WorldWideScience

Sample records for terrain

  1. DIORAMA Earth Terrain Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werley, Kenneth Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-10

    When simulating near-surface nuclear detonations, the terrain of the Earth can have an effect on the observed outputs. The critical parameter is called the “height of burst”. In order to model the effect of terrain on the simulations we have incorporated data from multiple sources to give 9 km resolution data with global coverage.

  2. TERRAIN, UNION PARISH, LOUSIANA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, KENDALL COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, DELAWARE COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, CEDAR COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, Norfolk County, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, DARKE COUNTY, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, DAWSON COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, Hampden County, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, RICE COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, WRIGHT COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, MERCER COUNTY, OHIO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, HANCOCK COUNTY, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, FULTON COUNTY, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, Bennington County, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, TROUSDALE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, BARNSTABLE COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, POTTER COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, Northampton COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  3. Terrain Park Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moffat, Craig

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study examined demographics, injury pattern, and hospital outcome in patients injured in winter resort terrain parks.Methods: The study included patients >12 years of age who presented to a regional trauma center with an acute injury sustained at a winter resort. Emergency department (ED research assistants collected patient injury and helmet use information using a prospectively designed questionnaire. ED and hospital data were obtained from trauma registry and hospital records.Results: Seventy-two patients were injured in a terrain park, and 263 patients were injured on non-terrain park slopes. Patients injured in terrain parks were more likely to be male [68/72 (94% vs. 176/263 (67%, p<0.0001], younger in age [23 ± 7 vs. 36 ± 17, p<0.0001], live locally [47/72 (65% vs. 124/263 (47%, p=0.006], use a snowboard [50/72 (69% vs. 91/263 (35%, p<0.0001], hold a season pass [46/66 (70% vs. 98/253 (39%, p<0.0001], and sustain an upper extremity injury [29/72 (40% vs. 52/263 (20%, p<0.001] when compared to patients injured on non-terrain park slopes. There were no differences between the groups in terms of EMS transport to hospital, helmet use, admission rate, hospital length of stay, and patients requiring specialty consultation in the ED.Conclusions: Patients injured in terrain parks represent a unique demographic within winter resort patrons. Injury severity appears to be similar to those patients injured on non-terrain park slopes.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:257-262.

  4. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  5. Flow on noisy terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsirogiannis, Konstantinos; Haverkort, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Computing watersheds on triangulated terrain models in a robust manner is a difficult task as it is sensitive to noise that appears in the elevation values of the input. This is amplified by the existence of many very small watersheds (corresponding to spurious minima) that obscure the overall hy...... to use a robust flow model together with exact arithmetic....

  6. Good terrain geometry, cheap!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchaineau, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wolinsky, M.; Sigeti, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Real-time terrain rendering for interactive visualization remains a demanding task. We present a novel algorithm with several advantages over previous methods: our method is unusually stingy with polygons yet achieves real-time performance and is scalable to arbitrary regions and resolutions. The method provides a continuous terrain mesh of specified triangle count having provably minimum error in restricted but reasonably general classes of permissible meshes and error metrics. Our method provides an elegant solution to guaranteeing certain elusive types of consistency in scenes produced by multiple scene generators which share a common finest-resolution database but which otherwise operate entirely independently. This consistency is achieved by exploiting the freedom of choice of error metric allowed by the algorithm to provide, for example, multiple exact lines-of-sight in real-time. Our methods rely on an off-line pre-processing phase to construct a multi-scale data structure consisting of triangular terrain approximations enhanced ({open_quotes}thickened{close_quotes}) with world-space error information. In real time, this error data is efficiently transformed into screen-space where it is used to guide a greedy top-down triangle subdivision algorithm which produces the desired minimal error continuous terrain mesh. Our algorithm has been implemented and it operates at real-time rates.

  7. Navigating Hypermasculine Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Karina Eske

    2017-01-01

    imposed by a street-based hypermasculine script. The analysis rests on an ethnographic study among 25 young Danish women aged 13 to 23 experienced in engaging in street-based physical violence. The study suggests that explorations of female tactics can provide a useful method of analysis for understanding...... female agency in (hyper)masculine social terrains....

  8. Washboard Terrain on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; White, Oliver L.; Howard, Alan D.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Schenk, Paul M.; Beyer, Ross A.; McKinnnon, William B.; Singer, Kelsi N.; Lauer, Tod R.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Young, Leslie; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Olkin, Catherine; Ennico, Kimberly; New Horizons Science Team

    2017-10-01

    Washboard texture or patterning consists of fields of parallel to sub-parallel ridges typically spaced ~1-2 km crest to crest and a few 100 m in amplitude (Fig. 4a in Moore et al., 2016, Science, 351, 1284-1293). For the most part, underlying topography can be easily discerned. We will refer to discrete, well-bounded patches of these landforms as Washboard Terrain (WT). WT is observed to occur along the rim, and just beyond the rim, of Sputnik basin from the West to NNW. Where it is seen in high-resolution data, it has clearly defined limits, beyond which it would be able to be seen if it were there. WT doesn’t occur at very low latitudes or very high latitudes (ranging from 22°N to 62°N). WT seems to occur most conspicuously on relatively level, gently sloping terrain. It is restricted to elevations between ~-2 km to area in which WT occurs is the sinuous valley network, which is suspected to have been formed, or at least substantially modified, by glaciation. WT also appears to occur mainly on an intermediate-albedo reddish material, where seen in enhanced color data. Where it occurs in level terrain, WT tends to trend ENE - there doesn’t seem to be a strong local control of its orientation in response to valley drainage directions. WT can display a greater range of orientations where it occurs in higher-relief (not higher elevation) settings such as spurs. WT appears superposed on very ancient landscapes, but is itself cratered locally by clusters of small (~1-3 km) craters, which may be secondaries. This implies that WT may be intermediate in age. Of several working hypotheses, we currently provisionally favor that WT may be akin to terrestrial recessional moraines (or de Geer moraines) associated with the retreat of a higher stand of N2 glaciation that once overfilled Sputnik basin. These putative moraine features may owe their spacing to superseasonal retreat on Milankovitch timescales of ~1 Ma. If this hypothesis has validity, then perhaps the

  9. Turbulence in complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jakob [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmosheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a model of the spectral velocity-tensor in neutral flow over complex terrain. The resulting equations are implemented in a computer code using the mean flow generated by a linear mean flow model as input. It estimates turbulence structure over hills (except on the lee side if recirculation is present) in the so-called outer layer and also models the changes in turbulence statistics in the vicinity roughness changes. The generated turbulence fields are suitable as input for dynamic load calculations on wind turbines and other tall structures and is under implementation in the collection of programs called WA{sup s}P Engineering. (au) EFP-97; EU-JOULE-3. 15 refs.

  10. Polygonal terrains on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pina

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of water ice on Mars is well established. Some featureson the planet point to the occurrence of processes similar to those that take place in periglacial areas of Earth. One of the clues for this is the existence of small-scale polygonal terrains. In this paper, we present a methodology that aims at the automated identification of polygonal patterns on high-spatial resolution images of the surface of Mars. In the context of the research project TERPOLI, this step will be complemented with a full characterization, in both geometric and topological terms, of thenetworks detected. In this manner, we hope to collect data that will lead to a better understanding of the conditions of formation of the polygons, and of their temporal evolution; namely, we intend to identify different groups of polygons and to compare them with terrestrial examples.

  11. On characterizing terrain visibility graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Evans

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A terrain is an $x$-monotone polygonal line in the $xy$-plane. Two vertices of a terrain are mutually visible if and only if there is no terrain vertex on or above the open line segment connecting them. A graph whose vertices represent terrain vertices and whose edges represent mutually visible pairs of terrain vertices is called a terrain visibility graph. We would like to find properties that are both necessary and sufficient for a graph to be a terrain visibility graph; that is, we would like to characterize terrain visibility graphs.Abello et al. [Discrete and Computational Geometry, 14(3:331--358, 1995] showed that all terrain visibility graphs are “persistent”. They showed that the visibility information of a terrain point set implies some ordering requirements on the slopes of the lines connecting pairs of points in any realization, and as a step towards showing sufficiency, they proved that for any persistent graph $M$ there is a total order on the slopes of the (pseudo lines in a generalized configuration of points whose visibility graph is $M$.We give a much simpler proof of this result by establishing an orientation to every triple of vertices, reflecting some slope ordering requirements that are consistent with $M$ being the visibility graph, and prove that these requirements form a partial order. We give a faster algorithm to construct a total order on the slopes. Our approach attempts to clarify the implications of the graph theoretic properties on the ordering of the slopes, and may be interpreted as defining properties on an underlying oriented matroid that we show is a restricted type of $3$-signotope.

  12. TERRAIN Submission for CHICKASAW, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, HART COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, LEVY COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, CHOCTAW COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, CULLMAN COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, NELSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, MENIFEE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, GREENE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, CLARKE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, ESTILL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, ELMORE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, MARSHALL COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, LIMESTONE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, HALE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, RUSSELL COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, OHIO COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, MCCREARY COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, FAYETTE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, MADISON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, MONROE COUNTY, Michigan USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, Metcalfe COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, CRITTENDEN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, Cedar COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, TRIGG COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, Fleming COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. Spectra of Velocity components over Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Larko, D.; Lipschut, R.

    1982-01-01

    Spectra have been measured over a variety of types of complex terrain: on tops of hills and escarpments, over land downstream of a water surface, and over rolling terrain. Differences between spectra over many types of complex terrain, and over uniform terrain, can be explained by these hypotheses...

  2. Complete Scene Recovery and Terrain Classification in Textured Terrain Meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyhyun Um

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Terrain classification allows a mobile robot to create an annotated map of its local environment from the three-dimensional (3D and two-dimensional (2D datasets collected by its array of sensors, including a GPS receiver, gyroscope, video camera, and range sensor. However, parts of objects that are outside the measurement range of the range sensor will not be detected. To overcome this problem, this paper describes an edge estimation method for complete scene recovery and complete terrain reconstruction. Here, the Gibbs-Markov random field is used to segment the ground from 2D videos and 3D point clouds. Further, a masking method is proposed to classify buildings and trees in a terrain mesh.

  3. Processing Terrain Point Cloud Data

    KAUST Repository

    DeVore, Ronald

    2013-01-10

    Terrain point cloud data are typically acquired through some form of Light Detection And Ranging sensing. They form a rich resource that is important in a variety of applications including navigation, line of sight, and terrain visualization. Processing terrain data has not received the attention of other forms of surface reconstruction or of image processing. The goal of terrain data processing is to convert the point cloud into a succinct representation system that is amenable to the various application demands. The present paper presents a platform for terrain processing built on the following principles: (i) measuring distortion in the Hausdorff metric, which we argue is a good match for the application demands, (ii) a multiscale representation based on tree approximation using local polynomial fitting. The basic elements held in the nodes of the tree can be efficiently encoded, transmitted, visualized, and utilized for the various target applications. Several challenges emerge because of the variable resolution of the data, missing data, occlusions, and noise. Techniques for identifying and handling these challenges are developed. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  4. Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat

    This thesis includes the results of a PhD study about complex terrain and wind lidars. The study mostly focuses on hilly and forested areas. Lidars have been used in combination with cups, sonics and vanes, to reach the desired vertical measurement heights. Several experiments are performed...... in complex terrain sites and the measurements are compared with two different flow models; a linearised flow model LINCOM and specialised forest model SCADIS. In respect to the lidar performance in complex terrain, the results showed that horizontal wind speed errors measured by a conically scanning lidar...... models and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated by LINCOM model was only reliable between 1 and 2 tree height (h) above canopy. The SCADIS model reported better correlation with the measurements in forest up to ∼6h. At the forest...

  5. Iapetus Bright and Dark Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this Voyager 2 image taken on August 22, 1981. Amazingly, the dark material covers precisely the side of Iapetus that leads in the direction of orbital motion around Saturn (except for the poles), whereas the bright material occurs on the trailing hemisphere and at the poles. The bright terrain is made of dirty ice, and the dark terrain is surfaced by carbonaceous molecules, according to measurements made with Earth-based telescopes. Iapetus' dark hemisphere has been likened to tar or asphalt and is so dark that no details within this terrain were visible to Voyager 2. The bright icy hemisphere, likened to dirty snow, shows many large impact craters. The closest approach by Voyager 2 to Iapetus was a relatively distant 600,000 miles, so that our best images, such as this, have a resolution of about 12 miles. The dark material is made of organic substances, probably including poisonous cyano compounds such as frozen hydrogen cyanide polymers. Though we know a little about the dark terrain's chemical nature, we do not understand its origin. Two theories have been developed, but neither is fully satisfactory--(1) the dark material may be organic dust knocked off the small neighboring satellite Phoebe and 'painted' onto the leading side of Iapetus as the dust spirals toward Saturn and Iapetus hurtles through the tenuous dust cloud, or (2) the dark material may be made of icy-cold carbonaceous 'cryovolcanic' lavas that were erupted from Iapetus' interior and then blackened by solar radiation, charged particles, and cosmic rays. A determination of the actual cause, as well as discovery of any other geologic features smaller than 12 miles across, awaits the Cassini Saturn orbiter to arrive in 2004.

  6. Complex terrain and wind lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingoel, F.

    2009-08-15

    This thesis includes the results of a PhD study about complex terrain and wind lidars. The study mostly focuses on hilly and forested areas. Lidars have been used in combination with cups, sonics and vanes, to reach the desired vertical measurement heights. Several experiments are performed in complex terrain sites and the measurements are compared with two different flow models; a linearised flow model LINCOM and specialised forest model SCADIS. In respect to the lidar performance in complex terrain, the results showed that horizontal wind speed errors measured by a conically scanning lidar can be of the order of 3-4% in moderately-complex terrain and up to 10% in complex terrain. The findings were based on experiments involving collocated lidars and meteorological masts, together with flow calculations over the same terrains. The lidar performance was also simulated with the commercial software WAsP Engineering 2.0 and was well predicted except for some sectors where the terrain is particularly steep. Subsequently, two experiments were performed in forested areas; where the measurements are recorded at a location deep-in forest and at the forest edge. Both sites were modelled with flow models and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated by LINCOM model was only reliable between 1 and 2 tree height (h) above canopy. The SCADIS model reported better correlation with the measurements in forest up to approx6h. At the forest edge, LINCOM model was used by allocating a slope half-in half out of the forest based on the suggestions of previous studies. The optimum slope angle was reported as 17 deg.. Thus, a suggestion was made to use WAsP Engineering 2.0 for forest edge modelling with known limitations and the applied method. The SCADIS model worked better than the LINCOM model at the forest edge but the model reported closer results to the measurements at upwind than the downwind and this should be

  7. Evaluating Terrain Irregularity by Robot Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Luneckas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A method that allows evaluate the terrain irregularity by a robot posture is presented in this paper. A necessity to evaluate terrain irregularity is pointed out. Description of irregular terrain is given. A possibility to evaluate terrain irregularity by feet coordinate standard deviation is proposed. When deviation is σ = 0, all robots are in one plane. Bigger σ the more robot legs are scattered, meaning robot is walking in irregular terrain. A method to evaluate robot horizontality according to terrain by position of three planes is introduced.Article in Lithuanian

  8. Digital terrain tapes: user guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1980-01-01

    DMATC's digital terrain tapes are a by-product of the agency's efforts to streamline the production of raised-relief maps. In the early 1960's DMATC developed the Digital Graphics Recorder (DGR) system that introduced new digitizing techniques and processing methods into the field of three-dimensional mapping. The DGR system consisted of an automatic digitizing table and a computer system that recorded a grid of terrain elevations from traces of the contour lines on standard topographic maps. A sequence of computer accuracy checks was performed and then the elevations of grid points not intersected by contour lines were interpolated. The DGR system produced computer magnetic tapes which controlled the carving of plaster forms used to mold raised-relief maps. It was realized almost immediately that this relatively simple tool for carving plaster molds had enormous potential for storing, manipulating, and selectively displaying (either graphically or numerically) a vast number of terrain elevations. As the demand for the digital terrain tapes increased, DMATC began developing increasingly advanced digitizing systems and now operates the Digital Topographic Data Collection System (DTDCS). With DTDCS, two types of data elevations as contour lines and points, and stream and ridge lines are sorted, matched, and resorted to obtain a grid of elevation values for every 0.01 inch on each map (approximately 200 feet on the ground). Undefined points on the grid are found by either linear or or planar interpolation.

  9. Urban Terrain Analysis Training Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    Continue on reverse aide If necessary and iden t i f y by b lock number) MOBA a Combat-In-Cities Training Aids for Urban Combat Urban Terrain ZQ...Urban Areas Working Group of the Military Operations Research Society; the joint DARCOM-TRADOC (U.S. Army) MOUT conferences; and a special MOBA

  10. An automated system for terrain database construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. F.; Fretz, R. K.; Logan, T. L.; Bryant, N. A.

    1987-01-01

    An automated Terrain Database Preparation System (TDPS) for the construction and editing of terrain databases used in computerized wargaming simulation exercises has been developed. The TDPS system operates under the TAE executive, and it integrates VICAR/IBIS image processing and Geographic Information System software with CAD/CAM data capture and editing capabilities. The terrain database includes such features as roads, rivers, vegetation, and terrain roughness.

  11. Handling Massive and Dynamic Terrain Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbæk, Morten

    analyzing flood risk and visibility, to producing nautical charts. Many algorithms and much commercial software have been developed to help analyze terrain models. However, significant algorithmic challenges arise from the increasing detail (and therefore size) of modern terrain models. Furthermore, terrain...

  12. Prediction models in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marti, I.; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the work is to investigatethe performance of HIRLAM in complex terrain when used as input to energy production forecasting models, and to develop a statistical model to adapt HIRLAM prediction to the wind farm. The features of the terrain, specially the topography, influence...... are calculated using on-line measurements of power production as well as HIRLAM predictions as input thus taking advantage of the auto-correlation, which is present in the power production for shorter pediction horizons. Statistical models are used to discribe the relationship between observed energy production...... the performance of HIRLAM in particular with respect to wind predictions. To estimate the performance of the model two spatial resolutions (0,5 Deg. and 0.2 Deg.) and different sets of HIRLAM variables were used to predict wind speed and energy production. The predictions of energy production for the wind farms...

  13. A GPS inspired Terrain Referenced Navigation algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Terrain Referenced Navigation (TRN) refers to a form of localization in which measurements of distances to the terrain surface are matched with a digital elevation map allowing a vehicle to estimate its own position within the map. The main goal of this dissertation is to improve TRN performance

  14. Terrain Classification of Norwegian Slab Avalanche Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallandvik, Linda; Aadland, Eivind; Vikene, Odd Lennart

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to rely on snow conditions, weather, and human factors when making judgments about avalanche risk because these variables are dynamic and complex; terrain, however, is more easily observed and interpreted. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate (1) the type of terrain in which historical fatal snow avalanche accidents in Norway…

  15. Remote sensing of Earth terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Research findings are summarized for projects dealing with the following: application of theoretical models to active and passive remote sensing of saline ice; radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest; scattering of electromagnetic waves from a dense medium consisting of correlated Mie scatterers with size distribution and applications to dry snow; variance of phase fluctuations of waves propagating through a random medium; theoretical modeling for passive microwave remote sensing of earth terrain; polarimetric signatures of a canopy of dielectric cylinders based on first and second order vector radiative transfer theory; branching model for vegetation; polarimetric passive remote sensing of periodic surfaces; composite volume and surface scattering model; and radar image classification.

  16. Human Robotic Systems (HRS): Extreme Terrain Mobility Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During 2014, the Extreme Terrain Mobility project element is developing five technologies:Exoskeleton Development for ISS EvaluationExtreme Terrain Mobility...

  17. Hydrographic Basins Analysis Using Digital Terrain Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaela, Pişleagă; -Minda Codruţa, Bădăluţă; Gabriel, Eleş; Daniela, Popescu

    2017-10-01

    The paper, emphasis the link between digital terrain modelling and studies of hydrographic basins, concerning the hydrological processes analysis. Given the evolution of computing techniques but also of the software digital terrain modelling made its presence felt increasingly, and established itself as a basic concept in many areas, due to many advantages. At present, most digital terrain modelling is derived from three alternative sources such as ground surveys, photogrammetric data capture or from digitized cartographic sources. A wide range of features may be extracted from digital terrain models, such as surface, specific points and landmarks, linear features but also areal futures like drainage basins, hills or hydrological basins. The paper highlights how the use appropriate software for the preparation of a digital terrain model, a model which is subsequently used to study hydrographic basins according to various geomorphological parameters. As a final goal, it shows the link between digital terrain modelling and hydrographic basins study that can be used to optimize the correlation between digital model terrain and hydrological processes in order to obtain results as close to the real field processes.

  18. Terrain identification for RHex-type robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, Camilo; Shill, Jacob; Johnson, Aaron; Clark, Jonathan; Collins, Emmanuel

    2013-05-01

    Terrain identification is a key enabling ability for generating terrain adaptive behaviors that assist both robot planning and motor control. This paper considers running legged robots from the RHex family) which the military plans to use in the field to assist troops in reconnaissance tasks. Important terrain adaptive behaviors include the selection of gaits) modulation of leg stiffness) and alteration of steering control laws that minimize slippage) maximize speed and/or reduce energy consumption. These terrain adaptive behaviors can be enabled by a terrain identification methodology that combines proprioceptive sensors already available in RHex-type robots. The proposed classification approach is based on the characteristic frequency signatures of data from leg observers) which combine current sensing with a dynamic model of the leg motion. The paper analyzes the classification accuracy obtained using both a single leg and groups of legs (through a voting scheme) on different terrains such as vinyl) asphalt) grass) and pebbles. Additionally) it presents a terrain classifier that works across various gait speeds and in fact almost as good as an overly specialized classifier.

  19. Wind turbine wake measurement in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Menke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    SCADA data from a wind farm and high frequency time series measurements obtained with remote scanning systems have been analysed with focus on identification of wind turbine wake properties in complex terrain. The analysis indicates that within the flow regime characterized by medium to large...... downstream distances (more than 5 diameters) from the wake generating turbine, the wake changes according to local atmospheric conditions e.g. vertical wind speed. In very complex terrain the wake effects are often “overruled” by distortion effects due to the terrain complexity or topology....

  20. Avalanche modeling in forested terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, M.; Bartelt, P. A.; Bebi, P.; Grêt-Regamey, A.

    2010-12-01

    Mountain forests are a valuable defense against snow avalanches. Currently, however, little quantitative information is available to estimate the effect of forest structure on the motion of avalanches. Avalanche flow is strongly influenced by the condition and composition of vegetation in the avalanche path. This potential decelerating effect has, however, not yet been quantified. We apply the numerical avalanche dynamics program RAMMS to simulate several well documented small avalanche events in forests. The two-dimensional model RAMMS predicts avalanche run-out distances, flow velocities and impact pressures in complex three-dimensional terrain by numerically solving a system of partial differential equations governing avalanche flow. Based on detailed data on forest conditions and avalanche characteristics such as release areas, fracture heights and length collected in forested areas, where avalanches were observed, we modify the input parameters of the RAMMS model to match the observations. We compare the model output with observed run-out distances in order to quantify the decelerating effects of different forest structures. Implementing avalanche forest interactions into numerical avalanche simulations will open new fields of application for avalanche models, e.g. for managing mountain forests and by better accounting for mountain forests as an effective biological protection measure against snow avalanches in natural hazard mapping and landscape planning.

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Pike County, KY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  2. Defending Critical Infrastructure as Cyber Key Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    AU/ACSC/2016 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY Defending Critical Infrastructure as Cyber Key Terrain by Derek Molle, Civ, USAF...20 Converged Enterprise Network...23 Logically Isolated Enterprise

  3. Visualization of Features in 3D Terrain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steve Dübel; Heidrun Schumann

    2017-01-01

    In 3D terrain analysis, topographical characteristics, such as mountains or valleys, and geo-spatial data characteristics, such as specific weather conditions or objects of interest, are important features...

  4. DCS Terrain Submission for Charlton Co GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS Terrain for HOUSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submission for Mohave, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, CITY OF DALLAS, DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS Terrain Submission for Newton, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain for ELBERT County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN Submission for Forest Countywide DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS Terrain Submission for Ector, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, CERRO GORDO COUNTY, IOWA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, UPPER CUMBERLAND WATERSHED, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Tyler TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. Digital Terrain Submittal for Duval County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain Submission for Albany County NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain Submission for Citrus County FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain Submission for Woodward, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain Submission for Merced, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. DCS Terrain Submission for Sanders County, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain for Middlesex County, NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  2. Terrain, CEDAR RAPIDS, LINN COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Ulster County NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submission for Caddo, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS TERRAIN Submission for STEARNS COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submission for Lagrange County, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for Cass County, MO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS Terrain Submission for Cass County, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain Submission for Brazos TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Logan, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS Terrain Submission for Carter, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Stephens, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR MARTIN COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Sioux Falls

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain Submission for Mayes, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain for Schley County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. Automatic terrain modeling using transfinite element analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2010-05-31

    An automatic procedure for modeling terrain is developed based on L2 projection-based interpolation of discrete terrain data onto transfinite function spaces. The function space is refined automatically by the use of image processing techniques to detect regions of high error and the flexibility of the transfinite interpolation to add degrees of freedom to these areas. Examples are shown of a section of the Palo Duro Canyon in northern Texas.

  18. Terrain classification for a quadruped robot

    OpenAIRE

    Degrave, Jonas; Van Cauwenbergh, Robin; wyffels, Francis; Waegeman, Tim; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Using data retrieved from the Puppy II robot at the University of Zurich (UZH), we show that machine learning techniques with non-linearities and fading memory are effective for terrain classification, both supervised and unsupervised, even with a limited selection of input sensors. The results indicate that most information for terrain classification is found in the combination of tactile sensors and proprioceptive joint angle sensors. The classification error is small enough to have a robot...

  19. The topography of chaos terrain on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G.; Prockter, L. M.; Schenk, P.

    2010-12-01

    Chaos terrain and lenticulae are commonly observed surface features unique to the Galilean satellite Europa. Chaos terrain occurs as discrete regions of the satellite’s surface 10s to 100s of km in size that are disrupted into isolated plates surrounded by hummocky matrix material. Lenticulae occur as positive- or negative-relief domes km to 10s of km in diameter that can disrupt the original surface in a manner similar to chaos terrain. Evidence suggests that they each form via an endogenic process involving the interaction of a mobile substrate with the brittle surface and it has been proposed that ice shell thinning or surface yielding coupled with brine production represents the most plausible mechanism for the formation of these features. These similarities in morphology and formation mechanism indicate they may represent a continuum process. We explore whether larger chaos terrain represent the coalescence of smaller lenticulae by examining topography within chaos to determine whether it contains domes on length scales similar to lenticulae. Schenk and Pappalardo (2004) alluded to the presence of several prominent domes within Conamara Chaos and we have previously shown that at least 4 and as many as 9 domes with length scales similar to lenticulae are present within and along the margins of the feature. This was accomplished by using Fourier analysis to decompose the topographic signature of Conamara Chaos and the surrounding terrain into discrete wavelength components. A low-pass filter was then used to strip away shorter wavelength components of the topography associated with the region and determine if longer wavelength features were present within the terrain. Here we present new work identifying the presence, size, and distribution of domes within the boundaries of other chaos terrains across the surface of Europa and discuss implications for chaos formation.

  20. Improved Inlet Conditions for Terrain CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard

    The atmospheric boundary layer flow over different types of terrain is studied through simulations made with the finite volume CFD code of Ellipsys 2D and 3D. The simulations are compared to measurements made at the Høvsøre test site and over the hill of Askervein.The primary objective...... for describing the flow after a change in the surface roughness. The derivation of these expressions is based on a range of simulations of flows over flat terrain with different types of roughness changes.The derived expressions show good agreement with simulations and could, as intended, be used to define inlet...... conditions for flow simulations over terrain, where an upstream roughness change is thought to have an influence. More thorough experimental verification is however, thought necessary to make the expressions sufficiently reliable. The same goes for the simulations-based conclusions regarding the flow over...

  1. SAR clutter simulation with terrain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, David W.; Scott, Iain

    2002-02-01

    A model for the signal returns from terrain features for a Synthetic Aperture Radar is developed. A standard range-azimuth geometry is used to divide the surface area into cells for which clutter returns are generated. This geometry is extended to a spherical Earth to introduce effects due to varying terrain height and slope, and to determine areas of shadow. The calculation of phase variation in the returned pulses at the IQ level required to successfully form a SAR is discussed. The technique is illustrated with an example which demonstrates the effect of look angle on SAR images.

  2. F-16 MMC Strafe in Mountainous Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    i AU/ACSC/2016 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY F-16 MMC Strafe in Mountainous Terrain by Jared P. White, Maj, USAF...Modular mission computer ( MMC ) 6.2 OFP introduced auto-ground collision avoidance software into the digital flight control computer (DFLCC). AGCAS

  3. Declarative terrain modeling for military training games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelik, R.M.; Tutenel, T.; Kraker, J.K.. de; Bidarra, R.

    2010-01-01

    Military training instructors increasingly often employ computer games to train soldiers in all sorts of skills and tactics. One of the difficulties instructors face when using games as a training tool is the creation of suitable content, including scenarios, entities, and corresponding terrain

  4. Visualization of Large Terrains Made Easy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, P; Pascucci, V

    2001-08-07

    We present an elegant and simple to implement framework for performing out-of-core visualization and view-dependent refinement of large terrain surfaces. Contrary to the recent trend of increasingly elaborate algorithms for large-scale terrain visualization, our algorithms and data structures have been designed with the primary goal of simplicity and efficiency of implementation. Our approach to managing large terrain data also departs from more conventional strategies based on data tiling. Rather than emphasizing how to segment and efficiently bring data in and out of memory, we focus on the manner in which the data is laid out to achieve good memory coherency for data accesses made in a top-down (coarse-to-fine) refinement of the terrain. We present and compare the results of using several different data indexing schemes, and propose a simple to compute index that yields substantial improvements in locality and speed over more commonly used data layouts. Our second contribution is a new and simple, yet easy to generalize method for view-dependent refinement. Similar to several published methods in this area, we use longest edge bisection in a top-down traversal of the mesh hierarchy to produce a continuous surface with subdivision connectivity. In tandem with the refinement, we perform view frustum culling and triangle stripping. These three components are done together in a single pass over the mesh. We show how this framework supports virtually any error metric, while still being highly memory and compute efficient.

  5. Maintaining Contour Trees of Dynamic Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Mølhave, Thomas; Revsbæk, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of maintaining the contour tree T of a terrain Sigma, represented as a triangulated xy-monotone surface, as the heights of its vertices vary continuously with time. We characterize the combinatorial changes in T and how they relate to topological changes in Sigma. We present...... an augmented contour tree and a join/split tree....

  6. Scaling Terrain Attributes By Fractal Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrain attributes derived from grid digital elevation models (DEMs) are commonly used in distributed hydrologic models. However, many attribute estimations are biased by DEM grid cell size. For example, land surface slopes estimated from 30-m DEMs are, on average, less than slopes estimated from ...

  7. Model-Based Method for Terrain-Following Display Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-15

    A model-based method for terrain-following display design and evaluation is described. The basic approach centers on the use of a pilot/ vehicle...data. Terrain-following, Mathematical modeling, Aircraft display design , Optimal control model.

  8. Investigation of Terrain Analysis and Classification Methods for Ground Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    alignment was verified after every 5 tests, by driving the wheel over a flat, rigid, aluminum plate covered with a thin layer of polyurethane foam in...primarily to their shape , and not to loss of traction between a wheel and the terrain. In contrast, non-geometric hazards are regions of terrain that are...classifier to label the terrain patch. Pairs of terrain class labels and associated visual features are stored in memory . When sufficient data is accumulated

  9. Large-Eddy Simulation of turbine wake in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J.; Troldborg, N.; Sørensen, N. N.; Patton, E. G.; Sullivan, P. P.

    2017-05-01

    We present Large-Eddy Simulation results of a turbine wake in realistic complex terrain with slopes above 0.5. By comparing simulations including and without the wind turbine we can estimate the induction factor, a, and we show how the presence of a strong recirculation zone in the terrain dictates the positioning of the wake. This last finding is in contrast to what would happen in gentle terrain with no substantial increase of turbulent kinetic energy in the terrain induced wakes.

  10. Local-scale stratigraphy of grooved terrain on Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Head, James W.; Helfenstein, Paul; Plescia, Jeffrey B.

    1987-01-01

    The surface of the Jovian satellite, Ganymede, is divided into two main units, dark terrain cut by arcuate and subradial furrows, and light terrain consisting largely of areas with pervasive U-shaped grooves. The grooved terrain may be subdivided on the basis of pervasive morphology of groove domains into four terrain types: (1) elongate bands of parallel grooves (groove lanes); (2) polygonal domains of parallel grooves (grooved polygons); (3) polygonal domains of two orthogonal groove sets (reticulate terrain); and (4) polygons having two to several complexly cross-cutting groove sets (complex grooved terrain). Reticulate terrain is frequently dark and not extensively resurfaced, and grades to a more hummocky terrain type. The other three grooved terrain types have almost universally been resurfaced by light material during their emplacement. The sequence of events during grooved terrain emplacement has been investigated. An attempt is made to integrate observed geologic and tectonic patterns to better constrain the relative ages and styles of emplacement of grooved terrain types. A revised model of grooved terrain emplacement is proposed and is tested using detailed geologic mapping and measurement of crater density.

  11. Hydrologic Terrain Processing Using Parallel Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Watson, D. W.; Wallace, R. M.; Schreuders, K.; Tesfa, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    Topography in the form of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), is widely used to derive information for the modeling of hydrologic processes. Hydrologic terrain analysis augments the information content of digital elevation data by removing spurious pits, deriving a structured flow field, and calculating surfaces of hydrologic information derived from the flow field. The increasing availability of high-resolution terrain datasets for large areas poses a challenge for existing algorithms that process terrain data to extract this hydrologic information. This paper will describe parallel algorithms that have been developed to enhance hydrologic terrain pre-processing so that larger datasets can be more efficiently computed. Message Passing Interface (MPI) parallel implementations have been developed for pit removal, flow direction, and generalized flow accumulation methods within the Terrain Analysis Using Digital Elevation Models (TauDEM) package. The parallel algorithm works by decomposing the domain into striped or tiled data partitions where each tile is processed by a separate processor. This method also reduces the memory requirements of each processor so that larger size grids can be processed. The parallel pit removal algorithm is adapted from the method of Planchon and Darboux that starts from a high elevation then progressively scans the grid, lowering each grid cell to the maximum of the original elevation or the lowest neighbor. The MPI implementation reconciles elevations along process domain edges after each scan. Generalized flow accumulation extends flow accumulation approaches commonly available in GIS through the integration of multiple inputs and a broad class of algebraic rules into the calculation of flow related quantities. It is based on establishing a flow field through DEM grid cells, that is then used to evaluate any mathematical function that incorporates dependence on values of the quantity being evaluated at upslope (or downslope) grid cells

  12. Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan

    2012-01-01

    This software solved the problem of displaying terrains that are usually too large to be displayed on standard workstations in real time. The software can visualize terrain data sets composed of billions of vertices, and can display these data sets at greater than 30 frames per second. The Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool allows large terrains, which can be composed of billions of vertices, to be visualized in real time. It utilizes a continuous level of detail technique called clipmapping to support this. It offloads much of the work involved in breaking up the terrain into levels of details onto the GPU (graphics processing unit) for faster processing.

  13. Application of Digital Terrain Model to volcanology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Achilli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of the ground surface (Digital Terrain Model, DTM, derived by airborne GPS photogrammetric surveys, is a powerful tool for implementing morphological analysis in remote areas. High accurate 3D models, with submeter elevation accuracy, can be obtained by images acquired at photo scales between 1:5000-1:20000. Multitemporal DTMs acquired periodically over volcanic area allow the monitoring of areas interested by crustal deformations and the evaluation of mass balance when large instability phenomena or lava flows have occurred. The work described the results obtained from the analysis of photogrammetric data collected over the Vulcano Island from 1971 to 2001. The data, processed by means of the Digital Photogrammetry Workstation DPW 770, provided DTM with accuracy ranging between few centimeters to few decimeters depending on the geometric image resolution, terrain configuration and quality of photographs.

  14. SAR Polarimetric Scattering from Natural Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    calculate the polarimetric speckle statistics (amplitude and phase difference), followed by a comparison with theoretical distributions . For fully developed...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0013 SAR Polarimetric Scattering from Natural Terrains Kun-Shan Chen National Central University Final Report 02/17/2017... DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ IOA Arlington, Virginia 22203 Air Force Research

  15. Mean Flow and Turbulence in Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    empirical power law relationship: aO(T) ( 0 ) x (T0 ) (7) Although the value of x varies with stability, wind speed, and height above the surface, a value...Elevation: 27 ft Terrain: flat river flood plane Vegetation: plowed field with arass at tower base, treeline 100 yds to N Structures: electronic shelter...NNW of tower, radar dish above SW building Comrmn ent: hiih winds indicative of this site, temperature sensor at 6-foot level has possible heating

  16. Recent Military Operations on Urban Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Is. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse. *do If nec.siay and id’ntif• ’ by block neumber) MOBA Egypt Israel C 3 MOUT Jordan Jerusalem Urban...Air Force IDF Israeli Defense Forces m meter mm meters MOBA military operations in built-up areas MOUT military operations on urban terrain TOE table...characteristics of the operation been exploited? 3. What equipment or tactical modifications were made for this MOBA operation? 4. How did Egypt prepare the city

  17. Mobility versus terrain: a game theoretic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, David; Muench, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Mobility and terrain are two sides of the same coin. You cannot describe mobility unless you describe the terrain. For example, if my world is trench warfare, the tank may be the ideal vehicle. If my world is urban warfare, clearing buildings and such, the tank may not be an ideal vehicle, perhaps an anthropomorphic robot would be better. We seek a general framework for mobility that captures the relative value of different mobility strategies. Game theory is positively the right way to analyze the interactions of rational players who behave strategically. In this paper, we will describe the interactions between a mobility player, who is trying to make it from point A to point B with one chance to refuel, and a terrain player who is trying to minimize that probability by placing an obstacle somewhere along the path from A to B. In previous work [1], we used Monte Carlo methods to analyze this mobility game, and found optimal strategies for a discretized version of the game. Here we show the relationship of this game to a classic game of timing [2], and use solution methods from that literature to solve for optimal strategies in a continuous version of this mobility game.

  18. Pitted terrains on Vesta: Thermophysical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capria, M.; Tosi, F.; De Sanctis, M.; Turrini, D.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Fonte, S.; Frigeri, A.; Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Zambon, F.; Schroeder, S.; Denevi, B.; Williams, D.; Scully, J.; Russell, C.; Raymond, C.

    2014-07-01

    Launched in 2007, the Dawn spacecraft, after one year spent orbiting Vesta, is now on its way to Ceres. In the science payload, the Visible and Infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) is devoted to the study of the mineralogical composition and thermophysical properties of Vesta's surface [1]. Disk-resolved surface temperatures of Vesta have been determined from the infrared spectra measured by VIR [2]. The observed temperatures, together with a thermophysical model, have been used to constrain the thermal properties of a large part of the surface of the asteroid [3]. The average thermal inertia of the surface is quite low, consistent with a widespread presence of a dust layer. While the global thermal inertia is low, the characterization of its surface in terms of regions showing peculiar thermophysical properties gives us the possibility to identify specific areas with different thermal and structural characteristics. These variations can be linked to strong albedo variations that have been observed, or to other physical and structural characteristics of the first few centimeters of the soil. The highest values of thermal inertia have been determined on areas coinciding with locations where pitted terrains have been found [4]. Pitted terrains, first identified on Mars, have been found in association with 4 craters on Vesta: Marcia, Cornelia, Licinia, and Numisia. The Marcia area is characterized by high hydrogen and OH content [5]. By analogy with Mars, the formation of these terrains is thought to be due to the rapid release of volatiles, triggered by heating from an impact event. A question arises on the origin of volatiles: hydrated minerals, or ground, buried ice? In order to discuss the second hypothesis, we have to assume that a comet impact delivers ice that gets buried under a layer of regolith. Successively, another impact on the same area would give origin to the pitted terrain. The buried ice has obviously to survive for the time between the two impacts

  19. Terrain-surface Estimation from Body Configurations of Passive Linkages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Chugo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A passive linkage mechanism is used for increasing the mobile performance of a wheeled vehicle on uneven ground. The mechanism changes its shape according to the terrain and enables all the wheels to remain grounded while the vehicle operates over rough terrain. This means that the shape of the passive linkage mechanism must correspond to that of the terrain surface, so that the vehicle can estimate the shape of the surface while passing over it. This paper proposes a new terrain-surface estimation scheme that uses a passive linkage mechanism. Our key concept is to enable changes in the vehicle body's configuration to correspond to those in the terrain's shape. Using this concept, our mobile platform estimates the shape of terrain surfaces without using external sensors; the estimated surface shapes are used to adjust the reference velocities of individual wheels, thereby improving the mobile performance of the vehicle. We test our proposed scheme by experiments using a prototype vehicle.

