies in the seasonal variation and spatial patterns of precipitation estimates, especially in the tropics, were reflected in the estimated carbon fluxes, as they significantly affected the magnitude of the vegetation productivity and, to a lesser extent, the seasonal variations in carbon fluxes. Nevertheless, the simulated fluxes based on the meteorological forcing from the GEM-MACH-GHG model are consistent to some extent with other estimates from bottom-up or top-down approaches. Indeed, when simulated fluxes obtained by driving the CLASS-CTEM model with meteorological data from the GEM-MACH-GHG model are used as prior estimates

  7. Coupling the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM v. 2.0 to Environment and Climate Change Canada's greenhouse gas forecast model (v.107-glb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Badawy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Land Surface Scheme and the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CLASS-CTEM together form the land surface component in the family of Canadian Earth system models (CanESMs. Here, CLASS-CTEM is coupled to Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC's weather and greenhouse gas forecast model (GEM-MACH-GHG to consistently model atmosphere–land exchange of CO2. The coupling between the land and the atmospheric transport model ensures consistency between meteorological forcing of CO2 fluxes and CO2 transport. The procedure used to spin up carbon pools for CLASS-CTEM for multi-decadal simulations needed to be significantly altered to deal with the limited availability of consistent meteorological information from a constantly changing operational environment in the GEM-MACH-GHG model. Despite the limitations in the spin-up procedure, the simulated fluxes obtained by driving the CLASS-CTEM model with meteorological forcing from GEM-MACH-GHG were comparable to those obtained from CLASS-CTEM when it is driven with standard meteorological forcing from the Climate Research Unit (CRU combined with reanalysis fields from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP to form CRU-NCEP dataset. This is due to the similarity of the two meteorological datasets in terms of temperature and radiation. However, notable discrepancies in the seasonal variation and spatial patterns of precipitation estimates, especially in the tropics, were reflected in the estimated carbon fluxes, as they significantly affected the magnitude of the vegetation productivity and, to a lesser extent, the seasonal variations in carbon fluxes. Nevertheless, the simulated fluxes based on the meteorological forcing from the GEM-MACH-GHG model are consistent to some extent with other estimates from bottom-up or top-down approaches. Indeed, when simulated fluxes obtained by driving the CLASS-CTEM model with meteorological data from the GEM-MACH-GHG model are used as

  8. Designing robots for industrial environments. [economic factors and vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Environmental hazards to industrial robots are summarized. The inherent reliability of the design of the Unimate robot is assessed and the data used in a management system to bring the reliability performance up to a level nearing what is theoretically available. The design is shown to be capable of a mean time between failure of 400 hours and an average up time of 98%. Specific design decisions made in view of application requirements are explored.

  9. Trajectory Design Tools for Libration and Cis-Lunar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, David C.; Webster, Cassandra M.; Bosanac, Natasha; Cox, Andrew; Guzzetti, Davide; Howell, Kathleen C.

    2016-01-01

    Innovative trajectory design tools are required to support challenging multi-body regimes with complex dynamics, uncertain perturbations, and the integration of propulsion influences. Two distinctive tools, Adaptive Trajectory Design and the General Mission Analysis Tool have been developed and certified to provide the astrodynamics community with the ability to design multi-body trajectories. In this paper we discuss the multi-body design process and the capabilities of both tools. Demonstrable applications to confirmed missions, the Lunar IceCube Cubesat lunar mission and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Sun-Earth L2 mission, are presented.

  10. Designing a Programmatic Digital Learning Environment: Lessons from Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Diane; Lewis, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Promoted as a way to enhance learning and improve efficiencies, the steady rise of technology adoption across higher education has created both new opportunities and new challenges. Borrowing principles of design thinking and related user- or learner-centered design practices, this descriptive case study offers an example of how institutions of…

  11. Design of a Networked Learning Master Environment for Professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2010-01-01

    The paper is presenting the overall learning design of MIL (Master in ICT and Learning). The learning design is integrating a number of principles: 1. Principles of problem and project based learning 2. Networked learning / learning in communities of practice. The paper will discuss how these pri...

  12. Early user involvement in designing intelligent products and environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijt-Evers, L.; Steen, M.

    2008-01-01

    A literature review was conducted on user involvement in design. The focus of the review was on how researchers and designers attempt to cooperate with end-users, with the goal of making a better match with end-users’ needs and preferences. The main goal of the research was to get insight in which

  13. Research on the Design of Public Space Environment for Aging Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Gu; Soo, Kim Chul

    2018-03-01

    This paper studies the living space environment suitable for the elderly, because the elderly and the disabled have become increasingly prominent social problems. Through the discussion of the humanistic environment design method of the elderly and the disabled, the paper puts forward a new environment design which has the traditional characteristics and adapts to the new society to care for the elderly (the disabled).By studying and analyzing the background of social aging, the theory of public space environment design and the needs of the elderly, it is pointed out that the design of public space environment in the aged society needs to be implemented in detail design. The number of elderly people in public space will increase, give full attention to the public space outdoor environment quality, for the elderly to provide a variety of environmental facilities have long-term significance.

  14. The Design of Immersive English Learning Environment Using Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Cheng-Ting; Cheng, Shein-Yung; Tsai, Chung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The study uses augmented reality (AR) technology to integrate virtual objects into the real learning environment for language learning. The English AR classroom is constructed using the system prototyping method and evaluated by semi-structured in-depth interviews. According to the flow theory by Csikszenmihalyi in 1975 along with the immersive…

  15. Visual Environment for Designing Interactive Learning Scenarios with Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, José Miguel; Ruiz-Rube, Iván; Dodero, Juan Manuel; Figueiredo, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) technology allows the inclusion of virtual elements on a vision of actual physical environment for the creation of a mixed reality in real time. This kind of technology can be used in educational settings. However, the current AR authoring tools present several drawbacks, such as, the lack of a mechanism for tracking the…

  16. Designs for Living and Learning: Transforming Early Childhood Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Deb; Carter, Margie

    While the early childhood field has formed standards to help in recognizing quality programs for children, practitioners seldom use values to guide in selection of materials or to help plan early childhood environments. This book draws on a variety of educational approaches, including Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia, to outline hundreds of…

  17. Pre-Service Teachers Designing Virtual World Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacka, Lisa; Booth, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Integrating Information Technology Communications in the classroom has been an important part of pre-service teacher education for over a decade. The advent of virtual worlds provides the pre-service teacher with an opportunity to study teaching and learning in a highly immersive 3D computer-based environment. Virtual worlds also provide a place…

  18. Lost in Interaction in IMS Learning Design Runtime Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derntl, Michael; Neumann, Susanne; Oberhuemer, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Educators are exploiting the advantages of advanced web-based collaboration technologies and massive online interactions. Interactions between learners and human or nonhuman resources therefore play an increasingly important pedagogical role, and the way these interactions are expressed in the user interface of virtual learning environments is…

  19. A Virtual Environment for Resilient Infrastructure Modeling and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A VIRTUAL ...September 2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT FOR RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE MODELING AND...postprocessing, including convenient and efficient methods for manipulating CI network data. Moreover, the object-oriented nature of Pyomo creates a natural

  20. Designing a Social Environment for Human-Robot Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amram, Fred M.

    Noting that work is partly a social activity, and that workers' psychological and emotional needs influence their productivity, this paper explores avenues for improving human-robot cooperation and for enhancing worker satisfaction in the environment of flexible automation. The first section of the paper offers a brief overview of the…

  1. Accurate 3D point cloud comparison and volumetric change analysis of Terrestrial Laser Scan data in a hard rock coastal cliff environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earlie, C. S.; Masselink, G.; Russell, P.; Shail, R.; Kingston, K.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of hard rock coastlines is limited due to the episodic nature and ';slow' rate at which changes occur. High-resolution surveying techniques, such as Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), have just begun to be adopted as a method of obtaining detailed point cloud data to monitor topographical changes over short periods of time (weeks to months). However, the difficulties involved in comparing consecutive point cloud data sets in a complex three-dimensional plane, such as occlusion due to surface roughness and positioning of data capture point as a result of a consistently changing environment (a beach profile), mean that comparing data sets can lead to errors in the region of 10 - 20 cm. Meshing techniques are often used for point cloud data analysis for simple surfaces, but in surfaces such as rocky cliff faces, this technique has been found to be ineffective. Recession rates of hard rock coastlines in the UK are typically determined using aerial photography or airborne LiDAR data, yet the detail of the important changes occurring to the cliff face and toe are missed using such techniques. In this study we apply an algorithm (M3C2 - Multiscale Model to Model Cloud Comparison), initially developed for analysing fluvial morphological change, that directly compares point to point cloud data using surface normals that are consistent with surface roughness and measure the change that occurs along the normal direction (Lague et al., 2013). The surfaces changes are analysed using a set of user defined scales based on surface roughness and registration error. Once the correct parameters are defined, the volumetric cliff face changes are calculated by integrating the mean distance between the point clouds. The analysis has been undertaken at two hard rock sites identified for their active erosion located on the UK's south west peninsular at Porthleven in south west Cornwall and Godrevy in north Cornwall. Alongside TLS point cloud data, in

  2. Computer Aided Design Tools for Extreme Environment Electronics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project aims to provide Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools for radiation-tolerant, wide-temperature-range digital, analog, mixed-signal, and radio-frequency...

  3. Modelling the cybersecurity environment using morphological ontology design engineering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Vuuren, JC

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ). This methodology is based on the combination of three different research methods, i.e. design science, general morphological analysis, and ontology based representation. General morphological analysis offers a solution for extracting meaningful information from...

  4. Using virtual worlds as collaborative environments for innovation and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehsani, Ehsan; Chase, Scott Curland

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss observations and lessons learned in conducting architectural design projects in virtual worlds. By integrating a community of users in virtual worlds into a collaborative architectural design process, organisations can tap the community's creativity and intelligence throu....... Here we propose four modes of collaboration, based on the choices for degree of openness and governance structure, which are illustrated by four case studies....

  5. Integrated design optimization research and development in an industrial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V.; German, Marjorie D.; Lee, S.-J.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of a design optimization project that is in progress at the GE Research and Development Center for the past few years. The objective of this project is to develop a methodology and a software system for design automation and optimization of structural/mechanical components and systems. The effort focuses on research and development issues and also on optimization applications that can be related to real-life industrial design problems. The overall technical approach is based on integration of numerical optimization techniques, finite element methods, CAE and software engineering, and artificial intelligence/expert systems (AI/ES) concepts. The role of each of these engineering technologies in the development of a unified design methodology is illustrated. A software system DESIGN-OPT has been developed for both size and shape optimization of structural components subjected to static as well as dynamic loadings. By integrating this software with an automatic mesh generator, a geometric modeler and an attribute specification computer code, a software module SHAPE-OPT has been developed for shape optimization. Details of these software packages together with their applications to some 2- and 3-dimensional design problems are described.

  6. Measuring Radionuclides in the environment: radiological quantities and sampling designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, G.

    1998-10-01

    One aim of the workshop was to support and provide an ICRU report committee (International Union of Radiation Units) with actual information on techniques, data and knowledge of modern radioecology when radionuclides are to be measured in the environment. It has been increasingly recognised that some studies in radioecology, especially those involving both field sampling and laboratory measurements, have not paid adequate attention to the problem of obtaining representative, unbiased samples. This can greatly affect the quality of scientific interpretation, and the ability to manage the environment. Further, as the discipline of radioecology has developed, it has seen a growth in the numbers of quantities and units used, some of which are ill-defined and which are non-standardised. (orig.)

  7. Gerald: a general environment for radiation analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, Ch.; Oliveira, P.I.E. de; Oliveira, C.R.E. de; Adams, M.L.; Galan, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper describes the status of the GERALD interactive workbench for the analysis of radiation transport problems. GERALD basically guides the user through the various steps that are necessary to solve a radiation transport problem, and is aimed at education, research and industry. The advantages of such workbench are many: quality assurance of problem setup, interaction of the user with problem solution, preservation of theory and legacy research codes, and rapid proto-typing and testing of new methods. The environment is of general applicability catering for analytical, deterministic and stochastic analysis of the radiation problem and is not tied to one specific solution method or code. However, GERALD is being developed as a portable, modular, open source framework which renders itself quite naturally to the coupling of existing computational tools through specifically developed plug-ins. By offering a common route for setting up, solving and analyzing radiation transport problems GERALD offers the possibility of methods intercomparison and validation. Such flexible radiation transport environment will also facilitate the coupling of radiation physics methods to other physical phenomena and their application to other areas of application such as medical physics and the environment. (authors)

  8. A Review of Light Shelf Designs for Daylit Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonis Kontadakis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Light shelves have been discussed in numerous studies as suitable solutions for controlling daylight in side-lit spaces. It is a system that can be easily modified, offering a range of design solutions. It can be easily mounted on the exterior and/or the interior of a vertical opening, it can come in various shapes from static flat forms to curved reflective surfaces, or it can even be actively controlled. A light shelf can offer shading and at the same time can redirect a significant part of the incoming light flux towards the ceiling improving daylight uniformity. Due to the aforesaid functions, light shelves are among the most popular system design solutions when it comes to daylight exploitation. The purpose of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to present the main research findings in relation to light shelves as daylighting systems and secondly to analyze the results, trying to establish a common basis for some efficient and practical design rules. The present paper is a review of the research realized in the last three decades concerning these systems together with their associated implications in a building’s daylight performance as well as in its energy balance in a few cases. In addition, the critical review of their design principles is included, which makes the presented information useful for design teams trying to select the optimal available system for any specific project.

  9. Sociotechnical design processes and working environment: The case of a continuous process wok

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole

    2000-01-01

    A five-year design process of a continuous process wok has been studied with the aim of elucidating the conditions for integrating working environment aspects. The design proc-ess is seen as a network building activity and as a social shaping process of the artefact. A working environment log is ...

  10. Sociotechnical design processes and working environment: The case of a continuous process wok

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole

    2000-01-01

    A five-year design process of a continuous process wok has been studied with the aim of elucidating the conditions for integrating working environment aspects. The design process is seen as a network building activity and as a social shaping process of the artefact. A working environment log is s...

  11. Instructional design of WWW-based course-support environments : From case to general principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Sanne; Collis, Betty; Eseryel, Deniz

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we describe the design of a WWW-based course-support environment for a course in instructional-design theories, give an overview of how the environment was used as part of the course experience, and summarize the student evaluation of the course. Our conclusion is that such a

  12. Medium-Based Design: Extending a Medium to Create an Exploratory Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, Jochen; Lamberty, K. K.

    2005-01-01

    This article introduces "medium-based" design -- an approach to creating "exploratory learning environments" using the method of "extending a medium". First, the characteristics of exploratory learning environments and medium-based design are described and grounded in related work. Particular attention is given to "extending a medium" --…

  13. Multimodality and Design of Interactive Virtual Environments for Creative Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürsimsek, Remzi Ates

    . The three-dimensional representation of space and the resources for non-verbal communication enable the users to interact with the digital content in more complex yet engaging ways. However, understanding the communicative resources in virtual spaces with the theoretical tools that are conventionally used......-user interaction, customization and interdisciplinary collaboration. These spaces accommodate new forms of spatial and social practices, provide multimodal communication resources in physical and virtual environments, and allow individuals (or groups) to actively engage with collaborative creative experiences...

  14. Multimedia as Rhizome: Design Issues in a Network Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Defines the concepts of hypertext, hypermedia, multimedia, and multimedia networks. Using the rhizome as a metaphor for electronically mediated exchange, a theory of hypermedia design that incorporates principles of connection and heterogeneity, multiplicity, asignifying rupture, and cartography and decalomania is explored. (four references) (MES)

  15. Designing immersion exhibits as border-crossing environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Marianne Foss

    2010-01-01

    be applied to achieve an understanding of the immersion exhibit form. The argument proceeds by demonstrating how the characteristics of immersion exhibits, and visitors to them, classify them as microcultures, and examining the implications of this for exhibit design using a hypothetical immersion exhibit...

  16. Fictional space in participatory design of engaging interactive environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian

    2010-01-01

    . This provides the basis for more nuanced insights as to how participants envision that their practices might change and which particular aspects hold most potential and resistance. Third, the notion provides concepts for designers to reflect on how ideas, scenarios, or mock-ups developed during particular...

  17. Liner shipping hub network design in a competitive environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelareh, Shahin; Nickel, Stefan; Pisinger, David

    2010-01-01

    market share—which depends on the service time and transportation cost—by locating a predefined number of hubs at candidate ports and designing its network. While general-purpose solvers do not solve instances of even small size, an accelerated Lagrangian method combined with a primal heuristic obtains...

  18. Liner Shipping Hub Network Design in a Competitive Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelareh, Shahin; Nickel, Stefan; Pisinger, David

    — proportional to service time and transportation cost —by locating a predefined number of hubs at candidate ports and designing its network. While general-purpose solvers do not solve instances of even small size, an accelerated lagrangian method coupled with a primal heuristic obtains very good bounds. Our...

  19. Designing a Self-Organized Conversational Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Steven J.; Smith, Ian D.

    1998-01-01

    Introduces concepts underlying the conversational science model of self-organized learning, and explains how it can influence the systems-thinking design of tools and educational procedures. Outlines person-based learning and comparative-learning models and discusses the context of person-based learning theory, the conversational learning model,…

  20. Applications of American design codes for elevated temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.

    1980-03-01

    A brief summary of the ASME Code rules of Case N-47 is presented. An overview of the typical procedure used to demonstrate Code compliance is provided. Application experience and some examples of detailed inelastic analysis and simplified-approximate methods are given. Recent developments and future trends in design criteria and ASME Code rules are also presented

  1. Designing the online oral language learning environment SpeakApps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nic Giolla Mhichíl, Mairéad; Appel, Christine; Ó Ciardubháin, Colm; Jager, Sake; Prizel-Kania, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on SpeakApps, a major collaborative computer-assisted language learning project, developed based on an open source techno-pedagogical solution to facilitate online oral language production and interaction. Design/methodology/approach – A mixed method

  2. By Design: Negotiating Flexible Learning in the Built Environment Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Richard; Morris, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    The term "flexible education" is now firmly entrenched within Australian higher education discourse, yet the term is a contested one imbued with a multiplicity of meanings. This paper describes a process designed to elucidate how the idea of flexible education can be translated into teaching models that are informed by the specific…

  3. Participatory design in the project of virtual learning environment of histology

    OpenAIRE

    Santa-Rosa, José Guilherme da Silva

    2012-01-01

    This present article describes a research on the development, under the approach of participatory design, a virtual teaching-learning of Histology in which students and teachers participated actively in all stages of development of the educational environment. We postulates that the development of virtual learning environment of Histology, through the Participatory Design approach, contributes to greater acceptance and use by students and that the adoption of virtual environment for teaching ...

