WorldWideScience

Sample records for terrain simulation tests

  1. Platform for Testing Robotic Vehicles on Simulated Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Randel

    2006-01-01

    The variable terrain tilt platform (VTTP) is a means of providing simulated terrain for mobility testing of engineering models of the Mars Exploration Rovers. The VTTP could also be used for testing the ability of other robotic land vehicles (and small vehicles in general) to move across terrain under diverse conditions of slope and surface texture, and in the presence of obstacles of various sizes and shapes. The VTTP consists mostly of a 16-ft-(4.88-m)-square tilt table. The tilt can be adjusted to any angle between 0 (horizontal) and 25 . The test surface of the table can be left bare; can be covered with hard, high-friction material; or can be covered with sand, gravel, and/or other ground-simulating material or combination of materials to a thickness of as much as 6 in. (approx. 15 cm). Models of rocks, trenches, and other obstacles can be placed on the simulated terrain. For example, for one of the Mars- Rover tests, a high-friction mat was attached to the platform, then a 6-in.- ( 15 cm) deep layer of dry, loose beach sand was deposited on the mat. The choice of these two driving surface materials was meant to bound the range of variability of terrain that the rover was expected to encounter on the Martian surface. At each of the different angles at which tests were performed, for some of the tests, rocklike concrete obstacles ranging in height from 10 to 25 cm were placed in the path of the rover (see figure). The development of the VTTP was accompanied by development of a methodology of testing to characterize the performance and modes of failure of a vehicle under test. In addition to variations in slope, ground material, and obstacles, testing typically includes driving up-slope, down-slope, cross-slope, and at intermediate angles relative to slope. Testing includes recording of drive-motor currents, wheel speeds, articulation of suspension mechanisms, and the actual path of the vehicle over the simulated terrain. The collected data can be used to

  2. Tests of high-resolution simulations over a region of complex terrain in Southeast coast of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Sin Chan; Luís Gomes, Jorge; Ristic, Ivan; Mesinger, Fedor; Sueiro, Gustavo; Andrade, Diego; Lima-e-Silva, Pedro Paulo

    2013-04-01

    The Eta Model is used operationally by INPE at the Centre for Weather Forecasts and Climate Studies (CPTEC) to produce weather forecasts over South America since 1997. The model has gone through upgrades along these years. In order to prepare the model for operational higher resolution forecasts, the model is configured and tested over a region of complex topography located near the coast of Southeast Brazil. The model domain includes the two Brazilians cities, Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, urban areas, preserved tropical forest, pasture fields, and complex terrain where it can rise from sea level up to about 1000 m. Accurate near-surface wind direction and magnitude are needed for the power plant emergency plan. Besides, the region suffers from frequent events of floods and landslides, therefore accurate local forecasts are required for disaster warnings. The objective of this work is to carry out a series of numerical experiments to test and evaluate high resolution simulations in this complex area. Verification of model runs uses observations taken from the nuclear power plant and higher resolution reanalyses data. The runs were tested in a period when flow was predominately forced by local conditions and in a period forced by frontal passage. The Eta Model was configured initially with 2-km horizontal resolution and 50 layers. The Eta-2km is a second nesting, it is driven by Eta-15km, which in its turn is driven by Era-Interim reanalyses. The series of experiments consists of replacing surface layer stability function, adjusting cloud microphysics scheme parameters, further increasing vertical and horizontal resolutions. By replacing the stability function for the stable conditions substantially increased the katabatic winds and verified better against the tower wind data. Precipitation produced by the model was excessive in the region. Increasing vertical resolution to 60 layers caused a further increase in precipitation production. This excessive

  3. Functional Decomposition of Modeling and Simulation Terrain Database Generation Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yakich, Valerie R; Lashlee, J. D

    2008-01-01

    .... This report documents the conceptual procedure as implemented by Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training, and Support and decomposes terrain database construction using the Integration Definition for Function Modeling (IDEF...

  4. Wind flow simulation over flat terrain using CFD based software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, Peter; Terziev, Angel; Genovski, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Velocity distribution recognition over definite place (terrain) is very important because due to that the zones with high energy potential could be defined (the fields with high velocities). This is a precondition for optimal wind turbine generators micro-sitting. In current work a simulation of the open flow over the flat terrain using the CFD based software is reviewed. The simulations are made of a real fluid flow in order to be defined the velocity fields over the terrain

  5. Large-Eddy Simulations of Flows in Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosovic, B.; Lundquist, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulation as a methodology for numerical simulation of turbulent flows was first developed to study turbulent flows in atmospheric by Lilly (1967). The first LES were carried by Deardorff (1970) who used these simulations to study atmospheric boundary layers. Ever since, LES has been extensively used to study canonical atmospheric boundary layers, in most cases flat plate boundary layers under the assumption of horizontal homogeneity. Carefully designed LES of canonical convective and neutrally stratified and more recently stably stratified atmospheric boundary layers have contributed significantly to development of better understanding of these flows and their parameterizations in large scale models. These simulations were often carried out using codes specifically designed and developed for large-eddy simulations of horizontally homogeneous flows with periodic lateral boundary conditions. Recent developments in multi-scale numerical simulations of atmospheric flows enable numerical weather prediction (NWP) codes such as ARPS (Chow and Street, 2009), COAMPS (Golaz et al., 2009) and Weather Research and Forecasting model, to be used nearly seamlessly across a wide range of atmospheric scales from synoptic down to turbulent scales in atmospheric boundary layers. Before we can with confidence carry out multi-scale simulations of atmospheric flows, NWP codes must be validated for accurate performance in simulating flows over complex or inhomogeneous terrain. We therefore carry out validation of WRF-LES for simulations of flows over complex terrain using data from Askervein Hill (Taylor and Teunissen, 1985, 1987) and METCRAX (Whiteman et al., 2008) field experiments. WRF's nesting capability is employed with a one-way nested inner domain that includes complex terrain representation while the coarser outer nest is used to spin up fully developed atmospheric boundary layer turbulence and thus represent accurately inflow to the inner domain. LES of a

  6. Simulating Sand Behavior through Terrain Subdivision and Particle Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, M.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in computer graphics, GPUs, and parallel processing hardware have provided researchers with new methods to visualize scientific data. In fact, these advances have spurred new research opportunities between computer graphics and other disciplines, such as Earth sciences. Through collaboration, Earth and planetary scientists have benefited by using these advances in hardware technology to process large amounts of data for visualization and analysis. At Oregon State University, we are collaborating with the Oregon Space Grant and IGERT Ecosystem Informatics programs to investigate techniques for simulating the behavior of sand. In addition, we have also been collaborating with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's DARTS Lab to exchange ideas on our research. The DARTS Lab specializes in the simulation of planetary vehicles, such as the Mars rovers. One aspect of their work is testing these vehicles in a virtual "sand box" to test their performance in different environments. Our research builds upon this idea to create a sand simulation framework to allow for more complex and diverse environments. As a basis for our framework, we have focused on planetary environments, such as the harsh, sandy regions on Mars. To evaluate our framework, we have used simulated planetary vehicles, such as a rover, to gain insight into the performance and interaction between the surface sand and the vehicle. Unfortunately, simulating the vast number of individual sand particles and their interaction with each other has been a computationally complex problem in the past. However, through the use of high-performance computing, we have developed a technique to subdivide physically active terrain regions across a large landscape. To achieve this, we only subdivide terrain regions where sand particles are actively participating with another object or force, such as a rover wheel. This is similar to a Level of Detail (LOD) technique, except that the density of subdivisions are determined by

  7. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Convective Flow Over Wavy Terrain

    OpenAIRE

    Dörnbrack, A.; Schumann, U.

    1993-01-01

    By means of a large-eddy simulation, the convective boundary layer is investigated for flows over wavy terrain. The lower surface varies sinusoidalty in the downstream direction while remaining constant in the other. Several cases are considered with amplitude 6 up to 0.15H and wavelength A of H to 8H, where H is the mean fluid-layer height. At the lower surface, the vertical heat flux is prescribed to be constant and the momentum flux is determined locally from the Monin-Obukhov relationship...

  8. Comparison of Different Measurement Techniques and a CFD Simulation in Complex Terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Christoph; Lutz, Thorsten; Hofsäß, Martin; Anger, Jan; Wen Cheng, Po; Rautenberg, Alexander; Bange, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a comparison of data collected by measurements and a simulation for a complex terrain test site in southern Germany. Lidar, met mast, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) measurements of wind speed and direction and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) data are compared to each other. The site is characterised regarding its flow features and the suitability for a wind turbine test field. A Delayed-Detached-Eddy- Simulation (DES) was employed using measurement data to generate generic turbulent inflow. A good agreement of the wind profiles between the different approaches was reached. The terrain slope leads to a speed-up, a change of turbulence intensity as well as to flow angle variations. (paper)

  9. Numerical simulation of radiation fog in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Musson-Genon, L.; Carissimo, B.; Dupont, E.

    2009-09-01

    The interest for micro-scale modeling of the atmosphere is growing for environmental applications related, for example, to energy production, transport and urban development. The turbulence in the stable layers where pollutant dispersion is low and can lead to strong pollution events. This could be further complicated by the presence of clouds or fog and is specifically difficult in urban or industrial area due to the presence of buildings. In this context, radiation fog formation and dissipation over complex terrain were therefore investigated with a state-of-the-art model. This study is divided into two phases. The first phase is a pilot stage, which consist of employing a database from the ParisFog campaign which took place in the south of Paris during winter 2006-07 to assess the ability of the cloud model to reproduce the detailed structure of radiation fog. The second phase use the validated model for the study of influence of complex terrain on fog evolution. Special attention is given to the detailed and complete simulations and validation technique used is to compare the simulated results using the 3D cloud model of computational fluid dynamical software Code_Saturne with one of the best collected in situ data during the ParisFog campaign. Several dynamical, microphysical parameterizations and simulation conditions have been described. The resulting 3D cloud model runs at a horizontal resolution of 30 m and a vertical resolution comparable to the 1D model. First results look very promising and are able to reproduce the spatial distribution of fog. The analysis of the behavior of the different parameterized physical processes suggests that the subtle balance between the various processes is achieved.

  10. A Tire Model for Off-Highway Vehicle Simulation on Short Wave Irregular Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Thomas Heegaard; Kristensen, Lars B; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.

    2010-01-01

    Manufacturers of construction machinery are challenged in several ways concerning dynamic loads. Considering off-highway dump trucks that travel through high amplitude short wave irregular terrain with considerable speed two aspects concerning dynamics are important. The first is the legal...... between simulated data and experimental data obtained from full vehicle testing. The experimental work is carried out by letting a dump truck pass a set of well defined obstacles. Based on the obtained agreement between simulated and measured results the tire model is considered suitable for describing...... joints, spring-damper elements and the welded structures it is crucial to have information on the time history of the loads. For trucks carrying payloads the most important load contribution is undoubtedly the reaction forces between terrain and tires. By use of virtual prototypes it is possible...

  11. Numerical simulation of turbulent convective flow over wavy terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörnbrack, A.; Schumann, U.

    1993-09-01

    By means of a large-eddy simulation, the convective boundary layer is investigated for flows over wavy terrain. The lower surface varies sinusoidally in the downstream direction while remaining constant in the other. Several cases are considered with amplitude δ up to 0.15 H and wavelength λ of H to 8 H, where H is the mean fluid-layer height. At the lower surface, the vertical heat flux is prescribed to be constant and the momentum flux is determined locally from the Monin-Obukhov relationship with a roughness length z o=10-4 H. The mean wind is varied between zero and 5 w *, where w * is the convective velocity scale. After rather long times, the flow structure shows horizontal scales up to 4 H, with a pattern similar to that over flat surfaces at corresponding shear friction. Weak mean wind destroys regular spatial structures induced by the surface undulation at zero mean wind. The surface heating suppresses mean-flow recirculation-regions even for steep surface waves. Short surface waves cause strong drag due to hydrostatic and dynamic pressure forces in addition to frictional drag. The pressure drag increases slowly with the mean velocity, and strongly with δ/ H. The turbulence variances increase mainly in the lower half of the mixed layer for U/w *>2.

  12. Merging LIDAR digital terrain model with direct observed elevation points for urban flood numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Campo, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    In last years, the concern about the economical and lives loss due to urban floods has grown hand in hand with the numerical skills in simulating such events. The large amount of computational power needed in order to address the problem (simulating a flood in a complex terrain such as a medium-large city) is only one of the issues. Among them it is possible to consider the general lack of exhaustive observations during the event (exact extension, dynamic, water level reached in different parts of the involved area), needed for calibration and validation of the model, the need of considering the sewers effects, and the availability of a correct and precise description of the geometry of the problem. In large cities the topographic surveys are in general available with a number of points, but a complete hydraulic simulation needs a detailed description of the terrain on the whole computational domain. LIDAR surveys can achieve this goal, providing a comprehensive description of the terrain, although they often lack precision. In this work an optimal merging of these two sources of geometrical information, measured elevation points and LIDAR survey, is proposed, by taking into account the error variance of both. The procedure is applied to a flood-prone city over an area of 35 square km approximately starting with a DTM from LIDAR with a spatial resolution of 1 m, and 13000 measured points. The spatial pattern of the error (LIDAR vs points) is analysed, and the merging method is tested with a series of Jackknife procedures that take into account different densities of the available points. A discussion of the results is provided.

  13. Simulation of Wind Farms in Flat & Complex terrain using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prospathopoulos, John; Cabezon, D.; Politis, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    , the combination of the induction factor method along with the turbulence correction provides satisfactory results. In the complex terrain case, there are some significant discrepancies with the measurements, which are discussed. In this case, the induction factor method does not provide satisfactory results....

  14. How fine is fine enough when doing CFD terrain simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Bechmann, Andreas; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2012-01-01

    The present work addresses the problemof establishing the necessary grid resolution to obtain a given level of numerical accuracy using a CFD model for prediction of flow over terrain. It is illustrated, that a very high resolution may be needed if the numerical difference between consecutive...

  15. Numerical simulation of flow over bariers in complex terrain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bodnár, Tomáš; Beneš, L.; Kozel, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 31, 5-6 (2008), s. 619-632 ISSN 1124-1896 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400760405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : boundary layer * complex terrain * finite difference Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.277, year: 2008 http://prometeo.sif.it:8080/papers/?pid=ncc9331

  16. Large-eddy simulation of atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechmann, A.

    2006-11-15

    The present report describes the development and validation of a turbulence model designed for atmospheric flows based on the concept of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The background for the work is the high Reynolds number k - epsilon model, which has been implemented on a finite-volume code of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS). The k - epsilon model is traditionally used for RANS computations, but is here developed to also enable LES. LES is able to provide detailed descriptions of a wide range of engineering flows at low Reynolds numbers. For atmospheric flows, however, the high Reynolds numbers and the rough surface of the earth provide difficulties normally not compatible with LES. Since these issues are most severe near the surface they are addressed by handling the near surface region with RANS and only use LES above this region. Using this method, the developed turbulence model is able to handle both engineering and atmospheric flows and can be run in both RANS or LES mode. For LES simulations a time-dependent wind field that accurately represents the turbulent structures of a wind environment must be prescribed at the computational inlet. A method is implemented where the turbulent wind field from a separate LES simulation can be used as inflow. To avoid numerical dissipation of turbulence special care is paid to the numerical method, e.g. the turbulence model is calibrated with the specific numerical scheme used. This is done by simulating decaying isotropic and homogeneous turbulence. Three atmospheric test cases are investigated in order to validate the behavior of the presented turbulence model. Simulation of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer, illustrates the turbulence model ability to generate and maintain the turbulent structures responsible for boundary layer transport processes. Velocity and turbulence profiles are in good agreement with measurements. Simulation of the flow over the Askervein hill is also

  17. Immersed boundary methods for high-resolution simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Katherine Ann

    Mesoscale models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are increasingly used for high resolution simulations, particularly in complex terrain, but errors associated with terrain-following coordinates degrade the accuracy of the solution. Use of an alternative Cartesian gridding technique, known as an immersed boundary method (IBM), alleviates coordinate transformation errors and eliminates restrictions on terrain slope which currently limit mesoscale models to slowly varying terrain. In this dissertation, an immersed boundary method is developed for use in numerical weather prediction. Use of the method facilitates explicit resolution of complex terrain, even urban terrain, in the WRF mesoscale model. First, the errors that arise in the WRF model when complex terrain is present are presented. This is accomplished using a scalar advection test case, and comparing the numerical solution to the analytical solution. Results are presented for different orders of advection schemes, grid resolutions and aspect ratios, as well as various degrees of terrain slope. For comparison, results from the same simulation are presented using the IBM. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional immersed boundary methods are then described, along with details that are specific to the implementation of IBM in the WRF code. Our IBM is capable of imposing both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Additionally, a method for coupling atmospheric physics parameterizations at the immersed boundary is presented, making IB methods much more functional in the context of numerical weather prediction models. The two-dimensional IB method is verified through comparisons of solutions for gentle terrain slopes when using IBM and terrain-following grids. The canonical case of flow over a Witch of Agnesi hill provides validation of the basic no-slip and zero gradient boundary conditions. Specified diurnal heating in a valley, producing anabatic winds, is used to validate the

  18. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, K A [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-05-12

    Mesoscale models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are increasingly used for high resolution simulations, particularly in complex terrain, but errors associated with terrain-following coordinates degrade the accuracy of the solution. Use of an alternative Cartesian gridding technique, known as an immersed boundary method (IBM), alleviates coordinate transformation errors and eliminates restrictions on terrain slope which currently limit mesoscale models to slowly varying terrain. In this dissertation, an immersed boundary method is developed for use in numerical weather prediction. Use of the method facilitates explicit resolution of complex terrain, even urban terrain, in the WRF mesoscale model. First, the errors that arise in the WRF model when complex terrain is present are presented. This is accomplished using a scalar advection test case, and comparing the numerical solution to the analytical solution. Results are presented for different orders of advection schemes, grid resolutions and aspect ratios, as well as various degrees of terrain slope. For comparison, results from the same simulation are presented using the IBM. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional immersed boundary methods are then described, along with details that are specific to the implementation of IBM in the WRF code. Our IBM is capable of imposing both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Additionally, a method for coupling atmospheric physics parameterizations at the immersed boundary is presented, making IB methods much more functional in the context of numerical weather prediction models. The two-dimensional IB method is verified through comparisons of solutions for gentle terrain slopes when using IBM and terrain-following grids. The canonical case of flow over a Witch of Agnesi hill provides validation of the basic no-slip and zero gradient boundary conditions. Specified diurnal heating in a valley, producing anabatic winds, is used to validate the

  19. Improved Path Loss Simulation Incorporating Three-Dimensional Terrain Model Using Parallel Coprocessors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Bin Loo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current network simulators abstract out wireless propagation models due to the high computation requirements for realistic modeling. As such, there is still a large gap between the results obtained from simulators and real world scenario. In this paper, we present a framework for improved path loss simulation built on top of an existing network simulation software, NS-3. Different from the conventional disk model, the proposed simulation also considers the diffraction loss computed using Epstein and Peterson’s model through the use of actual terrain elevation data to give an accurate estimate of path loss between a transmitter and a receiver. The drawback of high computation requirements is relaxed by offloading the computationally intensive components onto an inexpensive off-the-shelf parallel coprocessor, which is a NVIDIA GPU. Experiments are performed using actual terrain elevation data provided from United States Geological Survey. As compared to the conventional CPU architecture, the experimental result shows that a speedup of 20x to 42x is achieved by exploiting the parallel processing of GPU to compute the path loss between two nodes using terrain elevation data. The result shows that the path losses between two nodes are greatly affected by the terrain profile between these two nodes. Besides this, the result also suggests that the common strategy to place the transmitter in the highest position may not always work.

  20. High resolution simulations of orographic flow over a complex terrain on the Southeast coast of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, S. C.; Zolino, M. M.; Gomes, J. L.; Bustamante, J. F.; Lima-e-Silva, P. P.

    2012-04-01

    The Eta Model is used operationally by CPTEC to produce weather forecasts over South America since 1997. The model has gone through upgrades. In order to prepare the model for operational higher resolution forecasts, the model is configured and tested over a region of complex topography located near the coast of Southeast Brazil. The Eta Model was configured, with 2-km horizontal resolution and 50 layers. The Eta-2km is a second nesting, it is driven by Eta-15km, which in its turn is driven by Era-Interim reanalyses. The model domain includes the two Brazilians cities, Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, urban areas, preserved tropical forest, pasture fields, and complex terrain and coastline. Mountains can rise up to about 700m. The region suffers frequent events of floods and landslides. The objective of this work is to evaluate high resolution simulations of wind and temperature in this complex area. Verification of model runs uses observations taken from the nuclear power plant. Accurate near-surface wind direction and magnitude are needed for the plant emergency plan and winds are highly sensitive to model spatial resolution and atmospheric stability. Verification of two cases during summer shows that model has clear diurnal cycle signal for wind in that region. The area is characterized by weak winds which makes the simulation more difficult. The simulated wind magnitude is about 1.5m/s, which is close to observations of about 2m/s; however, the observed change of wind direction of the sea breeze is fast whereas it is slow in the simulations. Nighttime katabatic flow is captured by the simulations. Comparison against Eta-5km runs show that the valley circulation is better described in the 2-km resolution run. Simulated temperatures follow closely the observed diurnal cycle. Experiments improving some surface conditions such as the surface temperature and land cover show simulation error reduction and improved diurnal cycle.

  1. Large-eddy simulation of atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The present report describes the development and validation of a turbulence model designed for atmospheric flows based on the concept of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The background for the work is the high Reynolds number k - #epsilon# model, which has been implemented on a finite-volume code...... turbulence model is able to handle both engineering and atmospheric flows and can be run in both RANS or LES mode. For LES simulations a time-dependent wind field that accurately represents the turbulent structures of a wind environment must be prescribed at the computational inlet. A method is implemented...... where the turbulent wind field from a separate LES simulation can be used as inflow. To avoid numerical dissipation of turbulence special care is paid to the numerical method, e.g. the turbulence model is calibrated with the specific numerical scheme used. This is done by simulating decaying isotropic...

  2. Simulation and Analysis of the Topographic Effects on Snow-Free Albedo over Rugged Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalei Hao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Topography complicates the modeling and retrieval of land surface albedo due to shadow effects and the redistribution of incident radiation. Neglecting topographic effects may lead to a significant bias when estimating land surface albedo over a single slope. However, for rugged terrain, a comprehensive and systematic investigation of topographic effects on land surface albedo is currently ongoing. Accurately estimating topographic effects on land surface albedo over a rugged terrain presents a challenge in remote sensing modeling and applications. In this paper, we focused on the development of a simplified estimation method for snow-free albedo over a rugged terrain at a 1-km scale based on a 30-m fine-scale digital elevation model (DEM. The proposed method was compared with the radiosity approach based on simulated and real DEMs. The results of the comparison showed that the proposed method provided adequate computational efficiency and satisfactory accuracy simultaneously. Then, the topographic effects on snow-free albedo were quantitatively investigated and interpreted by considering the mean slope, subpixel aspect distribution, solar zenith angle, and solar azimuth angle. The results showed that the more rugged the terrain and the larger the solar illumination angle, the more intense the topographic effects were on black-sky albedo (BSA. The maximum absolute deviation (MAD and the maximum relative deviation (MRD of the BSA over a rugged terrain reached 0.28 and 85%, respectively, when the SZA was 60° for different terrains. Topographic effects varied with the mean slope, subpixel aspect distribution, SZA and SAA, which should not be neglected when modeling albedo.

  3. A simulation of cross-country skiing on varying terrain by using a mathematical power balance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxnes, John F; Sandbakk, Oyvind; Hausken, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    The current study simulated cross-country skiing on varying terrain by using a power balance model. By applying the hypothetical inductive deductive method, we compared the simulated position along the track with actual skiing on snow, and calculated the theoretical effect of friction and air drag on skiing performance. As input values in the model, air drag and friction were estimated from the literature, whereas the model included relationships between heart rate, metabolic rate, and work rate based on the treadmill roller-ski testing of an elite cross-country skier. We verified this procedure by testing four models of metabolic rate against experimental data on the treadmill. The experimental data corresponded well with the simulations, with the best fit when work rate was increased on uphill and decreased on downhill terrain. The simulations predicted that skiing time increases by 3%-4% when either friction or air drag increases by 10%. In conclusion, the power balance model was found to be a useful tool for predicting how various factors influence racing performance in cross-country skiing.

  4. Wind-farm simulation over moderately complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio; Castellani, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    A comparison between three independent software to estimate the power production and the flow field in a wind farm is conducted, validating them against SCADA (Supervisory, Control And Data Acquisition) data. The three software were ORFEUS, WindSim and WAsP: ORFEUS and WAsP are linearised solvers, while WindSim is fully nonlinear. A wake model (namely a prescribed velocity deficit associated to the turbines) is used by WAsP, while ORFEUS and WindSim use the actuator-disc method to account for the turbines presence. The comparison indicates that ORFEUS and WAsP perform slightly better than WindSim in the assessment of the polar efficiency. The wakes simulated with ORFEUS appear more persistent than the ones of WindSim, which uses a two-equation closure model for the turbulence effects.

  5. ATON (Autonomous Terrain-based Optical Navigation) for exploration missions: recent flight test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, S.; Ammann, N.; Andert, F.; Franz, T.; Krüger, H.; Lehner, H.; Lingenauber, M.; Lüdtke, D.; Maass, B.; Paproth, C.; Wohlfeil, J.

    2018-03-01

    Since 2010 the German Aerospace Center is working on the project Autonomous Terrain-based Optical Navigation (ATON). Its objective is the development of technologies which allow autonomous navigation of spacecraft in orbit around and during landing on celestial bodies like the Moon, planets, asteroids and comets. The project developed different image processing techniques and optical navigation methods as well as sensor data fusion. The setup—which is applicable to many exploration missions—consists of an inertial measurement unit, a laser altimeter, a star tracker and one or multiple navigation cameras. In the past years, several milestones have been achieved. It started with the setup of a simulation environment including the detailed simulation of camera images. This was continued by hardware-in-the-loop tests in the Testbed for Robotic Optical Navigation (TRON) where images were generated by real cameras in a simulated downscaled lunar landing scene. Data were recorded in helicopter flight tests and post-processed in real-time to increase maturity of the algorithms and to optimize the software. Recently, two more milestones have been achieved. In late 2016, the whole navigation system setup was flying on an unmanned helicopter while processing all sensor information onboard in real time. For the latest milestone the navigation system was tested in closed-loop on the unmanned helicopter. For that purpose the ATON navigation system provided the navigation state for the guidance and control of the unmanned helicopter replacing the GPS-based standard navigation system. The paper will give an introduction to the ATON project and its concept. The methods and algorithms of ATON are briefly described. The flight test results of the latest two milestones are presented and discussed.

  6. A large-eddy simulation based power estimation capability for wind farms over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senocak, I.; Sandusky, M.; Deleon, R.

    2017-12-01

    There has been an increasing interest in predicting wind fields over complex terrain at the micro-scale for resource assessment, turbine siting, and power forecasting. These capabilities are made possible by advancements in computational speed from a new generation of computing hardware, numerical methods and physics modelling. The micro-scale wind prediction model presented in this work is based on the large-eddy simulation paradigm with surface-stress parameterization. The complex terrain is represented using an immersed-boundary method that takes into account the parameterization of the surface stresses. Governing equations of incompressible fluid flow are solved using a projection method with second-order accurate schemes in space and time. We use actuator disk models with rotation to simulate the influence of turbines on the wind field. Data regarding power production from individual turbines are mostly restricted because of proprietary nature of the wind energy business. Most studies report percentage drop of power relative to power from the first row. There have been different approaches to predict power production. Some studies simply report available wind power in the upstream, some studies estimate power production using power curves available from turbine manufacturers, and some studies estimate power as torque multiplied by rotational speed. In the present work, we propose a black-box approach that considers a control volume around a turbine and estimate the power extracted from the turbine based on the conservation of energy principle. We applied our wind power prediction capability to wind farms over flat terrain such as the wind farm over Mower County, Minnesota and the Horns Rev offshore wind farm in Denmark. The results from these simulations are in good agreement with published data. We also estimate power production from a hypothetical wind farm in complex terrain region and identify potential zones suitable for wind power production.

  7. Large eddy simulation modeling of particle-laden flows in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salesky, S.; Giometto, M. G.; Chamecki, M.; Lehning, M.; Parlange, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    The transport, deposition, and erosion of heavy particles over complex terrain in the atmospheric boundary layer is an important process for hydrology, air quality forecasting, biology, and geomorphology. However, in situ observations can be challenging in complex terrain due to spatial heterogeneity. Furthermore, there is a need to develop numerical tools that can accurately represent the physics of these multiphase flows over complex surfaces. We present a new numerical approach to accurately model the transport and deposition of heavy particles in complex terrain using large eddy simulation (LES). Particle transport is represented through solution of the advection-diffusion equation including terms that represent gravitational settling and inertia. The particle conservation equation is discretized in a cut-cell finite volume framework in order to accurately enforce mass conservation. Simulation results will be validated with experimental data, and numerical considerations required to enforce boundary conditions at the surface will be discussed. Applications will be presented in the context of snow deposition and transport, as well as urban dispersion.

  8. Simulation of tracer dispersion from elevated and surface releases in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J. F.; Cremades, L.; Baldasano, J. M.

    A new version of an advanced mesoscale dispersion modeling system for simulating passive air pollutant dispersion in the real atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL), is presented. The system comprises a diagnostic mass-consistent meteorological model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LADISMO). The former version of LADISMO, developed according to Zannetti (Air pollution modelling, 1990), was based on the Monte Carlo technique and included calculation of higher-order moments of vertical random forcing for convective conditions. Its ability to simulate complex flow dispersion has been stated in a previous paper (Hernández et al. 1995, Atmospheric Environment, 29A, 1331-1341). The new version follows Thomson's scheme (1984, Q. Jl Roy. Met. Soc.110, 1107-1120). It is also based on Langevin equation and follows the ideas given by Brusasca et al. (1992, Atmospheric Environment26A, 707-723) and Anfossi et al. (1992, Nuovo Cemento 15c, 139-158). The model is used to simulate the dispersion and predict the ground level concentration (g.l.c.) of a tracer (SF 6) released from both an elevated source ( case a) and a ground level source ( case b) in a highly complex mountainous terrain during neutral and synoptically dominated conditions ( case a) and light and apparently stable conditions ( case b). The last case is considered as being a specially difficult task to simulate. In fact, few works have reported situations with valley drainage flows in complex terrains and real stable atmospheric conditions with weak winds. The model assumes that nearly calm situations associated to strong stability and air stagnation, make the lowest layers of PBL poorly diffusive (Brusasca et al., 1992, Atmospheric Environment26A, 707-723). Model results are verified against experimental data from Guardo-90 tracer experiments, an intensive field campaign conducted in the Carrion river valley (Northern Spain) to study atmospheric diffusion within a steep walled valley in mountainous

  9. Multispectral Terrain Background Simulation Techniques For Use In Airborne Sensor Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Michael; Wohlers, Ronald; Conant, John; Powers, Edward

    1988-08-01

    A background simulation code developed at Aerodyne Research, Inc., called AERIE is designed to reflect the major sources of clutter that are of concern to staring and scanning sensors of the type being considered for various airborne threat warning (both aircraft and missiles) sensors. The code is a first principles model that could be used to produce a consistent image of the terrain for various spectral bands, i.e., provide the proper scene correlation both spectrally and spatially. The code utilizes both topographic and cultural features to model terrain, typically from DMA data, with a statistical overlay of the critical underlying surface properties (reflectance, emittance, and thermal factors) to simulate the resulting texture in the scene. Strong solar scattering from water surfaces is included with allowance for wind driven surface roughness. Clouds can be superimposed on the scene using physical cloud models and an analytical representation of the reflectivity obtained from scattering off spherical particles. The scene generator is augmented by collateral codes that allow for the generation of images at finer resolution. These codes provide interpolation of the basic DMA databases using fractal procedures that preserve the high frequency power spectral density behavior of the original scene. Scenes are presented illustrating variations in altitude, radiance, resolution, material, thermal factors, and emissivities. The basic models utilized for simulation of the various scene components and various "engineering level" approximations are incorporated to reduce the computational complexity of the simulation.

  10. Realistic 3D Terrain Roaming and Real-Time Flight Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Xiang; Liu, Gang; He, Zhenwen; Qi, Guang

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an integrate method, which can provide access to current status and the dynamic visible scanning topography, to enhance the interactive during the terrain roaming and real-time flight simulation. A digital elevation model and digital ortho-photo map data integrated algorithm is proposed as the base algorithm for our approach to build a realistic 3D terrain scene. A new technique with help of render to texture and head of display for generating the navigation pane is used. In the flight simulating, in order to eliminate flying "jump", we employs the multidimensional linear interpolation method to adjust the camera parameters dynamically and steadily. Meanwhile, based on the principle of scanning laser imaging, we draw pseudo color figures by scanning topography in different directions according to the real-time flying status. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is prospective for applications and the method can improve the effect and enhance dynamic interaction during the real-time flight.

  11. Using the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxnes, John F; Sandbakk, Oyvind; Hausken, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    The current study adapts the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain. We assumed that the skier's locomotive power at a self-chosen pace is a function of speed, which is impacted by friction, incline, air drag, and mass. An elite male skier's position along the track during ski skating was simulated and compared with his experimental data. As input values in the model, air drag and friction were estimated from the literature based on the skier's mass, snow conditions, and speed. We regard the fit as good, since the difference in racing time between simulations and measurements was 2 seconds of the 815 seconds racing time, with acceptable fit both in uphill and downhill terrain. Using this model, we estimated the influence of changes in various factors such as air drag, friction, and body mass on performance. In conclusion, the power balance model with locomotive power as a function of speed was found to be a valid tool for analyzing performance in cross-country skiing.

  12. Using the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moxnes JF

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available John F Moxnes,1 Øyvind Sandbakk,2 Kjell Hausken31Department for Protection, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, Kjeller, Norway; 2Center for Elite Sports Research, Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 3Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, NorwayAbstract: The current study adapts the power balance model to simulate cross-country skiing on varying terrain. We assumed that the skier’s locomotive power at a self-chosen pace is a function of speed, which is impacted by friction, incline, air drag, and mass. An elite male skier’s position along the track during ski skating was simulated and compared with his experimental data. As input values in the model, air drag and friction were estimated from the literature based on the skier's mass, snow conditions, and speed. We regard the fit as good, since the difference in racing time between simulations and measurements was 2 seconds of the 815 seconds racing time, with acceptable fit both in uphill and downhill terrain. Using this model, we estimated the influence of changes in various factors such as air drag, friction, and body mass on performance. In conclusion, the power balance model with locomotive power as a function of speed was found to be a valid tool for analyzing performance in cross-country skiing.Keywords: air drag, efficiency, friction coefficient, speed, locomotive power

  13. Simulations of Turbulent Flow Over Complex Terrain Using an Immersed-Boundary Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeon, Rey; Sandusky, Micah; Senocak, Inanc

    2018-02-01

    We present an immersed-boundary method to simulate high-Reynolds-number turbulent flow over the complex terrain of Askervein and Bolund Hills under neutrally-stratified conditions. We reconstruct both the velocity and the eddy-viscosity fields in the terrain-normal direction to produce turbulent stresses as would be expected from the application of a surface-parametrization scheme based on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. We find that it is essential to be consistent in the underlying assumptions for the velocity reconstruction and the eddy-viscosity relation to produce good results. To this end, we reconstruct the tangential component of the velocity field using a logarithmic velocity profile and adopt the mixing-length model in the near-surface turbulence model. We use a linear interpolation to reconstruct the normal component of the velocity to enforce the impermeability condition. Our approach works well for both the Askervein and Bolund Hills when the flow is attached to the surface, but shows slight disagreement in regions of flow recirculation, despite capturing the flow reversal.

  14. Simulations of Turbulent Flow Over Complex Terrain Using an Immersed-Boundary Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeon, Rey; Sandusky, Micah; Senocak, Inanc

    2018-06-01

    We present an immersed-boundary method to simulate high-Reynolds-number turbulent flow over the complex terrain of Askervein and Bolund Hills under neutrally-stratified conditions. We reconstruct both the velocity and the eddy-viscosity fields in the terrain-normal direction to produce turbulent stresses as would be expected from the application of a surface-parametrization scheme based on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. We find that it is essential to be consistent in the underlying assumptions for the velocity reconstruction and the eddy-viscosity relation to produce good results. To this end, we reconstruct the tangential component of the velocity field using a logarithmic velocity profile and adopt the mixing-length model in the near-surface turbulence model. We use a linear interpolation to reconstruct the normal component of the velocity to enforce the impermeability condition. Our approach works well for both the Askervein and Bolund Hills when the flow is attached to the surface, but shows slight disagreement in regions of flow recirculation, despite capturing the flow reversal.

  15. Simulator testing system (STS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, V.N.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years there has been a greater demand placed on the capabilities and time usage of real-time nuclear plant simulators due to NRC, INPO and utilities requirements. The requirements applied to certification, new simulators, upgrades, modifications, and maintenance of the simulators vary; however, they all require the capabilities of the simulator to be tested whether it is for NRC 10CFR55.45b requirements, ATP testing of new simulators, ATP testing of upgrades with or without panels, adding software/hardware due to plant modifications, or analyzing software/hardware problems on the simulator. This paper describes the Simulator Testing System (STS) which addresses each one of these requirements placed on simulators. Special attention will be given to ATP testing of upgrades without the use of control room panels. The capabilities and applications of the four parts of STS which are the Display Control Software (DCS), Procedure Control Software (PCS), Display Generator Software (DGS) and the Procedure Generator Software (PGS) will be reviewed

  16. Toroidal simulation magnet tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstrom, P.L.; Domm, T.C.

    1975-01-01

    A number of different schemes for testing superconducting coils in a simulated tokamak environment are analyzed for their merits relative to a set of test criteria. Two of the concepts are examined in more detail: the so-called cluster test scheme, which employs two large background field coils, one on either side of the test coil, and the compact torus, a low-aspect ratio toroidal array of a small number of coils in which all of the coils are essentially test coils. Simulation of the pulsed fields of the tokamak is discussed briefly

  17. Numerical simulation of terrain-induced mesoscale circulation in the Chiang Mai area, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathitkunarat, Surachai; Wongwises, Prungchan; Pan-Aram, Rudklao; Zhang, Meigen

    2008-11-01

    The regional atmospheric modeling system (RAMS) was applied to Chiang Mai province, a mountainous area in Thailand, to study terrain-induced mesoscale circulations. Eight cases in wet and dry seasons under different weather conditions were analyzed to show thermal and dynamic impacts on local circulations. This is the first study of RAMS in Thailand especially investigating the effect of mountainous area on the simulated meteorological data. Analysis of model results indicates that the model can reproduce major features of local circulation and diurnal variations in temperatures. For evaluating the model performance, model results were compared with observed wind speed, wind direction, and temperature monitored at a meteorological tower. Comparison shows that the modeled values are generally in good agreement with observations and that the model captured many of the observed features.