  20. Integrating Terrain Maps Into a Reactive Navigation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ayanna; Werger, Barry; Seraji, Homayoun

    2006-01-01

    An improved method of processing information for autonomous navigation of a robotic vehicle across rough terrain involves the integration of terrain maps into a reactive navigation strategy. Somewhat more precisely, the method involves the incorporation, into navigation logic, of data equivalent to regional traversability maps. The terrain characteristic is mapped using a fuzzy-logic representation of the difficulty of traversing the terrain. The method is robust in that it integrates a global path-planning strategy with sensor-based regional and local navigation strategies to ensure a high probability of success in reaching a destination and avoiding obstacles along the way. The sensor-based strategies use cameras aboard the vehicle to observe the regional terrain, defined as the area of the terrain that covers the immediate vicinity near the vehicle to a specified distance a few meters away.

  1. Morphological modeling of terrains and volume data

    CERN Document Server

    Comic, Lidija; Magillo, Paola; Iuricich, Federico

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the mathematical background behind discrete approaches to morphological analysis of scalar fields, with a focus on Morse theory and on the discrete theories due to Banchoff and Forman. The algorithms and data structures presented are used for terrain modeling and analysis, molecular shape analysis, and for analysis or visualization of sensor and simulation 3D data sets. It covers a variety of application domains including geography, geology, environmental sciences, medicine and biology. The authors classify the different approaches to morphological analysis which are all ba

  2. Quantification of rock slope terrain properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkwein, Axel; Gerber, Werner

    2017-04-01

    Rockfall trajectory simulation codes need information on the terrain properties to formulate appropriate rebound models. Usually, the manuals of rockfall simulation codes give sketches or photographs of terrain samples [1,2]. Based on these the user can select suitable terrains for the simulation area. We now would like to start a discussion whether it is possible to numerically quantify the terrain properties which would make the ground assignment more objective. Different ground properties play a role for the interaction between a falling rock and the ground: • Elastic deformation • plastic deformation • Energy absorption • friction • hardness • roughness • surface vs. underground • etc. The question is now whether it is possible to quantify above parameters and to finally provide tables that contain appropriate simulation parameters. In a first attempt we suggest different methods or parameters that might be evaluated in situ: • Small scale drop tests • Light weight deflectometer (LWD) • Particle sizes • Sliding angle • Particle distribution • Soil cover • Water content Of course, above measurements will never perfectly fit to different mountain slopes. However, if a number of measurements has been made their spreading will give an idea on the natural variability of the ground properties. As an example, the following table gives an idea on how the ME and Evd values vary for different soils. Table 1: LWD measurements on different soil types [3] Ground type Soil layer Soil humidityEvd (median)σ (median)Evd (average) Humus-carb. < 10cm dry 17.4 6.8 15.6 Regosol 10 - 30cm dry 8.6 3.9 9.4 Brownish 30 - 50cm dry 12.1 3.2 11.7 Calcaric 30 - 50cm dry 7.5 3.3 7.0 Acid brownish70 - 100cmdry 7.8 2.1 7.7 Fahlgley 10 - 30cm dry 9.2 4.0 7.7 References [1] Bartelt P et al (2016) RAMMS::rockfall user manual v1.6. SLF, Davos. [2] Dorren L.K.A., 2015. Rockyfor3D (v5.2) revealed - Transparent description of the complete 3D rockfall model. ecoris

  3. UNIFIED REPRESENTATION FOR COLLABORATIVE VISUALIZATION OF PLANETARY TERRAIN DATA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to apply to planetary terrain mapping an alternative, multiresolution method, subdivision surfaces (subdivs), in place of conventional digital elevation...

  4. LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY ARA V NEFIAN*, TAEMIN KIM, MICHAEL BROXTON, AND ZACH MORATTO Abstract. Generating accurate three...

  5. T-transformation: traversability analysis for navigation on rugged terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Cang; Borenstein, Johann

    2004-09-01

    In order to maneuver autonomously on rough terrain, a mobile robot must constantly decide whether to traverse or circumnavigate terrain features ahead. This ability is called Obstacle Negotiation (ON). A critical aspect of ON is the so-called traversability analysis, which evaluates the level of difficulty associated with the traversal of the terrain. This paper presents a new method for traversability analysis, called T-transformation. It is implemented in a local terrain map as follows: (1) For each cell in the local terrain map, a square terrain patch is defined that symmetrically overlays the cell; (2) a plane is fitted to the data points in the terrain patch using a least-square approach and the slope of the least-squares plane and the residual of the fit are computed and used to calculate the Traversability Index (TI) for that cell; (3) after each cell is assigned a TI value, the local terrain map is transformed into a traversability map. The traversability map is further transformed into a traversability field histogram where each element represents the overall level of difficulty to move along the corresponding direction. Based on the traversability field histogram our reactive ON system then computes the steering and velocity commands to move the robot toward the intended goal while avoiding areas of poor traversability. The traversability analysis algorithm and the overall ON system were verified by extensive simulation. We verified our method partially through experiments on a Segway Robotics Mobility Platform (RMP), albeit only on flat terrain.

  6. Functional Decomposition of Modeling and Simulation Terrain Database Generation Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yakich, Valerie R; Lashlee, J. D

    2008-01-01

    .... This report documents the conceptual procedure as implemented by Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training, and Support and decomposes terrain database construction using the Integration Definition for Function Modeling (IDEF...

  7. Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

  8. Wind modelling over complex terrain using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Matias; Owen, Herbert; Folch, Arnau; Prieto, Luis; Cosculluela, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The present work deals with the numerical CFD modelling of onshore wind farms in the context of High Performance Computing (HPC). The CFD model involves the numerical solution of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations together with a κ-ɛ turbulence model and the energy equation, specially designed for Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) flows. The aim is to predict the wind velocity distribution over complex terrain, using a model that includes meteorological data assimilation, thermal coupling, forested canopy and Coriolis effects. The modelling strategy involves automatic mesh generation, terrain data assimilation and generation of boundary conditions for the inflow wind flow distribution up to the geostrophic height. The CFD model has been implemented in Alya, a HPC multi physics parallel solver able to run with thousands of processors with an optimal scalability, developed in Barcelona Supercomputing Center. The implemented thermal stability and canopy physical model was developed by Sogachev in 2012. The k-ɛ equations are of non-linear convection diffusion reaction type. The implemented numerical scheme consists on a stabilized finite element formulation based on the variational multiscale method, that is known to be stable for this kind of turbulence equations. We present a numerical formulation that stresses on the robustness of the solution method, tackling common problems that produce instability. The iterative strategy and linearization scheme is discussed. It intends to avoid the possibility of having negative values of diffusion during the iterative process, which may lead to divergence of the scheme. These problems are addressed by acting on the coefficients of the reaction and diffusion terms and on the turbulent variables themselves. The k-ɛ equations are highly nonlinear. Complex terrain induces transient flow instabilities that may preclude the convergence of computer flow simulations based on steady state formulation of the

  9. Archaean TTG of Vodlozero Terrain, Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekulaev, Valery; Arestova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    The Vodlozero terrain is the largest (about 270*240 km) early Archaean fragment of Fennoscandian Shield and composes its eastern part. The granitoids of TTG suite are predominant component of the terrain. The greenstone belts are placed along the margins of the terrain. Several stages of TTG formation can be distinguished in Achaean crust history. (1) The oldest TTG are trondhjemites and tonalities with age of 3240 Ma. They contain rare and small amphibolite inclusions of the same age. These TTG are characterized by high Sr (av. 412 ppm), Sr/Y (70), (La/Yb)n (54) and low Y (av. 7 ppm), Yb (0.32 ppm) and Nb (4 ppm). It was shown (Lobach-Zhuchenko et al., 2000), that the source of these TTG could be basic rocks, having composition similar with TH1 by K.Condie. (2) The tonalities and granodiorites with age of 3150 Ma are disposed near greenstone belts and contain compared to TTG of the first group less Sr (av. 250 ppm), Sr/Y (22), (La/Yb)n (18) and more K, Rb (av. 70 ppm), Ba (470 ppm), Y (11 ppm),Yb (1.16 ppm). TTG of both groups have identical T(DM)Nd (3250-3400 Ma) and differences in composition is evidently connected with lower level of source melting of the second group and also with K-metasomatism. The volcanics of the greenstone belts have age 3020 - 2940 Ma. Dykes of gabbro-amphibolites and andesites with the same age and composition cut TTG of the first and the second groups. The age of the third TTG group is about 2900 Ma ago. These rocks form leucosoma of migmatites within TTG of the second group. The composition of the third TTG and Nd isotope data suppose their origin by the melting of ancient TTG crust simultaneously with greenstone belt emplacement. The fourth TTG group with age 2780-2850 Ma forms a small intrusions, cutting older TTG and greenstone rocks. Their composition is similar to 3150 Ma TTG. Nd isotope data indicate that these TTG have younger (about 2850 Ma) source. Thus there are four TTG groups formed into interval more 400 Ma. The age and

  10. 75 FR 5767 - All Terrain Vehicle Chinese Language Webinar; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... COMMISSION All Terrain Vehicle Chinese Language Webinar; Meeting AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission... Terrain Vehicle Chinese Language Webinar. The webinar will focus on CPSC's requirements for ATV's.... Chinese language speakers can access the webinar at http://www.cpsc.gov/webcast/index_ch.html . English...

  11. Large-Eddy Simulation of turbine wake in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Troldborg, Niels; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2017-01-01

    We present Large-Eddy Simulation results of a turbine wake in realistic complex terrain with slopes above 0.5. By comparing simulations including and without the wind turbine we can estimate the induction factor, a, and we show how the presence of a strong recirculation zone in the terrain dictates...

  12. Terrain Perception in a Shape Shifting Rolling-Crawling Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchida Masataka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrain perception greatly enhances the performance of robots, providing them with essential information on the nature of terrain being traversed. Several living beings in nature offer interesting inspirations which adopt different gait patterns according to nature of terrain. In this paper, we present a novel terrain perception system for our bioinspired robot, Scorpio, to classify the terrain based on visual features and autonomously choose appropriate locomotion mode. Our Scorpio robot is capable of crawling and rolling locomotion modes, mimicking Cebrenus Rechenburgi, a member of the huntsman spider family. Our terrain perception system uses Speeded Up Robust Feature (SURF description method along with color information. Feature extraction is followed by Bag of Word method (BoW and Support Vector Machine (SVM for terrain classification. Experiments were conducted with our Scorpio robot to establish the efficacy and validity of the proposed approach. In our experiments, we achieved a recognition accuracy of over 90% across four terrain types namely grass, gravel, wooden deck, and concrete.

  13. What Influences Youth to Operate All-Terrain Vehicles Safely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummon, A. H.; Heaney, C. A.; Dellinger, W. A.; Wilkins, J. R., III

    2014-01-01

    The operation of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) by youth has contributed to the incidence of serious and fatal injuries among children. This study explored factors related to the frequency with which youth wore a helmet and refrained from engaging in three risky driving behaviors (driving at risky speeds, on paved roads and on unfamiliar terrain)…

  14. Stereo based Obstacle Detection with Uncertainty in Rough Terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, W. van der; Heuvel, J.C. van den; Groen, F.C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Autonomous robot vehicles that operate in offroad terrain should avoid obstacle hazards. In this paper we present a stereo vision based method that is able to cluster reconstructed terrain points into obstacles by evaluating their relative angles and distances. In our approach, constraints are

  15. Conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Bingöl

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Conically scanning lidars assume the flow to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying a risk that the lidar will derive an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured by collocating a meteorological mast and a lidar at two Greek sites, one hilly and one mountainous. The maximum error for the sites investigated is of the order of 10 %. In order to predict the error for various wind directions the flows at both sites are simulated with the linearized flow model, WAsP Engineering 2.0. The measurement data are compared with the model predictions with good results for the hilly site, but with less success at the mountainous site. This is a deficiency of the flow model, but the methods presented in this paper can be used with any flow model.

  16. Computational snow avalanche simulation in forested terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, M.; Fischer, J.-T.; Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Grêt-Regamey, A.

    2014-08-01

    Two-dimensional avalanche simulation software operating in three-dimensional terrain is widely used for hazard zoning and engineering to predict runout distances and impact pressures of snow avalanche events. Mountain forests are an effective biological protection measure against avalanches; however, the protective capacity of forests to decelerate or even to stop avalanches that start within forested areas or directly above the treeline is seldom considered in this context. In particular, runout distances of small- to medium-scale avalanches are strongly influenced by the structural conditions of forests in the avalanche path. We present an evaluation and operationalization of a novel detrainment function implemented in the avalanche simulation software RAMMS for avalanche simulation in forested terrain. The new approach accounts for the effect of forests in the avalanche path by detraining mass, which leads to a deceleration and runout shortening of avalanches. The relationship is parameterized by the detrainment coefficient K [kg m-1 s-2] accounting for differing forest characteristics. We varied K when simulating 40 well-documented small- to medium-scale avalanches, which were released in and ran through forests of the Swiss Alps. Analyzing and comparing observed and simulated runout distances statistically revealed values for K suitable to simulate the combined influence of four forest characteristics on avalanche runout: forest type, crown closure, vertical structure and surface cover, for example, values for K were higher for dense spruce and mixed spruce-beech forests compared to open larch forests at the upper treeline. Considering forest structural conditions within avalanche simulations will improve current applications for avalanche simulation tools in mountain forest and natural hazard management.

  17. Groundwater flood hazards in lowland karst terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Owen; McCormack, Ted

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal complexity of flooding in karst terrains pose unique flood risk management challenges. Lowland karst landscapes can be particularly susceptible to groundwater flooding due to a combination of limited drainage capacity, shallow depth to groundwater and a high level of groundwater-surface water interactions. Historically the worst groundwater flooding to have occurred in the Rep. of Ireland has been centred on the Gort Lowlands, a karst catchment on the western coast of Ireland. Numerous notable flood events have been recorded throughout the 20th century, but flooding during the winters of 2009 and 2015 were the most severe on record, inundating an area in excess of 20km2 and causing widespread and prolonged disruption and damage to property and infrastructure. Effective flood risk management requires an understanding of the recharge, storage and transport mechanisms during flood conditions, but is often hampered by a lack of adequate data. Using information gathered from the 2009 and 2015 events, the main hydrological and geomorphological factors which influence flooding in this complex lowland karst groundwater system under are elucidated. Observed flood mechanisms included backwater flooding of sinks, overland flow caused by the overtopping of sink depressions, high water levels in turlough basins, and surface ponding in local epikarst watersheds. While targeted small-scale flood measures can locally reduce the flood risk associated with some mechanisms, they also have the potential to exacerbate flooding down-catchment and must be assessed in the context of overall catchment hydrology. This study addresses the need to improve our understanding of groundwater flooding in karst terrains, in order to ensure efficient flood prevention and mitigation in future and thus help achieve the aims of the EU Floods Directive.

  18. Predicting Potential Evaporation in Topographically Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohafkan, M.; Thompson, S. E.; Hamilton, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    Predicting and understanding the water cycle in topographically complex terrain poses challenges for upscaling point-scale measurements of water and energy balance and for downscaling observations made from remote sensing or predictions made via global circulation models. This study evaluates hydrologic and climate data drawn from a spatially-distributed wireless sensor network at the Blue Oak Ranch Reserve near San Jose, California to investigate the influence of topographic variation, landscape position, and local ecology (vegetation) on one core component of the water balance: potential evaporation. High-resolution observations of solar radiation, ambient temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity are combined with canopy maps generated from LiDAR flyovers to develop spatially-distributed predictions of potential evaporation. These data are compared to estimates of EP based on inverse modeling of surface soil moisture data. Preliminary results suggest that the spatial structure of microclimate at Blue Oak Ranch Reserve is dominated by variations around the elevation gradient, with strong nocturnal inversions hypothesized to reflect the influence of the coastal marine layer. Estimates of EP based on the Penman-Monteith equation suggest that EP could vary by up to a factor of 5 across the site, with differences in vapor pressure deficit and canopy height largely responsible for this variability. The results suggest that a) large differences in the timing and magnitude of water stress could arise in topographically complex terrain due to localized differences in energy balance, and b) both localized and regional effects need to be accounted for when downscaling climate data over topographically complex sites. 2) Color map showing preliminary estimates of annual EP incorporating canopy information (spatially-distributed values of aerodynamic resistance and LAI) drawn from LiDAR imagery. The effect of the resistance on the dynamics is striking in its ability to

  19. Qualitative analysis of wind-turbine wakes over hilly terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, A.; Segalini, A.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, wind-turbine wakes are studied over flat and hilly terrains. Measurements made by using stereoscopic PIV are compared to data obtained from numerical simulations using RANS equations and an actuator-disc method. The numerical and experimental data show similar qualitative trends, indicating that the wind-turbine wake is perturbed by the presence of the hills. Additionally, a faster flow recovery at hub height is seen with the hilly terrain, indicating that the hills presence is beneficial for downstream turbines exposed to wake-interaction effects. The Jensen wake model is implemented over the hilly terrain and it is shown that this model cannot accurately capture the wake modulations induced by the hills. However, by superimposing a wind-turbine wake simulated over flat terrain on the hilly-terrain flow field, it is illustrated that the commonly-used wake-superposition technique can yield reasonable results if the used wake model has sufficient accuracy.

  20. Statistical Modeling of Robotic Random Walks on Different Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Austin; Kinnaman, Laura

    Issues of public safety, especially with crowd dynamics and pedestrian movement, have been modeled by physicists using methods from statistical mechanics over the last few years. Complex decision making of humans moving on different terrains can be modeled using random walks (RW) and correlated random walks (CRW). The effect of different terrains, such as a constant increasing slope, on RW and CRW was explored. LEGO robots were programmed to make RW and CRW with uniform step sizes. Level ground tests demonstrated that the robots had the expected step size distribution and correlation angles (for CRW). The mean square displacement was calculated for each RW and CRW on different terrains and matched expected trends. The step size distribution was determined to change based on the terrain; theoretical predictions for the step size distribution were made for various simple terrains. It's Dr. Laura Kinnaman, not sure where to put the Prefix.

  1. Slip estimation methods for proprioceptive terrain classification using tracked mobile robots

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masha, Ditebogo F

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that proprioceptive measurements such as terrain slip can be used for terrain classification. This paper investigates the suitability of four simple slip estimation methods for differentiating between indoor and outdoor terrain...

  2. Environmental Impacts of Forest Road Construction on Mountainous Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Caliskan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Forest roads are the base infrastructure foundation of forestry operations. These roads entail a complex engineering effort because they can cause substantial environmental damage to forests and include a high-cost construction. This study was carried out in four sample sites of Giresun, Trabzon(2 and Artvin Forest Directorate, which is in the Black Sea region of Turkey. The areas have both steep terrain (30-50% gradient and very steep terrain (51-80% gradient. Bulldozers and hydraulic excavators were determined to be the main machines for forest road construction, causing environmental damage and cross sections in mountainous areas.As a result of this study, the percent damage to forests was determined as follows: on steep terrain, 21% of trees were damaged by excavators and 33% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction, and on very steep terrain, 27% of trees were damaged by excavators and 44% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction. It was also determined that on steep terrain, when excavators were used, 12.23% less forest area was destroyed compared with when bulldozers were used and 16.13% less area was destroyed by excavators on very steep terrain. In order to reduce the environmental damage on the forest ecosystem, especially in steep terrains, hydraulic excavators should replace bulldozers in forest road construction activities.

  3. Self-Supervised Learning of Terrain Traversability from Proprioceptive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Max; Howard, Andrew B.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Robust and reliable autonomous navigation in unstructured, off-road terrain is a critical element in making unmanned ground vehicles a reality. Existing approaches tend to rely on evaluating the traversability of terrain based on fixed parameters obtained via testing in specific environments. This results in a system that handles the terrain well that it trained in, but is unable to process terrain outside its test parameters. An adaptive system does not take the place of training, but supplements it. Whereas training imprints certain environments, an adaptive system would imprint terrain elements and the interactions amongst them, and allow the vehicle to build a map of local elements using proprioceptive sensors. Such sensors can include velocity, wheel slippage, bumper hits, and accelerometers. Data obtained by the sensors can be compared to observations from ranging sensors such as cameras and LADAR (laser detection and ranging) in order to adapt to any kind of terrain. In this way, it could sample its surroundings not only to create a map of clear space, but also of what kind of space it is and its composition. By having a set of building blocks consisting of terrain features, a vehicle can adapt to terrain that it has never seen before, and thus be robust to a changing environment. New observations could be added to its library, enabling it to infer terrain types that it wasn't trained on. This would be very useful in alien environments, where many of the physical features are known, but some are not. For example, a seemingly flat, hard plain could actually be soft sand, and the vehicle would sense the sand and avoid it automatically.

  4. Routing, construction and maintenance of pipelines in landslide terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanek, M. [Geo-Enginering (M.S.T.) Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Factors influencing the location and routing of pipelines, and the effects of unstable terrain features on construction and maintenance are discussed. Examples from northwestern Alberta and northeastern British Columbia are cited to illustrate the various techniques, such as overhead crossings of valleys and directional drilling to install pipelines below streams, adopted by pipeline construction companies to deal with the challenges presented by sensitive and unstable terrain. The case histories cited also serve to emphasize the importance of terrain analysis and the proper identification of potential problem areas. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Hybrid RANS/LES applied to complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the wind in complex terrain is limited by computational cost. The number of computational grid points required to resolve the near-ground turbulent structures (eddies) are very high. The traditional solution to the problem has been to apply a wall function...... aspect ratio in the RANS layer and thereby resolve the mean near-wall velocity profile. The method is applicable to complex terrain and the benefits of traditional LES are kept intact. Using the hybrid method, simulations of the wind over a natural complex terrain near Wellington in New Zealand...

  6. Lunar All-Terrain Utility Vehicle for EVA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC proposes to develop a new type of planetary rover called a Lunar All-terrain Utility Vehicle ("LATUV") to assist extra-vehicular activities in...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for Hunterdon County New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. Classification of Mars Terrain Using Multiple Data Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Classification of Mars Terrain Using Multiple Data Sources Alan Kraut1, David Wettergreen1 ABSTRACT. Images of Mars are being collected faster than they can be...

  9. Lunar All-Terrain Utility Vehicle for EVA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC proposes to develop a new type of planetary rover called a Lunar All-terrain Utility Vehicle ("Lunar ATV") to assist extra-vehicular activities...

  10. DCS Terrain for Chatham Co GA (FY2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS Terrain for Effingham Co GA (FY2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. Bladed Terrain on Pluto: Possible Origins and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Umurhan, O. M.; White, O. L.; Schenk, P. M.; Beyer, R. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We conclude that Bladed Terrain on Pluto is a deposit of massive CH4, which preferentially precipitates at high elevations, and has since its initial formation, undergone episodes of sublimation erosion that has given this deposit its characteristic texture.

  13. Weather in Mountainous Terrain (Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Weather in Mountainous Terrain (Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support) Fiesta Resort & Conference Center Tempe, AZ February 1...Meteorology Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support Fiesta Resort & Conference Center Tempe, AZ February 1 & 2, 2010 Hosted by University

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Clay County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN DATA CAPTURE STANDARDS, LUZERNE COUNTY, PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  16. Laser altimetry and terrain analysis: A revolution in geomorphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anders, N.; Seijmonsbergen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Terrain analysis in geomorphology has undergone a serious quantitative revolution over recent decades. Lidar information has been efficiently used to automatically classify discrete landforms, map forest structures, and provide input for models simulating landscape development, e.g. channel incision

  17. DCS Terrain for Tift County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain Submission for Eau Claire County, Wisconsin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain Submission for Johnson County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN DATA, DELANEY CREEK WATERSHED, HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, CITY OF SEWARD, KENAI PENINSULA BOROUGH, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain Submission for Pine County, MN (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, City of El Dorado, Butler County, KS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submittal for Washita County, Oklahoma, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. Terrain, BIG BLUE RIVER TRIBUTARY NO 44, GAGE COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submission for Randolph County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for Jackson County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS Terrain Submission for McCook County, SD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain Submission for La Paz County, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Los Angeles County, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS Terrain Submittal for Macon County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Lake Kaweah PMR - Tulare County, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain Submission for Monmouth County, New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. Cross-Coupled Control for All-Terrain Rovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Reina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robots are increasingly being used in challenging outdoor environments for applications that include construction, mining, agriculture, military and planetary exploration. In order to accomplish the planned task, it is critical that the motion control system ensure accuracy and robustness. The achievement of high performance on rough terrain is tightly connected with the minimization of vehicle-terrain dynamics effects such as slipping and skidding. This paper presents a cross-coupled controller for a 4-wheel-drive/4-wheel-steer robot, which optimizes the wheel motors’ control algorithm to reduce synchronization errors that would otherwise result in wheel slip with conventional controllers. Experimental results, obtained with an all-terrain rover operating on agricultural terrain, are presented to validate the system. It is shown that the proposed approach is effective in reducing slippage and vehicle posture errors.

  15. Cross-coupled control for all-terrain rovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Giulio

    2013-01-08

    Mobile robots are increasingly being used in challenging outdoor environments for applications that include construction, mining, agriculture, military and planetary exploration. In order to accomplish the planned task, it is critical that the motion control system ensure accuracy and robustness. The achievement of high performance on rough terrain is tightly connected with the minimization of vehicle-terrain dynamics effects such as slipping and skidding. This paper presents a cross-coupled controller for a 4-wheel-drive/4-wheel-steer robot, which optimizes the wheel motors' control algorithm to reduce synchronization errors that would otherwise result in wheel slip with conventional controllers. Experimental results, obtained with an all-terrain rover operating on agricultural terrain, are presented to validate the system. It is shown that the proposed approach is effective in reducing slippage and vehicle posture errors.

  16. DCS Terrain Submittal for Pike County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain Submittal for Taylor County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain for Montgomery County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain Submittal for Crisp County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. DCS Terrain Submission for Chippewa County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain Submittal for Mitchell County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain for Wilcox County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION for MORRIS COUNTY, NEW JERSEY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  4. CITY OF RADFORD TERRAIN, CITY OF RADFORD, VA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  5. LandingNav: Terrain Guided Automated Precision Landing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I effort successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a terrain guided automated precision landing sensor using an innovative multi-field-of-view stereo...

  6. DCS Terrain Submittal for Thomas County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for New Castle County, DE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. Calibrated L-Band Terrain Measurements and Analysis Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    space of these three parameters, points corresponding to samples from different terrain types will be well separated. And not only will points for...different terrain types be quite distinct, but also dif- ferent regions of the three-parameter space will characterize differ- ent surface types. The...planned to examine goodness of fit of both the IG and log- 4-4 normal distributions to histograms based on various samples, using 86 the Kolmogoroff -Smirnov

  9. Learned navigation in unknown terrains: A retraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nageswara S. V.; Stoltzfus, N.; Iyengar, S. Sitharama

    1989-01-01

    The problem of learned navigation of a circular robot R, of radius delta (is greater than or equal to 0), through a terrain whose model is not a-priori known is considered. Two-dimensional finite-sized terrains populated by an unknown (but, finite) number of simple polygonal obstacles are also considered. The number and locations of the vertices of each obstacle are unknown to R. R is equipped with a sensor system that detects all vertices and edges that are visible from its present location. In this context two problems are covered. In the visit problem, the robot is required to visit a sequence of destination points, and in the terrain model acquisition problem, the robot is required to acquire the complete model of the terrain. An algorithmic framework is presented for solving these two problems using a retraction of the freespace onto the Voronoi diagram of the terrain. Algorithms are then presented to solve the visit problem and the terrain model acquisition problem.

  10. Stratigraphy of the layered terrain in Valles Marineris, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, G.; Strom, Roger G.

    1991-01-01

    The layered terrain in Valles Marineris provides information about its origin and the geologic history of this canyon system. Whether the terrain is sedimentary material deposited in a dry or lacustrine environment, or volcanic material related to the tectonics of the canyon is still controversial. However, recent studies of Gangis Layered Terrain suggests a cyclic sequence of deposition and erosion under episodic lacustrine conditions. The stratigraphic studies are extended to four other occurrences of layered terrains in Valles Marineris in an attempt to correlate and distinguish between depositional environments. The Juvantae Chasma, Hebes Chasma, Ophir and Candor Chasmata, Melas Chasma, and Gangis Layered Terrain were examined. Although there are broad similarities among the layered terrains, no two deposits are exactly alike. This suggests that there was no synchronized regional depositional processes to form all the layered deposits. However, the similar erosional style of the lower massive weakly bedded unit in Hebes, Gangis, and Ophir-Candor suggests it may have been deposited under similar circumstances.

  11. Terrain on Europa under Changing Lighting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    These images obtained by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft show the same region of Europa under different lighting conditions. The upper image was obtained on June 28th, 1996 during Galileo's first orbit around Jupiter under 'high-sun' conditions -- the equivalent of taking a picture from a high altitude at noon (with the sun directly overhead). Note that albedo (light/dark) features are emphasized. Compare this to the lower image containing a higher-resolution inset. This (inset) image was taken on November 6th, 1996 during the spacecraft's third orbit under 'low-sun' illumination -- the equivalent of taking a picture from a high altitude at sunrise or sunset. Note that in this image the albedo features are not readily apparent. Instead, the topography of the terrain is emphasized. Planetary geologists use information from images acquired under a variety of lighting conditions to identify different types of structures and interpret how they formed. Note that the bright linear features in the upper image are seen to be ridges in the lower image. The circular feature on the right side of both images, Cilix, is approximately 25 kilometers (15 miles) across.The area seen in the upper image is 312 kilometers (187 miles) by 570 kilometers (342 miles) across; the area covered by the inset is 36 kilometers (22 miles) by 315 kilometers (190 miles) across. Both of these images are centered near 2 South latitude, 185 West longitude. North is to the top of the frames.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  12. Strain in Archean Granite-Greenstone terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, C. M.; Bailey, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    A long-standing problem in Archean tectonics is the mode of origin of granite-greenstone belts. Based on structural and morphological similarities to salt domes and Rayleigh-Taylor structures, diapirism has long been an obvious but controversial candidate, as it implies the operation of vertical tectonics in the Archean. Current strain patterns are one of the few field observables available to test hypotheses about the kinematic history of granite-greenstone belts. Previous laboratory (Dixon & Summers, 1983) and numerical (Mareschal & West, 1980) experiments which have been used to predict strain in diapiric structures may not be realistic because of the lack of large thermally activated viscosity contrasts in these models. We have numerically modeled temperature-dependent, non-Newtonian visco-elastic solid-state diapirism under conditions appropriate to Archean crust (Robin & Bailey, 2009). Here we present analyses of strain derived from these models. Our results show important differences from those of previous modelers. These include the formation of narrow high strain zones in the greenstone at the batholith contact and in the axis of the keel, with a low-strain zone between the two, as well as only very small strains in the batholith itself. This suggests that strain recorded in the granitic domes of granite-greenstone terrains must be unrelated to the diapiric overturn mechanism. Our strain analyses should be useful for comparison with published and future field observations, and provide a basis for the interpretation of strain in these ubiquitous Archean structures. Principle strain directions for an evolved diapir resulting from an altered basaltic crust deposited over a granitic basement. Viscosities are temperature- and stress-dependent and viscoelastic.

  13. Integrated terrain mapping with digital Landsat images in Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinove, Charles Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Mapping with Landsat images usually is done by selecting single types of features, such as soils, vegetation, or rocks, and creating visually interpreted or digitally classified maps of each feature. Individual maps can then be overlaid on or combined with other maps to characterize the terrain. Integrated terrain mapping combines several terrain features into each map unit which, in many cases, is more directly related to uses of the land and to methods of land management than the single features alone. Terrain brightness, as measured by the multispectral scanners in Landsat 1 and 2, represents an integration of reflectance from the terrain features within the scanner's instantaneous field of view and is therefore more correlatable with integrated terrain units than with differentiated ones, such as rocks, soils, and vegetation. A test of the feasibilty of the technique of mapping integrated terrain units was conducted in a part of southwestern Queensland, Australia, in cooperation with scientists of the Queensland Department of Primary Industries. The primary purpose was to test the use of digital classification techniques to create a 'land systems map' usable for grazing land management. A recently published map of 'land systems' in the area (made by aerial photograph interpretation and ground surveys), which are integrated terrain units composed of vegetation, soil, topography, and geomorphic features, was used as a basis for comparison with digitally classified Landsat multispectral images. The land systems, in turn, each have a specific grazing capacity for cattle (expressed in beasts per km 2 ) which is estimated following analysis of both research results and property carrying capacities. Landsat images, in computer-compatible tape form, were first contrast-stretched to increase their visual interpretability, and digitally classified by the parallelepiped method into distinct spectral classes to determine their correspondence to the land systems classes and

  14. Planning and design considerations in karst terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J. A.; Greene, R. W.; Ottoson, R. S.; Graham, T. C.

    1988-10-01

    This article discusses the various steps that the authors feel are necessary to the successful progression of an engineered project sited in karst terrain. The procedures require a multidisciplined approach with liaison and cooperation among the various parties to the project. Initially, the prospective owner must have sufficient understanding of the potential engineering problems to incorporate the engineering geologist into the early stages of any planned acquisition. The first step in an investigation should include a review of the available geologic information, aerial photo interpretation, consultation with the State Geological Survey, and a geologic reconnaissance of the prospective site and surrounding area. A go-no-go decision as to purchase can often been made at an early time. Although, in some instances, more study is needed for a particularly intriguing property. The second stage should consider the various planning alternatives that are feasible based upon the limited available information. At this stage planning/purchase decisions can be made as to purchasing options, value of the property, design constraints, and the possible economic penalties that could be associated with the potential site construction. Various planning and construction alternatives should be considered in this phase of the work. The third stage should include a site investigation program of moderate size, consisting of test pits and/or exploratory borings. The borings should be drilled using water as the drilling fluid, with an experienced crew and qualified technical inspection. The authors find the use of geophysical techniques can be extremely misleading unless used in conjunction with exploratory drilling. Successful evaluations using geophysical procedures occur only under ideal conditions. The geotechnical viability of the plan and preliminary design should be investigated in the fourth phase. Additionally, the physical parameters required for the design of structures

  15. On autonomous terrain model acquistion by a mobile robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N. S. V.; Iyengar, S. S.; Weisbin, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    The following problem is considered: A point robot is placed in a terrain populated by an unknown number of polyhedral obstacles of varied sizes and locations in two/three dimensions. The robot is equipped with a sensor capable of detecting all the obstacle vertices and edges that are visible from the present location of the robot. The robot is required to autonomously navigate and build the complete terrain model using the sensor information. It is established that the necessary number of scanning operations needed for complete terrain model acquisition by any algorithm that is based on scan from vertices strategy is given by the summation of i = 1 (sup n) N(O sub i)-n and summation of i = 1 (sup n) N(O sub i)-2n in two- and three-dimensional terrains respectively, where O = (O sub 1, O sub 2,....O sub n) set of the obstacles in the terrain, and N(O sub i) is the number of vertices of the obstacle O sub i.

  16. The Improved Kriging Interpolation Algorithm for Local Underwater Terrain Based on Fractal Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interpolation-reconstruction of local underwater terrain using the underwater digital terrain map (UDTM is an important step for building an underwater terrain matching unit and directly affects the accuracy of underwater terrain matching navigation. The Kriging method is often used in terrain interpolation, but, with this method, the local terrain features are often lost. Therefore, the accuracy cannot meet the requirements of practical application. Analysis of the geographical features is performed on the basis of the randomness and self-similarity of underwater terrain. We extract the fractal features of local underwater terrain with the fractal Brownian motion model, compensating for the possible errors of the Kriging method with fractal theory. We then put forward an improved Kriging interpolation method based on this fractal compensation. Interpolation-reconstruction tests show that the method can simulate the real underwater terrain features well and that it has good usability.

  17. Introduction Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredsson, P H; Segalini, A

    2017-04-13

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas-locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Selection of key terrain attributes for SOC model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Adhikari, Kabindra; Chellasamy, Menaka

    of predictors in Digital soil mapping of SOC. But there are no rules only few empirical guidelines on which digital terrain attributes to use. The aim of this paper was to select and the evaluate 21 digital terrain attributes and use the best for mapping. A typical 7500 km2 region located in Denmark...... was selected, total 2,514,820 data mining models were constructed by 71 differences grid from 12m to 2304m and 22 attributes, 21 attributes derived by DTM and the original elevation. Relative importance and usage of each attributes in every model were calculated. Comprehensive impact rates of each attribute...... which was processed by weighting, grouping, summation and normalization was taken as the important indicator in SOC model. The results showed that there use differences in the SOC model using different terrain attributes. Relative Slope Position(RSP), Channel Altitude(Chnl_alti),and Standard High...

  19. ISOSTATICALLY DISTURBED TERRAIN OF NORTHWESTERN ANDES MOUNTAINS FROM SPECTRALLY CORRELATED FREE-AIR AND GRAVITY TERRAIN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández P Orlando

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently revised models on global tectonics describe the convergence of the North Andes, Nazca, Caribbean and South American Plates and their seismicity, volcanism, active faulting and extreme
    topography. The current plate boundaries of the area are mainly interpreted from volcanic and seismic datasets with variable confidence levels. New insights on the isostatic state and plate boundaries of
    the northwestern Andes Mountains can be obtained from the spectral analysis of recently available gravity and topography data.
    Isostatically disturbed terrain produces free-air anomalies that are highly correlated with the gravity effects of the terrain. The terrain gravity effects (TGE and free air gravity anomalies (FAGA of the
    Andes mountains spectral correlation data confirms that these mountains are isostatically disturbed. Strong negative terrain-correlated FAGA along western South America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles are consistent with anomalously deepened mantle displaced by subducting oceanic plates.

    Inversion of the compensated terrain gravity effects (CTGE reveals plate subduction systems with alternating shallower and steeper subduction angles. The gravity modeling highlights crustal
    deformation from plate collision and subduction and other constraints on the tectonism of the plate boundary zones for the region.

  20. Exact and approximate computations of watersheds on triangulated terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsirogiannis, Konstantinos; de Berg, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The natural way of modeling water flow on a triangulated terrain is to make the fundamental assumption that water follows the direction of steepest descent (dsd). However, computing watersheds and other flow-related structures according to the dsd model in an exact manner is difficult: the dsd...... implementation that computes watersheds on triangulated terrains following strictly the dsd model and using exact arithmetic, and we experimentally investigate its computational cost. Our experiments show that the algorithm cannot handle large data sets effectively, due to the bit-sizes needed in the exact...

  1. Terrain Quantization Model Based on Global Subdivision Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENG Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To solve the current problems in terrain quantization, such as the limitation of grid levels, the difficulties in data organization and management, and other issues, a quadrilateral terrain quantization model based on global subdivision grid is proposed. The model adopts GeoSOT as the spatial reference, and realize the correlation and retrieval of quantization data among different layers based on GeoSOT location identification code, which provides methods of the the quantization procession, the organization and storage, the data aggregation of the vector data and regular grid data.

  2. Robotic concepts for operation in barren terrain. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, K. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    We have performed a series of studies and configurations for robots that are capable of operating in rough barren terrains. The environments we are targeting are like those of the moon or other planets in the roughness and starkness of the terrains, the loose and hard materials that range from sandy slopes to boulder fields, and the extremes of temperature that are encountered in such places. We present a mission scenario, requirements and then present and evaluate a mechanism design. Additional subsystem issues of power, communication, sensing, and computing are all addressed with respect to these requirements.

  3. Integrating land cover and terrain characteristics to explain plague ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) statistical method was used to clarify the relationships between land cover and terrain variables with small mammals and fleas. Results indicate that elevation positively influenced the presence of small mammals. The presence of fleas was clearly influenced by land management features ...

  4. Scalable Algorithms for Large High-Resolution Terrain Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Thomas; Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars Allan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that the technology required to perform typical GIS computations on very large high-resolution terrain models has matured enough to be ready for use by practitioners. We also demonstrate the impact that high-resolution data has on common problems. To our knowledge, so...

