WorldWideScience

Sample records for terminally ill patients

  1. Multidisciplinary care of the terminally ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, S; Coyle, N; Payne, R

    2000-04-01

    This article discusses sedation, the assessment and management of physical symptoms, and symptom-assessment scales for the terminally ill patient. The evaluation of the ability of the family or community to care for a terminally ill patient in pain also is discussed.

  2. Living with a terminal illness: patients' priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Helen; MacLeod, Rod; Brander, Penny; McPherson, Kath

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of terminal illness and its consequences has been predominantly based on models derived from expert definition, rather than the patient's perspective. More recently, quality of life tools have been developed to enable patient choice in responses. However, an even broader approach may be needed to help identify goals for care for patients who are terminally ill. The aim of this paper is to report on an exploratory, qualitative study exploring what people living with terminal illness considered were the areas of priority in their lives. Ten people living with terminal cancer were interviewed. Analysis of the interviews incorporated principles of narrative analysis and grounded theory. Over 30 categories were identified and collated into five inter-related themes (personal/intrinsic factors, external/extrinsic factors, future issues, perceptions of normality and taking charge) encompassing the issues of importance to all participants. Each theme focused on 'life and living' in relation to life as it was or would be without illness. Practical issues of daily living and the opportunity to address philosophical issues around the meaning of life emerged as important areas. The central theme, 'taking charge', concerned with people's levels of life engagement, was integrally connected to all other themes. The findings suggest that the way in which health professionals manage patients' involvement in matters such as symptom relief can impact on existential areas of concern. Understanding patients' perspectives in relation to each theme may assist health professionals to develop management strategies appropriate to their needs. The findings challenge some aspects of traditional 'expert-defined' outcome measures. As this was an exploratory study, further work is needed to test and develop the model presented.

  3. Anxiety in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolva, Elissa; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William; Brescia, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Context Anxiety in terminal cancer is linked to diminished quality of life, yet overall it is poorly understood with regard to prevalence and relationship to other aspects of psychological distress. Objectives This study examines anxiety in terminally ill cancer patients, including the prevalence of anxiety symptoms, the relationship between anxiety and depression, differences in anxiety between participants receiving inpatient palliative care and those receiving outpatient care, and characteristics that distinguish highly anxious from less anxious patients. Methods Participants were 194 patients with terminal cancer. Approximately half (n = 103) were receiving inpatient care in a palliative care facility and half (n = 91) were receiving outpatient care in a tertiary care cancer center. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression, and was administered along with measures of hopelessness, desire for hastened death, and social support. Results Moderately elevated anxiety symptoms were found in 18.6% of participants (n = 36) and 12.4% (n = 24) had clinically significant anxiety symptoms. Level of anxiety did not differ between the two treatment settings. However, participants receiving palliative care reported significantly higher levels of depression and desire for hastened death. A multivariate prediction model indicated that belief in an afterlife, social support, and anxiolytic and antidepressant use were unique, significant predictors of anxiety. Conclusion Severity of anxiety symptoms did not differ between the study sites, suggesting that anxiety may differ from depression and desire for hastened death in the course that it takes over the duration of terminal cancer. PMID:21565460

  4. How music-inspired weeping can help terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Kay

    2011-09-01

    Music's power to improve the 'human condition' has been acknowledged since ancient times. Something as counter-intuitive as weeping in response to music can ameliorate suffering for a time even for terminally ill patients. Several benefits-including catharsis, communication, and experiencing vitality-can be associated with grieving in response to "sad" music. In addressing the potential rewards of such an activity for terminally ill patients, this author combines concepts from philosopher Jerrold R. Levinson's article, entitled "Music and Negative Emotion," an illustration from a major motion picture, and supporting research from medical reports and aesthetic writings. Carefully offering this experience is recommended for patients who retain the capacity to express preference.

  5. Dehydration in terminally ill patients. Is it appropriate palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, M; Bell, E R; Smith, S A; Tischler, J F; Veglia, J M

    1993-01-01

    Technological advances in artificial feeding and intravenous hydration play an important role in preserving life and facilitating patient recovery. In terminally ill patients, however, many hospice workers have observed that discontinuing artificial nutrition and hydration is more beneficial. This article presents three case reports from a hospice setting that demonstrate the palliative benefits of dehydration. The authors discuss possible physiologic explanations for observed dehydration-related phenomena and offer guidelines for determining when it is appropriate to decrease or discontinue nutritional support and hydration by artificial means.

  6. Should blood cultures be performed in terminally Ill cancer patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Asai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: No evidence-based guidelines or protocols to treat the infection-related symptoms in cancer patients with terminal stages have been established. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed all the patients with terminal stage cancer who died between April 2009 and March 2010. The patients' background, the prevalence of infection and clinical outcomes, pathogens isolated, antibiotics used, and whether blood cultures and some of examinations were performed or not were evaluated. Results: A total of 62 (44 males and 18 females patients were included in this study. The median age was 73 years (35-98 years. The most common cancer was that of the lung (n =59, 95.2%. A total of 32 patients were diagnosed with the following infections: Infection of respiratory tract in 27 (84.4%, of urinary tract in 4 (12.5%, and cholangitis in 1 (3.1%. Two cases (6.3% had pneumonia complicated with urinary tract infection. Blood cultures and antibiotic therapies were performed in 28 and 30 cases, respectively. Four (14.3% positive cultures were isolated from the blood obtained from 28 individual patients. As for clinical course, 3 (10% of them experienced improved symptoms after antibiotic therapy. Twenty-seven (90% patients were not confirmed as having any symptom improvement. Conclusions: Blood cultures and antibiotic therapy were limited, and might not be effective in terminally ill cancer patients with lung cancer. We suggest that administering an antibiotic therapy without performing a blood culture would be one of choices in those with respiratory tract infections if patients' life expectancy is short.

  7. Concept analysis of good death in terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granda-Cameron, Clara; Houldin, Arlene

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this concept analysis of good death was to examine the attributes of a good death and explore the changes of the concept over time and its impact on terminally ill patients. The method used for this analysis was the Rodgers' evolutionary method. A literature search was completed using Medline Ovid and Journal Storage (JSTOR).The findings describe the evolution of the good death concept over time from the prehistoric era followed by premodern, modern, and postmodern times. In addition, information is presented about surrogate terms, attributes, antecedents, and consequences associated with good death followed by analysis and discussion of the findings. General attributes of a good death include pain and symptom management, awareness of death, patient's dignity, family presence, family support, and communication among patient, family, and health care providers.

  8. Unfinished Business in Families of Terminally Ill with Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Ryoko; Arao, Harue; Takao, Ayumi; Masutani, Eiko; Morita, Tatsuya; Shima, Yasuo; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Aoyama, Maho; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-08-11

    Unfinished business often causes psychological issues after bereavement. Providing care for families of terminally ill patients with cancer to prevent unfinished business is important. To clarify the prevalence and types of unfinished business in families of end-of-life patients with cancer admitted to palliative care units (PCUs), explore depression and grief associated with unfinished business, and explore the factors affecting unfinished business. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, self-report questionnaire survey with 967 bereaved families of patients with cancer admitted to PCUs. The questionnaire assessed the presence/absence of unfinished business, content of unfinished business, depression, grief, process of preparedness, condition of the family and patient, and the degree of involvement of healthcare professionals. Questionnaires were sent to 967 families and 73.0% responded. In total, 26% of families had some unfinished business, with improvement of the patient-family relationship being a common type of unfinished business. Families with unfinished business had significantly higher depression and grief scores after bereavement compared with those without. Factors that influenced the presence/absence of unfinished business were preparedness for the patient's death (p=.001); discussion between the patient and family about the disease trajectory and way to spend daily life (pbusiness. Healthcare professionals should coordinate the appropriate timing for what the family wishes to do, with consideration of family dynamics including the family's preparedness, communication pattern, and relationships. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The Stigma Experienced by Terminally Ill Patients: Evidence From a Portuguese Ethnographic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hilário, Ana Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to offer an understanding of the ways in which terminally ill patients may face discrimination due to their visibly altered body. An ethnographic approach was adopted and fieldwork was conducted over 10 months in 2 inpatient hospice units in Portugal. Participant observation was complemented by 50 in-depth interviews with terminally ill patients, family members, and hospice staff. The stigma experienced by terminally ill patients derived mostly from the behavior of p...