  18. Numerical simulations of windblown dust over complex terrain: the Fiambalá Basin episode in June 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Mingari

    2017-06-01

    MSG-SEVIRI retrieval product. We tested two numerical schemes: with the default configuration of the FALL3D model, we found difficulties to simulate transport through orographic barriers, whereas an alternative configuration, using a numerical scheme to more accurately compute the horizontal advection in abrupt terrains, substantially improved the model performance.

  19. Experimental study and large eddy simulation of effect of terrain slope on marginal burning in shrub fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyang Zhou; Shankar Mahalingam; David Weise

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined study of laboratory scale fire spread experiments and a three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) to analyze the effect of terrain slope on marginal burning behavior in live chaparral shrub fuel beds. Line fire was initiated in single species fuel beds of four common chaparral plants under various fuel bed configurations and ambient...

  20. Repository simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The repository simulation experiments described in this paper are designed to assess the performance of SRP waste glass under the most realistic repository conditions that can be obtained in the laboratory. These tests simulate the repository environment as closely as possible and introduce systematically the variability of the geology, groundwater chemistry, and waste package components during the leaching of the waste glass. The tests evaluate waste form performance under site-specific conditions, which differ for each of the geologic repositories under consideration. Data from these experiments will aid in the development of a realistic source term that can describe the release of radionuclides from SRP waste glass as a component of proposed waste packages. Hence, this information can be useful to optimize waste package design for SRP waste glass and to provide data for predicting long-term performance and subsequent conformance to regulations. The repository simulation tests also help to bridge the gap in interpreting results derived from tests performed under the control of the laboratory to the uncertainity and variability of field tests. In these experiments, site-specific repository components and conditions are emphasized and only the site specific materials contact the waste forms. An important feature of these tests is that both actual and simulated waste glasses are tested identically. 7 figures, 2 tables

  1. A method for simulating the release of natural gas from the rupture of high-pressure pipelines in any terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yajun; Hu, Hongbing; Yu, Bo; Sun, Dongliang; Hou, Lei; Liang, Yongtu

    2018-01-15

    The rupture of a high-pressure natural gas pipeline can pose a serious threat to human life and environment. In this research, a method has been proposed to simulate the release of natural gas from the rupture of high-pressure pipelines in any terrain. The process of gas releases from the rupture of a high-pressure pipeline is divided into three stages, namely the discharge, jet, and dispersion stages. Firstly, a discharge model is established to calculate the release rate of the orifice. Secondly, an improved jet model is proposed to obtain the parameters of the pseudo source. Thirdly, a fast-modeling method applicable to any terrain is introduced. Finally, based upon these three steps, a dispersion model, which can take any terrain into account, is established. Then, the dispersion scenarios of released gas in four different terrains are studied. Moreover, the effects of pipeline pressure, pipeline diameter, wind speed and concentration of hydrogen sulfide on the dispersion scenario in real terrain are systematically analyzed. The results provide significant guidance for risk assessment and contingency planning of a ruptured natural gas pipeline. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Numerical Simulation of a Lee Wave Case over Three-Dimensional Mountainous Terrain under Strong Wind Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study of a lee wave event over three-dimensional (3D mountainous terrain in Lantau Island, Hong Kong, using a simulation combining mesoscale model and computational fluid dynamics (CFD model has shown that (1 3D steep mountainous terrain can trigger small scale lee waves under strong wind condition, and the horizontal extent of the wave structure is in a dimension of few kilometers and corresponds to the dimension of the horizontal cross-section of the mountain; (2 the life cycle of the lee wave is short, and the wave structures will continuously form roughly in the same location, then gradually move downstream, and dissipate over time; (3 the lee wave triggered by the mountainous terrain in this case can be categorized into “nonsymmetric vortex shedding” or “turbulent wake,” as defined before based on water tank experiments; (4 the magnitude of the wave is related to strength of wind shear. This study also shows that a simulation combining mesoscale model and CFD can capture complex wave structure in the boundary layer over realistic 3D steep terrain, and have a potential value for operational jobs on air traffic warning, wind energy utilization, and atmospheric environmental assessment.

  3. Nuclear system test simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, S.D.; Hill, W.D.; Wilson, P.A.; Steiner, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    A transportable test simulator is described for a nuclear power plant. The nuclear power plant includes a control panel, a reactor having actuated rods for moving into and out of a reactor for causing the plant to operate, and a control rod network extending between the control panel and the reactor rods. The network serially transmits command words between the panel and rods, and has connecting interfaces at preselected points remote from the control panel between the control panel and rods. The test simulator comprises: a test simulator input for transport to and connection into the network at at least one interface for receiving the serial command words from the network. Each serial command includes an identifier portion and a command portion; means for processing interior of the simulator for the serial command words for identifying that portion of the power plant designated in the identifier portion and processing the word responsive to the command portion of the word after the identification; means for generating a response word responsive to the command portion; and output means for sending and transmitting the response word to the nuclear power plant at the interface whereby the control panel responds to the response word

  4. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed layer in flow over complex terrain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the...

  5. High-resolution WRF-LES simulations for real episodes: A case study for prealpine terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, Cornelius; Mauder, Matthias; Laux, Patrick; Kunstmann, Harald

    2017-04-01

    While in most large or regional scale weather and climate models turbulence is parametrized, LES (Large Eddy Simulation) allows for the explicit modeling of turbulent structures in the atmosphere. With the exponential growth in available computing power the technique has become more and more applicable, yet it has mostly been used to model idealized scenarios. It is investigated how well WRF-LES can represent small scale weather patterns. The results are evaluated against different hydrometeorological measurements. We use WRF-LES to model the diurnal cycle for a 48 hour episode in summer over moderately complex terrain in southern Germany. The model setup uses a high resolution digital elevation model, land use and vegetation map. The atmospheric boundary conditions are set by reanalysis data. Schemes for radiation and microphysics and a land-surface model are employed. The biggest challenge in modeling arises from the high horizontal resolution of dx = 30m, since the subgrid-scale model then requires a vertical resolution dz ≈ 10m for optimal results. We observe model instabilities and present solutions like smoothing of the surface input data, careful positioning of the model domain and shortening of the model time step down to a twentieth of a second. Model results are compared to an array of various instruments including eddy covariance stations, LIDAR, RASS, SODAR, weather stations and unmanned aerial vehicles. All instruments are part of the TERENO pre-Alpine area and were employed in the orchestrated measurement campaign ScaleX in July 2015. Examination of the results show reasonable agreement between model and measurements in temperature- and moisture profiles. Modeled wind profiles are highly dependent on the vertical resolution and are in accordance with measurements only at higher wind speeds. A direct comparison of turbulence is made difficult by the purely statistical character of turbulent motions in the model.

  6. Numerical simulation of the aerodynamic field in complex terrain wind farm based on actuator disk model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Chen Qi; Han, Xing Xing

    2015-01-01

    Study on the aerodynamic field in complex terrain is significant to wind farm micro-sitting and wind power prediction. This paper modeled the wind turbine through an actuator disk model, and solved the aerodynamic field by CFD to study the influence of meshing, boundary conditions and turbulence ...

  7. Geological terrain models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupp, V. H.; Macdonald, H. C.; Waite, W. P.

    1981-01-01

    The initial phase of a program to determine the best interpretation strategy and sensor configuration for a radar remote sensing system for geologic applications is discussed. In this phase, terrain modeling and radar image simulation were used to perform parametric sensitivity studies. A relatively simple computer-generated terrain model is presented, and the data base, backscatter file, and transfer function for digital image simulation are described. Sets of images are presented that simulate the results obtained with an X-band radar from an altitude of 800 km and at three different terrain-illumination angles. The simulations include power maps, slant-range images, ground-range images, and ground-range images with statistical noise incorporated. It is concluded that digital image simulation and computer modeling provide cost-effective methods for evaluating terrain variations and sensor parameter changes, for predicting results, and for defining optimum sensor parameters.

  8. Simulant Development for LAWPS Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schonewill, Philip P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burns, Carolyn A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-23

    This report describes simulant development work that was conducted to support the technology maturation of the LAWPS facility. Desired simulant physical properties (density, viscosity, solids concentration, solid particle size), sodium concentrations, and general anion identifications were provided by WRPS. The simulant recipes, particularly a “nominal” 5.6M Na simulant, are intended to be tested at several scales, ranging from bench-scale (500 mL) to full-scale. Each simulant formulation was selected to be chemically representative of the waste streams anticipated to be fed to the LAWPS system, and used the current version of the LAWPS waste specification as a formulation basis. After simulant development iterations, four simulants of varying sodium concentration (5.6M, 6.0M, 4.0M, and 8.0M) were prepared and characterized. The formulation basis, development testing, and final simulant recipes and characterization data for these four simulants are presented in this report.

  9. Simulator for materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Sugaya, Naoto; Ohtsuka, Kaoru; Hanakawa, Hiroki; Onuma, Yuichi; Hosokawa, Jinsaku; Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Tamura, Kazuo; Hotta, Kohji; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    A real-time simulator for both reactor and irradiation facilities of a materials testing reactor, “Simulator of Materials Testing Reactors”, was developed for understanding reactor behavior and operational training in order to utilize it for nuclear human resource development and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of anticipated operational transients and accident conditions caused by the reactor and irradiation facilities. The development of the simulator was sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. This report summarizes the simulation components, hardware specification and operation procedure of the simulator. (author)

  10. Compaction-Based Deformable Terrain Model as an Interface for Real-Time Vehicle Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    N.Y. [20] Wulfsohn, D., and Upadhyaya, S. K., 1992, "Prediction of traction and soil compaction using three-dimensional soil- tyre contact profile," Journal of Terramechanics, 29(6), pp. 541-564. ...the relative speedup of utilizing GPUs for computational acceleration. INTRODUCTION In order to enable off- road vehicle dynamics analysis...ANSI Std Z39-18 Page 2 of 8 Figure 2. Tire geometry used to determine collision points with the terrain In the context of off- road vehicle

  11. A spatially explicit hydro-ecological modeling framework (BEPS-TerrainLab V2.0): Model description and test in a boreal ecosystem in Eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind, Ajit; Chen, Jing Ming; Margolis, Hank; Ju, Weimin; Sonnentag, Oliver; Giasson, Marc-André

    2009-04-01

    SummaryA spatially explicit, process-based hydro-ecological model, BEPS-TerrainLab V2.0, was developed to improve the representation of ecophysiological, hydro-ecological and biogeochemical processes of boreal ecosystems in a tightly coupled manner. Several processes unique to boreal ecosystems were implemented including the sub-surface lateral water fluxes, stratification of vegetation into distinct layers for explicit ecophysiological representation, inclusion of novel spatial upscaling strategies and biogeochemical processes. To account for preferential water fluxes common in humid boreal ecosystems, a novel scheme was introduced based on laboratory analyses. Leaf-scale ecophysiological processes were upscaled to canopy-scale by explicitly considering leaf physiological conditions as affected by light and water stress. The modified model was tested with 2 years of continuous measurements taken at the Eastern Old Black Spruce Site of the Fluxnet-Canada Research Network located in a humid boreal watershed in eastern Canada. Comparison of the simulated and measured ET, water-table depth (WTD), volumetric soil water content (VSWC) and gross primary productivity (GPP) revealed that BEPS-TerrainLab V2.0 simulates hydro-ecological processes with reasonable accuracy. The model was able to explain 83% of the ET, 92% of the GPP variability and 72% of the WTD dynamics. The model suggests that in humid ecosystems such as eastern North American boreal watersheds, topographically driven sub-surface baseflow is the main mechanism of soil water partitioning which significantly affects the local-scale hydrological conditions.

  12. New non-orthogonality treatment for atmospheric boundary layer flow simulation above highly non-uniform terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirkov Nikola S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we validate an improved finite volume approximation of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations for simulation of wind flows in body-fitted grids generated by algebraic extrusion from digital terrain elevation data, proposed in N. Mirkov et. al. J. Comput. Phys. 287, 18-45(2015, [1]. The approach is based on second-order accurate finite volume method with collocated variable arrangement and pressure-velocity coupling trough SIMPLE algorithm. The main objective is the attenuation of spurious pressure field oscillations in regions with discontinuity in grid line slopes, as encountered in grids representing highly non-uniform terrains. Moreover, the approach relaxes the need for grid generation based on elliptic PDEs or grid smoothing by applying fixed point iterations (i.e. Gauss-Seidel to initial grid node positions resulting from algebraic grid generators. Drawbacks of previous approaches which ignored treatment of finite volume grid cell cases with intersection point offset in non-orthogonality corrections are removed. Application to real-life wind farm project at Dobrič (Srvljig, Serbia is used to assess the effectiveness of the method. The results validate the view in which accurate discretization of governing equations play more important role than the choice of turbulence modelling closures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33036

  13. Weightless environment simulation test; Mujuryo simulation shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Kato, F. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-07-20

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., delivered a Weightless Environment Test System (WETS) to National Space Development Agency of Japan in 1994. This system creates a weightless environment similar to that in space by balancing gravity and buoyancy in the water, and is constituted of a large water tank, facilities to supply air and cooling water to space suits worn in the water, etc. In this report, a weightless environment simulation test and the facilities to supply air and cooling water are described. In the weightless environment simulation test, the astronaut to undergo tests and training wears a space suit quite similar to the suit worn on the orbit, and performs EVA/IVA (extravehicular activities/intravehicular activities) around a JEM (Japanese Experimental Module) mockup installed in the water verifying JEM design specifications, preparing manuals for operations on the orbit, or receives basic space-related drill and training. An EVA weightless environment simulation test No. 3 was accomplished with success in January, 1997, when the supply of breathing water and cooling water to the space suit, etc., were carried out with safety and reliability. 2 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Simulation of wind-induced snow transport in alpine terrain using a fully coupled snowpack/atmosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, V.; Martin, E.; Masson, V.; Guyomarc'h, G.; Naaim-Bouvet, F.; Prokop, A.; Durand, Y.; Lac, C.

    2013-06-01

    In alpine regions, wind-induced snow transport strongly influences the spatio-temporal evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. To gain understanding on the complex processes that drive the redistribution of snow, a new numerical model is developed. It couples directly the detailed snowpack model Crocus with the atmospheric model Meso-NH. Meso-NH/Crocus simulates snow transport in saltation and in turbulent suspension and includes the sublimation of suspended snow particles. A detailed representation of the first meters of the atmosphere allows a fine reproduction of the erosion and deposition process. The coupled model is evaluated against data collected around the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (2720 m a.s.l., French Alps). For this purpose, a blowing snow event without concurrent snowfall has been selected and simulated. Results show that the model captures the main structures of atmospheric flow in alpine terrain, the vertical profile of wind speed and the snow particles fluxes near the surface. However, the horizontal resolution of 50 m is found to be insufficient to simulate the location of areas of snow erosion and deposition observed by terrestrial laser scanning. When activated, the sublimation of suspended snow particles causes a reduction in deposition of 5.3%. Total sublimation (surface + blowing snow) is three times higher than surface sublimation in a simulation neglecting blowing snow sublimation.

  15. Simulation of wind-induced snow transport and sublimation in alpine terrain using a fully coupled snowpack/atmosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, V.; Martin, E.; Masson, V.; Guyomarc'h, G.; Naaim-Bouvet, F.; Prokop, A.; Durand, Y.; Lac, C.

    2014-03-01

    In alpine regions, wind-induced snow transport strongly influences the spatio-temporal evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. To gain understanding on the complex processes that drive the redistribution of snow, a new numerical model is developed. It directly couples the detailed snowpack model Crocus with the atmospheric model Meso-NH. Meso-NH/Crocus simulates snow transport in saltation and in turbulent suspension and includes the sublimation of suspended snow particles. The coupled model is evaluated against data collected around the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (2720 m a.s.l., French Alps). First, 1-D simulations show that a detailed representation of the first metres of the atmosphere is required to reproduce strong gradients of blowing snow concentration and compute mass exchange between the snowpack and the atmosphere. Secondly, 3-D simulations of a blowing snow event without concurrent snowfall have been carried out. Results show that the model captures the main structures of atmospheric flow in alpine terrain. However, at 50 m grid spacing, the model reproduces only the patterns of snow erosion and deposition at the ridge scale and misses smaller scale patterns observed by terrestrial laser scanning. When activated, the sublimation of suspended snow particles causes a reduction of deposited snow mass of 5.3% over the calculation domain. Total sublimation (surface + blowing snow) is three times higher than surface sublimation in a simulation neglecting blowing snow sublimation.

  16. Numerical Simulation Analysis of Seismic of Frame Structure on Hill Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Weisu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent year, Wenchuan,Ya’an,Yushu and other areas in china occur a series of high earthquake, however areas of earthquake is similar as mountainous terrain, building structure of seismic increasingly aroused our concern, and the research that hill topography affected building structure seismic in shallow mountain. The research content mainly includes: through modelling was built by the ANSYS software, the cooperative effects of a ten layer of frame structure- hill system were calculation. First, simple comparative dynamic characteristics analysis of soil - structure interaction and the rigid foundation assumption conditions; Second, put Hill-Soil-Structure Interaction(referred to as HSSI and Soil - Structure - Interaction(referred to as SSI further analysis of the dynamic response, including: including structural modal analysis (vibration mode, cycle, the time history analysis (such as displacement, internal force and acceleration and so on. Through Hill-Soil-Structure Interaction research, taking each factor in consideration, giving structure seismic key technology measures about shallow mountain to provide reference for such structure theory research.

  17. Meso- to micro-scale coupled simulations of flow over complex terrain at the Perdigao site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, J.; van Veen, L.; Chow, F. K.; Mirocha, J. D.; Lundquist, J. K.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the site of the 2017 Perdigao field campaign is analyzed with high resolution large-eddy simulations generated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model as a coupled mesoscale to microscale model. The fine topographic features of the site, with its ridgelines a mere 1.2 km apart, the occurrence of intermittent turbulence at night, and the presence of a wind turbine on one of the ridgelines pose a challenge for many current numerical models. Key test cases in the observational data that demonstrate these modelling difficulties are identified, and advanced modeling techniques for overcoming these issues in the WRF model are presented. These techniques include vertical grid nesting for control of the grid aspect ratio, the cell perturbation method for accelerating the generation of turbulence at the boundary, the dynamic reconstruction model as a closure model that allows for backscatter of turbulence, and the actuator disk model for representing the turbine wake. Multiple nesting configurations are considered, with special consideration given to spanning the `grey zone' where neither PBL nor LES closures are effective. Comparisons between model results and measured sounding, meteorological tower, and Lidar data are used to evaluate the effectiveness of these techniques, and the model results are evaluated to provide a broader view of the flow field and the turbine wake interactions at the site.

  18. Preduction of Vehicle Mobility on Large-Scale Soft-Soil Terrain Maps Using Physics-Based Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    Mechergui, Srinivas Sanikommu UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. (#28138) Outline • Motivation ...Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. (#28138) Motivation /NRMM • Mobility measures include: – Speed-made...Index (CI). – Terrain uphill grade. • Rest of the terrain parameters will be considered in future work. 4 Terrain map (22 km x 22 km) colored by

  19. Human Estimation of Slope, Distance, and Height of Terrain in Simulated Lunar Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    9643 APPENDIX J DEVON ISLAND DISTANCE REFERENCE 259 Distance References NBA Basketball Court Width 15 meters 50 feet...Cockpit Hours: Simulator Airframe: Hours: Sports Baseball Years: Beginner Intermediate Advanced Basketball Years: Beginner

  20. Adding complex terrain and stable atmospheric condition capability to the OpenFOAM-based flow solver of the simulator for on/offshore wind farm applications (SOWFA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churchfield Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications contains an OpenFOAM-based flow solver for performing large-eddy simulation of flow through wind plants. The solver computes the atmospheric boundary layer flow and models turbines with actuator lines. Until recently, the solver was limited to flows over flat terrain and could only use the standard Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model. In this work, we present our improvements to the flow solver that enable us to 1 use any OpenFOAM-standard subgrid-scale model and 2 simulate flow over complex terrain. We used the flow solver to compute a stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer using both the standard and the Lagrangian-averaged scale-independent dynamic Smagorinsky models. Surprisingly, the results using the standard Smagorinsky model compare well to other researchers' results of the same case, although it is often said that the standard Smagorinsky model is too dissipative for accurate stable stratification calculations. The scale-independent dynamic subgrid-scale model produced poor results, probably due to the spikes in model constant with values as high as 4.6. We applied a simple bounding of the model constant to remove these spikes, which caused the model to produce results much more in line with other researchers' results. We also computed flow over a simple hilly terrain and performed some basic qualitative analysis to verify the proper operation of the terrain-local surface stress model we employed.

  1. Creating and Testing Simulation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinich, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to learn about the software development process, specifically the process to test and fix components of the software. The paper will cover the techniques of testing code, and the benefits of using one style of testing over another. It will also discuss the overall software design and development lifecycle, and how code testing plays an integral role in it. Coding is notorious for always needing to be debugged due to coding errors or faulty program design. Writing tests either before or during program creation that cover all aspects of the code provide a relatively easy way to locate and fix errors, which will in turn decrease the necessity to fix a program after it is released for common use. The backdrop for this paper is the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI), a project whose goal is to simulate a launch using simulated models of the ground systems and the connections between them and the control room. The simulations will be used for training and to ensure that all possible outcomes and complications are prepared for before the actual launch day. The code being tested is the Programmable Logic Controller Interface (PLCIF) code, the component responsible for transferring the information from the models to the model Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), basic computers that are used for very simple tasks.

  2. Helicopter Flight Test of a Compact, Real-Time 3-D Flash Lidar for Imaging Hazardous Terrain During Planetary Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roback, VIncent E.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Brewster, Paul F.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Kempton, Kevin S.; Reisse, Robert A.; Bulyshev, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    A second generation, compact, real-time, air-cooled 3-D imaging Flash Lidar sensor system, developed from a number of cutting-edge components from industry and NASA, is lab characterized and helicopter flight tested under the Autonomous Precision Landing and Hazard Detection and Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project. The ALHAT project is seeking to develop a guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) and sensing system based on lidar technology capable of enabling safe, precise crewed or robotic landings in challenging terrain on planetary bodies under any ambient lighting conditions. The Flash Lidar incorporates a 3-D imaging video camera based on Indium-Gallium-Arsenide Avalanche Photo Diode and novel micro-electronic technology for a 128 x 128 pixel array operating at a video rate of 20 Hz, a high pulse-energy 1.06 µm Neodymium-doped: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, a remote laser safety termination system, high performance transmitter and receiver optics with one and five degrees field-of-view (FOV), enhanced onboard thermal control, as well as a compact and self-contained suite of support electronics housed in a single box and built around a PC-104 architecture to enable autonomous operations. The Flash Lidar was developed and then characterized at two NASA-Langley Research Center (LaRC) outdoor laser test range facilities both statically and dynamically, integrated with other ALHAT GN&C subsystems from partner organizations, and installed onto a Bell UH-1H Iroquois "Huey" helicopter at LaRC. The integrated system was flight tested at the NASA-Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on simulated lunar approach to a custom hazard field consisting of rocks, craters, hazardous slopes, and safe-sites near the Shuttle Landing Facility runway starting at slant ranges of 750 m. In order to evaluate different methods of achieving hazard detection, the lidar, in conjunction with the ALHAT hazard detection and GN&C system, operates in both a narrow 1deg FOV raster

  3. Surface Wind Regionalization over Complex Terrain: Evaluation and Analysis of a High-Resolution WRF Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez, P.A.; González-Rouco, J.F.; García-Bustamante, E.; Navarro, J.; Montávez, J.P.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Dudhia, J.; Muñoz-Roldan, A.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes the daily-mean surface wind variability over an area characterized by complex topography through comparing observations and a 2-km-spatial-resolution simulation performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for the period 1992–2005. The evaluation focuses on the

  4. Automatic Computer Mapping of Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedes, H. W.

    1971-01-01

    Computer processing of 17 wavelength bands of visible, reflective infrared, and thermal infrared scanner spectrometer data, and of three wavelength bands derived from color aerial film has resulted in successful automatic computer mapping of eight or more terrain classes in a Yellowstone National Park test site. The tests involved: (1) supervised and non-supervised computer programs; (2) special preprocessing of the scanner data to reduce computer processing time and cost, and improve the accuracy; and (3) studies of the effectiveness of the proposed Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) data channels in the automatic mapping of the same terrain, based on simulations, using the same set of scanner data. The following terrain classes have been mapped with greater than 80 percent accuracy in a 12-square-mile area with 1,800 feet of relief; (1) bedrock exposures, (2) vegetated rock rubble, (3) talus, (4) glacial kame meadow, (5) glacial till meadow, (6) forest, (7) bog, and (8) water. In addition, shadows of clouds and cliffs are depicted, but were greatly reduced by using preprocessing techniques.

  5. MM5 simulations for air quality modeling: An application to a coastal area with complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Mi; Princevac, Marko; Mitsutomi, Satoru; Cassmassi, Joe

    A series of modifications were implemented in MM5 simulation in order to account for wind along the Santa Clarita valley, a north-south running valley located in the north of Los Angeles. Due to high range mountains in the north and the east of the Los Angeles Air Basin, sea breeze entering Los Angeles exits into two directions. One branch moves toward the eastern part of the basin and the other to the north toward the Santa Clarita valley. However, the northward flow has not been examined thoroughly nor simulated successfully in the previous studies. In the present study, we proposed four modifications to trigger the flow separation. They were (1) increasing drag over the ocean, (2) increasing soil moisture content, (3) selective observational nudging, and (4) one-way nesting for the innermost domain. The Control run overpredicted near-surface wind speed over the ocean and sensible heat flux, in an urbanized area, which justifies the above 1st and 2nd modification. The Modified run provided an improvement in near-surface temperature, sensible heat flux and wind fields including southeasterly flow along the Santa Clarita valley. The improved MM5 wind field triggered a transport to the Santa Clarita valley generating a plume elongated from an urban center to the north, which did not exist in MM5 Control run. In all, the modified MM5 fields yielded better agreement in both CO and O3 simulations especially in the Santa Clarita area.

  6. Hot ductility testing and weld simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, G.; Schick, M.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the project was to enhance the insight into the causes of intergranular cracks detected in austenitic circumferential welds at BWR pipes. The susceptibility of a variety of austenitic pipe materials to hot cracking during welding and in-service intergranular crack corrosion was examined. The assumption was cracking in the root area of the HAZ of a multiple-layer weld. Hot-ductility tests and weld simulation tests specifically designed for the project were performed with the austenitic LWR pipe materials 1.4553 (X6 CrNiNb 18 10 S), 1.4550 (X10 CrNiNb 18 9), 1.4533 (X6 CrNiTi 18 9, two weld pools), and a non-stabilized TP 304 (X5 CrNi 18 10). (orig./CB) [de

  7. Test Generator for MATLAB Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Joel

    2011-01-01

    MATLAB Automated Test Tool, version 3.0 (MATT 3.0) is a software package that provides automated tools that reduce the time needed for extensive testing of simulation models that have been constructed in the MATLAB programming language by use of the Simulink and Real-Time Workshop programs. MATT 3.0 runs on top of the MATLAB engine application-program interface to communicate with the Simulink engine. MATT 3.0 automatically generates source code from the models, generates custom input data for testing both the models and the source code, and generates graphs and other presentations that facilitate comparison of the outputs of the models and the source code for the same input data. Context-sensitive and fully searchable help is provided in HyperText Markup Language (HTML) format.

  8. Testing philosophy and simulation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtbecker, H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews past and present testing philosophies and simulation techniques in the field of structure loading and response studies. The main objective of experimental programmes in the past was to simulate a hypothetical energy release with explosives and to deduce the potential damage to a reactor from the measured damage to the model. This approach was continuously refined by improving the instrumentation of the models, by reproducing the structures as faithful as possible and by developing new explosive charges. This paper presents an analysis of the factors which are expected to have an influence on the validity of the results e.g. strain rate effects and the use of water instead of sodium. More recently the discussion of a whole series of accidents in the probabilistic accident analysis and the intention to compare different reactor designs has revealed the need to develop and validate computer codes. Consequently experimental programmes have been started in which the primary aim is not to test a specific reactor but to validate codes. This paper shows the principal aspects of this approach and discusses first results. (Auth.)

  9. Soft Soil Impact Testing and Simulation of Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    In June 2007, a 38-ft/s vertical drop test of a 5-ft-diameter, 5-ft-long composite fuselage section that was retrofitted with a novel composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) was conducted onto unpacked sand. This test was one of a series of tests to evaluate the multi-terrain capabilities of the DEA and to generate test data for model validation. During the test, the DEA crushed approximately 6-in. and left craters in the sand of depths ranging from 7.5- to 9-in. A finite element model of the fuselage section with DEA was developed for execution in LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic code. Pre-test predictions were generated in which the sand was represented initially as a crushable foam material MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63). Following the drop test, a series of hemispherical penetrometer tests were conducted to assist in soil characterization. The penetrometer weighed 20-lb and was instrumented with a tri-axial accelerometer. Drop tests were performed at 16-ft/s and crater depths were measured. The penetrometer drop tests were simulated as a means for developing a more representative soil model based on a soil and foam material definition MAT_SOIL_AND FOAM (Mat 5) in LS-DYNA. The model of the fuselage with DEA was reexecuted using the updated soil model and test-analysis correlations are presented.

  10. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, M

    2005-01-01

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted from gibbsite to

  11. MODELLING AND VALIDATION OF A TESTING TRAILER FOR ABS AND TYRE INTERACTION ON ROUGH TERRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Žuraulis, Vidas; van der Merwe, Nico A.; Scholtz, Odette; Els, P. Schalk

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of a vehicle anti-lock braking system (ABS) is to prevent the tyres from locking-up in order to brake efficiently whilst maintaining steering control and stability. Sport utility vehicles (SUV) are designed to drive on various roads under different driving conditions, making it challenging to identify optimal operating conditions for ABS algorithms to be implemented. This paper describes the development and modelling of a testing trailer that is designed to benefit the res...

  12. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Drive Shaft for All Terrain Vehicle using Filament Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeshwant Nayak Suhas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Filament winding is a composite material fabrication technique that is used to manufacture concentric hollow components. In this study Carbon/Epoxy composite drive shafts were fabricated using filament winding process with a fiber orientation of [852/±452/252]s. Carbon in the form of multifilament fibers of Tairyfil TC-33 having 3000 filaments/strand was used as reinforcement with low viscosity epoxy resin as the matrix material. The driveshaft is designed to be used in SAE Baja All Terrain Vehicle (ATV that makes use of a fully floating axle in its rear wheel drive system. The torsional strength of the shaft was tested and compared to that of an OEM steel shaft that was previously used in the ATV. Results show that the composite shaft had 8.5% higher torsional strength in comparison to the OEM steel shaft and was also lighter by 60%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM micrographs were studied to investigate the probable failure mechanism. Delamination, matrix agglomeration, fiber pull-out and matrix cracking were the prominent failure mechanisms identified.

  13. Simulating lightning tests to radar system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaj, M.A.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The risk of destruction due to lightning makes simulating the effects of lightning strikes a necessity. We modeled a radar enclosure and simulated the effect of a lightning strike. The results have been validated using full threat lightning current tests.

  14. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Imaizumi, Tomomi; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishitsuka, Tatsuo; Tamura, Kazuo [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  15. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Imaizumi, Tomomi; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Suzuki, Masahide; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo; Tamura, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahoshi, Y.; Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  17. Testing cooperative systems with the MARS simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, B.D.; Wedemeijer, H.

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of cooperative systems makes the use of high fidelity simulation essential in the development and testing of cooperative applications and their interactions with other cooperative systems. In SAFESPOT a simulator test bench is setup to test the safety margin applications running on

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahoshi, Y. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  19. Reliability Testing Using the Vehicle Durability Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-20

    techniques are employed to reduce test and simulation time. Through application of these processes and techniques the reliability characteristics...remote parameter control (RPC) software. The software is specifically designed for the data collection, analysis, and simulation processes outlined in...the selection process for determining the desired runs for simulation . 4.3 Drive File Development. After the data have been reviewed and

  20. Simulation of Test Case B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, M.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This report shows the results of the simulations given in research item 1.19 (isothermal forced convection) within the work of International Energy Agency (lEA), Annex 20 subtask 1. The title of this work is "Air Flow within Buildings" and the working title for subtask 1 is "Room Air...

  1. Terrain-Toolkit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qi; Kaul, Manohar; Long, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    , as will be shown, is used heavily for query processing in spatial databases; and (3) they do not provide the surface distance operator which is fundamental for many applications based on terrain data. Motivated by this, we developed a tool called Terrain-Toolkit for terrain data which accepts a comprehensive set......Terrain data is becoming increasingly popular both in industry and in academia. Many tools have been developed for visualizing terrain data. However, we find that (1) they usually accept very few data formats of terrain data only; (2) they do not support terrain simplification well which...

  2. Simulation-based Testing of Control Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozmen, Ozgur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nutaro, James J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sanyal, Jibonananda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olama, Mohammed M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-02-10

    It is impossible to adequately test complex software by examining its operation in a physical prototype of the system monitored. Adequate test coverage can require millions of test cases, and the cost of equipment prototypes combined with the real-time constraints of testing with them makes it infeasible to sample more than a small number of these tests. Model based testing seeks to avoid this problem by allowing for large numbers of relatively inexpensive virtual prototypes that operate in simulation time at a speed limited only by the available computing resources. In this report, we describe how a computer system emulator can be used as part of a model based testing environment; specifically, we show that a complete software stack including operating system and application software - can be deployed within a simulated environment, and that these simulations can proceed as fast as possible. To illustrate this approach to model based testing, we describe how it is being used to test several building control systems that act to coordinate air conditioning loads for the purpose of reducing peak demand. These tests involve the use of ADEVS (A Discrete Event System Simulator) and QEMU (Quick Emulator) to host the operational software within the simulation, and a building model developed with the MODELICA programming language using Buildings Library and packaged as an FMU (Functional Mock-up Unit) that serves as the virtual test environment.

  3. Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kury, John W.; Anderson, Brian L.

    1999-09-28

    Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

  4. Selection method of terrain matching area for TERCOM algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qieqie; Zhao, Long

    2017-10-01

    The performance of terrain aided navigation is closely related to the selection of terrain matching area. The different matching algorithms have different adaptability to terrain. This paper mainly studies the adaptability to terrain of TERCOM algorithm, analyze the relation between terrain feature and terrain characteristic parameters by qualitative and quantitative methods, and then research the relation between matching probability and terrain characteristic parameters by the Monte Carlo method. After that, we propose a selection method of terrain matching area for TERCOM algorithm, and verify the method correctness with real terrain data by simulation experiment. Experimental results show that the matching area obtained by the method in this paper has the good navigation performance and the matching probability of TERCOM algorithm is great than 90%

  5. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST). Phase I test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W.S.; Alamgir, M.; Sutherland, W.A.

    1984-09-01

    A new full height BWR system simulator has been built under the Full-Integral-Simulation-Test (FIST) program to investigate the system responses to various transients. The test program consists of two test phases. This report provides a summary, discussions, highlights and conclusions of the FIST Phase I tests. Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests have investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. Results and governing phenomena of each test have been evaluated and discussed in detail in this report. One of the FIST program objectives is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two pretest predictions made with TRACB02 are presented and compared with test data in this report

  6. Simulation and material testing of jet engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA software engine simulator version U 1.7a beta has been used for simulation and material testing of jet engines. Specifications of Modem Jet Engines are stated, and then engine simulator is applied on these specifications. This simulator can simulate turbojet, afterburner, turbofan and ram jet. The material of many components of engine may be varied. Conventional and advanced materials for jet engines can be simulated and tested. These materials can be actively cooled to increase the operating temperature limit. As soon as temperature of any engine component exceeds the temperature limit of material, a warning message flashes across screen. Temperature Limits Exceeded. This flashing message remainst here until necessaryc hangesa re carried out in engine operationp rocedure. Selection Criteria of Engines is stated for piston prop, turboprop, turbofan, turbojet, and turbojet with afterburner and Ramjet. Several standard engines are modeled in Engine Simulator. These engines can. be compared by several engineering specifications. The design, modeling, simulation and testing of engines helps to better understand different types of materials used in jet engines. (author)

  7. Numerical simulations of rubber bearing tests and shaking table tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, K.; Matsuda, A.; Yabana, S.

    2002-01-01

    Test data concerning rubber bearing tests and shaking table tests of base-isolated model conducted by CRIEPI are provided to the participants of Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on 'Intercomparison of Analysis Methods for predicting the behaviour of Seismically Isolated Nuclear Structure', which is organized by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), for the comparison study of numerical simulation of base-isolated structure. In this paper outlines of the test data provided and the numerical simulations of bearing tests and shaking table tests are described. Using computer code ABAQUS, numerical simulations of rubber bearing tests are conducted for NRBs, LRBs (data provided by CRIEPI) and for HDRs (data provided by ENEA/ENEL and KAERI). Several strain energy functions are specified according to the rubber material test corresponding to each rubber bearing. As for lead plug material in LRB, mechanical characteristics are reevaluated and are made use of. Simulation results for these rubber bearings show satisfactory agreement with the test results. Shaking table test conducted by CRIEPI is of a base isolated rigid mass supported by LRB. Acceleration time histories, displacement time histories of the isolators as well as cyclic loading test data of the LRB used for the shaking table test are provided to the participants of the CRP. Simulations of shaking table tests are conducted for this rigid mass, and also for the steel frame model which is conducted by ENEL/ENEA. In the simulation of the rigid mass model test, where LRBs are used, isolators are modeled either by bilinear model or polylinear model. In both cases of modeling of isolators, simulation results show good agreement with the test results. In the case of the steel frame model, where HDRs are used as isolators, bilinear model and polylinear model are also used for modeling isolators. The response of the model is simulated comparatively well in the low frequency range of the floor response, however, in

  8. Implementation and Testing of Advanced Surface Boundary Conditions Over Complex Terrain in A Semi-idealized Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Epifanio, C.