  5. Mountain Biking: Does Rough Terrain Make Rugged Riders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, Chris

    1987-01-01

    No formal research has been conducted on the training effects and injury risks of all-terrain bicycles in mountain biking, but experience indicates they are apparently safe and may provide greater fitness benefits than traditional bicycles. The bicycles are described, and their apparent benefits are discussed. (MT)

  6. Modeling Air-Quality in Complex Terrain Using Mesoscale and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Air-quality in a complex terrain (Colorado-River-Valley/Grand-Canyon Area, Southwest U.S.) is modeled using a higher-order closure mesoscale model and a higher-order closure dispersion model. Non-reactive tracers have been released in the Colorado-River valley, during winter and summer 1992, to study the ...

  7. Terrain Mapping and Obstacle Detection Using Gaussian Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten; Massaro, Alessandro Salvatore; Bayramoglu, Enis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a probabilistic method for extracting terrain maps from a scene and use the information to detect potential navigation obstacles within it. The method uses Gaussian process regression (GPR) to predict an estimate function and its relative uncertainty. To test the new met...

  8. Terrain Mapping and Obstacle Detection using Gaussian Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten; Massaro, Alessandro Salvatore; Bayramoglu, Enis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a probabilistic method for extracting terrain maps from a scene and use the information to detect potential navigation obstacles within it. The method uses Gaussian process regression (GPR) to predict an estimate function and its relative uncertainty. To test the new met...

  9. The retrieval of land surface albedo in rugged terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, B.; Jia, L.; Menenti, M.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface albedo may be derived from the satellite data through the estimation of a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model and angular integration. However many BRDF models do not consider explicitly the topography. In rugged terrain, the topography influences the observed

  10. How fine is fine enough when doing CFD terrain simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Bechmann, Andreas; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    The present work addresses the problem of establishing the necessary grid resolution to obtain a given level of numerical accuracy using a CFD model for prediction of flow over terrain. It is illustrated, that a very high resolution may be needed if the numerical difference between consecutive...

  11. How fine is fine enough when doing CFD terrain simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Bechmann, Andreas; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2012-01-01

    The present work addresses the problemof establishing the necessary grid resolution to obtain a given level of numerical accuracy using a CFD model for prediction of flow over terrain. It is illustrated, that a very high resolution may be needed if the numerical difference between consecutive...

  12. Simulation of Wind Farms in Flat & Complex terrain using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prospathopoulos, John; Cabezon, D.; Politis, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Use of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods to predict the power production from wind entire wind farms in flat and complex terrain is presented in this paper. Two full 3D Navier–Stokes solvers for incompressible flow are employed that incorporate the k–ε and k–ω turbulence models respectively...

  13. Prediction of wind energy distribution in complex terrain using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Chenqi; Yang, Jianchuan

    2013-01-01

    Based on linear models, WAsP software predicts wind energy distribution, with a good accuracy for flat terrain, but with a large error under complicated topography. In this paper, numerical simulations are carried out using the FLUENT software on a mesh generated by the GAMBIT and ARGIS software...

  14. Shape-assisted body reorientation enhances trafficability through cluttered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Pullin, Andrew; Haldane, Duncan; Fearing, Ronald; Full, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Many birds and fishes have slender, streamlined bodies that reduce fluid dynamic drag and allow fast and efficient locomotion. Similarly, numerous terrestrial animals run through cluttered terrain where 3-D, multi-component obstacles like grass, bushes, trees, walls, doors, and pillars also resist motion, but it is unknown whether their body shape plays a major role. Here, we challenged discoid cockroaches that possess a rounded, thin, nearly ellipsoidal body to run through tall, narrowly spaced, grass-like beams. The animals primarily rolled their body to the side to maneuver through the obstacle gaps. Reduction of body roundness by artificial shells inhibited this side roll maneuver, resulting in a lower traversal probability and a longer traversal time (P robot of a nearly cuboidal body. The rounded shell enabled the robot to use passive side rolling to maneuver through beams. To explain the mechanism, we developed a simple physics model to construct an energy landscape of the body-terrain interaction, which allowed estimation of body forces and torques exerted by the beams. Our model revealed that, by passive interaction with the terrain, a rounded body (ellipsoid) rolled more easily than an angular body (cuboid) to access energy valleys between energy barriers caused by obstacles. Our study is the first to demonstrate that a terradynamically ``streamlined'' shape can reduce terrain resistance and enhance trafficability by assisting body reorientation.

  15. Hydrogeophysical study of parts of charnockite terrain of Akure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogeophysical study of parts of Charnockite terrain of Akure, southwestern Nigeria was carried out using the electrical resistivity method. The study involved one hundred and fifty two (152) Schlumberger geoelectric soundings (with seven (7) of them parametric)) alongside static water level measurements in 102 ...

  16. Prediction of characteristics of coastal plain soils using terrain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil properties determined include depth, sand, silt, clay, electrical and hydraulic conductivity, bulk density, pH, exchangeable calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium and acidity, available phosphorus, organic carbon, base saturation, crystalline and amorphous iron and aluminium oxides. The terrain attributes derived ...

  17. Effect of terrains on the volatiles of Cabernet Sauvignon wines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These odorants are associated with “fruity'' and ''ripe fruit'' odor descriptors. Wine from flat land with higher OAVs of ethyl octanoate and isoamyl acetate seems to have more intense fruity aromas (pineapple, pear and banana), with floral notes. Keywords: Cabernet Sauvignon wines, volatiles, terrains, Loess Plateau region, ...

  18. Effect of terrains on the volatiles of Cabernet Sauvignon wines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... from flat land with higher OAVs of ethyl octanoate and isoamyl acetate seems to have more intense fruity aromas (pineapple, pear and banana), with floral notes. Key words: Cabernet Sauvignon wines, volatiles, terrains, Loess Plateau region, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), gas ...

  19. Planning Routes Across Economic Terrains: Maximizing Utility, Following Heuristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Maddula, Soumya V.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2010-01-01

    We designed an economic task to investigate human planning of routes in landscapes where travel in different kinds of terrain incurs different costs. Participants moved their finger across a touch screen from a starting point to a destination. The screen was divided into distinct kinds of terrain and travel within each kind of terrain imposed a cost proportional to distance traveled. We varied costs and spatial configurations of terrains and participants received fixed bonuses minus the total cost of the routes they chose. We first compared performance to a model maximizing gain. All but one of 12 participants failed to adopt least-cost routes and their failure to do so reduced their winnings by about 30% (median value). We tested in detail whether participants’ choices of routes satisfied three necessary conditions (heuristics) for a route to maximize gain. We report failures of one heuristic for 7 out of 12 participants. Last of all, we modeled human performance with the assumption that participants assign subjective utilities to costs and maximize utility. For 7 out 12 participants, the fitted utility function was an accelerating power function of actual cost and for the remaining 5, a decelerating power function. We discuss connections between utility aggregation in route planning and decision under risk. Our task could be adapted to investigate human strategy and optimality of route planning in full-scale landscapes. PMID:21833269

  20. CALCULATION OF CHEMICAL ATMOSPHERE ESTIMATION GIVEN THE COMPLEX TERRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The 3D numerical model was used to simulate the toxic gas dispersion over a complex terrain after an accident spillage. The model is based on the K-gradient transport model and the model of potential flow. The results of numerical experiment are presented.

  1. Group Dynamics and Decision Making: Backcountry Recreationists in Avalanche Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Leslie Shay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and determine the prevalence of decision-making characteristics of recreational backcountry groups when making a decision of where to travel and ride in avalanche terrain from the perspective of individuals. Decision-making characteristics encompassed communication, decision-making processes, leadership,…

  2. Evaluation of topographic index in relation to terrain roughness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are upslope area, topographic index, stream power index, radiation index .... flat areas. The effect of smoothening and dis- cretisation were closely related to local terrain characteristics. However, the assessment of the topographic index is very ...... case study of two protected areas in Himalayan foothills;. Biodiversity and ...

  3. Effects of All-Terrain Vehicles on Stream Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Chin; Deven M. Rohrer; Daniel A. Marion; J. Alan Clingenpeel

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - This paper reports preliminary results from research conducted in the Ouachita National Forest to assess the effects of all-terrain vehicle (ATV) trails on stream characteristics. The study focuses on the Wolf Pen Gap Trail that has been in use since 1991. We examine whether that the trail system has caused increased sediment input to and...

  4. Terrain And Laboratory Conductivity Studies Of Flood Plains Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A shallow electromagnetic study (electrical conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements) and laboratory conductivity sampling of the flood plains of Oluwatuyi/Oshinle area of Akure have been undertaken. This is with the aim of correlating the terrain conductivity mapping with laboratory measurements to establish ...

  5. Representations and Metrics for Time-Varying Terrain Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    simpler computational models, such as deterministic finite automata , for which computational equivalence is computable that we are also investigating...Surge ............................................................... 10 3.3 Application of Interactive Mesh Differencing Tool...terrain analysis applications of the uncertainty band around the ridge surface The surface and volume structure will both be multi-resolution and

  6. Sculpting Mountains: Interactive Terrain Modeling Based on Subsurface Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordonnier, Guillaume; Cani, Marie-Paule; Benes, Bedrich; Braun, Jean; Galin, Eric

    2017-03-29

    Most mountain ranges are formed by the compression and folding of colliding tectonic plates. Subduction of one plate causes large-scale asymmetry while their layered composition (or stratigraphy) explains the multi-scale folded strata observed on real terrains. We introduce a novel interactive modeling technique to generate visually plausible, large scale terrains that capture these phenomena. Our method draws on both geological knowledge for consistency and on sculpting systems for user interaction. The user is provided hands-on control on the shape and motion of tectonic plates, represented using a new geologically-inspired model for the Earth crust. The model captures their volume preserving and complex folding behaviors under collision, causing mountains to grow. It generates a volumetric uplift map representing the growth rate of subsurface layers. Erosion and uplift movement are jointly simulated to generate the terrain. The stratigraphy allows us to render folded strata on eroded cliffs. We validated the usability of our sculpting interface through a user study, and compare the visual consistency of the earth crust model with geological simulation results and real terrains.

  7. Flow and wakes in complex terrain and offshore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Schepers, J.G.; Pihl, Sander van der

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents research conducted in the Flow workpackage of the EU funded UPWIND project which focuses on improving models for flow within and downwind of large wind farms in complex terrain and offshore. The main activity is modelling the behaviour of wind turbine wakes in order to improve ...

  8. Interactive Editing of GigaSample Terrain Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Treib, Marc

    2012-05-01

    Previous terrain rendering approaches have addressed the aspect of data compression and fast decoding for rendering, but applications where the terrain is repeatedly modified and needs to be buffered on disk have not been considered so far. Such applications require both decoding and encoding to be faster than disk transfer. We present a novel approach for editing gigasample terrain fields at interactive rates and high quality. To achieve high decoding and encoding throughput, we employ a compression scheme for height and pixel maps based on a sparse wavelet representation. On recent GPUs it can encode and decode up to 270 and 730 MPix/s of color data, respectively, at compression rates and quality superior to JPEG, and it achieves more than twice these rates for lossless height field compression. The construction and rendering of a height field triangulation is avoided by using GPU ray-casting directly on the regular grid underlying the compression scheme. We show the efficiency of our method for interactive editing and continuous level-of-detail rendering of terrain fields comprised of several hundreds of gigasamples. © 2012 The Author(s).

  9. Crustal Structure around Ordos Terrain Derived from Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Ning, J.; Tang, Y.; Chen, Y. J.

    2011-12-01

    We performed Rayleigh wave tomography around Ordos terrain by applying the ambient noise method to broadband seismic data. The data was recorded at 85 temporary stations of PKU array operated along Yinchuan-Jinan and 410 permanent stations of CEA network operated between Eastern margin of Tibetan plateau and Huabei basin. Receiver function technique was also applied to study Moho discontinuity in Southern Ordos by PKU array. We developed a new stacking technique to obtain high-quality dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves from cross correlation of seismic ambient noise. This technique is based on phase-matched filter and was implemented in a four-step iterative process: signal compression, stacking, signal extraction and signal decompression. We stack all the compressed Estimated Green Functions that have almost the same path to improve signal to noise ratio. Results show that this new stacking method is stable and can improve the quality of ambient noise inversion. The inversion results present in this study are consistent with tectonic nature in this region. S velocity at depths of 0-10 km beneath Huabei plain, Sichuan basin and Ordos terrain are obviously lower than those beneath Eastern margin of Tibetan plateau. That is probably due to the thick sediments in Huabei plain, Sichuan basin and Ordos block. S velocity beneath Lvliang-Taihang region keeps high in whole crust and this may relate to Cenozoic intrusion of mantle material here. Our results revealed that the crust is thick in the southern part of the Ordos terrain while it is a little thin in the northern part. This confirmed the result given by Chen et al. (2010) and explained the contradiction between the work of Chen's and former results. The contrasting crustal thickness of the Ordos terrain is also in accord with our Receiver Function results. Receiver functions revealed two interfaces at about 40 km and 60 km in southern part of the Ordos terrain, comparing with only one located at about 40 km depth

  10. Flight-appropriate 3D Terrain-rendering Toolkit for Synthetic Vision Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TerraBlocksTM 3D terrain data format and terrain-block-rendering methodology provides an enabling basis for successful commercial deployment of...

  11. Autonomous terrain characterization and modelling for dynamic control of unmanned vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, A.; Manduchi, R.; Castano, R.; Owens, K.; Matthies, L.; Castano, A.; Hogg, R.

    2002-01-01

    This end-to-end obstacle negotiation system is envisioned to be useful in optimized path planning and vehicle navigation in terrain conditions cluttered with vegetation, bushes, rocks, etc. Results on natural terrain with various natural materials are presented.

  12. Rough terrain motion planning for actively reconfigurable mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Michael

    2015-02-05

    In the aftermath of the Tohoku earthquake and the nuclear meltdown at the power plant of Fukushima Daiichi in 2011, reconfigurable robots like the iRobot Packbot were deployed. Instead of humans, the robots were used to investigate contaminated areas. Other incidents are the two major earthquakes in Northern Italy in May 2012. Besides many casualties, a large number of historical buildings was severely damaged. Due to the imminent danger of collapse, it was too dangerous for rescue personnel to enter many of the buildings. Therefore, the sites were inspected by reconfigurable robots, which are able to traverse the rubble and debris of the partially destroyed buildings. This thesis develops a navigation system enabling wheeled and tracked robots to safely traverse rough terrain and challenging structures. It consists of a planning mechanism and a controller. The focus of this thesis, however, is on the contribution to motion planning. The planning scheme employs a hierarchical approach to motion planning for actively reconfigurable robots in rough environments. Using a map of the environment the algorithm estimates the traversability under the consideration of uncertainties. Based on this analysis, an initial path search determines an approximate solution with respect to the robot's operating limits.Subsequently, a detailed planning step refines the initial path where it is required. The refinement step considers the robot's actuators and stability in addition to the quantities of the first search. Determining the robot-terrain interaction is very important in rough terrain. This thesis presents two path refinement approaches: a deterministic and a randomized approach. The experimental evaluation investigates the separate components of the planning scheme, the robot-terrain interaction for instance.In simulation as well as in real world experiments the evaluation demonstrates the necessity of such a planning algorithm in rough terrain and it provides

  13. Digital terrain model evaluation and computation of the terrain correction and indirect effect in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denizar Blitzkow

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this paper are to compare digital terrain models, to show the generated models for South America and to present two applications. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM produced the most important and updated height information in the world. This paper addresses the attention to comparisons of the following models: SRTM3, DTM2002, GLOBE, GTOPO30, ETOPO2 and ETOPO5, at the common points of the grid. The comparisons are limited by latitudes 60º S and 25 º N and longitudes 100 º W and 25 º W. All these data, after some analysis, have been used to create three models for South America: SAM_1mv1, SAM_1mv2 (both of 1' grid spacing and SAM_30s (30" grid spacing. Besides this effort, the three models as well as STRM were evaluated using Bench Marks (BM in Brazil and Argentina. This paper also shows two important geodesy and geophysics applications using the SAM_1mv1: terrain correction (one of the reductions applied to the gravity acceleration and indirect effect (a consequence of the reduction of the external mass to the geoid. These are important at Andes for a precise geoid computation.Los objetivos principales de este documento son comparar modelos digitales del continente; enseñar los modelos generados para Sudamérica y presentar dos aplicaciones. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM produjo la información más importante y más actualizada de las altitudes del mundo. Este trabajo centra su atención en las comparaciones de los modelos siguientes: SRTM3, DTM2002, GLOBO, GTOPO30, ETOPO2 y ETOPO5, en los puntos comunes de la rejilla. Las comparaciones son limitadas por las latitudes 60º S y 25 º N y longitudes 100 º W y 25 º W. Todos estos datos, después de los análisis, se han utilizado para crear tres modelos para Sudamérica: SAM_1mv1, SAM_1mv2 (1' de espaciamiento de la rejilla y SAM_30s (30" de espaciamiento de la rejilla. Los tres modelos bien como el STRM fueron evaluados usando puntos de referencia de

  14. Analyzing complex wake-terrain interactions and its implications on wind-farm performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib, Mandar; Rasheed, Adil; Fuchs, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Rotating wind turbine blades generate complex wakes involving vortices (helical tip-vortex, root-vortex etc.).These wakes are regions of high velocity deficits and high turbulence intensities and they tend to degrade the performance of down-stream turbines. Hence, a conservative inter-turbine distance of up-to 10 times turbine diameter (10D) is sometimes used in wind-farm layout (particularly in cases of flat terrain). This ensures that wake-effects will not reduce the overall wind-farm performance, but this leads to larger land footprint for establishing a wind-farm. In-case of complex-terrain, within a short distance (say 10D) itself, the nearby terrain can rise in altitude and be high enough to influence the wake dynamics. This wake-terrain interaction can happen either (a) indirectly, through an interaction of wake (both near tip vortex and far wake large-scale vortex) with terrain induced turbulence (especially, smaller eddies generated by small ridges within the terrain) or (b) directly, by obstructing the wake-region partially or fully in its flow-path. Hence, enhanced understanding of wake- development due to wake-terrain interaction will help in wind farm design. To this end the current study involves: (1) understanding the numerics for successful simulation of vortices, (2) understanding fundamental vortex-terrain interaction mechanism through studies devoted to interaction of a single vortex with different terrains, (3) relating influence of vortex-terrain interactions to performance of a wind-farm by studying a multi-turbine wind-farm layout under different terrains. The results on interaction of terrain and vortex has shown a much faster decay of vortex for complex terrain compared to a flatter-terrain. The potential reasons identified explaining the observation are (a) formation of secondary vortices in flow and its interaction with the primary vortex and (b) enhanced vorticity diffusion due to increased terrain-induced turbulence. The implications of

  15. A new method for determination of most likely landslide initiation points and the evaluation of digital terrain model scale in terrain stability mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tarolli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new approach for determining the most likely initiation points for landslides from potential instability mapped using a terrain stability model. This approach identifies the location with critical stability index from a terrain stability model on each downslope path from ridge to valley. Any measure of terrain stability may be used with this approach, which here is illustrated using results from SINMAP, and from simply taking slope as an index of potential instability. The relative density of most likely landslide initiation points within and outside mapped landslide scars provides a way to evaluate the effectiveness of a terrain stability measure, even when mapped landslide scars include run out zones, rather than just initiation locations. This relative density was used to evaluate the utility of high resolution terrain data derived from airborne laser altimetry (LIDAR for a small basin located in the Northeastern Region of Italy. Digital Terrain Models were derived from the LIDAR data for a range of grid cell sizes (from 2 to 50 m. We found appreciable differences between the density of most likely landslide initiation points within and outside mapped landslides with ratios as large as three or more with the highest ratios for a digital terrain model grid cell size of 10 m. This leads to two conclusions: (1 The relative density from a most likely landslide initiation point approach is useful for quantifying the effectiveness of a terrain stability map when mapped landslides do not or can not differentiate between initiation, runout, and depositional areas; and (2 in this study area, where landslides occurred in complexes that were sometimes more than 100 m wide, a digital terrain model scale of 10 m is optimal. Digital terrain model scales larger than 10 m result in loss of resolution that degrades the results, while for digital terrain model scales smaller than 10 m the physical processes responsible for triggering

  16. Evaluation of terrain geomorphometric characteristics for ground clearance charts production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko A. Borisov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphometric exploration applied in the military terrain analysis is based on the GIS methodology of spatial analyses and is related primarily to military terrain analyses. It includes relief assessment aiming at producing ground clearance charts for the analysis of terrain maneuverability and its deployment, cover and concealment possibilities. An evaluation analysis of geomorphological parameters was performed for the Avala test area using a few terrain parameters (visibility, terrain aspect and slope as well as some terrain qualitative categories (e.g. vegetation density. Terrain slope Slope and aspect are morphometric terrain parameters that can be derived directly from the DTM using some GIS operations. Slope is the first derivative of a surface and has both magnitude and direction. Slope is perhaps the most important aspect of the surface form, since surfaces are formed completely of slopes, and slope angles control the gravitational force available for geomorphic work. Mathematically, the tangent of the slope angle is the first derivative of altitude, and it is a tangent or percent slope as this surface parameter is generally referred to. Slope is defined at each point as the slope of a plane tangent to the surface at that point. In practice, however, slope is generally measured over a finite distance, especially when data are obtained from a contour map. Terrain aspect Aspect is also the first derivative of a surface and has both magnitude and direction. The term aspect is defined as the direction of the biggest slope vector on the tangent plane projected onto the horizontal plane. Aspect is the bearing (or azimuth of the slope direction, and its angle ranges from 0 to 360°. Analyses of terrain slope and ground clearance for military forces The analysis of land assessment of the Avala test area included the definition of relief categories in relation to cover and concealment purposes with the aim to include the geomorphological basis

  17. Using game engine for 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Mat, Ruzinoor; Shariff, Abdul Rashid Mohammed; Nasir Zulkifli, Abdul; Shafry Mohd Rahim, Mohd; Hafiz Mahayudin, Mohd

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews on the 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data using game engines that are available in the market as well as open source. 3D terrain visualisation is a technique used to visualise terrain information from GIS data such as a digital elevation model (DEM), triangular irregular network (TIN) and contour. Much research has been conducted to transform the 2D view of map to 3D. There are several terrain visualisation softwares that are available for free, which include Cesium, Hftool and Landserf. This review paper will help interested users to better understand the current state of art in 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data using game engines.

  18. Comparing English, Mandarin, and Russian Hydrographic and Terrain Categories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The paper compares hydrographic and terrain categories in the geospatial data standards of the US, Taiwan, and Russian Federation where the dominant languages used are from di erent language families. It aims to identify structural and semantic di erences between similar categories across three geospatial data standards. By formalizing the data standard structures and identifying the properties that di erentiate sibling categories in each geospatial data standard using well-known formal relations and quality universals, we develop a common basis on which hydrographic and terrain categories in the three data standards can be compared. The result suggests that all three data standards structure categories with a mixture of relations with di erent meaning even though most of them are well-known relations in top-level ontologies. Similar categories can be found across all three standards but exact match between similar categories are rare.

  19. Quantifying Traversability of Terrain for a Mobile Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ayanna; Seraji, Homayoun; Werger, Barry

    2005-01-01

    A document presents an updated discussion on a method of autonomous navigation for a robotic vehicle navigating across rough terrain. The method involves, among other things, the use of a measure of traversability, denoted the fuzzy traversability index, which embodies the information about the slope and roughness of terrain obtained from analysis of images acquired by cameras mounted on the robot. The improvements presented in the report focus on the use of the fuzzy traversability index to generate a traversability map and a grid map for planning the safest path for the robot. Once grid traversability values have been computed, they are utilized for rejecting unsafe path segments and for computing a traversalcost function for ranking candidate paths, selected by a search algorithm, from a specified initial position to a specified final position. The output of the algorithm is a set of waypoints designating a path having a minimal-traversal cost.

  20. Terrain, expérimentation et sciences sociales

    OpenAIRE

    Fleury-Vilatte, Béatrice; Walter, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Consacrés au terrain et à la méthode expérimentale, ces « Échanges » donnent la parole à cinq chercheurs appartenant à différentes disciplines. C’est du côté de la mythologie que Stéphane Olivesi place le terrain dès lors qu’il en situe les usages et légitimations dans le champ académique. Pour sa part, Thierry Meyer mène une réflexion sur la validité externe des approches expérimentales. Françoise Bernard et Robert-Vincent Joule discutent de l’intérêt à intégrer une méthodologie d’inspiratio...

  1. Hierarchical stochastic model of terrain subsidence during tunnel excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Tomáš; Šejnoha, Jiří; Šejnoha, Michal

    2017-09-01

    In this contribution the Bayesian statistical method is applied to assess the expected probability distribution of the terrain subsidence in the course of tunnel excavation. The approach utilizes a number of simplifying assumptions regarding the system kinematics to arrive at a very simple model with just a few degrees of freedom. This deterministic model together with the intrinsic uncertainties of its parameters and measurement inaccuracies are used to formulate the stochastic model which defines a distribution of the predicted values of terrain subsidence. Assuming the measured data to be fixed, the stochastic model thus defines the likelihood function of the model parameters which is directly used for updating their prior distribution. This way the model parameters can be incrementally updated with each excavation step and the prediction of the model refined.

  2. Introduction Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredsson, P. H.; Segalini, A.

    2017-01-01

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas—locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Wind energy in complex terrains’. PMID:28265020

  3. Optimization of Wind Farm Layout in Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Yang, Jianchuan; Li, Chenqi

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic site selection for wind farms in complex terrain is a technological difficulty in the development of onshore wind farms. This paper presented a method for optimizing wind farm layout in complex terrain. This method employed Lissaman and Jensen wake models, took wind velocity....... To calculate the output of each section, we used the wind speed distribution and its probability density as well as the wake loss between wind turbines for every section. The objective function is maximization of the whole wind farm's power output and the free variables are the wind turbines' coordinates which...... distribution law and wake loss between different turbines into consideration and calculated the sheltering area effect of wake loss from upstream wind turbines on downstream wind turbines. Wind direction was divided into sixteen sections, and the wind speed was processed by the Weibull distribution...

  4. Terrain traversability analysis methods for unmanned ground vehicles: A survey

    OpenAIRE

    Papadakis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Motion planning for unmanned ground vehicles (UGV) constitutes a domain of research where several disciplines meet, ranging from artificial intelligence and machine learning to robot perception and computer vision. In view of the plurality of related applications such as planetary exploration, search and rescue, agriculture, mining and off-road exploration, the aim of the present survey is to review the field of 3D terrain traversability analysis that is employed at a ...

  5. A Survey of Terrain Modeling Technologies and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    esthetically pleasing, is not the best representa- tion of the true digital terrain elevations. The results also show that this Automatic Feature...economical and easily available in the market . • With independent control of quality of data immediately after delivery and before final payment...recommended by the GDATP/GIST team). Collection LIDAR data from an airplane must more economical and easily available in market . • With independent

  6. Functional Decomposition of Modeling and Simulation Terrain Database Generation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-19

    necessary, the method selected depends upon the relative maturity of functionality between the soft - ware products. Attribute values such as the...most important M&S key thrust areas are (1) credibly modeling mili- tary systems and Soldiers and (2) developing realistic environmental representa...distributor of M&S terrain databases is a logical extension of its geospatial core competencies and consistent with its role as an Army Geo - spatial

  7. An Intelligent Assistant for Construction of Terrain Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, Neil C.; Reed, Chris; Jackson, Leroy; Baer, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    1998 Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium, Monterey CA, June 1998, 481-486. We describe TELLUSPLAN, an intelligent assistant for the problem of bargaining between user goals and system resources in the integration of terrain databases from separate source databases. TELLUSPLAN uses nondeterministic methods from artificial intelligence and a detailed cost model to infer the most reasonable compromise with the user's needs. Supported by the Army Artificial Int...

  8. Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-09

    been edited and appeared in the journal Boundary Layer Meteorology. It is entitled: Mountainous Terrain: Results from MATERJ-IORN-X (June 2016...Nocturnal Boundary-Layer Evolution on a Slope at the Foot of a Desert Mountain , Journal of Applied Meteorology. 54( 4), 732-751. Marjanovic, N., Wharton...Layer Heights over an Isolated Mountain : Cases from the MA TERHORN-2012 Experiment. Journal o.f Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 55, 1927- 1952

  9. The effect of terrain slope on firefighter safety zone effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret Butler; J. Forthofer; K. Shannon; D. Jimenez; D. Frankman

    2010-01-01

    The current safety zone guidelines used in the US were developed based on the assumption that the fire and safety zone were located on flat terrain. The minimum safe distance for a firefighter to be from a flame was calculated as that corresponding to a radiant incident energy flux level of 7.0kW-m-2. Current firefighter safety guidelines are based on the assumption...

  10. Topological Landscapes: A Terrain Metaphor for ScientificData

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Pascucci, Valerio

    2007-08-01

    Scientific visualization and illustration tools are designed to help people understand the structure and complexity of scientific data with images that are as informative and intuitive as possible. In this context, the use of metaphors plays an important role, since they make complex information easily accessible by using commonly known concepts. In this paper we propose a new metaphor, called 'Topological Landscapes', which facilitates understanding the topological structure of scalar functions. The basic idea is to construct a terrain with the same topology as a given dataset and to display the terrain as an easily understood representation of the actual input data. In this projection from an n-dimensional scalar function to a two-dimensional (2D) model we preserve function values of critical points, the persistence (function span) of topological features, and one possible additional metric property (in our examples volume). By displaying this topologically equivalent landscape together with the original data we harness the natural human proficiency in understanding terrain topography and make complex topological information easily accessible.

  11. Performance of a wind turbine over a ridged terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, Christian; Ciri, Umberto; Leonardi, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Performance of wind turbines is affected by their interaction with the topography. Low momentum flow from the terrain may impinge the turbine resulting in fatigue loads that may reduce durability. However, at the same time it may promote the transport of momentum and kinetic energy into the wake improving the power production on the downstream turbines. In order to address how the topography affects the flow, Large Eddy Simulations of a wind turbine located on a wavy surface are performed. The height variation of the topography is described by a sinusoidal wave. Two different amplitudes were considered, 0 . 10 D and 0 . 05 D , where D is the rotor diameter. The wavelength has been kept constant to 3 D . The effect of the relative position of rotor and terrain geometry was assessed by placing the turbine either at the crest or at the trough of the undulated wall. NREL-5MW turbine blades were modeled using the actuator line model whereas the tower, nacelle and topography using the immersed boundary method. A simulation of a wind turbine on a flat terrain was performed as reference case. The performance of the turbine was evaluated in terms of the power production and blade load fluctuations, as well as for the energy entrainment into the wake of the turbine. The numerical simulations were performed on XSEDE TACC under Grant No. CTS070066. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant Number IIA-1243482 (the WINDINSPIRE project).

  12. ROAMing terrain (Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchaineau, M.; Wolinsky, M.; Sigeti, D.E.; Miller, M.C.; Aldrich, C.; Mineev, M.

    1997-07-01

    Terrain visualization is a difficult problem for applications requiring accurate images of large datasets at high frame rates, such as flight simulation and ground-based aircraft testing using synthetic sensor stimulation. On current graphics hardware, the problem is to maintain dynamic, view-dependent triangle meshes and texture maps that produce good images at the required frame rate. We present an algorithm for constructing triangle meshes that optimizes flexible view-dependent error metrics, produces guaranteed error bounds, achieves specified triangle counts directly, and uses frame-to-frame coherence to operate at high frame rates for thousands of triangles per frame. Our method, dubbed Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM), uses two priority queues to drive split and merge operations that maintain continuous triangulations built from pre-processed bintree triangles. We introduce two additional performance optimizations: incremental triangle stripping and priority-computation deferral lists. ROAM execution time is proportionate to the number of triangle changes per frame, which is typically a few percent of the output mesh size, hence ROAM performance is insensitive to the resolution and extent of the input terrain. Dynamic terrain and simple vertex morphing are supported.

  13. CFD three dimensional wake analysis in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, F.; Astolfi, D.; Terzi, L.

    2017-11-01

    Even if wind energy technology is nowadays fully developed, the use of wind energy in very complex terrain is still challenging. In particular, it is challenging to characterize the combination effects of wind ow over complex terrain and wake interactions between nearby turbines and this has a practical relevance too, for the perspective of mitigating anomalous vibrations and loads as well improving the farm efficiency. In this work, a very complex terrain site has been analyzed through a Reynolds-averaged CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) numerical wind field model; in the simulation the inuence of wakes has been included through the Actuator Disk (AD) approach. In particular, the upstream turbine of a cluster of 4 wind turbines having 2.3 MW of rated power is studied. The objective of this study is investigating the full three-dimensional wind field and the impact of three-dimensionality on the evolution of the waked area between nearby turbines. A post-processing method of the output of the CFD simulation is developed and this allows to estimate the wake lateral deviation and the wake width. The reliability of the numerical approach is inspired by and crosschecked through the analysis of the operational SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) data of the cluster of interest.

  14. TERRAIN TECTONICS OF THE CENTRAL ASIAN FOLDED BELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Buslov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The terrain analysis concept envisages primarily a possibility of approximation of fragments / terrains of various geodynamic settings which belong to different plates. The terrain analysis can supplement the theory of plate tectonics in solving problems of geodynamics and tectonics of regions of the crust with complex structures. The Central Asian belt is among such complicated regions. Terrain structures occurred as a result of combined movements in the system of 'frontal' and/or oblique subduction – collision. In studies of geological objects, it is required first of all to prove their (vertical and horizontal autochthony in relations to each other and then proceed to paleogeodynamic, paleotectonic and paleogeographic reconstructions. Obviously, such a complex approach needs data to be obtained by a variety of research methods, including those applied to study geologic structures, stratigraphy, paleontology, paleogeography, lithothlogy, geochemistry, geochronology, paleomagnetism etc. Only by correlating such data collected from inter-disciplinary studies of the regions, it is possible to establish reliable characteristics of the geological settings and avoid mistakes and misinterpretations that may be associated with the 'stratigraphic' approach to solutions of both regional and global problems of geodynamics and tectonics of folded areas. The terrain analysis of the Central Asian folded belt suggests that its tectonic structure combines marginal continental rock complexes that were formed by the evolution of two major oceanic plates. One of them is the plate of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. As the analogue of the current Indo-Atlantic segment of Earth, it is characterised by the presence of continental blocks in the composition of the oceanic crust and the formation of oceanic basins resulting from the breakup of Rodinia and Gondvana. In the course of its evolution, super-continents disintegrated, and the blocks were reunited into the Kazakhstan

  15. TERRAIN TECTONICS OF THE CENTRAL ASIAN FOLDED BELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Buslov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrain analysis concept envisages primarily a possibility of approximation of fragments / terrains of various geodynamic settings which belong to different plates. The terrain analysis can supplement the theory of plate tectonics in solving problems of geodynamics and tectonics of regions of the crust with complex structures. The Central Asian belt is among such complicated regions. Terrain structures occurred as a result of combined movements in the system of 'frontal' and/or oblique subduction – collision. In studies of geological objects, it is required first of all to prove their (vertical and horizontal autochthony in relations to each other and then proceed to paleogeodynamic, paleotectonic and paleogeographic reconstructions. Obviously, such a complex approach needs data to be obtained by a variety of research methods, including those applied to study geologic structures, stratigraphy, paleontology, paleogeography, lithothlogy, geochemistry, geochronology, paleomagnetism etc. Only by correlating such data collected from inter-disciplinary studies of the regions, it is possible to establish reliable characteristics of the geological settings and avoid mistakes and misinterpretations that may be associated with the 'stratigraphic' approach to solutions of both regional and global problems of geodynamics and tectonics of folded areas. The terrain analysis of the Central Asian folded belt suggests that its tectonic structure combines marginal continental rock complexes that were formed by the evolution of two major oceanic plates. One of them is the plate of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. As the analogue of the current Indo-Atlantic segment of Earth, it is characterised by the presence of continental blocks in the composition of the oceanic crust and the formation of oceanic basins resulting from the breakup of Rodinia and Gondvana. In the course of its evolution, super-continents disintegrated, and the blocks were reunited into the Kazakhstan

  16. Linearized simulation of flow over wind farms and complex terrains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio

    2017-04-13

    The flow over complex terrains and wind farms is estimated here by numerically solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are linearized around the unperturbed incoming wind profile, here assumed logarithmic. The Boussinesq approximation is used to model the Reynolds stress with a prescribed turbulent eddy viscosity profile. Without requiring the boundary-layer approximation, two new linear equations are obtained for the vertical velocity and the wall-normal vorticity, with a reduction in the computational cost by a factor of 8 when compared with a primitive-variables formulation. The presence of terrain elevation is introduced as a vertical coordinate shift, while forestry or wind turbines are included as body forces, without any assumption about the wake structure for the turbines. The model is first validated against some available experiments and simulations, and then a simulation of a wind farm over a Gaussian hill is performed. The speed-up effect of the hill is clearly beneficial in terms of the available momentum upstream of the crest, while downstream of it the opposite can be said as the turbines face a decreased wind speed. Also, the presence of the hill introduces an additional spanwise velocity component that may also affect the turbines' operations. The linear superposition of the flow over the hill and the flow over the farm alone provided a first estimation of the wind speed along the farm, with discrepancies of the same order of magnitude for the spanwise velocity. Finally, the possibility of using a parabolic set of equations to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy after the linearized model is investigated with promising results.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Linearized simulation of flow over wind farms and complex terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    The flow over complex terrains and wind farms is estimated here by numerically solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are linearized around the unperturbed incoming wind profile, here assumed logarithmic. The Boussinesq approximation is used to model the Reynolds stress with a prescribed turbulent eddy viscosity profile. Without requiring the boundary-layer approximation, two new linear equations are obtained for the vertical velocity and the wall-normal vorticity, with a reduction in the computational cost by a factor of 8 when compared with a primitive-variables formulation. The presence of terrain elevation is introduced as a vertical coordinate shift, while forestry or wind turbines are included as body forces, without any assumption about the wake structure for the turbines. The model is first validated against some available experiments and simulations, and then a simulation of a wind farm over a Gaussian hill is performed. The speed-up effect of the hill is clearly beneficial in terms of the available momentum upstream of the crest, while downstream of it the opposite can be said as the turbines face a decreased wind speed. Also, the presence of the hill introduces an additional spanwise velocity component that may also affect the turbines' operations. The linear superposition of the flow over the hill and the flow over the farm alone provided a first estimation of the wind speed along the farm, with discrepancies of the same order of magnitude for the spanwise velocity. Finally, the possibility of using a parabolic set of equations to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy after the linearized model is investigated with promising results. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  18. Wind farm design in complex terrain: the FarmOpt methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ju; Shen, Wen Zhong; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    Designing wind farms in complex terrain is becoming more and more important, especially for countries like China, where a large portion of the territory is featured as complex terrain. Although potential richer wind resources could be expected at complex terrain sites (thanks to the terrain effects......), they also expose many challenges for wind farm designers/developers. In this study, we present the FarmOpt methodology for designing wind farms in complex terrain, which combines the state-of-the-art wind resource assessment methods with engineering wake models adapted for complex terrain and advanced...... layout optimization algorithms. Various constraints are also modelled and considered in the design optimization problem for maximizing the annual energy production (AEP). A case study is presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the methodology. Further developments of the FarmOpt tool are also...

  19. Atmospheric studies in complex terrain: a planning guide for future studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to assist the US Department of Energy in Conducting its atmospheric studies in complex terrain (ASCOT0 by defining various complex terrain research systems and relating these options to specific landforms sites. This includes: (1) reviewing past meteorological and diffusion research on complex terrain; (2) relating specific terrain-induced airflow phenomena to specific landforms and time and space scales; (3) evaluating the technical difficulty of modeling and measuring terrain-induced airflow phenomena; and (4) avolving severdal research options and proposing candidate sites for continuing and expanding field and modeling work. To evolve research options using variable candidate sites, four areas were considered: site selection, terrain uniqueness and quantification, definition of research problems and research plans. 36 references, 111 figures, 20 tables.

  20. Program Merges SAR Data on Terrain and Vegetation Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Paul; Hensley, Scott; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Simard, Marc

    2007-01-01

    X/P Merge is a computer program that estimates ground-surface elevations and vegetation heights from multiple sets of data acquired by the GeoSAR instrument [a terrain-mapping synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system that operates in the X and bands]. X/P Merge software combines data from X- and P-band digital elevation models, SAR backscatter magnitudes, and interferometric correlation magnitudes into a simplified set of output topographical maps of ground-surface elevation and tree height.