  10. Evaluation of Care Provided to Terminally Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Margaret T.; Williams, T. Franklin

    1983-01-01

    Studied the quality of terminal care in 40 patients in an acute care facility and a chronic care facility. Minimial difficulty was observed in making the transition from active to comfort care. An evaluation method and a model of terminal care emphasizing improved communication and emotional support are proposed. (Author/JAC)

  11. The essence of spirituality of terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Co-Shi Chantal; Chen, Ching-Huey; Yen, Miaofen

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this hermeneutic study was to investigate the essence of spirituality of terminally ill patients. In-depth unstructured interviews were used as the method for data collection. In the six-month period of data collection, the researcher was in the role of a hospice palliative care consultant who directly took care of the subject patients in a hospice ward of a teaching hospital. The six subjects were selected purposively according to various demographic backgrounds. Interview transcripts provided the data for analysis. The results were composed of four constitutive patterns and ten themes. The first constitutive pattern was "Communion with Self" which included three themes: (1) Self-identity--spirituality is the discovery of the authentic self. (2) Wholeness--a human being is full of contradictions but still in wholeness. (3) Inner peace--spirituality is negotiating conflicts for self-reconciliation. The second constitutive pattern was "Communion with others" which included two themes: (1) Love--spirituality is a caring relationship but not an over-attachment to others. (2) Reconciliation--spirituality is to forgive and to be forgiven. The third constitutive pattern was "Communion with Nature" which included two themes: (1) Inspiration from the nature--spirituality is the resonance of the marvelous beauty of nature. (2) Creativity--spirituality is conceiving imaginatively. The fourth constitutive pattern was "Communion with Higher Being" which included three themes: (1) Faithfulness--spirituality is keeping the trust dependably. (2) Hope--spirituality is claiming possibilities. (3) Gratitude--spirituality is giving thanks and embracing grace. The scientific rigor of this qualitative research as well as the strength and limitations of the study are reported. Implications for hospice palliative care and future research are recommended.

  12. The Relationship between Dignity Status and Quality of Life in Iranian Terminally Ill Patients with Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Abbas; Rezaei, Masoud; Bahrami, Masoud; Abbasi, Mohammad; Hariri, Hesammodin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Palliative care is an approach that has been used to care for terminally ill patients. The current study was performed to assess the association between the status of patient dignity and quality of life (QOL) in Iranian terminally ill patients with cancer. Materials and Methods: This descriptive correlational study was conducted on 210 end-stage cancer patients (102 men and 108 women) who were referred to Seyed Al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, in 2015. To assess dignity status,...

  13. Favored subjects and psychosocial needs in music therapy in terminally ill cancer patients: a content analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Preissler, Pia; Kordovan, Sarah; Ullrich, Anneke; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Oechsle, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Research has shown positive effects of music therapy on the physical and mental well-being of terminally ill patients. This study aimed to identify favored subjects and psychosocial needs of terminally ill cancer patients during music therapy and associated factors. Methods Forty-one Patients receiving specialized inpatient palliative care prospectively performed a music therapy intervention consisting of at least two sessions (total number of sessions: 166; per patient average: 4,...

  14. Doctors' strategies when breaking bad news to terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichsen, Maria J; Strang, Peter M

    2003-08-01

    Breaking bad news to patients with a terminal disease is a difficult task for physicians. The aim of this study was to study how doctors perceive their strategies when giving information to cancer patients about discontinuing active tumour treatment. Thirty doctors with different demographic characteristics working with patients with cancer in Sweden participated. Semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed using a qualitative phenomenographic method. The goal when giving this information was described as making the patient understands while being as considerate as possible. However, the strategies for reaching this goal were different: (1) explaining and convincing information, (i.e., giving a long explanation about why treatment has to be discontinued); (2) softening the impact of the information, with the doctor recommending discontinuation of treatment; (3) and preparing either the patient or the physician himself/herself for the information; (4) adapting or tailoring the information to the patient, with the doctor actively seeking knowledge about the patient in order to be able to adapt the information to the patient's level, or with the doctor briefly describing the situation and then remaining silent, allowing room for the patient's reactions and questions (i.e., letting the patient take an active part). When giving information, the doctors' goal was to make patients understand, but the strategies differed depending on the context.

  15. Patient and caregiver characteristics related to completion of advance directives in terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Grace W K; Skaggs, Lauren; Yenokyan, Gayane; Kellogg, Anela; Johnson, Julie A; Lee, Mei Ching; Heinze, Katherine; Hughes, Mark T; Sulmasy, Daniel P; Kub, Joan; Terry, Peter B; Astrow, Alan B; Zheng, Jing; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; Nolan, Marie T

    2017-02-01

    There is a growing body of literature describing the characteristics of patients who plan for the end of life, but little research has examined how caregivers influence patients' advance care planning (ACP). The purpose of this study was to examine how patient and caregiver characteristics are associated with advance directive (AD) completion among patients diagnosed with a terminal illness. We defined AD completion as having completed a living will and/or identified a healthcare power of attorney. A convenience sample of 206 caregiver-patient dyads was included in the study. All patients were diagnosed with an advanced life-limiting illness. Trained research nurses administered surveys to collect information on patient and caregiver demographics (i.e., age, sex, race, education, marital status, and individual annual income) and patients' diagnoses and completion of AD. Multivariate logistic regression was employed to model predictors for patients' AD completion. Over half of our patient sample (59%) completed an AD. Patients who were older, diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and with a caregiver who was Caucasian or declined to report an income level were more likely to have an AD in place. Our results suggest that both patient and caregiver characteristics may influence patients' decisions to complete an AD at the end of life. When possible, caregivers should be included in advance care planning for patients who are terminally ill.

  16. Loss and terminal illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, J Q

    1985-06-01

    The experience of terminal illness can best be viewed as a situation of multiple losses involving the dying person, family members and friends, and the health care providers engaged in offering services to them. It is a major transition during which the central participants must cope with the personal meanings of the forthcoming death as well as other losses brought about by the disease process, medical treatments, and the need to provide care for the dying person. How families adapt to the stresses and changes imposed by the experience of living with dying depends on their previous experiences with death, their established patterns of communication about serious matters, and their decision-making practices. Some individuals and families are at greater risk than others for developing maladaptive responses and behaviors during and after the experience of terminal illness. Risk factors to be considered in making hypotheses about the potential for maladaptive reactions include the strength of the attachment to the dying person, uncontrollable and distressing symptoms, and coping limitations associated with age and other factors contributing to increased vulnerability to the demands of continuous change. Working effectively with different kinds of families during the transition of terminal illness can best be accomplished within a conceptual framework built upon knowledge about people undergoing change. The concept of safe conduct can serve as an overall guide for the creation of nursing services designed to offer personalized care and accessibility of professional help at times of maximum need by the family. Assisting dying patients and their families toward the achievement of their personal goals is fundamental to the idea of safe conduct. The delivery of nursing care in terminal illness requires an orientation to assessment as an ongoing process that makes use of knowledge about disease processes, medical treatments, individual and group adaptations to loss, risk

  17. Spanish nurses' preparedness to care for hospitalised terminally ill patients and their daily approach to caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantzamendi, Maria; Addington-Hall, Julia; Saracibar, Maribel; Richardson, Alison

    2012-12-01

    To describe Spanish nurses' preparedness to care for hospitalised terminally ill patients and how this translates into care delivery. An exploratory, sequential mixed methods study with two stages. Stage I used unstructured observations of 22 hospital nurses over 235 hours to understand their daily reality, followed by semi-structured interviews with 21 nurses to elicit their perspectives. Stage 2 was a regional survey (65% response rate) concerned with hospital nurses' opinions of caring for terminally ill patients and their perceived competence. The nurses felt competent to provide physical but not emotional care for terminally ill patients. They reported that care could be improved, particularly through providing more emotional care. This coincided with an observed focus on physical care. The nurses reported a lack of support in caring for terminally ill patients and wanted more education on emotional issues and dealing with their own feelings. There is a need for an integrative approach in Spain that combines an educational programme with a supportive environment, focusing on developing nurses' competence to deliver emotional care and deal with their own feelings. Promoting a supportive environment might enable nurses to change their behaviour when caring for terminally ill patients and deal with patients' emotional as well as physical needs.

  18. The Stigma Experienced by Terminally Ill Patients: Evidence From a Portuguese Ethnographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilário, Ana Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to offer an understanding of the ways in which terminally ill patients may face discrimination due to their visibly altered body. An ethnographic approach was adopted and fieldwork was conducted over 10 months in 2 inpatient hospice units in Portugal. Participant observation was complemented by 50 in-depth interviews with terminally ill patients, family members, and hospice staff. The stigma experienced by terminally ill patients derived mostly from the behavior of peers, extended family members, and friends toward their visibly altered body. There was no evidence that these patients were discredited by their immediate family when they became visibly unwell; unlike what has been reported in previous studies. This finding could be related to the strong familial culture of Portuguese society.

  19. Symptoms, treatment and "dying peacefully" in terminally ill cancer patients: a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georges, J.J.; Philipsen, B.D.; van der Heide, A.; van der Wal, G.; van der Maas, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Goals: The aims of this study were to describe the symptoms, their treatment during the final months of life of terminally ill cancer patients and to assess characteristics of the dying process. Patients and methods: We used a prospective study design. From a representative sample of physicians who

  20. Symptoms, treatment and "dying peacefully" in terminally ill cancer patients: a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georges, J.J.; Philipsen, B.D.; Heide, van der A.; Wal, van der G.; Maas, van der P.J.