    2017-12-01

    In numerical prediction models, the interaction between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere is typically accounted for in terms of surface layer parameterizations, whose main job is to specify turbulent fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum across the lower boundary of the model domain. In the case of a domain with complex geometry, implementing the flux conditions (particularly the tensor stress condition) at the boundary can be somewhat subtle, and there has been a notable history of confusion in the CFD community over how to formulate and impose such conditions generally. In the atmospheric case, modelers have largely been able to avoid these complications, at least until recently, by assuming that the terrain resolved at typical model resolutions is fairly gentle, in the sense of having relatively shallow slopes. This in turn allows the flux conditions to be imposed as if the lower boundary were essentially flat. Unfortunately, while this flat-boundary assumption is acceptable for coarse resolutions, as grids become more refined and the geometry of the resolved terrain becomes more complex, the appproach is less justified. With this in mind, the goal of our present study is to explore the implementation and usage of the full, unapproximated version of the turbulent flux/stress conditions in atmospheric models, thus taking full account of the complex geometry of the resolved terrain. We propose to implement the conditions using a semi-idealized model developed by Epifanio (2007), in which the discretized boundary conditions are reduced to a large, sparse-matrix problem. The emphasis will be on fluxes of momentum, as the tensor nature of this flux makes the associated stress condition more difficult to impose, although the flux conditions for heat and moisture will be considered as well. With the resulotion of 90 meters, some of the results show that the typical differences between flat-boundary cases and full/stress cases are on the order of 10%, with extreme

  9. Using sport psychology in simulator testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primeau, T.; Chandler, K.

    2007-01-01

    The paper will cover the methods of simulator testing at Bruce Power and the recent trial of using a sport psychology consultant to help candidates deal with the mental, physiological and emotional responses to simulator examinations. Previous research has shown that mental skills training can enhance the performance of both cognitive and physical skills. As such, it was hypothesized that a structured mental skills program would assist candidates in achieving optimal performance during simulator testing. The paper will be written as a descriptive piece. The paper will offer insight into the benefits of using mental skills training in preparation for simulator testing and the drawbacks as experienced by the Authorized Nuclear Operator (ANO). (author)

  10. New high-fidelity terrain modeling method constrained by terrain semanteme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhou

    Full Text Available Production of higher-fidelity digital elevation models is important; as such models are indispensable components of space data infrastructure. However, loss of terrain features is a constant problem for grid digital elevation models, although these models have already been defined in such a way that their distinct usage as data sources in terrain modeling processing is prohibited. Therefore, in this study, the novel concept-terrain semanteme is proposed to define local space terrain features, and a new process for generating grid digital elevation models based on this new concept is designed. A prototype system is programmed to test the proposed approach; the results indicate that terrain semanteme can be applied in the process of grid digital elevation model generation, and that usage of this new concept improves the digital elevation model fidelity. Moreover, the terrain semanteme technique can be applied for recovery of distorted digital elevation model regions containing terrain semantemes, with good recovery efficiency indicated by experiments.

  11. Development of Partial Discharging Simulation Test Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Xue; Genghua, Liu; Yan, Jia; Ziqi, Chai; Jian, Lu

    2017-12-01

    In the case of partial discharge training for recruits who lack of on-site work experience, the risk of physical shock and damage of the test equipment may be due to the limited skill level and improper operation by new recruits. Partial discharge simulation tester is the use of simulation technology to achieve partial discharge test process simulation, relatively true reproduction of the local discharge process and results, so that the operator in the classroom will be able to get familiar with and understand the use of the test process and equipment.The teacher sets up the instrument to display different partial discharge waveforms so that the trainees can analyze the test results of different partial discharge types.

  12. CRIEPI and SKB cooperation report. No.11. Numerical analysis for long-term pumping test at crystalline terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasuharu

    2012-01-01

    A numerical analysis code for groundwater flow in rock mass, FEGM, which was developed by CRIEPI, was applied to the analysis of a long-term pumping test conducted at Olkiluoto Island in Finland. The groundwater level, the groundwater pressure and the groundwater inflow into the observation boreholes measured under the natural condition or during the pumping test could be reproduced in numerical simulations with FEGM. From this, the effectiveness of the numerical code was confirmed. And it was found that the site-scale groundwater flow is dependent on large-scale fracture zones in crystalline terrane like Olkiluoto Island. In this study, the calculated values of the groundwater inflow into the observation boreholes as well as the groundwater level and the groundwater pressure were compared to the measured ones. As a result, the reliability of the analytical model was improved. In addition, the travel times of groundwater particles from different depths at the same point to the model boundaries were compared. And the advantage of constructing waste disposal facilities at deep underground was confirmed from the viewpoint of the travel time of groundwater. (author)

  13. A mechanical breathing simulator for respirator test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mikio; Ikezawa, Yoshio; Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    1976-01-01

    A mechanical breathing simulator has been developed to produce the human respiration for use in respirator test. The respirations were produced through the strokes of piston controlled by a rockerarm with adjustable fulcrum. The respiration rate was governed by motor-speed control, independent of the tidal volume achieved by adjustment of the piston stroke. By the breather, the simulated respirations for work rate 0, 208, 415, 622 and 830 kg-m/min could be produced through the typical dummy head. (auth.)

  14. Complex terrain and wind lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingoel, F.

    2009-08-15

    This thesis includes the results of a PhD study about complex terrain and wind lidars. The study mostly focuses on hilly and forested areas. Lidars have been used in combination with cups, sonics and vanes, to reach the desired vertical measurement heights. Several experiments are performed in complex terrain sites and the measurements are compared with two different flow models; a linearised flow model LINCOM and specialised forest model SCADIS. In respect to the lidar performance in complex terrain, the results showed that horizontal wind speed errors measured by a conically scanning lidar can be of the order of 3-4% in moderately-complex terrain and up to 10% in complex terrain. The findings were based on experiments involving collocated lidars and meteorological masts, together with flow calculations over the same terrains. The lidar performance was also simulated with the commercial software WAsP Engineering 2.0 and was well predicted except for some sectors where the terrain is particularly steep. Subsequently, two experiments were performed in forested areas; where the measurements are recorded at a location deep-in forest and at the forest edge. Both sites were modelled with flow models and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated by LINCOM model was only reliable between 1 and 2 tree height (h) above canopy. The SCADIS model reported better correlation with the measurements in forest up to approx6h. At the forest edge, LINCOM model was used by allocating a slope half-in half out of the forest based on the suggestions of previous studies. The optimum slope angle was reported as 17 deg.. Thus, a suggestion was made to use WAsP Engineering 2.0 for forest edge modelling with known limitations and the applied method. The SCADIS model worked better than the LINCOM model at the forest edge but the model reported closer results to the measurements at upwind than the downwind and this should be

  15. 2-d Simulations of Test Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars Nyholm

    2004-01-01

    One of the main obstacles for the further development of self-compacting concrete is to relate the fresh concrete properties to the form filling ability. Therefore, simulation of the form filling ability will provide a powerful tool in obtaining this goal. In this paper, a continuum mechanical...... approach is presented by showing initial results from 2-d simulations of the empirical test methods slump flow and L-box. This method assumes a homogeneous material, which is expected to correspond to particle suspensions e.g. concrete, when it remains stable. The simulations have been carried out when...... using both a Newton and Bingham model for characterisation of the rheological properties of the concrete. From the results, it is expected that both the slump flow and L-box can be simulated quite accurately when the model is extended to 3-d and the concrete is characterised according to the Bingham...

  16. A computationally fast, reduced model for simulating landslide dynamics and tsunamis generated by landslides in natural terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, F.

    2016-12-01

    Landslide hazards such as fast-moving debris flows, slow-moving landslides, and other mass flows cause numerous fatalities, injuries, and damage. Landslide occurrences in fjords, bays, and lakes can additionally generate tsunamis with locally extremely high wave heights and runups. Two-dimensional depth-averaged models can successfully simulate the entire lifecycle of the three-dimensional landslide dynamics and tsunami propagation efficiently and accurately with the appropriate assumptions. Landslide rheology is defined using viscous fluids, visco-plastic fluids, and granular material to account for the possible landslide source materials. Saturated and unsaturated rheologies are further included to simulate debris flow, debris avalanches, mudflows, and rockslides respectively. The models are obtained by reducing the fully three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with the internal rheological definition of the landslide material, the water body, and appropriate scaling assumptions to obtain the depth-averaged two-dimensional models. The landslide and tsunami models are coupled to include the interaction between the landslide and the water body for tsunami generation. The reduced models are solved numerically with a fast semi-implicit finite-volume, shock-capturing based algorithm. The well-balanced, positivity preserving algorithm accurately accounts for wet-dry interface transition for the landslide runout, landslide-water body interface, and the tsunami wave flooding on land. The models are implemented as a General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Unit-based (GPGPU) suite of models, either coupled or run independently within the suite. The GPGPU implementation provides up to 1000 times speedup over a CPU-based serial computation. This enables simulations of multiple scenarios of hazard realizations that provides a basis for a probabilistic hazard assessment. The models have been successfully validated against experiments, past studies, and field data

  17. Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CRAWFORD, B.A.

    2000-01-05

    This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis.

  18. Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CRAWFORD, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis

  19. Prototyping a robotic dental testing simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemzadeh, K; Hyde, R A; Gao, J

    2007-05-01

    A parallel robot based on the Stewart platform is being developed to simulate jaw motion and investigate its effect on jaw function to test the wearing away of dental components such as individual teeth, crowns, bridges, full set of dentures, and implant-supported overdentures by controlling chewing motion. The current paper only describes the comparison between an alternative configuration proposed by Xu and the Stewart platform configuration. The Stewart platform was chosen as an ideal structure for simulating human mastication as it is easily assembled, has high rigidity, high load-carrying capacity, and accurate positioning capability. The kinematics and singularities of the Stewart platform have been analysed and software developed to (a) test the control algorithms/strategy of muscle movement for the six degree of freedom of mastication cycle and (b) simulate and observe various design options to be able to make the best judgement in product development. The human replica skull has been analysed and reverse engineered with further simplification before integration with the Stewart platform computer-aided design (CAD) to develop the robotic dental testing simulator. Assembly modelling of the reproduced skull was critically analysed for good occlusion in CAD environment. A pulse-width modulation (PWM) circuit plus interface was built to control position and speed of the chosen actuators. A computer numerical control (CNC) machine and wire-electro-discharge machining (wire EDM) were used to manufacture the critical parts such as lower mandible, upper maxilla, and universal joints.

  20. Geotechnical Tests on Asteroid Simulant Orgueil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alexander D'marco

    2017-01-01

    In the last 100 years, the global population has more than quadrupled to over seven billion people. At the same time, the demand for food and standard of living has been increasing which has amplified the global water use by nearly eight times from approximately 500 to 4000 cu km per yr from 1900 to 2010. With the increasing concern to sustain the growing population on Earth it is necessary to seek other approaches to ensure that our planet will have resources for generations to come. In recent years, the advancement of space travel and technology has allowed the idea of mining asteroids with resources closer to becoming a reality. During the duration of the internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center, several geotechnical tests were conducted on BP-1 lunar simulant and asteroid simulant Orgueil. The tests that were conducted on BP-1 was to practice utilizing the equipment that will be used on the asteroid simulant and the data from those tests will be omitted from report. Understanding the soil mechanics of asteroid simulant Orgueil will help provide basis for future technological advances and prepare scientists for the conditions they may encounter when mining asteroids becomes reality in the distant future. Distinct tests were conducted to determine grain size distribution, unconsolidated density, and maximum density. Once the basic properties are known, the asteroid simulant will be altered to different levels of compaction using a vibrator table to see how compaction affects the density. After different intervals of vibration compaction, a miniature vane shear test will be conducted. Laboratory vane shear testing is a reliable tool to investigate strength anisotropy in the vertical and horizontal directions of a very soft to stiff saturated fine-grained clayey soil. This test will provide us with a rapid determination of the shear strength on the undisturbed compacted regolith. The results of these tests will shed light on how much torque is necessary to drill

  1. Finite element simulation of asphalt fatigue testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullidtz, Per; Kieler, Thomas Lau; Kargo, Anders

    1997-01-01

    The traditional interpretation of fatigue tests on asphalt mixes has been in terms of a logarithmic linear relationship between the constant stress or strain amplitude and the number of load repetitions to cause failure, often defined as a decrease in modulus to half the initial value...... damage mechanics.The paper describes how continuum damage mechanics may be used with a finite element program to explain the progressive deterioration of asphalt mixes under laboratory fatigue testing. Both constant stress and constant strain testing are simulated, and compared to the actual results from...... three point and four point fatigue test on different mixes. It is shown that the same damage law, based on energy density, may be used to explain the gradual deterioration under constant stress as well as under constant strain testing.Some of the advantages of using this method for interpreting fatigue...

  2. Finite Element Simulation of Fracture Toughness Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Seok Jae; Liu, Cong Hao

    2013-01-01

    Finite element simulations of tensile tests were performed to determine the equivalent stress - equivalent plastic strain curves, critical equivalent stresses, and critical equivalent plastic strains. Then, the curves were used as inputs to finite element simulations of fracture toughness tests to determine the plane strain fracture toughness. The critical COD was taken as the COD when the equivalent plastic strain at the crack tip reached a critical value, and it was used as a crack growth criterion. The relationship between the critical COD and the critical equivalent plastic strain or the reduction of area was found. The relationship between the plane strain fracture toughness and the product of the critical equivalent stress and the critical equivalent plastic strain was also found

  3. Ground testing and simulation. II - Aerodynamic testing and simulation: Saving lives, time, and money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayman, B., Jr.; Fiore, A. W.

    1974-01-01

    The present work discusses in general terms the various kinds of ground facilities, in particular, wind tunnels, which support aerodynamic testing. Since not all flight parameters can be simulated simultaneously, an important problem consists in matching parameters. It is pointed out that there is a lack of wind tunnels for a complete Reynolds-number simulation. Using a computer to simulate flow fields can result in considerable reduction of wind-tunnel hours required to develop a given flight vehicle.

  4. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior

  5. Quantifying the added value of convection-permitting climate simulations in complex terrain: a systematic evaluation of WRF over the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Ramchandra; Hasson, Shabeh ul; Gerlitz, Lars; Schickhoff, Udo; Scholten, Thomas; Böhner, Jürgen

    2017-07-01

    Mesoscale dynamical refinements of global climate models or atmospheric reanalysis have shown their potential to resolve intricate atmospheric processes, their land surface interactions, and subsequently, realistic distribution of climatic fields in complex terrains. Given that such potential is yet to be explored within the central Himalayan region of Nepal, we investigate the skill of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with different spatial resolutions in reproducing the spatial, seasonal, and diurnal characteristics of the near-surface air temperature and precipitation as well as the spatial shifts in the diurnal monsoonal precipitation peak over the Khumbu (Everest), Rolwaling, and adjacent southern areas. Therefore, the ERA-Interim (0.75°) reanalysis has been dynamically refined to 25, 5, and 1 km (D1, D2, and D3) for one complete hydrological year (October 2014-September 2015), using the one-way nested WRF model run with mild nudging and parameterized convection for the outer but explicitly resolved convection for the inner domains. Our results suggest that D3 realistically reproduces the monsoonal precipitation, as compared to its underestimation by D1 but overestimation by D2. All three resolutions, however, overestimate precipitation from the westerly disturbances, owing to simulating anomalously higher intensity of few intermittent events. Temperatures are generally reproduced well by all resolutions; however, winter and pre-monsoon seasons feature a high cold bias for high elevations while lower elevations show a simultaneous warm bias. Unlike higher resolutions, D1 fails to realistically reproduce the regional-scale nocturnal monsoonal peak precipitation observed in the Himalayan foothills and its diurnal shift towards high elevations, whereas D2 resolves these characteristics but exhibits a limited skill in reproducing such a peak on the river valley scale due to the limited representation of the narrow valleys at 5 km resolution

  6. Quantifying the added value of convection-permitting climate simulations in complex terrain: a systematic evaluation of WRF over the Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Karki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale dynamical refinements of global climate models or atmospheric reanalysis have shown their potential to resolve intricate atmospheric processes, their land surface interactions, and subsequently, realistic distribution of climatic fields in complex terrains. Given that such potential is yet to be explored within the central Himalayan region of Nepal, we investigate the skill of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model with different spatial resolutions in reproducing the spatial, seasonal, and diurnal characteristics of the near-surface air temperature and precipitation as well as the spatial shifts in the diurnal monsoonal precipitation peak over the Khumbu (Everest, Rolwaling, and adjacent southern areas. Therefore, the ERA-Interim (0.75° reanalysis has been dynamically refined to 25, 5, and 1 km (D1, D2, and D3 for one complete hydrological year (October 2014–September 2015, using the one-way nested WRF model run with mild nudging and parameterized convection for the outer but explicitly resolved convection for the inner domains. Our results suggest that D3 realistically reproduces the monsoonal precipitation, as compared to its underestimation by D1 but overestimation by D2. All three resolutions, however, overestimate precipitation from the westerly disturbances, owing to simulating anomalously higher intensity of few intermittent events. Temperatures are generally reproduced well by all resolutions; however, winter and pre-monsoon seasons feature a high cold bias for high elevations while lower elevations show a simultaneous warm bias. Unlike higher resolutions, D1 fails to realistically reproduce the regional-scale nocturnal monsoonal peak precipitation observed in the Himalayan foothills and its diurnal shift towards high elevations, whereas D2 resolves these characteristics but exhibits a limited skill in reproducing such a peak on the river valley scale due to the limited representation of the narrow valleys at 5

  7. Simulation Facilities and Test Beds for Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlarmann, Bernhard Kl.; Leonard, Arian

    2002-01-01

    Galileo is the European satellite navigation system, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission (EC). The Galileo System, currently under definition phase, will offer seamless global coverage, providing state-of-the-art positioning and timing services. Galileo services will include a standard service targeted at mass market users, an augmented integrity service, providing integrity warnings when fault occur and Public Regulated Services (ensuring a continuity of service for the public users). Other services are under consideration (SAR and integrated communications). Galileo will be interoperable with GPS, and will be complemented by local elements that will enhance the services for specific local users. In the frame of the Galileo definition phase, several system design and simulation facilities and test beds have been defined and developed for the coming phases of the project, respectively they are currently under development. These are mainly the following tools: Galileo Mission Analysis Simulator to design the Space Segment, especially to support constellation design, deployment and replacement. Galileo Service Volume Simulator to analyse the global performance requirements based on a coverage analysis for different service levels and degrades modes. Galileo System Simulation Facility is a sophisticated end-to-end simulation tool to assess the navigation performances for a complete variety of users under different operating conditions and different modes. Galileo Signal Validation Facility to evaluate signal and message structures for Galileo. Galileo System Test Bed (Version 1) to assess and refine the Orbit Determination &Time Synchronisation and Integrity algorithms, through experiments relying on GPS space infrastructure. This paper presents an overview on the so called "G-Facilities" and describes the use of the different system design tools during the project life cycle in order to design the system with respect to

  8. Local-scale stratigraphy of grooved terrain on Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Head, James W.; Helfenstein, Paul; Plescia, Jeffrey B.

    1987-01-01

    The surface of the Jovian satellite, Ganymede, is divided into two main units, dark terrain cut by arcuate and subradial furrows, and light terrain consisting largely of areas with pervasive U-shaped grooves. The grooved terrain may be subdivided on the basis of pervasive morphology of groove domains into four terrain types: (1) elongate bands of parallel grooves (groove lanes); (2) polygonal domains of parallel grooves (grooved polygons); (3) polygonal domains of two orthogonal groove sets (reticulate terrain); and (4) polygons having two to several complexly cross-cutting groove sets (complex grooved terrain). Reticulate terrain is frequently dark and not extensively resurfaced, and grades to a more hummocky terrain type. The other three grooved terrain types have almost universally been resurfaced by light material during their emplacement. The sequence of events during grooved terrain emplacement has been investigated. An attempt is made to integrate observed geologic and tectonic patterns to better constrain the relative ages and styles of emplacement of grooved terrain types. A revised model of grooved terrain emplacement is proposed and is tested using detailed geologic mapping and measurement of crater density.

  9. Wave fields simulation in difficult terrain using numerical grid method; Hyoko henka no aru chiiki deno suchi koshi wo mochiita hado simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, W; Ogawa, T [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan); Tamagawa, T; Matsuoka, T [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    This paper describes that a high-accuracy simulation can be made on seismic exploration by using the numerical grid method. When applying a wave field simulation using the difference calculus to an area subjected to seismic exploration, a problem occurs as to how a boundary of the velocity structure including the ground surface should be dealt with. Simply applying grids to a boundary changing continuously makes accuracy of the simulation worse. The difference calculus using a numerical grid is a method to solve the problem by imaging a certain region into a rectangular region through use of variable conversion, which can impose the boundary condition more accurately. The wave field simulation was carried out on a simple two-layer inclined structure and a two-layer waved structure. It was revealed that amplitudes of direct waves and reflection waves are disturbed in the case where no numerical grid method is applied, and the amplitudes are more disperse in the reflection waves than those obtained by using the numerical grid method. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Merging field mapping and numerical simulation to interpret the lithofacies variations from unsteady pyroclastic density currents on uneven terrain: The case of La Fossa di Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronzo, Domenico M.; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Sulpizio, Roberto; Lucchi, Federico

    2017-01-01

    In order to obtain results from computer simulations of explosive volcanic eruptions, one either needs a statistical approach to test a wide range of initial and boundary conditions, or needs using a well-constrained field case study via stratigraphy. Here we followed the second approach, using data obtained from field mapping of the Grotta dei Palizzi 2 pyroclastic deposits (Vulcano Island, Italy) as input for numerical modeling. This case study deals with impulsive phreatomagmatic explosions of La Fossa Cone that generated ash-rich pyroclastic density currents, interacting with the topographic high of the La Fossa Caldera rim. One of the simplifications in dealing with well-sorted ash (one particle size in the model) is to highlight the topographic effects on the same pyroclastic material in an unsteady current. We demonstrate that by merging field data with 3D numerical simulation results it is possible to see key details of the dynamical current-terrain interaction, and to interpret the lithofacies variations of the associated deposits as a function of topography-induced sedimentation (settling) rate. Results suggest that a value of the sedimentation rate lower than 5 kg/m2 s at the bed load can still be sheared by the overlying current, producing tractional structures (laminae) in the deposits. Instead, a sedimentation rate higher than that threshold can preclude the formation of tractional structures, producing thicker massive deposits. We think that the approach used in this study could be applied to other case studies (both for active and ancient volcanoes) to confirm or refine such threshold value of the sedimentation rate, which is to be considered as an upper value as for the limitations of the numerical model.

  11. 75 FR 52616 - Third Party Testing for Certain Children's Products; Youth All-Terrain Vehicles: Requirements for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... content of the ILAC-MRA approach and of the requirements of the ISO/IEC 17025:2005 laboratory... must be to ISO Standard ISO/IEC 17025:2005, General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and... that at that time was ISO/IEC 17025 accredited by an ILAC-MRA signatory. For firewalled conformity...

  12. TERRAIN, Norfolk County, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, WRIGHT COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, RANKIN COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, MITCHELL COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, DAWSON COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, HOWARD COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, RICE COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, PIERCE, COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, DARKE COUNTY, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, JONES COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, Pierce County, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, BERKS COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, NEWTON COUNTY, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographical data that were used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, PIKE COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, Lincoln County, AR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, KENDALL COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, LEON COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, Bennington County, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, FRANKLIN COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, BARNSTABLE COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, Northampton COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, POTTER COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, KITSAP COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, TROUSDALE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, UNION PARISH, LOUSIANA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. ARAC terrain data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, H.

    1982-11-01

    A terrain data base covering the continental United States at 500-meter resolution has been generated. Its function is to provide terrain data for input to mesoscale atmospheric models that are used as part of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL). The structure of the data base as it exists on the LLNL computer system is described. The data base has been written to tapes for transfer to other systems and the format of these tapes is also described

  3. Motor operated valves problems tests and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinier, D.; Haas, J.L.

    1996-12-01

    An analysis of the two refusals of operation of the EAS recirculation shutoff valves enabled two distinct problems to be identified on the motorized valves: the calculation methods for the operating torques of valves in use in the power plants are not conservative enough, which results in the misadjustement of the torque limiters installed on their motorizations, the second problem concerns the pressure locking phenomenon: a number of valves may entrap a pressure exceeding the in-line pressure between the disks, which may cause a jamming of the valve. EDF has made the following approach to settle the first problem: determination of the friction coefficients and the efficiency of the valve and its actuator through general and specific tests and models, definition of a new calculation method. In order to solve the second problem, EDF has made the following operations: identification of the valves whose technology enables the pressure to be entrapped: the tests and numerical simulations carried out in the Research and Development Division confirm the possibility of a {open_quotes}boiler{close_quotes} effect: determination of the necessary modifications: development and testing of anti-boiler effect systems.

  4. Motor operated valves problems tests and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinier, D.; Haas, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of the two refusals of operation of the EAS recirculation shutoff valves enabled two distinct problems to be identified on the motorized valves: the calculation methods for the operating torques of valves in use in the power plants are not conservative enough, which results in the misadjustement of the torque limiters installed on their motorizations, the second problem concerns the pressure locking phenomenon: a number of valves may entrap a pressure exceeding the in-line pressure between the disks, which may cause a jamming of the valve. EDF has made the following approach to settle the first problem: determination of the friction coefficients and the efficiency of the valve and its actuator through general and specific tests and models, definition of a new calculation method. In order to solve the second problem, EDF has made the following operations: identification of the valves whose technology enables the pressure to be entrapped: the tests and numerical simulations carried out in the Research and Development Division confirm the possibility of a open-quotes boilerclose quotes effect: determination of the necessary modifications: development and testing of anti-boiler effect systems

  5. The Efficacy of Using Synthetic Vision Terrain-Textured Images to Improve Pilot Situation Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenking, Michael D.; Hughes, Monica F.

    2002-01-01

    The General Aviation Element of the Aviation Safety Program's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) Project is developing technology to eliminate low visibility induced General Aviation (GA) accidents. SVS displays present computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain on the Primary Flight Display (PFD) to greatly enhance pilot's situation awareness (SA), reducing or eliminating Controlled Flight into Terrain, as well as Low-Visibility Loss of Control accidents. SVS-conducted research is facilitating development of display concepts that provide the pilot with an unobstructed view of the outside terrain, regardless of weather conditions and time of day. A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. An experimental study is being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to explore and quantify the relationship between the realism of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and performance. Composed of complementary simulation and flight test efforts, Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays (TP-HDD) experiments will help researchers evaluate critical terrain portrayal concepts. The experimental effort is to provide data to enable design trades that optimize SVS applications, as well as develop requirements and recommendations to facilitate the certification process. In this part of the experiment a fixed based flight simulator was equipped with various types of Head Down flight displays, ranging from conventional round dials (typical of most GA aircraft) to glass cockpit style PFD's. The variations of the PFD included an assortment of texturing and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution combinations. A test matrix of 10 terrain display configurations (in addition to the baseline displays) were evaluated by 27 pilots of various backgrounds and experience levels. Qualitative (questionnaires) and quantitative (pilot performance and physiological) data were collected during

  6. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  7. RailSiTe® (Rail Simulation and Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Johne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RailSiTe® (Rail Simulation and Testing is DLR’s rail simulation and testing laboratory (see Figure 1. It is the implementation of a fully modular concept for the simulation of on-board and trackside control and safety technology. The RailSiTe® laboratory additionally comprises the RailSET (Railway Simulation Environment for Train Drivers and Operators human-factors laboratory, a realistic environment containing a realistic train mockup including 3D simulation.

  8. Probing the Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Runa

    2016-01-01

    Whether manifest in built structures or invisible infrastructures, architectures of control in the occupied Palestinian West Bank is structurally defined by endemic uncertainty. Shifting lines and frontiers are recorded on the terrain, creating elastic zones of uncertainty necessitating navigatio...... to the territory through its lines and laws, and how the very structure of the occupation has changed over the years, I seek to make visible the ways in which architectures of uncertainty compensate for the fleeting terrain that HH is probing.......Whether manifest in built structures or invisible infrastructures, architectures of control in the occupied Palestinian West Bank is structurally defined by endemic uncertainty. Shifting lines and frontiers are recorded on the terrain, creating elastic zones of uncertainty necessitating...

  9. Using contraband simulators for portal metal detector testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, D.W.

    1992-08-01

    Because contraband materials or items are either too dangerous or too expensive, contraband simulators have been widely used to test contraband detection equipment. Very realistic bomb simulators have been used to test x-ray scanners, and common radioactive sources have been used successfully to test the operation of special nuclear material (SNM) radiation detectors. The simulators used to test early metal detectors were also reasonably successful; however, these simulators were rapidly outdated by the introduction of modern active field metal detectors. This paper describes some of the earlier attempts to develop metal detector test simulators. A successful highly enriched uranium (HEU) simulator for metal detector testing is described that has duplicated all the characteristics modern equipment is capable of detecting. The paper also describes the development needed to produce handgun simulators that could be used effectively for metal detector performance testing.

  10. Using contraband simulators for portal metal detector testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    Because contraband materials or items are either too dangerous or too expensive, contraband simulators have been widely used to test contraband detection equipment. Very realistic bomb simulators have been used to test x-ray scanners, and common radioactive sources have been used successfully to test the operation of special nuclear material (SNM) radiation detectors. The simulators used to test early metal detectors were also reasonably successful; however, these simulators were rapidly outdated by the introduction of modern active field metal detectors. This paper describes some of the earlier attempts to develop metal detector test simulators. A successful highly enriched uranium (HEU) simulator for metal detector testing is described that has duplicated all the characteristics modern equipment is capable of detecting. The paper also describes the development needed to produce handgun simulators that could be used effectively for metal detector performance testing.

  11. Simulation and Verificaiton of Flow in Test Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars Nyholm; Szabo, Peter; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2005-01-01

    Simulations and experimental results of L-box and slump flow test of a self-compacting mortar and a self-compacting concrete are compared. The simulations are based on a single fluid approach and assume an ideal Bingham behavior. It is possible to simulate the experimental results of both tests...

  12. Simulation-Based Testing of Distributed Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rutherford, Matthew J; Carzaniga, Antonio; Wolf, Alexander L

    2006-01-01

    .... Typically written using an imperative programming language, these simulations capture basic algorithmic functionality at the same time as they focus attention on properties critical to distribution...

  13. Processing Terrain Point Cloud Data

    KAUST Repository

    DeVore, Ronald; Petrova, Guergana; Hielsberg, Matthew; Owens, Luke; Clack, Billy; Sood, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Terrain point cloud data are typically acquired through some form of Light Detection And Ranging sensing. They form a rich resource that is important in a variety of applications including navigation, line of sight, and terrain visualization

  14. Wind farm layout optimization in complex terrain: A preliminary study on a Gaussian hill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ju; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2014-01-01

    this problem for WFs in flat terrain or offshore has been investigated in many studies, it is still a challenging problem for WFs in complex terrain. In this preliminary study, the wind flow conditions of complex terrain without WTs are first obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation...

  15. Design of blast simulators for nuclear testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, A.; Opalka, K.O.; Kitchens, C.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A quasi-one-dimensional computational technique is used to model the flow of a large, complicated shock tube. The shock tube, or Large Blast Simulator, is used to simulate conventional or nuclear explosions by shaping the pressure history. Results from computations show favorable agreement when compared with data taken in the facility at Gramat, France. Such future shock tubes will include a thermal irradiation capability to better simulate a nuclear event. The computations point to the need for venting of the combustion products since the pressure history will be considerably altered as the shock propagates through these hot gases

  16. Automated testing and reverification for training simulators using SATAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, R.D.; Gaddy, C.D.; Nargarkar, A.; Colley, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that simulators used to train nuclear power plant operators must be recertified periodically to ensure fidelity for training (10 CFR 55.45). The objective of the Simulator Automated Testing and Reverification (SATAR) project was to develop software to reverify dynamic simulator performance automatically. The software resides in a standard configuration personal computer and in the simulator computer; the two computers are linked via serial ports. SATAR will automatically run performance tests, collect and analyze data, and compare data with baseline performance data. With SATAR, support from operations and simulator support personnel can be reduced greatly, and the repeatability of performance tests can be improved

  17. MAN-IN-SIMULANT TEST (MIST) CHAMBER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MIST chamber uses methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) vapor as a simulant for HD agent to conduct system level evaluations of chemical protective ensembles....

  18. Laser altimetry and terrain analysis: A revolution in geomorphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anders, N.; Seijmonsbergen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Terrain analysis in geomorphology has undergone a serious quantitative revolution over recent decades. Lidar information has been efficiently used to automatically classify discrete landforms, map forest structures, and provide input for models simulating landscape development, e.g. channel incision

  19. The Application of Voltage Transformer Simulator in Electrical Test Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Zhang, Jun; Chai, Ziqi; Wang, Jingpeng; Yang, Baowei

    2018-02-01

    The voltage transformer test is an important means to monitor its operating state. The accuracy and reliability of the test data is directly related to the test skill level of the operator. However, the risk of test instruments damage, equipment being tested damage and electric shock in operator is caused by improper operation when training the transformer test. In this paper, a simulation device of voltage transformer is set up, and a simulation model is built for the most common 500kV capacitor voltage transformer (CVT), the simulation model can realize several test items of CVT by combing with teaching guidance platform, simulation instrument, complete set of system software and auxiliary equipment in Changchun. Many successful applications show that the simulation device has good practical value and wide application prospect.

  20. Reactor numerical simulation and hydraulic test research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L. S.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the computer hardware was improved on the numerical simulation on flow field in the reactor. In our laboratory, we usually use the Pro/e or UG commercial software. After completed topology geometry, ICEM-CFD is used to get mesh for computation. Exact geometrical similarity is maintained between the main flow paths of the model and the prototype, with the exception of the core simulation design of the fuel assemblies. The drive line system is composed of drive mechanism, guide bush assembly, fuel assembly and control rod assembly, and fitted with the rod level indicator and drive mechanism power device

  1. Automatic apparatus and data transmission for field response tests of the ground; Automatisation et teletransmission des donnees pour les tests de reponse du terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laloui, L.; Steinmann, G.

    2004-07-01

    This is the report on the third part of a development started 1998 at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland. Energy piles are becoming increasingly used as a heat exchanger and heat storage device, as are geothermal probes. Their design and sizing is subject to some uncertainty due to the fact that the planner has to estimate the thermal and mechanical properties of the ground surrounding the piles or probes. The aim of the project was to develop an apparatus for field measurements of thermal and mechanical properties of an energy pile or a geothermal probe (thermal response tests). In the reported third phase of the project the portable apparatus was equipped with a data transmission device using the Internet. Real-time data acquisition and supervision is now implemented and data processing has been improved. Another goal of the project was to obtain the official accreditation of such response tests according to the European standard EN 45,000. First operation experience from a test in Lyon, France is reported.

  2. Simulation of the LHC injection kicker impedance test bench

    CERN Document Server

    Tsutsui, H

    2003-01-01

    The coupling impedance measurements of the LHC injection kicker test bench are simulated by HFSS code. The simulation gives qualitatively good agreement with the measurement. In order to damp the resonances, some ferrite rings are tested in the simulation. Longitudinal resonances are damped by a ferrite ring of large tan$\\delta_{\\mu}$. The effect of the ferrite ring is small for damping the transverse impedance resonance around 30 MHz.

  3. Construction Method of the Topographical Features Model for Underwater Terrain Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lihui

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrain database is the reference basic for autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV to implement underwater terrain navigation (UTN functions, and is the important part of building topographical features model for UTN. To investigate the feasibility and correlation of a variety of terrain parameters as terrain navigation information metrics, this paper described and analyzed the underwater terrain features and topography parameters calculation method. Proposing a comprehensive evaluation method for terrain navigation information, and constructing an underwater navigation information analysis model, which is associated with topographic features. Simulation results show that the underwater terrain features, are associated with UTN information directly or indirectly, also affect the terrain matching capture probability and the positioning accuracy directly.

  4. Reanimation of the RICH Test Beam Simulation in GEANT4

    CERN Document Server

    Arzymatov, Kenenbek

    2017-01-01

    This test was originally developed by Sajan Easo (LHCb) ten years ago mostly for the purpose of testing the behavior of photomultipliers, but it wasn’t used in regression testing in Gauss/Geant4 famework. The goal of project is to revive simulation of cherenkov radiaton test by completing.

  5. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  6. Conceptual design for simulator of irradiation test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Ohto, Tsutomu; Magome, Hirokatsu; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko

    2012-03-01

    A simulator of irradiation test reactors has been developed since JFY 2010 for understanding reactor behavior and for upskilling in order to utilize a nuclear human resource development (HRD) and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR, one of the irradiation test reactors, and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of accidents caused by the reactor and irradiation facility. The development of the simulator is sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. The training using the simulator will be started for the nuclear HRD from JFY 2012. This report summarizes the result of the conceptual design of the simulator in JFY 2010. (author)

  7. Unit testing, model validation, and biological simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Gopal P; Jacobs, Travis W; Watts, Mark D; Ghayoomie, S Vahid; Larson, Stephen D; Gerkin, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    The growth of the software industry has gone hand in hand with the development of tools and cultural practices for ensuring the reliability of complex pieces of software. These tools and practices are now acknowledged to be essential to the management of modern software. As computational models and methods have become increasingly common in the biological sciences, it is important to examine how these practices can accelerate biological software development and improve research quality. In this article, we give a focused case study of our experience with the practices of unit testing and test-driven development in OpenWorm, an open-science project aimed at modeling Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and discuss the challenges of incorporating test-driven development into a heterogeneous, data-driven project, as well as the role of model validation tests, a category of tests unique to software which expresses scientific models.

  8. 7th Conference Simulation and Testing for Vehicle Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Riese, Jens; Rüden, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The book includes contributions on the latest model-based methods for the development of personal and commercial vehicle control devices. The main topics treated are: application of simulation and model design to development of driver assistance systems; physical and database model design for engines, motors, powertrain, undercarriage and the whole vehicle; new simulation tools, methods and optimization processes; applications of simulation in function and software development; function and software testing using HiL, MiL and SiL simulation; application of simulation and optimization in application of control devices; automation approaches at all stages of the development process.

  9. Physiological Monitoring During Simulation Training and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-29

    Technique - Subdued entry; Procedure - Move quietly up to the room and enter with violence while minimizing time spent in the hallway Non-VR Group...popular multiplayer online role- playing aspect and test it in a real world environment. Not only is there a high demand for small unit, multi-user

  10. Information measures for terrain visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Xavier; Sima, Aleksandra A.; Feixas, Miquel; Buckley, Simon J.; Sbert, Mateu; Howell, John A.

    2017-02-01

    Many quantitative and qualitative studies in geoscience research are based on digital elevation models (DEMs) and 3D surfaces to aid understanding of natural and anthropogenically-influenced topography. As well as their quantitative uses, the visual representation of DEMs can add valuable information for identifying and interpreting topographic features. However, choice of viewpoints and rendering styles may not always be intuitive, especially when terrain data are augmented with digital image texture. In this paper, an information-theoretic framework for object understanding is applied to terrain visualization and terrain view selection. From a visibility channel between a set of viewpoints and the component polygons of a 3D terrain model, we obtain three polygonal information measures. These measures are used to visualize the information associated with each polygon of the terrain model. In order to enhance the perception of the terrain's shape, we explore the effect of combining the calculated information measures with the supplementary digital image texture. From polygonal information, we also introduce a method to select a set of representative views of the terrain model. Finally, we evaluate the behaviour of the proposed techniques using example datasets. A publicly available framework for both the visualization and the view selection of a terrain has been created in order to provide the possibility to analyse any terrain model.