  1. Complementary terrain/single beacon-based AUV navigation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Maurya, P.; Curado, T.F.; António, P.

    Complementary Terrain/Single Beacon-Based AUV Navigation � Pramod Maurya ∗,∗∗ Francisco Curado Teixeira ∗∗∗ Anto´nio Pascoal ∗ ∗ Laboratory for Robotics and Systems in Engineering and Science, Instituto Superior Te´cnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa... new architecture that brings together TAN and SBN whereby a TAN algorithm is also fed with the ranges between the marine robot and an underwater transponder installed at a known location. Our aim is to show analytically, via the computation...

  2. Assessing the importance of terrain parameters on glide avalanche release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Glide snow avalanches are dangerous and difficult to predict. Despite recent research there is still a lack of understanding regarding the controls of glide avalanche release. Glide avalanches often occur in similar terrain or the same locations annually and observations suggest that topography may be critical. Thus, to gain an understanding of the terrain component of these types of avalanches we examined terrain parameters associated with glide avalanche release as well as areas of consistent glide crack formation but no subsequent avalanches. Glide avalanche occurrences visible from the Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor in Glacier National Park, Montana from 2003-2013 were investigated using an avalanche database derived of daily observations each year from April 1 to June 15. This yielded 192 glide avalanches in 53 distinct avalanche paths. Each avalanche occurrence was digitized in a GIS using satellite, oblique, and aerial imagery as reference. Topographical parameters such as area, slope, aspect, elevation and elevation were then derived for the entire dataset utilizing GIS tools and a 10m DEM. Land surface substrate and surface geology were derived from National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring maps and U.S. Geological Survey surface geology maps, respectively. Surface roughness and glide factor were calculated using a four level classification index. . Then, each avalanche occurrence was aggregated to general avalanche release zones and the frequencies were compared. For this study, glide avalanches released in elevations ranging from 1300 to 2700 m with a mean aspect of 98 degrees (east) and a mean slope angle of 38 degrees. The mean profile curvature for all glide avalanches was 0.15 and a plan curvature of -0.01, suggesting a fairly linear surface (i.e. neither convex nor concave). The glide avalanches occurred in mostly bedrock made up of dolomite and limestone slabs and talus deposits with very few occurring in alpine meadows. However, not all glide

  3. Evaluating planetary digital terrain models-The HRSC DTM test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heipke, C.; Oberst, J.; Albertz, J.; Attwenger, M.; Dorninger, P.; Dorrer, E.; Ewe, M.; Gehrke, S.; Gwinner, K.; Hirschmuller, H.; Kim, J.R.; Kirk, R.L.; Mayer, H.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Rengarajan, R.; Rentsch, M.; Schmidt, R.; Scholten, F.; Shan, J.; Spiegel, M.; Wahlisch, M.; Neukum, G.

    2007-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) has been orbiting the planet Mars since January 2004 onboard the European Space Agency (ESA) Mars Express mission and delivers imagery which is being used for topographic mapping of the planet. The HRSC team has conducted a systematic inter-comparison of different alternatives for the production of high resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) from the multi look HRSC push broom imagery. Based on carefully chosen test sites the test participants have produced DTMs which have been subsequently analysed in a quantitative and a qualitative manner. This paper reports on the results obtained in this test. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Micro- and meso-scale effects of forested terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Mann, Jakob; Sogachev, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    The height and rotor diameter of modern wind turbines are so extensive, that the wind conditions they encounter often are well above the surface layer, where traditionally it is assumed that wind direction and turbulent fluxes are constant with respect to height, if the surface is homogenous...... scales are the height of the planetary boundary layer and the Monin-Obukhov length, which both are related to the energy balance of the surface. Examples of important micro- and meso-scale effects of forested terrain are shown using data and model results from recent and ongoing experiments. For micro...

  5. Evaluation of skiing and snowboarding injuries sustained in terrain parks versus traditional slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, M Alison; Evans, Michael D; Rivara, Frederick P

    2010-04-01

    This study compares skiing and snowboarding injuries in terrain parks versus slopes at two ski areas, 2000-05. A total of 3953 (26.7%) injuries occurred in terrain parks, predominantly among young male snowboarders. Terrain park injuries were more likely to be severe, involving head (RR 1.31, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.48) or back (RR 1.96, 95% CI 1.67 to 2.29).

  6. The Cyber War: Maintaining and Controlling the Key Cyber Terrain of the Cyberspace Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-26

    geographic position. The definition of critical geographic terrain is clear. It may include a hill, a crossing point of a river or lake, or a valley.1...serve as a definition of key cyber terrain. The five planes are also illustrated in Figure 1.14 1) Supervisory Plane. The supervisory plane provides...terrain (e.g., adversary characteristics and possible adversary actions) are consistent. • A claim or hypothesis is meaningful to a specific real

  7. A Large-scale Terrain Transmission Mechanism Based on Hybrid P2P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Zhanwu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In large scale terrain roaning systems, the terrain visualization components are usually running on the localhost and terrain datasets are stored in the remote server.The server should guarantee the certain response delay and realize the teal-time tendering of huge-scale terrain when the number of user is limited. However. as the number of clients is quickly increasing, the server performance will no rapidly to satisfy the client real-time tendering requirement. Peer-to-peer (P2P technologies can efficiently reduce the bandwidth consumption of the server by the means of utilizing the client nodes' resource. The paper combines the C/S and peer-to-peer into 2 new data transmission mode for large terrain data transmission. First, it gives a new model for data transmission and new' structure for client node. Then it presents the management of peers and the look-up of terrain blocks in the new mode. Also it presents a kind of optimal algorithm for terrain block scheduling. The optimal algorithm can improve the terrain data transmitting speed and be adapted to the network change. Fault-tolerance and security are also considered in the paper. We build a prototype system and compare the new mechanism with traditional unicast mode. Experimental results have shown that the new mechanism can make the server's bad lighter than the old mode in the case of equal number of user requests and improve greatly the response time of the terrain block request.

  8. The North America tapestry of time and terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Kate E.; Howell, David G.; Vigil, Jose F.

    2003-01-01

    The North America Tapestry of Time and Terrain (1:8,000,000 scale) is a product of the US Geological Survey in the I-map series (I-2781). This map was prepared in collaboration with the Geological Survey of Canada and the Mexican Consejo Recursos de Minerales. This cartographic Tapestry is woven from a geologic map and a shaded relief image. This digital combination reveals the geologic history of North America through the interrelation of rock type, topography and time. Regional surface processes as well as continent-scale tectonic events are exposed in the three dimensions of space and the fourth dimension, geologic time. The large map shows the varying age of bedrock underlying North America, while four smaller maps show the distribution of four principal types of rock: sedimentary, volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic.This map expands the original concept of the 2000 Tapestry of Time and Terrain, by José F. Vigil, Richard J. Pike and David G. Howell, which covered the conterminous United States. The U.S. Tapestry poster and website have been popular in classrooms, homes, and even the Google office building, and we anticipate the North America Tapestry will have a similarly wide appeal, and to a larger audience.

  9. Navigating a Mobile Robot Across Terrain Using Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Howard, Ayanna; Bon, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    A strategy for autonomous navigation of a robotic vehicle across hazardous terrain involves the use of a measure of traversability of terrain within a fuzzy-logic conceptual framework. This navigation strategy requires no a priori information about the environment. Fuzzy logic was selected as a basic element of this strategy because it provides a formal methodology for representing and implementing a human driver s heuristic knowledge and operational experience. Within a fuzzy-logic framework, the attributes of human reasoning and decision- making can be formulated by simple IF (antecedent), THEN (consequent) rules coupled with easily understandable and natural linguistic representations. The linguistic values in the rule antecedents convey the imprecision associated with measurements taken by sensors onboard a mobile robot, while the linguistic values in the rule consequents represent the vagueness inherent in the reasoning processes to generate the control actions. The operational strategies of the human expert driver can be transferred, via fuzzy logic, to a robot-navigation strategy in the form of a set of simple conditional statements composed of linguistic variables. These linguistic variables are defined by fuzzy sets in accordance with user-defined membership functions. The main advantages of a fuzzy navigation strategy lie in the ability to extract heuristic rules from human experience and to obviate the need for an analytical model of the robot navigation process.

  10. Walking Robots Dynamic Control Systems on an Uneven Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, M. S.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents ZPM dynamic control of walking robots, developing an open architecture real time control multiprocessor system, in view of obtaining new capabilities for walking robots. The complexity of the movement mechanism of a walking robot was taken into account, being a repetitive tilting process with numerous instable movements and which can lead to its turnover on an uneven terrain. The control system architecture for the dynamic robot walking is presented in correlation with the control strategy which contains three main real time control loops: balance robot control using sensorial feedback, walking diagram control with periodic changes depending on the sensorial information during each walk cycle, predictable movement control based on a quick decision from the previous experimental data. The results obtained through simulation and experiments show an increase in mobility, stability in real conditions and obtaining of high performances related to the possibility of moving walking robots on terrains with a configuration as close as possible to real situations, respectively developing new technological capabilities of the walking robot control systems for slope movement and walking by overtaking or going around obstacles.

  11. An extensible framework for provenance in human terrain visual analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rick; Slingsby, Aiden; Dykes, Jason; Xu, Kai; Wood, Jo; Nguyen, Phong H; Stephens, Derek; Wong, B L William; Zheng, Yongjun

    2013-12-01

    We describe and demonstrate an extensible framework that supports data exploration and provenance in the context of Human Terrain Analysis (HTA). Working closely with defence analysts we extract requirements and a list of features that characterise data analysed at the end of the HTA chain. From these, we select an appropriate non-classified data source with analogous features, and model it as a set of facets. We develop ProveML, an XML-based extension of the Open Provenance Model, using these facets and augment it with the structures necessary to record the provenance of data, analytical process and interpretations. Through an iterative process, we develop and refine a prototype system for Human Terrain Visual Analytics (HTVA), and demonstrate means of storing, browsing and recalling analytical provenance and process through analytic bookmarks in ProveML. We show how these bookmarks can be combined to form narratives that link back to the live data. Throughout the process, we demonstrate that through structured workshops, rapid prototyping and structured communication with intelligence analysts we are able to establish requirements, and design schema, techniques and tools that meet the requirements of the intelligence community. We use the needs and reactions of defence analysts in defining and steering the methods to validate the framework.

  12. Wind Power Curve Modeling in Simple and Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulaevskaya, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wharton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Irons, Z. [Enel Green Power North America, Andover, MA (United States); Qualley, G. [Pentalum, Colleyville, TX (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Our previous work on wind power curve modeling using statistical models focused on a location with a moderately complex terrain in the Altamont Pass region in northern California (CA). The work described here is the follow-up to that work, but at a location with a simple terrain in northern Oklahoma (OK). The goal of the present analysis was to determine the gain in predictive ability afforded by adding information beyond the hub-height wind speed, such as wind speeds at other heights, as well as other atmospheric variables, to the power prediction model at this new location and compare the results to those obtained at the CA site in the previous study. While we reach some of the same conclusions at both sites, many results reported for the CA site do not hold at the OK site. In particular, using the entire vertical profile of wind speeds improves the accuracy of wind power prediction relative to using the hub-height wind speed alone at both sites. However, in contrast to the CA site, the rotor equivalent wind speed (REWS) performs almost as well as the entire profile at the OK site. Another difference is that at the CA site, adding wind veer as a predictor significantly improved the power prediction accuracy. The same was true for that site when air density was added to the model separately instead of using the standard air density adjustment. At the OK site, these additional variables result in no significant benefit for the prediction accuracy.

  13. Compliant Biped Walking on Uneven Terrain with Point Feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Hou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim to realize compliant biped walking on uneven terrain with point feet. A control system is designed for a 5-link planar biped walker. According to the role that each leg plays, the control system is decomposed into two parts: the swing leg control and the support leg control. The trajectory of the swing foot is generated in real-time to regulate the walking speed. By considering the reaction torque of the swing leg's hip joint as disturbance, a sliding model controller is implemented at the support leg's hip joint to control the torso's posture angle. In order to make sure the landing foot does not rebound after impact, the vertical contact force control is set as the internal loop of the hip's height control. In simulation, the control system is tested on a virtual 5-link planar biped walker in Matlab. Finally, stable biped walking is realized on uneven terrain with roughness up to 2cm.

  14. Autonomous Path Tracking Steering Controller for Extraterrestrial Terrain Exporation Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Sonsalla, Roland; Kirchner, Frank

    Extraterrestrial surface missions typically use a robotic rover platform to carry the science instrumentation (e.g.,the twin MER rovers). Due to the risks in the rover path (i.e. low trafficability of unrecognized soil patches), it is proposed in the FASTER footnote{\\url{https://www.faster-fp7-space.eu}} project that two rovers should be used. A micro scout rover is used for determining the traversability of the terrain and collaborate with a primary rover to lower the risk of entering hazardous areas. That will improve the mission safety and the effective traverse speed for planetary rover exploration. This paper presents the design and implementation of the path following controller for micro scout rover. The objective to synthesize a control law which allows the rover to autonomously follow a desired path in a stable manner. Furthermore, the software architecture controlling the rover and all its subsystems is depicted. The performance of the designed controller is discussed and demonstrated with realistic simulations and experiments, conclusions and an outlook of future work are also given. Key words: Micro Rover, Scout Rover, Mars Exploration, Multi-Rover Team, Mobile, All-Terrain, Hybrid-Legged Wheel, Path Following, Automatic Steer, nonlinear systems.

  15. Stereo-vision-based terrain mapping for off-road autonomous navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo L.; Huertas, Andres; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-05-01

    Successful off-road autonomous navigation by an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) requires reliable perception and representation of natural terrain. While perception algorithms are used to detect driving hazards, terrain mapping algorithms are used to represent the detected hazards in a world model a UGV can use to plan safe paths. There are two primary ways to detect driving hazards with perception sensors mounted to a UGV: binary obstacle detection and traversability cost analysis. Binary obstacle detectors label terrain as either traversable or non-traversable, whereas, traversability cost analysis assigns a cost to driving over a discrete patch of terrain. In uncluttered environments where the non-obstacle terrain is equally traversable, binary obstacle detection is sufficient. However, in cluttered environments, some form of traversability cost analysis is necessary. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has explored both approaches using stereo vision systems. A set of binary detectors has been implemented that detect positive obstacles, negative obstacles, tree trunks, tree lines, excessive slope, low overhangs, and water bodies. A compact terrain map is built from each frame of stereo images. The mapping algorithm labels cells that contain obstacles as nogo regions, and encodes terrain elevation, terrain classification, terrain roughness, traversability cost, and a confidence value. The single frame maps are merged into a world map where temporal filtering is applied. In previous papers, we have described our perception algorithms that perform binary obstacle detection. In this paper, we summarize the terrain mapping capabilities that JPL has implemented during several UGV programs over the last decade and discuss some challenges to building terrain maps with stereo range data.

  16. Stereo Vision Based Terrain Mapping for Off-Road Autonomous Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo L.; Huertas, Andres; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Successful off-road autonomous navigation by an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) requires reliable perception and representation of natural terrain. While perception algorithms are used to detect driving hazards, terrain mapping algorithms are used to represent the detected hazards in a world model a UGV can use to plan safe paths. There are two primary ways to detect driving hazards with perception sensors mounted to a UGV: binary obstacle detection and traversability cost analysis. Binary obstacle detectors label terrain as either traversable or non-traversable, whereas, traversability cost analysis assigns a cost to driving over a discrete patch of terrain. In uncluttered environments where the non-obstacle terrain is equally traversable, binary obstacle detection is sufficient. However, in cluttered environments, some form of traversability cost analysis is necessary. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has explored both approaches using stereo vision systems. A set of binary detectors has been implemented that detect positive obstacles, negative obstacles, tree trunks, tree lines, excessive slope, low overhangs, and water bodies. A compact terrain map is built from each frame of stereo images. The mapping algorithm labels cells that contain obstacles as no-go regions, and encodes terrain elevation, terrain classification, terrain roughness, traversability cost, and a confidence value. The single frame maps are merged into a world map where temporal filtering is applied. In previous papers, we have described our perception algorithms that perform binary obstacle detection. In this paper, we summarize the terrain mapping capabilities that JPL has implemented during several UGV programs over the last decade and discuss some challenges to building terrain maps with stereo range data.

  17. Real-time terrain storage generation from multiple sensors towards mobile robot operation interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Cho, Seoungjae; Xi, Yulong; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun

    2014-01-01

    A mobile robot mounted with multiple sensors is used to rapidly collect 3D point clouds and video images so as to allow accurate terrain modeling. In this study, we develop a real-time terrain storage generation and representation system including a nonground point database (PDB), ground mesh database (MDB), and texture database (TDB). A voxel-based flag map is proposed for incrementally registering large-scale point clouds in a terrain model in real time. We quantize the 3D point clouds into 3D grids of the flag map as a comparative table in order to remove the redundant points. We integrate the large-scale 3D point clouds into a nonground PDB and a node-based terrain mesh using the CPU. Subsequently, we program a graphics processing unit (GPU) to generate the TDB by mapping the triangles in the terrain mesh onto the captured video images. Finally, we produce a nonground voxel map and a ground textured mesh as a terrain reconstruction result. Our proposed methods were tested in an outdoor environment. Our results show that the proposed system was able to rapidly generate terrain storage and provide high resolution terrain representation for mobile mapping services and a graphical user interface between remote operators and mobile robots.

  18. Tagungsbericht „Terrain vague: Die Brache in den Stadt- und Kulturwissenschaften“

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Maria Broich

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Zum DFG-Projekt „Terrain vague: Ästhetik und Poetik urbaner Zwischenräume in der französischen Moderne“ (Romanisches Seminar der Universität zu Köln, Projektleiter Wolfram Nitsch und zum Workshop vom 24. und 25. April 2015 „Terrain vague: Die Brache in den Stadt- und Raumwissenschaften“

  19. The influence to source of data for accuracy on digital terrain models (DTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajat Branislav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The overview of the contemporary data acquisition methods for Digital Terrain Models (DTM, as well as the accuracy of data provided by these methods, are given in this article. The procedure of the accuracy estimation for DTM which is produced by digitizing of topographic maps and test points obtained by GPS technology and aerophotogrammetric terrain surveying, is presented.

  20. Real-Time Terrain Storage Generation from Multiple Sensors towards Mobile Robot Operation Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mobile robot mounted with multiple sensors is used to rapidly collect 3D point clouds and video images so as to allow accurate terrain modeling. In this study, we develop a real-time terrain storage generation and representation system including a nonground point database (PDB, ground mesh database (MDB, and texture database (TDB. A voxel-based flag map is proposed for incrementally registering large-scale point clouds in a terrain model in real time. We quantize the 3D point clouds into 3D grids of the flag map as a comparative table in order to remove the redundant points. We integrate the large-scale 3D point clouds into a nonground PDB and a node-based terrain mesh using the CPU. Subsequently, we program a graphics processing unit (GPU to generate the TDB by mapping the triangles in the terrain mesh onto the captured video images. Finally, we produce a nonground voxel map and a ground textured mesh as a terrain reconstruction result. Our proposed methods were tested in an outdoor environment. Our results show that the proposed system was able to rapidly generate terrain storage and provide high resolution terrain representation for mobile mapping services and a graphical user interface between remote operators and mobile robots.

  1. Visual Odometry for Planetary Exploration Rovers in Sandy Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Visual odometry provides planetary exploration rovers with accurate knowledge of their position and orientation, which needs effective feature tracking results, especially in barren sandy terrains. In this paper, a stereovision based odometry algorithm is proposed for a lunar rover, which is composed of corner extraction, feature tracking and motion estimation. First, a morphology based image enhancement method is studied to guarantee enough corners are extracted. Second, a Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC algorithm is proposed to make a robust estimation of the fundamental matrix, which is the basic and critical part of feature matching and tracking. Then, the 6 degrees of freedom rover position and orientation is estimated by the RANSAC algorithm. Finally, experiments are performed in a simulated lunar surface environment using a prototype rover, which have confirmed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Global multi-resolution terrain elevation data 2010 (GMTED2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Gesch, Dean B.

    2011-01-01

    In 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a global topographic elevation model designated as GTOPO30 at a horizontal resolution of 30 arc-seconds for the entire Earth. Because no single source of topographic information covered the entire land surface, GTOPO30 was derived from eight raster and vector sources that included a substantial amount of U.S. Defense Mapping Agency data. The quality of the elevation data in GTOPO30 varies widely; there are no spatially-referenced metadata, and the major topographic features such as ridgelines and valleys are not well represented. Despite its coarse resolution and limited attributes, GTOPO30 has been widely used for a variety of hydrological, climatological, and geomorphological applications as well as military applications, where a regional, continental, or global scale topographic model is required. These applications have ranged from delineating drainage networks and watersheds to using digital elevation data for the extraction of topographic structure and three-dimensional (3D) visualization exercises (Jenson and Domingue, 1988; Verdin and Greenlee, 1996; Lehner and others, 2008). Many of the fundamental geophysical processes active at the Earth's surface are controlled or strongly influenced by topography, thus the critical need for high-quality terrain data (Gesch, 1994). U.S. Department of Defense requirements for mission planning, geographic registration of remotely sensed imagery, terrain visualization, and map production are similarly dependent on global topographic data. Since the time GTOPO30 was completed, the availability of higher-quality elevation data over large geographic areas has improved markedly. New data sources include global Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTEDRegistered) from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), Canadian elevation data, and data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). Given the widespread use of GTOPO30 and the equivalent 30-arc

  3. Sound Diffraction Modeling of Rotorcraft Noise Around Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, James H.; Sim, Ben W.; Chitta, Subhashini; Steinhoff, John

    2017-01-01

    A new computational technique, Wave Confinement (WC), is extended here to account for sound diffraction around arbitrary terrain. While diffraction around elementary scattering objects, such as a knife edge, single slit, disc, sphere, etc. has been studied for several decades, realistic environments still pose significant problems. This new technique is first validated against Sommerfeld's classical problem of diffraction due to a knife edge. This is followed by comparisons with diffraction over three-dimensional smooth obstacles, such as a disc and Gaussian hill. Finally, comparisons with flight test acoustics data measured behind a hill are also shown. Comparison between experiment and Wave Confinement prediction demonstrates that a Poisson spot occurred behind the isolated hill, resulting in significantly increased sound intensity near the center of the shadowed region.

  4. Predicting Wine Quality from Terrain Characteristics by Regression Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Schwarz

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available On utilise une précédente étude cartographique sur les caractéristiques des terrains de l'espace du Rhinegau allemand. On essaye d'évaluer la qualité relative du Riesling d'après des facteurs de localisation à l'aide d'une classification et d'un arbre de régression (CART. La validité des résultats suppose que la qualité supplante la quantité, que le niveau des prix ou les méthodes de vinification ne sont pas pris en compte. L'étude montre que CART est un outil statistique valable, sans restriction quant à la nature des données.

  5. A high-accuracy map of global terrain elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Dai; Ikeshima, Daiki; Tawatari, Ryunosuke; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Neal, Jeffery C.; Sampson, Christopher C.; Kanae, Shinjiro; Bates, Paul D.

    2017-06-01

    Spaceborne digital elevation models (DEMs) are a fundamental input for many geoscience studies, but they still include nonnegligible height errors. Here we introduce a high-accuracy global DEM at 3″ resolution ( 90 m at the equator) by eliminating major error components from existing DEMs. We separated absolute bias, stripe noise, speckle noise, and tree height bias using multiple satellite data sets and filtering techniques. After the error removal, land areas mapped with ±2 m or better vertical accuracy were increased from 39% to 58%. Significant improvements were found in flat regions where height errors larger than topography variability, and landscapes such as river networks and hill-valley structures, became clearly represented. We found the topography slope of previous DEMs was largely distorted in most of world major floodplains (e.g., Ganges, Nile, Niger, and Mekong) and swamp forests (e.g., Amazon, Congo, and Vasyugan). The newly developed DEM will enhance many geoscience applications which are terrain dependent.

  6. Nocturnal low-level jets: sporadic turbulence on complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, M. A.; Cuxart, J.

    2009-04-01

    Under weak pressure gradient conditions and clear-sky nights the development of locally generated circulations is favourished, specially in complex terrain. As night advances, the layer close to the ground cools down and stably stratified conditions prevail, with weak and usually sporadic or intermittent turbulence. In this work this phenomena is studied through high-resolution mesoscale simulations that are verified with data from weather stations and satellite information. The chosen domain is the island of Majorca, located in the western Mediterranean sea. A large variety of circulations is observed in the three main basins of the island, with drainage flows and organization at the basin scale. These low-level jet structures occasionaly cause turbulent bursts and very efficient mixing in the vertical, leading to significant changes of the atmospheric conditions close to the ground.

  7. Interpolating atmospheric water vapor delay by incorporating terrain elevation information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W. B.; Li, Z. W.; Ding, X. L.; Zhu, J. J.

    2011-09-01

    In radio signal-based observing systems, such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), the water vapor in the atmosphere will cause delays during the signal transmission. Such delays vary significantly with terrain elevation. In the case when atmospheric delays are to be eliminated from the measured raw signals, spatial interpolators may be needed. By taking advantage of available terrain elevation information during spatial interpolation process, the accuracy of the atmospheric delay mapping can be considerably improved. This paper first reviews three elevation-dependent water vapor interpolation models, i.e., the Best Linear Unbiased Estimator in combination with the water vapor Height Scaling Model (BLUE + HSM), the Best Linear Unbiased Estimator coupled with the Elevation-dependent Covariance Model (BLUE + ECM), and the Simple Kriging with varying local means based on the Baby semi-empirical model (SKlm + Baby for short). A revision to the SKlm + Baby model is then presented, where the Onn water vapor delay model is adopted to substitute the inaccurate Baby semi-empirical model (SKlm + Onn for short). Experiments with the zenith wet delays obtained through the GPS observations from the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) demonstrate that the SKlm + Onn model outperforms the other three. The RMS of SKlm + Onn is only 0.55 cm, while those of BLUE + HSM, BLUE + ECM and SKlm + Baby amount to 1.11, 1.49 and 0.77 cm, respectively. The proposed SKlm + Onn model therefore represents an improvement of 29-63% over the other known models.

  8. Basalt: Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, D. S. S.; Abercromby, A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Kobayashi, L.; Hughes, S. S.; Chappell, S.; Bramall, N. E.; Deans, M. C.; Heldmann, J. L.; Downs, M.; Cockell, C. S.; Stevens, A. H.; Caldwell, B.; Hoffman, J.; Vadhavk, N.; Marquez, J.; Miller, M.; Squyres, S. W.; Lees, D. S.; Fong, T.; Cohen, T.; Smith, T.; Lee, G.; Frank, J.; Colaprete, A.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the BASALT (Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains) program. BASALT research addresses Science, Science Operations, and Technology. Specifically, BASALT is focused on the investigation of terrestrial volcanic terrains and their habitability as analog environments for early and present-day Mars. Our scientific fieldwork is conducted under simulated Mars mission constraints to evaluate strategically selected concepts of operations (ConOps) and capabilities with respect to their anticipated value for the joint human and robotic exploration of Mars. a) Science: The BASALT science program is focused on understanding habitability conditions of early and present-day Mars in two relevant Mars-analog locations (the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and the East Rift Zone (ERZ) flows on the Big Island of Hawai'i and the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) in Idaho) to characterize and compare the physical and geochemical conditions of life in these environments and to learn how to seek, identify, and characterize life and life-related chemistry in basaltic environments representing these two epochs of martian history. b) Science Operations: The BASALT team will conduct real (non-simulated) biological and geological science at two high-fidelity Mars analogs, all within simulated Mars mission conditions (including communication latencies and bandwidth constraints) that are based on current architectural assumptions for Mars exploration missions. We will identify which human-robotic ConOps and supporting capabilities enable science return and discovery. c) Technology: BASALT will incorporate and evaluate technologies in to our field operations that are directly relevant to conducting the scientific investigations regarding life and life-related chemistry in Mars-analogous terrestrial environments. BASALT technologies include the use of mobile science platforms, extravehicular informatics, display technologies, communication

  9. Stability Impact on Wake Development in Moderately Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infield, D.; Zorzi, G.

    2017-05-01

    This paper uses a year of SCADA data from Whitelee Wind Farm near Glasgow to investigate wind turbine wake development in moderately complex terrain. Atmospheric stability measurements in terms of Richardson number from a met mast at an adjoining site have been obtained and used to assess the impact of stability on wake development. Considerable filtering of these data has been undertaken to ensure that all turbines are working normally and are well aligned with the wind direction. A group of six wind turbines, more or less in a line, have been selected for analysis, and winds within a 2 degree direction sector about this line are used to ensure, as far as possible, that all the turbines investigated are fully immersed in the wake/s of the upstream turbine/s. Results show how the terrain effects combine with the wake effects, with both being of comparable importance for the site in question. Comparison has been made with results from two commercial CFD codes for neutral stability, and reasonable agreement is demonstrated. Richardson number has been plotted against wind shear and turbulence intensity at a met mast on the wind farm that for the selected wind direction is not in the wake of any turbines. Good correlations are found indicating that the Richardson numbers obtained are reliable. The filtered data used for wake analysis were split according to Richardson number into two groups representing slightly stable to neutral, and unstable conditions. Very little difference in wake development is apparent. A greater difference can be observed when the data are separated simply by turbulence intensity, suggesting that, although turbulence intensity is correlated with stability, of the two it is the parameter that most directly impacts on wake development through mixing of ambient and wake flows.

  10. Pacing during an ultramarathon running event in hilly terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo A. Kerhervé

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The dynamics of speed selection as a function of distance, or pacing, are used in recreational, competitive, and scientific research situations as an indirect measure of the psycho-physiological status of an individual. The purpose of this study was to determine pacing on level, uphill and downhill sections of participants in a long (>80 km ultramarathon performed on trails in hilly terrain. Methods Fifteen ultramarathon runners competed in a  173 km event (five finished at  103 km carrying a Global-Positioning System (GPS device. Using the GPS data, we determined the speed, relative to average total speed, in level (LEV, uphill (UH and downhill (DH gradient categories as a function of total distance, as well as the correlation between overall performance and speed variability, speed loss, and total time stopped. Results There were no significant differences in normality, variances or means in the relative speed in 173-km and 103-km participants. Relative speed decreased in LEV, UH and DH. The main component of speed loss occurred between 5% and 50% of the event distance in LEV, and between 5% and 95% in UH and DH. There were no significant correlations between overall performance and speed loss, the variability of speed, or total time stopped. Conclusions Positive pacing was observed at all gradients, with the main component of speed loss occurring earlier (mixed pacing in LEV compared to UH and DH. A speed reserve (increased speed in the last section was observed in LEV and UH. The decrease in speed and variability of speed were more important in LEV and DH than in UH. The absence of a significant correlation between overall performance and descriptors of pacing is novel and indicates that pacing in ultramarathons in trails and hilly terrain differs to other types of running events.

  11. Numerical simulation of radiation fog in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Musson-Genon, L.; Carissimo, B.; Dupont, E.

    2009-09-01

    The interest for micro-scale modeling of the atmosphere is growing for environmental applications related, for example, to energy production, transport and urban development. The turbulence in the stable layers where pollutant dispersion is low and can lead to strong pollution events. This could be further complicated by the presence of clouds or fog and is specifically difficult in urban or industrial area due to the presence of buildings. In this context, radiation fog formation and dissipation over complex terrain were therefore investigated with a state-of-the-art model. This study is divided into two phases. The first phase is a pilot stage, which consist of employing a database from the ParisFog campaign which took place in the south of Paris during winter 2006-07 to assess the ability of the cloud model to reproduce the detailed structure of radiation fog. The second phase use the validated model for the study of influence of complex terrain on fog evolution. Special attention is given to the detailed and complete simulations and validation technique used is to compare the simulated results using the 3D cloud model of computational fluid dynamical software Code_Saturne with one of the best collected in situ data during the ParisFog campaign. Several dynamical, microphysical parameterizations and simulation conditions have been described. The resulting 3D cloud model runs at a horizontal resolution of 30 m and a vertical resolution comparable to the 1D model. First results look very promising and are able to reproduce the spatial distribution of fog. The analysis of the behavior of the different parameterized physical processes suggests that the subtle balance between the various processes is achieved.

  12. LEBANESE SOIL AND TERRAIN UNITES DELINEATION BASED ON DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean A. Doumit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Soil and Terrain digital database (SOTER stores attribute data on landform and soils, the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP create a soil and terrain digital database with a global coverage at a spatial resolution of one kilometer approximately. For a little country as Lebanon such data with a very low resolution cannot be useful, Until recently, only manual methods were used to delineate SOTER (SOil and TERrain Digital Database Units [21]. Theaimofourstudyisto apply aquantitativemethodtoderive terrain classes that match the physiography SOTER of the Lebanese territory at regional scale. According to SRTMdigital elevation model todefinetheSOTERTerrainUnit: hypsometry, slope, reliefintensity and stream density. Several GIS techniques were employed to translate the SOTER mapping concept. The four features are combined and vectorized to achieve the delineation of the SOTER Terrain unit’s map at a spatial precision of 90 meters.

  13. Landing Control of Foot with Springs for Walking Robots on Rough Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyuru Yamada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Landing control is one of the important issues for biped walking robot, because robots are expected to walk on not only known flat surfaces but also unknown and uneven terrain for working at various fields. This paper presents a new controller design for a robotic foot to land on unknown terrain. The robotic foot considered in this study equips springs to reduce the impact force at the foot landing. There are two objectives in the landing control; achieving the desired ground reaction force and positioning the foot on unknown terrain. To achieve these two objectives simultaneously by adjusting the foot position, we propose a PI force controller with a desired foot position, which guarantees the robust stability of control system with respect to terrain variance, and exact positioning of the foot to unknown terrain. Simulation results using the Open Dynamics Engine demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  14. Experimental Setup to Assess Blast and Penetration-Induced Secondary Debris in a Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    in a Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) Environment by Paul S Duvall Approved for public release; distribution...Research Laboratory Experimental Setup to Assess Blast and Penetration-Induced Secondary Debris in a Military Operations in Urban Terrain...Induced Secondary Debris in a Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  15. A real-time airborne terrain aided inertial navigation system and its performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q. Q.; Zhao, L.; Zhou, J. H.; Wang, B. H.; Zhang, Y. P.

    2017-12-01

    The current terrain aided navigation system has a shortcoming that it depends on terrain feature, so we need to select the terrain matching area and plan the flight path according to the flight mission in advance. In this paper, we present a real-time airborne terrain aided inertial navigation system. The system can plan and select the matching area online according to the heading angle and estimated position errors during aircraft flight, and adopt the appropriate terrain-aided navigation algorithm for different terrain areas and flight conditions. So it can ensure the positioning accuracy and improve the ability of carrier to maneuver at the same time. In order to verify the performance of the system, a flight simulation experiment and a real flight test are carried out, and we conduct a research on the performance of matching area planning and real-time positioning. The tests results show that the system can improve the ability of carrier to maneuver and the performance of real-time positioning. In addition, the system has a higher positioning accuracy and reliability than traditional TERCOM and SITAN methods. The position error is less than 50 m in acquisition mode and less than 18 m in tracking mode with the terrain elevation map of 25 m-resolution.

  16. InSAR Terrain Mapping Using ICESat Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, D.; Guritz, R.; Muskett, R.; Lingle, C.; Sauber, J.

    2006-12-01

    High quality geodetic ground control is time-consuming and costly to acquire in remote regions, where logistical operations are difficult to support. Hence, there is a strong interest in establishing new sources of ground control points that can be used in conjunction with Interferometric SAR (InSAR) for producing accurate digital elevation models (DEMs). In January 2003, NASA launched the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) into high polar orbit onboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). A major objective of this spaceborne laser altimeter system, with orbital coverage extending from 86° N to 86° S, is to provide elevation measurements of the Earth's topography with unprecedented accuracy. The intent of our project is to assess the accuracy of ICESat elevation data and evaluate its utility as ground control for topographic mapping. Our study area lies near Barrow, Alaska; 15,650 sq. km of coastal plain adjacent to the Arctic Ocean, characterized by vast expanses of tundra, lakes, and arctic wetlands of such low relief as to be nearly devoid of terrain features. Accuracy of the ICESat elevation measurements is assessed through comparison with differential GPS (DGPS) data, acquired along ICESat ground tracks crossing our study area. Using DGPS as the reference, ICESat yields a mean offset of -0.04 ± 0.15 m for fast static measurements on frozen tundra lakes and 0.22 ± 0.96 m for two kinematic DGPS profiles along the ICESat ground track. These results suggests that ICESat-derived elevations on the Arctic coastal plain are more than sufficiently accurate for use as ground control in DEM generation. The only clear limitation of the ICESat data is the non-uniform distribution of the ICESat tracks within the 33 day near-repeat sub-cycle. Although the coverage is poor at equatorial latitudes, track separation in the Arctic is on the order of tens of kilometers because of orbital convergence at the Poles. To test whether these data can be used

  17. Convective boundary layer heights over mountainous terrain – A review of concepts –

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan F.J. De Wekker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mountainous terrain exerts an important influence on the Earth's atmosphere and affects atmospheric transport and mixing at a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. The vertical scale of this transport and mixing is determined by the height of the atmospheric boundary layer, which is therefore an important parameter in air pollution studies, weather forecasting, climate modeling, and many other applications. It is recognized that the spatio-temporal structure of the daytime convective boundary layer (CBL height is strongly modified and more complex in hilly and mountainous terrain compared to flat terrain. While the CBL over flat terrain is mostly dominated by turbulent convection, advection from multi-scale thermally driven flows plays an important role for the CBL evolution over mountainous terrain. However, detailed observations of the CBL structure and understanding of the underlying processes are still limited. Characteristics of CBL heights in mountainous terrain are reviewed for dry, convective conditions. CBLs in valleys and basins, where hazardous accumulation of pollutants is of particular concern, are relatively well-understood compared to CBLs over slopes, ridges, or mountain peaks. Interests in the initiation of shallow and deep convection, and of budgets and long-range transport of air pollutants and trace gases, have triggered some recent studies on terrain induced exchange processes between the CBL and the overlying atmosphere. These studies have helped to gain more insight into CBL structure over complex mountainous terrain, but also show that the universal definition of CBL height over mountains remains an unresolved issue. The review summarizes the progress that has been made in documenting and understanding spatio-temporal behavior of CBL heights in mountainous terrain and concludes with a discussion of open research questions and opportunities for future research.

  18. Convective boundary layer heights over mountainous terrain - A review of concepts -

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wekker, Stephan; Kossmann, Meinolf

    2015-12-01

    Mountainous terrain exerts an important influence on the Earth's atmosphere and affects atmospheric transport and mixing at a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. The vertical scale of this transport and mixing is determined by the height of the atmospheric boundary layer, which is therefore an important parameter in air pollution studies, weather forecasting, climate modeling, and many other applications. It is recognized that the spatio-temporal structure of the daytime convective boundary layer (CBL) height is strongly modified and more complex in hilly and mountainous terrain compared to flat terrain. While the CBL over flat terrain is mostly dominated by turbulent convection, advection from multi-scale thermally driven flows plays an important role for the CBL evolution over mountainous terrain. However, detailed observations of the CBL structure and understanding of the underlying processes are still limited. Characteristics of CBL heights in mountainous terrain are reviewed for dry, convective conditions. CBLs in valleys and basins, where hazardous accumulation of pollutants is of particular concern, are relatively well-understood compared to CBLs over slopes, ridges, or mountain peaks. Interests in the initiation of shallow and deep convection, and of budgets and long-range transport of air pollutants and trace gases, have triggered some recent studies on terrain induced exchange processes between the CBL and the overlying atmosphere. These studies have helped to gain more insight into CBL structure over complex mountainous terrain, but also show that the universal definition of CBL height over mountains remains an unresolved issue. The review summarizes the progress that has been made in documenting and understanding spatio-temporal behavior of CBL heights in mountainous terrain and concludes with a discussion of open research questions and opportunities for future research.