    2005-01-01

    GOALS: The aims of this study were to describe the symptoms, their treatment during the final months of life of terminally ill cancer patients and to assess characteristics of the dying process. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used a prospective study design. From a representative sample of physicians who

  1. Care of terminally-ill patients: an opinion survey among critical care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Background: Modern medicine has allowed physicians to support the dying terminally-ill patient with artificial means. However, a common dilemma ..... Withholding therapy is more acceptable among physicians as doctors in general withhold information about interventions judged too futile to offer. They thus keep greater ...

  2. Palliative care for terminally ill patients in the Netherlands: Dutch government policy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    There is a broad range of palliative care available in the Netherlands. There are many options for obtaining palliative care at home. The care that terminally ill patients need can also be provided in nursing homes, care homes, hospitals and hospices. Government policy in this field is one of the

  3. Palliative management of malignant bowel obstruction in terminally Ill patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshit A Thaker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mr. P was a 57-year-old man who presented with symptoms of bowel obstruction in the setting of a known metastatic pancreatic cancer. Diagnosis of malignant bowel obstruction was made clinically and radiologically and he was treated conservatively (non-operativelywith octreotide, metoclopromide and dexamethasone, which provided good control over symptoms and allowed him to have quality time with family until he died few weeks later with liver failure. Bowel obstruction in patients with abdominal malignancy requires careful assessment. The patient and family should always be involved in decision making. The ultimate goals of palliative care (symptom management, quality of life and dignity of death should never be forgotten during decision making for any patient.

  4. Terminally ill patients and Jehovah's Witnesses: teaching acceptance of patients' refusals of vital treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, B S; Harding, T W

    2002-05-01

    To find out whether and how the teaching of medical ethics can influence attitudes on accepting treatment refusals. Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to 4 groups of students at the University of Geneva who had participated (P) or not (nP) in teaching modules on medical law and ethics. One vignette described a terminally ill patient refusing mechanical ventilation, another a Jehovah's Witness refusing a life-saving blood transfusion. 127 medical and 168 law students. 5-point Likert scale of responses to the vignettes reaching from certain acceptance to certain non-acceptance of the treatment refusal. More than 80% of law students (nP) said that a good physician should accept the terminally ill patient's refusal. 84% (P) compared to 68% (nP) of medical students (P=0.03) would accept this refusal. The acceptance of the Jehovah's Witness refusal of a life-saving transfusion was less among all students. Students from the groups (P) reported significantly more often (P accept (76% of medical students) or that a good physician should accept (63% of law students) the treatment refusal of the Jehovah's Witness than medical students (48%) and law students (27%) from the two other groups (nP). (P) students showed significantly more acceptance of treatment refusals in the hypothetical case scenarios than (nP) students from the same faculty. Religion, cultural origin and school education of the parents had less influence on attitudes than participation in ethical teaching and type of student (medicine vs. law).

  5. The Relationship between Dignity Status and Quality of Life in Iranian Terminally Ill Patients with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Abbas; Rezaei, Masoud; Bahrami, Masoud; Abbasi, Mohammad; Hariri, Hesammodin

    2017-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach that has been used to care for terminally ill patients. The current study was performed to assess the association between the status of patient dignity and quality of life (QOL) in Iranian terminally ill patients with cancer. This descriptive correlational study was conducted on 210 end-stage cancer patients (102 men and 108 women) who were referred to Seyed Al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, in 2015. To assess dignity status, we used the Patient Dignity Inventory. The Persian version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire was used for QOL assessment. There was a significant negative association between total dignity status and QOL scales. In addition, significant negative relationship was observed between dignity-related domains (loss of worth sense: r = -0.50, P uncertainty: r = -0.51, P < 0.001; symptom distress: r = -0.62, P < 0.001; and loss of autonomy: r = -0.61, P < 0.001) and functional scale and some subscales of the QOL scale. In contrast, a significant positive relationship was found between dignity-related domains, and total symptom scale and fatigue. No significant relationship was observed between different items of dignity and global health status/QOL scale. High dignity status in terminally ill patients was associated with higher QOL in terms of functional intactness and lower symptom distress. Further studies are necessary to shed light to our findings.

  6. Nursing the dying: essential elements in the care of terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, M M T; da Silva, M J P; Francisco, M C P B

    2004-09-01

    To verify those aspects of care that nurses view as important when assisting patients beyond therapeutic possibilities and who are not under intensive care. (1) To find out how nurses cope with daily confrontation with the death and suffering of dying patients, (2) To identify whether nurses feel it is important to have communication skills in order to assist the terminally ill patient, (3) To estimate nurses' degree of work satisfaction, and (4) To explore the humane aspects of nursing assistance to the dying. Data were collected in January and February of 2002 by means of individual semistructured interviews with 14 nurses from the unit of haematology at a general hospital in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and further analysed according to the qualitative method proposed by Bardin (1977). We found that Brazilian nurses caring for dying patients should be receiving psychological and emotional support. Results also highlighted different individual approaches in the endeavour to communicate with terminally ill patients, as well as the avoidance patterns developed by some nurses. The latter appeared to be as a result of personal difficulties in coping with the reality of human suffering and death. Finally, there is a need for better preparation in communication skills for nurses caring for terminally ill patients. Although the number of interviewed nurses in our study was small, the results corroborated the findings of other studies on the subject.

  7. Oral health conditions affect functional and social activities of terminally-ill cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D.J.; Epstein, J.B.; Yao, Y.; Wilkie, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Oral conditions are established complications in terminally-ill cancer patients. Yet despite significant morbidity, the characteristics and impact of oral conditions in these patients are poorly documented. The study objective was to characterize oral conditions in terminally-ill cancer patients to determine the presence, severity, and the functional and social impact of these oral conditions. Methods This was an observational clinical study including terminally-ill cancer patients (2.5–3 week life expectancy). Data were obtained via the Oral Problems Scale (OPS) that measures the presence of subjective xerostomia, orofacial pain, taste change, and the functional/social impact of oral conditions and a demographic questionnaire. A standardized oral examination was used to assess objective salivary hypofunction, fungal infection, mucosal erythema, and ulceration. Regression analysis and t test investigated the associations between measures. Results Of 104 participants, most were ≥50 years of age, female, and high-school educated; 45% were African American, 43% Caucasian, and 37% married. Oral conditions frequencies were: salivary hypofunction (98%), mucosal erythema (50%), ulceration (20%), fungal infection (36%), and other oral problems (46%). Xerostomia, taste change, and orofacial pain all had significant functional impact; poral ulcerations had significantly more orofacial pain with a social impact than patients without ulcers (p=.003). Erythema was significantly associated with fungal infection and with mucosal ulceration (pOral conditions significantly affect functional and social activities in terminally-ill cancer patients. Identification and management of oral conditions in these patients should therefore be an important clinical consideration. PMID:24232310

  8. The influence of family adaptability and cohesion on anxiety and depression of terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Yoon; Jeong, Young-Jin; Lee, Junyong; Moon, Nayun; Bang, Inho; Kim, Hyunju; Yun, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Yong-I; Jeon, Tae-Hee

    2017-10-04

    This study investigated the effect of family members on terminally ill cancer patients by measuring the relationship of the presence of the family caregivers, visiting time by family and friends, and family adaptability and cohesion with patient's anxiety and depression. From June, 2016 to March, 2017, 100 terminally ill cancer patients who were admitted to a palliative care unit in Seoul, South Korea, were surveyed, and their medical records were reviewed. The Korean version of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales III and Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale was used. Chi-square and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. The results of the chi-square analysis showed that the presence of family caregivers and family visit times did not have statistically significant effects on anxiety and depression in terminally ill cancer patients. In multiple logistic regression, when adjusted for age, sex, ECOG PS, and the monthly average income, the odds ratios (ORs) of the low family adaptability to anxiety and depression were 2.4 (1.03-5.83) and 5.4 (1.10-26.87), respectively. The OR of low family cohesion for depression was 5.4 (1.10-27.20) when adjusted for age, sex, ECOG PS, and monthly average household income. A higher family adaptability resulted in a lower degree of anxiety and depression in terminally ill cancer patients. The higher the family cohesion, the lower the degree of depression in the patient. The presence of the family caregiver and the visiting time by family and friends did not affect the patient's anxiety and depression.