  4. An integrated optimization environment for structural configuration design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirehdast, Mehran

    The relatively recent efforts for designing lightweight structures have motivated increasing use of formal mathematical optimization techniques for selecting the shape and sizes of structural members. How to obtain rigorous optimal topologies has been an elusive goal until the very recent introduction of the homogenization method. This dissertation describes a system for designing complete structures starting only with an available space and loading and boundary specifications. A three-phase design process is followed: generate an approximate topological image with homogenization (Phase 1), process the image to obtain a practical realistic structure (Phase 2), and refine the final topology by detailed shape and size optimization (Phase 3). An overview of the system is given together with several practical examples. The emphasis of this dissertation is on the appropriate design and implementation of the image interpretation module in Phase 2. Image processing and computer vision techniques are used in conjunction with insights from mechanics and knowledge about fabrication processes to implement the system. The main concentration of this dissertation is on two-dimensional structures. In Phase 2, two types of models are distinguished for two-dimensional structures, namely, skeletal and plain stress/plain strain models. Different approaches are taken for the treatment of both models in Phase 2. For skeletal structures their skeleton is useful, whereas for solid structures the information on their boundaries is pertinent. Techniques to extract and process this information are described. For each type of structure a fabrication domain is chosen, and rules are devised whose application to the representations in Phase 2 generates designs that are more easily manufacturable. For solid structures casting is chosen as the fabrication domain and, for skeletal structures weldments of trusses are explored. Extraction of other useful properties, such as symmetry and immobility

  5. Design Quality in the Context of Healthcare Environments: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anåker, Anna; Heylighen, Ann; Nordin, Susanna; Elf, Marie

    2017-07-01

    We explored the concept of design quality in relation to healthcare environments. In addition, we present a taxonomy that illustrates the wide range of terms used in connection with design quality in healthcare. High-quality physical environments can promote health and well-being. Developments in healthcare technology and methodology put high demands on the design quality of care environments, coupled with increasing expectations and demands from patients and staff that care environments be person centered, welcoming, and accessible while also supporting privacy and security. In addition, there are demands that decisions about the design of healthcare architecture be based on the best available information from credible research and the evaluation of existing building projects. The basic principles of Arksey and O'Malley's model of scoping review design were used. Data were derived from literature searches in scientific databases. A total of 18 articles and books were found that referred to design quality in a healthcare context. Design quality of physical healthcare environments involves three different themes: (i) environmental sustainability and ecological values, (ii) social and cultural interactions and values, and (iii) resilience of the engineering and building construction. Design quality was clarified herein with a definition. Awareness of what is considered design quality in relation to healthcare architecture could help to design healthcare environments based on evidence. To operationalize the concept, its definition must be clear and explicit and able to meet the complex needs of the stakeholders in a healthcare context, including patients, staff, and significant others.

  6. Development and application of terrestrial food chain models to assess health risks to man and releases of pollutants to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.V.; Hoffman, F.O.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Baes, C.F.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the development and application of mathematical models used to predict the terrestrial food chain transport of pollutants of potential importance to human health. A distinction is made between models developed specifically for assessment applications and models which may function as research tools. Differentiation is also made between models whose structure is based on steady-state relationships among food chain compartments and dynamic models developed to simulate food chain and pollutant kinetics. The strengths and weaknesses of these models are related to the needs of the model user, the availability of relevant data for parameter quantification, and the feasibility for model validation. For assessment purposes, an optimum level of structural complexity will be achieved when all parameters are readily measurable and predictive error due to unforeseen correlations among parameters is small. The optimum level of simplification, however, will be determined by model validation results and the ease of model implementation. Most examples are derived from models used to assess the terrestrial food chain transport of radionuclides because assessment methodologies for other types of pollutants are only at an early stage of development. It is concluded that current limitations in parameter quantification and model validation will probably restrict most assessment applications of terrestrial food chain models to a type of screening calculation. However, once pollutant releases actually occur, environmental monitoring will be necessary to ensure that potential model misprediction does not result in unacceptable consequences

  7. Development and application of terrestrial food-chain models to assess health risks to man from releases of pollutants to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.V.; Hoffman, O.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Baes, C.F.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reviews development and application of mathematical models used to predict the terrestrial food-chain transport of pollutants of potential importance to human health. A distinction is made between models developed specifically for assessment applications and models which may function as research tools. Differentiation is also made between models whose structure is based on steady-state relationships among food-chain compartments and dynamic models developed to simulate food-chain and pollutant kinetics. The strengths and weaknesses of these models are related to the needs of the model-user, the availability of relevant data for parameter quantification, and the feasibility for model validation. For assessment purposes, an optimum level of structural complexity will be achieved when all parameters are readily measurable and predictive error due to unforeseen correlations among parameters is small. The optimum level of simplification, however, will be determined by model validation results and the ease of model implementation. Most examples are derived from models used to assess the terrestrial food-chain transport of radionuclides because assessment methodologies for other types of pollutants are only at an early stage of development. It is concluded that current limitations in parameter quantification and model validation will probably restrict most assessment applications of terrestrial food-chain models to a type of screening calculation. However, once pollutant releases actually occur, environmental monitoring will be necessary to ensure that potential model misprediction does not result in unacceptable consequences. (author)

  8. Engineering Design Handbook: Environmental Series. Part Four. Life Cycle Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-03-31

    electrical strength Chemical reaction: Loss of mechanical str ~ingth Corrosion Interference with function Electrolysis Loss of eletctrical properties...required. All packages should be ruggedly designed to withstand rough handlinq. Components Electronic components in every Equipment str iding Idle or day...Corresponding figures for chocolate fudge bars were 40 yr. 17 yr. 6 yr. 2 yr. and 4 Corrosion of metal cans increased during mo. The estimated percentages of

  9. Handbook of virtual environments design, implementation, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hale, Kelly S

    2014-01-01

    This second edition of a bestseller presents systematic and extensive coverage of the primary areas of research and development within VE technology. It brings together a comprehensive set of contributed articles that address the principles required to define system requirements and design, build, evaluate, implement, and manage the effective use of VE applications. The contributors provide critical insights and principles associated with their given area of expertise to provide extensive scope and detail on VE technology.

  10. Design and development of environment friendly textile dyeing machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the novel development, installation, and operation of a textile dyeing machine that used one of the most emerging technologies based on Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs). The new machine was found to be capable of reducing water consumption by 57% and process time by 40%, without compromising textile dyeing quality. Different shades were dyed on newly built dyeing machine using three different types of reactive dyes, Vinylsulphone, Monofluorotriazine, and Monochlorotriazine. The washing and rinsing of dyed fabrics were carried out at the completion of dyeing, both in conventional and newly developed dyeing machines. Fabrics washed in both machines was compared in terms of color fastness, color alteration, color fading, and final appearance. Overall results from the environment point of view have indicated that the new dyeing machine is a promising alternative to the conventional machine because its wastewater exhibited lower pH, conductivity, and colour strength. (author)

  11. New economic initiatives are designed to protect the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleet, B.; Fleet, N.S.

    1992-01-01

    The use of economic initiatives or economic instruments as an alternative to or as support for existing environmental legislation is reviewed. The most controversial area of economic incentives is the concept of creating a market in pollution rights. While emissions trading can enable economic growth in areas of high pollution, this approach is only marginally different than the traditional regulatory approach. Environmental economics is complex, with mixtures of private and public costs. Social costs include subsidies, waste treatment, landfill disposal costs, etc. More intangible social costs include public health costs and damage to the natural environment. Conventional economic approaches ignore most such social costs. Several European countries have started to develop a green gross national product (GNP) which sets out an alternative approach to the traditional measure of economic activity by subtracting a figure for harm to the environment from economic activity. This ambitious approach attempts to measure the costs of all toxic discharges along with the disappearance of plant and animal life and other environmental changes. A powerful new tool for the environmental manager is full cost accounting, which uses a long (10-20 y) window for projects, anticipates the impact of stricter discharge standards, and attempts to quantify a range of less tangible social costs elements, such as liability, improved environmental image, etc. Various strategies can be ranked on the basis of their future risk cost. The application of full cost accounting models, small business, computer models and expert systems, developing country debt-for-nature swaps, and environmental risk assessment are discussed. 12 refs

  12. Development of pedagogical design in technology-rich environments for language teaching and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Jalkanen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the development of pedagogical design for language teaching and learning in increasingly technology-rich environments. More specifically, it focuses on the process of design, enactment and analysis of language and literacy pedagogies in technology-rich environments. Two substudies are reported in five articles, each of which approaches pedagogical design from a different perspective. The first substudy examined (a) what pedagogical choices language studen...

  13. Physical and Emotional Benefits of Different Exercise Environments Designed for Treadmill Running

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao-Pu Yeh; Joseph A. Stone; Sarah M. Churchill; Eric Brymer; Keith Davids

    2017-01-01

    (1)Background: Green physical activity promotes physical health and mental wellbeing and\\ud interesting questions concern effects of this information on designing indoor exercise environments.\\ud This study examined the physical and emotional effects of different nature-based environments\\ud designed for indoor treadmill running; (2) Methods: In a counterbalanced experimental design,\\ud 30 participants performed three, twenty-minute treadmill runs at a self-selected pace while viewing\\ud eith...

  14. In vivo strains in the femur of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) during terrestrial locomotion: testing hypotheses of evolutionary shifts in mammalian bone loading and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Michael T; White, Bartholomew J; Hudzik, Nathan B; Gosnell, W Casey; Parrish, John H A; Blob, Richard W

    2011-08-01

    Terrestrial locomotion can impose substantial loads on vertebrate limbs. Previous studies have shown that limb bones from cursorial species of eutherian mammals experience high bending loads with minimal torsion, whereas the limb bones of non-avian reptiles (and amphibians) exhibit considerable torsion in addition to bending. It has been hypothesized that these differences in loading regime are related to the difference in limb posture between upright mammals and sprawling reptiles, and that the loading patterns observed in non-avian reptiles may be ancestral for tetrapod vertebrates. To evaluate whether non-cursorial mammals show loading patterns more similar to those of sprawling lineages, we measured in vivo strains in the femur during terrestrial locomotion of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), a marsupial that uses more crouched limb posture than most mammals from which bone strains have been recorded, and which belongs to a clade phylogenetically between reptiles and the eutherian mammals studied previously. The presence of substantial torsion in the femur of opossums, similar to non-avian reptiles, would suggest that this loading regime likely reflects an ancestral condition for tetrapod limb bone design. Strain recordings indicate the presence of both bending and appreciable torsion (shear strain: 419.1 ± 212.8 με) in the opossum femur, with planar strain analyses showing neutral axis orientations that placed the lateral aspect of the femur in tension at the time of peak strains. Such mediolateral bending was unexpected for a mammal running with near-parasagittal limb kinematics. Shear strains were similar in magnitude to peak compressive axial strains, with opossum femora experiencing similar bending loads but higher levels of torsion compared with most previously studied mammals. Analyses of peak femoral strains led to estimated safety factor ranges of 5.1-7.2 in bending and 5.5-7.3 in torsion, somewhat higher than typical mammalian values

  15. Energy and environment in an architectural design application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, Silvia de; Evans, John Martin [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Arquitectura, Diseno y Urbanismo, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1998-09-01

    Office buildings with important administrative functions can produce high energy demands for lighting, cooling and heating. However, appropriate architectural design can achieve significant energy savings and improve environmental conditions, without sacrificing architectural quality. Intense solar radiation and high temperature swings in dry continental climates favour deep plan offices, though natural daylight requires limited depth. This paper presents a case study of a large administrative complex project for the Justice Palace, Neuquen Province, in the cold windy sem-desert climate in the Northern Patagonia Region of Argentina, demonstrating the relevance of specialised advisory services in the architectural field. (Author)

  16. Towards a Design Methodology for More supporting an inclusive design attitude in the built environment

    OpenAIRE

    IELEGEMS, Elke; HERSSENS, Jasmien; Vanrie, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The social, academic and political field embraces Design for All (DfA), Universal Design (UD) or Inclusive Design (ID) more and more as a global strategy to help formulating answers towards a more inclusive and sustainable world. The ageing population as well as the search for social relevant design, result in an increasing need for design methods and supportive design methodologies. While theoretical studies and knowledge in DfA are growing, the need for more insights ...

  17. Teachers as Participatory Designers: Two Case Studies with Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cober, Rebecca; Tan, Esther; Slotta, Jim; So, Hyo-Jeong; Könings, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    Teachers are not typically involved as participatory designers in the design of technology-enhanced learning environments. As they have unique and valuable perspectives on the role of technology in education, it is of utmost importance to engage them in a participatory design process. Adopting a case study methodology, we aim to reveal in what…

  18. An Instructional Design Framework for Fostering Student Engagement in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerkawski, Betul C.; Lyman, Eugene W.

    2016-01-01

    Many approaches, models and frameworks exist when designing quality online learning environments. These approaches assist and guide instructional designers through the process of analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation of instructional processes. Some of these frameworks are concerned with student participation, some with…

  19. Design for Environment as a Tool for the Development of a Sustainable Supply Chain

    CERN Document Server

    Bevilacqua, Maurizio; Giacchetta, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Design is becoming an increasingly significant agenda for many manufacturing companies and yet there is no standard to their approaches, strategies or their levels of execution. Applying Design for Environment (DfE) methodologies to develop a more sustainable supply chain has formed procedures and techniques which allow designers to integrate these methods with environmental supply chain management. Design for Environment as a Tool for the Development of a Sustainable Supply Chain aims to define relevant target specifications for a product throughout its life cycle; from conception and design to the end of its operating life.  Be considering this new approach to the supply chain, environmental responsiveness can work in tandem with sounds business management. The usual focus on suppliers, manufacturers and customers is expanded in Design for Environment as a Tool for the Development of a Sustainable Supply Chain to include stakeholders such as government bodies and recycling companies. The infl...

  20. The potential role of cAMP as a pollution biomarker of terrestrial environments using the land snail Eobania vermiculata: Correlation with lysosomal membrane stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itziou, A.; Dimitriadis, V.K. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). School of Biology

    2009-09-15

    The present study investigates the role of the signal transduction molecule cAMP, and the lysosomal membrane stability (LMS), as biomarkers of terrestrial environmental pollution using the land snail Eobania vermiculata. Snails were exposed to different concentrations of heavy metals (Ca, Pb and Cu) and organic pollutants (chlorpyrifos, parathion-methyl and PAHs) in laboratory conditions for 25 days. In addition, snails were collected from various sites located at different distances away from two polluted areas in northern Greece (the road Agiou Dimitriou in Thessaloniki city and a lignite power station in the district of Kozani). The results of the current investigation showed significantly increased levels of cAMP in the digestive gland of snails, as well as decreased LMS values in all experimental groups compared to control animals. In support of our data, cAMP levels were significantly negatively correlated with the conventional biomarker LMS, thus encouraging the use of cAMP as a new potential stress index in terrestrial pollution biomonitoring studies.

  1. The Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program Terrestrial Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tom; Payne, J.; Doyle, M.

    and coastal environments. The CBMP Terrestrial Plan is a framework to focus and coordinate monitoring of terrestrial biodiversity across the Arctic. The goal of the plan is to improve the collective ability of Arctic traditional knowledge (TK) holders, northern communities, and scientists to detect......The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), the biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council, established the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP) to address the need for coordinated and standardized monitoring of Arctic environments in terrestrial, marine, freshwater...

  2. Learning How to Design a Technology Supported Inquiry-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakverdi-Can, Meral; Sonmez, Duygu

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a study focusing on pre-service teachers' experience of learning how to design a technology supported inquiry-based learning environment using the Internet. As part of their elective course, pre-service science teachers were asked to develop a WebQuest environment targeting middle school students. A WebQuest is an…

  3. Evaluating the Physical Environment of Design Studios: A Case study in Malaysian Private Architecture Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthi Muniandy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the notion of learner’s experiences in the design of physical environment of an architecture design studio is a necessity as it contains certain values of influence. It is due to the unique learning experiences which are accrued particularly in design studio that is continued during professional practice as well. Most architectural campuses in Malaysian Private Higher Education Institutions (MPHEI are devoid of certain important elements and this issue needs to be looked into seriously. Apparently, most architectural design studios today have different physical settings, and have developed their own learning culture based on the typical space that they have. Reviewing the physical environment and how it contributes to the social environ-ment in MPHEI’s architectural context requires certain understanding on the learner’s psycho-logical needs, expectations and in the same time to meet the educational objective which is never an easy task. Hence, this paper reviewed the studies of the possible physical environment approaches in connecting the learner’s connections in architecture studio learning environ-ment. A questionnaire survey with Likert-scale components, and semi-structured interview on learners of five distinguished Private Architectural schools in Malaysia unveiled several signifi-cant findings that can lead entrepreneurs to upgrade the physical environment of these MPHEIs in order to cope with the demands of the stakeholders.

  4. The Design of Software Learning Environments Using Symbolic Computation: Two Case Studies in Pre-calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenne, Dominique; Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste; Gelis, Jean-Michel; Py, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    Describes an approach to the design of learning environments around a computer algebra kernel. Presents two environments to help students learn precalculus. Provides students with symbolic, graphic, and numeric tools as well as functionalities to help them build proofs. (Author/KHR)

  5. Designing "Geometry 2.0" Learning Environments: A Preliminary Study with Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Nuria Joglar; Sordo Juanena, José María; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    The information and communication technologies of Web 2.0 are arriving in our schools, allowing the design and implementation of new learning environments with great educational potential. This article proposes a pedagogical model based on a new geometry technology-integrated learning environment, called "Geometry 2.0," which was tested…

  6. Usability Studies in Virtual and Traditional Computer Aided Design Environments for Fault Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    Usability Studies In Virtual And Traditional Computer Aided Design Environments For Fault Identification Dr. Syed Adeel Ahmed, Xavier University...the differences in interaction when compared with traditional human computer interfaces. This paper provides analysis via usability study methods...communicate their subjective opinions. Keywords: Usability Analysis; CAVETM (Cave Automatic Virtual Environments); Human Computer Interface (HCI

  7. Design A Situated Learning Environment Using Mixed Reality Technology - A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rasimah Che Mohd Yusoff; Halimah Badioze Zaman; Azlina Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Mixed Reality (MR) is one of the newest technologies explored in education. It promises the potential to promote teaching and learning and making learners- experience more "engaging". However, there still lack of research on designing a virtual learning environment using MR technology. In this paper, we describe the Mixed Reality technology, the characteristics of situated learning as instructional design for virtual environment using mixed reality technology. We also exp...

  8. Plug-and-Design: Bringing a Design Environment to a Mobile Device

    OpenAIRE

    MESKENS, Jan; LUYTEN, Kris; CONINX, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the large amount of mobile devices that continue to appear on the consumer market, mobile user interface design becomes increasingly important. The major issue with many existing mobile user interface design approaches is the time and effort that is needed to deploy a user interface design to the target device. In order to address this issue, we propose the plug-and-design tool that relies on a continuous multi-device mouse pointer to design user interfaces directly on the mobile targe...

  9. Plug-and-Design: Embracing Mobile Devices as Part of the Design Environment

    OpenAIRE

    MESKENS, Jan; LUYTEN, Kris; CONINX, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the large amount of mobile devices that continue to appear on the consumer market, mobile user interface design becomes increasingly important. The major issue with many existing mobile user interface design approaches is the time and effort that is needed to deploy a user interface design to the target device. In order to address this issue, we propose the plug-and-design tool that relies on a continuous multi-device mouse pointer to design user interfaces directly on the mobile targe...

  10. Physical and Emotional Benefits of Different Exercise Environments Designed for Treadmill Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Pu Yeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Green physical activity promotes physical health and mental wellbeing and interesting questions concern effects of this information on designing indoor exercise environments. This study examined the physical and emotional effects of different nature-based environments designed for indoor treadmill running; (2 Methods: In a counterbalanced experimental design, 30 participants performed three, twenty-minute treadmill runs at a self-selected pace while viewing either a static nature image, a dynamic nature image or self-selected entertainment. Distance ran, heart rate (HR and five pre-and post-exercise emotional states were measured; (3 Results: Participants ran farther, and with higher HRs, with self-selected entertainment compared to the two nature-based environment designs. Participants attained lowered anger, dejection, anxiety and increased excitement post exercise in all of the designed environments. Happiness increased during the two nature-based environment designs compared with self-selected entertainment; (4 Conclusions: Self-selected entertainment encouraged greater physical performances whereas running in nature-based exercise environments elicited greater happiness immediately after running.