  19. Evaluation of ERA-Interim precipitation data in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lu; Bernhardt, Matthias; Schulz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation controls a large variety of environmental processes, which is an essential input parameter for land surface models e.g. in hydrology, ecology and climatology. However, rain gauge networks provides the necessary information, are commonly sparse in complex terrains, especially in high mountainous regions. Reanalysis products (e.g. ERA-40 and NCEP-NCAR) as surrogate data are increasing applied in the past years. Although they are improving forward, previous studies showed that these products should be objectively evaluated due to their various uncertainties. In this study, we evaluated the precipitation data from ERA-Interim, which is a latest reanalysis product developed by ECMWF. ERA-Interim daily total precipitation are compared with high resolution gridded observation dataset (E-OBS) at 0.25°×0.25° grids for the period 1979-2010 over central Alps (45.5-48°N, 6.25-11.5°E). Wet or dry day is defined using different threshold values (0.5mm, 1mm, 5mm, 10mm and 20mm). The correspondence ratio (CR) is applied for frequency comparison, which is the ratio of days when precipitation occurs in both ERA-Interim and E-OBS dataset. The result shows that ERA-Interim captures precipitation occurrence very well with a range of CR from 0.80 to 0.97 for 0.5mm to 20mm thresholds. However, the bias of intensity increases with rising thresholds. Mean absolute error (MAE) varies between 4.5 mm day-1 and 9.5 mm day-1 in wet days for whole area. In term of mean annual cycle, ERA-Interim almost has the same standard deviation of the interannual variability of daily precipitation with E-OBS, 1.0 mm day-1. Significant wet biases happened in ERA-Interim throughout warm season (May to August) and dry biases in cold season (November to February). The spatial distribution of mean annual daily precipitation shows that ERA-Interim significant underestimates precipitation intensity in high mountains and northern flank of Alpine chain from November to March while pronounced

  20. Delineation of Fractured Aquifer Using Numerical Analysis (Factor of Resistivity Data in a Granite Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolland Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In hard rock terrain, fractured aquifers comprise the major source of groundwater availability where the phreatic aquifer is desaturated. Identification of fracture zones in hard rock terrain and potential groundwater source delineation had been a perennial problem in hydrology. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the study over a small watershed area, in a granite terrain, wherein an attempt was made to delineate and map the fractured aquifer using numerical (factor analysis of the conventional vertical electrical sounding data, which was obscure in curve matching technique. This numerical approach in concatenation with resistivity imaging or other techniques would prove to be an effective tool in groundwater exploration.

  1. A vision-based terrain morphology estimation model inspired by the avian hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Oyekan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we take inspiration from the avian hippocampus and develop a preliminary model for estimating a terrain׳s morphology using visually detected features on the terrain. This could then be used to localise a portable micro-UAV during a demining task for humanitarian purposes in third world countries affected by buried land mines from previous wars. Our goal is that in future, the presented model and algorithm in this work would enable effective coverage of an affected area using the visual information obtained from the environment.

  2. Terrain and drift influences on snow surface aerodynamics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, A.; Leonard, K. C.; Manes, C.; Lehning, M.

    2010-12-01

    It has long been recognised in many branches of aeolian research that the process of sediment transport by the wind alters the surface aerodynamics. This effect is less clear over snow surfaces, particularly because of the difficulty of accurately identifying the contribution of surface topography and surface change. We present a synopsis of data from a series of experiments carried out over the last 5 years in a wind tunnel, in a test site in the European Alps and in Antarctica. This data covers both snow surface aerodynamic properties and drift activity and required the development of laboratory and field techniques to measure and better understand snow surface aerodynamics and drift activity. Our data allow the different contributions of snow drift and terrain to be separated, revealing that in some situations drift may significantly modify the apparent aerodynamic properties of the underlying surface. This effect is similar to that seen for soil or sand transport. A comparison with established land-surface classification methods of predicting roughness length shows that these effects can be important when assessing wind fields over snow.

  3. Unevenness Point Descriptor for Terrain Analysis in Mobile Robot Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Bellone

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of imaging sensors that produce a three-dimensional representation of the environment has become an efficient solution to increase the degree of perception of autonomous mobile robots. Accurate and dense 3D point clouds can be generated from traditional stereo systems and laser scanners or from the new generation of RGB-D cameras, representing a versatile, reliable and cost-effective solution that is rapidly gaining interest within the robotics community. For autonomous mobile robots, it is critical to assess the traversability of the surrounding environment, especially when driving across natural terrain. In this paper, a novel approach to detect traversable and non-traversable regions of the environment from a depth image is presented that could enhance mobility and safety through integration with localization, control and planning methods. The proposed algorithm is based on the analysis of the normal vector of a surface obtained through Principal Component Analysis and it leads to the definition of a novel, so defined, Unevenness Point Descriptor. Experimental results, obtained with vehicles operating in indoor and outdoor environments, are presented to validate this approach.

  4. Detecting Terrain Stoniness From Airborne Laser Scanning Data †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paavo Nevalainen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Three methods to estimate the presence of ground surface stones from publicly available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS point clouds are presented. The first method approximates the local curvature by local linear multi-scale fitting, and the second method uses Discrete-Differential Gaussian curvature based on the ground surface triangulation. The third baseline method applies Laplace filtering to Digital Elevation Model (DEM in a 2 m regular grid data. All methods produce an approximate Gaussian curvature distribution which is then vectorized and classified by logistic regression. Two training data sets consisted of 88 and 674 polygons of mass-flow deposits, respectively. The locality of the polygon samples is a sparse canopy boreal forest, where the density of ALS ground returns is sufficiently high to reveal information about terrain micro-topography. The surface stoniness of each polygon sample was categorized for supervised learning by expert observation on the site. The leave-pair-out (L2O cross-validation of the local linear fit method results in the area under curve A U C = 0 . 74 and A U C = 0 . 85 on two data sets, respectively. This performance can be expected to suit real world applications such as detecting coarse-grained sediments for infrastructure construction. A wall-to-wall predictor based on the study was demonstrated.

  5. Detecting changes in terrain using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Zia-ur; Hines, Glenn D.; Logan, Michael J.

    2005-05-01

    In recent years, small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have been used for more than the thrill they bring to model airplane enthusiasts. Their flexibility and low cost have made them a viable option for low-altitude reconnaissance. In a recent effort, we acquired video data from a small UAV during several passes over the same flight path. The objective of the exercise was to determine if objects had been added to the terrain along the flight path between flight passes. Several issues accrue to this simple-sounding problem: (1) lighting variations may cause false detection of objects because of changes in shadow orientation and strength between passes; (2) variations in the flight path due to wind-speed, and heading change may cause misalignment of gross features making the task of detecting changes between the frames very difficult; and (3) changes in the aircraft orientation and altitude lead to a change in size of the features from frame-to-frame making a comparison difficult. In this paper, we discuss our efforts to perform this change detection, and the lessons that we learned from this exercise.

  6. Complex terrain experiments in the New European Wind Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelou, N.; Callies, D.; Cantero, E.; Arroyo, R. Chávez; Courtney, M.; Cuxart, J.; Dellwik, E.; Gottschall, J.; Ivanell, S.; Kühn, P.; Lea, G.; Matos, J. C.; Palma, J. M. L. M.; Peña, A.; Rodrigo, J. Sanz; Söderberg, S.; Vasiljevic, N.; Rodrigues, C. Veiga

    2017-01-01

    The New European Wind Atlas project will create a freely accessible wind atlas covering Europe and Turkey, develop the model chain to create the atlas and perform a series of experiments on flow in many different kinds of complex terrain to validate the models. This paper describes the experiments of which some are nearly completed while others are in the planning stage. All experiments focus on the flow properties that are relevant for wind turbines, so the main focus is the mean flow and the turbulence at heights between 40 and 300 m. Also extreme winds, wind shear and veer, and diurnal and seasonal variations of the wind are of interest. Common to all the experiments is the use of Doppler lidar systems to supplement and in some cases replace completely meteorological towers. Many of the lidars will be equipped with scan heads that will allow for arbitrary scan patterns by several synchronized systems. Two pilot experiments, one in Portugal and one in Germany, show the value of using multiple synchronized, scanning lidar, both in terms of the accuracy of the measurements and the atmospheric physical processes that can be studied. The experimental data will be used for validation of atmospheric flow models and will by the end of the project be freely available. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Wind energy in complex terrains’. PMID:28265025

  7. Terrain modelling and motion planning for an autonomous exploration rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, F.; Benoliel, S.; Faugeras, O.; Grandjean, P.; Hayard, M.; Simeon, T.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of planetary exploration missions using rovers, the French national agency CNES, with a consortium of European laboratories and industrial concerns, has initiated the Eureka project, 'Illustration of an Autonomous Robot for the Exploration of Space' (IARES). IARES is a demonstrator composed of a rover and a ground station, linked by telemetry and telecommand. It is aimed at verifying, on earth, robotic concepts developed by the RISP group of French laboratories (LAAS, INRIA, CERT, LETI) to perform scientific missions such as autonomous terrain sample collecting over large areas. To cope with the actual needs of planet exploration, IARES suitability is assessed through constraints on limited bandwidth, time delay and on-board resources. This autonomy relies heavily on robust onboard trajectory generation capabilities. This paper presents the main functions of the IARES navigation sub-system and shows how they are combined to allow movement in Mars-like environments. Section 2 gives an overall description of the IARES system. Section 3 details the functions of the Navigation sub-system, and finally, section 4 illustrates with a simple example the use of these functions.

  8. Aerodynamic performances of cruise missile flying above local terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A.; Saad, M. R.; Che Idris, A.; Rahman, M. R. A.; Sujipto, S.

    2016-10-01

    Cruise missile can be classified as a smart bomb and also Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) due to its ability to move and manoeuvre by itself without a pilot. Cruise missile flies in constant velocity in cruising stage. Malaysia is one of the consumers of cruise missiles that are imported from other nations, which can have distinct geographic factors including their local terrains compared to Malaysia. Some of the aerodynamic performances of missile such as drag and lift coefficients can be affected by the local geographic conditions in Malaysia, which is different from the origin nation. Therefore, a detailed study must be done to get aerodynamic performance of cruise missiles that operate in Malaysia. The effect of aerodynamic angles such as angle of attack and side slip can be used to investigate the aerodynamic performances of cruise missile. Hence, subsonic wind tunnel testings were conducted to obtain the aerodynamic performances of the missile at various angle of attack and sideslip angles. Smoke visualization was also performed to visualize the behaviour of flow separation. The optimum angle of attack found was at α=21° and side slip, β=10° for optimum pitching and yawing motion of cruise missile.

  9. Rapid Traversability Assessment in 2.5D Grid-based Map on Rough Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Huang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a rapid traversability assessment approach based on an extended 2.5D grid-based representaion of the rough terrain. Stereo vision system is used to perceive the environment surrounding robot. Conventional 2D, 3D and other 2.5D grid maps determine the traversability indices of the grids directly from the sensor feedback, while our approach attempts to address the indices of terrain from multiple grids instead. By analyzing the properties of multiple grids that the robot is to traverse, passable grids are distinguished, which also takes the robot's size into account. Fuzzy logic framework is applied to extract traversabiltiy indices from the terrain characteristics. A soccer robot equipped with a stereo vision system is adopted for experiments. The results show that our map is capable of speeding the process of traversability assessment and providing an autonomous mobile robot with a appropriate representation of 3D uneven terrain profile.

  10. TERRAIN DATA, CITY OF SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, EL DORADO COUNTY, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  11. TERRAIN submission for Rock River Watershed Risk Map, Walworth County Portion

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for City of Scappoose PAL, Columbia County OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. Adaptive Pulsed Laser Line Extraction for Terrain Reconstruction using a Dynamic Vision Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eBrandli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor’s ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3mW at a distance of 45cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2mm.

  14. Seasonal variation of wind direction fluctuations vs Pasquill stabilities in complex terrain

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Murthy, K.P.R.V.

    The authors have studied the seasonal variation of sigma theta (the standard deviation of wind direction fluctuations) vs Pasquill stabilities over complex terrain. It is found that the values of sigma theta are quite high in the month of April...

  15. DCS Terrain Submission for Sauk County, Wisconsin USA (Baraboo River Project)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain Submission for Vernon County, Wisconsin USA (Baraboo River Project)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. Quality analysis of digital terrain models for the test area Zlatibor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajat Branislav

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital terrain models (DTM have recently become products which substitute standard methods for the terrain relief presentation. As a part of a Geographic Information Systems (GIS they represent not only a data base related to heights that are used for terrain visualization by the means of interpolation routines for the generation of contours, or terrain presentation by the 3D meshes, but also a useful data base in many GIS and other applications. Numerous users of DTMs should also be supplied with information of DTM quality. This is obtained by the statistical analysis of residuals between generated height and heights of the control points called ground truth. The results of this analysis might be compulsorily part of metadata base for all DTMs products.

  18. Wind Erosion of Layered Sediments on Mars, and the Role of Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, L. J.; Kite, E. S.; Michaels, T. I.

    2017-10-01

    Most sedimentary rocks on Mars exist as mounds in craters and canyons. To investigate the role of terrain in wind erosion, and the formation and evolution of these mounds, we combine mesoscale model output with a landscape evolution model.

  19. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed layer in flow over complex terrain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the...

  20. Pitted terrains around Marcia crater on Vesta: strong eucritic absorptions and their implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebner, T.; Otto, K.; Jaumann, R.; Schröder, S. E.; Krohn, K.; Matz, K.-D.; Stephan, K.; Preusker, F.; Roatsch, T.

    2017-09-01

    On the asteroid Vesta, we found that some of the pitted terrains around the crater Marcia exhibit strong eucritic-like absorption features and are spectrally distinct from their immediate surrounding.

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for City of Washougal PAL, Clark County WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. VBMP Digital Terrain Models - 2006/2007 (VA State Plane South)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  3. Latent heat flux measurements over complex terrain by airborne water vapour and wind lidars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kiemle, Christoph; Wirth, Martin; Fix, Andreas; Rahm, Stephan; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Vertical profiles of the latent heat flux in a convective boundary layer (CBL) are obtained for the first time over complex terrain with airborne water vapour differential absorption lidar and Doppler wind lidar...

  4. TERRAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, MI CITY OF ROMULUS 10-05-2466P PMR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS Terrain Submission for City of Kelso PAL, Cowlitz County WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. Ames Stereo Pipeline and LROC ASU Digital Terrain Model (DTM) Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H. M.; Awumah, A. A.; Henriksen, M. R.; Manheim, M. R.; Cisneros, E.; Wagner, R. V.; Robinson, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    Comparison between NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) and ASU LROC teams digital terrain model (DTM) products made from the same NAC stereo pairs. Using absolute, relative, and qualitative measurements, we provide recommendations for DTM product use.

  7. I/O-Efficient Computation of Water Flow Across a Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars Allan; Revsbæk, Morten; Zeh, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Consider rain falling at a uniform rate onto a terrain T represented as a triangular irregular network. Over time, water collects in the basins of T, forming lakes that spill into adjacent basins. Our goal is to compute, for each terrain vertex, the time this vertex is flooded (covered by water......). We present an I/O-efficient algorithm that solves this problem using O(sort(X) log (X/M) + sort(N)) I/Os, where N is the number of terrain vertices, X is the number of pits of the terrain, sort(N) is the cost of sorting N data items, and M is the size of the computer's main memory. Our algorithm...

  8. DCS Terrain Submission for City of Longview PAL, Cowlitz County WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. Path Planning Software and Graphics Interface for an Autonomous Vehicle, Accounting for Terrain Features

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hurezeanu, Vlad

    2000-01-01

    .... This vehicle performs tasks to include surveying fields, laying mines, and teleoperation. The capability of the vehicle will be increased if its supporting software plans paths that take into account the terrain features...

  10. TERRAIN, Lake county, Illinois, USA-- BOGUS METADATA SEE NON-FEMA PROFILE METADATA PROVIDED BY VENDOR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. Pitted Terrain on Vesta and Implications for the Presence of Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denevi, B. W.; Blewett, D. T.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Garry, W. B.; Gaskell, R. W.; Le Corre, L.; Li, J.-Y.; Marchi, S.; McCoy, T. J.; Nathues, A.; O'Brien, D. P.; Petro, N. E.; Pieters, C. M.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Sunshine, J. M.; Tosi, F.; Williams, D. A.; Wyrick, D.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the origin of unusual pitted terrain on asteroid Vesta, revealed in images from the Dawn spacecraft. Pitted terrain is characterized by irregular rimless depressions found in and around several impact craters, with a distinct morphology not observed on other airless bodies. Similar terrain is associated with numerous martian craters, where pits are thought to form through degassing of volatile-bearing material heated by the impact. Pitted terrain on Vesta may have formed in a similar manner, which indicates that portions of the surface contain a relatively large volatile component. Exogenic materials, such as water-rich carbonaceous chondrites, may be the source of volatiles, suggesting that impactor materials are preserved locally in relatively high abundance on Vesta and that impactor composition has played an important role in shaping the asteroid’s geology.

  12. La recherche sur le terrain ouvre des horizons au Vietnam | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Vivre les réalités de la recherche sur le terrain voilà ce que Claire Le Barbenchon, titulaire d'une bourse de recherche du CRDI en 2015, se remémore avec affection. « La recherche sur le terrain était une toute nouvelle expérience, mentionne-t-elle, et ce dans un pays encore inexploré pour moi : le Vietnam. »

  13. Proposal of a personal mobility vehicle capable of traversing rough terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shuro

    2014-05-01

    Personal mobility vehicles (PMVs) are now being actively developed. Most PMVs are wheel-driven, a mode of transport notable for its efficiency. However, such vehicles tend to have little mobility over rough terrain. We propose a new type of PMV, a vehicle that traverses relatively smooth terrain by wheel but is capable of negotiating rough terrain by using its wheel mechanisms as legs. The PMV we propose is intended to provide its user with a degree of outdoor mobility in daily urban life, say when going to a neighbourhood shop or simply taking a stroll. We do not consider elevators and other infrastructural elements that should be barrier-free, but rather focus on unimproved terrains that act as barriers to transport; for example, the steps that often act as de facto boundaries around building entrances. We developed a new type of PMV and implemented a new algorithm to realize the capability to move on rough terrain. We experimentally compared the capability of a commercially available PMV and the developed PMV. Through an experiment involving the traversing of a representative terrain and a comparative experiment using a stock PMV, we demonstrated the features of the proposed PMV. We developed a single-seat personal mobility vehicle, the RT-Mover PType 3, which is capable of traversing steps and other unimproved terrain often found within an urban environment. RT-Mover PType 3 can handle oblique slopes and other terrain that can be quite difficult to negotiate with a conventional electric wheelchair, thus enabling individuals with impaired mobility to move freely about urban environments. The current vehicle is primarily intended for the active elderly and other individuals in fairly good health, although, through further research and development, we do hope to extend its usefulness to those with substantial mobility impairments.

  14. Slip-based terrain estimation with a skid-steer vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Giulio; Galati, Rocco

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a novel approach for online terrain characterisation is presented using a skid-steer vehicle. In the context of this research, terrain characterisation refers to the estimation of physical parameters that affects the terrain ability to support vehicular motion. These parameters are inferred from the modelling of the kinematic and dynamic behaviour of a skid-steer vehicle that reveals the underlying relationships governing the vehicle-terrain interaction. The concept of slip track is introduced as a measure of the slippage experienced by the vehicle during turning motion. The proposed terrain estimation system includes common onboard sensors, that is, wheel encoders, electrical current sensors and yaw rate gyroscope. Using these components, the system can characterise terrain online during normal vehicle operations. Experimental results obtained from different surfaces are presented to validate the system in the field showing its effectiveness and potential benefits to implement adaptive driving assistance systems or to automatically update the parameters of onboard control and planning algorithms.

  15. Terrain Extraction by Integrating Terrestrial Laser Scanner Data and Spectral Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. L.; Halim, S.; Zulkepli, M.; Azwan, A. M.; Tang, W. L.; Chong, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    The extraction of true terrain points from unstructured laser point cloud data is an important process in order to produce an accurate digital terrain model (DTM). However, most of these spatial filtering methods just utilizing the geometrical data to discriminate the terrain points from nonterrain points. The point cloud filtering method also can be improved by using the spectral information available with some scanners. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of using the three-channel (red, green and blue) of the colour image captured from built-in digital camera which is available in some Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) for terrain extraction. In this study, the data acquisition was conducted at a mini replica landscape in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai campus using Leica ScanStation C10. The spectral information of the coloured point clouds from selected sample classes are extracted for spectral analysis. The coloured point clouds which within the corresponding preset spectral threshold are identified as that specific feature point from the dataset. This process of terrain extraction is done through using developed Matlab coding. Result demonstrates that a higher spectral resolution passive image is required in order to improve the output. This is because low quality of the colour images captured by the sensor contributes to the low separability in spectral reflectance. In conclusion, this study shows that, spectral information is capable to be used as a parameter for terrain extraction.

  16. Analysis of loads on wind turbines in complex terrain wind farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, K.; Markkilde Petersen, S. (The Test Station for Wind Turbines, Risoe National laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark)); Lading, P.; Sangill, O. (Windgineering ApS, Centre for Advanced Technology, Roskilde (Denmark))

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes structural load analysis of wind turbines erected in wind farms in complex terrain. The analysis is based on measurements on two Danwin turbines in Alta Mesa, San Gorgonia Pass California. The wind climate in wind farms in mountainous terrain differs significantly from wind conditions in homogeneous terrain, and this influences the turbine loading. Special attention is paid to characterize this difference by the wind turbulence characteristics. The power spectrum of the longitudinal turbulence component is investigated, and the measured wind conditions are analyzed in relation to what is expected for the free flow in homogenous terrain. The structural response is characterized by the main loads, i.e. blade and rotor loads. The response is related to the actual wind inflow. The relative importance of the deterministic and stochastic load-generating mechanisms is investigated. The azimuthal variations of the loads are calculated, and the load signals are spectral analyzed. The fatigue loads are estimated by Rainflow counting at different operational conditions and the resulting lifetime accumulated load spectra are calculated on the basis of wind distribution and turbulence level. The differences between lifetime fatigue loads seen in wind farms in complex terrain and wind farms in homogenous terrain are discussed. The accumulated load spectra are compared to the Danish Standard for Loads and Safety of Wind Turbines, and extensions to this standard are suggested for wind turbines erected in wind farm clusters. (au) (17 refs.).

  17. Millimeter-wave Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Data Imaging Based on Terrain Surface Projection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shun-jun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter-wave Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR has smaller size, lower weight, and higher resolution compared with other bands. Thus, it has become a hot research topic. However, owing to its shorter wavelength, millimeter-wave InSAR data processing requires high-precision measurements of platform motion. For nonideal trajectories, traditional methods face difficulties in echo imaging and interferogram extraction. In addition, existing methods mainly produce SAR images based on plane projection. When the terrain changes abruptly, these methods may cause strong interferometric phase unwrapping and geometric distortion in SAR images. To overcome the abovementioned disadvantages of conventional methods in millimeter-wave InSAR imaging, an approach based on terrain surface projection is proposed. The echoes of different antennas are projected on the same terrain surface space for data imaging and interferogram extraction. In addition, the relation between terrain elevation and interferometric phase is derived. Simulations and experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method; furthermore, the proposed approach improves the precision of interferometric phase extraction in complex motion conditions, while minimizing geometric distortion and phase wrapping in rough terrain, which is more conducive to terrain description and elevation inversion.

  18. An ice-rich flow origin for the banded terrain in the Hellas basin, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diot, X.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Guallini, L.; Schlunegger, F.; Norton, K. P.; Thomas, N.; Sutton, S.; Grindrod, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The interior of Hellas Basin displays a complex landscape and a variety of geomorphological domains. One of these domains, the enigmatic banded terrain covers much of the northwestern part of the basin. We use high-resolution (Context Camera and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) Digital Terrain Models to show that most of the complex viscous flowing behavior exhibited by the banded terrain is controlled by topography and flow-like interactions between neighboring banded terrain. Furthermore, the interior of the basin hosts several landforms suggestive of the presence of near-surface ice, which include polygonal patterns with elongated pits, scalloped depressions, isolated mounds, and collapse structures. We suggest that thermal contraction cracking and sublimation of near-surface ice are responsible for the formation and the development of most of the ice-related landforms documented in Hellas. The relatively pristine form, lack of superposed craters, and strong association with the banded terrain, suggest an Amazonian (water) expected in Hellas and summertime temperatures often exceeding the melting point of water ice suggest that the basin may have recorded relatively "temperate" climatic conditions compared to other places on Mars. Therefore, the potentially ice-rich banded terrain may have deformed with lower viscosity and stresses compared to other locations on Mars, which may account for its unique morphology.

  19. Simulating Sand Behavior through Terrain Subdivision and Particle Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, M.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in computer graphics, GPUs, and parallel processing hardware have provided researchers with new methods to visualize scientific data. In fact, these advances have spurred new research opportunities between computer graphics and other disciplines, such as Earth sciences. Through collaboration, Earth and planetary scientists have benefited by using these advances in hardware technology to process large amounts of data for visualization and analysis. At Oregon State University, we are collaborating with the Oregon Space Grant and IGERT Ecosystem Informatics programs to investigate techniques for simulating the behavior of sand. In addition, we have also been collaborating with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's DARTS Lab to exchange ideas on our research. The DARTS Lab specializes in the simulation of planetary vehicles, such as the Mars rovers. One aspect of their work is testing these vehicles in a virtual "sand box" to test their performance in different environments. Our research builds upon this idea to create a sand simulation framework to allow for more complex and diverse environments. As a basis for our framework, we have focused on planetary environments, such as the harsh, sandy regions on Mars. To evaluate our framework, we have used simulated planetary vehicles, such as a rover, to gain insight into the performance and interaction between the surface sand and the vehicle. Unfortunately, simulating the vast number of individual sand particles and their interaction with each other has been a computationally complex problem in the past. However, through the use of high-performance computing, we have developed a technique to subdivide physically active terrain regions across a large landscape. To achieve this, we only subdivide terrain regions where sand particles are actively participating with another object or force, such as a rover wheel. This is similar to a Level of Detail (LOD) technique, except that the density of subdivisions are determined by

  20. Close-Range Sensing Techniques in Alpine Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutzinger, M.; Höfle, B.; Lindenbergh, R.; Oude Elberink, S.; Pirotti, F.; Sailer, R.; Scaioni, M.; Stötter, J.; Wujanz, D.

    2016-06-01

    Early career researchers such as PhD students are a main driving force of scientific research and are for a large part responsible for research innovation. They work on specialized topics within focused research groups that have a limited number of members, but might also have limited capacity in terms of lab equipment. This poses a serious challenge for educating such students as it is difficult to group a sufficient number of them to enable efficient knowledge transfer. To overcome this problem, the Innsbruck Summer School of Alpine Research 2015 on close-range sensing techniques in Alpine terrain was organized in Obergurgl, Austria, by an international team from several universities and research centres. Of the applicants a group of 40 early career researchers were selected with interest in about ten types of specialized surveying tools, i.e. laser scanners, a remotely piloted aircraft system, a thermal camera, a backpack mobile mapping system and different grade photogrammetric equipment. During the one-week summer school, students were grouped according to their personal preference to work with one such type of equipment under guidance of an expert lecturer. All students were required to capture and process field data on a mountain-related theme like landslides or rock glaciers. The work on the assignments lasted the whole week but was interspersed with lectures on selected topics by invited experts. The final task of the summer school participants was to present and defend their results to their peers, lecturers and other colleagues in a symposium-like setting. Here we present the framework and content of this summer school which brought together scientists from close-range sensing and environmental and geosciences.

  1. Hexographic Method of Complex Town-Planning Terrain Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudyakov, A. Ju

    2017-11-01

    The article deals with the vital problem of a complex town-planning analysis based on the “hexographic” graphic analytic method, makes a comparison with conventional terrain estimate methods and contains the method application examples. It discloses a procedure of the author’s estimate of restrictions and building of a mathematical model which reflects not only conventional town-planning restrictions, but also social and aesthetic aspects of the analyzed territory. The method allows one to quickly get an idea of the territory potential. It is possible to use an unlimited number of estimated factors. The method can be used for the integrated assessment of urban areas. In addition, it is possible to use the methods of preliminary evaluation of the territory commercial attractiveness in the preparation of investment projects. The technique application results in simple informative graphics. Graphical interpretation is straightforward from the experts. A definite advantage is the free perception of the subject results as they are not prepared professionally. Thus, it is possible to build a dialogue between professionals and the public on a new level allowing to take into account the interests of various parties. At the moment, the method is used as a tool for the preparation of integrated urban development projects at the Department of Architecture in Federal State Autonomous Educational Institution of Higher Education “South Ural State University (National Research University)”, FSAEIHE SUSU (NRU). The methodology is included in a course of lectures as the material on architectural and urban design for architecture students. The same methodology was successfully tested in the preparation of business strategies for the development of some territories in the Chelyabinsk region. This publication is the first in a series of planned activities developing and describing the methodology of hexographical analysis in urban and architectural practice. It is also

  2. CONTEXT-BASED URBAN TERRAIN RECONSTRUCTION FROM IMAGES AND VIDEOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bulatov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection of buildings and vegetation, and even more reconstruction of urban terrain from sequences of aerial images and videos is known to be a challenging task. It has been established that those methods that have as input a high-quality Digital Surface Model (DSM, are more straight-forward and produce more robust and reliable results than those image-based methods that require matching line segments or even whole regions. This motivated us to develop a new dense matching technique for DSM generation that is capable of simultaneous integration of multiple images in the reconstruction process. The DSMs generated by this new multi-image matching technique can be used for urban object extraction. In the first contribution of this paper, two examples of external sources of information added to the reconstruction pipeline will be shown. The GIS layers are used for recognition of streets and suppressing false alarms in the depth maps that were caused by moving vehicles while the near infrared channel is applied for separating vegetation from buildings. Three examples of data sets including both UAV-borne video sequences with a relatively high number of frames and high-resolution (10 cm ground sample distance data sets consisting of (few spatial-temporarily diverse images from large-format aerial frame cameras, will be presented. By an extensive quantitative evaluation of the Vaihingen block from the ISPRS benchmark on urban object detection, it will become clear that our procedure allows a straight-forward, efficient, and reliable instantiation of 3D city models.

  3. Mechanisms initiating deep convection over complex terrain during COPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kottmeier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Precipitating convection in a mountain region of moderate topography is investigated, with particular emphasis on its initiation in response to boundary-layer and mid- and upper-tropospheric forcing mechanisms. The data used in the study are from COPS (Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study that took place in southwestern Germany and eastern France in the summer of 2007. It is found that the initiation of precipitating convection can be roughly classified as being due to either: (i surface heating and low-level flow convergence; (ii surface heating and moisture supply overcoming convective inhibition during latent and/or potential instability; or (iii mid-tropospheric dynamical processes due to mesoscale convergence lines and forced mean vertical motion. These phenomena have to be adequately represented in models in order to improve quantitative precipitation forecast. Selected COPS cases are analysed and classified into these initiation categories. Although only a subset of COPS data (mainly radiosondes, surface weather stations, radar and satellite data are used here, it is shown that convective systems are captured in considerable detail by sensor synergy. Convergence lines were observed by Doppler radar in the location where deep convection is triggered several hours later. The results suggest that in many situations, observations of the location and timing of convergence lines will facilitate the nowcasting of convection. Further on, forecasting of the initiation of convection is significantly complicated if advection of potentially convective air masses over changing terrain features plays a major role. The passage of a frontal structure over the Vosges - Rhine valley - Black Forest orography was accompanied by an intermediate suppression of convection over the wide Rhine valley. Further downstream, an intensification of convection was observed over the Black Forest due to differential surface heating, a convergence line

  4. Spatial distribution of thermokarst terrain in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, L. M.; Mann, D. H.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2016-11-01

    In landscapes underlain by ice-rich permafrost, the development of thermokarst landforms can have drastic impacts on ecosystem processes and human infrastructure. Here we describe the distribution of thermokarst landforms in the continuous permafrost zone of Arctic Alaska, analyze linkages to the underlying surficial geology, and discuss the vulnerability of different types of landscapes to future thaw. We identified nine major thermokarst landforms and then mapped their distributions in twelve representative study areas totaling 300-km2. These study areas differ in their geologic history, permafrost-ice content, and ground thermal regime. Results show that 63% of the entire study area is occupied by thermokarst landforms and that the distribution of thermokarst landforms and overall landscape complexity varies markedly with surficial geology. Areas underlain by ice-rich marine silt are the most affected by thermokarst (97% of total area), whereas areas underlain by glacial drift are least affected (14%). Drained thermokarst-lake basins are the most widespread thermokarst landforms, covering 33% of the entire study region, with greater prevalence in areas of marine silt (48% coverage), marine sand (47%), and aeolian silt (34%). Thermokarst-lakes are the second most common thermokarst landform, covering 16% of the study region, with highest coverage in areas underlain by marine silt (39% coverage). Thermokarst troughs and pits cover 7% of the study region and are the third most prevalent thermokarst landform. They are most common in areas underlain by deltaic sands and gravels (18% coverage) and marine sand (12%). Alas valleys are widespread in areas of aeolian silt (14%) located in gradually sloping uplands. Areas of marine silt have been particularly vulnerable to thaw in the past because they are ice-rich and have low-gradient topography facilitating the repeated development of thermokarst-lakes. In the future, ice-rich aeolian, upland terrain (yedoma) will be

  5. AERIAL TERRAIN MAPPING USING UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Tahar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks into the latest achievement in the low-cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV technology in their capacity to map the semi-development areas. The objectives of this study are to establish a new methodology or a new algorithm in image registration during interior orientation process and to determine the accuracy of the photogrammetric products by using UAV images. Recently, UAV technology has been used in several applications such as mapping, agriculture and surveillance. The aim of this study is to scrutinize the usage of UAV to map the semi-development areas. The performance of the low cost UAV mapping study was established on a study area with two image processing methods so that the results could be comparable. A non-metric camera was attached at the bottom of UAV and it was used to capture images at both sites after it went through several calibration steps. Calibration processes were carried out to determine focal length, principal distance, radial lens distortion, tangential lens distortion and affinity. A new method in image registration for a non-metric camera is discussed in this paper as a part of new methodology of this study. This method used the UAV Global Positioning System (GPS onboard to register the UAV image for interior orientation process. Check points were established randomly at both sites using rapid static Global Positioning System. Ground control points are used for exterior orientation process, and check point is used for accuracy assessment of photogrammetric product. All acquired images were processed in a photogrammetric software. Two methods of image registration were applied in this study, namely, GPS onboard registration and ground control point registration. Both registrations were processed by using photogrammetric software and the result is discussed. Two results were produced in this study, which are the digital orthophoto and the digital terrain model. These results were analyzed by using the root

  6. Aerial Terrain Mapping Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahar, K. N.

    2012-08-01

    This paper looks into the latest achievement in the low-cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology in their capacity to map the semi-development areas. The objectives of this study are to establish a new methodology or a new algorithm in image registration during interior orientation process and to determine the accuracy of the photogrammetric products by using UAV images. Recently, UAV technology has been used in several applications such as mapping, agriculture and surveillance. The aim of this study is to scrutinize the usage of UAV to map the semi-development areas. The performance of the low cost UAV mapping study was established on a study area with two image processing methods so that the results could be comparable. A non-metric camera was attached at the bottom of UAV and it was used to capture images at both sites after it went through several calibration steps. Calibration processes were carried out to determine focal length, principal distance, radial lens distortion, tangential lens distortion and affinity. A new method in image registration for a non-metric camera is discussed in this paper as a part of new methodology of this study. This method used the UAV Global Positioning System (GPS) onboard to register the UAV image for interior orientation process. Check points were established randomly at both sites using rapid static Global Positioning System. Ground control points are used for exterior orientation process, and check point is used for accuracy assessment of photogrammetric product. All acquired images were processed in a photogrammetric software. Two methods of image registration were applied in this study, namely, GPS onboard registration and ground control point registration. Both registrations were processed by using photogrammetric software and the result is discussed. Two results were produced in this study, which are the digital orthophoto and the digital terrain model. These results were analyzed by using the root mean square

  7. Climbing Mt. Sharp: Maximizing Curiosity's Science Over Traversable Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraeman, A. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bellutta, P.; Sletten, R. S.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    As Curiosity transitions from the plains of Gale Crater to the flanks of Mt. Sharp, the rover will begin to encounter material and terrains that could present greater mobility challenges. These challenges include the presence of significantly steeper slopes and large dunes that have the potential to embed the vehicle. Strategic path planning during this phase of the mission will therefore require carefully selecting a traversable route that is both time-efficient and that will provide access to the most scientifically rewarding targets. We consider possible solutions to this optimization problem by examining multiple orbital data sets in order to locate likely mobility hazards and to select potential science waypoints for future in situ investigation. High resolution HiRISE monochromatic images and digital elevation models show filled craters, rock fields, areas with slopes too steep for the rover to traverse, and other possible mobility obstacles on the northwest flank of Mt. Sharp. Using this context, we review accessibility to scientific targets on Mt. Sharp that have been previously discussed in landing site workshop presentations and peer-reviewed publications. Additionally, we identify new targets using detailed geologic maps combined with oversampled CRISM observations that provide mineralogical information at unprecedented high spatial resolutions (up to 6 m/pixel). For example, the spatially sharpened CRISM spectral data show a localized hematite deposit that is associated with the upper-most stratum of a ridge which is located ~3km from the rover's entry point to Mt. Sharp. This deposit may represent a previously habitable environment and is therefore a high priority target for in situ investigation. In order to study the hematite and also to eventually access the phyllosilicate-bearing trough that is located directly behind the ridge, Curiosity will have to cross this ridge, but the ridge edges are often defined by regions with slopes that are too steep

  8. Stochastic Cascade Dynamical Downscaling of Precipitation over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas, A.; Duffaut, L. E.; Jones, C.; Carvalho, L. V.; Carbajal, M.; Heidinger, H.; Quiroz, R.

    2013-12-01

    spatial and temporal variability of rainfall between the rainfall fields obtained from the rain gauge network and those generated by the simulation model. The potential advantages of this methodology are discussed.Stochastic Cascade Dynamical Downscaling of Precipitation over Complex Terrain

  9. Spatial distribution of thermokarst terrain in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Louise; Mann, Dan H; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    In landscapes underlain by ice-rich permafrost, the development of thermokarst landforms can have drastic impacts on ecosystem processes and human infrastructure. Here we describe the distribution of thermokarst landforms in the continuous permafrost zone of Arctic Alaska, analyze linkages to the underlying surficial geology, and discuss the vulnerability of different types of landscapes to future thaw. We identified nine major thermokarst landforms and then mapped their distributions in twelve representative study areas totaling 300-km2. These study areas differ in their geologic history, permafrost-ice content, and ground thermal regime. Results show that 63% of the entire study area is occupied by thermokarst landforms and that the distribution of thermokarst landforms and overall landscape complexity varies markedly with surficial geology. Areas underlain by ice-rich marine silt are the most affected by thermokarst (97% of total area), whereas areas underlain by glacial drift are least affected (14%). Drained thermokarst-lake basins are the most widespread thermokarst landforms, covering 33% of the entire study region, with greater prevalence in areas of marine silt (48% coverage), marine sand (47%), and aeolian silt (34%). Thermokarst-lakes are the second most common thermokarst landform, covering 16% of the study region, with highest coverage in areas underlain by marine silt (39% coverage). Thermokarst troughs and pits cover 7% of the study region and are the third most prevalent thermokarst landform. They are most common in areas underlain by deltaic sands and gravels (18% coverage) and marine sand (12%). Alas valleys are widespread in areas of aeolian silt (14%) located in gradually sloping uplands. Areas of marine silt have been particularly vulnerable to thaw in the past because they are ice-rich and have low-gradient topography facilitating the repeated development of thermokarst-lakes. In the future, ice-rich aeolian, upland terrain (yedoma) will be

  10. Secondary chaotic terrain formation in the higher outflow channels of southern circum-Chryse, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Kargel, J.S.; Tanaka, K.L.; Crown, D.A.; Berman, D.C.; Fairen, A.G.; Baker, V.R.; Furfaro, R.; Candelaria, P.; Sasaki, S.