  9. Preference for place-of-death among terminally ill cancer patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Sondergaard, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2011 Preference for place-of-death among terminally ill cancer patients in Denmark Achieving home death is often seen as an important endpoint in palliative care, but no studies of the preferred place-of-death have yet been conducted in Scandinavia. Furthermore, we do not know...... preference for home death weakened as death approached (down to 64.4%). A better congruence was seen between relatives' and GPs' accounts of preference for place of death at the end of the palliative period (κ 0.71) than between relatives' and CNs' accounts (κ 0.37). In conclusion, bereaved relatives (and...... GPs and CNs) report retrospectively that most terminally ill cancer patients wish to die at home. The preference weakened significantly as death approached. The agreement between relatives' and GPs' accounts on patients' preferences at the end of the palliative period was 'substantial', whereas...

  10. Impact of awareness of terminal illness and use of palliative care or intensive care unit on the survival of terminally ill patients with cancer: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young Ho; Lee, Myung Kyung; Kim, Seon Young; Lee, Woo Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae; Do, Young Rok; Kim, Samyong; Heo, Dae Seog; Choi, Jong Soo; Park, Sang Yoon; Jeong, Hyun Sik; Kang, Jung Hun; Kim, Si-Young; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Jung Lim; Park, Sook Ryun; Park, Sohee

    2011-06-20

    We conducted this study to evaluate the validity of the perception that awareness of their terminal prognosis and use of palliative care or nonuse of an intensive care unit (ICU) causes patients to die sooner than they would otherwise. In this prospective cohort study at 11 university hospitals and the National Cancer Center in Korea, we administered questionnaires to 619 consecutive patients immediately after they were determined by physicians to be terminally ill. We followed patients during 6 months after enrollment and assessed how their survival was affected by the disclosure of terminal illness and administration of palliative care or nonuse of the ICU. In a follow-up of 481 patients and 163.8 person-years, we identified 466 deceased patients. Nineteen percent of the patients died within 1 month, while 41.3% lived for 3 months, and 17.7% lived for 6 months. Once the cancer was judged terminal, the median survival time was 69 days. On multivariate analysis, neither patient awareness of terminal status at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.20; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.51), use of a palliative care facility (aHR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.21), nor general prostration (aHR, 1.23; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.57) was associated with reduced survival. Use of the ICU (aHR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.05) and poor Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (aHR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.71) were significantly associated with poor survival. Patients' being aware that they are dying and entering a palliative care facility or ICU does not seem to influence patients' survival.

  11. Clinical characteristics and survival outcomes of terminally ill patients undergoing withdrawal of mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Shin; Lee, Shu-Hui; Hung, Chia-Yen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Kao, Chen-Yi; Wang, Hung-Ming; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2017-10-11

    Withdrawal of mechanical ventilation is an important, but rarely explored issue in Asia during end-of-life care. This study aimed to describe the clinical characteristics and survival outcomes of terminally ill patients undergoing withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in Taiwan. One-hundred-thirty-five terminally ill patients who had mechanical ventilation withdrawn between 2013 and 2016, from a medical center in Taiwan, were enrolled. Patients' clinical characteristics and survival outcomes after withdrawal of mechanical ventilation were analyzed. The three most common diagnoses were organic brain lesion, advanced cancer, and newborn sequelae. The initiator of the withdrawal process was family, medical personnel, and patient him/herself. The median survival time was 45 min (95% confidence interval, 33-57 min) after the withdrawal of mechanical ventilation, and 102 patients (75.6%) died within one day after extubation. The median time from diagnosis of disease to receiving life-sustaining treatment and artificial ventilation support, receiving life-sustaining treatment and artificial ventilation support to "Withdrawal meeting," "Withdrawal meeting" to ventilator withdrawn, and ventilator withdrawn to death was 12.1 months, 19 days, 1 day, and 0 days, respectively. Patients with a diagnosis of advanced cancer and withdrawal initiation by the patients themselves had a significantly shorter time interval between receiving life-sustaining treatment and artificial ventilation support to "Withdrawal meeting" compared to those with non-cancer diseases and withdrawal initiation by family or medical personnel. This study is the first observational study to describe the patients' characteristics and elaborate on the survival outcome of withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in patients who are terminally ill in an Asian population. Understanding the clinical characteristics and survival outcomes of mechanical ventilation withdrawal might help medical personnel provide

  12. Characteristics of Oral Problems and Effects of Oral Care in Terminally Ill Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Nobuhisa

    2017-06-01

    Various distresses appear in the terminal stage of cancer. Oral problems including dry mouth, stomatitis and candidiasis are one of the important problems which should be resolved. The purpose of this study was to investigate oral problems in this stage and improvement of dry mouth by oral care. The study subjects were consecutive terminally ill cancer patients admitted over the past 2 years. Patients were divided based on the status of oral food intake into good oral food intake group (≥30%) and poor oral food intake group. The following 3 items were retrospectively investigated: 1) The incidences of these oral problems, 2) Severity of dry mouth and complication with other oral problems, 3) Improvement of dry mouth using standard oral care by nursing staff and specialist oral care including dentists as needed. There were 115 and 158 patients in good and poor oral intake groups, respectively. 1) The incidences of dry mouth, stomatitis, and candidiasis were significantly higher in poor oral intake group ( p oral intake groups, respectively ( p oral intake group ( p = 0.0002). 3) The rate of dry mouth improvement by oral care was 100% in Grade-1, 86% in Grade-2 and 81% in Grade-3. Oral problems occur in many of terminally ill cancer patients. Accurate diagnosis of oral problems and corresponding appropriate interventions are important for improving quality of end-of-life care.

  13. Meaninglessness in terminally ill cancer patients: a validation study and nurse education intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tatsuya; Murata, Hisayuki; Hirai, Kei; Tamura, Keiko; Kataoka, Jun; Ohnishi, Hideki; Akizuki, Nobuya; Kurihara, Yukie; Akechi, Tatsuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2007-08-01

    Recent empirical studies revealed that fostering patients' perception of meaning in their life is an essential task for palliative care clinicians. However, few studies have reported the effects of training programs for nurses specifically aimed at improving skills to relieve the meaninglessness of terminally ill cancer patients, and we have had no specific measurement instruments. The primary aims of this study were 1) to validate measurement tools to quantify nurses' self-reported practice and attitudes toward caring for terminally ill cancer patients feeling meaninglessness and 2) to explore the effects of the five-hour educational workshop focusing on meaninglessness on nurses' self-reported practice, attitudes toward caring for such patients, confidence, burnout, death anxiety, and meaning of life. A quasi-experimental pre-post questionnaire survey was performed on 147 nurses. The questionnaire was distributed before the intervention workshop and one and six months after. The workshop consisted of lecture, role-play, and the exercise of assessment and care planning based on two vignette verbatim records. First, using the first questionnaire sample and an additional sample of 20 nurses for the test-retest examination, we validated a six-item Self-Reported Practice scale, and an eight-item Attitudes Toward Caring for Patients Feeling Meaninglessness scale with three subscales (Willingness to Help, Positive Appraisal, and Helplessness). The nurses also completed a scale to assess confidence in caring for terminally ill patients with meaninglessness, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Death Attitude Inventory, the Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying scale, the Self-Reported Practice Score in General Communication, and the three pain-related items from the Palliative Care Quiz for Nursing. For the Self-Reported Practice scale and the subscales of the Attitudes Toward Caring for Patients Feeling Meaninglessness scale, the Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0

  14. Psychological responses of terminally ill patients who are experiencing suffering: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Juarez, Rafael; Garcia-Caro, María Paz; Campos-Calderon, Concepcion; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline; Gomez-Chica, Antonio; Marti-García, Celia; Cruz-Quintana, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Suffering is not only characterized by the feeling of being threatened, but also by the feeling of impotence to deal with such a threat. Literature identifies a terminal illness as a period during which several experiences implying an intense suffering are endured, but little attention has been paid to the psychological responses when reacting to threats. Identify the psychological responses that terminally ill patients put in place to face up to the demands of the end of life, as a foundation for future nursing interventions. Qualitative methodology with an interpretative phenomenological approach. Different hospitals health centers around the region of Granada (Spain). Twenty-four participants were finally chosen to take part in the research. The sampling procedure was intentional, and it was made taking into account exclusion and inclusion criteria. Patients with a cognitive impairment, who had been diagnosed with psychiatric alterations, who at that time suffered from uncontrollable symptoms such as intense pain were excluded from the sample. The patients were interviewed following a script (semistructured interview) carried out using the suggested theoretical framework. The interviews were analyzed using the sequence suggested by Strauss and Corbin: Open, axial and selective codification. The analysis of the participants' answers to the different questions of the semi-structured interview has allowed us to identify a main category "To realize that life is short". There are three categories where the different ways of facing up to the end of life concentrate: "Re-Evaluation of life", "Opportunity for growth", "Resignation/Acceptance". Nurses, have to try to alleviate the impact the terminal illness has on the subject, not only by controlling the symptoms but also encouraging the patients responses, by promoting the feeling of satisfaction in life, providing honest and sensitive information, establishing with the patient realistic goals, and facilitating a