  11. Simulation of Phenix EOL Asymmetric Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Kwi Seok; Lee, Kwi Lim; Choi, Chi Woong; Kang, Seok Hun; Chang, Won Pyo; Jeong, Hae Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The asymmetric test of End-Of-Life (EOL) tests on the Phenix plant was used for the evaluation of the MARS-LMR in the Generation IV frame as a part of the code validation. The purpose of the test is to evaluate the ability of the system code to describe asymmetric situations and to identify important phenomena during asymmetrical transient such as a three dimensional effect, buoyancy influence, and thermal stratification in the hot and cold pools. 3-dimensional sodium coolant mixing in the pools has different characteristics from the one dimensional full instantaneous mixing. The velocities and temperatures at the core outlet level differ at each sub-assembly and the temperature in the center of the hot pool may be high because the driver fuels are located at the center region. The temperatures in the hot pool are not the same in the radial and axial locations due to the buoyancy effect. The temperatures in the cold pool also differ along with the elevations and azimuthal directions due to the outlet location of IHX and the thermal stratification

  12. Modelling, simulation and visualisation for electromagnetic non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilham Mukriz Zainal Abidin; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the art and the recent development of modelling, simulation and visualization for eddy current Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) technique. Simulation and visualization has aid in the design and development of electromagnetic sensors and imaging techniques and systems for Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Testing (ENDT); feature extraction and inverse problems for Quantitative Non-Destructive Testing (QNDT). After reviewing the state-of-the art of electromagnetic modelling and simulation, case studies of Research and Development in eddy current NDT technique via magnetic field mapping and thermography for eddy current distribution are discussed. (author)

  13. Simulation and Test of a Fuel Cell Hybrid Golf Cart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingming Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes the simulation model of fuel cell hybrid golf cart (FCHGC, which applies the non-GUI mode of the Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR and the genetic algorithm (GA to optimize it. Simulation of the objective function is composed of fuel consumption and vehicle dynamic performance; the variables are the fuel cell stack power sizes and the battery numbers. By means of simulation, the optimal parameters of vehicle power unit, fuel cell stack, and battery pack are worked out. On this basis, GUI mode of ADVISOR is used to select the rated power of vehicle motor. In line with simulation parameters, an electrical golf cart is refitted by adding a 2 kW hydrogen air proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC stack system and test the FCHGC. The result shows that the simulation data is effective but it needs improving compared with that of the real cart test.

  14. Development of training simulator based on critical assemblies test bench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narozhnyi, A.T.; Vorontsov, S.V.; Golubeva, O.A.; Dyudyaev, A.M.; Il'in, V.I.; Kuvshinov, M.I.; Panin, A.V.; Peshekhonov, D.P.

    2007-01-01

    When preparing critical mass experiment, multiplying system (MS) parts are assembled manually. This work is connected with maximum professional risk to personnel. Personnel training and keeping the skill of working experts is the important factor of nuclear safety maintenance. For this purpose authors develop a training simulator based on functioning critical assemblies test bench (CATB), allowing simulation of the MS assemblage using training mockups made of inert materials. The control program traces the current status of MS under simulation. A change in the assembly neutron physical parameters is mapped in readings of the regular devices. The simulator information support is provided by the computer database on physical characteristics of typical MS components The work in the training mode ensures complete simulation of real MS assemblage on the critical test bench. It makes it possible to elaborate the procedures related to CATB operation in a standard mode safely and effectively and simulate possible abnormal situations. (author)

  15. The Center-TRACON Automation System: Simulation and field testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1995-01-01

    A new concept for air traffic management in the terminal area, implemented as the Center-TRACON Automation System, has been under development at NASA Ames in a cooperative program with the FAA since 1991. The development has been strongly influenced by concurrent simulation and field site evaluations. The role of simulation and field activities in the development process will be discussed. Results of recent simulation and field tests will be presented.

  16. simulate_CAT: A Computer Program for Post-Hoc Simulation for Computerized Adaptive Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlker Kalender

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computer software developed by the author. The software conducts post-hoc simulations for computerized adaptive testing based on real responses of examinees to paper and pencil tests under different parameters that can be defined by user. In this paper, short information is given about post-hoc simulations. After that, the working principle of the software is provided and a sample simulation with required input files is shown. And last, output files are described

  17. Finite element simulations of two rock mechanics tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Lott, S.A.

    1986-04-01

    Rock mechanics tests are performed to determine in situ stress conditions and material properties of an underground rock mass. To design stable underground facilities for the permanent storage of high-level nuclear waste, determination of these properties and conditions is a necessary first step. However, before a test and its associated equipment can be designed, the engineer needs to know the range of expected values to be measured by the instruments. Sensitivity studies by means of finite element simulations are employed in this preliminary design phase to evaluate the pertinent parameters and their effects on the proposed measurements. The simulations, of two typical rock mechanics tests, the plate bearing test and the flat-jack test, by means of the finite element analysis, are described. The plate bearing test is used to determine the rock mass deformation modulus. The flat-jack test is used to determine the in situ stress conditions of the host rock. For the plate bearing test, two finite element models are used to simulate the classic problem of a load on an elastic half space and the actual problem of a plate bearing test in an underground tunnel of circular cross section. For the flat-jack simulation, a single finite element model is used to simulate both horizontal and vertical slots. Results will be compared to closed-form solutions available in the literature

  18. Tests of numerical simulation algorithms for the Kubo oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.F.; Roy, R.; Yu, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulation algorithms for multiplicative noise (white or colored) are tested for accuracy against closed-form expressions for the Kubo oscillator. Direct white noise simulations lead to spurious decay of the modulus of the oscillator amplitude. A straightforward colored noise algorithm greatly reduces this decay and also provides highly accurate results in the white noise limit

  19. Environmental simulation testing of solar cell contamination by hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Test results for thermal vacuum and radiation environment simulation of hydrazine contamination are discussed. Solar cell performance degradation, measured by short circuit current, is presented in correlation with the variations used in environmental parameters.

  20. Simulated Field Trials Using an Indoor Aerosol Test Chamber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Semler, D. D; Roth, A. P; Semler, K. A; Nolan, P. M

    2004-01-01

    .... In this method, the aerosol chamber control software manipulates circulation fan speeds, chamber vacuum and agent spray times to produce a simulated dynamic cloud within the aerosol test chamber...

  1. Simulated Field Trials Using An Indoor Aerosol Test Chamber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Semler, D. D; Roth, A. P; Semler, K. A; Nolan, P. M

    2004-01-01

    .... In this method, the aerosol chamber control software manipulates circulation fan speeds, chamber vacuum and agent spray times to produce a simulated dynamic cloud within the aerosol test chamber...

  2. Standard Specification for Solar Simulation for Terrestrial Photovoltaic Testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This specification provides means for classifying solar simulators intended for indoor testing of photovoltaic devices (solar cells or modules), according to their spectral match to a reference spectral irradiance, non-uniformity of spatial irradiance, and temporal instability of irradiance. 1.2 Testing of photovoltaic devices may require the use of solar simulators. Test Methods that require specific classification of simulators as defined in this specification include Test Methods E948, E1036, and E1362. 1.3 This standard is applicable to both pulsed and steady state simulators and includes recommended test requirements used for classifying such simulators. 1.4 A solar simulator usually consists of three major components: (1) light source(s) and associated power supply; (2) any optics and filters required to modify the output beam to meet the classification requirements in Section 4; and (3) the necessary controls to operate the simulator, adjust irradiance, etc. 1.5 A light source that does not mee...

  3. Reduction Methods for Real-time Simulations in Hybrid Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid testing constitutes a cost-effective experimental full scale testing method. The method was introduced in the 1960's by Japanese researchers, as an alternative to conventional full scale testing and small scale material testing, such as shake table tests. The principle of the method...... is performed on a glass fibre reinforced polymer composite box girder. The test serves as a pilot test for prospective real-time tests on a wind turbine blade. The Taylor basis is implemented in the test, used to perform the numerical simulations. Despite of a number of introduced errors in the real...... is to divide a structure into a physical substructure and a numerical substructure, and couple these in a test. If the test is conducted in real-time it is referred to as real time hybrid testing. The hybrid testing concept has developed significantly since its introduction in the 1960', both with respect...

  4. Analyzing complex wake-terrain interactions and its implications on wind-farm performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib, Mandar; Rasheed, Adil; Fuchs, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Rotating wind turbine blades generate complex wakes involving vortices (helical tip-vortex, root-vortex etc.).These wakes are regions of high velocity deficits and high turbulence intensities and they tend to degrade the performance of down-stream turbines. Hence, a conservative inter-turbine distance of up-to 10 times turbine diameter (10D) is sometimes used in wind-farm layout (particularly in cases of flat terrain). This ensures that wake-effects will not reduce the overall wind-farm performance, but this leads to larger land footprint for establishing a wind-farm. In-case of complex-terrain, within a short distance (say 10D) itself, the nearby terrain can rise in altitude and be high enough to influence the wake dynamics. This wake-terrain interaction can happen either (a) indirectly, through an interaction of wake (both near tip vortex and far wake large-scale vortex) with terrain induced turbulence (especially, smaller eddies generated by small ridges within the terrain) or (b) directly, by obstructing the wake-region partially or fully in its flow-path. Hence, enhanced understanding of wake- development due to wake-terrain interaction will help in wind farm design. To this end the current study involves: (1) understanding the numerics for successful simulation of vortices, (2) understanding fundamental vortex-terrain interaction mechanism through studies devoted to interaction of a single vortex with different terrains, (3) relating influence of vortex-terrain interactions to performance of a wind-farm by studying a multi-turbine wind-farm layout under different terrains. The results on interaction of terrain and vortex has shown a much faster decay of vortex for complex terrain compared to a flatter-terrain. The potential reasons identified explaining the observation are (a) formation of secondary vortices in flow and its interaction with the primary vortex and (b) enhanced vorticity diffusion due to increased terrain-induced turbulence. The implications of

  5. Smoke simulating test apparatus for smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A smoke detector of the ionization type is described comprising: a measuring chamber having an interior substantially freely accessible to airborne products of combustion, first and second spaced-apart electrodes within the measuring chamber, a source of alpha radiation for ionizing air between the first and second electrodes such that current flows between the electrodes when an appropriate voltage is applied across the electrodes, alarm means coupled to the measuring chamber for producing an alarm signal when the electrical resistance of the measuring chamber increases to a value consistent with the presence within the measuring chamber of a predetermined level of airborne products of combustion, and intercepting means for intercepting alpha particles from the source of alpha radiation, the intercepting means being movable between a normal position providing a first electrical resistance between the first and second electrodes and a test position providing a second, higher electrical resistance between the electrodes, the second higher resistance being substantially equal to the said alarm value. (author)

  6. Standard Test Method for Testing Nonmetallic Seal Materials by Immersion in a Simulated Geothermal Test Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for a laboratory test for performing an initial evaluation (screening) of nonmetallic seal materials by immersion in a simulated geothermal test fluid. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see Section 6 and 11.7.

  7. Turbulence in complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jakob [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmosheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a model of the spectral velocity-tensor in neutral flow over complex terrain. The resulting equations are implemented in a computer code using the mean flow generated by a linear mean flow model as input. It estimates turbulence structure over hills (except on the lee side if recirculation is present) in the so-called outer layer and also models the changes in turbulence statistics in the vicinity roughness changes. The generated turbulence fields are suitable as input for dynamic load calculations on wind turbines and other tall structures and is under implementation in the collection of programs called WA{sup s}P Engineering. (au) EFP-97; EU-JOULE-3. 15 refs.

  8. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTS WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING DL

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented for several simulated waste tests related to development of the fractional crystallization process. Product salt dissolution rates were measured to support pilot plant equipment design. Evaporation tests were performed to evaluate the effects of organics on slurry behavior and to determine optimum antifoam addition levels. A loss-of-power test was performed to support pilot plant accident scenario analysis. Envelope limit tests were done to address variations in feed composition

  9. On characterizing terrain visibility graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Evans

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A terrain is an $x$-monotone polygonal line in the $xy$-plane. Two vertices of a terrain are mutually visible if and only if there is no terrain vertex on or above the open line segment connecting them. A graph whose vertices represent terrain vertices and whose edges represent mutually visible pairs of terrain vertices is called a terrain visibility graph. We would like to find properties that are both necessary and sufficient for a graph to be a terrain visibility graph; that is, we would like to characterize terrain visibility graphs.Abello et al. [Discrete and Computational Geometry, 14(3:331--358, 1995] showed that all terrain visibility graphs are “persistent”. They showed that the visibility information of a terrain point set implies some ordering requirements on the slopes of the lines connecting pairs of points in any realization, and as a step towards showing sufficiency, they proved that for any persistent graph $M$ there is a total order on the slopes of the (pseudo lines in a generalized configuration of points whose visibility graph is $M$.We give a much simpler proof of this result by establishing an orientation to every triple of vertices, reflecting some slope ordering requirements that are consistent with $M$ being the visibility graph, and prove that these requirements form a partial order. We give a faster algorithm to construct a total order on the slopes. Our approach attempts to clarify the implications of the graph theoretic properties on the ordering of the slopes, and may be interpreted as defining properties on an underlying oriented matroid that we show is a restricted type of $3$-signotope.

  10. CFD simulation of air discharge tests in the PPOOLEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanskanen, V.; Puustinen, M. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2008-07-15

    This report summarizes the CFD simulation results of two air discharge tests of the characterizing test program in 2007 with the scaled down PPOOLEX facility. Air was blown to the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe into the condensation pool (wet well). The selected tests were modeled with Fluent CFD code. Test CHAR-09-1 was simulated to 28.92 seconds of real time and test CHAR-09-3 to 17.01 seconds. The VOF model was used as a multiphase model and the standard k epsilon-model as a turbulence model. Occasional convergence problems, usually at the beginning of bubble formation, required the use of relatively short time stepping. The simulation time costs threatened to become unbearable since weeks or months of wall-clock time with 1-2 processors were needed. Therefore, the simulated time periods were limited from the real duration of the experiments. The results obtained from the CFD simulations are in a relatively good agreement with the experimental results. Simulated pressures correspond well to the measured ones and, in addition, fluctuations due to bubble formations and breakups are also captured. Most of the differences in temperature values and in their behavior seem to depend on the locations of the measurements. In the vicinity of regions occupied by water in the experiments, thermocouples getting wet and drying slowly may have had an effect on the measured temperature values. Generally speaking, most temperatures were simulated satisfyingly and the largest discrepancies could be explained by wetted thermocouples. However, differences in the dry well and blowdown pipe top measurements could not be explained by thermocouples getting wet. Heat losses and dry well / wet well heat transfer due to conduction have neither been estimated in the experiments nor modeled in the simulations. Estimation of heat conduction and heat losses should be carried out in future experiments and they should be modeled in future simulations, too. (au)

  11. CFD simulation of air discharge tests in the PPOOLEX facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanskanen, V.; Puustinen, M.

    2008-07-01

    This report summarizes the CFD simulation results of two air discharge tests of the characterizing test program in 2007 with the scaled down PPOOLEX facility. Air was blown to the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe into the condensation pool (wet well). The selected tests were modeled with Fluent CFD code. Test CHAR-09-1 was simulated to 28.92 seconds of real time and test CHAR-09-3 to 17.01 seconds. The VOF model was used as a multiphase model and the standard k ε-model as a turbulence model. Occasional convergence problems, usually at the beginning of bubble formation, required the use of relatively short time stepping. The simulation time costs threatened to become unbearable since weeks or months of wall-clock time with 1-2 processors were needed. Therefore, the simulated time periods were limited from the real duration of the experiments. The results obtained from the CFD simulations are in a relatively good agreement with the experimental results. Simulated pressures correspond well to the measured ones and, in addition, fluctuations due to bubble formations and breakups are also captured. Most of the differences in temperature values and in their behavior seem to depend on the locations of the measurements. In the vicinity of regions occupied by water in the experiments, thermocouples getting wet and drying slowly may have had an effect on the measured temperature values. Generally speaking, most temperatures were simulated satisfyingly and the largest discrepancies could be explained by wetted thermocouples. However, differences in the dry well and blowdown pipe top measurements could not be explained by thermocouples getting wet. Heat losses and dry well / wet well heat transfer due to conduction have neither been estimated in the experiments nor modeled in the simulations. Estimation of heat conduction and heat losses should be carried out in future experiments and they should be modeled in future simulations, too. (au)

  12. Digital terrain data base - new possibilities of 3D terrain modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Rihtaršič

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available GISs has brought new dimensions in the field of digital terrain modelling, too. Modem DTMs must be real (relational databases with high degree of "intelligence". This paper presents some of the demands, ivhich have to be solved in modern digital terrain databases, together with main steps of their's generation. Problems, connected to regional level, multi-pur pose use, new possibilities and direct integration into GIS are presented. The practical model was created across smaller test area, so few lines with practical experiences can be droped, too.

  13. Testing power system controllers by real-time simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venne, Philippe; Guillaud, Xavier; Sirois, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a number of state-of-the art methods for testing power system controllers based on the use of a real-time power system simulator. After introducing Hypersim, we list and discuss the different means of connection between the controller under tests and the power system...

  14. First International Workshop on Grid Simulator Testing of Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    utilities to exchange knowledge, discuss experiences, and identify needs in wind power grid compliance , multi-megawatt power electronic grid simulator systems capable of many types of grid compliance testing renewable energy technologies. Knowledge from the workshop will help guide the research and testing

  15. Education and training by utilizing irradiation test reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Shohei; Koike, Sumio; Takemoto, Noriyuki; Tanimoto, Masataka; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency, at its Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), completed an irradiation test reactor simulator in May 2012. This simulator simulates the operation, irradiation test, abnormal transient change during operation, and accident progress events, etc., and is able to perform operation training on reactor and irradiation equipment corresponding to the above simulations. This simulator is composed of a reactor control panel, process control panel, irradiation equipment control panel, instructor control panel, large display panel, and compute server. The completed simulator has been utilized in the education and training of JMTR operators for the purpose of the safe and stable operation of JMTR and the achievement of high operation rate after resuming operation. For the education and training, an education and training curriculum has been prepared for use in not only operation procedures at the time of normal operation, but also learning of fast and accurate response in case of accident events. In addition, this simulator is also being used in operation training for the purpose of contributing to the cultivation of human resources for atomic power in and out of Japan. (A.O.)

  16. Shear Strength Measurement Benchmarking Tests for K Basin Sludge Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Luna, Maria; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2009-06-10

    Equipment development and demonstration testing for sludge retrieval is being conducted by the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) at the MASF (Maintenance and Storage Facility) using sludge simulants. In testing performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (under contract with the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company), the performance of the Geovane instrument was successfully benchmarked against the M5 Haake rheometer using a series of simulants with shear strengths (τ) ranging from about 700 to 22,000 Pa (shaft corrected). Operating steps for obtaining consistent shear strength measurements with the Geovane instrument during the benchmark testing were refined and documented.

  17. Numerical simulation of small scale soft impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varpasuo, Pentti

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the small scale soft missile impact tests. The purpose of the test program is to provide data for the calibration of the numerical simulation models for impact simulation. In the experiments, both dry and fluid filled missiles are used. The tests with fluid filled missiles investigate the release speed and the droplet size of the fluid release. This data is important in quantifying the fire hazard of flammable liquid after the release. The spray release velocity and droplet size are also input data for analytical and numerical simulation of the liquid spread in the impact. The behaviour of the impact target is the second investigative goal of the test program. The response of reinforced and pre-stressed concrete walls is studied with the aid of displacement and strain monitoring. (authors)

  18. Claire, a simulation and testing tool for critical softwares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassino, J.; Henry, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The CEA and IPSN (Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety) needs concerning the testing of critical softwares, have led to the development of the CLAIRE tool which is able to test the softwares without modification. This tool allows to graphically model the system and its environment and to include components into the model which observe and do not modify the behaviour of the system to be tested. The executable codes are integrated in the model. The tool uses target machine simulators (microprocessors). The technique used (the event simulation) allows to associate actions with events such as the execution of an instruction, the access to a variable etc.. The simulation results are exploited using graphic, states research and test cover measurement tools. In particular, this tool can give help to the evaluation of critical softwares with pre-existing components. (J.S.)

  19. Flow analysis of HANARO flow simulated test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong-Chul; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Wu, Jong-Sub; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2002-01-01

    The HANARO, a multi-purpose research reactor of 30 MWth open-tank-in-pool type, has been under normal operation since its initial critical in February, 1995. Many experiments should be safely performed to activate the utilization of the NANARO. A flow simulated test facility is being developed for the endurance test of reactivity control units for extended life times and the verification of structural integrity of those experimental facilities prior to loading in the HANARO. This test facility is composed of three major parts; a half-core structure assembly, flow circulation system and support system. The half-core structure assembly is composed of plenum, grid plate, core channel with flow tubes, chimney and dummy pool. The flow channels are to be filled with flow orifices to simulate core channels. This test facility must simulate similar flow characteristics to the HANARO. This paper, therefore, describes an analytical analysis to study the flow behavior of the test facility. The computational flow analysis has been performed for the verification of flow structure and similarity of this test facility assuming that flow rates and pressure differences of the core channel are constant. The shapes of flow orifices were determined by the trial and error method based on the design requirements of core channel. The computer analysis program with standard k - ε turbulence model was applied to three-dimensional analysis. The results of flow simulation showed a similar flow characteristic with that of the HANARO and satisfied the design requirements of this test facility. The shape of flow orifices used in this numerical simulation can be adapted for manufacturing requirements. The flow rate and the pressure difference through core channel proved by this simulation can be used as the design requirements of the flow system. The analysis results will be verified with the results of the flow test after construction of the flow system. (author)

  20. Automating the simulator testing and data collection process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magi, T.; Dimitri-Hakim, R. [L-3 Communications MAPPS Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Scenario-based training is a key process in the use of Full Scope Simulators (FSS) for operator training. Scenario-based training can be defined as any set of simulated plant operations performed with a specific training objective in mind. In order to meet this training objective, the ANSI/ANS-3.5-2009 standard requires that certain simulator training scenarios be tested to ensure that they reproduce the expected plant responses, that all plant procedures can be followed, and that scenario-based training objectives can be met. While malfunction testing provided a narrow view of the simulator performance revolving around the malfunction itself, scenario testing provides a broader, overall view. The concept of instructor validation of simulator scenarios to be used for training and evaluation, and oversight of simulator performance during the validation process, work hand-in-hand. This is where Scenario-Based Testing comes into play. With the description of Scenario-Based Testing (SBT) within Nuclear Energy Institute NEI 09-09 white paper and within the ANSI/ANS-3.5-2009 standard, the industry now has a way forward that reduces the regulatory uncertainty. Together, scenario-based testing and scenario-based training combine to produce better simulators which in turn can be used to more effectively and efficiently train new and existing power plant operators. However, they also impose a significant data gathering and analysis burden on FSS users. L-3 MAPPS Orchid Instructor Station (Orchid IS) facilitates this data gathering and analysis by providing features that automate this process with a simple, centralized, easy to use interface. (author)

  1. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  2. Fractal Landscape Algorithms for Environmental Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, H.; Moran, S.

    2014-12-01

    Natural science and geographical research are now able to take advantage of environmental simulations that more accurately test experimental hypotheses, resulting in deeper understanding. Experiments affected by the natural environment can benefit from 3D landscape simulations capable of simulating a variety of terrains and environmental phenomena. Such simulations can employ random terrain generation algorithms that dynamically simulate environments to test specific models against a variety of factors. Through the use of noise functions such as Perlin noise, Simplex noise, and diamond square algorithms, computers can generate simulations that model a variety of landscapes and ecosystems. This study shows how these algorithms work together to create realistic landscapes. By seeding values into the diamond square algorithm, one can control the shape of landscape. Perlin noise and Simplex noise are also used to simulate moisture and temperature. The smooth gradient created by coherent noise allows more realistic landscapes to be simulated. Terrain generation algorithms can be used in environmental studies and physics simulations. Potential studies that would benefit from simulations include the geophysical impact of flash floods or drought on a particular region and regional impacts on low lying area due to global warming and rising sea levels. Furthermore, terrain generation algorithms also serve as aesthetic tools to display landscapes (Google Earth), and simulate planetary landscapes. Hence, it can be used as a tool to assist science education. Algorithms used to generate these natural phenomena provide scientists a different approach in analyzing our world. The random algorithms used in terrain generation not only contribute to the generating the terrains themselves, but are also capable of simulating weather patterns.

  3. Simulated hail impact testing of photovoltaic solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D.; Wilson, A.; Ross, R.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques used to simulate and study the effect of hail on photovoltaic solar panels are described. Simulated hail stones (frozen ice spheres projected at terminal velocity) or steel balls were applied by air guns, gravity drop, or static loading. Tests with simulated hail and steel balls yielded different results. The impact strength of 10 commercially available flat-plate photovoltaic modules was tested. It was found that none of the six panel designs incorporating clear potting silicone material as the outermost layer remained undamaged by 1-in. simulated hailstones, while a photovoltaic module equipped with a 0.188-in.-thick acrylic cover sheet would be able to withstand the impact of a 2-in.-diameter hailstone.

  4. Retran simulation of Oyster Creek generator trip startup test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alammar, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    RETRAN simulation of Oyster Creek generator trip startup test was carried out as part of Oyster Creek RETRAN model qualification program for reload licensing applications. The objective of the simulation was to qualify the turbine model and its interface with the control valve and bypass systems under severe transients. The test was carried out by opening the main breakers at rated power. The turbine speed governor closed the control valves and the pressure regulator opened the bypass valves within 0.5 sec. The stop valves closed by a no-load turbine trip, before the 10 percent overspeed trip was reached and the reactor scrammed on high APRM neutron flux. The simulation resulted in qualifying a normalized hydraulic torque for the turbine model and a 0.3 sec, delay block for the bypass model to account for the different delays in the hydraulic linkages present in the system. One-dimensional kinetics was used in this simulation

  5. EARTHWORK VOLUME CALCULATION FROM DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANIĆ Milorad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate calculation of cut and fill volume has an essential importance in many fields. This article shows a new method, which has no approximation, based on Digital Terrain Models. A relatively new mathematical model is developed for that purpose, which is implemented in the software solution. Both of them has been tested and verified in the praxis on several large opencast mines. This application is developed in AutoLISP programming language and works in AutoCAD environment.

  6. Self-Supervised Learning of Terrain Traversability from Proprioceptive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Max; Howard, Andrew B.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Robust and reliable autonomous navigation in unstructured, off-road terrain is a critical element in making unmanned ground vehicles a reality. Existing approaches tend to rely on evaluating the traversability of terrain based on fixed parameters obtained via testing in specific environments. This results in a system that handles the terrain well that it trained in, but is unable to process terrain outside its test parameters. An adaptive system does not take the place of training, but supplements it. Whereas training imprints certain environments, an adaptive system would imprint terrain elements and the interactions amongst them, and allow the vehicle to build a map of local elements using proprioceptive sensors. Such sensors can include velocity, wheel slippage, bumper hits, and accelerometers. Data obtained by the sensors can be compared to observations from ranging sensors such as cameras and LADAR (laser detection and ranging) in order to adapt to any kind of terrain. In this way, it could sample its surroundings not only to create a map of clear space, but also of what kind of space it is and its composition. By having a set of building blocks consisting of terrain features, a vehicle can adapt to terrain that it has never seen before, and thus be robust to a changing environment. New observations could be added to its library, enabling it to infer terrain types that it wasn't trained on. This would be very useful in alien environments, where many of the physical features are known, but some are not. For example, a seemingly flat, hard plain could actually be soft sand, and the vehicle would sense the sand and avoid it automatically.

  7. Magnetic Testing, and Modeling, Simulation and Analysis for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, Mary; Narvaez, Pablo; Herman, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The Aerospace Corporation (Aerospace) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems (LMSS) participated with Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the implementation of a magnetic cleanliness program of the NASA/JPL JUNO mission. The magnetic cleanliness program was applied from early flight system development up through system level environmental testing. The JUNO magnetic cleanliness program required setting-up a specialized magnetic test facility at Lockheed Martin Space Systems for testing the flight system and a testing program with facility for testing system parts and subsystems at JPL. The magnetic modeling, simulation and analysis capability was set up and performed by Aerospace to provide qualitative and quantitative magnetic assessments of the magnetic parts, components, and subsystems prior to or in lieu of magnetic tests. Because of the sensitive nature of the fields and particles scientific measurements being conducted by the JUNO space mission to Jupiter, the imposition of stringent magnetic control specifications required a magnetic control program to ensure that the spacecraft's science magnetometers and plasma wave search coil were not magnetically contaminated by flight system magnetic interferences. With Aerospace's magnetic modeling, simulation and analysis and JPL's system modeling and testing approach, and LMSS's test support, the project achieved a cost effective approach to achieving a magnetically clean spacecraft. This paper presents lessons learned from the JUNO magnetic testing approach and Aerospace's modeling, simulation and analysis activities used to solve problems such as remnant magnetization, performance of hard and soft magnetic materials within the targeted space system in applied external magnetic fields.

  8. Visuospatial Aptitude Testing Differentially Predicts Simulated Surgical Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchcliff, Emily; Green, Isabel; Destephano, Christopher; Cox, Mary; Smink, Douglas; Kumar, Amanika; Hokenstad, Erik; Bengtson, Joan; Cohen, Sarah

    2018-02-05

    To determine if visuospatial perception (VSP) testing is correlated to simulated or intraoperative surgical performance as rated by the American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) milestones. Classification II-2 SETTING: Two academic training institutions PARTICIPANTS: 41 residents, including 19 Brigham and Women's Hospital and 22 Mayo Clinic residents from three different specialties (OBGYN, general surgery, urology). Participants underwent three different tests: visuospatial perception testing (VSP), Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS®) peg transfer, and DaVinci robotic simulation peg transfer. Surgical grading from the ACGME milestones tool was obtained for each participant. Demographic and subject background information was also collected including specialty, year of training, prior experience with simulated skills, and surgical interest. Standard statistical analysis using Student's t test were performed, and correlations were determined using adjusted linear regression models. In univariate analysis, BWH and Mayo training programs differed in both times and overall scores for both FLS® peg transfer and DaVinci robotic simulation peg transfer (p<0.05 for all). Additionally, type of residency training impacted time and overall score on robotic peg transfer. Familiarity with tasks correlated with higher score and faster task completion (p= 0.05 for all except VSP score). There was no difference in VSP scores by program, specialty, or year of training. In adjusted linear regression modeling, VSP testing was correlated only to robotic peg transfer skills (average time p=0.006, overall score p=0.001). Milestones did not correlate to either VSP or surgical simulation testing. VSP score was correlated with robotic simulation skills but not with FLS skills or ACGME milestones. This suggests that the ability of VSP score to predict competence differs between tasks. Therefore, further investigation is required into aptitude testing, especially prior

  9. COTRANSA simulation of Chinshan unit one generator load rejection test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    A simulation of the plant behavior during a BWR generator load rejection transient using Exxon Nuclear Company's COTRANSA code is presented in this paper. The results are compared to measurements obtained by Taiwan Power Company during a generator load rejection transient, initiated at full power condition, which was one of the Chinshan Unit 1 initial cycle startup tests. Good agreement between the COTRANSA predicted and the measured values, indicates that the COTRANSA code can simulate this transient satisfactorily

  10. Virtual simulation of maneuvering captive tests for a surface vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hajivand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic derivatives or coefficients are required to predict the maneuvering characteristics of a marine vehicle. These derivatives are obtained numerically for a DTMB 5512 model ship by virtual simulating of captive model tests in a CFD environment. The computed coefficients are applied to predict the turning circle and zigzag maneuvers of the model ship. The comparison of the simulated results with the available experimental data shows a very good agreement among them. The simulations show that the CFD is precise and affordable tool at the preliminary design stage to obtain maneuverability performance of a marine vehicles.

  11. Simulation and interpretation of inter-well tracer tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugstad Øyvind

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In inter-well tracer tests (IWTT, chemical compounds or radioactive isotopes are used to label injection water and gas to establish well connections and fluid patterns in petroleum reservoirs. Tracer simulation is an invaluable tool to ease the interpretation of IWTT results and is also required for assisted history matching application of tracer data. In this paper we present a new simulation technique to analyse and interpret tracer results. Laboratory results are used to establish and test formulations of the tracer conservation equations, and the technique is used to provide simulated tracer responses that are compared with observed tracer data from an extensive tracer program. The implemented tracer simulation methodology use a fast post-processing of previously simulated reservoir simulation runs. This provides a fast, flexible and powerful method for analysing gas tracer behaviour in reservoirs. We show that simulation time for tracers can be reduced by factor 100 compared to solving the tracer flow equations simultaneously with the reservoir fluid flow equations. The post-processing technique, combined with a flexible built-in local tracer-grid refinement is exploited to reduce numerical smearing, particularly severe for narrow tracer pulses.

  12. Hybrid RANS/LES applied to complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the wind in complex terrain is limited by computational cost. The number of computational grid points required to resolve the near-ground turbulent structures (eddies) are very high. The traditional solution to the problem has been to apply a wall function...... aspect ratio in the RANS layer and thereby resolve the mean near-wall velocity profile. The method is applicable to complex terrain and the benefits of traditional LES are kept intact. Using the hybrid method, simulations of the wind over a natural complex terrain near Wellington in New Zealand...... that accounts for the whole near-wall region. Recently, a hybrid method was proposed in which the eddies close to the ground were modelled in a Reynolds-averaged sense (RANS) and the eddies above this region were simulated using LES. The advantage of the approach is the ability to use shallow cells of high...

  13. Test system to simulate transient overpower LMFBR cladding failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrus, H.G.; Feigenbutz, L.V.

    1981-01-01

    One of the HEDL programs has the objective to experimentally characterize fuel pin cladding failure due to cladding rupture or ripping. A new test system has been developed which simulates a transient mechanically-loaded fuel pin failure. In this new system the mechanical load is prototypic of a fuel pellet rapidly expanding against the cladding due to various causes such as fuel thermal expansion, fuel melting, and fuel swelling. This new test system is called the Fuel Cladding Mechanical Interaction Mandrel Loading Test (FCMI/MLT). The FCMI/MLT test system and the method used to rupture cladding specimens very rapidly to simulate a transient event are described. Also described is the automatic data acquisition and control system which is required to control the startup, operation and shutdown of the very fast tests, and needed to acquire and store large quantities of data in a short time

  14. WIPP waste package testing on simulated DHLW: emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Several series of simulated (nonradioactive) defense high-level waste (DHLW) package tests have been emplaced in the WIPP, a research and development facility authorized to demonstrate the safe disposal of defense-related wastes. The primary purpose of these 3-to-7 year duration tests is to evaluate the in situ materials performance of waste package barriers (canisters, overpacks, backfills, and nonradioactive DHLW glass waste form) for possible future application to a licensed waste repository in salt. This paper describes all test materials, instrumentation, and emplacement and testing techniques, and discusses progress of the various tests. These tests are intended to provide information on materials behavior (i.e., corrosion, metallurgical and geochemical alterations, waste form durability, surface interactions, etc.), as well as comparison between several waste package designs, fabrications details, and actual costs. These experiments involve 18 full-size simulated DHLW packages (approximately 3.0 m x 0.6 m diameter) emplaced in vertical boreholes in the salt drift floor. Six of the test packages contain internal electrical heaters (470 W/canister), and were emplace under approximately reference DHLW repository conditions. Twelve other simulated DHLW packages were emplaced under accelerated-aging or overtest conditions, including the artificial introduction of brine, and a thermal loading approximately three to four times higher than reference. Eight of these 12 test packages contain 1500 W/canister electrical heaters; the other four are filled with DHLW glass. 9 refs., 1 fig

  15. TERRAIN, HENRY COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, BARREN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, LOWNDES COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, FRANKLIN COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, HARRISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, LOGAN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, LAWRENCE COUNTY, Ohio USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, SEBASTIAN COUNTY, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographical data that were used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, MONROE COUNTY, Michigan USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, ALLENDALE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, WAKULLA COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, BRADFORD COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, GADSDEN COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, LEVY COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, WOODFORD COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, POWELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, TALLAPOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN Submission for CHICKASAW, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, CHEROKEE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, POWESHIEK COUNTY, IOWA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, RANDOLPH COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, ELMORE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, WASHINGTON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, WASHINGTON COUNTY, Ohio USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, WINNESHIEK COUNTY, IOWA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, MCLEAN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, WINSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, CHAMBERS COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, ESTILL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, NATCHITOCHES PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, CLINTON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, CHILTON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, GRAYSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, GARRARD COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, Sedgwick COUNTY, Kansas USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, MACOMB COUNTY, MI, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, MARSHALL COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. Terrain Data, Caroline COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, CHOCTAW COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, CARLISLE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, SIMPSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, GRAVES COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, MADISON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, TANEY COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, FRANKLIN PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, Catahoula PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, RICHLAND PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, OVERTON COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, STEWART COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, MOREHOUSE PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, ALLEN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, LEWIS COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, BUFFALO COUNTY, WISCONSIN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, MARENGO COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, CLARKE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, HART COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, HOUSTON COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, JESSAMINE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, LAWRENCE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, BALLARD COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, NELSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, EVANGELINE PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. Terrain Adaptive Reconfiguration of Mobility

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an algorithm (and software) to automatically adapt a reconfigurable robot to different types of terrains for improved mobility, that compared to SOA:...

  3. TERRAIN, MENIFEE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, SHELBY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, Platte County, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, SCOTT COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, FAYETTE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, MUHLENBERG COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, CARTER COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Elastic simulations and Arizona mine test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic seismic simulations and field data tests are used to validate the theory of a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM). For nearfield elastic simulation, the SSTM results show superresolution to be better than λ/8 if the only scattered data are used as input data. If the direct P and S waves are muted then the resolution of the scatterer locations are within about λ/5. Seismic data collected in an Arizona tunnel showed a superresolution limit of at least λ/19. These test results are consistent with the theory of the SSTM and suggest that the SSTM can be a tool used by geophysicists as a probe for near-field scatterers.