    2011-01-01

    Higher outflow channel dissection in the martian region of southern circum-Chryse appears to have extended from the Late Hesperian to the Middle Amazonian Epoch. These outflow channels were excavated within the upper 1. km of the cryolithosphere, where no liquid water is expected to have existed during these geologic epochs. In accordance with previous work, our examination of outflow channel floor morphologies suggests the upper crust excavated by the studied outflow channels consisted of a thin (a few tens of meters) layer of dry geologic materials overlying an indurated zone that extends to the bases of the investigated outflow channels (1. km in depth). We find that the floors of these outflow channels contain widespread secondary chaotic terrains (i.e., chaotic terrains produced by the destruction of channel-floor materials). These chaotic terrains occur within the full range of outflow channel dissection and tend to form clusters. Our examination of the geology of these chaotic terrains suggests that their formation did not result in the generation of floods. Nevertheless, despite their much smaller dimensions, these chaotic terrains are comprised of the same basic morphologic elements (e.g., mesas, knobs, and smooth deposits within scarp-bound depressions) as those located in the initiation zones of the outflow channels, which suggests that their formation must have involved the release of ground volatiles. We propose that these chaotic terrains developed not catastrophically but gradually and during multiple episodes of nested surface collapse. In order to explain the formation of secondary chaotic terrains within zones of outflow channel dissection, we propose that the regional Martian cryolithosphere contained widespread lenses of volatiles in liquid form. In this model, channel floor collapse and secondary chaotic terrain formation would have taken place as a consequence of instabilities arising during their exhumation by outflow channel dissection

  11. Characterization of Course and Terrain and Their Effect on Skier Speed in World Cup Alpine Ski Racing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgien, Matthias; Crivelli, Philip; Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2015-01-01

    World Cup (WC) alpine ski racing consists of four main competition disciplines (slalom, giant slalom, super-G and downhill), each with specific course and terrain characteristics. The International Ski Federation (FIS) has regulated course length, altitude drop from start to finish and course setting in order to specify the characteristics of the respective competition disciplines and to control performance and injury-related aspects. However to date, no detailed data on course setting and its adaptation to terrain is available. It is also unknown how course and terrain characteristics influence skier speed. Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize course setting, terrain geomorphology and their relationship to speed in male WC giant slalom, super-G and downhill. The study revealed that terrain was flatter in downhill compared to the other disciplines. In all disciplines, variability in horizontal gate distance (gate offset) was larger than in gate distance (linear distance from gate to gate). In giant slalom the horizontal gate distance increased with terrain inclination, while super-G and downhill did not show such a connection. In giant slalom and super-G, there was a slight trend towards shorter gate distances as the steepness of the terrain increased. Gates were usually set close to terrain transitions in all three disciplines. Downhill had a larger proportion of extreme terrain inclination changes along the skier trajectory per unit time skiing than the other disciplines. Skier speed decreased with increasing steepness of terrain in all disciplines except for downhill. In steep terrain, speed was found to be controllable by increased horizontal gate distances in giant slalom and by shorter gate distances in giant slalom and super-G. Across the disciplines skier speed was largely explained by course setting and terrain inclination in a multiple linear model. PMID:25760039

  12. Characterization of course and terrain and their effect on skier speed in World Cup alpine ski racing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Gilgien

    Full Text Available World Cup (WC alpine ski racing consists of four main competition disciplines (slalom, giant slalom, super-G and downhill, each with specific course and terrain characteristics. The International Ski Federation (FIS has regulated course length, altitude drop from start to finish and course setting in order to specify the characteristics of the respective competition disciplines and to control performance and injury-related aspects. However to date, no detailed data on course setting and its adaptation to terrain is available. It is also unknown how course and terrain characteristics influence skier speed. Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize course setting, terrain geomorphology and their relationship to speed in male WC giant slalom, super-G and downhill. The study revealed that terrain was flatter in downhill compared to the other disciplines. In all disciplines, variability in horizontal gate distance (gate offset was larger than in gate distance (linear distance from gate to gate. In giant slalom the horizontal gate distance increased with terrain inclination, while super-G and downhill did not show such a connection. In giant slalom and super-G, there was a slight trend towards shorter gate distances as the steepness of the terrain increased. Gates were usually set close to terrain transitions in all three disciplines. Downhill had a larger proportion of extreme terrain inclination changes along the skier trajectory per unit time skiing than the other disciplines. Skier speed decreased with increasing steepness of terrain in all disciplines except for downhill. In steep terrain, speed was found to be controllable by increased horizontal gate distances in giant slalom and by shorter gate distances in giant slalom and super-G. Across the disciplines skier speed was largely explained by course setting and terrain inclination in a multiple linear model.

  13. Characterization of course and terrain and their effect on skier speed in World Cup alpine ski racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgien, Matthias; Crivelli, Philip; Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2015-01-01

    World Cup (WC) alpine ski racing consists of four main competition disciplines (slalom, giant slalom, super-G and downhill), each with specific course and terrain characteristics. The International Ski Federation (FIS) has regulated course length, altitude drop from start to finish and course setting in order to specify the characteristics of the respective competition disciplines and to control performance and injury-related aspects. However to date, no detailed data on course setting and its adaptation to terrain is available. It is also unknown how course and terrain characteristics influence skier speed. Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize course setting, terrain geomorphology and their relationship to speed in male WC giant slalom, super-G and downhill. The study revealed that terrain was flatter in downhill compared to the other disciplines. In all disciplines, variability in horizontal gate distance (gate offset) was larger than in gate distance (linear distance from gate to gate). In giant slalom the horizontal gate distance increased with terrain inclination, while super-G and downhill did not show such a connection. In giant slalom and super-G, there was a slight trend towards shorter gate distances as the steepness of the terrain increased. Gates were usually set close to terrain transitions in all three disciplines. Downhill had a larger proportion of extreme terrain inclination changes along the skier trajectory per unit time skiing than the other disciplines. Skier speed decreased with increasing steepness of terrain in all disciplines except for downhill. In steep terrain, speed was found to be controllable by increased horizontal gate distances in giant slalom and by shorter gate distances in giant slalom and super-G. Across the disciplines skier speed was largely explained by course setting and terrain inclination in a multiple linear model.

  14. CONTEXT-BASED URBAN TERRAIN RECONSTRUCTION FROM UAV-VIDEOS FOR GEOINFORMATION APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bulatov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Urban terrain reconstruction has many applications in areas of civil engineering, urban planning, surveillance and defense research. Therefore the needs of covering ad-hoc demand and performing a close-range urban terrain reconstruction with miniaturized and relatively inexpensive sensor platforms are constantly growing. Using (miniaturized unmanned aerial vehicles, (MUAVs, represents one of the most attractive alternatives to conventional large-scale aerial imagery. We cover in this paper a four-step procedure of obtaining georeferenced 3D urban models from video sequences. The four steps of the procedure – orientation, dense reconstruction, urban terrain modeling and geo-referencing – are robust, straight-forward, and nearly fully-automatic. The two last steps – namely, urban terrain modeling from almost-nadir videos and co-registration of models 6ndash; represent the main contribution of this work and will therefore be covered with more detail. The essential substeps of the third step include digital terrain model (DTM extraction, segregation of buildings from vegetation, as well as instantiation of building and tree models. The last step is subdivided into quasi- intrasensorial registration of Euclidean reconstructions and intersensorial registration with a geo-referenced orthophoto. Finally, we present reconstruction results from a real data-set and outline ideas for future work.

  15. Wind farm layout optimization in complex terrain: A preliminary study on a Gaussian hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, J.; Shen, W. Z.

    2014-06-01

    One of the crucial problems for wind farm (WF) development is wind farm layout optimization. It seeks to find the optimal positions of wind turbines (WTs) inside a WF, so as to maximize and/or minimize a single objective or multiple objectives, while satisfying certain constraints. Although this problem for WFs in flat terrain or offshore has been investigated in many studies, it is still a challenging problem for WFs in complex terrain. In this preliminary study, the wind flow conditions of complex terrain without WTs are first obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, then an adapted Jensen wake model is developed by considering the terrain features and taking the inflow conditions as input. Using this combined method, the wake effects of WF in complex terrain are properly modelled. Besides, a random search (RS) algorithm proposed in previous study is improved by adding some adaptive mechanisms and applied to solve the layout optimization problem of a WF on a Gaussian shape hill. The layout of the WF with a certain number of WTs is optimized to maximize the total power output, which obtained steady improvements over expert guess layouts.

  16. Birds achieve high robustness in uneven terrain through active control of landing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V; Daley, Monica A

    2012-06-15

    We understand little about how animals adjust locomotor behaviour to negotiate uneven terrain. The mechanical demands and constraints of such behaviours likely differ from uniform terrain locomotion. Here we investigated how common pheasants negotiate visible obstacles with heights from 10 to 50% of leg length. Our goal was to determine the neuro-mechanical strategies used to achieve robust stability, and address whether strategies vary with obstacle height. We found that control of landing conditions was crucial for minimising fluctuations in stance leg loading and work in uneven terrain. Variation in touchdown leg angle (θ(TD)) was correlated with the orientation of ground force during stance, and the angle between the leg and body velocity vector at touchdown (β(TD)) was correlated with net limb work. Pheasants actively targeted obstacles to control body velocity and leg posture at touchdown to achieve nearly steady dynamics on the obstacle step. In the approach step to an obstacle, the birds produced net positive limb work to launch themselves upward. On the obstacle, body dynamics were similar to uniform terrain. Pheasants also increased swing leg retraction velocity during obstacle negotiation, which we suggest is an active strategy to minimise fluctuations in peak force and leg posture in uneven terrain. Thus, pheasants appear to achieve robustly stable locomotion through a combination of path planning using visual feedback and active adjustment of leg swing dynamics to control landing conditions. We suggest that strategies for robust stability are context specific, depending on the quality of sensory feedback available, especially visual input.

  17. Modelling changes in terrain resistance as a component of landform evolution in unstable hill country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, M. J.; Preston, N. J.

    Accurate modelling of landform evolution in unstable terrain requires some means of determining the frequency and magnitude of landslide occurrence. In many areas, this can be achieved with reference to the potency of the triggering regime and the susceptibility of the terrain. Terrain susceptibility is controlled by inherent geomechanical resistance and topographic conditions which filter the effect of the triggering agent. For a given terrain, susceptibility can be conveniently represented by establishing the triggering threshold required for the occurrence of landslides. Problems are identified in use of thresholds developed from historical and contemporary measurements of landslide activity to predict or postdict landslide activity. Even if all other external controlling factors remain constant, there appear to be event-related temporal shifts in terrain resistance which change the level of the triggering threshold and the occurrence of landslides over time. Mechanisms responsible for this change are proposed and the results of field investigation into geomechanical limiting equilibrium conditions are produced to demonstrate the effects of these mechanisms and the changes in resistance they produce. A conceptual model is presented to place event-related changes in susceptibility into the context of a major phase of landslide-induced soil erosion which has affected New Zealand hill country since European deforestation.

  18. An Effective Terrain Aided Navigation for Low-Cost Autonomous Underwater Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ling; Cheng, Xianghong; Zhu, Yixian; Dai, Chenxi; Fu, Jinbo

    2017-03-25

    Terrain-aided navigation is a potentially powerful solution for obtaining submerged position fixes for autonomous underwater vehicles. The application of terrain-aided navigation with high-accuracy inertial navigation systems has demonstrated meter-level navigation accuracy in sea trials. However, available sensors may be limited depending on the type of the mission. Such limitations, especially for low-grade navigation sensors, not only degrade the accuracy of traditional navigation systems, but further impact the ability to successfully employ terrain-aided navigation. To address this problem, a tightly-coupled navigation is presented to successfully estimate the critical sensor errors by incorporating raw sensor data directly into an augmented navigation system. Furthermore, three-dimensional distance errors are calculated, providing measurement updates through the particle filter for absolute and bounded position error. The development of the terrain aided navigation system is elaborated for a vehicle equipped with a non-inertial-grade strapdown inertial navigation system, a 4-beam Doppler Velocity Log range sensor and a sonar altimeter. Using experimental data for navigation performance evaluation in areas with different terrain characteristics, the experiment results further show that the proposed method can be successfully applied to the low-cost AUVs and significantly improves navigation performance.

  19. VIIRS/NPP Moderate Resolution Terrain Corrected Geolocation 6-Min L1 Swath 750m Light V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Moderate Resolution Terrain Correction Geolocation (VNP03MODLL) Version 1 product from the Suomi National...

  20. Cloud, Aerosol, and Complex Terrain Interactions (CACTI) Preliminary Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varble, Adam [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Nesbitt, Steve [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Salio, Paola [Univ. of Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zipser, Edward [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); van den Heever, Susan [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); McFarquhar, Greg [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Kollias, Pavlos [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Kreidenweis, Sonia [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); DeMott, Paul [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Jensen, Michael [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Houze, Jr., Robert [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rasmussen, Kristen [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Leung, Ruby [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Romps, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gochis, David [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Avila, Eldo [National Univ. of Cordoba (Argentina); Williams, Christopher [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    General circulation models and downscaled regional models exhibit persistent biases in deep convective initiation location and timing, cloud top height, stratiform area and precipitation fraction, and anvil coverage. Despite important impacts on the distribution of atmospheric heating, moistening, and momentum, nearly all climate models fail to represent convective organization, while system evolution is not represented at all. Improving representation of convective systems in models requires characterization of their predictability as a function of environmental conditions, and this characterization depends on observing many cases of convective initiation, non-initiation, organization, and non-organization. The Cloud, Aerosol, and Complex Terrain Interactions (CACTI) experiment in the Sierras de Córdoba mountain range of north-central Argentina is designed to improve understanding of cloud life cycle and organization in relation to environmental conditions so that cumulus, microphysics, and aerosol parameterizations in multi-scale models can be improved. The Sierras de Córdoba range has a high frequency of orographic boundary-layer clouds, many reaching congestus depths, many initiating into deep convection, and some organizing into mesoscale systems uniquely observable from a single fixed site. Some systems even grow upscale to become among the deepest, largest, and longest-lived in the world. These systems likely contribute to an observed regional trend of increasing extreme rainfall, and poor prediction of them likely contributes to a warm, dry bias in climate models downstream of the Sierras de Córdoba range in a key agricultural region. Many environmental factors influence the convective lifecycle in this region including orographic, low-level jet, and frontal circulations, surface fluxes, synoptic vertical motions influenced by the Andes, cloud detrainment, and aerosol properties. Local and long-range transport of smoke resulting from biomass burning as

  1. Digital terrain model generalization incorporating scale, semantic and cognitive constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Papadogiorgaki, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Cartographic generalization is a well-known process accommodating spatial data compression, visualization and comprehension under various scales. In the last few years, there are several international attempts to construct tangible GIS systems, forming real 3D surfaces using a vast number of mechanical parts along a matrix formation (i.e., bars, pistons, vacuums). Usually, moving bars upon a structured grid push a stretching membrane resulting in a smooth visualization for a given surface. Most of these attempts suffer either in their cost, accuracy, resolution and/or speed. Under this perspective, the present study proposes a surface generalization process that incorporates intrinsic constrains of tangible GIS systems including robotic-motor movement and surface stretching limitations. The main objective is to provide optimized visualizations of 3D digital terrain models with minimum loss of information. That is, to minimize the number of pixels in a raster dataset used to define a DTM, while reserving the surface information. This neighborhood type of pixel relations adheres to the basics of Self Organizing Map (SOM) artificial neural networks, which are often used for information abstraction since they are indicative of intrinsic statistical features contained in the input patterns and provide concise and characteristic representations. Nevertheless, SOM remains more like a black box procedure not capable to cope with possible particularities and semantics of the application at hand. E.g. for coastal monitoring applications, the near - coast areas, surrounding mountains and lakes are more important than other features and generalization should be "biased"-stratified to fulfill this requirement. Moreover, according to the application objectives, we extend the SOM algorithm to incorporate special types of information generalization by differentiating the underlying strategy based on topologic information of the objects included in the application. The final

  2. Effective Albedo of Vegetated Terrain at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives an explicit expression for an effective albedo of vegetated terrain from the zero- and multiple- order radiative transfer (RT) model comparison. The formulation establishes a direct physical link between the effective vegetation parameterization and the theoretical description of absorption and scattering within the canopy. The paper will present an evaluation of the derived albedo for corn canopies with data taken during an experiment at Alabama A&M Winfield A. Thomas Agricultural Research Station near Huntsville, Alabama in June, 1998. The test site consisted of two 50-m x 60-m plots - one with a bare surface and the other with grass cover - and four 30-m x 50-m plots of corn at different planting densities. One corn field was planted at a full density of 9.5 plants/sq m while the others were planted at 1/3, 1/2 and 2/3 of the full density. The fields were observed with a truck-mounted L-band radiometer at incident angle of 15 degree for the period of two weeks. Soil moisture (SM) changed daily due to irrigation and natural rainfall. Variations in gravimetric SM from 18 % to 34 % were seen during this period. Ground truth data, including careful characterization of the corn size and orientation statistics, and its dielectric, was also collected and used to simulate the effective albedo for the vegetation. The single-scattering albedo is defined as the fractional power scattered from individual vegetation constituents with respect to canopy extinction. It represents single-scattering properties of vegetation elements only, and is independent of ground properties. The values of the albedo get higher when there is dense vegetation (i.e. forest, mature corn, etc.) with scatterers, such as branches and trunks (or stalks in the case of corn), which are large with respect to the wavelength. This large albedo leads to a reduction in brightness temperature in the zero-order RT solution (known as tau-omega model). Higher-order multiple-scattering RT

  3. Fast integral equation algorithms for the solution of electromagnetic wave propagation over general terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim K. Abu Seif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a fast numerical algorithm to solve an integral equation model for wave propagation along a perfectly conducting two-dimensional terrain is suggested. It is applied to different actual terrain profiles and the results indicate very good agreement with published work. In addition, the proposed algorithm has achieved considerable saving in processing time. The formulation is extended to solve the propagation over lossy dielectric surfaces. A combined field integral equation (CFIE for wave propagation over dielectric terrain is solved efficiently by utilizing the method of moments with complex basis functions. The numerical results for different cases of dielectric surfaces are compared with the results of perfectly conducting surface evaluated by the IE conventional algorithm.

  4. Terrain Inclination Aided Three-Dimensional Localization and Mapping for an Outdoor Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorui Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new 3D localization and mapping technique with terrain inclination assistance is proposed in this paper to allow a robot to identify its location and build a global map in an outdoor environment. The Iterative Closest Points (ICP algorithm and terrain inclination-based localization are combined together to achieve accurate and fast localization and mapping. Inclinations of the terrains the robot navigates are used to achieve local localization during the interval between two laser scans. Using the results of the above localization as the initial condition, the ICP algorithm is then applied to align the overlapped laser scan maps to update the overhanging obstacles for building a global map of the surrounding area. Comprehensive experiments were carried out for the validation of the proposed 3D localization and mapping technique. The experimental results show that the proposed technique could reduce time consumption and improve the accuracy of the performance.

  5. Path-following control of wheeled planetary exploration robots moving on deformable rough terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang; Gao, Hai-bo; Deng, Zong-quan; Li, Zhijun; Xia, Ke-rui; Duan, Guang-ren

    2014-01-01

    The control of planetary rovers, which are high performance mobile robots that move on deformable rough terrain, is a challenging problem. Taking lateral skid into account, this paper presents a rough terrain model and nonholonomic kinematics model for planetary rovers. An approach is proposed in which the reference path is generated according to the planned path by combining look-ahead distance and path updating distance on the basis of the carrot following method. A path-following strategy for wheeled planetary exploration robots incorporating slip compensation is designed. Simulation results of a four-wheeled robot on deformable rough terrain verify that it can be controlled to follow a planned path with good precision, despite the fact that the wheels will obviously skid and slip.

  6. Pitted terrains on (1) Ceres and implications for shallow subsurface volatile distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, H.G.; Platz, Thomas; Schorghofer, Norbert; Prettyman, Thomas; De Sanctis, Maria Christina; Crown, David A.; Schmedemann, Nico; Nessemann, Andeas; Kneissl, Thomas; Simone Marchi,; Schenk, Paul M.; Bland, Michael; Schmidt, B.E.; Hughson, Kynan H.G.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F; Mest, S.C.; Yingst, R.A.; Williams, D.A.; Russell, C.T.; Raymond, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Dawn spacecraft at Ceres, the dwarf planet was anticipated to be ice-rich. Searches for morphological features related to ice have been ongoing during Dawn's mission at Ceres. Here we report the identification of pitted terrains associated with fresh Cerean impact craters. The Cerean pitted terrains exhibit strong morphological similarities to pitted materials previously identified on Mars (where ice is implicated in pit development) and Vesta (where the presence of ice is debated). We employ numerical models to investigate the formation of pitted materials on Ceres and discuss the relative importance of water ice and other volatiles in pit development there. We conclude that water ice likely plays an important role in pit development on Ceres. Similar pitted terrains may be common in the asteroid belt and may be of interest to future missions motivated by both astrobiology and in situ resource utilization.

  7. Pitted terrains on (1) Ceres and implications for shallow subsurface volatile distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, H. G.; Platz, T.; Schorghofer, N.; Prettyman, T. H.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Crown, D. A.; Schmedemann, N.; Neesemann, A.; Kneissl, T.; Marchi, S.; Schenk, P. M.; Bland, M. T.; Schmidt, B. E.; Hughson, K. H. G.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Mest, S. C.; Yingst, R. A.; Williams, D. A.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2017-07-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Dawn spacecraft at Ceres, the dwarf planet was anticipated to be ice-rich. Searches for morphological features related to ice have been ongoing during Dawn's mission at Ceres. Here we report the identification of pitted terrains associated with fresh Cerean impact craters. The Cerean pitted terrains exhibit strong morphological similarities to pitted materials previously identified on Mars (where ice is implicated in pit development) and Vesta (where the presence of ice is debated). We employ numerical models to investigate the formation of pitted materials on Ceres and discuss the relative importance of water ice and other volatiles in pit development there. We conclude that water ice likely plays an important role in pit development on Ceres. Similar pitted terrains may be common in the asteroid belt and may be of interest to future missions motivated by both astrobiology and in situ resource utilization.

  8. Wind farm layout optimization in complex terrain: A preliminary study on a Gaussian hill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ju; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2014-01-01

    One of the crucial problems for wind farm (WF) development is wind farm layout optimization. It seeks to find the optimal positions of wind turbines (WTs) inside a WF, so as to maximize and/or minimize a single objective or multiple objectives, while satisfying certain constraints. Although...... this problem for WFs in flat terrain or offshore has been investigated in many studies, it is still a challenging problem for WFs in complex terrain. In this preliminary study, the wind flow conditions of complex terrain without WTs are first obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation...... adaptive mechanisms and applied to solve the layout optimization problem of a WF on a Gaussian shape hill. The layout of the WF with a certain number of WTs is optimized to maximize the total power output, which obtained steady improvements over expert guess layouts....

  9. Paleogeography of the northern portion of the Mixteca terrain, southern Mexico, during the Middle Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Miranda, C.; Morán-Zenteno, D. J.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Silva-Romo, G.; Böhnel, H.; Jurado-Chichay, Z.; Cabral-Cano, E.

    A preliminary paleogeographic reconstruction of the northern Mixteca terrain in southern Mexico is presented for the Middle Jurassic. The reconstruction is derived from combined analyses of spatial distribution of marine-continental Jurassic sedimentary units, identification of sediment source, and observations based on sedimentary indicators of environment and transport directions, as well as paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) results. There is an overall agreement between the AMS magnetic fabric results and the sedimentary indicators of current directions and paleogeographic elements. The results suggest a coastline at the south-southwest portion of this terrain, a general transport of fluvial sediments to the south and southwest, and marine influxes from the south. A Pacific margin provenance is supported by the paleomagnetic results for the northern portion of the Mixteca terrain.

  10. An Inter-Comparison Study of Multi- and DBS Lidar Measurements in Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauscher, Lukas; Vasiljevic, Nikola; Callies, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Wind measurements using classical profiling lidars suffer from systematic measurement errors in complex terrain. Moreover, their ability to measure turbulence quantities is unsatisfactory for wind-energy applications. This paper presents results from a measurement campaign during which multiple...... seems to be more important for turbulence measurements. In summary, the results clearly show the advantages of the ML technique in complex terrain and indicate that it has the potential to achieve significantly higher accuracy in measuring turbulence quantities for wind-energy applications than...... WindScanners were focused on one point next to a reference mast in complex terrain. This multi-lidar (ML) technique is also compared to a profiling lidar using the Doppler beam swinging (DBS) method. First- and second-order statistics of the radial wind velocities from the individual instruments...

  11. Rolling ball algorithm as a multitask filter for terrain conductivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Portable frequency domain electromagnetic devices, commonly known as terrain conductivity meters, have become increasingly popular in recent years, especially in locating underground utilities. Data collected using these devices, however, usually suffer from major problems such as complexity and interference of apparent conductivity anomalies, near edge local spikes, and fading of conductivity contrast between a utility and the surrounding soil. This study presents the experience of adopting the rolling ball algorithm, originally designed to remove background from medical images, to treat these major problems in terrain conductivity measurements. Applying the proposed procedure to data collected using different terrain conductivity meters at different locations and conditions proves the capability of the rolling ball algorithm to treat these data both efficiently and quickly.

  12. A Research on Wind Farm Micro-sitting Optimization in Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Yang, Jianchuan; Li, Chenqi

    2013-01-01

    turbines’ park coordinates which subject to the boundary and minimum distance conditions between two wind turbines. A Cross Particle Swarm Optimization (CPSO) method is developed and applied to optimize the layout for a certain wind farm case. Compared with the uniform and experience method, results show......Wind farm layout optimization in complex terrain is a pretty difficult issue for onshore wind farm. In this article, a novel optimization method is proposed to optimize the layout for wind farms in complex terrain. This method utilized Lissaman and Jensen wake models for taking the terrain height...... and the wake loss from the upstream turbines into the wind turbine power output calculation. Wind direction is divided into sixteen sections, and the wind speed is processed using the Weibull distribution. The objective is to maximize the total wind farm power output and the free design variables are the wind...

  13. A framework for global terrain classification using 250-m DEMs to predict geohazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahashi, J.; Matsuoka, M.; Yong, A.

    2016-12-01

    Geomorphology is key for identifying factors that control geohazards induced by landslides, liquefaction, and ground shaking. To systematically identify landforms that affect these hazards, Iwahashi and Pike (2007; IP07) introduced an automated terrain classification scheme using 1-km-scale Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation models (DEMs). The IP07 classes describe 16 categories of terrain types and were used as a proxy for predicting ground motion amplification (Yong et al., 2012; Seyhan et al., 2014; Stewart et al., 2014; Yong, 2016). These classes, however, were not sufficiently resolved because coarse-scaled SRTM DEMs were the basis for the categories (Yong, 2016). Thus, we develop a new framework consisting of more detailed polygonal global terrain classes to improve estimations of soil-type and material stiffness. We first prepare high resolution 250-m DEMs derived from the 2010 Global Multi-resolution Terrain Elevation Data (GMTED2010). As in IP07, we calculate three geometric signatures (slope, local convexity and surface texture) from the DEMs. We create additional polygons by using the same signatures and multi-resolution segmentation techniques on the GMTED2010. We consider two types of surface texture thresholds in different window sizes (3x3 and 13x13 pixels), in addition to slope and local convexity, to classify pixels within the DEM. Finally, we apply the k-means clustering and thresholding methods to the 250-m DEM and produce more detailed polygonal terrain classes. We compare the new terrain classification maps of Japan and California with geologic, aerial photography, and landslide distribution maps, and visually find good correspondence of key features. To predict ground motion amplification, we apply the Yong (2016) method for estimating VS30. The systematic classification of geomorphology has the potential to provide a better understanding of the susceptibility to geohazards, which is especially vital in populated areas.

  14. Terrain-based Predictive Modeling of a Functional Riparian Corridor in a Coastal Northern California Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, T.; Davis, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    Riparian corridors and their associated geomorphic landforms (e.g., channels, floodplains, and terraces) and vegetation communities (e.g., forests and wetlands) have been significantly degraded in California, prompting an expansion of efforts to delineate riparian corridors and identify priorities for conservation via deed restrictions and easements. Current techniques to delineate riparian corridors for these purposes include fixed-width buffers based on stream centerlines and digitization of woody vegetation from aerial photos. Although efficient, these delineation methods do not accurately capture the extent of ecologically functional riparian corridors and result in riparian habitat being excluded from conservation efforts while non-riparian is included. From a physical perspective, ecologically functional riparian corridors have widths that vary with topography and ample space for dynamic fluvial geomorphic processes that create and maintain river morphology and vegetation and sustain ecological interactions that extend from the stream channel laterally into upland ecosystems and up- and downstream ecosystems in longitudinal directions. New terrain-based spatial analysis techniques and high-resolution digital terrain data show promise in delineating ecologically functional riparian corridors. In this study, we compare the efficacy of three terrain-based predictors of riparian corridors that have emerged in the literature—elevation above channel, flow accumulation, and distance from channel. The results of each terrain predictor are compared with field-based indicators of the riparian corridor of an alluvial reach of Mark West Creek in Sonoma County, California (a mediterranean climate). Indicators include soil type, fluvial geomorphic landforms, and vegetation. A one-meter digital terrain model from LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) supplied by a NASA ROSES grant is used as the base terrain data for spatial analysis. We discuss in detail the use of

  15. TouchTerrain: A simple web-tool for creating 3D-printable topographic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiuk, Franciszek J.; Harding, Chris; Renner, Alex Raymond; Winer, Eliot

    2017-12-01

    An open-source web-application, TouchTerrain, was developed to simplify the production of 3D-printable terrain models. Direct Digital Manufacturing (DDM) using 3D Printers can change how geoscientists, students, and stakeholders interact with 3D data, with the potential to improve geoscience communication and environmental literacy. No other manufacturing technology can convert digital data into tangible objects quickly at relatively low cost; however, the expertise necessary to produce a 3D-printed terrain model can be a substantial burden: knowledge of geographical information systems, computer aided design (CAD) software, and 3D printers may all be required. Furthermore, printing models larger than the build volume of a 3D printer can pose further technical hurdles. The TouchTerrain web-application simplifies DDM for elevation data by generating digital 3D models customized for a specific 3D printer's capabilities. The only required user input is the selection of a region-of-interest using the provided web-application with a Google Maps-style interface. Publically available digital elevation data is processed via the Google Earth Engine API. To allow the manufacture of 3D terrain models larger than a 3D printer's build volume the selected area can be split into multiple tiles without third-party software. This application significantly reduces the time and effort required for a non-expert like an educator to obtain 3D terrain models for use in class. The web application is deployed at http://touchterrain.geol.iastate.edu/

  16. Training Revising Based Traversability Analysis of Complex Terrains for Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Song

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Traversability analysis is one of the core issues in the autonomous navigation for mobile robots to identify the accessible area by the information of sensors on mobile robots. This paper proposed a model to analyze the traversability of complex terrains based on rough sets and training revising. The model described the traversability for mobile robots by traversability cost. Through the experiment, the paper gets the conclusion that traversability analysis model based on rough sets and training revising can be used where terrain features are rich and complex, can effectively handle the unstructured environment, and can provide reliable and effective decision rules in the autonomous navigation for mobile robots.

  17. A BEM approach to validate a model for predicting sound propagation over non-flat terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quirós Alpera, Susana; Jacobsen, Finn; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2003-01-01

    A two-dimensional boundary element model for sound propagation in a homogeneous atmosphere above non-flat terrain has been constructed. An infinite impedance plane is taken into account in the Green's function in the underlying integral equation, so that only the nonflat parts of the terrain need....... Sound Vibrat. 223 (1999) 355]. The resulting BEM model, which can handle arbitrary combinations of barriers and hollows, has been used for validating a ray model for various difficult configurations, including combinations of valleys and barriers. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. A BEM approach to validate a model for predicting sound propagation over non-flat terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quirósy Alpera, S.; Jacobsen, Finn; Juhl, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    A two-dimensional boundary element model for sound propagation in a homogeneous atmosphere above non-flat terrain has been constructed. An infinite impedance plane is taken into account in the Green's function in the underlying integral equation, so that only the nonflat parts of the terrain need....... Sound Vibrat. 223 (1999) 355]. The resulting BEM model, which can handle arbitrary combinations of barriers and hollows, has been used for validating a ray model for various difficult configurations, including combinations of valleys and barriers....

  19. Prediction of wind power potential by wind speed probability distribution in a hilly terrain near Bh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Siraj; Diwakar, Nilesh

    2010-09-15

    Daily wind speed data in metre per second and its direction of flow in degree were recorded from of the India Meteorological Department for a site near the Bhopal Airport for the period of eleven years. The influence of roughness of the terrain, obstacles and topography in terms of contour for the area were also taken into consideration. These data were analysed using WAsP programme and regional wind climate of the area was determined. It is seen from the analysis of the wind speed data and keeping the topographical variation of terrain, exploitable wind speed is experienced at 50 m.

  20. Extraction of oil palm plantations on the undulating terrains in the Borneo using PALSAR Global Mosaic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, Y.; Ishii, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Nagai, S.; Suzuki, R.

    2013-12-01

    Conversions of forests and peat swamps into oil palm plantations might cause decrease of net ecosystem production, change of water stream and loss of biodiversity. Most of the oil plantations in the South East Asia have been expanded in the past decade. For monitoring the distribution and condition of these plantations, the PALSAR Global Mosaic data set (PGM) have been utilized. This PGM is one of the L-Band Synthetic Aparture Radar (SAR) data sets orthorectified and mosaicked (unified). Unlike optical satellite imagery, the L-band SAR is useful especially for cloudy tropic regions. In addition, PGM have high resolution (about 10 m) and contains cross polarization (HV) SAR data which is useful for observation of forest because cross polarization SAR data contain data of the volume scattering which reflect the volume of plant bodies. On the other hand, topographic effect in PGM is not reduced sufficiently because of low resolution of DEM utilized to make PGM. As a result, pixel value of PGM is affected by the highlight effect especially in undulating terrains. These undulating terrains consist of rises which have about 10m height, exist in about 100m horizontal interval and cause striped patterns on SAR images. These patterns result in difficulty in extracting oil palm plantation using SAR imagery in the undulating terrains. However, many papers extracting oil palm plantations didn't show the accuracy of distributions extracted as oil palm plantation in the undulating terrains and thus it isn't clear how well oil palm plantations on the undulating terrains can be extracted. In this study, we carried out a supervised classification and extracted oil palm plantations in the north-west of Borneo Island. The Island is a part of the South East Asia and contains undulating terrains. In this extraction, we used the PGM data, a learning model and the training data made from PGM data, aerial photograph, high resolution optical satellite data and field survey data. After

  1. Polarimetric SAR Terrain Classification Using Polarimetric Features Derived from Rotation Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chensong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Terrain classification is an important application for understanding and interpreting Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR images. One common PolSAR terrain classification uses roll-invariant feature parameters such as H/A/a/SPAN. However, the back scattering response of a target is closely related to its orientation and attitude. This frequently introduces ambiguity in the interpretation of scattering mechanisms and limits the accuracy of the PolSAR terrain classification, which only uses roll-invariant feature parameters for classification. To address this problem, the uniform polarimetric matrix rotation theory, which interprets a target’s scattering properties when its polarimetric matrix is rotated along the radar line of sight and derives a series of polarimetric features to describe hidden information of the target in the rotation domain was proposed. Based on this theory, in this study, we apply the polarimetric features in the rotation domain to PolSAR terrain discrimination and classification, and develop a PolSAR terrain classification method using both the polarimetric features in the rotation domain and the roll-invariant features of H/A/a/SPAN. This method also uses both the selected polarimetric feature parameters in the rotation domain and H/A/a/SPAN as input for a Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier and achieves better classification performance by complementing the terrain discrimination abilities of both. Results from comparison experiments based on AIRSAR and UAVSAR data demonstrate that compared with the conventional method, which only uses H/A/a/SPAN as SVM classifier input, the proposed method can achieve higher classification accuracy and better robustness. For fifteen terrain classes of AIRSAR data, the total classification accuracy of the proposed method was 92.3%, which is higher than the 91.1% of the conventional method. Moreover, for seven terrain classes of multi-temporal UAVSAR data, the averaged

  2. Analyse spatiale, évaluation et cartographie du risque glissement de terrain

    OpenAIRE

    Malet, Jean-Philippe; Thiery, Yannick; Maquaire, Olivier; Puissant, Anne

    2006-01-01

    International audience; RÉSUMÉ : Pour évaluer et cartographier le risque « glissement de terrain », les techniques d'analyse spatiale et les technologies SIG sont rarement utilisées. En particulier, aucune étude concerne la cartographie automatique du risque « glissement de terrain » à grande échelle (1:10,000 è), échelle de travail correspondant à la cartographie règlementaire du risque naturel en France. Cet article présente une procédure en trois étapes pour évaluer et cartographier le ris...

  3. Traversable terrain classification for outdoor autonomous robots using single 2D laser scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Blas, Morten Rufus; Andersen, Nils Axel

    2006-01-01

    , curvature, slope, width and invalid data. These are then used to extract road borders, traversable terrain and identify obstacles. Experimental results are shown and discussed. The results were obtained using a DTU developed mobile robot, and the autonomous tests were conducted in a national park......Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses seven distinctly different classifiers: raw height, roughness, step size...

  4. Hybrid RANS/LES method for wind flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2010-01-01

    ), and this layer acts as wall model for the outer flow handled by LES. The well-known high Reynolds number two-equation k - turbulence model is used in the RANS layer and the model automatically switches to a two-equation k - subgrid scale stress model in the LES region. The approach can be used for flow over...... the turbulent kinetic energy, whereas the new method captures the high turbulence levels well but underestimates the mean velocity. The presented results are for a relative mild configuration of complex terrain, but the proposed method can also be used for highly complex terrain where the benefits of the new...

  5. Terrain Classification for Outdoor Autonomous Robots using 2D Laser Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rufus Blas, Morten; Riisgaard, Søren; Ravn, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses four distinctly different classifiers: raw height, step size, slope, and ro...... with a department developed Medium Mobile Robot and tests conducted in a national park environment......Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses four distinctly different classifiers: raw height, step size, slope...

  6. LINCOM wind flow model: Application to complex terrain with thermal stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunkerley, F.; Moreno, J.; Mikkelsen, T.

    2001-01-01

    LINCOM is a fast linearised and spectral wind flow model for use over hilly terrain. It is designed to rapidly generate mean wind field predictions which provide input to atmospheric dispersion models and wind engineering applications. The thermal module, LINCOM-T, has recently been improved...... to provide reasonably robust results over a range of stability conditions. The results predicted for idealised terrain only are presented here. Meteorological data used to initialise the model are normally obtained from measurements or from outputs from larger scale numerical models. These standard data...

  7. Online 3D terrain visualisation using Unity 3D game engine: A comparison of different contour intervals terrain data draped with UAV images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Mahayudin, Mohd; Che Mat, Ruzinoor

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to discuss on the effectiveness of visualising terrain draped with Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) images generated from different contour intervals using Unity 3D game engine in online environment. The study area that was tested in this project was oil palm plantation at Sintok, Kedah. The contour data used for this study are divided into three different intervals which are 1m, 3m and 5m. ArcGIS software were used to clip the contour data and also UAV images data to be similar size for the overlaying process. The Unity 3D game engine was used as the main platform for developing the system due to its capabilities which can be launch in different platform. The clipped contour data and UAV images data were process and exported into the web format using Unity 3D. Then process continue by publishing it into the web server for comparing the effectiveness of different 3D terrain data (contour data) draped with UAV images. The effectiveness is compared based on the data size, loading time (office and out-of-office hours), response time, visualisation quality, and frame per second (fps). The results were suggest which contour interval is better for developing an effective online 3D terrain visualisation draped with UAV images using Unity 3D game engine. It therefore benefits decision maker and planner related to this field decide on which contour is applicable for their task.

  8. Melt and collapse of buried water ice: An alternative hypothesis for the formation of chaotic terrains on Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, T.E.; Oosthoek, J.H.P.; Rossi, A.P.; Blom, J.K.; Schumacher, S.

    2010-01-01

    Chaotic terrains and the associated massive outflow channels are some of the most enigmatic features on Mars. Over hundreds of kilometres of rock units are fractured, tilted, and have subsided, forming chaotic terrain basins (Sharp, 1973). Large quantities of water emanated from these chaotic

  9. Soil and Terrain Database for Argentina, primary data (version 1.0) - scale 1:1 million (SOTER_Argentina)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkshoorn, J.A.; Huting, J.R.M.

    2014-01-01

    The Soil and Terrain database for Argentina primary data (version 1.0), at scale 1:1 million (SOTER_Argentina), was compiled of enhanced soil information within the framework of the FAO's program Land Degradation Assessment in Drylands (LADA). Primary soil and terrain data for Argentina were

  10. 75 FR 76708 - Extension of the Date by Which Youth All-Terrain Vehicles Must Be Tested and Certified

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... COMMISSION Extension of the Date by Which Youth All-Terrain Vehicles Must Be Tested and Certified AGENCY... (including importers) of youth all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) must submit sufficient samples of such products to... which youth ATVs must be tested by third party conformity assessment bodies accredited by the Commission...