  11. Physical and Emotional Benefits of Different Exercise Environments Designed for Treadmill Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsiao-Pu; Stone, Joseph A; Churchill, Sarah M; Brymer, Eric; Davids, Keith

    2017-07-11

    (1) Background: Green physical activity promotes physical health and mental wellbeing and interesting questions concern effects of this information on designing indoor exercise environments. This study examined the physical and emotional effects of different nature-based environments designed for indoor treadmill running; (2) Methods: In a counterbalanced experimental design, 30 participants performed three, twenty-minute treadmill runs at a self-selected pace while viewing either a static nature image, a dynamic nature image or self-selected entertainment. Distance ran, heart rate (HR) and five pre-and post-exercise emotional states were measured; (3) Results: Participants ran farther, and with higher HRs, with self-selected entertainment compared to the two nature-based environment designs. Participants attained lowered anger, dejection, anxiety and increased excitement post exercise in all of the designed environments. Happiness increased during the two nature-based environment designs compared with self-selected entertainment; (4) Conclusions: Self-selected entertainment encouraged greater physical performances whereas running in nature-based exercise environments elicited greater happiness immediately after running.

  12. Promoting Participation Through the Universal Design of Built Environments: Making it Happen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Watchorn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental design is a determinant of social inclusion and people’s participation in life roles. Design that does not cater for a diverse range of ages, abilities and cultures restricts people’s access to, and use of, domestic or public premises. Universal design is an approach that acknowledges diversity of populations and encourages designers to create objects and places that are usable by the greatest majority of users. Although there are potential benefits to the widest application of universal design within society, such application is not mandatory within Australia. This paper presents findings from an Australian qualitative study that explored universal design as a means of facilitating greater environmental access for all. The views of experts working within the field of architecture and environmental access were explored regarding factors that restrict or facilitate application of universal design to the design of built environments. Study findings revealed a number of themes relating to factors that may restrain, ‘what’s holding us back?’ and factors that may facilitate application of universal design, ‘making it happen’. These findings have direct relevance to those involved in the planning and design of built environments, policy developers and educators. Keywords: Universal design, architecture, occupational therapy, built environments, barriers, facilitators, inter-professional education

  13. INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF EMPLOYING IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT ON ENHANCING SPATIAL PERCEPTION WITHIN DESIGN PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawan Taisser Abu Alatta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent developments in Information Technology (IT and digital media have introduced new opportunities to design studio and new dimensions to design and architecture. The current research studies how the immersion of Virtual Reality (VR in architectural design studio affects spatial perception through the design process. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of using such environments on changing the way how to design for human experience: how it will improve students' spatial understanding of Three Dimensions (3D volumes, and how it will enhance their imagination, enrich their creativity and promote their ability to experience their design's sensations. This study hypothesizes that using an immersive virtual environment in design studio will empower students' imaginations and give them the ability to understand and experience their ideas. It will give them the opportunity to check their design's validity with greater 3D exploration, understanding and comprehension of spatial volumes.  Within a framework of an experimental design research, a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate what had been assumed.  The research used teaching, monitoring, explanatory observation and evaluation methods. The results showed that VR can not only enhance spatial perception and improve the design, but also it can affect the design process and make changes in the architectural design way of thinking. It can help designers to incorporate human experience within the design process.

  14. A new approach in the design of an interactive environment for teaching Hamiltonian digraphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iordan, A E; Panoiu, M

    2014-01-01

    In this article the authors present the necessary steps in object orientated design of an interactive environment that is dedicated to the process of acquaintances assimilation in Hamiltonian graphs theory domain, especially for the simulation of algorithms which determine the Hamiltonian trails and circuits. The modelling of the interactive environment is achieved through specific UML diagrams representing the steps of analysis, design and implementation. This interactive environment is very useful for both students and professors, because computer programming domain, especially digraphs theory domain is comprehended and assimilated with difficulty by students

  15. Designing inclusive environments: rehabilitating the body and the relevance of universal design

    OpenAIRE

    Imrie, Rob; Luck, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The papers in this issue reflect participants' disquiet with the theoretical and conceptual content of universal design, and the epistemological and methodological bases shaping its understanding of disability and design. What seems to dominate is a positivistic, scientific, tradition, placing emphasis on the production of technical, objective, knowledge and its applications. Here, a dominant focus is process-based techniques, and the evaluation of universal design in relation to issues of te...

  16. Microplastics in the terrestrial ecosystem: Implications for Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza; Gertsen, H.F.; Gooren, H.; Peters, P.D.; Salanki, T.E.; Ploeg, van der M.J.C.; Besseling, E.; Koelmans, A.A.; Geissen, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plastic debris is widespread in the environment, but information on the effects of microplastics on terrestrial fauna is completely lacking. Here, we studied the survival and fitness of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) exposed to microplastics (Polyethylene, <150 μm)

  17. Bridging Theory and Practice: Developing Guidelines to Facilitate the Design of Computer-based Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa D. Young

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The design of computer-based learning environments has undergone a paradigm shift; moving students away from instruction that was considered to promote technical rationality grounded in objectivism, to the application of computers to create cognitive tools utilized in constructivist environments. The goal of the resulting computer-based learning environment design principles is to have students learn with technology, rather than from technology. This paper reviews the general constructivist theory that has guided the development of these environments, and offers suggestions for the adaptation of modest, generic guidelines, not mandated principles, that can be flexibly applied and allow for the expression of true constructivist ideals in online learning environments.

  18. Developing a Conceptual Framework for Participatory Design of Psychosocial and Physical Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Tiina; Helfenstein, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    The present study shows how the mixed-methods approach can be used in capturing and organising learning environment (LE) characteristics for the participatory design of psychosocial and physical LEs involving learners. Theoretical constructs were tested and further elaborated on in the analysis of two similar educational design research studies:…

  19. An Evaluation-Driven Design Approach to Develop Learning Environments Based on Full-Body Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, Laura; Schaper, Marie-Monique; Pares, Narcís

    2016-01-01

    The development of learning environments based on full-body interaction has become an increasingly important field of research in recent years. However, the design and evaluation strategies currently used present some significant limitations. Two major shortcomings are: the inadequate involvement of children in the design process and a lack of…

  20. Essential perspectives for Design for Environment : Experiences from the electronics industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, C.B.; Stevels, A.L.N.

    2007-01-01

    Consolidation of knowledge, information and experiences in application of Design for Environment principles is done at various levels, ranging from easy to understand slogans to design guidelines, and even to tailor-made solutions. This brings about that dissemination of this knowledge should be

  1. Homeostasis of Complementary Pair Theory: Ecological Comparisons in Diverse Universal Design for Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianneo, Brittany

    2014-01-01

    Accommodation~assimilation relations were theorized by Kelso and Engstrom (2006) as independent and dependent complementary pairs. This study defined relationships between organisms that experienced complementary interactions of accommodation~assimilation in diverse ecologies designed with universal design for learning environments (UDLE) compared…

  2. Cross-Cultural Interface Design and the Classroom-Learning Environment in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Lin; Su, Yelin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether using localized interface designs would make a difference in users' learning results and their perceptions of the interface design in a classroom learning environment. This study also sought to learn more about users' attitudes toward the localized interface features. To assess the impact of using localized interfaces…

  3. The Interface Design and the Usability Testing of a Fossilization Web-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiang-Kwei; Yang, Chiachi

    2005-01-01

    This article describes practical issues related to the design and the development of a Web-Based Learning Environment (Web-LE) for high school students. The purpose of the Fossilization Web-LE was to help students understand the process of fossilization, which is a complex phenomenon and is affected by many factors. The instructional design team…

  4. Physical Environment as a 3-D Textbook: Design and Development of a Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Seng Yeap; Yaacob, Naziaty Mohd; Ariffin, Ati Rosemary Mohd

    2015-01-01

    The use of the physical environment as a three-dimensional (3-D) textbook is not a common practice in educational facilities design. Previous researches documented that little progress has been made to incorporate environmental education (EE) into architecture, especially among the conventional designers who are often constrained by the budget and…

  5. A Framework for Adaptive Learning Design in a Web-Conferencing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Many recent technologies provide the ability to dynamically adjust the interface depending on the emerging cognitive and collaborative needs of the learning episode. This means that educators can adaptively re-design the learning environment during the lesson, rather than purely relying on preemptive learning design thinking. Based on a…

  6. The Impact of Urban Design Descriptors on Outdoor Thermal Environment: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingying Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a literature review on urban design indicators addressing the impact of urban geometry and vegetation on the outdoor thermal environment at the pedestrian level, as urban geometry and vegetation have been regarded as the most influential urban design factors that affect outdoor microclimate. The thermal balance concept is first introduced to elaborate how each component of energy fluxes is affected by the urban built environment, which helps to explore the underlying thermophysical mechanisms of how urban design modifies the outdoor thermal environment. The literature on numerous urban design descriptors addressing urban geometric characteristics is categorized into five groups in this paper according to the design features that the parameters entail, including land use intensity, building form, canyon geometry, space enclosure and descriptive characteristics. The literature on urban vegetation descriptors is reviewed together, followed by the combined effect of urban geometry and vegetation. This paper identifies a series of important urban design parameters and shows that the impact of design parameters on thermal environment varies with time, season, local climate and urban contexts. Contradictory impacts often occur between daytime and nighttime, or different seasons, which requests trade-offs to be achieved when proposing design strategies.

  7. What if Undergraduate Students Designed Their Own Web Learning Environment? Exploring Students' Web 2.0 Mentality through Participatory Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaigeorgiou, G.; Triantafyllakos, G.; Tsinakos, A.

    2011-01-01

    Following the increasing calls for a more skeptical analysis of web 2.0 and the empowerment of learners' voices in formulating upcoming technologies, this paper elaborates on the participatory design of a web learning environment. A total of 117 undergraduate students from two Greek Informatics Departments participated in 25 participatory design…

  8. The Sustainable Expression of Ecological Concept in the Urban Landscape Environment Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Junyan; Zhou, Tiejun; Xin, Lisen; Tan, Yuetong; Wang, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    Urbanization is an inevitable trend of development of human society, also the inevitable outcome of economic development and scientific and technological progress, while urbanization process in promoting the development of human civilization, also no doubt, urban landscape has been a corresponding impact. Urban environment has suffered unprecedented damage, the urban population density, traffic congestion, shortage of resources, environmental pollution, ecological degradation, has become the focus of human society. In order to create an environment of ecological and harmonious, beautiful, sustainable development in the urban landscape, This paper discusses the concept of ecological design combined with the urban landscape design and sustainable development of urban landscape design.

  9. Launch Vehicle Design and Optimization Methods and Priority for the Advanced Engineering Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Lawrence F.; Korte, John J.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a research and development program that will improve collaboration among design engineers for launch vehicle conceptual design and provide the infrastructure (methods and framework) necessary to enable that environment. In this paper, three major technical challenges facing the AEE program are identified, and three specific design problems are selected to demonstrate how advanced methods can improve current design activities. References are made to studies that demonstrate these design problems and methods, and these studies will provide the detailed information and check cases to support incorporation of these methods into the AEE. This paper provides background and terminology for discussing the launch vehicle conceptual design problem so that the diverse AEE user community can participate in prioritizing the AEE development effort.

  10. Evaluating the Physical Environment of Design Studios: A Case study in Malaysian Private Architecture Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Shanthi Muniandy; Tareef Hayat Khan; Abdullah Sani Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the notion of learner’s experiences in the design of physical environment of an architecture design studio is a necessity as it contains certain values of influence. It is due to the unique learning experiences which are accrued particularly in design studio that is continued during professional practice as well. Most architectural campuses in Malaysian Private Higher Education Institutions (MPHEI) are devoid of certain important elements and this issue needs to be looked into s...

  11. An Agent Based Approach To Finding Expertise In The Engineering Design Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Crowder, Richard; Hughes, Gareth; Hall, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    During the engineering design process people need to locate colleagues with knowledge to resolve a problem. As identified by discussions with practicing designers the use of computer based systems that assist users with finding such expertise will become increasingly important. In this paper we discuss the development of an agent based Expertise Finder suitable for use within an engineering design environment. A key feature of our approach is that the Expertise Finder returns both recommended...

  12. A Participatory Design Approach to Develop an Interactive Sound Environment Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Geir K; Dahl, Yngve

    2016-10-01

    Our purpose is to provide insight into the added value of applying a participatory design approach in the design of an interactive sound environment simulator to facilitate communication and understanding between patients and audiologists in consultation situations. We have applied a qualitative approach, presenting results and discussion in the form of a story, following 3 consecutive steps: problem investigation, design, and evaluation. We provide an overview of lessons learned, emphasizing how patients and audiologists took roles and responsibilities in the design process and the effects of this involvement. Our results suggest that participatory design is a viable and practical approach to address multifaceted problems directly affecting patients and practitioners.

  13. Bridging the Design-Science Gap with Tools: Science Learning and Design Behaviors in a Simulated Environment for Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Xie, Charles; Nourian, Saeid; Chen, Guanhua; Bailey, Siobhan; Goldstein, Molly H.; Purzer, Senay; Adams, Robin S.; Tutwiler, M. Shane

    2017-01-01

    Many pedagogical innovations aim to integrate engineering design and science learning. However, students frequently show little attempt or have difficulties in connecting their design projects with the underlying science. Drawing upon the Cultural-Historical Activity Theory, we argue that the design tools available in a learning environment…

  14. The terrestrial alteration of saharan shergottites dar al gani 476 and 489: a case study of weathering in a hot desert environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozaz, Ghislaine; Wadhwa, Meenakshi

    2001-03-01

    Rare earth element (REE) and other selected trace and minor element concentrations were determined in various phases of Dar al Gani 476 and 489, two basaltic shergottites recently found in the Libyan Sahara. Whereas merrillite and feldspathic glass compositions do not seem to have been altered since the fall of these meteorites, olivine and pyroxenes commonly show light REE enrichments, sometimes accompanied by Ce anomalies, that are attributed to terrestrial alteration. Sr and Ba enrichments are also observed. The calcium carbonate that resides in most cracks is essentially devoid of REE but a fine-grained amorphous silicate material that fills some veins and pockets has striking light REE enrichments and elevated P, Sr, and Ba. It is argued that this material, likely to be impact melt, as well as the notoriously light REE-poor olivine and pyroxenes, were preferentially affected by a crustal light REE-rich contaminant. Caution is urged when using whole rock, or even mineral separate, compositional, and isotopic data for hot desert meteorites.

  15. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  16. THE EFFECTS OF BUILT ENVIRONMENT DESIGN ON OPPORTUNITIES FOR WELLBEING IN CARE HOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley J McIntyre

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The built environment influences the wellbeing of older people in care homes. In order to design for enablement, physical activity, and social connectivity there are lessons to be learnt from current care home buildings. Uncovering this design information is key for the future improvement of environments for older people. To the field of architecture, this paper presents an analysis of ethnographic observations (utilising an adapted form of the AEIOU heuristic from five urban care homes in the UK. Findings provide insight into the qualities of the built environment that have impact on the activity and potential wellbeing of older residents. Five significant qualities of the built environment are identified:  Spatial Legibility, Spatial Interconnectedness, Spatial Traversability, Spatial Diversity, and Spatial Aesthetics.

  17. Multi-language Co-design Environment for Controller System Design

    OpenAIRE

    M. Benmohammed; S. Merniz

    2005-01-01

    The present research discuss the main issues and approaches to multi-language design. Two research directions are currently explored by the EDA community. The first is based on the computation models underlying the languages while the second deals with the specification languages themselves.

  18. The signal software environment for real-time system specification, design, and implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Benveniste , Albert; Le Guernic , Paul; Jacquemot , Christian

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, "reactive systems", i.e. systems which interact permanently with their environment, are considered. Such systems are encountered, for instance, in real-time control or signal processing systems, command-control-communication system, man-machine interfaces, to mention just a few. We present the Signal software environment designed and developped at INRIA-IRISA and its formal calculus system to perform the above mentioned tasks. We outline the principles of the Signal "synchronou...

  19. Facility of Laboratories for Sustainable Habitation - an Initial Design of a Closed-Loop Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Quantius, Dominik; Schubert, Daniel; Maiwald, Volker; Parìs Lopéz, Rosa; Hauslage, Jens; Seboldt, Wolfgang; Doule, Ondrej; Schlacht, Irene Lia; Ransom, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    An effective and self-sustainable artificial habitat design is essential for human spaceflight and expansion of mankind into orbit or towards other celestial bodies. Besides the necessity to create an artificial habitat for the extreme environments of space, development of a self-sustainable habitat can also enable more effective exploration of extreme environments on Earth. One major application of the habitat’s closed-loop capabilities can also be in enabling ecological habitation of human ...

  20. Context-sensitive User Interfaces for Ambient Environments: Design, Development and Deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Luyten, Kris; Vandervelpen, Chris; Van den Bergh, Jan; Coninx, Karin

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing demand for design support to create interactive systems that are deployed in ambient intelligent environments. Unlike traditional interactive systems, the wide diversity of situations these type of user interfaces need to work in require tool-support that is close to the environment of the end-user on the one hand and provide a smooth integration with the application logic on the other hand. This paper shows how the Model-Based User Interface Development methodology can be ...

  1. Involvement of Student Teachers and Pupils in Designing and Manipulating Virtual Learning Environments Impacts Reading Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Zaretsky

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at investigating the involvement of student teachers and pupils in designing and manipulating virtual learning environment and its impact on reading achievements through action research. In order to understand the connection between the real and virtual worlds, the design of such simulations is based on applying the virtual environment to the real world as much as possible. The objects were taken from the pupils’ everyday environment and unique motivation. The researcher taught the method to 30 student teachers. Such procedures were held among different populations. The findings showed that as the student teachers practiced the simulation design through the PowerPoint Software, it became clear to them how the computer can be implemented in their practical work. Consequently, their presentations became highly animated, and applied to the pupils

  2. OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTS AT CRISIS SHELTERS: User Needs and Preferences with Respect to Design and Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. Lygum

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify implications for the design of outdoor environments at crisis shelters for women and children survivors of domestic violence. To address this aim, landscape analyses and interviews with staff were conducted at three Danish cases. The findings are presented in descriptions of the three cases in terms of the number of residents, context, building type and the characteristics of outdoor environments. Furthermore, a thematic content analysis of the interviews resulted in five categories that offer a nuanced insight into how the different types of outdoor environments support crisis shelter functions. The categories are: Protection against perpetrators of violence and helping residents to feel safe; Accessibility in the design, straightforward activities and staff guidance; Being outside and the positive distractions of nature; Space for all; Room to play and relieve children’s feelings. Finally, the findings were summarized to give an overview of implications for design.

  3. Ecological transfer mechanisms - Terrestrial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.E.; Raines, Gilbert E.; Bloom, S.G.; Levin, A.A.