  13. Simulation of thermohydraulic phenomena and model test for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Kazuziro

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the major thermohydraulic phenomena of FBRs and the conventional ways of their model tests, and introduces the recent findings regarding measurement technology and computational science. In the future commercial stage of FBRs, the design optimization will becomes important to improve economy and safety more and more. It is indispensable to use computational science to the plant design and safety evaluation. The most of the model tests will be replaced by the simulation analyses based on computational science. The measurement technology using ultrasonic and the numerical simulation with super parallel computing are considered to be the key technology to realize the design by analysis method. (author)

  14. Terrain Mapping and Classification in Outdoor Environments Using Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Yukinobu Hata; Denis Fernando Wolf; Gustavo Pessin; Fernando Osório

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional terrain mapping and classification technique to allow the operation of mobile robots in outdoor environments using laser range finders. We propose the use of a multi-layer perceptron neural network to classify the terrain into navigable, partially navigable, and non-navigable. The maps generated by our approach can be used for path planning, navigation, and local obstacle avoidance. Experimental tests using an outdoor robot and a laser sensor demonstra...

  15. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AN AGRICULTURAL SOIL SHEAR STRESS TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Formato

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work a numerical simulation of agricultural soil shear stress tests was performed through soil shear strength data detected by a soil shearometer. We used a soil shearometer available on the market to measure soil shear stress and constructed special equipment that enabled automated detection of soil shear stress. It was connected to an acquisition data system that displayed and recorded soil shear stress during the full field tests. A soil shearometer unit was used to the in situ measurements of soil shear stress in full field conditions for different types of soils located on the right side of the Sele river, at a distance of about 1 km from each other, along the perpendicular to the Sele river in the direction of the sea. Full field tests using the shearometer unit were performed alongside considered soil characteristic parameter data collection. These parameter values derived from hydrostatic compression and triaxial tests performed on considered soil samples and repeated 4 times and we noticed that the difference between the maximum and minimum values detected for every set of performed tests never exceeded 4%. Full field shear tests were simulated by the Abaqus program code considering three different material models of soils normally used in the literature, the Mohr-Coulomb, Drucker-Prager and Cam-Clay models. We then compared all data outcomes obtained by numerical simulations with those from the experimental tests. We also discussed any further simulation data results obtained with different material models and selected the best material model for each considered soil to be used in tyre/soil contact simulation or in soil compaction studies.

  16. Comparison of driving simulator performance and neuropsychological testing in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterba, Sylvia; Mueller, Nicole; Leidag, Markus; Widdig, Walter; Rasche, Kurt; Malin, Jean-Pierre; Schultze-Werninghaus, Gerhard; Orth, Maritta

    2004-09-01

    Daytime sleepiness and cataplexy can increase automobile accident rates in narcolepsy. Several countries have produced guidelines for issuing a driving license. The aim of the study was to compare driving simulator performance and neuropsychological test results in narcolepsy in order to evaluate their predictive value regarding driving ability. Thirteen patients with narcolepsy (age: 41.5+/-12.9 years) and 10 healthy control patients (age: 55.1+/-7.8 years) were investigated. By computer-assisted neuropsychological testing, vigilance, alertness and divided attention were assessed. In a driving simulator patients and controls had to drive on a highway for 60 min (mean speed of 100 km/h). Different weather and daytime conditions and obstacles were presented. Epworth Sleepiness Scale-Scores were significantly raised (narcolepsy patients: 16.7+/-5.1, controls: 6.6+/-3.6, P divided attention (56.9+/-25.4) and vigilance (58.7+/-26.8) were in a normal range. There was, however, a high inter-individual difference. There was no correlation between driving performance and neuropsychological test results or ESS Score. Neuropsychological test results did not significantly change in the follow-up. The difficulties encountered by the narcolepsy patient in remaining alert may account for sleep-related motor vehicle accidents. Driving simulator investigations are closely related to real traffic situations than isolated neuropsychological tests. At the present time the driving simulator seems to be a useful instrument judging driving ability especially in cases with ambiguous neuropsychological results.

  17. Safety panel and new procedures evaluation by simulator tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin, T.

    1986-01-01

    With more than thirty weeks of simulator testing (for the last three years only) and approximately three hundred scenarios, EDF's experience in this field is extensive. This practice is well known within Fossil and Nuclear Generation and is well accepted by the operating teams which participate in it. Simulator testing appears to be an essential decision-making tool in the process of developing new operating aids in PWR plants. Accelerated development and the elimination of long and expensive modifications after commissioning is an economic advantage. The saving in time is obvious, since modifications are carried out continuously throughout the development phase. Finally, operators participate in the development of systems and receive fixed, well-defined applications. This practice has become systematic, and all new applications concerning the operation of PWR plants are simulator-tested, particularly 1300-MW unit computers and operating procedures, the new generation of 900-MW unit computers, and the new 1500-MW fully computerized control rooms. Finally, this simulator testing allows us to considerably increase our knowledge concerning the behavior of operators in accident situations, and special tests are performed for this purpose

  18. LOCA simulation in the NRU reactor: materials test-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russcher, G.E.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Wildung, N.J.; Rausch, W.N.

    1981-10-01

    A simulated loss-of-coolant accident was performed with a full-length test bundle of pressurized water reactor fuel rods. This second experiment of the program produced peak fuel cladding temperatures of 1148K (1607 0 F) and resulted in six ruptured fuel rods. Test data and initial results from the experiment are presented here in the form of photographs and graphical summaries. These results are also compared with the preceding prototypic thermal-hydraulic test results and with computer model test predictions

  19. UPTF loop seal tests and their RELAP simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomainen, M.; Tuunanen, J.

    1997-01-01

    In a pressurized water reactor the loop seals have an effect on the natural circulation. If a loop seal is filled with water it can cause a flow stagnation in the loop during two-phase natural circulation. Also the pressure loss over a filled loop seal is high, which lowers the water level in the core. Tests to investigate the loop seal behaviour were performed on a German Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). The purpose of the tests was to study the amount of water in the loop seal under different steam flow rates. The tests were simulated with RELAP5/MOD3.2. With high steam flow rates the code had problems in simulating the amount of the water remaining in the pump elbow, but in general the agreement between the calculated results and the experimental data was good. (orig.)

  20. Modeling and Simulation of a Nuclear Fuel Element Test Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.; Emrich, William

    2011-01-01

    "The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator" test section closely simulates the internal operating conditions of a thermal nuclear rocket. The purpose of testing is to determine the ideal fuel rod characteristics for optimum thermal heat transfer to their hydrogen cooling/working fluid while still maintaining fuel rod structural integrity. Working fluid exhaust temperatures of up to 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit can be encountered. The exhaust gas is rendered inert and massively reduced in temperature for analysis using a combination of water cooling channels and cool N2 gas injectors in the H2-N2 mixer portion of the test section. An extensive thermal fluid analysis was performed in support of the engineering design of the H2-N2 mixer in order to determine the maximum "mass flow rate"-"operating temperature" curve of the fuel elements hydrogen exhaust gas based on the test facilities available cooling N2 mass flow rate as the limiting factor.

  1. Natural tracer test simulation by stochastic particle tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerer, P.; Mose, R.; Semra, K.

    1990-01-01

    Stochastic particle tracking methods are well adapted to 3D transport simulations where discretization requirements of other methods usually cannot be satisfied. They do need a very accurate approximation of the velocity field. The described code is based on the mixed hybrid finite element method (MHFEM) to calculated the piezometric and velocity field. The random-walk method is used to simulate mass transport. The main advantages of the MHFEM over FD or FE are the simultaneous calculation of pressure and velocity, which are considered as unknowns; the possibility of interpolating velocities everywhere; and the continuity of the normal component of the velocity vector from one element to another. For these reasons, the MHFEM is well adapted for particle tracking methods. After a general description of the numerical methods, the model is used to simulate the observations made during the Twin Lake Tracer Test in 1983. A good match is found between observed and simulated heads and concentrations. (Author) (12 refs., 4 figs.)

  2. Development of simulated contamination (SIMCON) and miscellaneous decontamination scoping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    This report details the development of a method of simulating ICPP type contamination (SIMCON) with surrogate, nonradioactive materials and some miscellaneous testing and results that were completed using SIMCON. An analysis of historical ICPP decontamination samples is given, along with the justification relating SIMCON to this historical data. Some SIMCON testing of the following methods are given as miscellaneous examples: water rinse, water ultrasonic, cerric nitrate, CO 2 snowflake blasting, nitrogen ''Cryogenic'' blasting and strippable coating removal

  3. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lanigan, David C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    This revision to the original report adds two longer term leach sets of data to the report and provides more discussion and graphics on how to interpret the results from long-term laboratory leach tests. The leach tests were performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams.

  4. Computer simulation of ultrasonic testing for aerospace vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamawaki, H [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1, Sengen, 305-0047 Tsukuba (Japan); Moriya, S; Masuoka, T [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 1 Koganesawa, Kimigawa, 981-1525 Kakuda (Japan); Takatsubo, J, E-mail: yamawaki.hisashi@nims.go.jp [Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, 305-8568 Tsukuba (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive testing techniques are developed to secure reliability of aerospace vehicles used repetitively. In the case of cracks caused by thermal stress on walls in combustion chambers of liquid-fuel rockets, it is examined by ultrasonic waves visualization technique developed in AIST. The technique is composed with non-contact ultrasonic generation by pulsed-laser scanning, piezoelectric transducer for the ultrasonic detection, and image reconstruction processing. It enables detection of defects by visualization of ultrasonic waves scattered by the defects. In NIMS, the condition of the detection by the visualization is investigated using computer simulation for ultrasonic propagation that has capability of fast 3-D calculation. The simulation technique is based on finite-difference method and two-step elastic wave equations. It is reported about the investigation by the calculation, and shows availability of the simulation for the ultrasonic testing technique of the wall cracks.

  5. A Monte Carlo Simulation Framework for Testing Cosmological Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heymann Y.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We tested alternative cosmologies using Monte Carlo simulations based on the sam- pling method of the zCosmos galactic survey. The survey encompasses a collection of observable galaxies with respective redshifts that have been obtained for a given spec- troscopic area of the sky. Using a cosmological model, we can convert the redshifts into light-travel times and, by slicing the survey into small redshift buckets, compute a curve of galactic density over time. Because foreground galaxies obstruct the images of more distant galaxies, we simulated the theoretical galactic density curve using an average galactic radius. By comparing the galactic density curves of the simulations with that of the survey, we could assess the cosmologies. We applied the test to the expanding-universe cosmology of de Sitter and to a dichotomous cosmology.

  6. Obtaining reliable Likelihood Ratio tests from simulated likelihood functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Laura Mørch

    It is standard practice by researchers and the default option in many statistical programs to base test statistics for mixed models on simulations using asymmetric draws (e.g. Halton draws). This paper shows that when the estimated likelihood functions depend on standard deviations of mixed param...

  7. Simulation and video software development for soil consolidation testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karim, Usama F.A.

    2003-01-01

    The development techniques and file structures of CTM, a novel multi-media (computer simulation and video) package on consolidation and laboratory consolidation testing, are presented in this paper. A courseware tool called Authorware proved to be versatile for building the package and the paper

  8. Couplex1 test case nuclear - Waste disposal far field simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This first COUPLEX test case is to compute a simplified Far Field model used in nuclear waste management simulation. From the mathematical point of view the problem is of convection diffusion type but the parameters are highly varying from one layer to another. Another particularity is the very concentrated nature of the source, both in space and in time. (author)

  9. Accelerated pavement testing efforts using the heavy vehicle simulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, Louw

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief description of the technological developments involved in the development and use of the Heavy Vehicle Simulator (HVS) accelerated pavement testing equipment. This covers the period from concept in the late 1960’s...

  10. Sequential Computerized Mastery Tests--Three Simulation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, Marie

    2006-01-01

    A simulation study of a sequential computerized mastery test is carried out with items modeled with the 3 parameter logistic item response theory model. The examinees' responses are either identically distributed, not identically distributed, or not identically distributed together with estimation errors in the item characteristics. The…

  11. Resonant Column Tests and Nonlinear Elasticity in Simulated Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Resmi; Sitharam, T. G.

    2018-01-01

    Rocks are generally regarded as linearly elastic even though the manifestations of nonlinearity are prominent. The variations of elastic constants with varying strain levels and stress conditions, disagreement between static and dynamic moduli, etc., are some of the examples of nonlinear elasticity in rocks. The grain-to-grain contact, presence of pores and joints along with other compliant features induce the nonlinear behavior in rocks. The nonlinear elastic behavior of rocks is demonstrated through resonant column tests and numerical simulations in this paper. Resonant column tests on intact and jointed gypsum samples across varying strain levels have been performed in laboratory and using numerical simulations. The paper shows the application of resonant column apparatus to obtain the wave velocities of stiff samples at various strain levels under long wavelength condition, after performing checks and incorporating corrections to the obtained resonant frequencies. The numerical simulation and validation of the resonant column tests using distinct element method are presented. The stiffness reductions of testing samples under torsional and flexural vibrations with increasing strain levels have been analyzed. The nonlinear elastic behavior of rocks is reflected in the results, which is enhanced by the presence of joints. The significance of joint orientation and influence of joint spacing during wave propagation have also been assessed and presented using the numerical simulations. It has been found that rock joints also exhibit nonlinear behavior within the elastic limit.

  12. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Findlay, J.A.; Hwang, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation

  13. Morphological modeling of terrains and volume data

    CERN Document Server

    Comic, Lidija; Magillo, Paola; Iuricich, Federico

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the mathematical background behind discrete approaches to morphological analysis of scalar fields, with a focus on Morse theory and on the discrete theories due to Banchoff and Forman. The algorithms and data structures presented are used for terrain modeling and analysis, molecular shape analysis, and for analysis or visualization of sensor and simulation 3D data sets. It covers a variety of application domains including geography, geology, environmental sciences, medicine and biology. The authors classify the different approaches to morphological analysis which are all ba

  14. Test requirements for the integral effect test to simulate Korean PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Park, C. K.; Lee, S. J.; Kwon, T. S.; Yun, B. J.; Chung, M. K

    2001-02-01

    In this report, the test requirements are described for the design of the integral effect test facility to simulate Korean PWR plants. Since the integral effect test facility should be designed so as to simulate various thermal hydraulic phenomena, as closely as possible, to be occurred in real plants during operation or anticipated transients, the design and operational characteristics of the reference plants (Korean Standard Nuclear Plant and Korean Next Generation Reactor)were analyzed in order to draw major components, systems, and functions to be satisfied or simulated in the test facility. The test matrix is set up by considering major safety concerns of interest and the test objectives to confirm and enhance the safety of the plants. And the analysis and prioritization of the test matrix leads to the general design requirements of the test facility. Based on the general design requirements, the design criteria is set up for the basic and detailed design of the test facility. And finally it is drawn the design requirements specific to the fluid system and measurement system of the test facility. The test requirements in this report will be used as a guideline to the scaling analysis and basic design of the test facility. The test matrix specified in this report can be modified in the stage of main testing by considering the needs of experiments and circumstances at that time.

  15. Test requirements for the integral effect test to simulate Korean PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Park, C. K.; Lee, S. J.; Kwon, T. S.; Yun, B. J.; Chung, M. K.

    2001-02-01

    In this report, the test requirements are described for the design of the integral effect test facility to simulate Korean PWR plants. Since the integral effect test facility should be designed so as to simulate various thermal hydraulic phenomena, as closely as possible, to be occurred in real plants during operation or anticipated transients, the design and operational characteristics of the reference plants (Korean Standard Nuclear Plant and Korean Next Generation Reactor)were analyzed in order to draw major components, systems, and functions to be satisfied or simulated in the test facility. The test matrix is set up by considering major safety concerns of interest and the test objectives to confirm and enhance the safety of the plants. And the analysis and prioritization of the test matrix leads to the general design requirements of the test facility. Based on the general design requirements, the design criteria is set up for the basic and detailed design of the test facility. And finally it is drawn the design requirements specific to the fluid system and measurement system of the test facility. The test requirements in this report will be used as a guideline to the scaling analysis and basic design of the test facility. The test matrix specified in this report can be modified in the stage of main testing by considering the needs of experiments and circumstances at that time

  16. NPSNET: Dynamic Terrain and Cultured Feature Depiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    defaults. bridge(terrain *ptr, vertex pos, bridge mattype bmat ); This constructor takes only the pointer to the underlying terrain, a placement, and a...material to use for construction. bridge(terrain *ptr, vertex pos, bridge-mattype bmat , float dir); This constructor takes a terrain pointer, a...placement position, a material to use, and a direction to run. bridge(terrain *ptr, vertex pos, bridge-mattype bmat , float dir, float width, float height

  17. Spatial and temporal variability of hyperspectral signatures of terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. F.; Perovich, D. K.; Koenig, G. G.

    2008-04-01

    Electromagnetic signatures of terrain exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity on a range of scales as well as considerable temporal variability. A statistical characterization of the spatial heterogeneity and spatial scaling algorithms of terrain electromagnetic signatures are required to extrapolate measurements to larger scales. Basic terrain elements including bare soil, grass, deciduous, and coniferous trees were studied in a quasi-laboratory setting using instrumented test sites in Hanover, NH and Yuma, AZ. Observations were made using a visible and near infrared spectroradiometer (350 - 2500 nm) and hyperspectral camera (400 - 1100 nm). Results are reported illustrating: i) several difference scenes; ii) a terrain scene time series sampled over an annual cycle; and iii) the detection of artifacts in scenes. A principal component analysis indicated that the first three principal components typically explained between 90 and 99% of the variance of the 30 to 40-channel hyperspectral images. Higher order principal components of hyperspectral images are useful for detecting artifacts in scenes.

  18. A Fault Sample Simulation Approach for Virtual Testability Demonstration Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; QIU Jing; LIU Guanjun; YANG Peng

    2012-01-01

    Virtual testability demonstration test has many advantages,such as low cost,high efficiency,low risk and few restrictions.It brings new requirements to the fault sample generation.A fault sample simulation approach for virtual testability demonstration test based on stochastic process theory is proposed.First,the similarities and differences of fault sample generation between physical testability demonstration test and virtual testability demonstration test are discussed.Second,it is pointed out that the fault occurrence process subject to perfect repair is renewal process.Third,the interarrival time distribution function of the next fault event is given.Steps and flowcharts of fault sample generation are introduced.The number of faults and their occurrence time are obtained by statistical simulation.Finally,experiments are carried out on a stable tracking platform.Because a variety of types of life distributions and maintenance modes are considered and some assumptions are removed,the sample size and structure of fault sample simulation results are more similar to the actual results and more reasonable.The proposed method can effectively guide the fault injection in virtual testability demonstration test.

  19. Simulation and Analysis of Converging Shock Wave Test Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-21

    Results and analysis pertaining to the simulation of the Guderley converging shock wave test problem (and associated code verification hydrodynamics test problems involving converging shock waves) in the LANL ASC radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE are presented. One-dimensional (1D) spherical and two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric geometric setups are utilized and evaluated in this study, as is an instantiation of the xRAGE adaptive mesh refinement capability. For the 2D simulations, a 'Surrogate Guderley' test problem is developed and used to obviate subtleties inherent to the true Guderley solution's initialization on a square grid, while still maintaining a high degree of fidelity to the original problem, and minimally straining the general credibility of associated analysis and conclusions.

  20. Testability, Test Automation and Test Driven Development for the Trick Simulation Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the adoption of a Test Driven Development approach and a Continuous Integration System in the development of the Trick Simulation Toolkit, a generic simulation development environment for creating high fidelity training and engineering simulations at the NASA Johnson Space Center and many other NASA facilities. It describes the approach, and the significant benefits seen, such as fast, thorough and clear test feedback every time code is checked into the code repository. It also describes an approach that encourages development of code that is testable and adaptable.

  1. Simulation-Based Testing of Pager Interruptions During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujka, Joseph A; Safcsak, Karen; Bhullar, Indermeet S; Havron, William S

    2018-01-30

    To determine if pager interruptions affect operative time, safety, or complications and management of pager issues during a simulated laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Twelve surgery resident volunteers were tested on a Simbionix Lap Mentor II simulator. Each resident performed 6 randomized simulated laparoscopic cholecystectomies; 3 with pager interruptions (INT) and 3 without pager interruptions (NO-INT). The pager interruptions were sent in the form of standardized patient vignettes and timed to distract the resident during dissection of the critical view of safety and clipping of the cystic duct. The residents were graded on a pass/fail scale for eliciting appropriate patient history and management of the pager issue. Data was extracted from the simulator for the following endpoints: operative time, safety metrics, and incidence of operative complications. The Mann-Whitney U test and contingency table analysis were used to compare the 2 groups (INT vs. NO-INT). Level I trauma center; Simulation laboratory. Twelve general surgery residents. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in any of the operative endpoints as measured by the simulator. However, in the INT group, only 25% of the time did the surgery residents both adequately address the issue and provide effective patient management in response to the pager interruption. Pager interruptions did not affect operative time, safety, or complications during the simulated procedure. However, there were significant failures in the appropriate evaluations and management of pager issues. Consideration for diversion of patient care issues to fellow residents not operating to improve quality and safety of patient care outside the operating room requires further study. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Enhanced Verification Test Suite for Physics Simulation Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamm, J R; Brock, J S; Brandon, S T; Cotrell, D L; Johnson, B; Knupp, P; Rider, W; Trucano, T; Weirs, V G

    2008-10-10

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations. The key points of this document are: (1) Verification deals with mathematical correctness of the numerical algorithms in a code, while validation deals with physical correctness of a simulation in a regime of interest. This document is about verification. (2) The current seven-problem Tri-Laboratory Verification Test Suite, which has been used for approximately five years at the DOE WP laboratories, is limited. (3) Both the methodology for and technology used in verification analysis have evolved and been improved since the original test suite was proposed. (4) The proposed test problems are in three basic areas: (a) Hydrodynamics; (b) Transport processes; and (c) Dynamic strength-of-materials. (5) For several of the proposed problems we provide a 'strong sense verification benchmark', consisting of (i) a clear mathematical statement of the problem with sufficient information to run a computer simulation, (ii) an explanation of how the code result and benchmark solution are to be evaluated, and (iii) a description of the acceptance criterion for simulation code results. (6) It is proposed that the set of verification test problems with which any particular code be evaluated include some of the problems described in this document. Analysis of the proposed verification test problems constitutes part of a necessary--but not sufficient--step that builds confidence in physics and engineering simulation codes. More complicated test cases, including physics models of

  3. Finite element simulation and testing of ISW CFRP anchorage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Goltermann, Per; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2013-01-01

    is modelled in the 3D finite Element program ABAQUS, just as digital image correlation (DIC) testing was performed to verify the finite element simulation. Also a new optimized design was produced to ensure that the finite element simulation and anchorage behaviour correlated well. It is seen....... This paper presents a novel mechanical integrated sleeve wedge anchorage which seem very promising when perusing the scope of ultimate utilization of CFRP 8mm rods (with a tension capacity of approximately 140kN). Compression transverse to the CFRP is evaluated to prevent premature failure. The anchorage...

  4. Processing Terrain Point Cloud Data

    KAUST Repository

    DeVore, Ronald

    2013-01-10

    Terrain point cloud data are typically acquired through some form of Light Detection And Ranging sensing. They form a rich resource that is important in a variety of applications including navigation, line of sight, and terrain visualization. Processing terrain data has not received the attention of other forms of surface reconstruction or of image processing. The goal of terrain data processing is to convert the point cloud into a succinct representation system that is amenable to the various application demands. The present paper presents a platform for terrain processing built on the following principles: (i) measuring distortion in the Hausdorff metric, which we argue is a good match for the application demands, (ii) a multiscale representation based on tree approximation using local polynomial fitting. The basic elements held in the nodes of the tree can be efficiently encoded, transmitted, visualized, and utilized for the various target applications. Several challenges emerge because of the variable resolution of the data, missing data, occlusions, and noise. Techniques for identifying and handling these challenges are developed. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  5. Forced vibration tests and simulation analyses of a nuclear reactor building. Part 2: simulation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, M.; Nakagawa, S.; Momma, T.; Naito, Y.; Niwa, M.; Motohashi, S.

    1995-01-01

    Forced vibration tests of a BWR-type reactor building. Hamaoka Unit 4, were performed. Valuable data on the dynamic characteristics of the soil-structure interaction system were obtained through the tests. Simulation analyses of the fundamental dynamic characteristics of the soil-structure system were conducted, using a basic lumped mass soil-structure model (lattice model), and strong correlation with the measured data was obtained. Furthermore, detailed simulation models were employed to investigate the effects of simultaneously induced vertical response and response of the adjacent turbine building on the lateral response of the reactor building. (author). 4 refs., 11 figs

  6. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) program: facility description report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, A.G.

    1984-09-01

    A new boiling water reactor safety test facility (FIST, Full Integral Simulation Test) is described. It will be used to investigate small breaks and operational transients and to tie results from such tests to earlier large-break test results determined in the TLTA. The new facility's full height and prototypical components constitute a major scaling improvement over earlier test facilities. A heated feedwater system, permitting steady-state operation, and a large increase in the number of measurements are other significant improvements. The program background is outlined and program objectives defined. The design basis is presented together with a detailed, complete description of the facility and measurements to be made. An extensive component scaling analysis and prediction of performance are presented

  7. Filter Media Tests Under Simulated Martian Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars will require the optimal utilization of planetary resources. One of its abundant resources is the Martian atmosphere that can be harvested through filtration and chemical processes that purify and separate it into its gaseous and elemental constituents. Effective filtration needs to be part of the suite of resource utilization technologies. A unique testing platform is being used which provides the relevant operational and instrumental capabilities to test articles under the proper simulated Martian conditions. A series of tests were conducted to assess the performance of filter media. Light sheet imaging of the particle flow provided a means of detecting and quantifying particle concentrations to determine capturing efficiencies. The media's efficiency was also evaluated by gravimetric means through a by-layer filter media configuration. These tests will help to establish techniques and methods for measuring capturing efficiency and arrestance of conventional fibrous filter media. This paper will describe initial test results on different filter media.

  8. Color film spectral properties test experiment for target simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyue; Ming, Xing; Fan, Da; Guo, Wenji

    2017-04-01

    In hardware-in-loop test of the aviation spectra camera, the liquid crystal light valve and digital micro-mirror device could not simulate the spectrum characteristics of the landmark. A test system frame was provided based on the color film for testing the spectra camera; and the spectrum characteristics of the color film was test in the paper. The result of the experiment shows that difference was existed between the landmark and the film spectrum curse. However, the spectrum curse peak should change according to the color, and the curse is similar with the standard color traps. So, if the quantity value of error between the landmark and the film was calibrated and the error could be compensated, the film could be utilized in the hardware-in-loop test for the aviation spectra camera.

  9. Simulation to Flight Test for a UAV Controls Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Mark A.; Logan, Michael J.; French, Michael L.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis, Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights, including a fully autonomous demonstration at the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) UAV Demo 2005. Simulations based on wind tunnel data are being used to further develop advanced controllers for implementation and flight test.

  10. Acceptance testing and quality assurance of Simulix evolution radiotherapy simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Ashutosh; Singh, Navin; Gurjar, Om Prakash; Bagdare, Priyusha

    2015-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy depends on precise treatment simulation and proper patient positioning. The simulator is a conventional radiographic and fluoroscopic system which emulates the geometrical positions of radiotherapy treatment unit. Hence, the acceptance tests and quality assurance (QA) of the simulator are important prior to its commissioning for the safe and precise clinical use. The verification of mechanical and optical readouts, field size, isocenter, optical and radiation field congruence were performed. The X-ray beam parameters were tested for kVp, mAs and consistency of radiation output. The flat panel detector performance was checked with respect to resolution, low contrast sensitivity (LCS), automatic dose rate control (ADRC), and gray image resolution (GIR). Gantry, table, and imaging system collision possibility was checked. Radiation survey around the room was also performed. The field size test for digital readout and on graph paper, the results of isocenter checkup for rotation of gantry, collimator, and couch, and the deviations observed in auto stop for various movements were found within the tolerance limits. Optical field and radiation field was found congruent. All the lasers were found aligned with the established isocenter. Maximum deviation for set and measured kV was found to be 3% in fluoro mode. The maximum deviation observed in mAs was 1.5% in 3-point as well as in 2-point film exposed mode. The X-ray output was found consistent. The results of tests for resolution, LCS, ADRC, and GIR of the flat panel detector were within tolerance limits. All the six safety interlocks were found working. Radiation level around the room was found within the acceptable limits. All the tests carried out were found within the tolerance limits. The data which has been taken in this study will provide basic support to the routine QA of the simulator. (author)

  11. Echo simulator with novel training and competency testing tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Florence H; Otto, Catherine M; Freeman, Rosario V

    2013-01-01

    We developed and validated an echo simulator with three novel tools that facilitate training and enable quantitative and objective measurement of psychomotor as well as cognitive skill. First, the trainee can see original patient images - not synthetic or simulated images - that morph in real time as the mock transducer is manipulated on the mannequin. Second, augmented reality is used for Visual Guidance, a tool that assists the trainee in scanning by displaying the target organ in 3-dimensions (3D) together with the location of the current view plane and the plane of the anatomically correct view. Third, we introduce Image Matching, a tool that leverages the aptitude of the human brain for recognizing similarities and differences to help trainees learn to perform visual assessment of ultrasound images. Psychomotor competence is measured in terms of the view plane angle error. The construct validity of the simulator for competency testing was established by demonstrating its ability to discriminate novices vs. experts.

  12. The Titan Sky Simulator ™ - Testing Prototype Balloons in Conditions Approximating those in Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nott, Julian

    This paper will describe practical work flying prototype balloons in the "The Titan Sky Simulator TM " in conditions approximating those found in Titan's atmosphere. Saturn's moon, Titan, is attracting intense scientific interest. This has led to wide interest in exploring it with Aerobots, balloons or airships. Their function would be similar to the Rovers exploring Mars, but instead of moving laboriously across the rough terrain on wheels, they would float freely from location to location. To design any balloon or airship it is essential to know the temperature of the lifting gas as this influences the volume of the gas, which in turn influences the lift. To determine this temperature it is necessary to know how heat is transferred between the craft and its surroundings. Heat transfer for existing balloons is well understood. However, Titan conditions are utterly different from those in which balloons have ever been flown, so heat transfer rates cannot currently be calculated. In particular, thermal radiation accounts for most heat transfer for existing balloons but over Titan heat transfer will be dominated by convection. To be able to make these fundamental calculations, it is necessary to get fundamental experimental data. This is being obtained by flying balloons in a Simulator filled with nitrogen gas at very low temperature, about 95° K / minus 180° C, typical of Titan's temperatures. Because the gas in the Simulator is so cold, operating at atmospheric pressure the density is close to that of Titan's atmosphere. "The Titan Sky Simulator TM " has an open interior approximately 4.5 meter tall and 2.5 meters square. It has already been operated at 95° K/-180° C. By the time of the Conference it is fully expected to have data to present from actual balloons flying at this temperature. Perhaps the most important purpose of this testing is to validate numerical [computational fluid dynamics] models being developed by Tim Colonius of Caltech. These numerical

  13. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad E.; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA Subassembly (MTSAS) was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort was testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon's EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. Lunar environment testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 Nomenclature loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This exceeded any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  14. Cyber-Physical Energy Systems Modeling, Test Specification, and Co-Simulation Based Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Meer, A. A.; Palensky, P.; Heussen, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The gradual deployment of intelligent and coordinated devices in the electrical power system needs careful investigation of the interactions between the various domains involved. Especially due to the coupling between ICT and power systems a holistic approach for testing and validating is required....... Taking existing (quasi-) standardised smart grid system and test specification methods as a starting point, we are developing a holistic testing and validation approach that allows a very flexible way of assessing the system level aspects by various types of experiments (including virtual, real......, and mixed lab settings). This paper describes the formal holistic test case specification method and applies it to a particular co-simulation experimental setup. The various building blocks of such a simulation (i.e., FMI, mosaik, domain-specific simulation federates) are covered in more detail...

  15. Distributed Sensor Network Software Development Testing through Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, Sean M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2003-12-01

    The distributed sensor network (DSN) presents a novel and highly complex computing platform with dif culties and opportunities that are just beginning to be explored. The potential of sensor networks extends from monitoring for threat reduction, to conducting instant and remote inventories, to ecological surveys. Developing and testing for robust and scalable applications is currently practiced almost exclusively in hardware. The Distributed Sensors Simulator (DSS) is an infrastructure that allows the user to debug and test software for DSNs independent of hardware constraints. The exibility of DSS allows developers and researchers to investigate topological, phenomenological, networking, robustness and scaling issues, to explore arbitrary algorithms for distributed sensors, and to defeat those algorithms through simulated failure. The user speci es the topology, the environment, the application, and any number of arbitrary failures; DSS provides the virtual environmental embedding.

  16. Test/score/report: Simulation techniques for automating the test process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Barbara H.; Sigman, Clayton B.; Koslosky, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A Test/Score/Report capability is currently being developed for the Transportable Payload Operations Control Center (TPOCC) Advanced Spacecraft Simulator (TASS) system which will automate testing of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) and Mission Operations Center (MOC) software in three areas: telemetry decommutation, spacecraft command processing, and spacecraft memory load and dump processing. Automated computer control of the acceptance test process is one of the primary goals of a test team. With the proper simulation tools and user interface, the task of acceptance testing, regression testing, and repeatability of specific test procedures of a ground data system can be a simpler task. Ideally, the goal for complete automation would be to plug the operational deliverable into the simulator, press the start button, execute the test procedure, accumulate and analyze the data, score the results, and report the results to the test team along with a go/no recommendation to the test team. In practice, this may not be possible because of inadequate test tools, pressures of schedules, limited resources, etc. Most tests are accomplished using a certain degree of automation and test procedures that are labor intensive. This paper discusses some simulation techniques that can improve the automation of the test process. The TASS system tests the POCC/MOC software and provides a score based on the test results. The TASS system displays statistics on the success of the POCC/MOC system processing in each of the three areas as well as event messages pertaining to the Test/Score/Report processing. The TASS system also provides formatted reports documenting each step performed during the tests and the results of each step. A prototype of the Test/Score/Report capability is available and currently being used to test some POCC/MOC software deliveries. When this capability is fully operational it should greatly reduce the time necessary

  17. A comparative study of accelerated tests to simulate atmospheric corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, Sergio Luiz de

    2000-01-01

    In this study, specimens coated with five organic coating systems were exposed to accelerated tests for periods up to 2000 hours, and also to weathering for two years and six months. The accelerated tests consisted of the salt spray test, according to ASTM B-117; Prohesion (ASTM G 85-98 annex 5A); Prohesion combined with cyclic exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation; 'Prohchuva' a test described by ASTM G 85-98 using a salt spray with composition that simulated the acid rain of Sao Paulo, but one thousand times more concentrated, and 'Prohchuva' combined with cyclic exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation. The coated specimens were exposed with and without incision to expose the substrate. The onset and progress of corrosion at and of the exposed metallic surface, besides coating degradation, were followed by visual observation, and photographs were taken. The coating systems were classified according to the extent of corrosion protection given to the substrate, using a method based on ASTM standards D-610, D-714, D-1654 and D-3359. The rankings of the coatings obtained from accelerated tests and weathering were compared and contrasted with classification of the same systems obtained from literature, for specimens exposed to an industrial atmosphere. Coating degradation was strongly dependent on the test, and could be attributed to differences in test conditions. The best correlation between accelerated test and weathering was found for the test Prohesion alternated with cycles of exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation. (author)

  18. Irradiation test plan of the simulated DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ki Kwang; Yang, M. S.; Kim, B. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    Simulated DUPIC fuel had been irradiated from Aug. 4, 1999 to Oct. 4 1999, in order to produce the data of its in-core behavior, to verify the design of DUPIC non-instrumented capsule developed, and to ensure the irradiation requirements of DUPIC fuel at HANARO. The welding process was certified for manufacturing the mini-element, and simulated DUPIC fuel rods were manufactured with simulated DUPIC pellets through examination and test. The non-instrumented capsule for a irradiation test of DUPIC fuel has been designed and manufactured referring to the design specification of the HANARO fuel. This is to be the design basis of the instrumented capsule under consideration. The verification experiment, whether the capsule loaded in the OR4 hole meet the HANARO requirements under the normal operation condition, as well as the structural analysis was carried out. The items for this experiment were the pressure drop test, vibration test, integrity test, et. al. It was noted that each experimental result meet the HANARO operational requirements. For the safety analysis of the DUPIC non-instrumented capsule loaded in the HANARO core, the nuclear/mechanical compatibility, thermodynamic compatibility, integrity analysis of the irradiation samples according to the reactor condition as well as the safety analysis of the HANARO were performed. Besides, the core reactivity effects were discussed during the irradiation test of the DUPIC capsule. The average power of each fuel rod in the DUPIC capsule was calculated, and maximal linear power reflecting the axial peaking power factor from the MCNP results was evaluated. From these calculation results, the HANARO core safety was evaluated. At the end of this report, similar overseas cases were introduced. 9 refs., 16 figs., 10 tabs. (Author)

  19. Parallel-Processing Test Bed For Simulation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blech, Richard; Cole, Gary; Townsend, Scott

    1996-01-01

    Second-generation Hypercluster computing system is multiprocessor test bed for research on parallel algorithms for simulation in fluid dynamics, electromagnetics, chemistry, and other fields with large computational requirements but relatively low input/output requirements. Built from standard, off-shelf hardware readily upgraded as improved technology becomes available. System used for experiments with such parallel-processing concepts as message-passing algorithms, debugging software tools, and computational steering. First-generation Hypercluster system described in "Hypercluster Parallel Processor" (LEW-15283).

  20. Prediction of wind energy distribution in complex terrain using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Chenqi; Yang, Jianchuan

    2013-01-01

    Based on linear models, WAsP software predicts wind energy distribution, with a good accuracy for flat terrain, but with a large error under complicated topography. In this paper, numerical simulations are carried out using the FLUENT software on a mesh generated by the GAMBIT and ARGIS software ...

  1. CALCULATION OF CHEMICAL ATMOSPHERE ESTIMATION GIVEN THE COMPLEX TERRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The 3D numerical model was used to simulate the toxic gas dispersion over a complex terrain after an accident spillage. The model is based on the K-gradient transport model and the model of potential flow. The results of numerical experiment are presented.

  2. Finite Element Simulation of Diametral Strength Test of Hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, Fahrettin; Toros, Serkan; Evis, Zafer

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the diametral strength test of sintered hydroxyapatite was simulated by the finite element software, ABAQUS/Standard. Stress distributions on diametral test sample were determined. The effect of sintering temperature on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite was studied. It was concluded that high sintering temperatures did not reduce the stress on hydroxyapatite. It had a negative effect on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite after 1300 deg. C. In addition to the porosity, other factors (sintering temperature, presence of phases and the degree of crystallinity) affect the diametral strength of the hydroxyapatite.