  15. Sedation for terminally ill patients with cancer with uncontrollable physical distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Hiroyuki; Ueoka, Hiroshi; Takeyama, Hiroyasu; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Morita, Tatsuya

    2005-02-01

    Relief of distressful symptoms in terminally ill patients with cancer is of prime importance. Use of sedation to accomplish this has been the focus of recent medical studies in countries other than Japan. We investigated the influence on consciousness of sedative drugs in a Japanese hospice. We defined sedation as medical procedure to decrease level of consciousness in order to relieve severe physical distress refractory to standard interventions. We excluded increases in doses of morphine or other analgesic drugs resulting in secondary somnolence from the present study. We reviewed medical records of patients receiving sedation among 124 consecutive patients admitted to our palliative care unit between January and December in 1999. The 63 patients who received sedation (50.3%) died an average of 3.4 days after its initiation. Major symptoms requiring sedation were dyspnea, general malaise/restlessness, pain, agitation, and nausea/vomiting. The Palliative Performance Status (PPS) just before sedation was 20 or less in 83% of patients. Drugs administered for sedation were midazolam, haloperidol, scopolamine hydrobromide, and chlorpromazine. During the few days before death, sedated patients were significantly more drowsy and less responsive than that in those receiving non-sedative treatment. Our data suggest the effectiveness of sedation in relieving severe, refractory physical symptoms in terminally ill Japanese patients with cancer. Further investigation to confirm safety and effectiveness of sedation in this context is warranted.

  16. The effect of music therapy on anxiety in patients who are terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne-Thompson, Anne; Grocke, Denise

    2008-05-01

    The literature supporting the use of music therapy in palliative care is growing. However, the number of quantitative research studies investigating the use of music therapy in palliative care, and specifically anxiety, is limited. The aim of this research project was to examine the effectiveness of a single music therapy session in reducing anxiety for terminally ill patients. A randomized-controlled design was implemented and the following hypotheses tested. There will be a significant difference between the experimental and control groups on anxiety levels as demonstrated by the anxiety measurement of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and heart rate. The experimental group received a single music therapy intervention and the control group received a volunteer visit. Twenty-five participants with end-stage terminal disease receiving inpatient hospice services were recruited. The first hypothesis was supported. Results demonstrated a significant reduction in anxiety for the experimental group on the anxiety measurement of the ESAS (p = 0.005). A post hoc analysis found significant reductions in other measurements on the ESAS in the experimental group, specifically pain (p = 0.019), tiredness (p = 0.024) and drowsiness (p = 0.018). The second hypothesis was not supported. The study supports the use of music therapy to manage anxiety in terminally ill patients. Further studies are required to examine the effect of music therapy over a longer time period, as well as addressing other symptom issues.

  17. Favored subjects and psychosocial needs in music therapy in terminally ill cancer patients: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Pia; Kordovan, Sarah; Ullrich, Anneke; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Oechsle, Karin

    2016-05-12

    Research has shown positive effects of music therapy on the physical and mental well-being of terminally ill patients. This study aimed to identify favored subjects and psychosocial needs of terminally ill cancer patients during music therapy and associated factors. Forty-one Patients receiving specialized inpatient palliative care prospectively performed a music therapy intervention consisting of at least two sessions (total number of sessions: 166; per patient average: 4, range, 2-10). Applied music therapy methods and content were not pre-determined. Therapeutic subjects and psychosocial needs addressed in music therapy sessions were identified from prospective semi-structured "field notes" using qualitative content analysis. Patient- and treatment-related characteristics as well as factors related to music and music therapy were assessed by questionnaire or retrieved from medical records. Seven main categories of subjects were identified: "condition, treatment, further care", "coping with palliative situation", "emotions and feelings", "music and music therapy", "biography", "social environment", and "death, dying, and spiritual topics". Patients addressed an average of 4.7 different subjects (range, 1-7). Some subjects were associated with gender (p = .022) and prior impact of music in patients' life (p = .012). The number of subjects per session was lower when receptive music therapy methods were used (p = .040). Psychosocial needs were categorized into nine main dimensions: "relaxing and finding comfort", "communication and dialogue", "coping and activation of internal resources", "activity and vitality", "finding expression", "sense of self and reflection", "finding emotional response", "defocusing and diversion", and "structure and hold". Patients expressed an average of 4.9 psychosocial needs (range, 1-8). Needs were associated with age, parallel art therapy (p = .010), role of music in patient's life (p = .021), and the applied music

  18. Ethics of physiotherapy practice in terminally ill patients in a developing country, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigbo, N N; Ezeome, E R; Onyeka, T C; Amah, C C

    2015-12-01

    Physiotherapy has been widely defined as a healthcare profession that assesses, diagnoses, treats, and works to prevent disease and disability through physical means. The World Confederation for Physical Therapy describes physiotherapy as providing services to people and populations to develop, maintain, and restore maximum movement and functional ability throughout the lifespan. Physiotherapists working with terminally ill patients face a myriad of ethical issues which have not been substantially discussed in bioethics especially in the African perspective. In the face of resource limitation in developing countries, physiotherapy seems to be a cost-effective means of alleviating pain and distressing symptoms at the end-of-life, ensuring a more dignified passage from life to death, yet referrals to physiotherapy are not timely. Following extensive literature search using appropriate keywords, six core ethical themes related to physiotherapy in terminally ill patients were identified and using the four principles of bioethics (patient's autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice), an ethical analysis of these themes was done to highlight the ethical challenges of physiotherapists working in a typical African setting such as Nigeria.

  19. Modifiable factors associated with caregiver burden among family caregivers of terminally ill Korean cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seok-Joon; Kim, Jong-Sung; Jung, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Samyong

    2014-05-01

    Higher caregiver burden is associated with poor quality of life among family caregivers. However, in Korea, very few studies have examined factors associated with caregiver burden. The present study investigated factors associated with caregiver burden among family caregivers of terminally ill Korean cancer patients, particularly modifiable factors as a potential target of intervention strategies. A cross-sectional study using self-administered questionnaires was performed. Sixty-four family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients who were admitted to the hospice-palliative care unit of a university hospital in South Korea were included. To identify caregiver burden, the Caregiver Reaction Assessment scale (CRA) was used in this study. Time spent in providing care per day, number of visits per week from other family members, family functioning, and a positive subscale, self-esteem, of the CRA were deemed as modifiable factors. Other sociodemographic, caregiving characteristics of the subjects were non-modifiable factors. Longer time spent providing care per day, fewer weekly visits from other family members, poor family functioning, and low self-esteem were considered as modifiable factors associated with caregiver burden. Low monthly income and the spouse being the family caregiver were non-modifiable factors. Our study has practical significance in that it identifies modifiable factors that can be used to devise intervention strategies. Developing and applying such intervention strategies for alleviating the factors associated with high caregiver burden could be important for improving the quality of life of both patients and their families.

  20. Experiences of truth disclosure in terminally ill cancer patients in palliative home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichsen, Maria; Lindholm, Ann; Milberg, Anna

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and preferences of terminally ill cancer patients regarding truth telling in the communication of poor prognoses. We recorded and transcribed interviews with 45 patients who knew their cancer was terminal, and analyzed their responses hermeneutically. Patients identified three different modes of truth: (1) the absolute objective truth that they are dying; (2) the partial truth about their condition including some facts but not all of the details; and (3) the desired truth, originating in the patient's own beliefs about a healthy or better life. Coping strategies were related to patients' preferred mode of truth: (1) facing the truth in order to take action; (2) facing some parts of the truth in order to maintain hope; and (3) hovering between facing and avoiding the truth. In their struggle for existential survival, patients used different coping strategies, changing from one to another depending upon the circumstances. Varying use of different coping strategies impacts on patient preferences concerning communication about bad news with their doctors. Truth-telling entails more than merely providing information related to the forthcoming death. It also concerns how physicians or other healthcare staff can support the patient's existential survival by fine-tuning the communication of "truth" according to the individuals' preferences.