    1969-01-01

    Radionuclides produced by nuclear excavation detonations and released to the environment may enter a variety of biogeochemical cycles and follow essentially the same transfer pathways as their stable-element counterparts. Estimation of potential internal radiation doses to individuals and/or populations living in or near fallout-contaminated areas requires analysis of the food-chain and other ecological pathways by which radionuclides released to the environment may be returned to man. A generalized materials transfer diagram, applicable to the forest, agricultural, freshwater and marine ecosystems providing food and water to the indigenous population of Panama and Colombia in regions that could be affected by nuclear excavation of a sea-level canal between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, is presented. Transfer mechanisms effecting the movement of stable elements and radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems are discussed, and methods used to simulate these processes by means of mathematical models are described to show how intake values are calculated for different radionuclides in the major ecological pathways leading to man. These data provide a basis for estimating potential internal radiation doses for comparison with the radiation protection criteria established by recognized authorities; and this, in turn, provides a basis for recommending measures to insure the radiological safety of the nuclear operation plan. (author)

  4. On the Design of Smart Homes: A Framework for Activity Recognition in Home Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicirelli, Franco; Fortino, Giancarlo; Giordano, Andrea; Guerrieri, Antonio; Spezzano, Giandomenico; Vinci, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    A smart home is a home environment enriched with sensing, actuation, communication and computation capabilities which permits to adapt it to inhabitants preferences and requirements. Establishing a proper strategy of actuation on the home environment can require complex computational tasks on the sensed data. This is the case of activity recognition, which consists in retrieving high-level knowledge about what occurs in the home environment and about the behaviour of the inhabitants. The inherent complexity of this application domain asks for tools able to properly support the design and implementation phases. This paper proposes a framework for the design and implementation of smart home applications focused on activity recognition in home environments. The framework mainly relies on the Cloud-assisted Agent-based Smart home Environment (CASE) architecture offering basic abstraction entities which easily allow to design and implement Smart Home applications. CASE is a three layered architecture which exploits the distributed multi-agent paradigm and the cloud technology for offering analytics services. Details about how to implement activity recognition onto the CASE architecture are supplied focusing on the low-level technological issues as well as the algorithms and the methodologies useful for the activity recognition. The effectiveness of the framework is shown through a case study consisting of a daily activity recognition of a person in a home environment.

  5. Design of a simulation environment for laboratory management by robot organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Bernard P.; Cellier, Francois E.; Rozenblit, Jerzy W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the basic concepts needed for a simulation environment capable of supporting the design of robot organizations for managing chemical, or similar, laboratories on the planned U.S. Space Station. The environment should facilitate a thorough study of the problems to be encountered in assigning the responsibility of managing a non-life-critical, but mission valuable, process to an organized group of robots. In the first phase of the work, we seek to employ the simulation environment to develop robot cognitive systems and strategies for effective multi-robot management of chemical experiments. Later phases will explore human-robot interaction and development of robot autonomy.

  6. Integrated Design Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment - Aerodynamics, Aerothermodynamics, and Thermal Protection System Integration Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hilmi N.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the work performed during from March 2010 October 2011. The Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) environment is a collaborative environment based on an object-oriented, multidisciplinary, distributed environment using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) as the underlying framework. This report will focus on describing the work done in the area of extending the aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics module using S/HABP, CBAERO, PREMIN and LANMIN. It will also detail the work done integrating EXITS as the TPS sizing tool.

  7. Design for unusual environment (space). Complementary use of modelling and testing phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambiaghi, Danilo; Cambiaghi, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Designing for space requires a great imagination effort from the designer. He must perceive that the stresses experimented by the facilities he is designing will be quite different in space (during the mission), in launch phase and on ground (before launch handling phase), and he must design for all such environmental conditions. Furthermore he must design for mechanical and thermal environment, which often lead to conflicting needs. Virtual models may help very much in balancing the conflicting requirements, but models must be validated to be reliable. Test phase help validating the models, but may overstress the items. The aim of the designer is to reach an efficient and safe design through a balanced use of creativity, modelling and testing

  8. Designing health care environments: Part I. Basic concepts, principles, and issues related to evidence-based design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Sandra K

    2009-06-01

    A 2001 Institute of Medicine report captured the nation's attention regarding the dangers that can result from the health care environment. This report, fueled by the need for new facilities to be constructed, led to an explosion of research that now links the physical structure and design of health care facilities to the health and well-being of patients, nurses, other health care workers, and visitors. Continuing nursing education that highlights the importance of evidence-based design has been associated with measurable improvement in health care facilities' clinical outcomes, economic performance, employee productivity, customer satisfaction, and cultural congruency. Three major categories of outcomes can be impacted by evidence-based design: stress reduction, safety, and overall health care quality and ecology. In this article, Part I of a two-part series, the basic concepts, principles, and issues related to evidence-based design are introduced. Part II will describe continuing education programs available for nurses.

  9. Software Architecture Design for Spatially-Indexed Media in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCHIPOR, O.-A.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce in this work a new software architecture design, based on well-established web communication protocols and scripting languages, for implementing spatially-indexed media in smart environments. We based our approach on specific design guidelines. Our concept of spatially-indexed media enables users to readily instantiate mappings between digital content and specific regions of the physical space. We present an implementation of the architecture using a motion capture system, a large visualization display, and several smart devices. We also present an experimental evaluation of our new software architecture by reporting response times function of changes in the complexity of physical-digital environment.

  10. Integrated Design Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment Automated Generation of Structured CFD Grids using Topology Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hilmi N.

    2012-01-01

    This report documents the work performed from March 2010 to March 2012. The Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) environment is a collaborative environment based on an object-oriented, multidisciplinary, distributed framework using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) as a framework and supporting the configuration design and parametric CFD grid generation. This report will focus on describing the work in the area of parametric CFD grid generation using novel concepts for defining the interaction between the mesh topology and the geometry in such a way as to separate the mesh topology from the geometric topology while maintaining the link between the mesh topology and the actual geometry.

  11. Blockchain to Rule the Waves - Nascent Design Principles for Reducing Risk and Uncertainty in Decentralized Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nærland, Kristoffer; Müller-Bloch, Christoph; Beck, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Many decentralized, inter-organizational environments such as supply chains are characterized by high transactional uncertainty and risk. At the same time, blockchain technology promises to mitigate these issues by introducing certainty into economic transactions. This paper discusses the findings...... on our insights from the project, we provide first evidence for preliminary design principles for applications that aim to mitigate the transactional risk and uncertainty in decentralized environments using blockchain. Both the artifact and the first evidence for emerging design principles are novel......, contributing to the discourse on the implications that the advent of blockchain technology poses for governing economic activity....

  12. Can a Virtual Design Environment Enhance Group Creativity and the Use of Stimuli?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Ed; Chamakiotis, Petros; Howard, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    of generating idea in such a fashion. This paper puts together three ways of improving the group brainstorming session; working in nominal groups, using stimuli and working in a virtual team. The final sections sets out recommendations for a future virtual design environment capable of supporting group......It is a common perception that creativity for design is best performed in a collaborative, group environment. Group idea generation and brainstorm sessions are of widespread practice across industries. This technique remains popular despite numerous studies highlighting the inefficiencies...

  13. A model for design of tailored working environment intervention programmes for small enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasle, Peter; Kvorning, Laura V; Rasmussen, Charlotte Dn; Smith, Louise H; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

    2012-09-01

    Small enterprises have higher exposure to occupational hazards compared to larger enterprises and further, they have fewer resources to control the risks. In order to improve the working environment, development of efficient measures is therefore a major challenge for regulators and other stakeholders. The aim of this paper is to develop a systematic model for the design of tailored intervention programmes meeting the needs of small enterprises. An important challenge for the design process is the transfer of knowledge from one context to another. The concept of realist analysis can provide insight into mechanisms by which intervention knowledge can be transferred from one context to another. We use this theoretical approach to develop a design model. THE MODEL CONSIST OF FIVE STEPS: 1) Defining occupational health and safety challenges of the target group, 2) selecting methods to improve the working environment, 3) developing theories about mechanisms which motivate the target group, 4) analysing the specific context of the target group for small enterprise programmes including owner-management role, social relations, and the perception of the working environment, and 5) designing the intervention based on the preceding steps. We demonstrate how the design model can be applied in practice by the development of an intervention programme for small enterprises in the construction industry. The model provides a useful tool for a systematic design process. The model makes it transparent for both researchers and practitioners as to how existing knowledge can be used in the design of new intervention programmes.

  14. Sensitvie life detection strategies for low-biomass environments: optimizing extraction of nucleic acids adsorbing to terrestrial and Mars analogue minerals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Direito, S.O.L.; Marees, A.; Roling, W.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of nucleic acids to mineral matrixes can result in low extraction yields and negatively influences molecular microbial ecology studies, in particular for low-biomass environments on Earth and Mars. We determined the recovery of nucleic acids from a range of minerals relevant to Earth

  15. Design, construction, and validation of a scale to measure cyberbullying in a work environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz N. Fernández-López

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to design, construct, and validate a scale to measure cyberbullying in a work environment. The design used was quantitative, not experimental, and transversal. The research method was based on the Reactive Response Theory. This research produced a validated scale with a sample of the work environment in Puerto Rico. Three analyses were performed: content validity, reliability analysis of the Cronbach alpha coefficient, and the divergent type construct validity. Based on the analysis of the results, the scale was deemed to be useful for the purpose it was designed. Building a scale that measures cyberbullying contributes to the design of new instruments and the revision of existing ones; furthermore, it may serve as the basis for future re- search related to the topic of cyberbullying.

  16. Software Engineering Environment for Component-based Design of Embedded Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yu

    2010-01-01

    as well as application models in a computer-aided software engineering environment. Furthermore, component models have been realized following carefully developed design patterns, which provide for an efficient and reusable implementation. The components have been ultimately implemented as prefabricated......, validation, and executable code generation for specific hardware platforms. Developing such an environment and the associated tools is a highly complex engineering task. Therefore, this thesis has investigated key design issues and analysed existing platforms supporting model-driven software development...... software technology, which is largely based on informal design methods and manual coding techniques. That is why it is necessary to develop new design methods and tools that will eventually help improve existing practices. These considerations have motivated the development of the framework -- Component...

  17. Ceramic MEMS Designed for Wireless Pressure Monitoring in the Industrial Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlin, Marko; Belavic, Darko; Novak, Franc

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a wireless pressure-monitoring system for harsh-environment applications. Two types of ceramic pressure sensors made with a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) were considered. The first type is a piezoresistive strain gauge pressure sensor. The second type is a capacitive pressure sensor, which is based on changes of the capacitance values between two electrodes: one electrode is fixed and the other is movable under an applied pressure. The design was pri...

  18. Relationship between Process, form and Representation in the Design Environment of 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Onur TURAN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Research in design and design methodologies began to appear in industrialized societies in the 1950s and 1960s and design, as an act been described in various ways. After this period, examination of, and debates over the contents and components of design, as well as such topics as the thinking process of the designer, gradually increased and in this context new theories and methods emerged. Today, these examinations and debates have gained a new dimension in terms of developments in science and technology, particularly with the involvement of computer environment and computational technologies in the design process. This work is focused on the interactive transformations between the process, form and representation which determine contemporary architectural discourse.

  19. INCORPORATING THE BEHAVIORAL DIMENSION IN DESIGNING INCLUSIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT FOR AUTISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Khare

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In last two decades environment and behavior studies has profoundly influenced the practice of architecture and there is growing trend towards people-centered and evidence-based design. The field has tremendous application in designing for special needs; most of the researches on designing for special groups, accessibility codes and design guidelines are based on the functional needs of the users, necessity to explore potential of behavioral aspects to design for people with cognitive limitations is felt though. In the present research, the systematic study of behavioral features in autism has provided a wealth of understanding that is applied to the process of design. There are several stages to this research project, in initial stage, learning behaviors of children, their strength and weakness in educational spaces helped in defining ‘enabling environment’ for autism, which is tested in the subsequent stages to provide evidence based body of knowledge that is expected to help architects and designers to design autism friendly inclusive educational spaces. The purpose of this paper is to present the enabling aspects of educational environment for children with autism and measure their affects on functional performance.

  20. An Overview of NASA's Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the design of subsonic and supersonic aircraft has been divided into separate technical disciplines (such as propulsion, aerodynamics and structures), each of which performs design and analysis in relative isolation from others. This is possible, in most cases, either because the amount of interdisciplinary coupling is minimal, or because the interactions can be treated as linear. The design of hypersonic airbreathing vehicles, like NASA's X-43, is quite the opposite. Such systems are dominated by strong non-linear interactions between disciplines. The design of these systems demands that a multi-disciplinary approach be taken. Furthermore, increased analytical fidelity at the conceptual design phase is highly desirable, as many of the non-linearities are not captured by lower fidelity tools. Only when these systems are designed from a true multi-disciplinary perspective, can the real performance benefits be achieved and complete vehicle systems be fielded. Toward this end, the Vehicle Analysis Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has been developing the Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment. IDEA is a collaborative environment for parametrically modeling conceptual and preliminary designs for launch vehicle and high speed atmospheric flight configurations using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) as the underlying framework. The environment integrates geometry, packaging, propulsion, trajectory, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, engine and airframe subsystem design, thermal and structural analysis, and vehicle closure into a generative, parametric, unified computational model where data is shared seamlessly between the different disciplines. Plans are also in place to incorporate life cycle analysis tools into the environment which will estimate vehicle operability, reliability and cost. IDEA is currently being funded by NASA?s Hypersonics Project, a part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program within the Aeronautics

  1. Addressing Challenges to the Design & Test of Operational Lighting Environments for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Toni A.

    2014-01-01

    In our day to day lives, the availability of light, with which to see our environment, is often taken for granted. The designers of land based lighting systems use sunlight and artificial light as their toolset. The availability of power, quantity of light sources, and variety of design options are often unlimited. The accessibility of most land based lighting systems makes it easy for the architect and engineer to verify and validate their design ideas. Failures with an implementation, while sometimes costly, can easily be addressed by renovation. Consider now, an architectural facility orbiting in space, 260 miles above the surface of the earth. This human rated architectural facility, the International Space Station (ISS) must maintain operations every day, including life support and appropriate human comforts without fail. The facility must also handle logistics of regular shipments of cargo, including new passengers. The ISS requires accommodations necessary for human control of machine systems. Additionally, the ISS is a research facility and supports investigations performed inside and outside its livable volume. Finally, the facility must support remote operations and observations by ground controllers. All of these architectural needs require a functional, safe, and even an aesthetic lighting environment. At Johnson Space Center, our Habitability and Human Factors team assists our diverse customers with their lighting environment challenges, via physical test and computer based analysis. Because of the complexity of ISS operational environment, our team has learned and developed processes that help ISS operate safely. Because of the dynamic exterior lighting environment, uses computational modeling to predict the lighting environment. The ISS' orbit exposes it to a sunrise every 90 minutes, causing work surfaces to quickly change from direct sunlight to earthshine to total darkness. Proper planning of vehicle approaches, robotics operations, and crewed

  2. Environmental aspects: - Atmospheric, - aquatic, - terrestrial dispersion of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmann, R.

    1982-01-01

    After general introductory remarks the paper deals with the dispersion of radionuclides in the atmosphere and in the aquatic environment as well as with the transfer through the terrestrial environment. (RW)

  3. Learning from and with Museum Objects: Design Perspectives, Environment, and Emerging Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Henriikka; Enkenberg, Jorma

    2013-01-01

    Sociocultural approaches emphasize the systemic, context-bound nature of learning, which is mediated by other people, physical and conceptual artifacts, and tools. However, current educational systems tend not to approach learning from the systemic perspective, and mostly situate learning within classroom environments. This design-based research…

  4. Pedagogical, Social and Technical Designs of a Blended Synchronous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiyun; Huang, Changqin

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a blended synchronous learning environment (BSLE) was designed from pedagogical, social and technical perspectives. It was created for a group of master's students to attend lessons in the classroom and at the same time allow a few of them to join the identical sessions using video conferencing from different sites. The purpose of…

  5. Designing a Web-Based Distance Learning Environment Based on an Intelligent Tutoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolti, Codrin; Voinea, Lucian; Dima, Gabriel; Miu, Ion; Profirescu, Marcel

    This paper describes a distributed approach toward designing an Intelligent Tutoring System for the World Wide Web (WWW) at the University "Politehnica" of Bucharest (Romania). This approach was implemented in the EDIT Learning Environment and is defined by the following features: a WWW dedicated architecture, a distributed way of…

  6. Best Practices for Designing Online Learning Environments for 3D Modeling Curricula: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapson, Kathleen Harrell

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an inventory of best practices for designing online learning environments for 3D modeling curricula. Due to the instructional complexity of three-dimensional modeling, few have sought to develop this type of course for online teaching and learning. Considering this, the study aimed to collectively aggregate…

  7. Embedding an Integrated Learning Environment and Digital Repository in Design Engineering Education: Lessons Learned for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Caroline; Nicol, David; Grierson, Hilary; Wodehouse, Andrew; Juster, Neal; Ion, William

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes how a system comprising a learning environment and digital repository is being embedded into the teaching and learning of Design Engineering at the University of Strathclyde. It then maps out the issues that have been encountered, how these have been overcome and how other departments or institutions would be affected if they…

  8. Instructional Control of Cognitive Load in the Design of Complex Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Liesbeth; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Kester, L., Paas, F., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2010). Instructional control of cognitive load in the design of complex learning environments. In J. L. Plass, R. Moreno, & Roland Brünken (Eds.), Cognitive Load Theory (pp. 109-130). New York: Cambridge University Press.

  9. The Integrated Design for Micro - environment Monitoring System of Showcase in Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Chan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the current environment quality of cultural relics in museum and make them preserved for a long time, the paper proposes the integrated design for micro - environment monitoring system of showcase in museum, the system mainly monitors the micro-environment of heritage, such as ultraviolet, light, formaldehyde, CO2, TVOC, PM 2.5, choosing cotex-M3 ARM microcontroller STM32F103ZET6 as the control core. Based on the concept of integration, the system integrates the single air monitoring instruments. The design of circuit mainly includes the process of digital power supply and analog power supply, the acquisition and processing of 5 analog signals from sensors, and the design of reserved interface. In the aspect of interaction, the serial port lcd module was uesd for the display and control, which can get rid of the control of PC and achieve the functions of environmental monitoring, environmental warning, environmental assessment, historical data query. The integrated design for Micro-environment of Showcase in Museum achieves a monitoring platform successfully which is easy for users’ operation and access to display information conveniently. The advantages of the system are strong portability, low cost and short development cycle.

  10. Design and Implementation of a Space Environment Simulation Toolbox for Small Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Larsen, Jesper A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a developed toolbox for space environment model in SIMULINK that facilitates development and design of Attitude Determination and Control Systems (ADCS) for a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The toolbox includes, among others, models of orbit propagators, disturbances, Earth...

  11. Evaluation of a ubiquitous learning system in a design engineering environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroom, R.W.; Horvath, I.; Rusak, Z.; De Smit, A.; Opiyo, E.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing is computing power that is integrated in devices and environments in such a way that they offer optimal support to human daily life activities. For industrial design engineering students, applying ubiquitous technologies offer a great opportunity and challenge for innovating

  12. National design environment for pulp mills; Kansallinen paperitehtaan suunnitteluympaeristoe - PMST 03

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaijaluoto, S. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    The research to be done in the CACTUS research programme produces new process models and generates new knowledge about the influence of various contaminants on the runnability and the quality of paper. The generated information calls for an environment where it can be analysed and utilised. The goal of the project is to build a design environment for papermaking processes. The environment will be composed of a number of tools, all integrated together, that can be used in process design from preliminary concept screening through detailed simulation studies to the design and tuning of control systems. The design environment is based on the Balas and APMS simulation programmes developed at VTT. Balas is a general steady-state simulation package for chemical processes with emphasis on pulp and paper. Recent applications include the analysis of the influence of new drying techniques on the energy and water management of a paper mill and the evaluation of new paper machine and water treatment concepts. APMS (Advanced Pulp and Paper Mill Simulator) is a new flexible tool intended for fast modelling and efficient simulation of the dynamic performance the various unit processes in pulp and paper mill, or even of the whole integrated mill. (orig.)