  11. Soil and Terrain Database for Nepal (version 1.0) - scale 1:1 million (SOTER_Nepal)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkshoorn, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The Soil and Terrain database for Nepal primary data (version 1.0), at scale 1:1 million (SOTER_Nepal). SOTER_Nepal is generalized from the original Soils and Terrain database of Nepal at scale 1:50,000 compiled by FAO and Nepal's Survey Dept. The SOTER_Nepal database provides generalized

  12. Numerical simulation of the aerodynamic field in complex terrain wind farm based on actuator disk model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Chen Qi; Han, Xing Xing

    2015-01-01

    Study on the aerodynamic field in complex terrain is significant to wind farm micro-sitting and wind power prediction. This paper modeled the wind turbine through an actuator disk model, and solved the aerodynamic field by CFD to study the influence of meshing, boundary conditions and turbulence ...

  13. Soil and Terrain Database for Malawi (ver. 1.0) (SOTER_Malawi)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, B.

    2014-01-01

    The Soil and Terrain database for Malawi (version 1.0), at scale 1:1 million, was compiled based on the soil map of Malawi at scale 1:250,000 (compiled by the Land Resources Evaluation Project) that was complemented with soil boundary information from the provisional soil map at scale 1:1 million.

  14. Compaction-Based Deformable Terrain Model as an Interface for Real-Time Vehicle Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    Dimensional Terrain Surfaces," J. of Terramechanics, 47(4), pp. 209-217. [10] Bekker , M. G., 1956, Theory of land locomotion; the mechanics of...for all applications related to vehicle dynamics," Vehicle System Dynamics, 45(139-151). [18] Bekker , M. G., 1960, Off-the-road locomotion; research

  15. Robot navigation in unknown terrains: Introductory survey of non-heuristic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, N.S.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Kareti, S.; Shi, Weimin [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (US). Dept. of Computer Science; Iyengar, S.S. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (US). Dept. of Computer Science

    1993-07-01

    A formal framework for navigating a robot in a geometric terrain by an unknown set of obstacles is considered. Here the terrain model is not a priori known, but the robot is equipped with a sensor system (vision or touch) employed for the purpose of navigation. The focus is restricted to the non-heuristic algorithms which can be theoretically shown to be correct within a given framework of models for the robot, terrain and sensor system. These formulations, although abstract and simplified compared to real-life scenarios, provide foundations for practical systems by highlighting the underlying critical issues. First, the authors consider the algorithms that are shown to navigate correctly without much consideration given to the performance parameters such as distance traversed, etc. Second, they consider non-heuristic algorithms that guarantee bounds on the distance traversed or the ratio of the distance traversed to the shortest path length (computed if the terrain model is known). Then they consider the navigation of robots with very limited computational capabilities such as finite automata, etc.

  16. Prototyping Radiometrically Terrain Corrected Sentinel-1A Large-Scale Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenson, K.; Nicoll, J. B.; Logan, T. A.; Gens, R.; Garron, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility Distributed Active Archive Data Center (ASF DAAC) is undertaking prototyping and analysis of radiometrically terrain corrected (RTC) data products derived from Sentinel-1A SAR data, processed using different software packages. RTC products from both the GAMMA software and the Sentinel 1 toolbox were created for a variety of terrain types. Images were analyzed for residual terrain effects, number of looks, and noise floor. Radiometric terrain correction addresses two aspects of the effects of side-looking geometry of SAR imagery. First, the geometric distortions are corrected using the best digital elevation model available for a given region. Second, the radiometry is adjusted in the affected foreshortening and layover regions using the pixel-area integration approach for radiometric normalization. The RTC process provides improved backscatter estimates that can be used as input for applications such as the monitoring of deforestation, land-cover classification, and delineation of wet snow covered areas. The result of this prototyping effort, if approved, will be used to create an extensive archive of RTC products that can be easily combined with other geographically-projected datasets.

  17. Estimation of Short-Wavelength Gravity on a Dense Grid Using Digital Terrain Elevation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-15

    4-9 I REFERENCES 1. Forsberg, R., and Tscherning, C.C., "The Use of Height Data in Gravity Field Approximation by Collocation ", Journal of Geophysical...Computing Terrain Corrections", Manuscripta Geodaetica, Vol. 10, pp. 66-73, 1985. 5. Heiskanen, W.A., and Moritz , H., Physical Geodesy, W.H. Freeman and

  18. Performance of a Battery Electric Vehicle in the Cold Climate and Hilly Terrain of Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-23

    The goal of this research project was to determine the performance of a battery electric vehicle (BEV) in the cold climate and hilly terrain of Vermont. For this study, a 2005 Toyota Echo was converted from an internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle...

  19. The use of remote sensing in soil and terrain mapping: Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, V.L.; Bruin, de S.; Schaepman, M.E.; Mayr, T.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the use of optical and microwave remote sensing data for soil and terrain mapping with emphasis on applications at regional and coarser scales. Remote sensing is expected to offer possibilities for improving incomplete spatial and thematic coverage of current regional and global

  20. Seasonal variations in groundwater chemistry of a phreatic coastal and crystalline terrain of central Kerala, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Laluraj, C.M.; Gopinath, G.; DineshKumar, P.K.; Seralathan, P.

    parameters showed marginal variation. The trilinear diagram reveals that most of the groundwater samples from the crystalline terrain, which is of type IV (Ca sup(2+) -Mg sup(2+) -Cl sup(-) -SO sub(4) sup(2-)) during the premonsoon period, changed character...

  1. Footstep Planning on Uneven Terrain with Mixed-Integer Convex Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    of the scene using the perception tools developed by Team MIT for the DRC [13]. A Sobel filter was used to classify areas of the terrain which were...Generalized and separable sobel op- erators,” in Machine vision for three-dimensional scenes, H. Freeman, Ed. Sand Diego, CA: Academic Press, Inc., 1990.

  2. Determination of Terrain Serviceability of Military Vehicles by GIS Relief Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Pahernik

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses capabilities of terrain serviceability ofvehicles in regards to the ground features. Two key relief attributesrelated to the slope inclination are defined, as well as reliefforms quantitatively defined as deviations of height above sea-level. As the secondary attribute, the topographic wetness indexis estimated, which, in correlation with the drainage coefficientyields the wetness value index as an essential factor of passablenessin the conditions of harder and more intensive precipitations,that is to say, sudden snow melting. By application ofGIS analysis, based on the digital model of space heights alongthe Kupa River from Pisarovina to SiSinec, the values of primaryand secondary relief attributes have been calculated, andthe analysis of Landsat satellite images has been used to definethe values of vegetation cover. Based on these values and dataon the soil type, the layer of ground wetness has been estimated.Cross Country Mobility Program of ESRI company, withinGIS program package Arc View 3.3. has been used to set themarginal values of the defined relief parameters and to estimatethe levels of mobility for single vehicles in different terrain conditions.The comparison of the obtained results clearly indicatesa possible application of the defined data in the analysisof terrain serviceability of military vehicles, with regard to therelief features of the terrain. For full applicability of the model itis also necessary to define other attributes of mobility related tohydrographical, vegetation, pedological, anthropogenic andother ground features.

  3. Intuitive Terrain Reconstruction Using Height Observation-Based Ground Segmentation and 3D Object Boundary Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungdae Sim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robot operators must make rapid decisions based on information about the robot’s surrounding environment. This means that terrain modeling and photorealistic visualization are required for the remote operation of mobile robots. We have produced a voxel map and textured mesh from the 2D and 3D datasets collected by a robot’s array of sensors, but some upper parts of objects are beyond the sensors’ measurements and these parts are missing in the terrain reconstruction result. This result is an incomplete terrain model. To solve this problem, we present a new ground segmentation method to detect non-ground data in the reconstructed voxel map. Our method uses height histograms to estimate the ground height range, and a Gibbs-Markov random field model to refine the segmentation results. To reconstruct a complete terrain model of the 3D environment, we develop a 3D boundary estimation method for non-ground objects. We apply a boundary detection technique to the 2D image, before estimating and refining the actual height values of the non-ground vertices in the reconstructed textured mesh. Our proposed methods were tested in an outdoor environment in which trees and buildings were not completely sensed. Our results show that the time required for ground segmentation is faster than that for data sensing, which is necessary for a real-time approach. In addition, those parts of objects that were not sensed are accurately recovered to retrieve their real-world appearances.

  4. Modeling large-scale winter recreation terrain selection with implications for recreation management and wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucretia E. Olson; John R. Squires; Elizabeth K. Roberts; Aubrey D. Miller; Jacob S. Ivan; Mark Hebblewhite

    2017-01-01

    Winter recreation is a rapidly growing activity, and advances in technology make it possible for increasing numbers of people to access remote backcountry terrain. Increased winter recreation may lead to more frequent conflict between recreationists, as well as greater potential disturbance to wildlife. To better understand the environmental characteristics favored by...

  5. Experimental Modeling of the Effect of Terrain Slope on Marginal Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    X. Zhou; S. Mahalingam; D. Weise

    2005-01-01

    A series of laboratory fire spread experiments were completed to analyze the effect of terrain slope on marginal burning behavior of live chaparral shrub fuels that grow in the mountains of southern California. We attempted to burn single species fuel beds of four common chaparral plants under various fuel bed configurations and ambient conditions. Seventy-three (or 42...

  6. terrain analysis in the course curricula of the south african army

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a_lodi

    working relationship with the military intelligence staff and the engineer terrain warrant officer. For the purposes of this ... The expert understands the limitations and capabilities of geospatial information and can integrate them into the ..... artificial features on the surface of a part or the whole of the earth or other planetary ...

  7. Investigating the effect of different terrain modeling techniques on the computation of local gravity anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoulis, Dimitrios; Patlakis, Konstantinos

    2017-04-01

    Gravity reductions and gravity anomalies express important tools for the analysis and interpretation of real gravity measurements at all spatial scales. Simple geometries of planar or spherical slabs for the topographic masses underlying the computation point down to a reference height surface produce the traditional definition of simple Bouguer anomalies. However, especially for gravity measurements obtained from local gravity surveys stretching up to only a few tens of kilometers, a detailed consideration of the deviations of the surface topographic relief from the ideal slab geometry is required and necessary in order to obtain the so-called refined Bouguer anomalies. The present contribution examines the further refinement of these computations depending on the exact geometric representation of the topographic surface and the corresponding masses defining the terrain correction quantity. Using as input data 328 surface gravity observations and a 20 km x 15 km Digital Terrain Model with a 50 m x 50 m spatial resolution of a steep terrain area in the Bavarian Alps different sets of gravity anomalies were computed from different geometrical and mathematical approximations of the topographic masses and its corresponding gravitational effect. Right rectangular prisms, polyhedrons, bilinear surfaces, mass-line and mass-prism FFT representations of the terrain effect have been implemented for the evaluation of refined Bouguer gravity anomalies over the 20 km x 15 km region and the computed grids have been compared both against each other as well as with respect to the topographic height.

  8. Mapping the Terrain of Educational Leadership and Management in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinger, Philip; Bryant, Darren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to gain perspective on the extent to which the vision for knowledge production in East Asia set forth by Bajunid, Cheng, Hallinger, Walker, Dimmock and others almost 20 years ago has been fulfilled. The authors undertook an effort to map the terrain of knowledge production in educational leadership and…

  9. Experimental investigation of terrain slugging: formation mechanism and potential mitigation methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiferli, W.; Hansen, J.H.; Brasjen, B.J.; Belfroid, S.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study on terrain-induced slugging on shallow inclines (typically less than 3°) has been conducted, using three setups with a pipe diameter of around 1”, with incline lengths of 1 m, 3 m and 24 m. In addition to an extensive characterization of the formation and evolution of slugs as

  10. Empirical downscaling of daily minimum air temperature at very fine resolutions in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary A. Holden; John T. Abatzoglou; Charles H. Luce; L. Scott Baggett

    2011-01-01

    Available air temperature models do not adequately account for the influence of terrain on nocturnal air temperatures. An empirical model for night time air temperatures was developed using a network of one hundred and forty inexpensive temperature sensors deployed across the Bitterroot National Forest, Montana. A principle component analysis (PCA) on minimum...

  11. Improved Path Loss Simulation Incorporating Three-Dimensional Terrain Model Using Parallel Coprocessors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Bin Loo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current network simulators abstract out wireless propagation models due to the high computation requirements for realistic modeling. As such, there is still a large gap between the results obtained from simulators and real world scenario. In this paper, we present a framework for improved path loss simulation built on top of an existing network simulation software, NS-3. Different from the conventional disk model, the proposed simulation also considers the diffraction loss computed using Epstein and Peterson’s model through the use of actual terrain elevation data to give an accurate estimate of path loss between a transmitter and a receiver. The drawback of high computation requirements is relaxed by offloading the computationally intensive components onto an inexpensive off-the-shelf parallel coprocessor, which is a NVIDIA GPU. Experiments are performed using actual terrain elevation data provided from United States Geological Survey. As compared to the conventional CPU architecture, the experimental result shows that a speedup of 20x to 42x is achieved by exploiting the parallel processing of GPU to compute the path loss between two nodes using terrain elevation data. The result shows that the path losses between two nodes are greatly affected by the terrain profile between these two nodes. Besides this, the result also suggests that the common strategy to place the transmitter in the highest position may not always work.

  12. Real-time Terrain Rendering using Smooth Hardware Optimized Level of Detail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bent Dalgaard; Christensen, Niels Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    - also known as ’popping’, when reducing the geometry by exploiting the low-level hardware programmability in order to maintain interactive framerates. Terrain models are repolygonized in order to minimizing the visible error. Furthermore, the method minimizes CPU usage during rendering and requires...

  13. The Human Terrain System: Achieving a Competitive Advantage Through Enhanced Population-Centric Knowledge Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    SYSTEM: ACHIEVING A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE THROUGH ENHANCED “POPULATION-CENTRIC” KNOWLEDGE FLOWS by Eric X. Schaner September 2008 Thesis... Competitive Advantage Through Enhanced “Population-Centric” Knowledge Flows 6. AUTHOR(S) Eric X. Schaner 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Terrain Team, Competitive Advantage , Counterinsurgency Warfare, Tacit Knowledge, Explicit Knowledge 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  14. Snow Depth from Lidar: Challenges and New Technology for Measurements in Extreme Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisford, D. F.; Kadatskiy, V.; Boardman, J. W.; Bormann, K.; Deems, J. S.; Goodale, C. E.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Richardson, M.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) uses an airborne LiDAR system to measure basin-wide snow depth with cm-scale accuracy at ~1m spatial resolution. This is accomplished by creating a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) over snow-free terrain in the summer, then repeating the flights again when the terrain is snow-covered and subtracting the elevations. Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) is then calculated by incorporating modeled snow density estimates, and when combined with coincident spectrometer albedo measurements, informs distributed hydrologic modeling and runoff prediction. This method provides SWE estimates of unprecedented accuracy and extent compared to traditional snow surveys and towers, and 24hr latency data products through the ASO processing pipeline using Apache Tika and OODT software. The timely ASO outputs support operational decision making by water/dam operators for optimal water management. The water-resource snowpack in the western US lies in remote mountainous terrain, spanning large areas containing steep faces at all aspects, often amongst tree canopy. This extreme terrain presents unusual challenges for LiDAR, and requires high altitude flights to achieve wide area coverage, high point density to capture small terrain features, and the ability to capture all slope aspects without shadowing. These challenges were met by the new state-of-the-art Riegl LMS-Q1560 LiDAR system, which incorporates two independent laser channels and a single rotating mirror. Both lasers and mirror are designed to provide forward, backward, and nadir look capability, which minimizes shadowing and ensures data capture even on very steep slopes. The system is capable of logging more than 10 simultaneous pulses in the air, which allows data collection at extremely high resolution while maintaining very high altitude which reduces complete region acquisition time significantly, and allows data collection over terrain with extreme elevation variation. Our experience to

  15. DEM sourcing guidelines for computing 1 Eö accurate terrain corrections for airborne gravity gradiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annecchione, Maria; Hatch, David; Hefford, Shane W.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we investigate digital elevation model (DEM) sourcing requirements to compute gravity gradiometry terrain corrections accurate to 1 Eötvös (Eö) at observation heights of 80 m or more above ground. Such survey heights are typical in fixed-wing airborne surveying for resource exploration where the maximum signal-to-noise ratio is sought. We consider the accuracy of terrain corrections relevant for recent commercial airborne gravity gradiometry systems operating at the 10 Eö noise level and for future systems with a target noise level of 1 Eö. We focus on the requirements for the vertical gradient of the vertical component of gravity (Gdd) because this element of the gradient tensor is most commonly interpreted qualitatively and quantitatively. Terrain correction accuracy depends on the bare-earth DEM accuracy and spatial resolution. The bare-earth DEM accuracy and spatial resolution depends on its source. Two possible sources are considered: airborne LiDAR and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The accuracy of an SRTM DEM is affected by vegetation height. The SRTM footprint is also larger and the DEM resolution is thus lower. However, resolution requirements relax as relief decreases. Publicly available LiDAR data and 1 arc-second and 3 arc-second SRTM data were selected over four study areas representing end member cases of vegetation cover and relief. The four study areas are presented as reference material for processing airborne gravity gradiometry data at the 1 Eö noise level with 50 m spatial resolution. From this investigation we find that to achieve 1 Eö accuracy in the terrain correction at 80 m height airborne LiDAR data are required even when terrain relief is a few tens of meters and the vegetation is sparse. However, as satellite ranging technologies progress bare-earth DEMs of sufficient accuracy and resolution may be sourced at lesser cost. We found that a bare-earth DEM of 10 m resolution and 2 m accuracy are sufficient for

  16. Uncertainty into statistical landslide susceptibility models resulting from terrain mapping units and landslide input data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zêzere, José Luis; Pereira, Susana; Melo, Raquel; Oliveira, Sérgio; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    There are multiple sources of uncertainty within statistically-based landslide susceptibility assessment that needs to be accounted and monitored. In this work we evaluate and discuss differences observed on landslide susceptibility maps resulting from the selection of the terrain mapping unit and the selection of the feature type to represent landslides (polygon vs point). The work is performed in the Silveira Basin (18.2 square kilometres) located north of Lisbon, Portugal, using a unique database of geo-environmental landslide predisposing factors and an inventory of 81 shallow translational slides. The Logistic Regression is the statistical method selected to combine the predictive factors with the dependent variable. Four landslide susceptibility models were computed using the complete landslide inventory and considering the total landslide area over four different terrain mapping units: Slope Terrain Units (STU), Geo-Hydrological Terrain Units (GHTU), Census Terrain Units (CTU) and Grid Cell Terrain Units (GCTU). Four additional landslide susceptibility models were made over the same four terrain mapping units using a landslide training group (50% of the inventory randomly selected). These models were independently validated with the other 50% of the landslide inventory (landslide test group). Lastly, two additional landslide susceptibility models were computed over GCTU, one using the landslide training group represented as point features corresponding to the centroid of landslide, and other using the centroid of landslide rupture zone. In total, 10 landslide susceptibility maps were constructed and classified in 10 classes of equal number of terrain units to allow comparison. The evaluation of the prediction skills of susceptibility models was made using ROC metrics and Success and Prediction rate curves. Lastly, the landslide susceptibility maps computed over GCTU were compared using the Kappa statistics. With this work we conclude that large differences

  17. The Influence of Hilly Terrain on Canopy-Atmosphere Carbon Dioxide Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, G. G.; Finnigan, J. J.; Poggi, D.; Leuning, R.; Belcher, S. E.

    2006-01-01

    Topography influences many aspects of forest-atmosphere carbon exchange; yet only a small number of studies have considered the role of topography on the structure of turbulence within and above vegetation and its effect on canopy photosynthesis and the measurement of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (Nee) using flux towers. Here, we focus on the interplay between radiative transfer, flow dynamics for neutral stratification, and ecophysiological controls on CO2 sources and sinks within a canopy on a gentle cosine hill. We examine how topography alters the forest-atmosphere CO2 exchange rate when compared to uniform flat terrain using a newly developed first-order closure model that explicitly accounts for the flow dynamics, radiative transfer, and nonlinear eco physiological processes within a plant canopy. We show that variation in radiation and airflow due to topography causes only a minor departure in horizontally averaged and vertically integrated photosynthesis from their flat terrain values. However, topography perturbs the airflow and concentration fields in and above plant canopies, leading to significant horizontal and vertical advection of CO2. Advection terms in the conservation equation may be neglected in flow over homogeneous, flat terrain, and then Nee = Fc, the vertical turbulent flux of CO2. Model results suggest that vertical and horizontal advection terms are generally of opposite sign and of the same order as the biological sources and sinks. We show that, close to the hilltop, Fc departs by a factor of three compared to its flat terrain counterpart and that the horizontally averaged Fc-at canopy top differs by more than 20% compared to the flat-terrain case.

  18. Terradynamically streamlined shapes in animals and robots enhance traversability through densely cluttered terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Pullin, Andrew O; Haldane, Duncan W; Lam, Han K; Fearing, Ronald S; Full, Robert J

    2015-06-22

    Many animals, modern aircraft, and underwater vehicles use fusiform, streamlined body shapes that reduce fluid dynamic drag to achieve fast and effective locomotion in air and water. Similarly, numerous small terrestrial animals move through cluttered terrain where three-dimensional, multi-component obstacles like grass, shrubs, vines, and leaf litter also resist motion, but it is unknown whether their body shape plays a major role in traversal. Few ground vehicles or terrestrial robots have used body shape to more effectively traverse environments such as cluttered terrain. Here, we challenged forest-floor-dwelling discoid cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis) possessing a thin, rounded body to traverse tall, narrowly spaced, vertical, grass-like compliant beams. Animals displayed high traversal performance (79 ± 12% probability and 3.4 ± 0.7 s time). Although we observed diverse obstacle traversal strategies, cockroaches primarily (48 ± 9% probability) used a novel roll maneuver, a form of natural parkour, allowing them to rapidly traverse obstacle gaps narrower than half their body width (2.0 ± 0.5 s traversal time). Reduction of body roundness by addition of artificial shells nearly inhibited roll maneuvers and decreased traversal performance. Inspired by this discovery, we added a thin, rounded exoskeletal shell to a legged robot with a nearly cuboidal body, common to many existing terrestrial robots. Without adding sensory feedback or changing the open-loop control, the rounded shell enabled the robot to traverse beam obstacles with gaps narrower than shell width via body roll. Such terradynamically 'streamlined' shapes can reduce terrain resistance and enhance traversability by assisting effective body reorientation via distributed mechanical feedback. Our findings highlight the need to consider body shape to improve robot mobility in real-world terrain often filled with clutter, and to develop better locomotor-ground contact models to understand

  19. PHYSICAL MODELLING OF TERRAIN DIRECTLY FROM SURFER GRID AND ARC/INFO ASCII DATA FORMATS#

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.K. Modi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Additive manufacturing technology is used to make physical models of terrain using GIS surface data. Attempts have been made to understand several other GIS file formats, such as the Surfer grid and the ARC/INFO ASCII grid. The surface of the terrain in these file formats has been converted into an STL file format that is suitable for additive manufacturing. The STL surface is converted into a 3D model by making the walls and the base. In this paper, the terrain modelling work has been extended to several other widely-used GIS file formats. Terrain models can be created in less time and at less cost, and intricate geometries of terrain can be created with ease and great accuracy.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Laagvervaardigingstegnologie word gebruik om fisiese modelle van terreine vanaf GIS oppervlakdata te maak. Daar is gepoog om verskeie ander GIS lêerformate, soos die Surfer rooster en die ARC/INFO ASCII rooster, te verstaan. Die oppervlak van die terrein in hierdie lêerformate is omgeskakel in 'n STL lêerformaat wat geskik is vir laagvervaardiging. Verder is die STL oppervlak omgeskakel in 'n 3D model deur die kante en die basis te modelleer. In hierdie artikel is die terreinmodelleringswerk uitgebrei na verskeie ander algemeen gebruikte GIS lêerformate. Terreinmodelle kan so geskep word in korter tyd en teen laer koste, terwyl komplekse geometrieë van terreine met gemak en groot akkuraatheid geskep kan word.

  20. Path Planning and Replanning for Mobile Robot Navigation on 3D Terrain: An Approach Based on Geodesic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Lin Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, mobile robot navigation on a 3D terrain with a single obstacle is addressed. The terrain is modelled as a smooth, complete manifold with well-defined tangent planes and the hazardous region is modelled as an enclosing circle with a hazard grade tuned radius representing the obstacle projected onto the terrain to allow efficient path-obstacle intersection checking. To resolve the intersections along the initial geodesic, by resorting to the geodesic ideas from differential geometry on surfaces and manifolds, we present a geodesic-based planning and replanning algorithm as a new method for obstacle avoidance on a 3D terrain without using boundary following on the obstacle surface. The replanning algorithm generates two new paths, each a composition of two geodesics, connected via critical points whose locations are found to be heavily relying on the exploration of the terrain via directional scanning on the tangent plane at the first intersection point of the initial geodesic with the circle. An advantage of this geodesic path replanning procedure is that traversability of terrain on which the detour path traverses could be explored based on the local Gauss-Bonnet Theorem of the geodesic triangle at the planning stage. A simulation demonstrates the practicality of the analytical geodesic replanning procedure for navigating a constant speed point robot on a 3D hill-like terrain.

  1. The Effect of Terrain Inclination on Performance and the Stability Region of Two-Wheeled Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareena Kausar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-wheeled mobile robots (TWMRs have a capability of avoiding the tip-over problem on inclined terrain by adjusting the centre of mass position of the robot body. The effects of terrain inclination on the robot performance are studied to exploit this capability. Prior to the real-time implementation of position control, an estimation of the stability region of the TWMR is essential for safe operation. A numerical method to estimate the stability region is applied and the effects of inclined surfaces on the performance and stability region of the robot are investigated. The dynamics of a TWMR is modelled on a general uneven terrain and reduced for cases of inclined and horizontal flat terrain. A full state feedback (FSFB controller is designed based on optimal gains with speed tracking on a horizontal flat terrain. The performance and stability regions are simulated for the robot on a horizontal flat and inclined terrain with the same controller. The results endorse a variation in equilibrium points and a reduction in stability region for robot motion on inclined terrain.

  2. Parameter selection in the Green's function parabolic equation for outdoor sound propagation over varied terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jennifer L.

    2003-10-01

    There is a need for a method to predict the attenuation of sound over a varied terrain and for realistic weather conditions. Parabolic equation based propagation codes can deal successfully with a sound speed that is a function of height (as could be caused by wind or temperature gradients) as well as varying ground heights and impedances. The ability to predict the received sound levels for a set of digitized terrain and sound speed data is desired. The accuracy of the Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE) has already been confirmed for propagation over flat ground with a slowly varying sound speed profile and/or with atmospheric turbulence. The approach here will be to compare to a benchmark solution for each different kind of terrain (i.e. flat, slope, step, barrier) with constant sound speed to verify the numeric code and to define the limits of accuracy in the GFPE for these situations. The GFPE is based on a one-way wave equation, so the numerical model will not be able to accurately predict the pressure behind multiple barriers or for other situations in which backward reflections can affect the received pressure. We will define the additional limits to the applicability of this model based on many comparisons with analytical solutions for propagation beyond barriers with constant sound speed. The sloping terrain will be treated as a series of stairsteps---a digitized ground height. Buildings and steps will be merely larger stairsteps. Although the GFPE has already been documented, as well as wide angle parabolic equations (PEs) and PEs using conformal mapping or similar rudimentary stair-stepping terrain maps, a PE that works with large discontinuities has not been documented, nor has there been work on a propagation model over complicated terrain profiles (in the past most work has been done in underwater acoustics for oceans with a sloping bottom condition but no variation in the slope was presented). The main emphasis here will be on the assumptions

  3. Assessment of HRSC Digital Terrain Models Produced for the South Polar Residual Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2017-04-01

    The current Digital Terrain Models available for Mars consist of NASA MOLA (Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter) Digital Terrain Models with an average resolution of 112 m/ pixel (512 pixels/degree) for the polar region. The ESA/DLR High Resolution Stereo Camera is currently orbiting Mars and mapping its surface, 98% with resolution of ≤100 m/pixel and better and 100% at lower resolution [1]. It is possible to produce Digital Terrain Models from HRSC images using various methods. In this study, the method developed on Kim and Muller [2] which uses the VICAR open source program together with photogrammetry sofrware from DLR (Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt) with image matching based on the GOTCHA (Gruen-Otto-Chau) algorithm [3]. Digital Terrain Models have been processed over the South Pole with emphasis on areas around South Polar Residual Cap from High Resolution Stereo Camera images [4]. Digital Terrain Models have been produced for 31 orbits out of 149 polar orbits available. This study analyses the quality of the DTMs including an assessment of accuracy of elevations using the MOLA MEGDR (Mission Experiment Gridded Data Records) which has roughly 42 million MOLA PEDR (Precision Experiment Data Records) points between latitudes of 78 o -90 o S. The issues encountered in the production of Digital Terrain Models will be described and the statistical results and assessment method will be presented. The resultant DTMs will be accessible via http://i-Mars.eu/web-GIS References: [1] Neukum, G. et. al, 2004. Mars Express: The Scientific Payload pp. 17-35. [2] Kim, J.-R. and J.-P. Muller. 2009. PSS vol. 57, pp. 2095-2112. [3] Shin, D. and J.-P. Muller. 2012. Pattern Recognition, 45(10), 3795 -3809. [4] Putri, A.R. D., et al., Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B4, 463-469 Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received partial funding from the STFC "MSSL Consolidated Grant" ST/K000977/1 and partial support from the

  4. Quantitative analysis of terrain units mapped in the northern quarter of Venus from Venera 15/16 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, G. G.

    1991-01-01

    The contacts between 34 geological/geomorphic terrain units in the northern quarter of Venus mapped from Venera 15/16 data were digitized and converted to a Sinusoidal Equal-Area projection. The result was then registered with a merged Pioneer Venus/Venera 15/16 altimetric database, root mean square (rms) slope values, and radar reflectivity values derived from Pioneer Venus. The resulting information includes comparisons among individual terrain units and terrain groups to which they are assigned in regard to percentage of map area covered, elevation, rms slopes, distribution of suspected craters greater than 10 km in diameter.

  5. A Matching Method of Space-borne Laser Altimeter Big Footprint Waveform and Terrain Based on Cross Cumulative Residual Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUE Chunyu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A matching method of space-borne laser altimeter big footprint waveform and terrain based on cross cumulative residual entropy(CCRE is proposed. Firstly, the waveform data and digital surface model(DSM data are projected to the statistics domain, according to the terrain structure information of the waveform, where statistics signal vectors of the two data are in the same dimension. Then, the waveform data and DSM image are matched in the statistics domain with CCRE. Experiments show that the algorithm proposed is effective in waveform and terrain matching, and the matching accuracy is within 1 pixel.

  6. The critical phase for visual control of human walking over complex terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthis, Jonathan Samir; Barton, Sean L; Fajen, Brett R

    2017-08-08

    To walk efficiently over complex terrain, humans must use vision to tailor their gait to the upcoming ground surface without interfering with the exploitation of passive mechanical forces. We propose that walkers use visual information to initialize the mechanical state of the body before the beginning of each step so the resulting ballistic trajectory of the walker's center-of-mass will facilitate stepping on target footholds. Using a precision stepping task and synchronizing target visibility to the gait cycle, we empirically validated two predictions derived from this strategy: (1) Walkers must have information about upcoming footholds during the second half of the preceding step, and (2) foot placement is guided by information about the position of the target foothold relative to the preceding base of support. We conclude that active and passive modes of control work synergistically to allow walkers to negotiate complex terrain with efficiency, stability, and precision.

  7. A multitasking behavioral control system for the Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klarer, P.

    1994-03-01

    The design of a multitasking behavioral control system for the Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) is described. The control system design attempts to ameliorate some of the problems noted by some researchers when implementing subsumption or behavioral control systems, particularly with regard to multiple processor systems and real-time operations. The architecture is designed to allow both synchronous and asynchronous operations between various behavior modules by taking advantage of intertask communications channels, and by implementing each behavior module and each interconnection node as a stand-alone task. The potential advantages of this approach over those previously described in the field are discussed. An implementation of the architecture is planned for a prototype Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) currently under development, and is briefly described.

  8. Pointing Angle Calibration of ZY3-02 Satellite Laser Altimeter Using Terrain Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Tang, X.; Gao, X.; Huang, J. P.; Chen, J.; Lu, J.

    2017-05-01

    After GLAS (Geo-science Laser Altimeter System) loaded on the ICESat (Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite), satellite laser altimeter attracts more and more attention. ZY3-02 equipped with the Chinese first satellite laser altimeter has been successfully launched on 30th May, 2016. The geometric calibration is an important step for the laser data processing and application. The method to calculate the laser pointing angle error based on existed reference terrain data is proposed in this paper. The public version terrain data, such as 90m-SRTM and 30m-AW3D30, can be used to estimate the pointing angle of laser altimeter. The GLAS data with simulated pointing error and actual ZY3-02 laser altimetry data is experimented to validate the algorithm. The conclusion will be useful for the future domestic satellite laser altimeter.

  9. A bibliography of terrain modeling (geomorphometry), the quantitative representation of topography: supplement 4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    Terrain modeling, the practice of ground-surface quantification, is an amalgam of Earth science, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. The discipline is known variously as geomorphometry (or simply morphometry), terrain analysis, and quantitative geomorphology. It continues to grow through myriad applications to hydrology, geohazards mapping, tectonics, sea-floor and planetary exploration, and other fields. Dating nominally to the co-founders of academic geography, Alexander von Humboldt (1808, 1817) and Carl Ritter (1826, 1828), the field was revolutionized late in the 20th Century by the computer manipulation of spatial arrays of terrain heights, or digital elevation models (DEMs), which can quantify and portray ground-surface form over large areas (Maune, 2001). Morphometric procedures are implemented routinely by commercial geographic information systems (GIS) as well as specialized software (Harvey and Eash, 1996; Köthe and others, 1996; ESRI, 1997; Drzewiecki et al., 1999; Dikau and Saurer, 1999; Djokic and Maidment, 2000; Wilson and Gallant, 2000; Breuer, 2001; Guth, 2001; Eastman, 2002). The new Earth Surface edition of the Journal of Geophysical Research, specializing in surficial processes, is the latest of many publication venues for terrain modeling. This is the fourth update of a bibliography and introduction to terrain modeling (Pike, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1999) designed to collect the diverse, scattered literature on surface measurement as a resource for the research community. The use of DEMs in science and technology continues to accelerate and diversify (Pike, 2000a). New work appears so frequently that a sampling must suffice to represent the vast literature. This report adds 1636 entries to the 4374 in the four earlier publications1. Forty-eight additional entries correct dead Internet links and other errors found in the prior listings. Chronicling the history of terrain modeling, many entries in this report predate the 1999 supplement

  10. Wind tunnel-based assessment of wind field in complex topographic terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangan, Horia [WindEEE Research Institute (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of the assessment of wind fields in complex topographic terrain based on wind tunnels. It comprises mesoscale modeling, wind tunnel simulation, benchmarking microscale simulations and the windEEE dome. The modeling is categorized into maps for complex terrain, linear models limited to generic topography, measurement techniques for wind tunnel testing and CFD simulations linked with wind tunnel test results required for benchmarking. The wind tunnel testing is discussed in detail using topographic features like valleys, hills and ridges. Instantaneous and mean velocity vectors are calculated for the ridge and mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles are presented for a hill. Flow is measured over the whole domain using both qualitative and quantitative techniques. These techniques can also be used to simulate low-level nocturnal currents, downbursts and tornados in the actual physical environment. The impact on wind farms and turbines of these local storms can also be calculated.

  11. All-terrain vehicle, trampoline and scooter injuries and their prevention in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Deborah

    2006-06-01

    Childhood injuries are the leading cause of death in children and result in significant healthcare utilization. Injuries specifically related to all terrain vehicles, trampolines and scooter usage can be devastating and are often preventable. Our understanding of how and why these injuries occur can aid in preventing morbidity and mortality. The popularity of all-terrain vehicles, nonmotorized scooters and trampolines has soared over recent years. This increased usage has led to a tremendous rise in injuries in children utilizing these recreational activities. Many of the injuries occur in younger children who may not possess the motor and cognitive skills necessary to safely engage in these activities. These activities lead to a number of head and extremity injuries, most of which can be attenuated by the use of protective gear such as helmets and protective padding. Understanding the nature of these injuries can lead to advocacy and hopefully legislation to prevent further injuries from occurring.

  12. Thermal characteristics of mountain desert terrain derived from thermal infrared multispectral scanner measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astling, E. G.; Quattrochi, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of mountain-desert territory thermal is examined with an airborne thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS). The purpose of the study is to demonstrate that inhomogeneities of the surface temperatures in the area can be adequately large to influence mesoscale circulations and the turbulence characteristics of boundary-layer flow. Ground truth measurements are compared to the TIMS imagery, with focus placed on the thermal infrared sensitivity to wet and dry soils, terrain elevation, and soil type. The results indicate that variations in the thermal features are dependent on soil type and soil moisture, and that the dependence on surface radiative temperatures on terrain elevation is apparent in daytime measurements.

  13. The Collection of The Main Issues for Wind Farm Optimisation in Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Chen, Dandan; Han, Xingxing; Pan, Hangping; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-09-01

    The paper aims at establishing the collection of the main issues for wind farm optimisation in complex terrain. To make wind farm cost effective, this paper briefly analyses the main factors influencing wind farm design in complex terrain and sets up a series of mathematical model that includes micro-siting, collector circuits, access roads design for optimization problems. The paper relies on the existing one year wind data in the wind farm area and uses genetic algorithm to optimize the micro-siting problem. After optimization of the turbine layout, single-source shortest path algorithm and minimum spanning tree algorithm are used to optimize collector circuits and access roads. The obtained results can provide important guidance for wind farms construction.

  14. The collection of the main issues for wind farm optimisation in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Chen, Dandan; Han, Xingxing

    2016-01-01

    micro-siting, collector circuits, access roads design for optimization problems. The paper relies on the existing one year wind data in the wind farm area and uses genetic algorithm to optimize the micro-siting problem. After optimization of the turbine layout, single-source shortest path algorithm......The paper aims at establishing the collection of the main issues for wind farm optimisation in complex terrain. To make wind farm cost effective, this paper briefly analyses the main factors influencing wind farm design in complex terrain and sets up a series of mathematical model that includes...... and minimum spanning tree algorithm are used to optimize collector circuits and access roads. The obtained results can provide important guidance for wind farms construction....

  15. Designing, Building, Measuring and Testing a Constant Equivalent Fall Height Terrain Park Jump

    CERN Document Server

    Petrone, Nicola; McNeil, James A; Hubbard, Mont

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has presented both a theoretical foundation for designing terrain park jumps that control landing impact and computer software to accomplish this task. US ski resorts have been reluctant to adopt this more engineered approach to jump design, in part due to questions of feasibility. The present study demonstrates this feasibility. It describes the design, construction, measurement and experimental testing of such a jump. It improves on previous efforts with more complete instrumentation, a larger range of jump distances, and a new method for combining jumper- and board-mounted accelerometer data to estimate equivalent fall height, a measure of impact severity. It unequivocally demonstrates the efficacy of the engineering design approach, namely that it is possible and practical to design and build free style terrain park jumps with landing surface shapes that control for landing impact as predicted by the theory.

  16. Hexapod Walking Robot Energy Consumption Dependence On Different Gaits And Speed While Moving On Even Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Luneckas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of robotic energetics while moving on rough terrain becomes a difficult task without having the information about the movement on even terrain. The problem appears in selection of gaits depending on how much power robot consumes. In this paper, energy consumption of a hexapod walking robot dependence on different gaits and speed is observed. Three most common gaits were used in this experiment: tripod gait, bipod gait and wave gait. Results clearly show that while moving at slow speed, the least energy is consumed by wave gait. As the speed increases, bipod gait selection is required to lower energy consumption. Finally, tripod gait must be selected at even higher speed.

  17. A 3D terrain reconstruction method of stereo vision based quadruped robot navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhuo; Zhu, Ying; Liang, Guanhao

    2017-01-01

    To provide 3D environment information for the quadruped robot autonomous navigation system during walking through rough terrain, based on the stereo vision, a novel 3D terrain reconstruction method is presented. In order to solve the problem that images collected by stereo sensors have large regions with similar grayscale and the problem that image matching is poor at real-time performance, watershed algorithm and fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm are combined for contour extraction. Aiming at the problem of error matching, duel constraint with region matching and pixel matching is established for matching optimization. Using the stereo matching edge pixel pairs, the 3D coordinate algorithm is estimated according to the binocular stereo vision imaging model. Experimental results show that the proposed method can yield high stereo matching ratio and reconstruct 3D scene quickly and efficiently.