  1. Symptoms, signs, problems, and diseases of terminally ill nursing home patients: a nationwide observational study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, H.E.; Deliens, L.H.J.; Ooms, M.E.; van der Steen, J.T.; van der Wal, G.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Nursing homes (NHs) are less well studied than hospices or hospitals as a setting for terminal care. For more targeted palliative care, more information is needed about the patient characteristics, symptoms, direct causes and underlying diseases, and incidence of terminally ill NH

  2. Prospective Study on Music Therapy in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients during Specialized Inpatient Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordovan, Sarah; Preissler, Pia; Kamphausen, Anne; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Oechsle, Karin

    2016-04-01

    This study was a prospective evaluation of feasibility, acceptance, and potential beneficial effects of music therapy in terminally ill cancer patients on a specialized palliative care inpatient ward. Intervention had to consist of at least two sessions, but frequency and duration was left to the patients` decision. Different music therapy methods were offered to the patient at the beginning of every session. Patients rated their subjective benefit. Disease-related and sociodemographic factors were considered as potentially influencing factors. A total of 166 music therapy sessions were performed with 41 patients (average, 4; range, 2-10). Average session duration was 41 minutes (range, 20-70). Most favored methods were therapeutic conversation in 84% of sessions; listening to relaxing music, 39%; playing an instrument, 31%; and music-lead imagination, 11%. Receptive music therapy was applied in 45%, active forms in 25%, a combination of both in 7%, and therapeutic conversation only in 23%. Music therapy was rated to be "helpful" in 68%. Positive effects were significantly associated with frequency (p = 0.009) and duration (p = 0.040), living in a partnership (p = 0.017), having children (p = 0.035), psycho-oncologic therapy (p = 0.043), experience with music therapy (p = 0.007), role of music in life (p = 0.035), playing an instrument (p = 0.021), and singing regularly (p = 0.003). Music therapy techniques, especially receptive methods, are feasible and well accepted in terminally ill cancer patients. Therapeutic conversation seems to play an important role. Frequency and duration of music therapy, previous experience with music and music therapy, as well as sociodemographic factors influence positive effects of music therapy.

  3. Communicating with the terminally-ill patient La comunicación con el moribundo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberio Alvarez Echeverri

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Some important elements of the relationship between physicians and their terminally-ill patients are discussed; with them it Is Intended to humanize such relationship and, besides, to alleviate the patient’s uncertainty; to orient his or her personal, familial and social life; to analyze the steps to be followed and to discern specific actions leading to the solution of problems; finally, to clarify positions towards life and death.

    En el presente articulo se discuten algunos elementos Importantes en las relaciones del médico con el paciente que está en fase terminal; con ellos se busca: disminuir la incertidumbre; orientar la vida personal, familiar y social; analizar los pasos a seguir y definir la acción especifica para la solución de los problemas; clarificar las posiciones ante la vida y la muerte y humanizar la relación del médico con el paciente moribundo. Se hace énfasis en el establecimiento de una comunicación adecuada con el enfermo terminal, manteniendo el debido respeto por sus creencias, costumbres y formas de ver la vida.

  4. Truth-telling to patients' terminal illness: what makes oncology nurses act individually?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-He; Tang, Fu-In; Liu, Chang-Yi; Chen, Mei-Bih; Liang, Te-Hsin; Sheu, Shuh-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Nurses encounter the challenge of truth-telling to patients' terminal illness (TTPTI) in their daily care activities, particularly for nurses working in the pervasive culture of family protectiveness and medical paternalism. This study aims to investigate oncology nurses' major responses to handling this issue and to explore what factors might explain oncology nurses' various actions. A pilot quantitative study was designed to describe full-time nurses' (n = 70) truth-telling experiences at an oncology centre in Taipei. The potential influencing factors of nurses' demographic data, clinical characteristics, and truth-telling attitudes were also explored. Most nurses expressed that truth-telling was a physician's responsibility. Nevertheless, 70.6% of nurses responded that they had performed truth-telling, and 20 nurses (29.4%) reported no experience. The reasons for inaction were "Truth-telling is not my duty", "Families required me to conceal the truth", and "Truth-telling is difficult for me". Based on a stepwise regression analysis, nurses' truth-telling acts can be predicted based on less perceived difficulty of talking about "Do not resuscitate" with patients, a higher perceived authorisation from the unit, and more oncology work experience (adjusted R² = 24.1%). Oncology care experience, perceived comfort in communication with terminal patients, and unit authorisation are important factors for cultivating nurses' professional accountability in truth-telling. Nursing leaders and educators should consider reducing nursing barriers for truth-telling, improving oncology nurses' professional accountability, and facilitating better quality care environments for terminal patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The attitudes of Greek physicians and lay people on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpa, Efi; Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Tsilika, Eleni; Sakkas, Pavlos; Patiraki, Elisabeth; Pistevou-Gombaki, Kyriaki; Galanos, Antonis; Vlahos, Lambros

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the attitudes of lay people and physicians regarding euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in terminally ill cancer patients in Greece. The sample consisted of 141 physicians and 173 lay people. A survey questionnaire was used concerning issues such as euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and so forth. Many physicians (42.6%) and lay people (25.4%, P = .002) reported that in the case of a cardiac and/or respiratory arrest, there would not be an effort to revive a terminally ill cancer patient. Only 8.1% of lay people and 2.1% of physicians agreed on physician-assisted suicide (P = .023). Many of the respondents, especially physicians, supported sedation but not euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. However, many of the respondents would prefer the legalization of a terminally ill patient's hastened death.

  6. Attachment style dimensions can affect prolonged grief risk in caregivers of terminally ill patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Carlo; Luciani, Massimiliano; Galli, Federico; Morelli, Emanuela; Cappelluti, Roberta; Penco, Italo; Aceto, Paola; Lombardo, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the predictive role of attachment dimensions on the risk of prolonged grief. Sixty caregivers of 51 terminally ill patients with cancer who had been admitted in a hospice were selected. Caregivers were interviewed using Attachment Scale Questionnaire, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, and Prolonged Grief Disorder 12 (PG-12). The consort caregivers showed higher PG-12 level compared to the sibling caregivers. Anxiety, depression, need for approval, and preoccupation with relationships levels were significantly correlated with PG-12 scores. Female gender, high levels of depression, and preoccupation with relationships significantly predicted higher levels of prolonged grief risk. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. The use of life review to enhance spiritual well-being in patients with terminal illnesses: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Cecilia W M; Ng, Marques S N; Chan, Carmen W H

    2017-12-01

    To conduct an integrative review of the current literature on using life review as an intervention to address the spiritual need of patients with terminal illnesses. Palliative care highlights the holistic approach of care including the spiritual aspect. Life review has been used in palliative nursing intending to enhance patients' emotional and spiritual well-being, and quality of life. However, there is a lack of publications that provide a structured overview on life review programmes and their effectiveness. Integrative review. The Whittemore and Knafl integrative review method was used. Five major online databases were included in our literature search. The keywords used were "life review" and "palliative care, terminal care, terminally ill, death & dying, hospice, spiritual wellbeing, spirituality". Seven primary papers were identified, critically appraised and synthesised in the final review. There are limited clinical studies on life review programmes for patients with terminal illness. The research design of these studies is too widely varied for meta-analysis. Here, we identified two major programmes of life review as an intervention to address the spiritual well-being of patients with terminal illness. However, repeated studies on the effectiveness of these two programmes are lacking. The shorter programme of life review is more likely to be applicable and effective for terminal patients. Further research in this area is required to provide strong evidence on the effectiveness and applicability of life review in patients receiving palliative care. This review adds weight to the need of a better understanding on the use of life review in addressing the spiritual needs of patients with terminal illness. Such understanding would provide evidence for the use of life review as an alternative approach in palliative care delivery. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Pregabalin prescription for terminally ill cancer patients receiving specialist palliative care in an acute hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Ryo; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Ise, Yuya; Suzuki, Norihito; Yokoyama, Yuta; Kizu, Junko; Katayama, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Pregabalin is recommended as an adjuvant analgesic for neuropathic cancer-related pain, and may be taken at all steps of the World Health Organization analgesic ladder. However, unlike opioids, pregabalin treatments are limited to an oral administration route. If patients have oral feeding difficulties, it is not possible to administer any drug as an adjuvant analgesic for neuropathic cancer-related pain. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the problems of pain control after pregabalin discontinuation in terminally ill cancer patients. Our subjects comprised cancer patients who died during their hospital stay and were referred between April 2013 and October 2015 to the palliative care team of the 899-bed Cancer Hospital at the Nippon Medical School Hospital in Japan. The medical records of each patient were retrospectively reviewed, and patient characteristics were recorded. We obtained data on 183 patients during the study period. Thirty-eight (20.8 %) patients were treated with pregabalin. Thirty-three (86.8 %) out of 38 patients were prescribed pregabalin for neuropathic cancer-related pain. The incidence of bony metastases was significantly higher in patients administered pregabalin than in those not taking the drug (non-pregabalin group 32.4 % vs pregabalin group 57.9 %). Pregabalin was ultimately discontinued in all patients, with the main reason being oral feeding difficulties (81.6 %). After the discontinuation of pregabalin, the amount of opioid drugs administered was increased in 56.5 % of patients with oral feeding difficulties. Our results demonstrated that the amount of opioid drugs administered was increased in more than 50 % of patients following the discontinuation of pregabalin, and was repeatedly increased for some patients. A new administration route is required for cancer patients unable to take oral medication. UMIN000022507. May 28, 2016 retrospectively registered.