  13. Online Learning Environments: A Report of an Instructional Design Case Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Myung Hwa; Branch, Robert Maribe

    2004-01-01

    This is a discussion about the role of a case or authentic scenario in an online learning environment. Using authentic cases for intentional learning promotes effective, cognitive, and affective transfer between learning space and performance space. Creating an online case event provides an opportunity for learning design professionals to use…

  14. Factors Affecting the Design and Development of a Personal Learning Environment: Research on Super-Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Helene; Kop, Rita

    2011-01-01

    After speculation in literature about the nature of Personal Learning Environments, research in the design and development of PLEs is now in progress. This paper reports on the first phase of the authors' research on PLE, the identification process of what potential users would consider important components, applications, and tools in a PLE. The…

  15. Being Social @ Work: Designing for Playfully Mediated Social Awareness in Work Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; van de Watering, M.R.; Eliens, A.P.W.; Eliëns, A.; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Venkatesh, A; Gonsalves, T; Monk, A; Buckner, K

    2007-01-01

    Awareness within work environments should not be seen limited to important work-related information, activities and relationships. Mediating somewhat casual and engaging encounters related to non-work issues could also lead to meaningful and pleasurable experiences. This paper explores a design

  16. The Effects of a Systematically Designed Online Learning Environment on Preservice Teachers' Professional Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evens, Marie; Larmuseau, Charlotte; Dewaele, Katrien; Van Craesbeek, Leen; Elen, Jan; Depaepe, Fien

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the effects of an online learning environment on preservice teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), content knowledge (CK) (related to French in primary teacher education), and pedagogical knowledge (PK) in a quasi-experimental design. More specifically, the following research question is addressed: Is a systematically…

  17. Environment: General; Grammar & Usage; Money Management; Music History; Web Page Creation & Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Web Feet, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes Web site resources for elementary and secondary education in the topics of: environment, grammar, money management, music history, and Web page creation and design. Each entry includes an illustration of a sample page on the site and an indication of the grade levels for which it is appropriate. (AEF)

  18. Adopting the alternate reality game approach in the design of the Singa environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlodlo, N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Playing games, especially electronic games, is a popular free-time activity among children and adolescents and these games seem to have a prominent role in the culture of young people. It is with this in mind that the SINGA environment was designed...

  19. Design of a Problem-Based Online Learning Environment and Evaluation of Its Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Abdullah Yasin; Alemdag, Ecenaz; Yasar, Sevil; Erdem, Mukaddes

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning approach presents several advantages such as improving students' engagement in learning and fostering their higher-order thinking skills. Although there is a plethora of research regarding implementation of problem-based learning in classrooms, its design and application process for web-based environments need further…

  20. [Design of an anesthesia and micro-environment information management system in mobile operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwen; Liu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wenchang; Wu, Qingfu; Tan, Shulin

    2013-08-01

    We have designed a mobile operating room information management system. The system is composed of a client and a server. A client, consisting of a PC, medical equipments, PLC and sensors, provides the acquisition and processing of anesthesia and micro-environment data. A server is a powerful computer that stores the data of the system. The client gathers the medical device data by using the C/S mode, and analyzes the obtained HL7 messages through the class library call. The client collects the micro-environment information with PLC, and finishes the data reading with the OPC technology. Experiment results showed that the designed system could manage the patient anesthesia and micro-environment information well, and improve the efficiency of the doctors' works and the digital level of the mobile operating room.

  1. Research on Digital Forensic Readiness Design in a Cloud Computing-Based Smart Work Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangho Park

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the work environments of organizations have been in the process of transitioning into smart work environments by applying cloud computing technology in the existing work environment. The smart work environment has the characteristic of being able to access information assets inside the company from outside the company through cloud computing technology, share information without restrictions on location by using mobile terminals, and provide a work environment where work can be conducted effectively in various locations and mobile environments. Thus, in the cloud computing-based smart work environment, changes are occurring in terms of security risks, such as an increase in the leakage risk of an organization’s information assets through mobile terminals which have a high risk of loss and theft and increase the hacking risk of wireless networks in mobile environments. According to these changes in security risk, the reactive digital forensic method, which investigates digital evidence after the occurrence of security incidents, appears to have a limit which has led to a rise in the necessity of proactive digital forensic approaches wherein security incidents can be addressed preemptively. Accordingly, in this research, we design a digital forensic readiness model at the level of preemptive prevention by considering changes in the cloud computing-based smart work environment. Firstly, we investigate previous research related to the cloud computing-based smart work environment and digital forensic readiness and analyze a total of 50 components of digital forensic readiness. In addition, through the analysis of the corresponding preceding research, we design seven detailed areas, namely, outside the organization environment, within the organization guideline, system information, terminal information, user information, usage information, and additional function. Then, we design a draft of the digital forensic readiness model in the cloud

  2. Designing Scientific Academic Conferences as a Learning Environment: How to Stimulate Active Learning at Academic Conferences?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Johan

    2015-01-01

    conference design and an appropriate learning environment are available. The overall conference design, however, is a crucial aspect in the learning of the participants and deserves special attention from conference organizers. Method: I have organized around 15 carefully designed conferences (and attended...... for discussing and learning makes a huge difference in sharing and developing new knowledge. This paper aims to highlight the importance and raise awareness of different methods of stimulating the construction of knowledge by conference participants. I hope it will inspire future conference organizers and help...

  3. SLS-SPEC-159 Cross-Program Design Specification for Natural Environments (DSNE) Revision E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2017-01-01

    The DSNE completes environment-related specifications for architecture, system-level, and lower-tier documents by specifying the ranges of environmental conditions that must be accounted for by NASA ESD Programs. To assure clarity and consistency, and to prevent requirements documents from becoming cluttered with extensive amounts of technical material, natural environment specifications have been compiled into this document. The intent is to keep a unified specification for natural environments that each Program calls out for appropriate application. This document defines the natural environments parameter limits (maximum and minimum values, energy spectra, or precise model inputs, assumptions, model options, etc.), for all ESD Programs. These environments are developed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (MSFC organization code: EV44). Many of the parameter limits are based on experience with previous programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program. The parameter limits contain no margin and are meant to be evaluated individually to ensure they are reasonable (i.e., do not apply unrealistic extreme-on-extreme conditions). The natural environments specifications in this document should be accounted for by robust design of the flight vehicle and support systems. However, it is understood that in some cases the Programs will find it more effective to account for portions of the environment ranges by operational mitigation or acceptance of risk in accordance with an appropriate program risk management plan and/or hazard analysis process. The DSNE is not intended as a definition of operational models or operational constraints, nor is it adequate, alone, for ground facilities which may have additional requirements (for example, building codes and local environmental constraints). "Natural environments," as the term is used here, refers to the environments that are not the result of intended human activity or intervention. It

  4. Data management in an object-oriented distributed aircraft conceptual design environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhijie

    In the competitive global market place, aerospace companies are forced to deliver the right products to the right market, with the right cost, and at the right time. However, the rapid development of technologies and new business opportunities, such as mergers, acquisitions, supply chain management, etc., have dramatically increased the complexity of designing an aircraft. Therefore, the pressure to reduce design cycle time and cost is enormous. One way to solve such a dilemma is to develop and apply advanced engineering environments (AEEs), which are distributed collaborative virtual design environments linking researchers, technologists, designers, etc., together by incorporating application tools and advanced computational, communications, and networking facilities. Aircraft conceptual design, as the first design stage, provides major opportunity to compress design cycle time and is the cheapest place for making design changes. However, traditional aircraft conceptual design programs, which are monolithic programs, cannot provide satisfactory functionality to meet new design requirements due to the lack of domain flexibility and analysis scalability. Therefore, we are in need of the next generation aircraft conceptual design environment (NextADE). To build the NextADE, the framework and the data management problem are two major problems that need to be addressed at the forefront. Solving these two problems, particularly the data management problem, is the focus of this research. In this dissertation, in light of AEEs, a distributed object-oriented framework is firstly formulated and tested for the NextADE. In order to improve interoperability and simplify the integration of heterogeneous application tools, data management is one of the major problems that need to be tackled. To solve this problem, taking into account the characteristics of aircraft conceptual design data, a robust, extensible object-oriented data model is then proposed according to the

  5. Designing learning environments to promote student learning: ergonomics in all but name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    This report introduces evidence for the conclusion that a common theme underlies almost all proposed solutions for improving the performance of K-12 students, namely their reliance on the design of educational system environments, features and operations. Two categories of design factors impacting such performance are addressed: (1) 9 factors reliably shown to have a strong influence - namely environmental design of classroom and building facilities, longer exposure to learning, cooperative learning designs, early childhood education, teaching quality, nutritional adequacy, participation in physical activity, good physical fitness, and school-community integration; and (2) 11 factors with an equivocal, varied or weak influence - classroom technology, online learning environments, smaller class size, school choice, school funding, school size, school start times, teacher training level, amount of homework, student self-confidence and informal learning. It is concluded that: (1) student learning outcomes, and more broadly the edifice of education itself, are largely defined in terms of an extensive system of design factors and conditions; (2) the time is long overdue for the educational system to acknowledge the central role of E/HF design as the major influence on student performance and learning; and (3) K-12 educators and administrators should emphasize allocation of resources to design factors reliably shown to have a strongly positive impact on student performance, but should treat expenditure on factors with equivocal, varied or weak influence on such performance with more caution and/or skepticism.

  6. Development and Application of the Collaborative Optimization Architecture in a Multidisciplinary Design Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, R. D.; Kroo, I. M.

    1995-01-01

    Collaborative optimization is a design architecture applicable in any multidisciplinary analysis environment but specifically intended for large-scale distributed analysis applications. In this approach, a complex problem is hierarchically de- composed along disciplinary boundaries into a number of subproblems which are brought into multidisciplinary agreement by a system-level coordination process. When applied to problems in a multidisciplinary design environment, this scheme has several advantages over traditional solution strategies. These advantageous features include reducing the amount of information transferred between disciplines, the removal of large iteration-loops, allowing the use of different subspace optimizers among the various analysis groups, an analysis framework which is easily parallelized and can operate on heterogenous equipment, and a structural framework that is well-suited for conventional disciplinary organizations. In this article, the collaborative architecture is developed and its mathematical foundation is presented. An example application is also presented which highlights the potential of this method for use in large-scale design applications.

  7. A New Professional Master in Universal Design in the Built Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl, Camilla; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    2016-01-01

    specifically for people in practice contribute to the process? This paper describes the new Master in universal design offered at SBi Aalborg University in Copenhagen and discusses how the Masters programme through its design and focus on challenges and unresolved potential aims at changing the understanding...... and rhetoric of universal design in the built environment. As the programme is targeted at people with extensive experience of the field, it is also designed to take the investigations to a higher level than the physical solutions. Studies of e.g. phenomenology, perception theory, disability studies......, organisational and strategic theories, economics and ethics are included. Based on the experience gained by the authors from giving the first class in the Masters programme, the paper presents implications and the potential of expanding the understanding of how universal design may be interpreted within...

  8. Conceptual design of a device to measure hand swelling in a micro-gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysinger, Christopher L.

    1993-01-01

    In the design of pressurized suits for use by astronauts in space, proper fit is an important consideration. One particularly difficult aspect of the suit design is the design of the gloves. If the gloves of the suit do not fit properly, the grip strength of the astronaut can be decreased by as much as fifty percent. These gloves are designed using an iterative process and can cost over 1.5 million dollars. Glove design is further complicated by the way the body behaves in a micro-gravity environment. In a micro-gravity setting, fluid from the lower body tends to move into the upper body. Some of this fluid collects in the hands and causes the hands to swell. Therefore, a pair of gloves that fit well on earth may not fit well when they are used in space. The conceptual design process for a device which can measure the swelling that occurs in the hands in a micro-gravity environment is described. This process involves developing a specifications list and function structure for the device and generating solution variants for each of the sub functions. The solution variants are then filtered, with the variants that violate any of the specifications being discarded. After acceptable solution variants are obtained, they are combined to form design concepts. These design concepts are evaluated against a set of criteria and the design concepts are ranked in order of preference. Through this process, the two most plausible design concepts were an ultrasonic imaging technique and a laser mapping technique. Both of these methods create a three dimensional model of the hand, from which the amount of swelling can be determined. In order to determine which of the two solutions will actually work best, a further analysis will need to be performed.

  9. Architectural design influences the diversity and structure of the built environment microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembel, Steven W; Jones, Evan; Kline, Jeff; Northcutt, Dale; Stenson, Jason; Womack, Ann M; Bohannan, Brendan Jm; Brown, G Z; Green, Jessica L

    2012-08-01

    Buildings are complex ecosystems that house trillions of microorganisms interacting with each other, with humans and with their environment. Understanding the ecological and evolutionary processes that determine the diversity and composition of the built environment microbiome--the community of microorganisms that live indoors--is important for understanding the relationship between building design, biodiversity and human health. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to quantify relationships between building attributes and airborne bacterial communities at a health-care facility. We quantified airborne bacterial community structure and environmental conditions in patient rooms exposed to mechanical or window ventilation and in outdoor air. The phylogenetic diversity of airborne bacterial communities was lower indoors than outdoors, and mechanically ventilated rooms contained less diverse microbial communities than did window-ventilated rooms. Bacterial communities in indoor environments contained many taxa that are absent or rare outdoors, including taxa closely related to potential human pathogens. Building attributes, specifically the source of ventilation air, airflow rates, relative humidity and temperature, were correlated with the diversity and composition of indoor bacterial communities. The relative abundance of bacteria closely related to human pathogens was higher indoors than outdoors, and higher in rooms with lower airflow rates and lower relative humidity. The observed relationship between building design and airborne bacterial diversity suggests that we can manage indoor environments, altering through building design and operation the community of microbial species that potentially colonize the human microbiome during our time indoors.

  10. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented

  11. Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    biodiversity. Consequently, the major environmental challenges facing us in the 21st century include: global climate change , energy, population and food...technological prowess, and security interests. Challenges Global Climate Change – Evidence shows that our environment and the global climate ... urbanization will continue to pressure the regional environment . Although most countries have environmental protection ministries or agencies, a lack of

  12. Design Issues for Using Magnetic Materials in Radiation Environments at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of designing motors and alternators for use in nuclear powered space missions is accounting for the effects of radiation. Terrestrial reactor power plants use distance and shielding to minimize radiation damage but space missions must economize volume and mass. Past studies have shown that sufficiently high radiation levels can affect the magnetic response of hard and soft magnetic materials. Theoretical models explaining the radiation-induced degradation have been proposed but not verified. This paper reviews the literature and explains the cumulative effects of temperature, magnetic-load, and radiation-level on the magnetic properties of component materials. Magnetic property degradation is very specific to alloy choice and processing history, since magnetic properties are very much entwined with specific chemistry and microstructural features. However, there is basic theoretical as well as supportive experimental evidence that the negative impact to magnetic properties will be minimal if the bulk temperature of the material is less than fifty percent of the Curie temperature, the radiation flux is low, and the demagnetization field is small. Keywords: Magnets, Permanent Magnets, Power Converters, Nuclear Electric Power Generation, Radiation Tolerance.

  13. Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment - Propulsion Related Module Development and Vehicle Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hilmi N.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the work performed during the period from May 2011 - October 2012 on the Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) environment. IDEA is a collaborative environment based on an object-oriented, multidisciplinary, distributed framework using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML). This report will focus on describing the work done in the areas of: (1) Integrating propulsion data (turbines, rockets, and scramjets) in the system, and using the data to perform trajectory analysis; (2) Developing a parametric packaging strategy for a hypersonic air breathing vehicles allowing for tank resizing when multiple fuels and/or oxidizer are part of the configuration; and (3) Vehicle scaling and closure strategies.

  14. Task based design of a digital work environment (DWE for an academic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan Meyyappan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Task based design is considered one of the effective ways of designing functional software. It is generally accepted that tasks play an important role in system and user interface design. Identifying the user's tasks enables the designer to construct user interfaces reflecting the tasks' properties, including efficient usage patterns, easy-to-use interaction sequences, and powerful assistance features. In this paper, we present a prototype of a Digital Work Environment (DWE to support a task-oriented design to information access in a typical community of academic users. The resources in DWE are organized according to specific tasks performed by the research students and staff in the Division of Information Studies of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. The tasks and resources were elicited based on the needs of faculty and students through interviews and focus groups. Examples of these tasks include preparation of a new course outline, setting of examination papers, preparation of reading lists and assignments, conducting literature reviews and writing dissertations. This paper discusses the problems of digital library users in an academic environment, highlights task oriented projects and focuses on the task of preparing and writing a Master dissertation. It highlights the importance of task based design in assisting and helping students and instructors from the time of selecting the research project to the time of submitting the final bound copies of the dissertation.

  15. Using a bespoke situated digital kiosk to encourage user participation in healthcare environment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackrill, J; Marshall, P; Payne, S R; Dimitrokali, E; Cain, R

    2017-03-01

    Involving users through participation in healthcare service and environment design is growing. Existing approaches and toolkits for practitioners and researchers are often paper based involving workshops and other more traditional design approaches such as paper prototyping. The advent of digital technology provides the opportunity to explore new platforms for user participation. This paper presents results from three studies that used a bespoke situated user participation digital kiosk, engaging 33 users in investigating healthcare environment design. The studies, from primary and secondary care settings, allowed participant feedback on each environment and proved a novel, engaging "21st century" way to participate in the appraisal of the design process. The results point toward this as an exciting and growing area of research in developing not just a new method of user participation but also the technology that supports it. Limitations were noted in terms of data validity and engagement with the device. To guide the development of user participation using similar situated digital devices, key lessons and reflections are presented. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Riparian vegetation in the alpine connectome: Terrestrial-aquatic and terrestrial-terrestrial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharescu, Dragos G; Palanca-Soler, Antonio; Hooda, Peter S; Tanase, Catalin; Burghelea, Carmen I; Lester, Richard N

    2017-12-01

    Alpine regions are under increased attention worldwide for their critical role in early biogeochemical cycles, their high sensitivity to environmental change, and as repositories of natural resources of high quality. Their riparian ecosystems, at the interface between aquatic and terrestrial environments, play important geochemical functions in the watershed and are biodiversity hotspots, despite a harsh climate and topographic setting. With climate change rapidly affecting the alpine biome, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of the extent of interactions between riparian surface, lake and catchment environments. A total of 189 glacial - origin lakes were surveyed in the Central Pyrenees to test how key elements of the lake and terrestrial environments interact at different scales to shape riparian plant composition. Secondly, we evaluated how underlying ecotope features drive the formation of natural communities potentially sensitive to environmental change and assessed their habitat distribution. At the macroscale, vegetation composition responded to pan-climatic gradients altitude and latitude, which captured in a narrow geographic area the transition between large European climatic zones. Hydrodynamics was the main catchment-scale factor connecting riparian vegetation with major water fluxes, followed by topography and geomorphology. Lake sediment Mg and Pb, and water Mn and Fe contents reflected local influences from mafic bedrock and soil water saturation. Community analysis identified four keystone ecosystems: (i) damp ecotone, (ii) snow bed-silicate bedrock, (iii) wet heath, and (iv) calcareous substrate. These communities and their connections with ecotope elements could be at risk from a number of environmental change factors including warmer seasons, snow line and lowland species advancement, increased nutrient/metal input and water level fluctuations. The results imply important natural terrestrial-aquatic linkages in the riparian environment

  17. Climate change effects on environment (marine, atmospheric and terrestrial) and human perception in an Italian Region (Marche) and the nearby northern Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiotti, F.; Krzelj, M.; Marincioni, F.; Russo, A.