  18. Deep Learning as Applied in SAR Target Recognition and Terrain Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Feng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep learning such as deep neural networks has revolutionized the computer vision area. Deep learning-based algorithms have surpassed conventional algorithms in terms of performance by a significant margin. This paper reviews our works in the application of deep convolutional neural networks to target recognition and terrain classification using the SAR image. A convolutional neural network is employed to automatically extract a hierarchic feature representation from the data, based on which the target recognition and terrain classification can be conducted. Experimental results on the MSTAR benchmark dataset reveal that deep convolutional network could achieve a state-of-the-art classification accuracy of 99% for the 10-class task. For a polarimetric SAR image classification, we propose complex-valued convolutional neural networks for complex SAR images. This algorithm achieved a state-of-the-art accuracy of 95% for the 15-class task on the Flevoland benchmark dataset.

  19. Identifying Ground-Robot Impedance to Improve Terrain Adaptability in Running Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Arevalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, running robots are still outperformed by animals, but their dynamic behaviour can be described by the same model. This coincidence means that biomechanical studies can reveal much about the adaptability and energy efficiency of walking mechanisms. In particular, animals adjust their leg stiffness to negotiate terrains with different stiffnesses to keep the total leg-ground stiffness constant. In this work, we aim to provide one method to identify ground-robot impedance so that control can be applied to emulate the aforementioned animal behaviour. Experimental results of the method are presented, showing well-differentiated estimations on four different types of terrain. Additionally, an analysis of the convergence time is presented and compared with the contact time of humans while running, indicating that the method is suitable for use at high speeds.

  20. Navigation and Hazard Avoidance for High-Speed Unmanned Ground Vehicles in Rough Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-07

    Number of Manuscripts: 0.00 Number of Inventions : Graduate Students PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME Martin Udengaard 1.00 1.00FTE Equivalent: 1Total Number... Inventions (DD882) NAVIGATION AND HAZARD AVOIDANCE FOR HIGH-SPEED UNMANNED GROUND VEHICLES IN ROUGH TERRAIN ARO Award Number: W911NF-05-1...pressure given the same ground reaction force. Figure 4. A schematic showing a spherical wheel (left) and its use on an omnidirectional wheelchair

  1. Terrain Hazard Detection and Avoidance During the Descent and Landing Phase of the Altair Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strhan, Alan L.; Johnson, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes some of the environmental challenges associated with landing a crewed or robotic vehicle at any certified location on the lunar surface (i.e. not a mountain peak, permanently dark crater floor or overly steep terrain), with a specific focus on how hazard detection technology may be incorporated to mitigate these challenges. For this discussion, the vehicle of interest is the Altair Lunar Lander, being the vehicle element of the NASA Constellation Program aimed at returning humans to the moon. Lunar environmental challenges for such global lunar access primarily involve terrain and lighting. These would include sizable rocks and slopes, which are more concentrated in highland areas; small craters, which are essentially everywhere independent of terrain type; and for polar regions, low-angle sunlight, which leaves significant terrain in shadow. To address these issues, as well as to provide for precision landing, the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) Project was charted by NASA Headquarters, and has since been making significant progress. The ALHAT team considered several sensors for real-time hazard detection, settling on the use of a Flash Lidar mounted to a high-speed gimbal, with computationally intense image processing and elevation interpretation software. The Altair Project has been working with the ALHAT team to understand the capabilities and limitations of their concept, and has incorporated much of the ALHAT hazard detection system into the Altair baseline design. This integration, along with open issues relating to computational performance, the need for system redundancy, and potential pilot interaction, will be explored further in this paper.

  2. Multidimensional method-of-lines transport for atmospheric flows over steep terrain using arbitrary meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, James; Weller, Hilary; Methven, John; Davies, Terry

    2017-09-01

    Including terrain in atmospheric models gives rise to mesh distortions near the lower boundary that can degrade accuracy and challenge the stability of transport schemes. Multidimensional transport schemes avoid splitting errors on distorted, arbitrary meshes, and method-of-lines schemes have a low computational cost because they perform reconstructions at fixed points. This paper presents a multidimensional method-of-lines finite volume transport scheme, ;cubicFit;, which is designed to be numerically stable on arbitrary meshes. Stability conditions derived from a von Neumann stability analysis are imposed during model initialisation to obtain stability and improve accuracy in distorted regions of the mesh, and near steeply-sloping lower boundaries. Reconstruction calculations depend upon the mesh only, needing just one vector multiply per face per time-stage irrespective of the velocity field. The cubicFit scheme is evaluated using three, idealised numerical tests. The first is a variant of a standard horizontal transport test on severely distorted terrain-following meshes. The second is a new test case that assesses accuracy near the ground by transporting a tracer at the lower boundary over steep terrain on terrain-following meshes, cut-cell meshes, and new, slanted-cell meshes that do not suffer from severe time-step constraints associated with cut cells. The third, standard test deforms a tracer in a vortical flow on hexagonal-icosahedral meshes and cubed-sphere meshes. In all tests, cubicFit is stable and largely insensitive to mesh distortions, and cubicFit results are more accurate than those obtained using a multidimensional linear upwind transport scheme. The cubicFit scheme is second-order convergent regardless of mesh distortions.

  3. Real-Time Flight Planning Solution of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Spatial Trajectory in Complex Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tan’

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a tendency in the world that the unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs are beginning to be widely used in civilian areas. With the rapid development of the UAV, capable of moving in complicated terrain, the task of planning a real-time flight route is becoming more relevant and attractive.Combining control methods of predictive models with and mixed integer linear programming can improve the efficiency of solving the problem of flight route planning in real time. In order to plan the optimal spatial trajectory of UAV when flying in difficult terrain (houses, mountains, etc., in this paper, a novel approach to real-time three-dimensional trajectory planning for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV was represented under conditions of complex mountainous terrain, which can be built on the model of predictive control (MPC. Local terrain around UAV, which was modeled by triangulated irregular network (TIN method as well as logical and continuous variables describing obstacle-avoidance are known within the limit detection radius.However, taking into account the functional characteristics of the UAV, it is necessary to further treat smooth trajectory in its true time to receive the real-time permissible threedimensional trajectory. This article has been selected an algorithm for the serial connection of radius segments to smooth the planned route of flight of the UAV.In the final part through the simulation results of the algorithm we have shown, using this algorithm, that the UAV successfully avoids all obstacles in real-time. This algorithm fully takes into account the limits on the maneuvering capabilities of the UAV, and it is proved that our algorithm is efficiently applied when the UAV moves in unknown environments, or in a situation of gradual obstacle detection in real flight.

  4. Pulsating continents on Venus: An explanation for crustal plateaus and tessera terrains

    OpenAIRE

    Romeo Briones, Ignacio; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    We propose that tessera terrains on Venus represent continental crust that does not participate in the periodic recycling of the lithosphere through global subduction events.We have studied the force balance on the boundary of a continental area that survives a global subduction event using an analytical model. In the proposed model, the ratio between the crustal and lithospheric mantle thicknesses controls the force balance. If the crust thickness is less than ∼2/5 of the lithosp...

  5. The geometric signature: Quantifying landslide-terrain types from digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Topography of various types and scales can be fingerprinted by computer analysis of altitude matrices (digital elevation models, or DEMs). The critical analytic tool is the geometric signature, a set of measures that describes topographic form well enough to distinguish among geomorphically disparate landscapes. Different surficial processes create topography with diagnostic forms that are recognizable in the field. The geometric signature abstracts those forms from contour maps or their DEMs and expresses them numerically. This multivariate characterization enables once-in-tractable problems to be addressed. The measures that constitute a geometric signature express different but complementary attributes of topographic form. Most parameters used here are statistical estimates of central tendency and dispersion for five major categories of terrain geometry; altitude, altitude variance spectrum, slope between slope reversals, and slope and its curvature at fixed slope lengths. As an experimental application of geometric signatures, two mapped terrain types associated with different processes of shallow landsliding in Marin County, California, were distinguished consistently by a 17-variable description of topography from 21??21 DEMs (30-m grid spacing). The small matrix is a statistical window that can be used to scan large DEMs by computer, thus potentially automating the mapping of contrasting terrain types. The two types in Marin County host either (1) slow slides: earth flows and slump-earth flows, or (2) rapid flows: debris avalanches and debris flows. The signature approach should adapt to terrain taxonomy and mapping in other areas, where conditions differ from those in Central California. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  6. Utilisation des données de terrain et gestion des informations multi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Auteurs :

    Le secteur Nord-Ouest de la région de Yaoundé au relief accidenté est sensible aux glissements de terrain et aux éboulements. Les témoins de manifestations anciennes outrepassent les délimitations connues des zones à risque ; d'où la complexité de la configuration de l'aléa. En synchronisant les données.

  7. SIG et risques naturels: le glissement de terrain de Séchilienne (Isère

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre ASTÉ

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available À Séchilienne (massif de l’Oisans s’est produit un glissement de terrain qui, selon les experts, peut devenir glissement de versant entier. Leurs scénarios ont été traduits cartographiquement en un SIG qui, malgré ses limites, constitue un premier outil de prise de conscience et d’aide à la décision.

  8. SIG et risques naturels: le glissement de terrain de Séchilienne (Isère)

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Pierre ASTÉ; Pierre DUMOLARD; Frédéric LEONE; Shi JIN

    1993-01-01

    À Séchilienne (massif de l’Oisans) s’est produit un glissement de terrain qui, selon les experts, peut devenir glissement de versant entier. Leurs scénarios ont été traduits cartographiquement en un SIG qui, malgré ses limites, constitue un premier outil de prise de conscience et d’aide à la décision.

  9. Research challenges for permafrost in steep and cold terrain: an alpine perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Haeberli, W; Gruber, S

    2008-01-01

    The past few decades have seen a rapid development and progress in research on permafrost in mountain areas with complex and rugged topography such as the European Alps. At the same time, it becomes increasingly clear that climate change impacts have the potential to severely affect future living conditions in areas with steep and cold terrain by influencing the chain of surface processes that link debris production via rock fall to talus/moraine formation, creep deformation of frozen deposit...

  10. Relationships between Plant Species Richness and Terrain in Middle Sub-Tropical Eastern China

    OpenAIRE

    Chuangye Song; Mingchang Cao

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the relation between species richness and topography in the middle sub-tropical area of Eastern China. A species richness survey was conducted along altitude in Kaihua County, Zhejiang Province, Eastern China. Topographic variables, such as altitude, slope, aspect, terrain roughness, relief degree and the topographical wetness index, were extracted from the digital elevation model. The Generalized Additive Model (GAM), the linear model and the quadr...

  11. Waterfront on the Martian Planitia: Algorithmic emergent catchments on disordered terrain

    OpenAIRE

    Handmer, Casey J.

    2016-01-01

    Under a terraforming scenario, a reactivated hydrological cycle on Mars will result in upwards movement of water due to evaporation and precipitation. If Mars' embryonic fossilized catchments provide inadequate drainage, Mars' limited supplies of water may be absorbed entirely by crater lakes and glaciers, with negative consequences for the terraforming effort. We demonstrate a stable, convergent algorithm for the efficient modeling of water flow over disordered terrain. This model is applied...

  12. New Tools for a New Terrain Air Force Support to Special Operations in the Cyber Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    available to this SOF operator to use a construct such as a map or visualization of the cyber terrain. Few software tools exist to manipulate this...practically by knowing every physical object also has a cyber representation and signature. Mapping, visualizing , and manipulating actions both... useful method for the US military to discuss, visualize , and operate within a cyberspace plane of routes, connections, nodes, and hot spots where

  13. Spacial and Frequency Domain Calculation of Terrain Roughness Metric Root-Mean-Square (RMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    SQUARE (RMS) W. Bylsma Dynamics and Structures U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) U.S. Army Tank-automotive and...Distribution Unlimited. [5] Simon and Roach. Measurement of the Cross-Country Terrain Environment. US Army Transportation Research Command ...Procedure (TOP) 1-1-010, 4 January 2012 (Pages 10-11). Automotive Directorate (CSTE- DTC -AT-AD), US Army Aberdeen Test Center, 400 Colleran Road

  14. Sloped Terrain Segmentation for Autonomous Drive Using Sparse 3D Point Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Seoungjae Cho; Jonghyun Kim; Warda Ikram; Kyungeun Cho; Young-Sik Jeong; Kyhyun Um; Sungdae Sim

    2014-01-01

    A ubiquitous environment for road travel that uses wireless networks requires the minimization of data exchange between vehicles. An algorithm that can segment the ground in real time is necessary to obtain location data between vehicles simultaneously executing autonomous drive. This paper proposes a framework for segmenting the ground in real time using a sparse three-dimensional (3D) point cloud acquired from undulating terrain. A sparse 3D point cloud can be acquired by scanning the geogr...

  15. Spectroscopic classification of icy satellites of Saturn I: Identification of terrain units on Dione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Stephan, K.; Filacchione, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.

    2013-11-01

    Dione is one of the largest and densest icy satellites of Saturn. Its surface shows a marked asymmetry between its leading and trailing hemispheres, the leading side being brighter than the trailing side, which shows regions mantled by a dark veneer whose origin is likely exogenic. In order to identify different terrain units we applied the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) classification technique to Dione’s hyperspectral images acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini Orbiter in the infrared range (0.88-5.12 μm). On a relatively limited portion of the surface of Dione we first identified nine spectral endmembers, corresponding to as many terrain units, which mostly distinguish for water ice abundance and ice grain size. We then used these endmembers in SAM to achieve a comprehensive classification of the entire surface. The analysis of the infrared spectra returned by VIMS shows that different regions of Dione have variations in water ice bands depths, in average ice grain size, and in the concentration of contaminants, such as CO2 and hydrocarbons, which are clearly connected to morphological and geological structures. Generally, the spectral units that classify optically dark terrains are those showing suppressed water ice bands, a finer ice grain size and a higher concentration of carbon dioxide. Conversely, spectral units labeling brighter regions have deeper water ice absorption bands, higher albedo and a smaller concentration of contaminants. We also considered VIMS cubes of the small satellite Helene (one of the two Dione’s trojan moons) and we compared its infrared spectra to those of the spectral units found on Dione. We observe that the closest match between the spectra of the two satellites occurs for one of the youngest and freshest terrain units on Dione: the Creusa crater region.

  16. Methods for Improving Long-Range Wireless Communication Between Extreme Terrain Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul; Zarzhitsky, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    Axel is an extreme terrain, two-wheeled rover designed to traverse rocky surface and sub-surface landscapes in order to conduct remote science experiments in hard-to-reach locations. The rover's design meets many requirements for a mobile research platform capable of reaching water seeps on Martian cliff sides. Axel was developed by the Mobility and Robotic Systems section at the Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Unique design criteria associated with extreme terrain mobility led to a unique rover solution, consisting of a central module, which provides long-term energy storage and space for large-scale science payloads, and two detachable Axels that can detach and explore extreme terrain locations that are inaccessible to conventional rovers. The envisioned mission could involve a four-wheeled configuration of Axel called 'DuAxel' that is able to traverse the benign, flattened terrain of a landing site and approach the edge of the targeted crater or cave where it would deploy anchoring legs and detach one of the Axel rovers [1]. A tether provides a secure link between the Axel rover and the central module, acting as an anchor to allow Axel to descend along steep crater walls to collect data from the scientifically relevant sites along the water seeps or crater ledges. After completing its scientific mission Axel would hoist itself up to the central module and dock autonomously (using its on-board stereo cameras), allowing the once-again recombined DuAxel to travel to another location to repeat data collection.

  17. RGB–D terrain perception and dense mapping for legged robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belter Dominik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issues of unstructured terrain modeling for the purpose of navigation with legged robots. We present an improved elevation grid concept adopted to the specific requirements of a small legged robot with limited perceptual capabilities. We propose an extension of the elevation grid update mechanism by incorporating a formal treatment of the spatial uncertainty. Moreover, this paper presents uncertainty models for a structured light RGB-D sensor and a stereo vision camera used to produce a dense depth map. The model for the uncertainty of the stereo vision camera is based on uncertainty propagation from calibration, through undistortion and rectification algorithms, allowing calculation of the uncertainty of measured 3D point coordinates. The proposed uncertainty models were used for the construction of a terrain elevation map using the Videre Design STOC stereo vision camera and Kinect-like range sensors. We provide experimental verification of the proposed mapping method, and a comparison with another recently published terrain mapping method for walking robots.

  18. A sequential iterative dual-filter for Lidar terrain modeling optimized for complex forested environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véga, C.; Durrieu, S.; Morel, J.; Allouis, T.

    2012-07-01

    This paper introduces a sequential iterative dual-filter method for filtering Lidar point clouds acquired over rough and forested terrain and computing a digital terrain model (DTM). The method belongs to the family of virtual deforestation algorithms that iteratively detect and filter objects above-the ground surface. The method uses both points and raster models to do so. The algorithm performance was first tested over a complex badlands environment and compared to a reference model obtained using a traditional TIN-Iterative approach. It was further tested on a benchmark site of the ISPRS (site 5) representing mainly forests and slopes. Over badlands, the resulting DTM elevation RMSE was 0.14 m over flat areas, and increased to 0.28 m under forested and rough terrain. The later value was 12.5% lower than the one obtained with a TIN-Iterative approach. Over the ISPRS site, the TIN-Iterative model provided better results for 3 out of the 4 sample sites. But the proposed algorithm, still worked fairly well provided a total classification error of 5.52%, and is well ranked compared with other algorithms. While the TIN-iterative approach might work better with low density, the proposed one is a good alternative to process high density point cloud and compute DTMs suitable for modeling either hydrodynamic or morphological processes under forest cover at a local scale.

  19. Efficient parallel implementations of approximation algorithms for guarding 1.5D terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Martinović

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the 1.5D terrain guarding problem, an x-monotone polygonal line is dened by k vertices and a G set of terrain points, i.e. guards, and a N set of terrain points which guards are to observe (guard. This involves a weighted version of the guarding problem where guards G have weights. The goal is to determine a minimum weight subset of G to cover all the points in N, including a version where points from N have demands. Furthermore, another goal is to determine the smallest subset of G, such that every point in N is observed by the required number of guards. Both problems are NP-hard and have a factor 5 approximation [3, 4]. This paper will show that if the (1+ϵ-approximate solver for the corresponding linear program is a computer, for any ϵ > 0, an extra 1+ϵ factor will appear in the final approximation factor for both problems. A comparison will be carried out the parallel implementation based on GPU and CPU threads with the Gurobi solver, leading to the conclusion that the respective algorithm outperforms the Gurobi solver on large and dense inputs typically by one order of magnitude.

  20. Multiscale Feature Model for Terrain Data Based on Adaptive Spatial Neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiresolution hierarchy based on features (FMRH has been applied in the field of terrain modeling and obtained significant results in real engineering. However, it is difficult to schedule multiresolution data in FMRH from external memory. This paper proposed new multiscale feature model and related strategies to cluster spatial data blocks and solve the scheduling problems of FMRH using spatial neighborhood. In the model, the nodes with similar error in the different layers should be in one cluster. On this basis, a space index algorithm for each cluster guided by Hilbert curve is proposed. It ensures that multi-resolution terrain data can be loaded without traversing the whole FMRH; therefore, the efficiency of data scheduling is improved. Moreover, a spatial closeness theorem of cluster is put forward and is also proved. It guarantees that the union of data blocks composites a whole terrain without any data loss. Finally, experiments have been carried out on many different large scale data sets, and the results demonstrate that the schedule time is shortened and the efficiency of I/O operation is apparently improved, which is important in real engineering.

  1. Adaptive sampling for real-time rendering of large terrain based on B-spline wavelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalem, Sid Ali; Kourgli, Assia

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a central processing unit (CPU)-based technique for terrain geometry rendering that could relieve graphics processing unit (GPU) from processing the appropriate level of detail (LOD) of the geometric surface. The proposed approach alleviates the computational load on the CPU and approaches GPU-based efficiency. As the datasets of realistic terrains are usually huge for real-time rendering, we suggest using a training stage to handle large tiled QuadTree terrain representation. The training stage is based on multiresolution wavelet decomposition and is used to limit the region of error control inside the tile. Maximum approximation errors are then calculated for each tile at different resolutions. Maximum world-space errors of the tile at different resolutions permit selection of the appropriate resolution of downsampling that will represent the tile at the run time. Tests and experiments demonstrate that B-spline 0 and B-spline 1 wavelets, well known for their properties of localization and their compact support, are suitable for fast and accurate localization of the maximum approximation error. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach drastically reduces computation time in the CPU. Such a technique should also be used on low/medium end PCs, and embedded systems that are not equipped with the latest models of graphic hardware.

  2. Validation of the simpleFoam (RANS solver for the atmospheric boundary layer in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We validate the simpleFoam (RANS solver in OpenFOAM (version 2.1.1 for simulating neutral atmospheric boundary layer flows in complex terrain. Initial and boundary conditions are given using Richards and Hoxey proposal [1]. In order to obtain stable simulation of the ABL, modified wall functions are used to set the near-wall boundary conditions, following Blocken et al remedial measures [2]. A structured grid is generated with the new library terrainBlockMesher [3,4], based on OpenFOAM's blockMesh native mesher. The new tool is capable of adding orographic features and the forest canopy. Additionally, the mesh can be refined in regions with complex orography. We study both the classical benchmark case of Askervein hill [5] and the more recent Bolund island data set [6]. Our purpose is two-folded: to validate the performance of OpenFOAM steady state solvers, and the suitability of the new meshing tool to generate high quality structured meshes, which will be used in the future for performing more computationally intensive LES simulations in complex terrain.

  3. REINFORCED CONCRETE ELEMENTS OF LANDSCAPING OF ALLOTMENT GARDENS ON THE TERRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malakhova Anna Nikolaevna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Simplicity of formation of the monolithic reinforced concrete and benefits of its use in the restrained conditions of the terrain make its application lucrative. Retaining walls and stairs are the most widely spread monolithic concrete elements used in the landscaping of private allotment gardens on the terrain. In the article, the authors propose their design solutions for reinforced concrete elements integrated into the landscaping of allotment gardens on the terrain: a sheet-pile retaining wall with stairs and a monolithic reinforced concrete arch bridge. The authors provide their sample analysis of a monolithic sheet-pile retaining wall with a stairs. Its steps and stair-head were analyzed as flexural elements tightly coupled with the retaining wall, with a platform on three sides and steps on two sides. There are formwork drawings and reinforcement drawings of a monolithic sheet-pile retaining wall with a stairs in the article. Analysis of a monolithic reinforced concrete arch bridge was performed using LIRA software. To reduce the temperature and shrinkage stresses in an arch bridge, as well as stresses that arise in it in case of installation of supports, a two-hinged arch was chosen as the design bridge model. There are dimensions of the formwork, pattern of the steel frame of the reinforced concrete arch bridge and the design solution of a swivel support unit in the article.

  4. The importance of meteorological scales to forecast air pollution scenarios on coastal complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Palau

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of the meteorological approaches commonly considered in urban air pollution models do not take into account the importance of the smaller scales in the meteorology of complex-terrain coastal sites. The aim of this work is to estimate the impact of using the proper meteorological scales when simulating the behaviour of the pollutant concentrations emitted in the lower layers over coastal complex terrain areas. The availability of experimental measurements of a power plant plume near the Castellón conurbation (on the Spanish Mediterranean coast has allowed us to use this plume as a tracer of opportunity of the lower atmosphere to check the results of a simulation exercise using the RAMS mesoscale model coupled to the HYPACT particle model. The results obtained show that in a complex-terrain coastal site, because of the strong effect of the meteorological interactions between the different scales on the integral advection and the turbulent dispersion of pollutants, using an inadequate scale to solve the meteorology can result in a very big gap in the simulation of lower-layer pollutant behaviour at urban scales.

  5. For wind turbines in complex terrain, the devil is in the detail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Julia; Mann, Jakob; Berg, Jacob; Parvu, Dan; Kilpatrick, Ryan; Costache, Adrian; Chowdhury, Jubayer; Siddiqui, Kamran; Hangan, Horia

    2017-09-01

    The cost of energy produced by onshore wind turbines is among the lowest available; however, onshore wind turbines are often positioned in a complex terrain, where the wind resources and wind conditions are quite uncertain due to the surrounding topography and/or vegetation. In this study, we use a scale model in a three-dimensional wind-testing chamber to show how minor changes in the terrain can result in significant differences in the flow at turbine height. These differences affect not only the power performance but also the life-time and maintenance costs of wind turbines, and hence, the economy and feasibility of wind turbine projects. We find that the mean wind, wind shear and turbulence level are extremely sensitive to the exact details of the terrain: a small modification of the edge of our scale model, results in a reduction of the estimated annual energy production by at least 50% and an increase in the turbulence level by a factor of five in the worst-case scenario with the most unfavorable wind direction. Wind farm developers should be aware that near escarpments destructive flows can occur and their extent is uncertain thus warranting on-site field measurements.

  6. Modelling of the optimal vehicle route in terrain in emergency situations using GIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybansky, M.

    2014-02-01

    Most navigation systems in transport are oriented towards the search for optimal paths (shortest or fastest), using vector GIS data. At the time of natural disasters and emergency situations is necessary to consider roads and terrain for transport. This article is focused on finding optimal routes in terrain, which contains a number of point, line and area obstacles. The most frequent point obstacles are trees in the forest. The paper analyzes the typical structure of tree stands in the forest, their characteristics in GIS databases, as well as dimensional parameters of vehicles moving in the forest. The quality of these data is a prerequisite for finding routes between point obstacles. Searching for the fastest or shortest route of the vehicle described in this article is based on the use of the relationship between the Delaunay triangulation and Voronoi graph, the application of Dijkstra's algorithm and the optimization of fractional line. The above-mentioned methods are also exploitable for searching for the shortest route of movement among line obstructions and area obstructions, such route can be apprehended as the joining of points defining impassable terrain. In such a case, the condition must be met that the distance of terminal points of joins has to be adjusted to the extent that it will be shorter than a vehicle width increased by safe margin.

  7. An Inter-Comparison Study of Multi- and DBS Lidar Measurements in Complex Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Pauscher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wind measurements using classical profiling lidars suffer from systematic measurement errors in complex terrain. Moreover, their ability to measure turbulence quantities is unsatisfactory for wind-energy applications. This paper presents results from a measurement campaign during which multiple WindScanners were focused on one point next to a reference mast in complex terrain. This multi-lidar (ML technique is also compared to a profiling lidar using the Doppler beam swinging (DBS method. First- and second-order statistics of the radial wind velocities from the individual instruments and the horizontal wind components of several ML combinations are analysed in comparison to sonic anemometry and DBS measurements. The results for the wind speed show significantly reduced scatter and directional error for the ML method in comparison to the DBS lidar. The analysis of the second-order statistics also reveals a significantly better correlation for the ML technique than for the DBS lidar, when compared to the sonic. However, the probe volume averaging of the lidars leads to an attenuation of the turbulence at high wave numbers. Also the configuration (i.e., angles of the WindScanners in the ML method seems to be more important for turbulence measurements. In summary, the results clearly show the advantages of the ML technique in complex terrain and indicate that it has the potential to achieve significantly higher accuracy in measuring turbulence quantities for wind-energy applications than classical profiling lidars.

  8. Simulation de l'ecoulement dans un parc d'eoliennes situees sur un terrain accidente

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kasmi, Amina

    L'objectif principal de cette these est la modelisation de l'ecoulement de la couche limite atmospherique dans un parc eolien sur un terrain complexe. Pour ce faire, trois domaines distincts ont ete abordes: caracteristiques de la couche limite atmospherique, aerodynamique des eoliennes et modelisation du terrain complexe. Ainsi l'objectif global de la these a ete divise a trois objectifs specifiques. Le premier objectif specifique est de demontrer l'efficacite du modele de turbulence propose base sur le modele de turbulence RNG, combinee avec les equations du tenseur de Reynolds moyennees dans le temps (RANS) pour simuler l'ecoulement turbulent moyen sur les collines et les vallees bidimensionnelles de formes analytiques et de pentes variables, et aussi, sur le terrain complexe tridimensionnel Blashaval. Le deuxieme objectif specifique de la these est de proposer un nouveau modele de turbulence pour simuler l'ecoulement axisymetrique a travers une eolienne a axe horizontal. Pour valider le modele propose, des resultats sont presentes pour les eoliennes experimentales Nibe B, Danwin 180/23, et MOD-0A. Le dernier objectif specifique est d'appliquer le modele de turbulence propose pour la simulation de l'ecoulement tridimensionnel a travers une eolienne immergee dans une couche limite atmospherique sous diverses conditions de stabilite thermique.

  9. An Iterative Terrain Recovery Approach to Automated DTM Generation from Airborne LIDAR Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Cheng, M.; Li, J.; Liu, Y.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical recovery method to generate DTMs from airborne LiDAR point clouds based one an idea of layering. The developed method first registers the last return points, and then layering them. The layering is done by dividing the points into different height layers and assigning layer numbers to each point. The layer numbers are comparing references in later identification process. Then a series of rasterized pyramid levels which consisted of lowest points are generated. Since the outliers have been removed after the layering, the cells in top level are considered to be terrain points and used as reference to identify cells in the following level. After the identification of the second level, an interpolation will occur in the cells which identified as offterrain. And the interpolated level will be used as reference in its following level and the same process is repeated at each level. Once this process of the bottom level finished, the proposed method adjusts the results based on the first return feedback and followed by the final interpolation. As a result, this produces the final DTM. The developed method is data driven, and does not assume a prior knowledge about the scene complexity. The proposed method was tested with the ISPRS WG III/3 LiDAR datasets covering different terrain types and filtering difficulties. The results show that the proposed method can perform well in flat terrain or gentle slope area.

  10. Speed-profile-based road segmentation for accident occurrence modelling for hilly terrains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balusu, Surya Prasanna Kumar; Iraganaboina, Naveen Chandra; Shallam, Regulus Dominic K; Chunchu, Mallikarjuna

    2017-12-01

    Modelling the accident occurrences per unit length of the road requires segmentation of road stretch. In the case of hilly terrains, homogeneity-based approach results in extremely small sections thus creating a biased accident data. This result is due to the high variations in geometry along the length of the road stretch. Constant length sections do not consider the effect of road's characteristics, hence may lead to undesirable results. It is hypothesized that the speed profile of a vehicle moving in free-flow conditions is governed by the road geometry as well as the road side environment. In this paper, a new methodology based on speed profile of a test vehicle (passenger car) has been proposed for segmenting a road stretch passing through hilly terrain. Comparative analysis of the results obtained from the constant length segmentation approach and the proposed approach shows that the later approach is producing statistically better results. Relatively more parameters were found to be statistically significant in the model based on speed-profile-based segmentation. Grade length, which could be one of the major parameters in hilly terrains, was found to be statistically significant only in the model based on speed-profile-based segmentation.

  11. Terrain controls on the occurrence of coastal retrogressive thaw slumps along the Yukon Coast, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, Justine L.; Irrgang, Anna M.; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Morgenstern, Anne; Couture, Nicole; Lantuit, Hugues

    2017-09-01

    Retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs) are among the most active landforms in the Arctic; their number has increased significantly over the past decades. While processes initiating discrete RTSs are well identified, the major terrain controls on the development of coastal RTSs at a regional scale are not yet defined. Our research reveals the main geomorphic factors that determine the development of RTSs along a 238 km segment of the Yukon Coast, Canada. We (1) show the current extent of RTSs, (2) ascertain the factors controlling their activity and initiation, and (3) explain the spatial differences in the density and areal coverage of RTSs. We mapped and classified 287 RTSs using high-resolution satellite images acquired in 2011. We highlighted the main terrain controls over their development using univariate regression trees model. Coastal geomorphology influenced both the activity and initiation of RTSs: active RTSs and RTSs initiated after 1972 occurred primarily on terrains with slope angles greater than 3.9° and 5.9°, respectively. The density and areal coverage of RTSs were constrained by the volume and thickness of massive ice bodies. Differences in rates of coastal change along the coast did not affect the model. We infer that rates of coastal change averaged over a 39 year period are unable to reflect the complex relationship between RTSs and coastline dynamics. We emphasize the need for large-scale studies of RTSs to evaluate their impact on the ecosystem and to measure their contribution to the global carbon budget.

  12. Modeling wake effects in large wind farms in complex terrain: the problem, the methods and the issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Politis, E.S.; Prospathopoulos, J.; Cabezon, D.

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods are used in this paper to predict the power production from entire wind farms in complex terrain and to shed some light into the wake flow patterns. Two full three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solvers for incompressible fluid flow, employing k - ε and k - ω...... of the work being undertaken within the UpWind Integrated Project that aims to develop the design tools for next generation of large wind turbines. In this part of UpWind, the performance of wind farm and wake models is being examined in complex terrain environment where there are few pre-existing relevant...... measurements. The focus of the work being carried out is to evaluate the performance of CFD models in large wind farm applications in complex terrain and to examine the development of the wakes in a complex terrain environment....

  13. Hydrogeology - HYDROGEOL_SETTINGS_IN: Hydrogeologic Terrains and Settings of Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:100,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — HYDROGEOL_SETTINGS_IN is a polygon shapefile that shows hydrogeologic terrains and settings of Indiana. The methodology of the investigation and definitions of terms...

  14. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

  15. Leading-Side Terrains on Enceladus: Clues to Early Volcanism and Tectonism from Cassini ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, P.; Giese, B.; Perry, J. E.; Roatsch, T.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P. C.; Denk, T.; Neukum, G.; Porco, C.

    2010-12-01

    Until November 2009 the relation of the tectonic styles on the leading hemisphere of Enceladus to those elsewhere on the satellite were unclear. Cassini's ISS Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) acquired high-resolution mosaics of the leading hemisphere for the first time during three close flybys, one on November 21, 2009, another on May 18, 2010, and a third on August 13, 2010, respectively. The new mosaics show that the leading side has distinct geological provinces that exhibit diverse tectonic styles and different cratering histories. The highly tectonised terrains are bounded by a prominent broad annulus of grooved and striated terrains that ranges from about 60 km to over 140 km in width. It surrounds a complex arrangement of tectonic structures, including a conspicuous province near 30°N, 90°W of curvilinear massifs and roughly orthogonal-trending ridged-troughs that define a crudely radial and concentric pattern relative to a point near 25°N, 125°W. This angular sector, about 65° in width, may be the partial remains of an ancient impact basin with a diameter of about 180 km. It could also be the surface expression of an ancient, large diapir. The peculiar quasi-radial ridged-troughs resemble extinct, topographically degraded examples of tiger stripes seen elsewhere on Enceladus. While these features may have a different fracture origin from tiger stripes, their comparable morphology suggests that long ago they may have expressed a similar style of fissure volcanism. Among our other significant findings is a region near 10°S, 60°W of rounded, rope-like sub-parallel ridges similar to ropy (funiscular) plains materials previously found only in the South Polar Terrain region near active tiger stripes. We suggest that the pattern of ropy ridges on the leading hemisphere arose from a similar style of tectonic deformation that produced the South Polar funiscular plains - a terrain that is closely related to possible folding and tectonic spreading associated with the

  16. An Investigation of the Hypotheses for Formation of the Platy-Ridged Terrain in Elysium Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z.; Gou, S.; Michael, G.; Di, K.; Xie, H.; Gong, H.; Shao, Y.

    2017-07-01

    The origin of the platy-ridged-polygonized (PRP) terrains on Martian surface has long been debated. The terrain has generally been classified as water, pack ice, or basalt lava related flow. The crater counting results of the PRP terrains suggest they are geologically very young; therefore, they are significant in understanding the recent evolution of Mars. This work evaluated the current hypotheses through detailed analysis of the distribution and microtopographies with the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images for the PRP terrains in Elysium Planitia, Mars. Quantitative measurements and statistics of the typical features of the PRP terrains were also made. In addition, we also found an analog site in Tarim Basin in Xinjiang, China. Our results suggest that mud flow is responsible for the formation of the PRP terrains on the Mars surface, although the hypothesis of low-viscosity basalt lava floods cannot be completely excluded. This finding implies that a regional environment suitable for liquid water may have existed in recent geologic time, which has great importance for future Mars scientific exploration.

  17. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE HYPOTHESES FOR FORMATION OF THE PLATY-RIDGED-POLYGONIZED TERRAIN IN ELYSIUM PLANITIA, MARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yue

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the platy-ridged-polygonized (PRP terrains on Martian surface has long been debated. The terrain has generally been classified as water, pack ice, or basalt lava related flow. The crater counting results of the PRP terrains suggest they are geologically very young; therefore, they are significant in understanding the recent evolution of Mars. This work evaluated the current hypotheses through detailed analysis of the distribution and microtopographies with the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE images for the PRP terrains in Elysium Planitia, Mars. Quantitative measurements and statistics of the typical features of the PRP terrains were also made. In addition, we also found an analog site in Tarim Basin in Xinjiang, China. Our results suggest that mud flow is responsible for the formation of the PRP terrains on the Mars surface, although the hypothesis of low-viscosity basalt lava floods cannot be completely excluded. This finding implies that a regional environment suitable for liquid water may have existed in recent geologic time, which has great importance for future Mars scientific exploration.

  18. LiDAR-based TWI and terrain attributes in improving parametric predictor for tree growth in southeast Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamedou, Cheikh; Tokola, Timo; Eerikäinen, Kalle

    2017-10-01

    The effect of soil moisture content on vegetation and therefore on growth is well known. Information about the growth of forest stands is key in forest planning and management, and is the concern of various stakeholders. One way to assess moisture content and its impacts on forest growth is to apply the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI) and the derived terrain attributes from the Digital Terrain Model (DTM). The TWI is an important terrain attribute, used in various ecological studies. In the current study, a total of 9987 tally trees within 197 sample plots in southeastern Finland and LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) -based TWI were selected to examine: 1) the effect of cell resolutions and focal statistics of neighborhood cells of DTM, on tree diameter increment, and 2) possibilities to improve the prediction accuracy of an existing single-tree growth model using the terrain attributes and TWI with the combined effects of three characteristics (i.e., cell resolutions, neighborhood cells and terrain attributes). The results suggest that the TWI with terrain attributes improved the growth estimation significantly, and within different site types the Root Mean Square Errors (RMSE) were lowered substantially. The best results were obtained for birch trees. The higher resolution of the DTM and the lower focal neighborhood cells were found to be the best alternative in computing the TWI.

  19. Terrain-Following Motion of an Autonomous Agent as Means of Motion Planning in the Unknown Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramova, Inna

    This work considers the problem of motion planning in the unknown environment, where terrain features and goal positioning data are used for navigation. The described terrain-following motion control law is based on reactive collision avoidance methods, but also involves a strong deliberative component as well as full consideration of kinematic and dynamic constraints of the autonomous mobile agent. That way common pitfalls such as generating impossible paths, losing the goal, and getting stuck in the local minima are avoided, whereas the necessary ability to react quickly to changes in the environment is ensured. Emergency obstacle avoidance maneuver supplements the described navigation algorithm when physical constraints of an agent make regularly generated path segment infeasible. Terrain-acquiring sensor model constitutes an important part of the described navigation algorithm since processing of sensor data determines behavior type of an agent, for example, whether it tends to choose low-lying terrain areas vs. passing above the hills, or favors close-to-horizontal motion. The implemented terrain-acquiring sensor model is consistent with the simplified model of rotating laser rangefinder/ LIDAR, where terrain "vision" process is discrete, and could be viewed as "snapshot-based ray-tracing". The equations of motion are derived using Udwadia-Kalaba Equation, thus, obtained control force is always minimized. Case studies, illustrating different behavior types and resulting paths, are presented.

  20. Estimating Soil Displacement from Timber Extraction Trails in Steep Terrain: Application of an Unmanned Aircraft for 3D Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Pierzchała

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Skid trails constructed for timber extraction in steep terrain constitute a serious environmental concern if not well planned, executed and ameliorated. Carrying out post-harvest surveys in monitoring constructed trails in such terrain is an onerous task for forest administrators, as hundreds of meters need to be surveyed per site, and the quantification of parameters and volumes is largely based on assumptions of trail symmetry and terrain uniformity. In this study, aerial imagery captured from a multi-rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle was used in generating a detailed post-harvest terrain model which included all skid trails. This was then compared with an Airborne Laser Scanning derived pre-harvest terrain model and the dimensions, slopes and cut-and-fill volumes associated with the skid trails were determined. The overall skid trail length was 954 m, or 381 m·ha−1 with segments varying from 40–60 m, inclinations from 3.9% to 9.6%, and cut volumes, from 1.7 to 3.7 m3 per running meter. The methods used in this work can be used in rapidly assessing the extent of disturbance and erosion risk on a wide range of sites. The multi-rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV was found to be highly suited to the task, given the relatively small size of harvested stands, their shape and their location in the mountainous terrain.