  9. Influence of caregiver personality on the burden of family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Hyun; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Shim, Hyun-Jeong; Hwang, Jun-Eul; Chung, Ik-Joo; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2016-02-01

    To determine the influence of caregiver personality and other factors on the burden of family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients. We investigated a wide range of factors related to the patient-family caregiver dyad in a palliative care setting using a cross-sectional design. Caregiver burden was assessed using the seven-item short version of the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI-7). Caregiver personality was assessed using the 10-item short version of the Big Five Inventory (BFI-10), which measures the following five personality dimensions: extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness. Patient- and caregiver-related sociodemographic and psychological factors were included in the analysis because of their potential association with caregiver burden. Clinical patient data were obtained from medical charts or by using other measures. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to identify the independent factors associated with caregiver burden. We analyzed 227 patient-family caregiver dyads. The multivariate analysis revealed that caregiver extroversion was protective against caregiver burden, whereas depressive symptoms in caregivers were related to increased burden. Neuroticism was positively correlated with caregiver burden, but this relationship was nonsignificant following adjustment for depressive symptoms. Patient-related factors were not significantly associated with caregiver burden. Evaluating caregiver personality traits could facilitate identification of individuals at greater risk of high burden. Furthermore, depression screening and treatment programs for caregivers in palliative care settings are required to decrease caregiver burden.

  10. Oncology nurses' experiences with requests for assisted dying from terminally ill patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, D L

    2001-01-01

    To explore oncology nurses' experiences with receiving requests for assisted dying from terminally ill patients with cancer. Descriptive, naturalistic. RNs who identified themselves as direct care providers or clinical nurse specialist members of the Oncology Nursing Society. 40 oncology nurses who responded to a randomized, sequential direct mailing submitted 48 stories for analysis. Anonymously submitted written stories analyzed using Denzin's process of interpretive interactionism. The experience of receiving a request for assisted dying. Four main themes emerged from the thematic analysis: Control, Conflict, Covert Communication, and the Enduring Influence. Eleven subthemes included the Cry for Help, Hastening the Process, What if, Managing the Morphine, Countering With Palliative Care, Collision of Values, Sense of Distress, Dialogue Around the Request, Silent Knowing, the Unforgettable, and Reflections on Lessons Learned. Experiences included a mixture of direct-patient and family requests for pain relief, anticipatory fear of future pain, desire to end life before unacceptable deterioration, family requests to hasten the dying trajectory, and others. Stories reflected the larger societal struggle with desires to control life, health, and the dying process. Nurses should be prepared to respond to such requests in a compassionate and helpful way that is respectful of both the patient's and the nurse's personal values. Diversity of individual values and priorities may trigger some patients to seek assistance in controlling the timing and circumstances of death. Thus, continued study of nurse, patient, and family member experiences with this ethical dilemma is warranted.

  11. Preferred Place of Care and Death in Terminally Ill Patients with Lung and Heart Disease Compared to Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skorstengaard, Marianne H.; Neergaard, Mette A.; Andreassen, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The dual aim of this study is, first, to describe preferred place of care (PPOC) and preferred place of death (PPOD) in terminally ill patients with lung and heart diseases compared with cancer patients and second, to describe differences in level of anxiety among patients...... to be cared for and to die at home. Patients with cancer and heart diseases chose hospice as their second most common preference for both PPOC and PPOD, whereas patients with lung diseases chose nursing home and hospice equally frequent as their second most common preference. Regardless of their diagnosis......-sectional study. Setting: Eligible patients from the recruiting departments filled in questionnaires regarding sociodemographics, PPOC and PPOD, and level of anxiety. Results: Of the 354 eligible patients, 167 patients agreed to participate in the study. Regardless of their diagnosis, most patients wished...

  12. Palliative care services for Indian migrants in Australia: Experiences of the family of terminally Ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Shanmugasundaram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The way that health care systems in developing countries like India care for dying patients, has an impact on the expectations of such care for those who migrate to other countries faces. At the end of life, cultural issues may impact on the quality of life remaining and for that reason, it is important that particular cultural practices are understood. This paper describes a study that investigated the cultural issues of access to palliative care services for Indian migrants in Australia. Purpose of the Study: To investigate the experiences of the family members of terminally ill Indian migrants in Victoria, Australia. Objective of the Study: To explore the issues related to accessing palliative care services for Indian migrants; to identify the effectiveness of palliative care in supporting the patient and family and to recommend strategies for improving this care. Materials and Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was utilized. Up to 6 family members were selected for in-depth interviews in understanding cultural issues related to the palliative care services for a family member. Results: Analysis of the interviews revealed that families of Indian patients experience difficulties whilst receiving palliative care services, which fell into three main categories: Indian support systems, cultural issues, and caring experiences. Although each of these issues had a direct influence on the experience of terminal care that their family member received, cultural issues and support systems also influenced the caring experiences. Conclusion: Despite the successful implementation of palliative care services across Australia, there are still problems in accessing and receiving the services among minority and disadvantaged groups like various cultural groups.

  13. Open communication between caregivers and terminally ill cancer patients: the role of caregivers' characteristics and situational variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachner, Yaacov G; Carmel, Sara

    2009-09-01

    This study assesses caregivers' perceived level of open communication about illness and death with their terminally ill relatives and examines the contribution of caregivers' characteristics and situational variables to the explanation of open communication. A total of 236 primary caregivers of terminal cancer patients participated in the study. Level of open communication was measured by 6 items clustered into 1 factor. Caregivers' characteristics were composed of demographic variables, personality traits, and negative emotional reactions to caregiving. The situational variables included the duration and intensity of caregiving, and perceived functioning and suffering of the patient. Caregivers experienced substantial difficulties in communicating with patients about illness and death. Level of open communication was explained by caregivers' emotional reactions (emotional exhaustion, depression) and self-efficacy, as well as by the duration of caregiving. Intervention programs for health professionals need to focus on prevention, identification, and treatment of caregivers at risk for negative reactions to caregiving.

  14. Recruiting Terminally Ill Patients into Non-Therapeutic Oncology Studies: views of Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleiderman Erika

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-therapeutic trials in which terminally ill cancer patients are asked to undergo procedures such as biopsies or venipunctures for research purposes, have become increasingly important to learn more about how cancer cells work and to realize the full potential of clinical research. Considering that implementing non-therapeutic studies is not likely to result in direct benefits for the patient, some authors are concerned that involving patients in such research may be exploitive of vulnerable patients and should not occur at all, or should be greatly restricted, while some proponents doubt whether such restrictions are appropriate. Our objective was to explore clinician-researcher attitudes and concerns when recruiting patients who are in advanced stages of cancer into non-therapeutic research. Methods We conducted a qualitative exploratory study by carrying out open-ended interviews with health professionals, including physicians, research nurses, and study coordinators. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Analysis was carried out using grounded theory. Results The analysis of the interviews unveiled three prominent themes: 1 ethical considerations; 2 patient-centered issues; 3 health professional issues. Respondents identified ethical issues surrounding autonomy, respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, discrimination, and confidentiality; bringing to light that patients contribute to science because of a sense of altruism and that they want reassurance before consenting. Several patient-centered and health professional issues are having an impact on the recruitment of patients for non-therapeutic research. Facilitators were most commonly associated with patient-centered issues enhancing communication, whereas barriers in non-therapeutic research were most often professionally based, including the doctor-patient relationship, time constraints, and a lack of education and training in research

  15. Recruiting terminally ill patients into non-therapeutic oncology studies: views of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiderman, Erika; Avard, Denise; Black, Lee; Diaz, Zuanel; Rousseau, Caroline; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2012-12-05

    Non-therapeutic trials in which terminally ill cancer patients are asked to undergo procedures such as biopsies or venipunctures for research purposes, have become increasingly important to learn more about how cancer cells work and to realize the full potential of clinical research. Considering that implementing non-therapeutic studies is not likely to result in direct benefits for the patient, some authors are concerned that involving patients in such research may be exploitive of vulnerable patients and should not occur at all, or should be greatly restricted, while some proponents doubt whether such restrictions are appropriate. Our objective was to explore clinician-researcher attitudes and concerns when recruiting patients who are in advanced stages of cancer into non-therapeutic research. We conducted a qualitative exploratory study by carrying out open-ended interviews with health professionals, including physicians, research nurses, and study coordinators. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Analysis was carried out using grounded theory. The analysis of the interviews unveiled three prominent themes: 1) ethical considerations; 2) patient-centered issues; 3) health professional issues. Respondents identified ethical issues surrounding autonomy, respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, discrimination, and confidentiality; bringing to light that patients contribute to science because of a sense of altruism and that they want reassurance before consenting. Several patient-centered and health professional issues are having an impact on the recruitment of patients for non-therapeutic research. Facilitators were most commonly associated with patient-centered issues enhancing communication, whereas barriers in non-therapeutic research were most often professionally based, including the doctor-patient relationship, time constraints, and a lack of education and training in research. This paper aims to contribute to debates on the overall

  16. The Palliative Care Information Act and Access to Palliative Care in Terminally ill Patients: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria, Kitty; Patel, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that over 50% of end-of-life discussions take place for the first time in the hospital and that terminally ill patients often have unrealistic views regarding the possible scope of treatment. The Palliative Care information Act (PCIA) was passed in an attempt to address the lack of access for terminally ill patients to palliative care services. A multi-database systematic review was performed on published studies from 2010 to present, and there were none found measuring the effectiveness of the PCIA. We aimed to study the effect of the PCIA on access to palliative care services. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all terminally ill patients who died at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center from January 2010 to August 2013 in relation to passing of the PCIA. Prelaw (prior to the law passing), 12.3% of the terminal patients received palliative care consults, 25% during the transition period (time between passing of law and when it came into effect) and 37.7% postlaw (after coming into effect) (P access to palliative care services and can change the culture of a hospital to be more pro-palliative for the appropriate populations.