  3. Dynamic stack testing and HiL simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randolf, G. [GRandalytics, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The applications for fuel cell and stack deployment have changed rapidly over the years, from stationary backup supplies to highly dynamic automotive power systems. As a result, testing must keep up in order to ensure mature products of high quality. A new breed of stack test stations has been designed, based on a newly developed single cell, high dynamic hardware-in-the-loop (HiL) simulator in order to meet the growing demand of realistic fuel cell testing scenarios for aviation and automotive industries. The paper described and illustrated the test station architecture and outline of communication nodes. The paper also described the voltage monitor and presented schematics of voltage monitoring modules. The basic requirements of the architecture that were presented included low latency; flexible communication with simulation targets and other data input/output nodes; scalability to various stack sizes; and, safety and reliability. It was concluded that first tests with the voltage monitoring system not only confirmed the design, high throughput and signal quality, but also suggested another application, namely a stack impedance spectrometer for each individual cell. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  4. FEM simulation of static loading test of the Omega beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílý, Petr; Kohoutková, Alena; Jedlinský, Petr

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with a FEM simulation of static loading test of the Omega beam. Omega beam is a precast prestressed high-performance concrete element with the shape of Greek letter omega. Omega beam was designed as a self-supporting permanent formwork member for construction of girder bridges. FEM program ATENA Science was exploited for simulation of load-bearing test of the beam. The numerical model was calibrated using the data from both static loading test and tests of material properties. Comparison of load-displacement diagrams obtained from the experiment and the model was conducted. Development of cracks and crack patterns were compared. Very good agreement of experimental data and the FEM model was reached. The calibrated model can be used for design of optimized Omega beams in the future without the need of expensive loading tests. The calibrated material model can be also exploited in other types of FEM analyses of bridges constructed with the use of Omega beams, such as limit state analysis, optimization of shear connectors, prediction of long-term deflections or prediction of crack development.

  5. Creating a simulation model of software testing using Simulink package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Dubovoi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the solution model of software testing that allows prediction both the whole process and its specific stages is actual for IT-industry. The article focuses on solving this problem. The aim of the article is prediction the time and improvement the quality of software testing. The analysis of the software testing process shows that it can be attributed to the branched cyclic technological processes because it is cyclical with decision-making on control operations. The investigation uses authors' previous works andsoftware testing process method based on Markov model. The proposed method enables execution the prediction for each software module, which leads to better decision-making of each controlled suboperation of all processes. Simulink simulation model shows implementation and verification of results of proposed technique. Results of the research have practically implemented in the IT-industry.

  6. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulant) Thermodynamic Vent System Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low-gravity (space) environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leaks. During low-gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. A series of TVS tests was conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using liquid nitrogen (LN2) as a liquid oxygen (LO2) simulant. The tests were performed at tank til1 levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%, and with a specified tank pressure control band. A transient one-dimensional TVS performance program is used to analyze and correlate the test data for all three fill levels. Predictions and comparisons of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature with test data are presented.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of a mammographic test phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R. A.; Dance, D. R.; Pachoud, M.; Carlsson, G. A.; Sandborg, M.; Ullman, G.

    2005-01-01

    A test phantom, including a wide range of mammographic tissue equivalent materials and test details, was imaged on a digital mammographic system. In order to quantify the effect of scatter on the contrast obtained for the test details, calculations of the scatter-to-primary ratio (S/P) have been made using a Monte Carlo simulation of the digital mammographic imaging chain, grid and test phantom. The results show that the S/P values corresponding to the imaging conditions used were in the range 0.084-0.126. Calculated and measured pixel values in different regions of the image were compared as a validation of the model and showed excellent agreement. The results indicate the potential of Monte Carlo methods in the image quality-patient dose process optimisation, especially in the assessment of imaging conditions not available on standard mammographic units. (authors)

  8. Treinta y Tres stratigraphic terrain: ex Cuchilla Dionisio terrain. Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, J.

    2010-01-01

    From 1998 we are discussing if the eastern area of ZCSB is an allochtonous block named TCD or if it belongs to Dom Feliciano belt with an age of 500 - 700 Ma. This crustal block is difficult to study because Laguna Merin Graben cut it in two around 4000 k m2 crustal fragments distant s more de 100 km between them. Southern block which was named T PE by Masquelín (2006) was demonstrated as allochtonous by Bossi and Gaucher (2004) destroying the Cdf model but seriously complicating the stratigraphic terminology. It is proposed to do some changes in order to profit the general agreement about allochtomy. The CDT with change by Treinta y Tres terrane; T PE become sub - terrain Punta del Este; sub - terrain Cuchilla Dionisio for the septetrional block. From 1998 we are discussing if the eastern area of ZCSB is an allochtonous block named TCD or if it belongs to Dom Feliciano belt with an age of 500 - 700 Ma. This crustal block is difficult to study because Laguna Merín Graben cut it in two around 4000 k m2 crustal fragments distant s more de 100 km between them. Southern block which was named T PE by Masquelín (2006) was demonstrated as allochtonous by Bossi and Gaucher (2004) destroying the CDF model but seriously complicating the stratigraphic terminology. It is proposed to do some changes in order to profit the general agreement about allochtomy. The CDT with change by Treinta y Tres terrain; TPE become sub - terrain Punta del Este; sub - terrain Cuchilla Dionisio for the septetrional block

  9. Steel Fibers Reinforced Concrete Pipes - Experimental Tests and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doru, Zdrenghea

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents in the first part a state of the art review of reinforced concrete pipes used in micro tunnelling realised through pipes jacking method and design methods for steel fibres reinforced concrete. In part two experimental tests are presented on inner pipes with diameters of 1410mm and 2200mm, and specimens (100x100x500mm) of reinforced concrete with metal fibres (35 kg / m3). In part two experimental tests are presented on pipes with inner diameters of 1410mm and 2200mm, and specimens (100x100x500mm) of reinforced concrete with steel fibres (35 kg / m3). The results obtained are analysed and are calculated residual flexural tensile strengths which characterise the post-cracking behaviour of steel fibres reinforced concrete. In the third part are presented numerical simulations of the tests of pipes and specimens. The model adopted for the pipes test was a three-dimensional model and loads considered were those obtained in experimental tests at reaching breaking forces. Tensile stresses determined were compared with mean flexural tensile strength. To validate tensile parameters of steel fibres reinforced concrete, experimental tests of the specimens were modelled with MIDAS program to reproduce the flexural breaking behaviour. To simulate post - cracking behaviour was used the method σ — ε based on the relationship stress - strain, according to RILEM TC 162-TDF. For the specimens tested were plotted F — δ diagrams, which have been superimposed for comparison with the similar diagrams of experimental tests. The comparison of experimental results with those obtained from numerical simulation leads to the following conclusions: - the maximum forces obtained by numerical calculation have higher values than the experimental values for the same tensile stresses; - forces corresponding of residual strengths have very similar values between the experimental and numerical calculations; - generally the numerical model estimates a breaking force greater

  10. Simulation tests of plastic-packaged commercial SRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, O.A.; Nikiforov, A.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Laser and X-ray simulation test technique is developed adopted to plastic-packaged ICs. Dose rate and total dose test results are presented for two types of commercial RAMS. Dose rate and total dose test results were obtained for two types of commercial RAMS: AS7C256-20 256 K (32 K x 8) and MT5C1008W - 1 M (128 K x 8). The latch-up of AS7C256-20 was detected at dose rate 1.510 9 rad(Si)/s and of MT5C1008W - at dose rate 5.7-10 8 rad(Si)/s. The total dose failure thresholds were in the ranges of 55 to 90 krad(Si) for AS7C25620 and 40 to 328 krad for MT5C1008W depending on RAM operational mode under irradiation. The obtained simulation test results are in a good agreement with previously published for radiation installations. (authors)

  11. Potential countersample materials for in vitro simulation wear testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Adrian C; Hu, Xiao Q; Marquis, Peter M

    2002-05-01

    Any laboratory investigation of the wear resistance of dental materials needs to consider oral conditions so that in vitro wear results can be correlated with in vivo findings. The choice of the countersample is a critical factor in establishing the pattern of tribological wear and in achieving an efficient in vitro wear testing system. This research investigated the wear behavior and surface characteristics associated with three candidate countersample materials used for in vitro wear testing in order to identify a possible suitable substitute for human dental enamel. Three candidate materials, stainless steel, steatite and dental porcelain were evaluated and compared to human enamel. A variety of factors including hardness, wear surface evolution and frictional coefficients were considered, relative to the tribology of the in vivo situation. The results suggested that the dental porcelain investigated bore the closest similarity to human enamel of the materials investigated. Assessment of potential countersample materials should be based on the essential tribological simulation supported by investigations of mechanical, chemical and structural properties. The selected dental porcelain had the best simulating ability among the three selected countersample materials and this class of material may be considered as a possible countersample material for in vitro wear test purposes. Further studies are required, employing a wider range of dental ceramics, in order to optimise the choice of countersample material for standardized in vitro wear testing.

  12. Shear test on viscoelastic granular material using Contact Dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Juan Carlos; Sagnol, Loba; Chazallon, Cyrille

    2017-06-01

    By means of 3D contact dynamic simulations, the behavior of a viscoelastic granular material under shear loading is investigated. A viscoelastic fluid phase surrounding the solid particles is simulated by a contact model acting between them. This contact law was implemented in the LMGC90 software, based on the Burgers model. This model is able to simulate also the effect of creep relaxation. To validate the proposed contact model, several direct shear tests were performed, experimentally and numerically using the Leutner device. The numerical samples were created using spheres with two particle size distribution, each one identified for two layers from a road structure. Our results show a reasonable agreement between experimental and numerical data regarding the strain-stress evolution curves and the stress levels measured at failure. The proposed model can be used to simulate the mechanical behavior of multi-layer road structure and to study the influence of traffic on road deformation, cracking and particles pull-out induced by traffic loading.

  13. Transient productivity index for numerical well test simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, G.; Ding, D.Y.; Ene, A. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Pau (France)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The most difficult aspect of numerical simulation of well tests is the treatment of the Bottom Hole Flowing (BHF) Pressure. In full field simulations, this pressure is derived from the Well-block Pressure (WBP) using a numerical productivity index which accounts for the grid size and permeability, and for the well completion. This productivity index is calculated assuming a pseudo-steady state flow regime in the vicinity of the well and is therefore constant during the well production period. Such a pseudo-steady state assumption is no longer valid for the early time of a well test simulation as long as the pressure perturbation has not reached several grid-blocks around the well. This paper offers two different solutions to this problem: (1) The first one is based on the derivation of a Numerical Transient Productivity Index (NTPI) to be applied to Cartesian grids; (2) The second one is based on the use of a Corrected Transmissibility and Accumulation Term (CTAT) in the flow equation. The representation of the pressure behavior given by both solutions is far more accurate than the conventional one as shown by several validation examples which are presented in the following pages.

  14. Automatic terrain modeling using transfinite element analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan; Calo, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    An automatic procedure for modeling terrain is developed based on L2 projection-based interpolation of discrete terrain data onto transfinite function spaces. The function space is refined automatically by the use of image processing techniques

  15. Rain Simulation for the Test of Automotive Surround Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasirlioglu, Sinan; Riener, Andreas; Doric, Igor

    2017-04-01

    The WHO Global Health Observatory data indicates that over 1.25 million people die in traffic accidents annually. To save lives, car manufacturers spend lot of efforts on the development of novel safety systems aiming to avoid or mitigate accidents and provide maximum protection for vehicle occupants as well as vulnerable road users. All the safety features mainly rely on data from surround sensors such as radar, lidar and camera and intelligent vehicles today use these environmental data for instant decision making and vehicle control. As already small errors in sensor data measurements could lead to catastrophes like major injuries or road traffic fatalities, it is of utmost importance to ensure high reliability and accuracy of sensors and safety systems. This work focuses on the influence of environmental factors such as rain conditions, as it is known that rain drops scatter the electromagnetic waves. The result is incorrect measurements with a direct negative impact on environment detection. To identify potential problems of sensors under varying environmental conditions, systems are today tested in real-world settings with two main problems: First, tests are time-consuming and second, environmental conditions are not reproducible. Our approach to test the influence of weather on automotive sensors is to use an indoor rain simulator. Our artificial rain maker, installed at CARISSMA (Center of Automotive Research on Integrated Safety Systems and Measurement Area), is parametrized with rain characteristics measured in the field using a standard disdrometer. System behavior on artificial rain is compared and validated with natural rainfall. With this simulator it is finally possible to test environmental influence at various levels and under reproducible conditions. This saves lot of efforts required for the test process itself and furthermore has a positive impact on the reliability of sensor systems due to the fact that test driven development is enabled.

  16. Post irradiation test report of irradiated DUPIC simulated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Jung, I. H.; Moon, J. S. and others

    2001-12-01

    The post-irradiation examination of irradiated DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) simulated fuel in HANARO was performed at IMEF (Irradiated Material Examination Facility) in KAERI during 6 months from October 1999 to March 2000. The objectives of this post-irradiation test are i) the integrity of the capsule to be used for DUPIC fuel, ii) ensuring the irradiation requirements of DUPIC fuel at HANARO, iii) performance verification in-core behavior at HANARO of DUPIC simulated fuel, iv) establishing and improvement the data base for DUPIC fuel performance verification codes, and v) establishing the irradiation procedure in HANARO for DUPIC fuel. The post-irradiation examination performed are γ-scanning, profilometry, density, hardness, observation the microstructure and fission product distribution by optical microscope and electron probe microanalyser (EPMA)

  17. Simulation and test of 3D silicon radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleta, C.; Pennicard, D.; Bates, R.; Parkes, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Wright, V.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2007-01-01

    The work presented here is the result of the collaborative effort between the University of Glasgow, ITC-IRST (Trento) and IMB-CNM (Barcelona) in the framework of the CERN-RD50 Collaboration to produce 3D silicon radiation detectors and study their performance. This paper reports on two sets of 3D devices. IRST and CNM have fabricated a set of single-type column 3D detectors, which have columnar electrodes of the same doping type and an ohmic contact located at the backplane. Simulations of the device behaviour and electrical test results are presented. In particular, current-voltage, capacitance-voltage and charge collection efficiency measurements are reported. Other types of structures called double-sided 3D detectors are currently being fabricated at CNM. In these detectors the sets of n and p columns are made on opposite sides of the device. Electrical and technological simulations and first processing results are presented

  18. Note: Simulation and test of a strip source electron gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Munawar; Islam, G U; Misbah, I; Iqbal, O; Zhou, Z

    2014-06-01

    We present simulation and test of an indirectly heated strip source electron beam gun assembly using Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) electron beam trajectory program. The beam is now sharply focused with 3.04 mm diameter in the post anode region at 15.9 mm. The measured emission current and emission density were 1.12 A and 1.15 A/cm(2), respectively, that corresponds to power density of 11.5 kW/cm(2), at 10 kV acceleration potential. The simulated results were compared with then and now experiments and found in agreement. The gun is without any biasing, electrostatic and magnetic fields; hence simple and inexpensive. Moreover, it is now more powerful and is useful for accelerators technology due to high emission and low emittance parameters.

  19. Non-Integrated Standalone Tests of APR1400 Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Su Hyun; Lee, Jeong Ik; Hong, Soon Joon; Lee, Byung Chul; Seo, Jeong Gwan; Lee, Myung Soo

    2007-01-01

    APR1400 being developed for the construction of New Kori 3 and 4 Units has improved safety and more economical efficiency compared with previous PWR. The ESF(Engineered Safety Features) newly introduced to enhance safety are as follows: DVI (Direct Vessel Injection), Fluidic Device, IRWST (In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank). So the transient pattern of anticipated accidents will show different characteristics from previous PWR. There are multidimensional flow phenomena like as emergency core cooling coolant bypass discharge in the downcomer, downcomer boiling, and different safety injection characteristics due to fluidic device during LBLOCA. Also there is the phenomenon of critical flow due to the open of pressurizer POSRV (Pilot Operated Safety Relief valve) connected to IRWST and safety depressurization system and the prediction of discharge flow is very important. KEPRI is developing APR1400 simulator using RELAP-RT . RELAP-RT was developed by DS and S (Data systems and Solutions) based on RELAP5/MOD3.2. The improved features of RELAP-RT to function as a simulator are as follows: Add simulator functionality - Control by simulator executive - IC snap and reset capability - Back-track snap and reset capability - Fast time capability. Fast time capability(examples) - The rate of condensation has been limited. - Fictional choking model has been developed for internal junctions. - Wall heat transfer coefficients and heat fluxes has been limited. In this study, various NISTs (Non-Integrated Standalone Tests) were performed to verify the capability of RELAP-RT as APR1400 simulator by the comparison with RELAP5/MOD3.3

  20. Neutralizer Hollow Cathode Simulations and Comparisons with Ground Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Snyder, John S.; Goebel, Dan M.; Katz, Ira; Herman, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    The fidelity of electric propulsion physics-based models depends largely on the validity of their predictions over a range of operating conditions and geometries. In general, increased complexity of the physics requires more extensive comparisons with laboratory data to identify the region(s) that lie outside the validity of the model assumptions and to quantify the uncertainties within its range of application. This paper presents numerical simulations of neutralizer hollow cathodes at various operating conditions and orifice sizes. The simulations were performed using a two-dimensional axisymmetric model that solves numerically a relatively extensive system of conservation laws for the partially ionized gas in these devices. A summary of the comparisons between simulation results and Langmuir probe measurements is provided. The model has also been employed to provide insight into recent ground test observations of the neutralizer cathode in NEXT. It is found that a likely cause of the observed keeper voltage drop is cathode orifice erosion. However, due to the small magnitude of this change, is approx. 0.5 V (less than 5% of the beginning-of-life value) over 10 khrs, and in light of the large uncertainties of the cathode material sputtering yield at low ion energies, other causes cannot be excluded. Preliminary simulations to understand transition to plume mode suggest that in the range of 3-5 sccm the existing 2-D model reproduces fairly well the rise of the keeper voltage in the NEXT neutralizer as observed in the laboratory. At lower flow rates the simulation produces oscillations in the keeper current and voltage that require prohibitively small time-steps to resolve with the existing algorithms.

  1. Pre-flight physical simulation test of HIMES reentry test vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Yonemoto, Koichi; Hosokawa, Shigeru

    ISAS is now developing a small reentry test vehicle, which is 2m long with a 1.5m wing span and weighs about 170 kg, for the purpose of exploring high angle-of-attack aerodynamic attitude control issue in supersonic and hypersonic speed. The flight test, employing 'Rockoon' launch system, is planned as a preliminary design verification for a fully reusable winged rocket named HIMES (Highly Maneuverable Experimental Space) vehicle. This paper describes the results of preflight ground test using a motion table system. This ground system test is called 'physical simulation' aimed at: (1) functional verification of side-jet system, aerodynamic surface actuators, battery and onboard avionics; and (2) guidance and control law evaluation, in total hardware-in-the-loop system. The pressure of side-jet nozzles was measured to provide exact thrust characteristics of reaction control. The dynamics of vehicle motion was calculated in real-time by the ground simulation computer.

  2. Secondary Waste Simulant Development for Cast Stone Formulation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rinehart, Donald E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, David J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Mahoney, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) funded Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a waste form testing program to implement aspects of the Secondary Liquid Waste Treatment Cast Stone Technology Development Plan (Ashley 2012) and the Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap (PNNL 2009) related to the development and qualification of Cast Stone as a potential waste form for the solidification of aqueous wastes from the Hanford Site after the aqueous wastes are treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The current baseline is that the resultant Cast Stone (or grout) solid waste forms would be disposed at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Data and results of this testing program will be used in the upcoming performance assessment of the IDF and in the design and operation of a solidification treatment unit planned to be added to the ETF. The purpose of the work described in this report is to 1) develop simulants for the waste streams that are currently being fed and future WTP secondary waste streams also to be fed into the ETF and 2) prepare simulants to use for preparation of grout or Cast Stone solid waste forms for testing.

  3. Spectra of Velocity components over Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Larko, D.; Lipschut, R.

    1982-01-01

    : When air moves over terrain with changed characteristics, then (1) for wavelengths very short relative to the fetch over the new terrain, the spectral densities are in equilibrium with the new terrain. (1) for wavelengths long compared to this fetch, spectral densities remain unchanged if the ground...

  4. Design of a Realistic Test Simulator For a Built-In Self Test Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ahmad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a realistic test approach suitable to Design For Testability (DFT and Built- In Self Test (BIST environments. The approach is culminated in the form of a test simulator which is capable of providing a required goal of test for the System Under Test (SUT. The simulator uses the approach of fault diagnostics with fault grading procedure to provide the tests. The tool is developed on a common PC platform and hence no special software is required. Thereby, it is a low cost tool and hence economical. The tool is very much suitable for determining realistic test sequences for a targeted goal of testing for any SUT. The developed tool incorporates a flexible Graphical User Interface (GUI procedure and can be operated without any special programming skill. The tool is debugged and tested with the results of many bench mark circuits. Further, this developed tool can be utilized for educational purposes for many courses such as fault-tolerant computing, fault diagnosis, digital electronics, and safe - reliable - testable digital logic designs.

  5. Simulation of integral local tests with high-burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyori, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behaviour of nuclear fuel under LOCA conditions may strongly depend on the burnup-dependent fuel characteristics, as it has been indicated by recent integral experiments. Fuel fragmentation and the associated fission gas release can influence the integral fuel behaviour, the rod rupture and the radiological release. The TRANSURANUS fuel performance code is a proper tool for the consistent simulation of burnup-dependent phenomena during normal operation and the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod in a subsequent accident. The code has been extended with an empirical model for micro-cracking induced FGR and fuel fragmentation and verified against integral LOCA tests of international projects. (author)

  6. Radiological dispersal device outdoor simulation test: Cesium chloride particle characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Don, E-mail: lee.sangdon@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Snyder, Emily G.; Willis, Robert [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Fischer, Robert; Gates-Anderson, Dianne; Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Viani, Brian [Simbol Mining Corp., Pleasanton, CA 94566 (United States); Drake, John [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); MacKinney, John [U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC 20528 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Particles were generated from the detonation of simulated radiological dispersal devices (RDDs) using non-radioactive CsCl powder and explosive C4. The physical and chemical properties of the resulting particles were characterized. Two RDD simulation tests were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: one of the simulated RDDs was positioned 1 m above a steel plate and the other was partially buried in soil. Particles were collected with filters at a distance of 150 m from the origin of the RDD device, and particle mass concentrations were monitored to identify the particle plume intensity using real time particle samplers. Particles collected on filters were analyzed via computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (CCSEM/EDX) to determine their size distribution, morphology, and chemical constituents. This analysis showed that particles generated by the detonation of explosives can be associated with other materials (e.g., soil) that are in close proximity to the RDD device and that the morphology and chemical makeup of the particles change depending on the interactions of the RDD device with the surrounding materials.

  7. Radiological dispersal device outdoor simulation test: Cesium chloride particle characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Don; Snyder, Emily G.; Willis, Robert; Fischer, Robert; Gates-Anderson, Dianne; Sutton, Mark; Viani, Brian; Drake, John; MacKinney, John

    2010-01-01

    Particles were generated from the detonation of simulated radiological dispersal devices (RDDs) using non-radioactive CsCl powder and explosive C4. The physical and chemical properties of the resulting particles were characterized. Two RDD simulation tests were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: one of the simulated RDDs was positioned 1 m above a steel plate and the other was partially buried in soil. Particles were collected with filters at a distance of 150 m from the origin of the RDD device, and particle mass concentrations were monitored to identify the particle plume intensity using real time particle samplers. Particles collected on filters were analyzed via computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (CCSEM/EDX) to determine their size distribution, morphology, and chemical constituents. This analysis showed that particles generated by the detonation of explosives can be associated with other materials (e.g., soil) that are in close proximity to the RDD device and that the morphology and chemical makeup of the particles change depending on the interactions of the RDD device with the surrounding materials.

  8. Mechanical simulations of sandia II tests OECD ISP 48 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghavamian, Sh.; Courtois, A.; Valfort, J.-L.; Heinfling, G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper illustrates the work carried out by EDF within the framework of ISP48 post-test analysis of NUPEC/NRCN 1:4-scale model of a prestressed pressure containment vessel of a nuclear power plant. EDF as a participant of the International Standard Problem n degree 8 has performed several simulations to determine the ultimate response of the scale model. To determine the most influent parameter in such an analysis several studies were carried out. The mesh was built using a parametric tool to measure the influence of discretization on results. Different material laws of concrete were also used. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the ultimate behaviour of SANDIA II model obtained by Code-Asterwith comparison to tests records, and also to share the lessons learned from the parametric computations and precautions that must be taken. (authors)

  9. Altitude simulation facility for testing large space motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, U.; Lustig, J.; Cohen, Y.; Malkin, I.

    1993-02-01

    This work describes the design of an altitude simulation facility for testing the AKM motor installed in the 'Ofeq' satellite launcher. The facility, which is controlled by a computer, consists of a diffuser and a single-stage ejector fed with preheated air. The calculations of performance and dimensions of the gas extraction system were conducted according to a one-dimensional analysis. Tests were carried out on a small-scale model of the facility in order to examine the design concept, then the full-scale facility was constructed and operated. There was good agreement among the results obtained from the small-scale facility, from the full-scale facility, and from calculations.

  10. Computer simulation of the Charpy V-notch toughness test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, D.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic Charpy V-notch test was simulated on a computer. The calculational models (for A-533 Grade B class 1 steel) used both a rounded and a flat-tipped striker. The notch stress/strain state was found to be independent of the three-point loading type and was most strongly correlated with notch-opening displacement. The dynamic stress/strain state at the time of fracture initiation was obtained by comparing the calculated deformed shape with that obtained in interrupted Charpy V-notch tests where cracking had started. The calculation was also compared with stress/strain states calculated in other geometries at failure. The distribution and partition of specimen energy was calculated and adiabatic heating and strain rate are discussed

  11. Testing simulation and structural models with applications to energy demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Hendrik

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation deals with energy demand and consists of two parts. Part one proposes a unified econometric framework for modeling energy demand and examples illustrate the benefits of the technique by estimating the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital. Part two assesses the energy conservation policy of Daylight Saving Time and empirically tests the performance of electricity simulation. In particular, the chapter "Imposing Monotonicity and Curvature on Flexible Functional Forms" proposes an estimator for inference using structural models derived from economic theory. This is motivated by the fact that in many areas of economic analysis theory restricts the shape as well as other characteristics of functions used to represent economic constructs. Specific contributions are (a) to increase the computational speed and tractability of imposing regularity conditions, (b) to provide regularity preserving point estimates, (c) to avoid biases existent in previous applications, and (d) to illustrate the benefits of our approach via numerical simulation results. The chapter "Can We Close the Gap between the Empirical Model and Economic Theory" discusses the more fundamental question of whether the imposition of a particular theory to a dataset is justified. I propose a hypothesis test to examine whether the estimated empirical model is consistent with the assumed economic theory. Although the proposed methodology could be applied to a wide set of economic models, this is particularly relevant for estimating policy parameters that affect energy markets. This is demonstrated by estimating the Slutsky matrix and the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital, which are crucial parameters used in computable general equilibrium models analyzing energy demand and the impacts of environmental regulations. Using the Berndt and Wood dataset, I find that capital and energy are complements and that the data are significantly consistent with duality

  12. High Sodium Simulant Testing To Support SB8 Sludge Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, J. D.

    2012-01-01

    Scoping studies were completed for high sodium simulant SRAT/SME cycles to determine any impact to CPC processing. Two SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having sodium supernate concentration of 1.9M at 130% and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Both of these failed to meet DWPF processing objectives related to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Another set of SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having a sodium supernate concentration of 1.6M at 130%, 125%, 110%, and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Only the run at 110% met DWPF processing objectives. Neither simulant had a stoichiometric factor window of 30% between nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation. Based on the 2M-110 results it was anticipated that the 2.5M stoichiometric window for processing would likely be smaller than from 110-130%, since it appeared that it would be necessary to increase the KMA factor by at least 10% above the minimum calculated requirement to achieve nitrite destruction due to the high oxalate content. The 2.5M-130 run exceeded the DWPF hydrogen limits in both the SRAT and SME cycle. Therefore, testing of this wash endpoint was halted. This wash endpoint with this minimum acid requirement and mercury-noble metal concentration profile appears to be something DWPF should not process due to an overly narrow window of stoichiometry. The 2M case was potentially processable in DWPF, but modifications would likely be needed in DWPF such as occasionally accepting SRAT batches with undestroyed nitrite for further acid addition and reprocessing, running near the bottom of the as yet ill-defined window of allowable stoichiometric factors, potentially extending the SRAT cycle to burn off unreacted formic acid before transferring to the SME cycle, and eliminating formic acid additions in the frit slurry

  13. Test methods and load simulation at roller test stand; Pruefmethoden und Lastsimulation auf Rollenpruefstaenden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, Juergen [BMW AG, Muenchen (Germany); Koenig, Manfred [VISPIRON AG, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The development of vehicles is a time expensive process and requires a worldwide mobility, since the vehicles are tested for different environmental conditions, which only occur in specified regions and within predefined seasonal periods. To become independent of weather conditions and the local and seasonal variation, it is necessary to shift particular tests to a climatic wind tunnel. Although this offers an ideal environment for precise and reproducible results, many tests need to be performed in order to acquire knowledge about the differences between real road investigations and wind tunnel experiments. It is the work of Method developers to properly transfer specified road tests to the test facility such that comparable results are obtained. These details will be discussed in the first chapter. An important aspect, within this objective, is the realistic simulation of drive resistance on the road by dynamometers. Therefore the different forces, contributing to the drive resistance on the road, are determined in order to simulate the realistic load on the vehicle drive train by the electric drive units of the dynamometers. To increase the accuracy of the load simulation, a special feature has been added to the dyno-control. This feature includes the influence of air-density on the drive resistance at a given environmental temperature, pressure and humidity. (orig.)

  14. Test Plan for the Boiling Water Reactor Dry Cask Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The thermal performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are evaluated through detailed numerical analysis . These modeling efforts are completed by the vendor to demonstrate performance and regulatory compliance. The calculations are then independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the efficiency of internal conduction pathways and by increasing the internal convection through greater canister helium pressure. These same vertical, canistered cask systems rely on ventilation between the canister and the overpack to convect heat away from the canister to the environment for both above and below-ground configurations. While several testing programs have been previously conducted, these earlier validation attempts did not capture the effects of elevated helium pressures or accurately portray the external convection of above-ground and below-ground canistered dry cask systems. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern vertical, canistered dry cask systems. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above-ground and below-ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 deg C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the

  15. TREAT [Transient Reactor Test Facility] reactor control rod scram system simulations and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, C.W.; Stevens, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    Air cylinders moving heavy components (100 to 300 lbs) at high speeds (above 300 in/sec) present a formidable end-cushion-shock problem. With no speed control, the moving components can reach over 600 in/sec if the air cylinder has a 5 ft stroke. This paper presents an overview of a successful upgrade modification to an existing reactor control rod drive design using a computer model to simulate the modified system performance for system design analysis. This design uses a high speed air cylinder to rapidly insert control rods (278 lb moved 5 ft in less than 300 msec) to scram an air-cooled test reactor. Included is information about the computer models developed to simulate high-speed air cylinder operation and a unique new speed control and end cushion design. A patent application is pending with the US Patent ampersand Trade Mark Office for this system (DOE case number S-68,622). The evolution of the design, from computer simulations thru operational testing in a test stand (simulating in-reactor operating conditions) to installation and use in the reactor, is also described. 6 figs

  16. TopoSCALE v.1.0: downscaling gridded climate data in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiddes, J.; Gruber, S.

    2014-02-01

    Simulation of land surface processes is problematic in heterogeneous terrain due to the the high resolution required of model grids to capture strong lateral variability caused by, for example, topography, and the lack of accurate meteorological forcing data at the site or scale it is required. Gridded data products produced by atmospheric models can fill this gap, however, often not at an appropriate spatial resolution to drive land-surface simulations. In this study we describe a method that uses the well-resolved description of the atmospheric column provided by climate models, together with high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), to downscale coarse-grid climate variables to a fine-scale subgrid. The main aim of this approach is to provide high-resolution driving data for a land-surface model (LSM). The method makes use of an interpolation of pressure-level data according to topographic height of the subgrid. An elevation and topography correction is used to downscale short-wave radiation. Long-wave radiation is downscaled by deriving a cloud-component of all-sky emissivity at grid level and using downscaled temperature and relative humidity fields to describe variability with elevation. Precipitation is downscaled with a simple non-linear lapse and optionally disaggregated using a climatology approach. We test the method in comparison with unscaled grid-level data and a set of reference methods, against a large evaluation dataset (up to 210 stations per variable) in the Swiss Alps. We demonstrate that the method can be used to derive meteorological inputs in complex terrain, with most significant improvements (with respect to reference methods) seen in variables derived from pressure levels: air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and incoming long-wave radiation. This method may be of use in improving inputs to numerical simulations in heterogeneous and/or remote terrain, especially when statistical methods are not possible, due to lack of

  17. Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, J P; Easter, J R; Roth, E M [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Over the last year, Westinghouse engineers and operators from the Beznau nuclear power station (KKB), owned by the Nordostschweizerische Krafwerke AG of Baden, Switzerland, have been installing and testing the Westinghouse AWARE Alarm Management System in Beznau/SNUPPS operator training simulator, owned and operated by the Westinghouse Electric Corp., in Waltz Mill, PA, USA. The testing has focused primarily on validating the trigger logic data base and on familiarizing the utility`s training department with the operation of the system in a real-time environment. Some of the tests have included plant process scenarios in which the computerized Emergency Procedures were available and used through the COMPRO (COMputerized PROcedures) System in conjunction with the AWARE System. While the results to date are qualitative from the perspective of system performance and improvement in message presentation, the tests have generally confirmed the expectations of the design. There is a large reduction in the number of messages that the control room staff must deal with during major process abnormalities, yet at times of relative minor disturbances, some additional messages are available which add clarification, e.g., ``Pump Trouble`` messages. The ``flow`` of an abnormality as it progresses from one part of the plant`s processes to another is quite visible. Timing of the messages and the lack of message avalanching is proving to give the operators additional time to respond to messages. Generally, the anxiety level to ``do something`` immediately upon a reactor trip appears to be reduced. (author). 8 refs.

  18. Design and simulations for RFPI system test jig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshwani, Rajesh; Khole, Shailesh; Sujo, C.I.; Shukla, Hitesh; Afaash, M.; Bharade, Sandeep; Joshi, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    RFPI system for condition monitoring and protection of RF systems of LEHIPA has been designed. The intention of this system is to protect and monitor different high power RF components. The system consists of variety of analog and digital cards to process, acquire and monitor signals from RF sensors, photo multiplier tubes (PMT), field emission probes, photo sensors, etc. The system can also accept and process digital inputs or contacts and analog input signals from other subsystems, indicating their status. It comprises of analog signal processing electronics, condition monitoring, data acquisition and fault reporting features. Since RFPI system should process and take action within prescribed time limit, the testing of system is critical issue. In order to carry out stand-alone field testing of such elaborate electronic system, variety of carefully designed electronic test circuit with suitable rangeability is required. These include fast current sources, fast amplifiers, fast rectifiers, etc. This paper elaborates on specifications, design approach, circuit design and simulations for various circuits used in test jig

  19. Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, J.P.; Easter, J.R.; Roth, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Over the last year, Westinghouse engineers and operators from the Beznau nuclear power station (KKB), owned by the Nordostschweizerische Krafwerke AG of Baden, Switzerland, have been installing and testing the Westinghouse AWARE Alarm Management System in Beznau/SNUPPS operator training simulator, owned and operated by the Westinghouse Electric Corp., in Waltz Mill, PA, USA. The testing has focused primarily on validating the trigger logic data base and on familiarizing the utility's training department with the operation of the system in a real-time environment. Some of the tests have included plant process scenarios in which the computerized Emergency Procedures were available and used through the COMPRO (COMputerized PROcedures) System in conjunction with the AWARE System. While the results to date are qualitative from the perspective of system performance and improvement in message presentation, the tests have generally confirmed the expectations of the design. There is a large reduction in the number of messages that the control room staff must deal with during major process abnormalities, yet at times of relative minor disturbances, some additional messages are available which add clarification, e.g., ''Pump Trouble'' messages. The ''flow'' of an abnormality as it progresses from one part of the plant's processes to another is quite visible. Timing of the messages and the lack of message avalanching is proving to give the operators additional time to respond to messages. Generally, the anxiety level to ''do something'' immediately upon a reactor trip appears to be reduced. (author). 8 refs

  20. Declarative Terrain Modeling for Military Training Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben M. Smelik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Military training instructors increasingly often employ computer games to train soldiers in all sorts of skills and tactics. One of the difficulties instructors face when using games as a training tool is the creation of suitable content, including scenarios, entities, and corresponding terrain models. Terrain plays a key role in many military training games, as for example, in our case game Tactical Air Defense. However, current manual terrain editors are both too complex and too time-consuming to be useful for instructors; automatic terrain generation methods show a lot of potential, but still lack user control and intuitive editing capabilities. We present a novel way for instructors to model terrain for their training games: instead of constructing a terrain model using complex modeling tools, instructors can declare the required properties of their terrain using an advanced sketching interface. Our framework integrates terrain generation methods and manages dependencies between terrain features in order to automatically create a complete 3D terrain model that matches the sketch. With our framework, instructors can easily design a large variety of terrain models that meet their training requirements.

  1. Sculpting Mountains: Interactive Terrain Modeling Based on Subsurface Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordonnier, Guillaume; Cani, Marie-Paule; Benes, Bedrich; Braun, Jean; Galin, Eric

    2018-05-01

    Most mountain ranges are formed by the compression and folding of colliding tectonic plates. Subduction of one plate causes large-scale asymmetry while their layered composition (or stratigraphy) explains the multi-scale folded strata observed on real terrains. We introduce a novel interactive modeling technique to generate visually plausible, large scale terrains that capture these phenomena. Our method draws on both geological knowledge for consistency and on sculpting systems for user interaction. The user is provided hands-on control on the shape and motion of tectonic plates, represented using a new geologically-inspired model for the Earth crust. The model captures their volume preserving and complex folding behaviors under collision, causing mountains to grow. It generates a volumetric uplift map representing the growth rate of subsurface layers. Erosion and uplift movement are jointly simulated to generate the terrain. The stratigraphy allows us to render folded strata on eroded cliffs. We validated the usability of our sculpting interface through a user study, and compare the visual consistency of the earth crust model with geological simulation results and real terrains.

  2. Conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Bingöl

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Conically scanning lidars assume the flow to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying a risk that the lidar will derive an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured by collocating a meteorological mast and a lidar at two Greek sites, one hilly and one mountainous. The maximum error for the sites investigated is of the order of 10 %. In order to predict the error for various wind directions the flows at both sites are simulated with the linearized flow model, WAsP Engineering 2.0. The measurement data are compared with the model predictions with good results for the hilly site, but with less success at the mountainous site. This is a deficiency of the flow model, but the methods presented in this paper can be used with any flow model.