    2012-04-01

    An integrated analysis of recent climate change, including atmosphere, sea and land, as well as some of the impacts on society, has been conducted on the Marche Region in central Italy and the northern portion of the Adriatic Sea. The Marche Region is one of the 20 administrative divisions of Italy, located at a latitude approximately 43° North, with a total surface area of 9,366 km2 and 1,565,000 residents. The northern Adriatic Sea is the northernmost area of the Mediterranean Sea, and it has peculiar relevance for several aspects (environment, tourism, fisheries, economy). The collected environmental data included meteorological stations (daily maximum and minimum air temperature, daily precipitation), oceanographic stations (sea temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nutrient salts concentration, chlorophyll) and river flows, over the last 50 years. The collected social data include 800 questionnaires and interviews carried out on selected samples of residents, decision-makers and emergency managers. These questionnaires and interviews aimed at highlighting the perception of climate change risks. The trend analysis of air temperature and precipitation data detailed an overall temperature increase in all seasons and rainfall decreases in Winter, Spring and Summer with Autumn increases, influencing river flow changes. Marine data showed a relevant warming of the water column in the period after 1990 in comparison with the previous period, particularly in the cold season. Surface salinity increased in Spring and Summer and strongly decreased in Autumn and Winter (according with the precipitation and river flow changes). These last mentioned changes, combined with anthropogenic effects, also influenced the marine ecosystems, with changes of nutrient salts, chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen. Changes in nutrient discharge from rivers influenced the average marine chlorophyll concentration reduction and the consequent average reduction of warm season hypoxic

  18. Sensitive life detection strategies for low-biomass environments: optimizing extraction of nucleic acids adsorbing to terrestrial and Mars analogue minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Susana O L; Marees, Andries; Röling, Wilfred F M

    2012-07-01

    The adsorption of nucleic acids to mineral matrixes can result in low extraction yields and negatively influences molecular microbial ecology studies, in particular for low-biomass environments on Earth and Mars. We determined the recovery of nucleic acids from a range of minerals relevant to Earth and Mars. Clay minerals, but also other silicates and nonsilicates, showed very low recovery (< 1%). Consequently, optimization of DNA extraction was directed towards clays. The high temperatures and acidic conditions used in some methods to dissolve mineral matrices proved to destruct DNA. The most efficient method comprised a high phosphate solution (P/EtOH; 1 M phosphate, 15% ethanol buffer at pH 8) introduced at the cell-lysing step in DNA extraction, to promote chemical competition with DNA for adsorption sites. This solution increased DNA yield from clay samples spiked with known quantities of cells up to nearly 100-fold. DNA recovery was also enhanced from several mineral samples retrieved from an aquifer, while maintaining reproducible DGGE profiles. DGGE profiles were obtained for a clay sample for which no profile could be generated with the standard DNA isolation protocol. Mineralogy influenced microbial community composition. The method also proved suitable for the recovery of low molecular weight DNA (< 1.5 kb). © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using Virtual Simulations in the Design of 21st Century Space Science Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Sonya L.; Alves, Jeffery R.

    1996-01-01

    Space Technology has been rapidly increasing in the past decade. This can be attributed to the future construction of the International Space Station (ISS). New innovations must constantly be engineered to make ISS the safest, quality, research facility in space. Since space science must often be gathered by crew members, more attention must be geared to the human's safety and comfort. Virtual simulations are now being used to design environments that crew members can live in for long periods of time without harmful effects to their bodies. This paper gives a few examples of the ergonomic design problems that arise on manned space flights, and design solutions that follow NASA's strategic commitment to customer satisfaction. The conclusions show that virtual simulations are a great asset to 21st century design.

  20. Design Program in Graphic User Interface Environment for Automobile ER Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.; Park, J. S.; Sohn, J. W.; Choi, S. B.

    This work presents a design and analysis program for vehicle devices utilizing an electrorheological (ER) fluid. The program is operated in graphic user interface (GUI) environment and the initial window is consisted of four subprogram modules which are related to ER shock absorber, ER seat damper, ER engine mount, and ER anti-lock brake system (ABS), respectively. In order to execute each module, both material properties and design parameters are to be chosen by the user. Then, the output display window shows the field-dependent performance characteristics to be considered as design criteria. In addition, control performances of the vehicle system equipped with ER devices are displayed in time and frequency domain. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed program, ER shock absorber and ER ABS are designed and manufactured and their performance characteristics are evaluated.

  1. Exposure enriched outcome dependent designs for longitudinal studies of gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhichao; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Estes, Jason P; Vokonas, Pantel S; Park, Sung Kyun

    2017-08-15

    Joint effects of genetic and environmental factors have been increasingly recognized in the development of many complex human diseases. Despite the popularity of case-control and case-only designs, longitudinal cohort studies that can capture time-varying outcome and exposure information have long been recommended for gene-environment (G × E) interactions. To date, literature on sampling designs for longitudinal studies of G × E interaction is quite limited. We therefore consider designs that can prioritize a subsample of the existing cohort for retrospective genotyping on the basis of currently available outcome, exposure, and covariate data. In this work, we propose stratified sampling based on summaries of individual exposures and outcome trajectories and develop a full conditional likelihood approach for estimation that adjusts for the biased sample. We compare the performance of our proposed design and analysis with combinations of different sampling designs and estimation approaches via simulation. We observe that the full conditional likelihood provides improved estimates for the G × E interaction and joint exposure effects over uncorrected complete-case analysis, and the exposure enriched outcome trajectory dependent design outperforms other designs in terms of estimation efficiency and power for detection of the G × E interaction. We also illustrate our design and analysis using data from the Normative Aging Study, an ongoing longitudinal cohort study initiated by the Veterans Administration in 1963. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A workout for virtual bodybuilders (design issues for embodiment in multi-actor virtual environments)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Steve; Bowers, John; Fahlen, Lennart E.; Greenhalgh, Chris; Snowdon, Dave

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores the issue of user embodiment within collaborative virtual environments. By user embodiment we mean the provision of users with appropriate body images so as to represent them to others and also to themselves. By collaborative virtual environments we mean multi-user virtual reality systems which support cooperative work (although we argue that the results of our exploration may also be applied to other kinds of collaborative systems). The main part of the paper identifies a list of embodiment design issues including: presence, location, identity, activity, availability, history of activity, viewpoint, action point, gesture, facial expression, voluntary versus involuntary expression, degree of presence, reflecting capabilities, manipulating the user's view of others, representation across multiple media, autonomous and distributed body parts, truthfulness and efficiency. Following this, we show how these issues are reflected in our own DIVE and MASSIVE prototype collaborative virtual environments.

  3. Common strategies and technologies for the ecosafety assessment and design of nanomaterials entering the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Ilaria; Cherr, Gary N; Lenihan, Hunter S; Labille, Jerome; Hassellov, Martin; Canesi, Laura; Dondero, Francesco; Frenzilli, Giada; Hristozov, Danail; Puntes, Victor; Della Torre, Camilla; Pinsino, Annalisa; Libralato, Giovanni; Marcomini, Antonio; Sabbioni, Enrico; Matranga, Valeria

    2014-10-28

    The widespread use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in a variety of technologies and consumer products inevitably causes their release into aquatic environments and final deposition into the oceans. In addition, a growing number of ENM products are being developed specifically for marine applications, such as antifouling coatings and environmental remediation systems, thus increasing the need to address any potential risks for marine organisms and ecosystems. To safeguard the marine environment, major scientific gaps related to assessing and designing ecosafe ENMs need to be filled. In this Nano Focus, we examine key issues related to the state-of-the-art models and analytical tools being developed to understand ecological risks and to design safeguards for marine organisms.

  4. Environment as a basis for the design of advertising structures by forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelevsky, Y. P.; Seryakov, V. A.; Mamontov, G. Y.; Tsarenko, D. T.

    2017-01-01

    A few different neighbouring styles of architectural forms are quite frequent in the cities of great historical past. As a result, a designer or architect has to solve the complex problem while designing the objects within such environment, i.e. one has to fit them naturally into the existing site development. Often, form making is found to be hard, due to the fact that the existing architectural forms of totally different stylistic execution coexist in the visual proximity. Presently, placement of the advertising bills in urban environment is both an urgent and debatable issue. On the one hand, advertising providers are keen to present their product bigger and brighter, on the other hand, the overall and eye-catching exhibition stands can be disharmonious with the surrounding architectural ensemble of the city. This situation is relevant for every cultural city.

  5. Residential hospice environments: evidence-based architectural and landscape design considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verderber, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The residential hospice care movement is increasingly accepted and supported globally, and yet, unfortunately, the amount of literature on best practices in the planning and design of residential hospice facilities and adjacent outdoor spaces remains relatively small. This paper reports on a compendium of architectural and landscape design considerations that reflect the fundamental dimensions of the residential hospice experience: site and context, arrival spaces, communal and private spaces of the residential milieu, transitional spaces, and nature connectivity. Additionally, key staffing and administrative ramifications of this built-environment compendium are addressed, as are prognostications and challenges for the future.

  6. Design of Compact Particle Detector System Using FPGA for Space Particle Environment Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ryu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We have designed a high resolution proton and electron telescope for the detection of high energy particles, which constitute a major part of the space environment. The flux of the particles, in the satellite orbits, can vary abruptly according to the position and solar activities. In this study, a conceptual design of the detector, for adapting these variations with a high energy resolution, was made and the performance was estimated. In addition, a parallel processing algorithm was devised and embodied using FPGA for the high speed data processing, capable of detecting high flux without losing energy resolution, on board a satellite.

  7. Patient-centred improvements in health-care built environments: perspectives and design indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Calbert H; Douglas, Mary R

    2005-09-01

    To explore patients' perceptions of health-care built environments, to assess how they perceived health-care built facilities and designs. To develop a set of patient-centred indicators by which to appraise future health-care designs. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies, including futures group conferencing, autophotographic study, novice-expert exchanges and a questionnaire survey of a representative sample of past patients. The research was carried out at Salford Royal Hospitals NHS Trust (SRHT), Greater Manchester, UK, selected for the study because of planned comprehensive redevelopment based on the new NHS vision for hospital care and service delivery for the 21st century. Participants included 35 patients who took part in an autophotographic study, eight focus groups engaged in futures conferencing, a sample of past inpatients from the previous 12 months that returned 785 completed postal questionnaires. The futures group provided suggestions for radical improvements which were categorized into transport issues; accessibility and mobility; ground and landscape designs; social and public spaces; homeliness and assurance; cultural diversity; safety and security; personal space and access to outside. Patients' autophotographic study centred on: the quality of the ward design, human interactions, the state and quality of personal space, and facilities for recreation and leisure. The novices' suggestions were organized into categories of elemental factors representing patient-friendly designs. Experts from the architectural and surveying professions and staff at SRHT in turn considered these categories and respective subsets of factors. They agreed with the novices in terms of the headings but differed in prioritizing the elemental factors. The questionnaire survey of past patients provided opinions about ward designs that varied according to where they stayed, single room, bay ward or long open ward. The main concerns were limitation of private space

  8. Experimental Tests of UltraFlex Array Designs in Low Earth Orbital and Geosynchronous Charging Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofaro, Joel T.; Vayner, Boris V.; Hillard, Grover B.

    2011-01-01

    The present ground based investigations give the first definitive look describing the expected on-orbit charging behavior of Orion UltraFlex array coupons in the Low Earth Orbital and Geosynchronous Environments. Furthermore, it is important to note that the LEO charging environment also applies to the International Space Station as well as to the lunar mission charging environments. The GEO charging environment includes the bounding case for all lunar orbital and lunar surface mission environments. The UltraFlex thin film photovoltaic array technology has been targeted to become the sole power system for life support and on-orbit power for the manned Aires Crew Exploration Vehicle. It is therefore, crucial to gain an understanding of the complex charging behavior to answer some of the basic performance and survivability issues in an attempt to ascertain that a single UltraFlex array design will be able to cope with the projected worst case LEO and GEO charging environments. Testing was limited to four array coupons, two coupons each from two different array manufactures, Emcore and Spectrolab. The layout of each array design is identical and varies only in the actual cell technology used. The individual array cells from each manufacturer have an antireflection layered coating and come in two different varieties either uncoated (only AR coating) or coated with a thin conducting ITO layer. The LEO Plasma tests revealed that all four coupons passed the arc threshold -120 V bias tests. GEO electron gun charging tests revealed that only front side area of ITO coated coupons passed tests. Only the Emcore AR array passed backside Stage 2 GEO Tests.

  9. Design and Comparative Study of Three Photovoltaic Battery Charge Control Algorithms in MATLAB/SIMULINK Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ankur Bhattacharjee

    2012-01-01

    This paper contains the design of a three stage solar battery charge controller and a comparative study of this charge control technique with three conventional solar battery charge control techniques such as 1. Constant Current (CC) charging, 2. Two stage constant current constant voltage (CC-CV) charging technique. The analysis and the comparative study of the aforesaid charging techniques are done in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. Here the practical data used to simulate the charge control a...

  10. A new approach for automatic control modeling, analysis and design in fully fuzzy environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gabr, Walaa Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a new approach for the modeling, analysis and design of automatic control systems in fully fuzzy environment based on the normalized fuzzy matrices. The approach is also suitable for determining the propagation of fuzziness in automatic control and dynamical systems where all system coefficients are expressed as fuzzy parameters. A new consolidity chart is suggested based on the recently newly developed system consolidity index for testing the susceptibility of the system t...

  11. Design and implementation of a mini quadrotor control system in GPS denied environments

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chang; Prior, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design of quadrotor control architecture, based on crowd-sourcing electronics. The aim of this quadrotor is to provide a test-bed for vision-based autonomous navigation system in GPS denied environments. The control architecture consists of a cascaded structure, where an attitude controller nested in velocity and altitude controllers. The sub-controllers are all linear controllers with feedforward term to linearize the quadrotor dynamics. The control and sensor fusion ...

  12. Microplastics in the Terrestrial Ecosystem: Implications for Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza; Gertsen, Hennie; Gooren, Harm; Peters, Piet; Salánki, Tamás; van der Ploeg, Martine; Besseling, Ellen; Koelmans, Albert A; Geissen, Violette

    2016-03-01

    Plastic debris is widespread in the environment, but information on the effects of microplastics on terrestrial fauna is completely lacking. Here, we studied the survival and fitness of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) exposed to microplastics (Polyethylene, digestion of ingested organic matter, microplastic was concentrated in cast, especially at the lowest dose (i.e., 7% in litter) because that dose had the highest proportion of digestible organic matter. Whereas 50 percent of the microplastics had a size of earthworms. These concentration-transport and size-selection mechanisms may have important implications for fate and risk of microplastic in terrestrial ecosystems.

  13. Low earth orbit satellite/terrestrial mobile service compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheriff, R. E.; Gardiner, J. G.

    Digital cellular mobile 'second generation' systems are now gradually being introduced into service; one such example is GSM, which will provide a digital voice and data service throughout Europe. Total coverage is not expected to be achieved until the mid '90's, which has resulted in several proposals for the integration of GSM with a geostationary satellite service. Unfortunately, because terrestrial and space systems have been designed to optimize their performance for their particular environment, integration between a satellite and terrestrial system is unlikely to develop further than the satellite providing a back-up service. This lack of system compatibility is now being addressed by system designers of third generation systems. The next generation of mobile systems, referred to as FPLMTS (future public land mobile telecommunication systems) by CCIR and UMTS (universal mobile telecommunication system) in European research programs, are intended to provide inexpensive, hand-held terminals that can operate in either satellite, cellular, or cordless environments. This poses several challenges for system designers, not least in terms of the choice of multiple access technique and power requirements. Satellite mobile services have been dominated by the geostationary orbital type. Recently, however, a number of low earth orbit configurations have been proposed, for example Iridium. These systems are likely to be fully operational by the turn of the century, in time for the implementation of FPLMTS. The developments in LEO mobile satellite service technology were recognized at WARC-92 with the allocation of specific frequency bands for 'big' LEO's, as well as a frequency allocation for FPLMTS which included a specific satellite allocation. When considering integrating a space service into the terrestrial network, LEO's certainly appear to have their attractions: they can provide global coverage, the round trip delay is of the order of tens of milliseconds, and

  14. Personal Learning Environment design and the professors' educative training on ICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cabero

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper belongs to a PLE (Personal Learning Environment research, which is in a development phase. This research is about PLE design, production and evaluation, and is designed with the goal of qualifying university staff in the using of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT.The research presents four revised phases, all of them focused in methodology and working plan: a PLE design, production and evaluation; b pilot study; c virtual environment dissemination; d development of the final report. Owing to the fact that the research is in a development phase we don’t have results. It’s our purposal to obtain different scientific-technical taxes and benefits with this project, for example: identify the most significant aspects for the faculty’s training in order to incorporate ICT in teachers’ professional development; create a PLE with the aim of developing an environment for the faculty’s training on ICT; recognize the impact that different tools have in the faculty training; become aware of the necessary methodological change that involves incorporate the PLE in the European Space for Higher Education (ESHE at university.Before concluding this paper, we would like to present our intention to incorporate some proposals from PLE Congress. (July 2010, Cornellà

  15. Evaluation of carbon-14 (C{sup 14}) levels of terrestrial and marine food products of the environment of the site of Cogema La Hague; Evaluation des niveaux de carbone-14 ({sup 14}C) des denrees alimentaires terrestres et marines de l'environnement du site de COGEMA - La Hague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-04-15

    This evaluation has for object to inform about the levels in carbon 14 in the environment of the factories of La Hague. Two sectors were differentiated on one hand the terrestrial environment, and on the other hand the marine environment. The investigations concerned first and foremost food products stemming as the vegetable culture (vegetables) or individual breeding (milk, eggs) but also foodstuffs stemming from the local agriculture (cereal). In touch with the second sector, the marine environment, the sampling concerned the accessible products of the sea by all and those locally marketed (fishes, molluscs, shellfishes). The different results are presented in tables. (N.C.)

  16. Designing new collaborative learning spaces in clinical environments: experiences from a children's hospital in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bines, Julie E; Jamieson, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Hospitals are complex places that provide a rich learning environment for students, staff, patients and their families, professional groups and the community. The "new" Royal Children's Hospital opened in late 2011. Its mission is focused on improving health and well-being of children and adolescents through leadership in healthcare, research and education. Addressing the need to create "responsive learning environments" aligned with the shift to student-centred pedagogy, two distinct learning environments were developed within the new Royal Children's Hospital; (i) a dedicated education precinct providing a suite of physical environments to promote a more active, collaborative and social learning experience for education and training programs conducted on the Royal Children's Hospital campus and (ii) a suite of learning spaces embedded within clinical areas so that learning becomes an integral part of the daily activities of this busy Hospital environment. The aim of this article is to present the overarching educational principles that lead the design of these learning spaces and describe the opportunities and obstacles encountered in the development of collaborative learning spaces within a large hospital development.