  3. RIA simulation tests using driver tube for ATF cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, N. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, R. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, K. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) is a potential failure mechanism for accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding candidates during a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA). This report summarizes Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 research activities that were undertaken to evaluate the PCMI-like hoop-strain-driven mechanical response of ATF cladding candidates. To achieve various RIA-like conditions, a modified-burst test (MBT) device was developed to produce different mechanical pulses. The calibration of the MBT instrument was accomplished by performing mechanical tests on unirradiated Generation-I iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloy samples. Shakedown tests were also conducted in both FY 2016 and FY 2017 using unirradiated hydrided ZIRLO™ tube samples. This milestone report focuses on testing of ATF materials, but the benchmark tests with hydrided ZIRLO™ tube samples are documented in a recent journal article.a For the calibration and benchmark tests, the hoop strain was monitored using strain gauges attached to the sample surface in the hoop direction. A novel digital image correlation (DIC) system composed of a single high-speed camera and an array of six mirrors was developed for the MBT instrument to better resolve the failure behavior of samples and to provide useful data for validation of high-fidelity modeling and simulation tools. The DIC system enable a 360° view of a sample’s outer surface. This feature was added to the instrument to determine the precise failure location on a sample’s surface for strain predictions. The DIC system was tested on several silicon carbide fiber/silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite tube samples at various pressurization rates of the driver tube (which correspond to the strain rates for the samples). The hoop strains for various loading conditions were determined for the SiC/SiC composite tube samples. Future work is planned to enhance understanding of the failure behavior of the ATF cladding candidates of age

  4. Terrain Mapping and Obstacle Detection Using Gaussian Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten; Massaro, Alessandro Salvatore; Bayramoglu, Enis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a probabilistic method for extracting terrain maps from a scene and use the information to detect potential navigation obstacles within it. The method uses Gaussian process regression (GPR) to predict an estimate function and its relative uncertainty. To test the new...... show that the estimated maps follow the terrain shape, while protrusions are identified and may be isolated as potential obstacles. Representing the data with a covariance function allows a dramatic reduction of the amount of data to process, while maintaining the statistical properties of the measured...... and interpolated features....

  5. Landing Control of Foot with Springs for Walking Robots on Rough Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyuru Yamada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Landing control is one of the important issues for biped walking robot, because robots are expected to walk on not only known flat surfaces but also unknown and uneven terrain for working at various fields. This paper presents a new controller design for a robotic foot to land on unknown terrain. The robotic foot considered in this study equips springs to reduce the impact force at the foot landing. There are two objectives in the landing control; achieving the desired ground reaction force and positioning the foot on unknown terrain. To achieve these two objectives simultaneously by adjusting the foot position, we propose a PI force controller with a desired foot position, which guarantees the robust stability of control system with respect to terrain variance, and exact positioning of the foot to unknown terrain. Simulation results using the Open Dynamics Engine demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  6. Liquid Nitrogen (Oxygen Simulent) Thermodynamic Venting System Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Tucker, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    In designing systems for the long-term storage of cryogens in low gravity space environments, one must consider the effects of thermal stratification on excessive tank pressure that will occur due to environmental heat leakage. During low gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) concept is expected to maintain tank pressure without propellant resettling. The TVS consists of a recirculation pump, Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion valve, and a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger combined with a longitudinal spray bar. Using a small amount of liquid extracted by the pump and passing it though the J-T valve, then through the heat exchanger, the bulk liquid and ullage are cooled, resulting in lower tank pressure. A series of TVS tests were conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using liquid nitrogen as a liquid oxygen simulant. The tests were performed at fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25% with gaseous nitrogen and helium pressurants, and with a tank pressure control band of 7 kPa. A transient one-dimensional model of the TVS is used to analyze the data. The code is comprised of four models for the heat exchanger, the spray manifold and injector tubes, the recirculation pump, and the tank. The TVS model predicted ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature are compared with data. Details of predictions and comparisons with test data regarding pressure rise and collapse rates will be presented in the final paper.

  7. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

    2002-01-01

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts

  8. Performance simulations of catalytic converters during the Federal Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, H.; Shamim, T.; Sengupta, S.; Son, S.; Adamczyk, A.A.

    1999-07-01

    A numerical study is carried out to predict the tailpipe emissions and emission conversion efficiencies of unburned hydrocarbon, nitrogen oxide and carbon monoxide flowing through a catalytic converter during the Federal Test Procedure (FTP). The model considers the effect of heat transfer in the catalytic converter, coupled with catalyst chemical kinetics, including an oxygen storage mechanism. The resulting governing equations based on the conservation of mass and energy are solved by a tridiagonal matrix algorithm (TDMA) with a successive line under relaxation method. The numerical scheme for this non-linear problem is found to have good convergence efficiency. The simulation for the complete FTP cycle is accomplished in less than fifteen minutes on a desktop personal computer. A 13-step reaction mechanism plus a nine-step O{sub 2} storage mechanism is used to simulate the chemical kinetics. The energy equations include the heat loss due to conduction and convection plus the energy liberated by chemical reactions. The effect of radiation is assumed to be negligible and is not considered. The results of the numerical model for both the instantaneous and accumulated emissions are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. The conversion efficiencies of HC, CO and NO as predicted by the model are found to be within 5% of those dynamic measurements, and calculated results of accumulated HC, CO and NO{sub x} are in fair agreement with experimental measurements. The transient measurements are also used to check the robustness of the numerical model. The model is found to be robust and hence can simulate various operating conditions of engine output to the converter.

  9. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

    2002-05-21

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts

  10. Parallelization of ultrasonic field simulations for non destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The Non Destructive Testing field increasingly uses simulation. It is used at every step of the whole control process of an industrial part, from speeding up control development to helping experts understand results. During this thesis, a fast ultrasonic field simulation tool dedicated to the computation of an ultrasonic field radiated by a phase array probe in an isotropic specimen has been developed. During this thesis, a simulation tool dedicated to the fast computation of an ultrasonic field radiated by a phased array probe in an isotropic specimen has been developed. Its performance enables an interactive usage. To benefit from the commonly available parallel architectures, a regular model (aimed at removing divergent branching) derived from the generic CIVA model has been developed. First, a reference implementation was developed to validate this model against CIVA results, and to analyze its performance behaviour before optimization. The resulting code has been optimized for three kinds of parallel architectures commonly available in workstations: general purpose processors (GPP), many-core co-processors (Intel MIC) and graphics processing units (nVidia GPU). On the GPP and the MIC, the algorithm was reorganized and implemented to benefit from both parallelism levels, multithreading and vector instructions. On the GPU, the multiple steps of field computing have been divided in multiple successive CUDA kernels. Moreover, libraries dedicated to each architecture were used to speedup Fast Fourier Transforms, Intel MKL on GPP and MIC and nVidia cuFFT on GPU. Performance and hardware adequation of the produced codes were thoroughly studied for each architecture. On multiple realistic control configurations, interactive performance was reached. Perspectives to address more complex configurations were drawn. Finally, the integration and the industrialization of this code in the commercial NDT platform CIVA is discussed. (author) [fr

  11. Short-duration Electron Precipitation Studied by Test Particle Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaejin Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy spectra of electron microbursts from 170 keV to 340 keV have been measured by the solid-state detectors aboard the low-altitude (680 km polar-orbiting Korean STSAT-1 (Science and Technology SATellite. These measurements have revealed two important characteristics unique to the microbursts: (1 They are produced by a fast-loss cone-filling process in which the interaction time for pitch-angle scattering is less than 50 ms and (2 The e-folding energy of the perpendicular component is larger than that of the parallel component, and the loss cone is not completely filled by electrons. To understand how wave-particle interactions could generate microbursts, we performed a test particle simulation and investigated how the waves scattered electron pitch angles within the timescale required for microburst precipitation. The application of rising-frequency whistler-mode waves to electrons of different energies moving in a dipole magnetic field showed that chorus magnetic wave fields, rather than electric fields, were the main cause of microburst events, which implied that microbursts could be produced by a quasi-adiabatic process. In addition, the simulation results showed that high-energy electrons could resonate with chorus waves at high magnetic latitudes where the loss cone was larger, which might explain the decreased e-folding energy of precipitated microbursts compared to that of trapped electrons.

  12. SPACE code simulation of ATLAS DVI line break accident test (SB DVI 08 Test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Gyu [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    APR1400 has adopted new safety design features which are 4 mechanically independent DVI (Direct Vessel Injection) systems and fluidic device in the safety injection tanks (SITs). Hence, DVI line break accident has to be evaluated as one of the small break LOCA (SBLOCA) to ensure the safety of APR1400. KAERI has been performed for DVI line break test (SB DVI 08) using ATLAS (Advanced Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) facility which is an integral effect test facility for APR1400. The test result shows that the core collapsed water level decreased before a loop seal clearance, so that a core uncover occurred. At this time, the peak cladding temperature (PCT) is rapidly increased even though the emergency core cooling (ECC) water is injected from safety injection pump (SIP). This test result is useful for supporting safety analysis using thermal hydraulic safety analysis code and increases the understanding of SBLOCA phenomena in APR1400. The SBLOCA evaluation methodology for APR1400 is now being developed using SPACE code. The object of the development of this methodology is to set up a conservative evaluation methodology in accordance with appendix K of 10 CFR 50. ATLAS SB DVI 08 test is selected for the evaluation of SBLOCA methodology using SPACE code. Before applying the conservative models and correlations, benchmark calculation of the test is performed with the best estimate models and correlations to verify SPACE code capability. This paper deals with benchmark calculations results of ATLAS SB DVI 08 test. Calculation results of the major hydraulics variables are compared with measured data. Finally, this paper carries out the SPACE code performances for simulating the integral effect test of SBLOCA.

  13. A Practical Guide To Solar Array Simulation And PCDU Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Noah; Carroll, Greg; Clegg, Russell

    2011-10-01

    Solar arrays consisting of multiple photovoltaic segments provide power to satellites and charge internal batteries for use during eclipse. Solar arrays have unique I-V characteristics and output power which vary with environmental and operational conditions such as temperature, irradiance, spin, and eclipse. Therefore, specialty power solutions are needed to properly test the satellite on the ground, especially the Power Control and Distribution Unit (PCDU) and the Array Power Regulator (APR.) This paper explores some practical and theoretical considerations that should be taken into account when choosing a commercial, off-the-shelf solar array simulator (SAS) for verification of the satellite PCDU. An SAS is a unique power supply with I-V output characteristics that emulate the solar arrays used to power a satellite. It is important to think about the strengths and the limitations of this emulation capability, how closely the SAS approximates a real solar panel, and how best to design a system using SAS as components.

  14. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Walter S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Working on the ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations) project I have had the opportunity to add functionality to the physics simulation software known as KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), create a new application allowing WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) creation of KATE schematic files and begin a preliminary design and implementation of a new subsystem that will provide vision services on the IHM (Integrated Health Management) bus. The functionality I added to KATE over the past few months includes a dynamic visual representation of the fluid height in a pipe based on number of gallons of fluid in the pipe and implementing the IHM bus connection within KATE. I also fixed a broken feature in the system called the Browser Display, implemented many bug fixes and made changes to the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

  15. Experiments and simulation of split Hopkinson Bar tests on sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, P D; Gould, P J; Wood, A D; Tyas, A

    2014-01-01

    Static triaxial cell data and Split Hopkinson Bar data has been generated for well controlled dry and wet sand under confined and unconfined conditions. This has demonstrated that the dry sand is rate independent in its behaviour, whereas the wet sand exhibits a strain rate dependency in its behaviour. Simulations have been performed with the Lagrangian hydrocode DYNA using a Porter-Gould equation of state (EOS) and Johnson-Holmquist type constitutive model. Comparison with the raw strain gauge data is qualitatively reasonable, although some of the details of the trace are not reproduced. Sensitivity studies have also been performed, which has demonstrated some deficiencies in the constitutive model, relating to wave-speed and definition of moduli in a granular material. This has given some insights into how the constitutive model should be improved and which future experimental tests will be required.

  16. Simulated HLLW compositions for cold test of waste management development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banba, Tsunetaka; Kimura, Hideo; Kamizono, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Shingo

    1982-07-01

    Three grades of simulated high-level liquid waste (HLLW)-JW-A, JW-B, and JW-C - were proposed to be used respectively according to stages of various cold tests for safety assessment of HLW management. The composition of HLLW was estimated taking into account the spectrum of fission products and actinides, waste volume, corrosion products, and chemical additives. One of conditions, the spectrum of fission products and actinides of LWR spent fuels, was calculated by DCHAIN-code. Fuel burn-up of 28,000 MWD/tUO 2 and 33,000 MWD/tUO 2 were adopted as normal and maximum values of Japanese LWR power plants. The other conditions were estimated using the data obtained at Marcoule plant in France. (author)

  17. Constraining the Surface Energy Balance of Snow in Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapo, Karl E.

    values and coupled land-atmosphere models have difficulty representing these processes. We developed a new method analyzing turbulent fluxes at the land surface that relies on using the observed surface temperature, which we called the offline turbulence method. We used this method to test a number of stability schemes as they are implemented within land models. Stability schemes can cause small biases in the simulated sensible heat flux, but these are caused by compensating errors, as no single method was able to accurately reproduce the observed distribution of the sensible heat flux. We described how these turbulence schemes perform within different turbulence regimes, particularly noting the difficulty representing turbulence during conditions with faster wind speeds and the transition between weak and strong wind turbulence regimes. Heterogeneity in the horizontal distribution of surface temperature associated with different land surface types likely explains some of the missing physics within land models and is manifested as counter-gradient fluxes in observations. The coupling of land and atmospheric models needs further attention, as we highlight processes that are missing. Expanding on the utility of surface temperature, Ts, in model evaluations, we demonstrated the utility of using surface temperature in snow models evaluations. Ts is the diagnostic variable of the modeled surface energy balance within physically-based models and is an ideal supplement to traditional evaluation techniques. We demonstrated how modeling decisions affect Ts, specifically testing the impact of vertical layer structure, thermal conductivity, and stability corrections in addition to the effect of uncertainty in forcing data on simulated Ts. The internal modeling decisions had minimal impacts relative to uncertainty in the forcing data. Uncertainty in downwelling longwave was found to have the largest impact on simulated Ts. Using Ts, we demonstrated how various errors in the forcing

  18. ''Football'' test coil: a simulated service test of internally-cooled, cabled superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, P.G.; Iwasa, Y.; Thome, R.J.; Hoenig, M.O.

    1981-01-01

    Internally-cooled, cabled superconductor, (ICCS), appears from small-scale tests to be a viable alternative to pool-boiling cooled superconductors for large superconducting magnets. Potential advantages may include savings in helium inventory, smaller structure and ease of fabrication. Questions remain, however, about the structural performance of these systems. The ''football'' test coil has been designed to simulate the actual ''field-current-stress-thermal'' operating conditions of a 25 ka ICCS in a commercial scale MHD magnet. The test procedure will permit demonstration of the 20 year cyclic life of such a magnet in less than 20 days. This paper describes the design, construction and test of that coil which is wound of copper-stabilized niobium-titanium cable in steel conduit. 2 refs

  19. Development, simulation and testing of structural materials for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laesser, R.; Baluc, N.; Boutard, J.-L.; Diegele, E.; Gasparotto, M.; Riccardi, B.; Dudarev, S.; Moeslang, A.; Pippan, R.; Schaaf, B. van der

    2006-01-01

    up to 40 dpa/fpy in a limited volume. Recent advances in multiscale materials modelling have significantly improved the understanding of the processes leading from the atomistic defects to the changes of macroscopic properties. In future modelling will become an important tool for correlating experimental results achieved under different irradiation conditions (material testing reactors, fast reactors, accelerators, etc.), optimisation of the IFMIF test matrix and extrapolation to DEMO relevant operation parameters. This paper will describe the most promising structural materials with focus on Eurofer, present recently obtained results, simulations and testing, and will also address open material aspects on the path to DEMO. (author)

  20. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel, E-mail: teodor.chelaru@upb.ro [University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest - Research Center for Aeronautics and Space, Str. Ghe Polizu, nr. 1, Bucharest, Sector 1 (Romania); Cristian, Barbu, E-mail: barbucr@mta.ro [Military Technical Academy, Romania, B-dul. George Coşbuc, nr. 81-83, Bucharest, Sector 5 (Romania); Chelaru, Adrian, E-mail: achelaru@incas.ro [INCAS -National Institute for Aerospace Research Elie Carafoli, B-dul Iuliu Maniu 220, 061126, Bucharest, Sector 6 (Romania)

    2014-12-10

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project 'Suborbital Launcher for Testing' (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital

  1. Are Titan's radial Labyrinth terrains surface expressions of large laccoliths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurmeier, L.; Dombard, A. J.; Malaska, M.; Radebaugh, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Labyrinth terrain unit may be the one of the best examples of the surface expression of Titan's complicated history. They are characterized as highly eroded, dissected, and elevated plateaus and remnant ridges, with an assumed composition that is likely organic-rich based on radar emissivity. How these features accumulated organic-rich sediments and formed topographic highs by either locally uplifting or surviving pervasive regional deflation or erosion is an important question for understanding the history of Titan. There are several subsets of Labyrinth terrains, presumably with differing evolutionary histories and formation processes. We aim to explain the formation of a subset of Labyrinth terrain units informally referred to as "radial Labyrinth terrains." They are elevated and appear dome-like, circular in planform, have a strong radial dissection pattern, are bordered by Undifferentiated Plains units, and are found in the mid-latitudes. Based on their shape, clustering, and dimensions, we suggest that they may be the surface expression of large subsurface laccoliths. A recent study by Manga and Michaut (Icarus, 2017) explained Europa's lenticulae (pits, domes, spots) with the formation of saucer-shaped sills that form laccoliths around the brittle-ductile transition depth within the ice shell (1-5 km). Here, we apply the same scaling relationships and find that the larger size of radial labyrinth terrains with Titan's higher gravity implies deeper intrusion depths of around 20-40 km. This intrusion depth matches the expected brittle-ductile transition on Titan based on our finite element simulations and yield strength envelope analyses. We hypothesize that Titan's radial labyrinth terrains formed as cryovolcanic (water) intrusions that rose to the brittle-ductile transition within the ice shell where they spread horizontally, and uplifted the overlying ice. The organic-rich sedimentary cover also uplifted, becoming more susceptible to pluvial and fluvial

  2. Annex 1: Simulation of the Serso underground heat storage - Calibration using data from two-years measurements; Annexe 1: simulation du stockage de chaleur dans le terrain de l'installation Serso et calibrage sur deux ans de mesure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahud, D.

    2006-12-15

    This is the Annex 1 of the annual report 2006 of the Serso project. The basic idea of the Serso project is to defrost a road bridge in winter with heat produced by the bridge in summer by solar radiation absorption and stored in a diffusive underground store. Pipes are imbedded in the bridge surface material and connected to a set of underground borehole heat exchangers ('geothermal probes'). A heat transfer fluid is circulated by a pump. The store is loaded in summer and discharged in winter. In the present Annex the computer code developed to simulate the underground heat store is validated and tuned on the basis of a two-years series of field measurements. The agreement between predicted and measured values is good. A limitation of the computer model is that it cannot simulate only a part of the borehole heat exchangers, a feature that were implemented in the pilot store, to enable discharging the peripheral heat exchangers and leave the central ones untouched. The authors investigated the relevance of such a feature and found out that it does not significantly improve the store efficiency. As it is an additional hardware complication they recommend to ignore such a feature in future projects.

  3. Airflow Patterns In Nuclear Workplace - Computer Simulation And Qualitative Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haim, M.; Szanto, M.; Weiss, Y.; Kravchick, T.; Levinson, S.; German, U.

    1999-01-01

    Concentration of airborne radioactive materials inside a room can vary widely from one location to another, sometimes by orders of magnitude even for locations that are relatively close. Inappropriately placed samplers can give misleading results and. therefore, the location of air samplers is important. Proper placement of samplers cannot be determined simply by observing the position of room air supply and exhaust vents. Airflow studies, such as the release of smoke aerosols, should be used. The significance of airflow pattern studies depends on the purpose of sampling - for estimating worker intakes, warning of high concentrations. defacing airborne radioactive areas, testing for confinement of sealed radioactive materials. etc. When sampling air in rooms with complex airflow patterns, it may be useful to use qualitative airflow studies with smoke tubes, smoke candles or isostatic bubbles. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Regulatory Guide 8.25 [1]. suggests that an airflow study should be conducted after any changes at work area including changes in the setup of work areas, ventilation system changes, etc. The present work presents an airflow patterns study conducted in a typical room using two methods: a computer simulation and a qualitative test using a smoke tube

  4. Numerical simulation of impact tests on reinforced concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Xiaowo; He, Shuanhai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Predictions using advanced concrete model compare well with the impact test results. ► Several important behavior of concrete is discussed. ► Two mesh ways incorporating rebar into concrete mesh is also discussed. ► Gives a example of using EPDC model and references to develop new constitutive models. -- Abstract: This paper focuses on numerical simulation of impact tests of reinforced concrete (RC) beams by the LS-DYNA finite element (FE) code. In the FE model, the elasto-plastic damage cap (EPDC) model, which is based on continuum damage mechanics in combination with plasticity theory, is used for concrete, and the reinforcement is assumed to be elasto-plastic. The numerical results compares well with the experimental values reported in the literature, in terms of impact force history, mid-span deflection history and crack patterns of RC beams. By comparing the numerical and experimental results, several important behavior of concrete material is investigated, which includes: damage variable to describe the strain softening section of stress–strain curve; the cap surface to describe the plastic volume change; the shape of the meridian and deviatoric plane to describe the yield surface as well as two methods of incorporating rebar into concrete mesh. This study gives a good example of using EPDC model and can be utilized for the development new constitutive models for concrete in future.

  5. Thermal System Upgrade of the Space Environment Simulation Test Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ashok B.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the refurbishing and upgrade of the thermal system for the existing thermal vacuum test facility, the Space Environment Simulator, at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The chamber is the largest such facility at the center. This upgrade is the third phase of the long range upgrade of the chamber that has been underway for last few years. The first phase dealt with its vacuum system, the second phase involved the GHe subsystem. The paper describes the considerations of design philosophy options for the thermal system; approaches taken and methodology applied, in the evaluation of the remaining "life" in the chamber shrouds and related equipment by conducting special tests and studies; feasibility and extent of automation, using computer interfaces and Programmable Logic Controllers in the control system and finally, matching the old components to the new ones into an integrated, highly reliable and cost effective thermal system for the facility. This is a multi-year project just started and the paper deals mainly with the plans and approaches to implement the project successfully within schedule and costs.

  6. Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

    1997-11-01

    For environmental remediation, management of nuclear waste disposal, or geothermal reservoir engineering, it is very important to evaluate the permeabilities, spacing, and sizes of the subsurface fractures which control ground water flow. Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes an aperture of cluster of fracture elements, which are chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures, to improve the match to observed pressure transients. The size of the clusters is held constant throughout the iterations. Sensitivity studies using simple fracture models with eight wells show that, in general, it is necessary to conduct interference tests using at least three different wells as pumping well in order to reconstruct the fracture network with a transmissivity contrast of one order of magnitude, particularly when the cluster size is not known a priori. Because hydraulic inversion is inherently non-unique, it is important to utilize additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimum cluster size (and its shape) to enhance the reliability and convergence of the inversion. It appears that the cluster size corresponding to about 20--40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and the practical range of spatial correlation is evaluated to be about 5--10 m from the optimal cluster size in the inversion

  7. Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

    1997-11-01

    For environmental remediation, management of nuclear waste disposal, or geothermal reservoir engineering, it is very important to evaluate the permeabilities, spacing, and sizes of the subsurface fractures which control ground water flow. Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes an aperture of cluster of fracture elements, which are chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures, to improve the match to observed pressure transients. The size of the clusters is held constant throughout the iterations. Sensitivity studies using simple fracture models with eight wells show that, in general, it is necessary to conduct interference tests using at least three different wells as pumping well in order to reconstruct the fracture network with a transmissivity contrast of one order of magnitude, particularly when the cluster size is not known a priori. Because hydraulic inversion is inherently non-unique, it is important to utilize additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimum cluster size (and its shape) to enhance the reliability and convergence of the inversion. It appears that the cluster size corresponding to about 20--40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and the practical range of spatial correlation is evaluated to be about 5--10 m from the optimal cluster size in the inversion.

  8. Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat

    software WAsP Engineering 2.0 and was well predicted except for some sectors where the terrain is particularly steep. Subsequently, two experiments were performed in forested areas; where the measurements are recorded at a location deep-in forest and at the forest edge. Both sites were modelled with flow...... edge, LINCOM model was used by allocating a slope half-in half out of the forest based on the suggestions of previous studies. The optimum slope angle was reported as 17º. Thus, a suggestion was made to use WAsP Engineering 2.0 for forest edge modelling with known limitations and the applied method...

  9. New formulation for interferometric synthetic aperture radar for terrain mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1994-06-01

    The subject of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) for high-accuracy terrain elevation mapping continues to gain importance in the arena of radar signal processing. Applications to problems in precision terrain-aided guidance and automatic target recognition, as well as a variety of civil applications, are being studied by a number of researchers. Not unlike many other areas of SAR processing, the subject of IFSAR can, at first glance, appear to be somewhat mysterious. In this paper we show how the mathematics of IFSAR for terrain elevation mapping using a pair of spotlight mode SAR collections can be derived in a very straightforward manner. Here, we employ an approach that relies entirely on Fourier transforms, and utilizes no reference to range equations or Doppler concepts. The result is a simplified explanation of the fundamentals of interferometry, including an easily-seen link between image domain phase difference and terrain elevation height. The derivation builds upon previous work by the authors in which a framework for spotlight mode SAR image formation based on an analogy to 3D computerized axial tomography (CAT) was developed. After outlining the major steps in the mathematics, we show how a computer simulator which utilizes 3D Fourier transforms can be constructed that demonstrates all of the major aspects of IFSAR from spotlight mode collections.

  10. Realistic terrain visualization based on 3D virtual world technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fengru; Lin, Hui; Chen, Bin; Xiao, Cai

    2010-11-01

    The rapid advances in information technologies, e.g., network, graphics processing, and virtual world, have provided challenges and opportunities for new capabilities in information systems, Internet applications, and virtual geographic environments, especially geographic visualization and collaboration. In order to achieve meaningful geographic capabilities, we need to explore and understand how these technologies can be used to construct virtual geographic environments to help to engage geographic research. The generation of three-dimensional (3D) terrain plays an important part in geographical visualization, computer simulation, and virtual geographic environment applications. The paper introduces concepts and technologies of virtual worlds and virtual geographic environments, explores integration of realistic terrain and other geographic objects and phenomena of natural geographic environment based on SL/OpenSim virtual world technologies. Realistic 3D terrain visualization is a foundation of construction of a mirror world or a sand box model of the earth landscape and geographic environment. The capabilities of interaction and collaboration on geographic information are discussed as well. Further virtual geographic applications can be developed based on the foundation work of realistic terrain visualization in virtual environments.

  11. Irregular Morphing for Real-Time Rendering of Large Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kalem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The following paper proposes an alternative approach to the real-time adaptive triangulation problem. A new region-based multi-resolution approach for terrain rendering is described which improves on-the-fly the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile after selecting appropriate Level-Of-Detail by an adaptive sampling. This proposed approach organizes the heightmap into a QuadTree of tiles that are processed independently. This technique combines the benefits of both Triangular Irregular Network approach and region-based multi-resolution approach by improving the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile. Our technique morphs the initial regular grid of the tile to deformed grid in order to minimize approximation error. The proposed technique strives to combine large tile size and real-time processing while guaranteeing an upper bound on the screen space error. Thus, this approach adapts terrain rendering process to local surface characteristics and enables on-the-fly handling of large amount of terrain data. Morphing is based-on the multi-resolution wavelet analysis. The use of the D2WT multi-resolution analysis of the terrain height-map speeds up processing and permits to satisfy an interactive terrain rendering. Tests and experiments demonstrate that Haar B-Spline wavelet, well known for its properties of localization and its compact support, is suitable for fast and accurate redistribution. Such technique could be exploited in client-server architecture for supporting interactive high-quality remote visualization of very large terrain.

  12. Water Clarity Simulant for K East Basin Filtration Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-20

    This document provides a simulant formulation intended to mimic the behavior of the suspended solids in the K East (KE) Basin fuel storage pool. The simulant will be used to evaluate alternative filtration apparatus to improve Basin water clarity and to possibly replace the existing sandfilter. The simulant was formulated based on the simulant objectives, the key identified parameters important to filtration, the composition and character of the KE Basin suspended sludge particles, and consideration of properties of surrogate materials.

  13. Handsheet formation and mechanical testing via fiber-level simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard H. Switzer; Daniel J. Klingenberg; C. Tim Scott

    2004-01-01

    A fiber model and simulation method are employed to investigate the mechanical response of planar fiber networks subjected to elongational deformation. The simulated responses agree qualitatively with numerous experimental observations. suggesting that such simulation methods may be useful for probing the relationships between fiber properties and interactions and the...

  14. Effect of load carriage and natural terrain conditions on cognitive performance in desert environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Debojyoti; Pal, Madhusudan; Chatterjee, Tirthankar; Majumdar, Dhurjati

    2017-10-01

    Correct decision making is a critical component of cognitive performance of a soldier, which may be influenced by the load carriage and terrain conditions during their deployment in desert environment. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of loads and terrain conditions on the cognitive performance in a group of twelve healthy heat acclimatized infantry soldiers under natural desert environment. The soldiers participated in a 10min walking trial during carrying no load and also carrying 10.7, 21.4 and 30kg at two terrain conditions viz., sandy and hard. We studied attention, memory and executive function, which are having immense functional importance in military operations. Standardized cognitive test battery was applied to the participants after carrying each magnitude of load at each terrain. Baseline cognitive performance was recorded on a separate day and was compared with the performances recorded after the load carriage trials. An attempt was made to reveal the relationship between physiological workload (relative workload) and cognitive performance at the point of completion of load carriage trials. Load, terrains and load×terrain interaction did not produce any significant effect (p>0.05) on the cognitive performance. Attention and relative workload were found significantly correlated at hard terrain under no load, 21.4kg and 30kg. Significant correlation was found between executive function and relative workload at hard terrain under no load. Carrying upto 30kg load for 10min at 3.5-4kmph walking speed resulted in improvement in attention at sandy terrain, decrement in memory at both sandy and hard terrains and improvement in executive function at sandy terrain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Local curvature entropy-based 3D terrain representation using a comprehensive Quadtree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiyu; Liu, Gang; Ma, Xiaogang; Mariethoz, Gregoire; He, Zhenwen; Tian, Yiping; Weng, Zhengping

    2018-05-01

    Large scale 3D digital terrain modeling is a crucial part of many real-time applications in geoinformatics. In recent years, the improved speed and precision in spatial data collection make the original terrain data more complex and bigger, which poses challenges for data management, visualization and analysis. In this work, we presented an effective and comprehensive 3D terrain representation based on local curvature entropy and a dynamic Quadtree. The Level-of-detail (LOD) models of significant terrain features were employed to generate hierarchical terrain surfaces. In order to reduce the radical changes of grid density between adjacent LODs, local entropy of terrain curvature was regarded as a measure of subdividing terrain grid cells. Then, an efficient approach was presented to eliminate the cracks among the different LODs by directly updating the Quadtree due to an edge-based structure proposed in this work. Furthermore, we utilized a threshold of local entropy stored in each parent node of this Quadtree to flexibly control the depth of the Quadtree and dynamically schedule large-scale LOD terrain. Several experiments were implemented to test the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrate that our method can be applied to construct LOD 3D terrain models with good performance in terms of computational cost and the maintenance of terrain features. Our method has already been deployed in a geographic information system (GIS) for practical uses, and it is able to support the real-time dynamic scheduling of large scale terrain models more easily and efficiently.

  16. Lie group model neuromorphic geometric engine for real-time terrain reconstruction from stereoscopic aerial photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Thomas R.; Tsao, Doris

    1997-04-01

    In the 1980's, neurobiologist suggested a simple mechanism in primate visual cortex for maintaining a stable and invariant representation of a moving object. The receptive field of visual neurons has real-time transforms in response to motion, to maintain a stable representation. When the visual stimulus is changed due to motion, the geometric transform of the stimulus triggers a dual transform of the receptive field. This dual transform in the receptive fields compensates geometric variation in the stimulus. This process can be modelled using a Lie group method. The massive array of affine parameter sensing circuits will function as a smart sensor tightly coupled to the passive imaging sensor (retina). Neural geometric engine is a neuromorphic computing device simulating our Lie group model of spatial perception of primate's primal visual cortex. We have developed the computer simulation and experimented on realistic and synthetic image data, and performed a preliminary research of using analog VLSI technology for implementation of the neural geometric engine. We have benchmark tested on DMA's terrain data with their result and have built an analog integrated circuit to verify the computational structure of the engine. When fully implemented on ANALOG VLSI chip, we will be able to accurately reconstruct a 3D terrain surface in real-time from stereoscopic imagery.

  17. Energy management that generates terrain following versus apex-preserving hopping in man and machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalveram, Karl Theodor; Haeufle, Daniel F B; Seyfarth, André; Grimmer, Sten

    2012-01-01

    While hopping, 12 subjects experienced a sudden step down of 5 or 10 cm. Results revealed that the hopping style was "terrain following". It means that the subjects pursued to keep the distance between maximum hopping height (apex) and ground profile constant. The spring-loaded inverse pendulum (SLIP) model, however, which is currently considered as template for stable legged locomotion would predict apex-preserving hopping, by which the absolute maximal hopping height is kept constant regardless of changes of the ground level. To get more insight into the physics of hopping, we outlined two concepts of energy management: "constant energy supply", by which in each bounce--regardless of perturbations--the same amount of mechanical energy is injected, and "lost energy supply", by which the mechanical energy that is going to be dissipated in the current cycle is assessed and replenished. When tested by simulations and on a robot testbed capable of hopping, constant energy supply generated stable and robust terrain following hopping, whereas lost energy supply led to something like apex-preserving hopping, which, however, lacks stability as well as robustness. Comparing simulated and machine hopping with human hopping suggests that constant energy supply has a good chance to be used by humans to generate hopping.

  18. An evaluation of WRF's ability to reproduce the surface wind over complex terrain based on typical circulation patterns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez, P.A.; Dudhia, J.; González-Rouco, J.F.; Montávez, J.P.; Garcia-Bustamante, E.; Navarro, J.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Munoz-Roldán, A.

    2013-01-01

    [1] The performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to reproduce the surface wind circulations over complex terrain is examined. The atmospheric evolution is simulated using two versions of the WRF model during an over 13¿year period (1992 to 2005) over a complex terrain region

  19. Atmospheric processes over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Robert M.; Berri, G.; Blumen, William; Carruthers, David J.; Dalu, G. A.; Durran, Dale R.; Egger, Joseph; Garratt, J. R.; Hanna, Steven R.; Hunt, J. C. R.

    1990-06-01

    A workshop on atmospheric processes over complex terrain, sponsored by the American Meteorological Society, was convened in Park City, Utah from 24 vto 28 October 1988. The overall objective of the workshop was one of interaction and synthesis--interaction among atmospheric scientists carrying out research on a variety of orographic flow problems, and a synthesis of their results and points of view into an assessment of the current status of topical research problems. The final day of the workshop was devoted to an open discussion on the research directions that could be anticipated in the next decade because of new and planned instrumentation and observational networks, the recent emphasis on development of mesoscale numerical models, and continual theoretical investigations of thermally forced flows, orographic waves, and stratified turbulence. This monograph represents an outgrowth of the Park City Workshop. The authors have contributed chapters based on their lecture material. Workshop discussions indicated interest in both the remote sensing and predictability of orographic flows. These chapters were solicited following the workshop in order to provide a more balanced view of current progress and future directions in research on atmospheric processes over complex terrain.

  20. Simulation and test of the thermal behavior of pressure switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifang; Chen, Daner; Zhang, Yao; Dai, Tingting

    2018-04-01

    Little, lightweight, low-power microelectromechanical system (MEMS) pressure switches offer a good development prospect for small, ultra-long, simple atmosphere environments. In order to realize MEMS pressure switch, it is necessary to solve one of the key technologies such as thermal robust optimization. The finite element simulation software is used to analyze the thermal behavior of the pressure switch and the deformation law of the pressure switch film under different temperature. The thermal stress releasing schemes are studied by changing the structure of fixed form and changing the thickness of the substrate, respectively. Finally, the design of the glass substrate thickness of 2.5 mm is used to ensure that the maximum equivalent stress is reduced to a quarter of the original value, only 154 MPa when the structure is in extreme temperature (80∘C). The test results show that after the pressure switch is thermally optimized, the upper and lower electrodes can be reliably contacted to accommodate different operating temperature environments.