  17. Project Lifespan-based Nonstationary Hydrologic Design Methods for Changing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, L.

    2017-12-01

    Under changing environment, we must associate design floods with the design life period of projects to ensure the hydrologic design is really relevant to the operation of the hydrologic projects, because the design value for a given exceedance probability over the project life period would be significantly different from that over other time periods of the same length due to the nonstationarity of probability distributions. Several hydrologic design methods that take the design life period of projects into account have been proposed in recent years, i.e. the expected number of exceedances (ENE), design life level (DLL), equivalent reliability (ER), and average design life level (ADLL). Among the four methods to be compared, both the ENE and ER methods are return period-based methods, while DLL and ADLL are risk/reliability- based methods which estimate design values for given probability values of risk or reliability. However, the four methods can be unified together under a general framework through a relationship transforming the so-called representative reliability (RRE) into the return period, i.e. m=1/1(1-RRE), in which we compute the return period m using the representative reliability RRE.The results of nonstationary design quantiles and associated confidence intervals calculated by ENE, ER and ADLL were very similar, since ENE or ER was a special case or had a similar expression form with respect to ADLL. In particular, the design quantiles calculated by ENE and ADLL were the same when return period was equal to the length of the design life. In addition, DLL can yield similar design values if the relationship between DLL and ER/ADLL return periods is considered. Furthermore, ENE, ER and ADLL had good adaptability to either an increasing or decreasing situation, yielding not too large or too small design quantiles. This is important for applications of nonstationary hydrologic design methods in actual practice because of the concern of choosing the emerging

  18. Efficient supersonic air vehicle design using the Service-Oriented Computing Environment (SORCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Air Force Research Lab’s Multidisciplinary Science and Technology Center is investigating conceptual design processes and computing frameworks that could significantly impact the design of the next generation efficient supersonic air vehicle (ESAV. The ESAV conceptual design process must accommodate appropriate fidelity multidisciplinary engineering analyses (MDAs to assess the impact of new air vehicle technologies. These analyses may be coupled and computationally expensive, posing a challenge due to the large number of air vehicle configurations analyzed during conceptual design. In light of these observations, a design process using the Service-Oriented Computing Environment (SORCER software is implemented to combine propulsion, structures, aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, and performance in an integrated MDA. The SORCER software provides the automation and tight integration to grid computing resources necessary to achieve the volume of appropriate fidelity analyses required. Two design studies are performed using a gradient-based optimization method to produce long and short range ESAV wing designs. The studies demonstrate the capability of the ESAV MDA, the optimization algorithm, and the computational scalability and reliability of the SORCER software.

  19. Introduced Terrestrial Species (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted future potential distributions of terrestrial plants, animals, and pathogens non-native to the Middle-Atlantic region. These data are...

  20. Solar-Terrestrial Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kahler, Stephen W

    2008-01-01

    This report covers a basic research (6.1 level) task on solar-terrestrial interactions carried out in the Space Weather Center of Excellence over an 11-year period for the Air Force Office of Scientific Research...

  1. Analysis of design characteristics of a V-type support using an advanced engineering environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwiazda, A.; Banaś, W.; Sękala, A.; Cwikla, G.; Topolska, S.; Foit, K.; Monica, Z.

    2017-08-01

    Modern mining support, for the entire period of their use, is the important part of the mining complex, which includes all the devices in the excavation during his normal use. Therefore, during the design of the support, it is an important task to choose the shape and to select the dimensions of a support as well as its strength characteristics. According to the rules, the design process of a support must take into account, inter alia, the type and the dimensions of the expected means of transport, the number and size of pipelines, and the type of additional equipment used excavation area. The support design must ensure the functionality of the excavation process and job security, while maintaining the economic viability of the entire project. Among others it should ensure the selection of a support for specific natural conditions. It is also important to take into consideration the economic characteristics of the project. The article presents an algorithm of integrative approach and its formalized description in the form of integration the areas of different construction characteristics optimization of a V-type mining support. The paper includes the example of its application for developing the construction of this support. In the paper is also described the results of the characteristics analysis and changings that were introduced afterwards. The support models are prepared in the computer environment of the CAD class (Siemens NX PLM). Also the analyses were conducted in this design, graphical environment.

  2. Teaching Design in Adolescent Environments: Twinning Secondary and Tertiary Learning Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jones

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly our landscape architecture teaching and educational pedagogies are facing an internationalisation in approach and expectation. We are positioned within a tertiary learning layer in a tripartite educational system for which each layer assumes certain expectations and outcomes. But their vertical linkages are unclear, and we incorrectly assume continuity of knowledge and skill learning strategies. It is a horizontally stratified teaching setting that we have to work within and while we can think of internationalisation as occurring within our level we need to appreciate that internationalisation is also occurring at the secondary level. This paper discusses the educational environment within which globalisation is occurring, and reviews a project model that builds bridges vertically between secondary and tertiary learning environments. The project displays possibilities in both secondary and tertiary educational sectors, but especially in enhancing and improving the design fluency of our annual incoming cohorts who often possess a naive understanding of built environmental design. Commencing in 1998 as an experimental project, it has been recognised at the South Australian state level as a forward-thinking initiative that has radically transformed secondary school Design teacher's perspectives as to educational possibilities, and substantially matured attitudes to landscape design by both suites of participants. As a consequence, it is an educational project that has experienced requests from numerous secondary schools around the State to participate.

  3. Design Process for Online Websites Created for Teaching Turkish as a Foreign Language in Web Based Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Fatih Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    In today's world, where online learning environments have increased their efficiency in education and training, the design of the websites prepared for education and training purposes has become an important process. This study is about the teaching process of the online learning environments created to teach Turkish in web based environments, and…

  4. The Design and Pilot Evaluation of an Interactive Learning Environment for Introductory Programming Influenced by Cognitive Load Theory and Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moons, Jan; De Backer, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the architecture and evaluation of a novel environment for programming education. The design of this programming environment, and the way it is used in class, is based on the findings of constructivist and cognitivist learning paradigms. The environment is evaluated based on qualitative student and teacher evaluations and…

  5. Murder on Grimm Isle: The Impact of Game Narrative Design in an Educational Game-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of narrative design in a game-based learning environment. Specifically, this investigation focuses the narrative design in an adventure-styled, game-based learning environment for fostering argumentation writing by looking at how the game narrative impacted player/learner (1) intrinsic…

  6. Toward a sectorwide design for environment support system for the rail industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewulp, Wim; Duflou, Joost; Ander, Asa

    2004-08-01

    Rail has an important role to play in the development toward a sustainable transportation system. In this perspective, the European Brite Euram Project RAVEL (Rail Vehicle Eco-Efficient Design) has developed a rail sectorwide Design for Environment system to be used and standardized throughout the full supply chain. At the core of the system, quantitative environmental performance indicators for rail vehicles and components are used to incorporate environmental performance target levels in the product requirements and to measure and communicate achieved environmental performance. The concept of eco-efficiency is used to integrate both environmental and economical considerations. The methodology further builds on a standardized material list, standardized data formats, and proactive design guidance. To date, first steps are already taken to integrate the RAVEL project results into sector initiatives toward industrywide acceptance and standardization.

  7. Sedimentology and depositional environments of the Red Sandstone Group, Rukwa Rift Basin, southwestern Tanzania: New insight into Cretaceous and Paleogene terrestrial ecosystems and tectonics in sub-equatorial Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eric M.; O'Connor, Patrick M.; Stevens, Nancy J.; Gottfried, Michael D.; Jinnah, Zubair A.; Ngasala, Sifael; Choh, Adeline M.; Armstrong, Richard A.

    2010-05-01

    . The 400+ m-thick late Oligocene Nsungwe Formation is temporally constrained by concordant mammalian biostratigraphy, detrital zircon geochronology and a radiometrically dated volcanic tuff capping the sequence (˜24.9 Ma). A significant change in depositional environments occurs between the lower alluvial fan-dominated Utengule Member and the upper fluvial and lacustrine-dominated Songwe Member. The Songwe Member preserves a diverse terrestrial and aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate fauna, with abundant ashfall and ashflow volcanic tuffs that were deposited in a semi-arid wetland landscape during the late Oligocene. The Nsungwe Formation provides a new window into the early tectonics and faunal transitions associated with initiation of the "modern" East African Rift System.

  8. A Summary of the NASA Design Environment for Novel Vertical Lift Vehicles (DELIVER) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.

    2018-01-01

    The number of new markets and use cases being developed for vertical take-off and landing vehicles continues to explode, including the highly publicized urban air taxi and package deliver applications. There is an equally exploding variety of novel vehicle configurations and sizes that are being proposed to fill these new market applications. The challenge for vehicle designers is that there is currently no easy and consistent way to go from a compelling mission or use case to a vehicle that is best configured and sized for the particular mission. This is because the availability of accurate and validated conceptual design tools for these novel types and sizes of vehicles have not kept pace with the new markets and vehicles themselves. The Design Environment for Novel Vertical Lift Vehicles (DELIVER) project was formulated to address this vehicle design challenge by demonstrating the use of current conceptual design tools, that have been used for decades to design and size conventional rotorcraft, applied to these novel vehicle types, configurations and sizes. In addition to demonstrating the applicability of current design and sizing tools to novel vehicle configurations and sizes, DELIVER also demonstrated the addition of key transformational technologies of noise, autonomy, and hybrid-electric and all-electric propulsion into the vehicle conceptual design process. Noise is key for community acceptance, autonomy and the need to operate autonomously are key for efficient, reliable and safe operations, and electrification of the propulsion system is a key enabler for these new vehicle types and sizes. This paper provides a summary of the DELIVER project and shows the applicability of current conceptual design and sizing tools novel vehicle configurations and sizes that are being proposed for urban air taxi and package delivery type applications.

  9. Teaching scientific principles through a computer-based, design-centered learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Michael Brian

    Research on science instruction indicates that the traditional science classroom is not always effective in improving students' scientific understanding. Physics courses, in particular, do not promote the ability to apply scientific principles for many reasons, based on their focus on procedural problem-solving and lab exercises. In this dissertation, I propose the Designing-to-Learn Architecture (DTLA), a design-centered goal-based scenario (GBS) architecture, theoretically grounded in the literature on design-centered learning environments, goal-based scenarios, intelligent tutoring systems and simulations. The DTLA offers an alternative approach to addressing the issues encountered in the traditional science classroom. The architecture consists of an artifact with associated design goals; components with component options; a simulation; a reference database; and guided tutorials. I describe the design of Goin' Up?, the prototype DTL application, serving as the basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the DTLA. I present results of interview and testing protocols from the formative evaluation of Goin' Up?, suggesting that learning outcomes, though not statistically significant, could be improved through DTLA enhancements informed by usage patterns in software sessions. I conclude with an analysis of the results and suggestions for improvements to the DTLA, including additional components to address reflection, provide support for novice designers, and offer tutorial guidance on the analysis of the artifact.

  10. Designing Science Learning Environments That Support Emerging Bilingual Students to Problematize Electrical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Enrique A.

    This dissertation investigates how emerging bilingual students make sense of natural phenomena through engaging in certain epistemic practices of science, and the elements of the learning environment that created those opportunities. Specifically, the dissertation focuses on how emerging bilingual students problematized electrical phenomena, like electric flow and electrical resistance, and how the design features of the environment (e.g., sequencing of activities, linguistic practices) may have supported students as they made sense of phenomena. The first study describes how for students presented and evaluated mechanistic models of electric flow, focusing specifically on how students identified and negotiated a disagreement between their explanatory models. The results from this study highlight the complexity of students' disagreements, not only because of the epistemological aspects related to presenting and evaluating knowledge, but also due to interpersonal dynamics and the discomfort associated with disagreeing with another person. The second study focuses on the design features of the learning environment that supported emerging bilingual students' investigations of electrical phenomena. The findings from this study highlight how a carefully designed set of activities, with the appropriate material resources (e.g., experimental tools), could support students to problematize electrical resistance. The third study describes how emerging bilingual students engaged in translanguaging practices and the contextual features of the learning environment that created and hindered opportunities for translanguaging. The findings from this study identify and articulate how emerging bilingual students engaged in translanguaging practices when problematizing electrical resistance, and strengthen the perspective that, in order to be equitable for emerging bilingual students, science learning environments need to act as translanguaging spaces. This dissertation makes three

  11. Vroom: designing an augmented environment for remote collaboration in digital cinema production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Todd; Cornish, Tracy

    2013-03-01

    As media technologies become increasingly affordable, compact and inherently networked, new generations of telecollaborative platforms continue to arise which integrate these new affordances. Virtual reality has been primarily concerned with creating simulations of environments that can transport participants to real or imagined spaces that replace the "real world". Meanwhile Augmented Reality systems have evolved to interleave objects from Virtual Reality environments into the physical landscape. Perhaps now there is a new class of systems that reverse this precept to enhance dynamic media landscapes and immersive physical display environments to enable intuitive data exploration through collaboration. Vroom (Virtual Room) is a next-generation reconfigurable tiled display environment in development at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) at the University of California, San Diego. Vroom enables freely scalable digital collaboratories, connecting distributed, high-resolution visualization resources for collaborative work in the sciences, engineering and the arts. Vroom transforms a physical space into an immersive media environment with large format interactive display surfaces, video teleconferencing and spatialized audio built on a highspeed optical network backbone. Vroom enables group collaboration for local and remote participants to share knowledge and experiences. Possible applications include: remote learning, command and control, storyboarding, post-production editorial review, high resolution video playback, 3D visualization, screencasting and image, video and multimedia file sharing. To support these various scenarios, Vroom features support for multiple user interfaces (optical tracking, touch UI, gesture interface, etc.), support for directional and spatialized audio, giga-pixel image interactivity, 4K video streaming, 3D visualization and telematic production. This paper explains the design process that

  12. Virtual Environment as a Design Tool for Sustainable Residential Spaces in Light of Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebatalla Sherin Nazmy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to reveal the impact of Virtual Environment as a design tool on the interior architect's design behavior towards adopting sustainable residential interior design practices. This approach is guided by the Theory of Planned Behaviour as a theoretical framework; the purpose as such would serve to bridge the gap between theoretical knowledge and its practical implementation to promote sustainable design practices. Findings revealed that Virtual Environment is anticipated to assist the interior architect in integrating the complex sustainable residential design objectives, and thus positively affect the interior architect's behavioral performance towards embracing sustainable residential design solutions.

  13. Next-Generation Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves for Hydrologic Design in Snow-Dominated Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Hongxiang [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington United States; Sun, Ning [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington United States; Wigmosta, Mark [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington United States; Distinguished Faculty Fellow, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle Washington United States; Skaggs, Richard [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington United States; Hou, Zhangshuan [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington United States; Leung, Ruby [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington United States

    2018-02-01

    There is a renewed focus on the design of infrastructure resilient to extreme hydrometeorological events. While precipitation-based intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves are commonly used as part of infrastructure design, a large percentage of peak runoff events in snow-dominated regions are caused by snowmelt, particularly during rain-on-snow (ROS) events. In these regions, precipitation-based IDF curves may lead to substantial over-/under-estimation of design basis events and subsequent over-/under-design of infrastructure. To overcome this deficiency, we proposed next-generation IDF (NG-IDF) curves, which characterize the actual water reaching the land surface. We compared NG-IDF curves to standard precipitation-based IDF curves for estimates of extreme events at 376 Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) stations across the western United States that each had at least 30 years of high-quality records. We found standard precipitation-based IDF curves at 45% of the stations were subject to under-design, many with significant under-estimation of 100-year extreme events, for which the precipitation-based IDF curves can underestimate water potentially available for runoff by as much as 125% due to snowmelt and ROS events. The regions with the greatest potential for under-design were in the Pacific Northwest, the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and the Middle and Southern Rockies. We also found the potential for over-design at 20% of the stations, primarily in the Middle Rockies and Arizona mountains. These results demonstrate the need to consider snow processes in the development of IDF curves, and they suggest use of the more robust NG-IDF curves for hydrologic design in snow-dominated environments.

  14. Nurturing gerontology students' intrinsic motivation to cocreate: The design of a powerful learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukema, Jan S; Veerman, Mieke; Van Alphen, Jacqueline; Visser, Geraldine; Smits, Carolien; Kingma, Tineke

    2017-09-21

    Professionals such as gerontologists play an important role in the design, development and implementation of age-friendly services. and products, by using working methods and principles of co-creation. A Dutch undergraduate applied gerontology programme aims to train students in the why, how and what of co-creation. The degree to which students are intrinsically motivated to develop competencies depends on how their psychological needs are met. These needs are autonomy, an awareness of competence and a sense of relatedness, as described in the self-determination theory. To nurture the intrinsic motivation of the applied gerontology students, a realistic, powerful learning environment called the Living Lab Applied Gerontology was designed and implemented. The aim of this paper is to present the design of this powerful learning environment and to discuss its value for nurturing the students' intrinsic motivation for co-creation. Based on a focus group with eight students, we identify directions for further research and development of living labs.

  15. Cryogenic Fiber Optic Assemblies for Spaceflight Environments: Design, Manufacturing, Testing, and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomes, W. Joe; Ott, Melanie N.; Chuska, Richard; Switzer, Robert; Onuma, Eleanya; Blair, Diana; Frese, Erich; Matyseck, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic assemblies have been used on spaceflight missions for many years as an enabling technology for routing, transmitting, and detecting optical signals. Due to the overwhelming success of NASA in implementing fiber optic assemblies on spaceflight science-based instruments, system scientists increasingly request fibers that perform in extreme environments while still maintaining very high optical transmission, stability, and reliability. Many new applications require fiber optic assemblies that will operate down to cryogenic temperatures as low as 20 Kelvin. In order for the fiber assemblies to operate with little loss in optical throughput at these extreme temperatures requires a system level approach all the way from how the fiber assembly is manufactured to how it is held, routed, and integrated. The NASA Goddard Code 562 Photonics Group has been designing, manufacturing, testing, and integrating fiber optics for spaceflight and other high reliability applications for nearly 20 years. Design techniques and lessons learned over the years are consistently applied to developing new fiber optic assemblies that meet these demanding environments. System level trades, fiber assembly design methods, manufacturing, testing, and integration will be discussed. Specific recent examples of ground support equipment for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST); the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2); and others will be included.

  16. An intelligent and integrated V and V environment design for NPP I and C software systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Seo Ryong; Son Han Seong; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is the safety critical system. Since, nuclear instrumentation and control (I and C) systems including the plant protection system play the brain part of human, nuclear I and C systems have an influence on safety and operation of NPP. Essentially, software V and V should be performed for the safety critical systems based on software. It is very important in the technical aspect because of the problems concerning license acquisitions. In this work, an intelligent and integrated V and V environment supporting the automation of V and V was designed. The intelligent and integrated V and V environment consists of the intelligent controller part, components part, interface part, and GUI part. These parts were integrated systematically, while taking their own independent functions

  17. A Design of Ginseng Planting Environment Monitoring System Based on WSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ding

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Through the analysis of ginseng products industry chain, this paper designs and implements ginseng planting environment monitoring system. The system realized data collection and detection of ginseng planting environment in real time by using wireless sensor, transmission of environmental parameters in real time by using GPRS wireless transmission module, and video monitor and alarm of ginseng land by using unattended machine. It is the foundation of information transformation of ginseng products industry chain based on the Internet of Things. The experiment of ginseng planting base in Fusong indicates the system can offer support of original data for scientific cultivation of ginseng, comprehensive analysis of ginseng products and propaganda of ginseng brand.

  18. Commercialization of terrestrial applications of aerospace power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberg, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    The potential for commercialization of terrestrial energy systems based upon aerospace power technology's explored. Threats to the aerospace power technology industry, caused by the end of the cold war and weak world economy are described. There are also new opportunities caused by increasing terrestrial energy needs and world-wide concern for the environment. In this paper, the strengths and weaknesses of the aerospace power industry in commercializing terrestrial energy technologies are reviewed. Finally, actions which will enable the aerospace power technology industry to commercialize products into terrestrial energy markets are described

  19. Built environment instruments for walkability, bikeability, and recreation: disability and universal design relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jennifer A; Zimmerman, Jennifer L; Rimmer, James H

    2012-04-01

    Despite a plethora of instruments that measure the built environment with respect to its effect on potential physical activity, little is known about how relevant these instruments are for people with disabilities (PWDs). This review comprises an in-depth review of instruments related to the built environment and physical activity, as well as an examination of such instruments to determine their applicability for PWDs. In this paper, the term "built environment" refers to human-made structures (e.g., urban and rural design characteristics, recreational structures) that may facilitate or impede an individual's ability to be physically active. A content analysis was conducted on 95 instruments measuring walkability, bikeability, and recreation with respect to disability and universal design (UD) relevance. Instruments were also cataloged according to other dimensions, including psychometric properties, data collection modalities, and impact or use. Roughly one third of all instruments include some disability-specific items, and only a few UD principles are consistently demonstrated across all instruments. Psychometric information is available for approximately one half of the instruments. Most instruments use objective/audit methods of data collection, with less using subjective/perceived and Geographic Information System (GIS) methods. With respect to instrument impact/use, just over one half of the instruments have articles cited in the peer-reviewed literature. Recommendations for new and revised built environment instruments include more focus on specific disability populations, incorporation of all UD principles, as well as attention to psychometric quality and measurement specificity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Kyu Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS. The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36±1°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  1. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Kyu; Park, Seul-Hyun; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Gi-Hyuk

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  2. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondietti, E.A.; Bogle, M.A.; Brantley, J.N.

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: water-sediment interactions of U, Pu, Am, and Cm; relative availability of actinide elements from abiotic to aquatic biota; comparative uptake of transuranic elements by biota bordering Pond 3513; metabolic reduction of 239 Np from Np(V) to Np(IV) in cotton rats; evaluation of hazards associated with transuranium releases to the biosphere; predicting Pu in bone; adsorption--solubility--complexation phenomena in actinide partitioning between sorbents and solution; comparative soil extraction data; and comparative plant uptake data

  3. Iodine dynamics in the terrestrial environment

    OpenAIRE

    Bowley, Hannah E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of soil properties on soil iodine dynamics and uptake to plants. Soil and vegetation samples were collected from across eastern Northern Ireland (NI) to form the basis of most experimental work; samples from the Rothamsted Park Grass archive were used to investigate the role of changing soil chemistry through time and due to selected fertiliser applications; and iodine dynamics in humic acid (HA) were studied to improve understanding of the r...

  4. Terrestrial nematodes in a changing environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, de R.G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Increasing awareness of the nature and extent of soil pollution on soil biota and their role in soil processes has resulted in exploring the possibilities of biological assessment systems to indicate the ecological condition of soils and to predict the ecological efficacy of e.g. policy

  5. RHIC/AGS Online Model Environments: Experiences and Design for AGS Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.; Niederer, J.; Satogata, T.; Alai Tafti, A.; Tsoupas, N.; Zeijts, J. van

    1999-01-01

    The RHIC/AGS online modeling environment, a general client-server modeling package that supports cdev and straightforward integration of diverse computational modeling engines (CMEs), is being adapted to model the AGS and Booster at BNL. This implementation uses a version of MAD modified at BNL that allows traditional lattice structure analysis, single pass beam line analysis, multi-particle tracking, interactive graphics, and the use of field maps. The on-line model system is still under development, a real working prototype exists and is being tested. This paper describes the system and experience with its design and use for AGS and AGS Booster online modeling

  6. Understanding aural fluency in auditory display design for ambient intelligent environments

    OpenAIRE

    Droumeva, Milena; Wakkary, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the design and some evaluation results from the auditory display model of an ambient intelligent game named socio-ec(h)o. socio-ec(h)o is played physically by a team of four, and displays information via a responsive environment of light and sound. Based on a study of 56 participants involving both qualitative and preliminary quantitative analysis, we present our findings to date as they relate to the auditory display model, future directions and implications. Based on our...

  7. Design and implementation of a flipped classroom learning environment in the biomedical engineering context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrias, Alberto; Cho Hong, James Goh

    2015-01-01

    The design and implementation of a learning environment that leverages on the use of various technologies is presented. The context is an undergraduate core engineering course within the biomedical engineering curriculum. The topic of the course is data analysis in biomedical engineering problems. One of the key ideas of this study is to confine the most mathematical and statistical aspects of data analysis in prerecorded video lectures. Students are asked to watch the video lectures before coming to class. Since the classroom session does not need to cover the mathematical theory, the time is spent on a selected real world scenario in the field of biomedical engineering that exposes students to an actual application of the theory. The weekly cycle is concluded with a hands-on tutorial session in the computer rooms. A potential problem would arise in such learning environment if the students do not follow the recommendation of watching the video lecture before coming to class. In an attempt to limit these occurrences, two key instruments were put in place: a set of online self-assessment questions that students are asked to take before the classroom session and a simple rewards system during the classroom session. Thanks to modern learning analytics tools, we were able to show that, on average, 57.9% of students followed the recommendation of watching the video lecture before class. The efficacy of the learning environment was assessed through various means. A survey was conducted among the students and the gathered data support the view that the learning environment was well received by the students. Attempts were made to quantify the impacts on learning of the proposed measures by taking into account the results of selected questions of the final examination of the course. Although the presence of confounding factors demands caution in the interpretation, these data seem to indicate a possible positive effect of the use of video lectures in this technologically

  8. How scientific experiments are designed: Problem solving in a knowledge-rich, error-rich environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lisa M.

    bias in earlier studies using science-like tasks, in which characteristics of the alternate hypothesis space may have made it unfeasible for participants to generate and test alternate hypotheses. In general, scientists and science undergraduates were found to engage in a systematic experimental design process that responded to salient features of the problem environment, including the constant potential for experimental error, availability of alternate hypotheses, and access to both theoretical knowledge and knowledge of experimental techniques.

  9. An automation of design and modelling tasks in NX Siemens environment with original software - generator module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbiciak, M.; Grabowik, C.; Janik, W.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays the design constructional process is almost exclusively aided with CAD/CAE/CAM systems. It is evaluated that nearly 80% of design activities have a routine nature. These design routine tasks are highly susceptible to automation. Design automation is usually made with API tools which allow building original software responsible for adding different engineering activities. In this paper the original software worked out in order to automate engineering tasks at the stage of a product geometrical shape design is presented. The elaborated software works exclusively in NX Siemens CAD/CAM/CAE environment and was prepared in Microsoft Visual Studio with application of the .NET technology and NX SNAP library. The software functionality allows designing and modelling of spur and helicoidal involute gears. Moreover, it is possible to estimate relative manufacturing costs. With the Generator module it is possible to design and model both standard and non-standard gear wheels. The main advantage of the model generated in such a way is its better representation of an involute curve in comparison to those which are drawn in specialized standard CAD systems tools. It comes from fact that usually in CAD systems an involute curve is drawn by 3 points that respond to points located on the addendum circle, the reference diameter of a gear and the base circle respectively. In the Generator module the involute curve is drawn by 11 involute points which are located on and upper the base and the addendum circles therefore 3D gear wheels models are highly accurate. Application of the Generator module makes the modelling process very rapid so that the gear wheel modelling time is reduced to several seconds. During the conducted research the analysis of differences between standard 3 points and 11 points involutes was made. The results and conclusions drawn upon analysis are shown in details.

  10. Probing a Proactive Home: Challenges in Researching and Designing Everyday Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Mäyrä

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of a 3-year interdisciplinary study, this article presents an approach in which proactive information technology was introduced into homes, and discusses the derived design principles from a human-centered perspective. The application of proactive computing in homes will face particularly sensitive conditions, as familiar and reliable household elements remain strongly preferred. Since there is considerable resistance towards the increase of information technology in homes, both the calm system behaviors and the degree of variety in aesthetic designs will play major roles in the acceptance of proactive technology. If proactive technology will be an embedded part of a home’s structures and furniture, it needs to blend with the normal, cozy standards of a real living environment and aim to enhance the homeyness or the key social and aesthetic qualities of homes.

  11. Solar Probe Plus MAG Sensor Thermal Design for Low Heater Power and Extreme Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The heater power available for the Solar Probe Plus FIELDS MAG sensor is less than half of the heritage value for other missions. Nominally the MAG sensors are in the spacecraft's umbra. In the worst hot case, approximately 200 spacecraft communication downlinks, up to 10 hours each, are required at 0.7 AU. These downlinks require the spacecraft to slew 45 deg. about the Y-axis, exposing the MAG sensors and boom to sunlight. This paper presents the thermal design to meet the MAG sensor thermal requirements in the extreme thermal environment and with low heater power. A thermal balance test on the MAG sensor engineering model has verified the thermal design and correlated the thermal model for flight temperature predictions.

  12. Systems Engineering Design Via Experimental Operation Research: Complex Organizational Metric for Programmatic Risk Environments (COMPRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mog, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Unique and innovative graph theory, neural network, organizational modeling, and genetic algorithms are applied to the design and evolution of programmatic and organizational architectures. Graph theory representations of programs and organizations increase modeling capabilities and flexibility, while illuminating preferable programmatic/organizational design features. Treating programs and organizations as neural networks results in better system synthesis, and more robust data modeling. Organizational modeling using covariance structures enhances the determination of organizational risk factors. Genetic algorithms improve programmatic evolution characteristics, while shedding light on rulebase requirements for achieving specified technological readiness levels, given budget and schedule resources. This program of research improves the robustness and verifiability of systems synthesis tools, including the Complex Organizational Metric for Programmatic Risk Environments (COMPRE).

  13. The development of a distributed computing environment for the design and modeling of plasma spectroscopy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.K.; Eme, W.G.; Lee, R.W.; Salter, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    The design and analysis of plasma spectroscopy experiments can be significantly complicated by relatively routine computational tasks arising from the massive amount of data encountered in the experimental design and analysis stages of the work. Difficulties in obtaining, computing, manipulating and visualizing the information represent not simply an issue of convenience -- they have a very real limiting effect on the final quality of the data and on the potential for arriving at meaningful conclusions regarding an experiment. We describe ongoing work in developing a portable UNIX environment shell with the goal of simplifying and enabling these activities for the plasma-modeling community. Applications to the construction of atomic kinetics models and to the analysis of x-ray transmission spectroscopy will be shown

  14. Students as active co-designers in an online learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    This paper is based on an online seminar on ICT and Learning in Organizations where the traditional practice of using online discussions was challenged by expecting the students not only individually to take part in online discussions but also on a group basis to discuss what kind of opening...... question they would pose in order to invite co-students to take part in the online dialogue. Thus in contrast to the traditional understanding of the teacher as sole designer of the learning environment, the students were involved as active co-designers. They constantly engaged in dialogue both with fellow...... group members and other participating students. Drawing on theories of dialogic digital communication and collaborative learning, the paper will analyze students´ participation in dialogically organized online seminars and reflect on the challenges for students as independent and interconnected learners...

  15. Thermal Performance of Precast Concrete Sandwich Panel (PCSP) Design for Sustainable Built Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Peniel Ang Soon; Ling, Lim Mei; Kasim, Narimah; Hamid, Zuhairi Abd; Masrom, Md Asrul Nasid Bin

    2017-10-01

    Malaysia’s awareness of performance criteria in construction industry towards a sustainable built environment with the use of precast concrete sandwich panel (PCSP) system is applied in the building’s wall to study the structural behaviour. However, very limited studies are conducted on the thermal insulation of exterior and interior panels in PCSP design. In hot countries such as Malaysia, proper designs of panel are important to obtain better thermal insulation for building. This study is based on thermal performance of precast concrete sandwich panel design for sustainable built environment in Malaysia. In this research, three full specimens, which are control specimen (C), foamed concrete (FC) panels and concrete panels with added palm oil fuel ash (FC+ POFA), where FC and FC+POFA sandwiched with gypsum board (G) were produced to investigate their thermal performance. Temperature difference of exterior and interior surface of specimen was used as indicators of thermal-insulating performance of PCSP design. Heat transfer test by halogen lamp was carried out on three specimens where the exterior surface of specimens was exposed to the halogen lamp. The temperature reading of exterior and interior surface for three specimens were recorded with the help of thermocouple. Other factors also studied the workability, compressive strength and axial compressive strength of the specimens. This study has shown that FC + POFA specimen has the strength nearer to normal specimen (C + FC specimen). Meanwhile, the heat transfer results show that the FC+POFA has better thermal insulation performance compared to C and FC specimens with the highest temperature difference, 3.4°C compared to other specimens. The results from this research are useful to be implemented in construction due to its benefits such as reduction of energy consumption in air-conditioning, reduction of construction periods and eco-friendly materials.

  16. A new approach for automatic control modeling, analysis and design in fully fuzzy environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Ibrahim Gabr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new approach for the modeling, analysis and design of automatic control systems in fully fuzzy environment based on the normalized fuzzy matrices. The approach is also suitable for determining the propagation of fuzziness in automatic control and dynamical systems where all system coefficients are expressed as fuzzy parameters. A new consolidity chart is suggested based on the recently newly developed system consolidity index for testing the susceptibility of the system to withstand changes due to any system or input parameters changes effects. Implementation procedures are elaborated for the consolidity analysis of existing control systems and the design of new ones, including systems comparisons based on such implementation consolidity results. Application of the proposed methodology is demonstrated through illustrative examples, covering fuzzy impulse response of systems, fuzzy Routh–Hurwitz stability criteria, fuzzy controllability and observability. Moreover, the use of the consolidity chart for the appropriate design of control system is elaborated through handling the stabilization of inverted pendulum through pole placement technique. It is also shown that the regions comparison in consolidity chart is based on type of consolidity region shape such as elliptical or circular, slope or angle in degrees of the centerline of the geometric shape, the centroid of the geometric shape, area of the geometric shape, length of principal diagonals of the shape, and the diversity ratio of consolidity points for each region. Finally, it is recommended that the proposed consolidity chart approach be extended as a unified theory for modeling, analysis and design of continuous and digital automatic control systems operating in fully fuzzy environment.

  17. Terrestrial and extraterrestrial fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heymann, D.; Jenneskens, L.W.; Jehlicka, J; Koper, C.; Vlietstra, E. [Rice Univ, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Science

    2003-07-01

    This paper reviews reports of occurrences of fullerenes in circumstellar media, interstellar media, meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), lunar rocks, hard terrestrial rocks from Shunga (Russia), Sudbury (Canada) and Mitov (Czech Republic), coal, terrestrial sediments from the Cretaceous-Tertiary-Boundary and Pennian-Triassic-Boundary, fulgurite, ink sticks, dinosaur eggs, and a tree char. The occurrences are discussed in the context of known and postulated processes of fullerene formation, including the suggestion that some natural fullerenes might have formed from biological (algal) remains.

  18. Design and Development of a Low-Cost, Portable Monitoring Device for Indoor Environment Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Tiele

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the design and development of a low-cost, portable monitoring system for indoor environment quality (IEQ. IEQ is a holistic concept that encompasses elements of indoor air quality (IAQ, indoor lighting quality (ILQ, acoustic comfort, and thermal comfort (temperature and relative humidity. The unit is intended for the monitoring of temperature, humidity, PM2.5, PM10, total VOCs (×3, CO2, CO, illuminance, and sound levels. Experiments were conducted in various environments, including a typical indoor working environment and outdoor pollution, to evaluate the unit’s potential to monitor IEQ parameters. The developed system was successfully able to monitor parameter variations, based on specific events. A custom IEQ index was devised to rate the parameter readings with a simple scoring system to calculate an overall IEQ percentage. The advantages of the proposed system, with respect to commercial units, is associated with better customisation and flexibility to implement a variety of low-cost sensors. Moreover, low-cost sensor modules reduce the overall cost to provide a comprehensive, portable, and real-time monitoring solution. This development facilities researchers and interested enthusiasts to become engaged and proactive in participating in the study, management, and improvement of IEQ.

  19. Design, conception, and metrology of Extreme Ultraviolet multilayers mirrors resistant environments of space and EUV sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecquet, Ch.

    2009-03-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrum (EUV) wavelengths, which range between 13 nm and 40 nm, have many applications in science and technology. These have been developed for example in plasma physics (high order harmonics sources, X ray lasers). The work presented is about the design, the fabrication and the metrology of periodic multilayer mirrors. The main motivation of this study is to establish a cycle of development taking into account both the optical properties of reflective coatings (reflectivity, spectral selectivity, attenuation) and their behaviour under various environments. To improve the spectral selectivity, new multilayer periodic structures have been developed. They are characterized by a bimodal reflectance profile with adjustable attenuation. The effect of environment on the stability of performance is especially critical for the optical collection. The addition of material barriers has stabilized the performance of the peak reflectivity for over 200 h at 400 C deg. and it reduces the influence of other factors of instability on the reflectance. In addition, all structures have been fabricated successfully and evaluated in severe environments. (author)

  20. Rationale and study design of the Japan environment and children's study (JECS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Nitta, Hiroshi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Toda, Eisaku; Tsukamoto, Naoya; Hasegawa, Manabu; Yamagata, Zentaro; Kayama, Fujio; Kishi, Reiko; Ohya, Yukihiro; Saito, Hirohisa; Sago, Haruhiko; Okuyama, Makiko; Ogata, Tsutomu; Yokoya, Susumu; Koresawa, Yuji; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Nakayama, Shoji; Michikawa, Takehiro; Takeuchi, Ayano; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-10

    There is global concern over significant threats from a wide variety of environmental hazards to which children face. Large-scale and long-term birth cohort studies are needed for better environmental management based on sound science. The primary objective of the Japan Environment and Children's Study (JECS), a nation-wide birth cohort study that started its recruitment in January 2011, is to elucidate environmental factors that affect children's health and development. Approximately 100,000 expecting mothers who live in designated study areas will be recruited over a 3-year period from January 2011. Participating children will be followed until they reach 13 years of age. Exposure to environmental factors will be assessed by chemical analyses of bio-specimens (blood, cord blood, urine, breast milk, and hair), household environment measurements, and computational simulations using monitoring data (e.g. ambient air quality monitoring) as well as questionnaires. JECS' priority outcomes include reproduction/pregnancy complications, congenital anomalies, neuropsychiatric disorders, immune system disorders, and metabolic/endocrine system disorders. Genetic factors, socioeconomic status, and lifestyle factors will also be examined as covariates and potential confounders. To maximize representativeness, we adopted provider-mediated community-based recruitment. Through JECS, chemical substances to which children are exposed during the fetal stage or early childhood will be identified. The JECS results will be translated to better risk assessment and management to provide healthy environment for next generations.