  1. Spray drying test of simulated borated waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Hongxiang; Zhou Lianquan; Fan Zhiwen; Sun Qi; Lin Xiaolong

    2007-01-01

    Performance and the effecting factors of spray drying of simulated borated waste solutions is studied for three contaeting methods between the atomized beads and the heated air, in which boron concentration is around 21000 ppm. The contacting modes are centrifugal atomizing co-current flow, pneumatic atomizing co-current flow and mixed flow. The results show that a free-flowing product in all these tests when the temperature of the solutions is between 62 degree C and 64 degree C, the inlet temperature of the spray drying chamber is between 210 degree C and 220 degree C, the temperature of the outlet of the spray drying chamber is between 110 and 120 degree C, the flow rate of the pressure air is 8.0 m 3 /h, the rotational speed of the centrifugal atomizer is 73.0 m/s. The diameters of the powder product which account for 95% of the feed range from 0.356 mm to 0.061 mm. The production capacity and water content in the powder increase in the order of pneumatic atomizing co-current flow, mixed flow and centrifugal atomizing co-current flow. The volume reduction coeffecient of spray drying is in the ranged of 0.22 and 0.27. (authors)

  2. Rough terrain motion planning for actively reconfigurable mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Michael

    2015-02-05

    In the aftermath of the Tohoku earthquake and the nuclear meltdown at the power plant of Fukushima Daiichi in 2011, reconfigurable robots like the iRobot Packbot were deployed. Instead of humans, the robots were used to investigate contaminated areas. Other incidents are the two major earthquakes in Northern Italy in May 2012. Besides many casualties, a large number of historical buildings was severely damaged. Due to the imminent danger of collapse, it was too dangerous for rescue personnel to enter many of the buildings. Therefore, the sites were inspected by reconfigurable robots, which are able to traverse the rubble and debris of the partially destroyed buildings. This thesis develops a navigation system enabling wheeled and tracked robots to safely traverse rough terrain and challenging structures. It consists of a planning mechanism and a controller. The focus of this thesis, however, is on the contribution to motion planning. The planning scheme employs a hierarchical approach to motion planning for actively reconfigurable robots in rough environments. Using a map of the environment the algorithm estimates the traversability under the consideration of uncertainties. Based on this analysis, an initial path search determines an approximate solution with respect to the robot's operating limits.Subsequently, a detailed planning step refines the initial path where it is required. The refinement step considers the robot's actuators and stability in addition to the quantities of the first search. Determining the robot-terrain interaction is very important in rough terrain. This thesis presents two path refinement approaches: a deterministic and a randomized approach. The experimental evaluation investigates the separate components of the planning scheme, the robot-terrain interaction for instance.In simulation as well as in real world experiments the evaluation demonstrates the necessity of such a planning algorithm in rough terrain and it provides

  3. Rough terrain motion planning for actively reconfigurable mobile robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Tohoku earthquake and the nuclear meltdown at the power plant of Fukushima Daiichi in 2011, reconfigurable robots like the iRobot Packbot were deployed. Instead of humans, the robots were used to investigate contaminated areas. Other incidents are the two major earthquakes in Northern Italy in May 2012. Besides many casualties, a large number of historical buildings was severely damaged. Due to the imminent danger of collapse, it was too dangerous for rescue personnel to enter many of the buildings. Therefore, the sites were inspected by reconfigurable robots, which are able to traverse the rubble and debris of the partially destroyed buildings. This thesis develops a navigation system enabling wheeled and tracked robots to safely traverse rough terrain and challenging structures. It consists of a planning mechanism and a controller. The focus of this thesis, however, is on the contribution to motion planning. The planning scheme employs a hierarchical approach to motion planning for actively reconfigurable robots in rough environments. Using a map of the environment the algorithm estimates the traversability under the consideration of uncertainties. Based on this analysis, an initial path search determines an approximate solution with respect to the robot's operating limits.Subsequently, a detailed planning step refines the initial path where it is required. The refinement step considers the robot's actuators and stability in addition to the quantities of the first search. Determining the robot-terrain interaction is very important in rough terrain. This thesis presents two path refinement approaches: a deterministic and a randomized approach. The experimental evaluation investigates the separate components of the planning scheme, the robot-terrain interaction for instance.In simulation as well as in real world experiments the evaluation demonstrates the necessity of such a planning algorithm in rough terrain and it provides

  4. The performance of tests on endogeneity of subsets of explanatory variables scanned by simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiviet, J.F.; Pleus, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tests for classification as endogenous or predetermined of arbitrary subsets of regressors are formulated as significance tests in auxiliary IV regressions and their relationships with various more classic test procedures are examined. Simulation experiments are designed by solving the data

  5. VHF/UHF imagery and RCS measurements of ground targets in forested terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatesman, Andrew J.; Beaudoin, Christopher J.; Giles, Robert H.; Waldman, Jerry; Nixon, William E.

    2002-08-01

    The monostatic VV and HH-polarized radar signatures of several targets and trees have been measured at foliage penetration frequencies (VHF/UHF) by using 1/35th scale models and an indoor radar range operating at X-band. An array of high-fidelity scale model ground vehicles and test objects as well as scaled ground terrain and trees have been fabricated for the study. Radar measurement accuracy has been confirmed by comparing the signature of a test object with a method of moments radar cross section prediction code. In addition to acquiring signatures of targets located on a smooth, dielectric ground plane, data have also been acquired with targets located in simulated wooded terrain that included scaled tree trunks and tree branches. In order to assure the correct backscattering behavior, all dielectric properties of live tree wood and moist soil were scaled properly to match the complex dielectric constant of the full-scale materials. The impact of the surrounding tree clutter on the VHF/UHF radar signatures of ground vehicles was accessed. Data were processed into high-resolution, polar-formatted ISAR imagery and signature comparisons are made between targets in open-field and forested scenarios.

  6. Improved visibility computation on massive grid terrains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fishman, J.; Haverkort, H.J.; Toma, L.; Wolfson, O.; Agrawal, D.; Lu, C.-T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design and engineering of algorithms for computing visibility maps on massive grid terrains. Given a terrain T, specified by the elevations of points in a regular grid, and given a viewpoint v, the visibility map or viewshed of v is the set of grid points of T that are

  7. Computing visibility on terrains in external memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, H.J.; Toma, L.; Zhuang, Yi

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel application of the distribution sweeping technique to computing visibility on terrains. Given an arbitrary viewpoint v, the basic problem we address is computing the visibility map or viewshed of v, which is the set of points in the terrain that are visible from v. We give the

  8. Terrain Classification of Norwegian Slab Avalanche Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallandvik, Linda; Aadland, Eivind; Vikene, Odd Lennart

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to rely on snow conditions, weather, and human factors when making judgments about avalanche risk because these variables are dynamic and complex; terrain, however, is more easily observed and interpreted. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate (1) the type of terrain in which historical fatal snow avalanche accidents in Norway…

  9. Parallel Implementation of the Terrain Masking Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    contains behavior rules which can define a computation or an algorithm. It can communicate with other process nodes, it can contain local data, and it can...terrain maskirg calculation is being performed. It is this algorithm that comsumes about seventy percent of the total terrain masking calculation time

  10. A GPS inspired Terrain Referenced Navigation algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Terrain Referenced Navigation (TRN) refers to a form of localization in which measurements of distances to the terrain surface are matched with a digital elevation map allowing a vehicle to estimate its own position within the map. The main goal of this dissertation is to improve TRN performance

  11. Reliability Verification of DBE Environment Simulation Test Facility by using Statistics Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Kyung Nam; Kim, Jong Soeg; Jeong, Sun Chul; Kyung Heum

    2011-01-01

    In the nuclear power plant, all the safety-related equipment including cables under the harsh environment should perform the equipment qualification (EQ) according to the IEEE std 323. There are three types of qualification methods including type testing, operating experience and analysis. In order to environmentally qualify the safety-related equipment using type testing method, not analysis or operation experience method, the representative sample of equipment, including interfaces, should be subjected to a series of tests. Among these tests, Design Basis Events (DBE) environment simulating test is the most important test. DBE simulation test is performed in DBE simulation test chamber according to the postulated DBE conditions including specified high-energy line break (HELB), loss of coolant accident (LOCA), main steam line break (MSLB) and etc, after thermal and radiation aging. Because most DBE conditions have 100% humidity condition, in order to trace temperature and pressure of DBE condition, high temperature steam should be used. During DBE simulation test, if high temperature steam under high pressure inject to the DBE test chamber, the temperature and pressure in test chamber rapidly increase over the target temperature. Therefore, the temperature and pressure in test chamber continue fluctuating during the DBE simulation test to meet target temperature and pressure. We should ensure fairness and accuracy of test result by confirming the performance of DBE environment simulation test facility. In this paper, in order to verify reliability of DBE environment simulation test facility, statistics method is used

  12. Planning Routes Across Economic Terrains: Maximizing Utility, Following Heuristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Maddula, Soumya V.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2010-01-01

    We designed an economic task to investigate human planning of routes in landscapes where travel in different kinds of terrain incurs different costs. Participants moved their finger across a touch screen from a starting point to a destination. The screen was divided into distinct kinds of terrain and travel within each kind of terrain imposed a cost proportional to distance traveled. We varied costs and spatial configurations of terrains and participants received fixed bonuses minus the total cost of the routes they chose. We first compared performance to a model maximizing gain. All but one of 12 participants failed to adopt least-cost routes and their failure to do so reduced their winnings by about 30% (median value). We tested in detail whether participants’ choices of routes satisfied three necessary conditions (heuristics) for a route to maximize gain. We report failures of one heuristic for 7 out of 12 participants. Last of all, we modeled human performance with the assumption that participants assign subjective utilities to costs and maximize utility. For 7 out 12 participants, the fitted utility function was an accelerating power function of actual cost and for the remaining 5, a decelerating power function. We discuss connections between utility aggregation in route planning and decision under risk. Our task could be adapted to investigate human strategy and optimality of route planning in full-scale landscapes. PMID:21833269

  13. PLANNING ROUTES ACROSS ECONOMIC TERRAINS: MAXIMIZING UTILITY, FOLLOWING HEURISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang eZhang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We designed an economic task to investigate human planning of routes in landscapes where travel in different kinds of terrain incurs different costs. Participants moved their finger across a touch screen from a starting point to a destination. The screen was divided into distinct kinds of terrain and travel within each kind of terrain imposed a cost proportional to distance traveled. We varied costs and spatial configurations of terrains and participants received fixed bonuses minus the total cost of the routes they chose. We first compared performance to a model maximizing gain. All but one of 12 participants failed to adopt least-cost routes and their failure to do so reduced their winnings by about 30% (median value. We tested in detail whether participants’ choices of routes satisfied three necessary conditions (heuristics for a route to maximize gain. We report failures of one heuristic for 7 out of 12 participants. Last of all, we modeled human performance with the assumption that participants assign subjective utilities to costs and maximize utility. For 7 out 12 participants, the fitted utility function was an accelerating power function of actual cost and for the remaining 5, a decelerating power function. We discuss connections between utility aggregation in route planning and decision under risk. Our task could be adapted to investigate human strategy and optimality of route planning in full-scale landscapes.

  14. Numerical simulation supports formation testing planning; Simulacao numerica auxilia planejamento de teste de formacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Rogerio Marques; Fonseca, Carlos Eduardo da [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    A well test is an operation that allows the engineer assessing reservoir performance and fluids properties by measuring flow rates and pressures under a range of flowing conditions. In most well tests, a limited amount of fluid is allowed to flow from the formation being tested. The formation is isolated behind cemented casing and perforated at the formation depth or, in open hole, the formation is straddled by a pair of packers that isolate the formation. During the flow period, the pressure at the formation is monitored over time. Then, the formation is closed (or shut in) and the pressure monitored at the formation while the fluid within the formation equilibrates. The analysis of these pressure changes can provide information on the size and shape of the formation as well as its ability to produce fluids. . The flow of fluid through the column test causes your heating and hence its elongation. Several factors affect the rate of exchange of heat as well and the characteristics of the fluid, the flow of time and the flow and the existence of deep water. The prediction of temperature over well, in its various components, and the effect caused in the column test is not a trivial task. Some authors, for example, describe a method of calculating the behaviour of columns of production, making it simpler variation of constant temperature throughout the entire column, a fact that this does not occur in practice. The work aims at presenting the advantages of using the numerical simulation in determining the efforts and corresponding movements of the column of test of formation. (author)

  15. CFD three dimensional wake analysis in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, F.; Astolfi, D.; Terzi, L.

    2017-11-01

    Even if wind energy technology is nowadays fully developed, the use of wind energy in very complex terrain is still challenging. In particular, it is challenging to characterize the combination effects of wind ow over complex terrain and wake interactions between nearby turbines and this has a practical relevance too, for the perspective of mitigating anomalous vibrations and loads as well improving the farm efficiency. In this work, a very complex terrain site has been analyzed through a Reynolds-averaged CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) numerical wind field model; in the simulation the inuence of wakes has been included through the Actuator Disk (AD) approach. In particular, the upstream turbine of a cluster of 4 wind turbines having 2.3 MW of rated power is studied. The objective of this study is investigating the full three-dimensional wind field and the impact of three-dimensionality on the evolution of the waked area between nearby turbines. A post-processing method of the output of the CFD simulation is developed and this allows to estimate the wake lateral deviation and the wake width. The reliability of the numerical approach is inspired by and crosschecked through the analysis of the operational SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) data of the cluster of interest.

  16. Terrain assessment guidelines : CAGC best practice. Version 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This terrain classification assessment guideline discussed the steps required for personnel to understand terrain hazards present during seismic operations. Maps and other sources must be used to classify terrain steepness and surface conditions using geographical information systems (GIS), LIDAR, or satellite photographs. The impact of managing steep terrain within projects must also be considered when class 3, 4, 5, or 6 terrain has been identified. Terrains must also be classified according to colours. Secondary terrain assessments must be conducted when class 3, 4, 5, or 6 terrain has been identified. Terrain management plans should included methods of keeping untrained workers out of areas with classes greater than 3. Methods of entering and exiting steep terrain must be identified. Workers must be trained to work in areas with steep terrains. Methods of rescue and evacuation must also be established. Procedures were outlined for all terrain classes. Footwear, head protection and general safety requirements were outlined. 14 figs.

  17. CLAIRE, an event-driven simulation tool for testing software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raguideau, J.; Schoen, D.; Henry, J.Y.; Boulc'h, J.

    1994-06-01

    CLAIRE is a software tool created to perform validations on executable codes or on specifications of distributed real-time applications for nuclear safety. CLAIRE can be used both to verify the safety properties by modelling the specifications, and also to validate the final code by simulating the behaviour of its equipment and software interfaces. It can be used to observe and provide dynamic control of the simulation process, and also to record changes to the simulated data for off-line analysis. (R.P.)

  18. High Performance Electrical Modeling and Simulation Verification Test Suite - Tier I; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHELLS, REGINA L.; BOGDAN, CAROLYN W.; WIX, STEVEN D.

    2001-01-01

    This document describes the High Performance Electrical Modeling and Simulation (HPEMS) Global Verification Test Suite (VERTS). The VERTS is a regression test suite used for verification of the electrical circuit simulation codes currently being developed by the HPEMS code development team. This document contains descriptions of the Tier I test cases

  19. Design, Construct and Test the Hi-Therm Simulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zavitsanos, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Under the previous SBIR programs, GSI investigated the application of highly exothermic intermetallic reactions with the most energetic of these reactions constituting the basis for the Hi-Therm Simulator...

  20. Task-Specific Asteroid Simulants for Ground Testing, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will produce at least four asteroid simulants at high fidelity for mineral content and particle size, created through standardized inputs and documented...

  1. A multi-mode real-time terrain parameter estimation method for wheeled motion control of mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuankai; Ding, Liang; Zheng, Zhizhong; Yang, Qizhi; Zhao, Xingang; Liu, Guangjun

    2018-05-01

    For motion control of wheeled planetary rovers traversing on deformable terrain, real-time terrain parameter estimation is critical in modeling the wheel-terrain interaction and compensating the effect of wheel slipping. A multi-mode real-time estimation method is proposed in this paper to achieve accurate terrain parameter estimation. The proposed method is composed of an inner layer for real-time filtering and an outer layer for online update. In the inner layer, sinkage exponent and internal frictional angle, which have higher sensitivity than that of the other terrain parameters to wheel-terrain interaction forces, are estimated in real time by using an adaptive robust extended Kalman filter (AREKF), whereas the other parameters are fixed with nominal values. The inner layer result can help synthesize the current wheel-terrain contact forces with adequate precision, but has limited prediction capability for time-variable wheel slipping. To improve estimation accuracy of the result from the inner layer, an outer layer based on recursive Gauss-Newton (RGN) algorithm is introduced to refine the result of real-time filtering according to the innovation contained in the history data. With the two-layer structure, the proposed method can work in three fundamental estimation modes: EKF, REKF and RGN, making the method applicable for flat, rough and non-uniform terrains. Simulations have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method under three terrain types, showing the advantages of introducing the two-layer structure.

  2. 3D Orthorhombic Elastic Wave Propagation Pre-Test Simulation of SPE DAG-1 Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R. P.; Preston, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    A more realistic representation of many geologic media can be characterized as a dense system of vertically-aligned microfractures superimposed on a finely-layered horizontal geology found in shallow crustal rocks. This seismic anisotropy representation lends itself to being modeled as an orthorhombic elastic medium comprising three mutually orthogonal symmetry planes containing nine independent moduli. These moduli can be determined by observing (or prescribing) nine independent P-wave and S-wave phase speeds along different propagation directions. We have developed an explicit time-domain finite-difference (FD) algorithm for simulating 3D elastic wave propagation in a heterogeneous orthorhombic medium. The components of the particle velocity vector and the stress tensor are governed by a set of nine, coupled, first-order, linear, partial differential equations (PDEs) called the velocity-stress system. All time and space derivatives are discretized with centered and staggered FD operators possessing second- and fourth-order numerical accuracy, respectively. Additionally, we have implemented novel perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary conditions, specifically designed for orthorhombic media, to effectively suppress grid boundary reflections. In support of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Phase II, a series of underground chemical explosions at the Nevada National Security Site, the code has been used to perform pre-test estimates of the Dry Alluvium Geology - Experiment 1 (DAG-1). Based on literature searches, realistic geologic structure and values for orthorhombic P-wave and S-wave speeds have been estimated. Results and predictions from the simulations are presented.

  3. Wind Tunnel Modeling Of Wind Flow Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, D.; Cochran, B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation will describe the finding of an atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind tunnel study conducted as part of the Bolund Experiment. This experiment was sponsored by Risø DTU (National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark) during the fall of 2009 to enable a blind comparison of various air flow models in an attempt to validate their performance in predicting airflow over complex terrain. Bohlund hill sits 12 m above the water level at the end of a narrow isthmus. The island features a steep escarpment on one side, over which the airflow can be expected to separate. The island was equipped with several anemometer towers, and the approach flow over the water was well characterized. This study was one of only two only physical model studies included in the blind model comparison, the other being a water plume study. The remainder were computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, including both RANS and LES. Physical modeling of air flow over topographical features has been used since the middle of the 20th century, and the methods required are well understood and well documented. Several books have been written describing how to properly perform ABL wind tunnel studies, including ASCE manual of engineering practice 67. Boundary layer wind tunnel tests are the only modelling method deemed acceptable in ASCE 7-10, the most recent edition of the American Society of Civil Engineers standard that provides wind loads for buildings and other structures for buildings codes across the US. Since the 1970’s, most tall structures undergo testing in a boundary layer wind tunnel to accurately determine the wind induced loading. When compared to CFD, the US EPA considers a properly executed wind tunnel study to be equivalent to a CFD model with infinitesimal grid resolution and near infinite memory. One key reason for this widespread acceptance is that properly executed ABL wind tunnel studies will accurately simulate flow separation

  4. PEP Run Report for Simulant Shakedown/Functional Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.

    2009-12-29

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes." The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3-8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration

  5. Development, test, and simulation of an influence drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, C.

    1992-07-01

    The experiment PS185 measuring the reaction anti pp → anti YY with strangeness S = 1 hyperons is a unique tool to study the process of anti ss quark pair creation. The so far measured anti ΛΛ and anti ΛΣ 0 channels have stimulated a lot of theoretical work and will be complemented by the charged Σ-channels anti Σ + Σ + and anti Σ - Σ - . Therefore, the PS185 apparatus has to be extended by a microvertex-detector with good spatial resolution and high rate capability. Last years in Juelich such a detector, the Induction Drift Chamber, was developed. A wire plane consists of alternating potential wires (20 μm) and anodes (7μm) asymmetrically positioned between two cathode foils defining one independent chamber. The good track resolution (≤ 25 μm) for perpendicular tracks even for high rates (≥ 10 6 events/(sec x mm 2 )) is achieved by evaluate the induced signals of the potential wires, which measure the azimuthal avalanche position with respect to the anodes. An expression is derived to describe the principles of the induced signals so that the simulation of the IDC is in good agreement with the experimental data. One central point is the derivation of an algorithm for inclined tracks. To overcome limits in the spatial resolution which arise from the fluctuation of ionisation loss, a Flash-ADC read out was used, which also gives the possibility to digitalize the track inside one plane. For the 400 channels in two FADC-Crates a real time data acquisition system with interrupt processing was developed on a VME-processor so that an event rate ≥ 100 Hz by an event length ≥ 1 kByte could be reached. The mechanical construction of the IDC allows a stack of independent planes to be built with a height of 3.5 mm for each. Results of two test runs measuring the spatial resolution are reported. (orig.) [de

  6. UAS applications in high alpine, snow-covered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Y.; Stoffel, A.; Ginzler, C.

    2017-12-01

    Access to snow-covered, alpine terrain is often difficult and dangerous. Hence parameters such as snow depth or snow avalanche release and deposition zones are hard to map in situ with adequate spatial and temporal resolution and with spatial continuous coverage. These parameters are currently operationally measured at automated weather stations and by observer networks. However such isolated point measurements are not able to capture the information spatial continuous and to describe the high spatial variability present in complex mountain topography. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) have the potential to fill this gap by frequently covering selected high alpine areas with high spatial resolution down to ground resolutions of even few millimeters. At the WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF we test different photogrammetric UAS with visual and near infrared bands. During the last three years we were able to gather experience in more than 100 flight missions in extreme terrain. By processing the imagery applying state-of-the-art structure from motion (SfM) software, we were able to accurately document several avalanche events and to photogrammetrically map snow depth with accuracies from 1 to 20 cm (dependent on the flight height above ground) compare to manual snow probe measurements. This was even possible on homogenous snow surfaces with very little texture. A key issue in alpine terrain is flight planning. We need to cover regions at high elevations with large altitude differences (up to 1 km) with high wind speeds (up to 20 m/s) and cold temperatures (down to - 25°C). Only a few UAS are able to cope with these environmental conditions. We will give an overview on our applications of UAS in high alpine terrain that demonstrate the big potential of such systems to acquire frequent, accurate and high spatial resolution geodata in high alpine, snow covered terrain that could be essential to answer longstanding questions in avalanche and snow hydrology

  7. Ranging error analysis of single photon satellite laser altimetry under different terrain conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiapeng; Li, Guoyuan; Gao, Xiaoming; Wang, Jianmin; Fan, Wenfeng; Zhou, Shihong

    2018-02-01

    Single photon satellite laser altimeter is based on Geiger model, which has the characteristics of small spot, high repetition rate etc. In this paper, for the slope terrain, the distance of error's formula and numerical calculation are carried out. Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the experiment of different terrain measurements. The experimental results show that ranging accuracy is not affected by the spot size under the condition of the flat terrain, But the inclined terrain can influence the ranging error dramatically, when the satellite pointing angle is 0.001° and the terrain slope is about 12°, the ranging error can reach to 0.5m. While the accuracy can't meet the requirement when the slope is more than 70°. Monte Carlo simulation results show that single photon laser altimeter satellite with high repetition rate can improve the ranging accuracy under the condition of complex terrain. In order to ensure repeated observation of the same point for 25 times, according to the parameters of ICESat-2, we deduce the quantitative relation between the footprint size, footprint, and the frequency repetition. The related conclusions can provide reference for the design and demonstration of the domestic single photon laser altimetry satellite.

  8. Rapid Optimal Generation Algorithm for Terrain Following Trajectory Based on Optimal Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨剑影; 张海; 谢邦荣; 尹健

    2004-01-01

    Based on the optimal control theory, a 3-dimensionnal direct generation algorithm is proposed for anti-ground low altitude penetration tasks under complex terrain. By optimizing the terrain following(TF) objective function,terrain coordinate system, missile dynamic model and control vector, the TF issue is turning into the improved optimal control problem whose mathmatical model is simple and need not solve the second order terrain derivative. Simulation results prove that this method is reasonable and feasible. The TF precision is in the scope from 0.3 m to 3.0 m,and the planning time is less than 30 min. This method have the strongpionts such as rapidness, precision and has great application value.

  9. 3D Fractal reconstruction of terrain profile data based on digital elevation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.M.; Chen, C.-J.

    2009-01-01

    Digital Elevation Model (DEM) often makes it difficult for terrain reconstruction and data storage due to the failure in acquisition of details with higher resolution. If original terrain of DEM can be simulated, resulting in geographical details can be represented precisely while reducing the data size, then an effective reconstruction scheme is essential. This paper adopts two sets of real-world 3D terrain profile data to proceed data reducing, i.e. data sampling randomly, then reconstruct them through 3D fractal reconstruction. Meanwhile, the quantitative and qualitative difference generated from different reduction rates were evaluated statistically. The research results show that, if 3D fractal interpolation method is applied to DEM reconstruction, the higher reduction rate can be obtained for DEM of larger data size with respect to that of smaller data size under the assumption that the entire terrain structure is still maintained.

  10. Knowledge-inducing Global Path Planning for Robots in Environment with Hybrid Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-nan Guo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In complex environment with hybrid terrain, different regions may have different terrain. Path planning for robots in such environment is an open NP-complete problem, which lacks effective methods. The paper develops a novel global path planning method based on common sense and evolution knowledge by adopting dual evolution structure in culture algorithms. Common sense describes terrain information and feasibility of environment, which is used to evaluate and select the paths. Evolution knowledge describes the angle relationship between the path and the obstacles, or the common segments of paths, which is used to judge and repair infeasible individuals. Taken two types of environments with different obstacles and terrain as examples, simulation results indicate that the algorithm can effectively solve path planning problem in complex environment and decrease the computation complexity for judgment and repair of infeasible individuals. It also can improve the convergence speed and have better computation stability.

  11. From Butterflies to Galaxies: Testing Chaotic System Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, W.

    2005-05-01

    N-body simulations have become a mainstay in modern astrophysics. They have been used to garner understanding of such varied phenomena as chaos in the solar system, to clumping of matter in the early universe. However, even the earliest practitioners realized that the results of such simulations may be suspect, because the tiniest differences between two simulations (such as what machine the simulation is run on, or old-fashioned numerical errors) can lead to vastly different simulation results. Over the decades, enormous effort has been put into studying and minimizing such errors, and the consensus today is that, although the microscopic details of large simulations are almost certainly incorrect, certain macroscopic measures are valid. However, nobody is quite sure which measures are valid and under precisely what conditions; as such, the fundamental reliability of such simulations has yet to be conclusively demonstrated. In this talk I will review some past results of simulation reliability and then introduce the concept of shadowing, which was first applied to N-body systems by Quinlan & Tremaine in 1992. A shadow of a numerical integration is an exact solution that remains close to the numerical solution for a long time. As such, an integration which has a shadow can be viewed as an observation of an exact trajectory. Unfortunately, it turns out that the full phase-space integration of a large n-body system is not shadowable. Howewver, it appears that if one is willing to allow that only some particles have reliable trajectories, then we can demonstrate that the number of reliable particles decays exponentially with time, and that the decay becomes slower with increasing simulation accuracy. Unfortunately the decay is extremely rapid for collisional systems, so that all particles have become unshadowable after just a few crossing times. However, preliminary results for collisionless systems appear to indicate that a large majority of particles can be shadowed

  12. Used nuclear fuel separations process simulation and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Krebs, J.F.; Copple, J.M.; Frey, K.E.; Maggos, L.E.; Figueroa, J.; Willit, J.L.; Papadias, D.D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent efforts in separations process simulation at Argonne have expanded from the traditional focus on solvent extraction flowsheet design in order to capture process dynamics and to simulate other components, processing and systems of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. For example, the Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction (AMUSE) code has been enhanced to make it both more portable and more readily extensible. Moving away from a spreadsheet environment makes the addition of new species and processes simpler for the expert user, which should enable more rapid implementation of chemical models that simulate evolving processes. The dyAMUSE (dynamic AMUSE) version allows the simulation of transient behavior across an extractor. Electrochemical separations have now been modeled using spreadsheet codes that simulate the electrochemical recycle of fast reactor fuel. The user can follow the evolution of the salt, products, and waste compositions in the electro-refiner, cathode processors, and drawdown as a function of fuel batches treated. To further expand capabilities in integrating multiple unit operations, a platform for linking mathematical models representing the different operations that comprise a reprocessing facility was adapted to enable systems-level analysis and optimization of facility functions. (authors)

  13. Used nuclear fuel separations process simulation and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, C.; Krebs, J.F.; Copple, J.M.; Frey, K.E.; Maggos, L.E.; Figueroa, J.; Willit, J.L.; Papadias, D.D. [Argonne National Laboratory: 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Recent efforts in separations process simulation at Argonne have expanded from the traditional focus on solvent extraction flowsheet design in order to capture process dynamics and to simulate other components, processing and systems of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. For example, the Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction (AMUSE) code has been enhanced to make it both more portable and more readily extensible. Moving away from a spreadsheet environment makes the addition of new species and processes simpler for the expert user, which should enable more rapid implementation of chemical models that simulate evolving processes. The dyAMUSE (dynamic AMUSE) version allows the simulation of transient behavior across an extractor. Electrochemical separations have now been modeled using spreadsheet codes that simulate the electrochemical recycle of fast reactor fuel. The user can follow the evolution of the salt, products, and waste compositions in the electro-refiner, cathode processors, and drawdown as a function of fuel batches treated. To further expand capabilities in integrating multiple unit operations, a platform for linking mathematical models representing the different operations that comprise a reprocessing facility was adapted to enable systems-level analysis and optimization of facility functions. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of full-scope simulator testing methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feher, M P; Moray, N; Senders, J W; Biron, K [Human Factors North Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the use of full scope nuclear power plant simulators in licensing examinations for Unit First Operators of CANDU reactors. The existing literature is reviewed, and an annotated bibliography of the more important sources provided. Since existing methods are judged inadequate, conceptual bases for designing a system for licensing are discussed, and a method proposed which would make use of objective scoring methods based on data collection in full-scope simulators. A field trial of such a method is described. The practicality of such a method is critically discussed and possible advantages of subjective methods of evaluation considered. (author). 32 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  15. Evaluation of full-scope simulator testing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feher, M.P.; Moray, N.; Senders, J.W.; Biron, K.

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the use of full scope nuclear power plant simulators in licensing examinations for Unit First Operators of CANDU reactors. The existing literature is reviewed, and an annotated bibliography of the more important sources provided. Since existing methods are judged inadequate, conceptual bases for designing a system for licensing are discussed, and a method proposed which would make use of objective scoring methods based on data collection in full-scope simulators. A field trial of such a method is described. The practicality of such a method is critically discussed and possible advantages of subjective methods of evaluation considered. (author). 32 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  16. Modification of the small-size heating device for the testing of soils' thermal response; Actualisation du mini-module de chauffage pour tests de reponse thermique des terrains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laloui, L.; Steinmann, G.

    2006-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project that involved the modification of small-size testing equipment. This equipment, built by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland, is dedicated to the measurement of the thermal characteristics of soils and geothermal probes. Its characteristics and performance have been improved. The remote data transmission system has also been changed. The improved possibilities presented by this optimised mini-module when, for example, carrying out thermal response tests in bore-hole heat exchangers of more than 300 m depth are described. The modifications made and the tests carried out with the modified equipment are described and discussed.

  17. The Role of Simulation in Test and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    manual N MUM platform (handshake) checklist N Operational test agency milestone C assessment report input N Recorded mission vignettes (LUT training re...Journal Acknowledgments AB3 FDT&E test team (Figure 5): MAJ Cornelius L. Allen, Jr. (test officer), Dr. Bruce Wardlow (analyst), LTC Brian Apgar

  18. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF THE THERMAL TESTING PROCESS FOR STUDENTS OF «NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING AND TECHNICAL DIAGNOSTICS» SPECIALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolii H. Protasov

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the computer simulation method of thermal nondestructive testing procedure. FEMLAB is interactive software package and used for simulation. It allows forming a model of physical objects with given parameters and properties. A proposed method helps students to understand better the processes happen in solid under the action of temperature.

  19. Simulation of Particle Fluxes at the DESY-II Test Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetz, Anne

    2015-05-01

    In the course of this Master's thesis ''Simulation of Particle Fluxes at the DESY-II Test Beam Facility'' the test beam generation for the DESY test beam line was studied in detail and simulated with the simulation software SLIC. SLIC uses the Geant4 toolkit for realistic Monte Carlo simulations of particles passing through detector material.After discussing the physics processes relevant for the test beam generation and the principles of the beam generation itself, the software used is introduced together with a description of the functionality of the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation of the test beam line follows the sequence of the test beam generation. Therefore, it starts with the simulation of the beam bunch of the synchrotron accelerator DESY-II, and proceeds step by step with the single test beam line components. An additional benefit of this thesis is the provision of particle flux and trajectory maps, which make fluxes directly visible by following the particle tracks through the simulated beam line. These maps allow us to see each of the test beam line components, because flux rates and directions change rapidly at these points. They will also guide the decision for placements of future test beam line components and measurement equipment.In the end, the beam energy and its spread, and the beam rate of the final test beam in the test beam area were studied in the simulation, so that the results can be compared to the measured beam parameters. The test beam simulation of this Master's thesis will serve as a key input for future test beam line improvements.

  20. A new simulation tool for testing smart home recognition algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, K.; Ajroud, A.; Bouchard, B.; Bouzouane, A. [Chicoutimi Univ. du Quebec, Saguenay, PQ (Canada)

    2010-08-13

    Smart home technologies are being actively researched. However, many scientists studying this topic of research do not own smart home infrastructure, and therefore, are unable to conduct proper experiments in a concrete environment with real data. In order to address this problem and to help researchers working in the field of activity recognition, this paper presented a novel and flexible three-dimensional smart home infrastructure simulator called SIMACT developed in Java. The paper discussed the proposed simulator including the software architecture, implementation, and scripting. It also discussed the actual initiative to gather real data that would be incorporated in the simulator as real case pre-recorded scenarios. An overview of related work and future developments were also presented. It was concluded that SIMACT is a user-friendly three-dimensional animated simulator that offers a simple interface that could be easily adapted to individual needs and could become a very useful tool for the community with its XML scripting language, many options, customizable three-dimensional frame and its set of pre-defined real case scenarios. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Heavy vehicle simulator testing of trial sections for CALTRANS.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rust, FC

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available ) commissioned the University of California at Berkely (UCB), Dynatest Consulting and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in South Africa to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the potential of the South African Heavy Vehicle Simulator (HVS...

  2. Simulation technologies in networking and communications selecting the best tool for the test

    CERN Document Server

    Pathan, Al-Sakib Khan; Khan, Shafiullah

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is a widely used mechanism for validating the theoretical models of networking and communication systems. Although the claims made based on simulations are considered to be reliable, how reliable they really are is best determined with real-world implementation trials.Simulation Technologies in Networking and Communications: Selecting the Best Tool for the Test addresses the spectrum of issues regarding the different mechanisms related to simulation technologies in networking and communications fields. Focusing on the practice of simulation testing instead of the theory, it presents

  3. Mountain bicycle frame testing as an example of practical implementation of hybrid simulation using RTFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, Waldemar; Kuś, Wacław

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents a practical implementation of hybrid simulation using Real Time Finite Element Method (RTFEM). Hybrid simulation is a technique for investigating dynamic material and structural properties of mechanical systems by performing numerical analysis and experiment at the same time. It applies to mechanical systems with elements too difficult or impossible to model numerically. These elements are tested experimentally, while the rest of the system is simulated numerically. Data between the experiment and numerical simulation are exchanged in real time. Authors use Finite Element Method to perform the numerical simulation. The following paper presents the general algorithm for hybrid simulation using RTFEM and possible improvements of the algorithm for computation time reduction developed by the authors. The paper focuses on practical implementation of presented methods, which involves testing of a mountain bicycle frame, where the shock absorber is tested experimentally while the rest of the frame is simulated numerically.

  4. Development of Simulants to Support Mixing Tests for High Level Waste and Low Activity Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EIBLING, RUSSELLE.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop two different types of simulants to support vendor agitator design studies and mixing studies. The initial simulant development task was to develop rheologically-bounding physical simulants and the final portion was to develop a nominal chemical simulant which is designed to match, as closely as possible, the actual sludge from a tank. The physical simulants to be developed included a lower and upper rheologically bounded: pretreated low activity waste (LAW) physical simulant; LAW melter feed physical simulant; pretreated high level waste (HLW) physical simulant; HLW melter feed physical simulant. The nominal chemical simulant, hereafter referred to as the HLW Precipitated Hydroxide simulant, is designed to represent the chemical/physical composition of the actual washed and leached sludge sample. The objective was to produce a simulant which matches not only the chemical composition but also the physical properties of the actual waste sample. The HLW Precipitated Hydroxide simulant could then be used for mixing tests to validate mixing, homogeneity and representative sampling and transferring issues. The HLW Precipitated Hydroxide simulant may also be used for integrated nonradioactive testing of the WTP prior to radioactive operation

  5. Consideration of characteristic values of unleaded sliding layer systems in tests and in EHD simulations; Beruecksichtigung von Kenngroessen bleifreier Gleitschichtsysteme in Test und EHD-Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiadas, A.; Schubert, W. [KS Gleitlager GmbH, St. Leon-Rot (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Composite materials for hydrodynamic plain bearings are tested on engine like test rigs in order to assess their mechanical and tribological behavior. The determined characteristic values can be used either in a direct comparison to the actual application or as well for the evaluation of EHD-simulations. (orig.)

  6. Validation of RETRAN-03 by simulating a peach bottom turbine trip and boiloff at the full integral simulation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westacott, J.L.; Peterson, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the RETRAN-03 computer code is validated by simulating two tests that were performed at the Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) facility. The RETRAN-03 results of a turbine trip (test 4PTT1) and failure to maintain water level at decay power (test T1QUV) are compared with the FIST test data. The RETRAN-03 analysis of test 4PTT1 is compared with a previous TRAC-BWR analysis of the test. Sensitivity to various model nodalizations and RETRAN-03 slip options are studied by comparing results of test T1QUV. The predicted thermal-hydraulic responses of both tests agree well with the test data. The pressure response of test 4PTT1 and the boiloff rate for test T1QUV are accurately predicted. Core uncovery time is found to be sensitive to the upper downcomer and upper plenum nodalization. The RETRAN-03 algebraic and dynamic slip options produce similar results for test T1QUV

  7. ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) system description for second simulated fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The ROSA-IV Program's Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) is a test facility for integral simulation of thermal-hydraulic response of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) during small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) and transients. In this facility, the PWR core nuclear fuel rods are simulated using electric heater rods. The simulated fuel assembly which was installed during the facility construction was replaced with a new one in 1988. The first test with this second simulated fuel assembly was conducted in December 1988. This report describes the facility configuration and characteristics as of this date (December 1988) including the new simulated fuel assembly design and the facility changes which were made during the testing with the first assembly as well as during the renewal of the simulated fuel assembly. (author)

  8. TERRAIN, CITY OF DALLAS, DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain Submission for Cass County, MO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Bark River PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS Terrain Submission for Lee County MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Mono, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain for Greer County, Oklahoma, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Angelina County, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. Terrain Sumbission for Howard County NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN Submission for Outagamie Countywide DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR VOLUSIA COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  18. Terrain, CEDAR RAPIDS, LINN COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DOGWOOD RUN TERRAIN, YORK COUNTY, PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  20. DCS Terrain Submission for Irwin, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Stephens, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN Submission for Waushara Countywide DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Dawes County, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain for Middlesex County, NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  5. DCS Terrain Submission for Seminole, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submission for Chemung County, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for Garvin, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS Terrain Submission for Winston County, AL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain for Jasper County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN DATA CAPTURE STANDARDS, Bedford PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  11. TERRAIN DATA, CITY OF CARSON CITY, NV

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, ESSEX COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS - Coastal PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain Submission for Fulton County, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Miami County, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain Submittal for Socorro County NM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain for HOUSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. Digital Terrain Submittal for Duval County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain for Clay County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR KNOX COUNTY, TN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, UPPER CUMBERLAND WATERSHED, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...