  17. Trajectories of Terminally Ill Patients' Cardiovascular Response to Receptive Music Therapy in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Marco; Kessler, Jens; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2016-08-01

    Relaxation interventions are frequently used to promote symptom relief in palliative care settings, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. The present analysis aimed at examining the psychophysiological pathways of terminally ill patients' cardiovascular response to a live music therapy vs. prerecorded mindfulness exercise. Eighty-four patients of a palliative care unit were randomly assigned to either of the two interventions. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze trajectories of physiological change. Vagally mediated heart rate variability (VM-HRV) and blood volume pulse amplitude (BVP-A) served as indices of autonomic nervous system response. Participants' gender, age, baseline scores, self-rated pain, and assignment to treatment were entered to the models as predictors. Both VM-HRV and BVP-A showed significant linear and quadratic trends over time, as well as substantial heterogeneity among individuals' trajectories. Baseline scores, pain, and treatment significantly accounted for random variation in VM-HRV intercepts. BVP-A levels were significantly higher in women than in men. Moreover, assignment to treatment significantly accounted for differences in the linear slopes of peripheral blood flow. Higher levels of VM-HRV in the music therapy group highlight the importance of a therapeutic relationship for the effectiveness of relaxation interventions in end-of-life care settings. Music therapy caused significantly stronger reductions of vascular sympathetic tone and, therefore, may be indicated in the treatment of pain and stress-related symptoms in palliative care. Initial self-ratings of pain moderated patients' physiological response and need to be taken into account in clinical practice and future theory building. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rational suicide in the terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Joyce S

    2002-01-01

    To examine the current debate over the right to die specific to the rational suicide of terminally ill patients. Literature was reviewed for information concerning historical end-of-life practices and the past acceptance of suicide. Another review showed philosophical opinions and perspectives that spanned from ancient Greece and the Roman Empire to modern philosophical discourse. A case study of a terminally ill woman who chose suicide is presented to apply the history and philosophy to nursing care today. As more nursing care is delivered in patients' homes, nurses will face this situation with increasing frequency. A call is made for organizations to provide guidelines for nursing practice.

  19. The needs of terminally ill patients at home: directing one's life, health and things related to beloved others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proot, Ireen M; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer; ter Meulen, Ruud H J; Goldsteen, Minke; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the results of a grounded theory study among terminally ill patients (with a life expectancy of less than three months) at home (n = 13, aged 39-83). The most commonly recurring theme identified in the analysis is 'directing', in the sense of directing a play. From the perspectives of patients in our study, 'directing' concerns three domains: 1) directing one's own life; 2) directing one's own health and health care; and 3) directing things related to beloved others (in the meaning of taking care of beloved ones). The patient's directing is affected by impeding and facilitating circumstances: the patient's needs and problems in the physical, psychological and existential/spiritual domain, and the support by family members and providers. Supporting patients and families, stimulating the patients' directing, giving attention to all domains of needs and counselling patients' families in the terminal phase are issues that need attention and warrant further investigation.

  20. The impact of loneliness on the relationship between depression and pain of Hong Kong Chinese terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wallace Chi Ho; Kwan, Chi Wai; Chi, Iris; Chong, Alice Ming Lin

    2014-05-01

    Depression and pain often coexist in terminally ill patients, but few studies have examined their relationship among larger samples. Other psychosocial factors experienced by patients may become barriers to pain management and affect the relationship between depression and pain. This study aims to examine the relationship between depression and pain in terminally ill Chinese elders in Hong Kong and explore the moderating effect of psychosocial factors such as loneliness, communication, and being at ease interacting with others. A secondary data analysis was conducted on a large cohort of community-dwelling Chinese elders applying for long-term care service in Hong Kong between 2004 and 2009. A total of 312 elders who had a prognosis of less than 6 months were included. Depression was associated positively and significantly with pain. However, loneliness moderated this relationship, and for participants who felt lonely, depression and pain were no longer significantly associated. Findings support the positive relationship between depression and pain in terminally ill elders. Feeling lonely may affect the tendency to report pain. To ensure optimal pain management for patients in palliative and end-of-life care, assessment and intervention should focus on the impact of psychosocial factors such as loneliness, and how they may affect elders' reporting of pain.

  1. Effects of dignity therapy on terminally ill patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Suzana Cristina Teixeira; Matuoka, Jéssica Yumi; Yamashita, Camila Cristófero; Salvetti, Marina de Goés

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the evidence of the effects of dignity therapy onterminally ill patients. A Systematic review of the literature conducted using the search strategy in six databases. Inclusion criteria were primary studies, excluding literature reviews (systematic or not) and conceptual articles. Ten articles were analyzed regarding method, results and evidence level. Dignity therapy improved the sense of meaning andpurpose, will to live, utility, quality of life, dignity and family appreciationin studies with a higher level of evidence. The effects are not well established in relation to depression, anxiety, spirituality and physical symptoms. Studies with a moderate to high level of evidence have shown increased sense of dignity, will to live and sense of purpose. Further studies should be developed to increase knowledge about dignity therapy. Analisar as evidências sobre os efeitos da terapia da dignidade para pacientes em fase terminal de vida. Revisão sistemática da literatura realizada em seis bases de dados na estratégia de busca. Os critérios de inclusão foram estudos primários, excluindo-se revisões da literatura (sistemáticas ou não) e artigos conceituais. Dez artigos foram analisados quanto ao método, aos resultados e nível de evidência. Nos estudos com maior nível de evidência, a terapia da dignidade melhorou o senso de significado, propósito, vontade de viver, utilidade, qualidade de vida, dignidade e apreciação familiar.Os efeitos não estão bem estabelecidos em relação à depressão, ansiedade, espiritualidade e aos sintomas físicos. Os estudos de nível de evidência de moderado a alto demonstraram aumento do senso de dignidade, vontade de viver e senso de propósito. Mais estudos devem ser desenvolvidos para ampliar o conhecimento sobre a terapia da dignidade.

  2. Efficacy of dignity therapy on depression and anxiety in Portuguese terminally ill patients: a phase II randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julião, Miguel; Oliveira, Fátima; Nunes, Baltazar; Vaz Carneiro, António; Barbosa, António

    2014-06-01

    Dignity therapy is a brief psychotherapy developed for patients living with a life-limiting illness. To determine the influence of dignity therapy on depression and anxiety in inpatients with a terminal illness and experiencing a high level of distress in a palliative care unit. A nonblinded phase II randomized controlled trial of 80 patients who were randomly assigned to one of two groups: intervention group (dignity therapy+standard palliative care [SPC]) or control group (SPC alone). The main outcomes were depression and anxiety scores, as measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and assessed at baseline (T1), day 4 (T2), day 15 (T3), and day 30 (T4) of follow-up. This study is registered with www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN34354086. Of the final 80 participants, 41 were randomly assigned to SPC and 39 to dignity therapy. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Dignity therapy was associated with a decrease in depression scores (median, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -4.00, -6.00 to -2.00, pdepression and anxiety symptoms in end-of-life care. The therapeutic benefit of dignity therapy was sustained over a 30-day period. Having established its efficacy, future trials of dignity therapy may now begin, comparing it with other psychotherapeutic approaches within the context of terminal illness.

  3. The impact of awareness of terminal illness on quality of death and care decision making: a prospective nationwide survey of bereaved family members of advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eunmi; Shin, Dong Wook; Choi, Jin Young; Kang, Jina; Kim, Dae Kyun; Kim, Hyesuk; Lee, Eunil; Hwang, Kwan Ok; Oh, Bumjo; Cho, BeLong

    2013-12-01

    We aimed to assess whether awareness of a terminal illness can affect care decision making processes and the achievement of a good death in advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care services. Awareness of terminal illness at the time of palliative care service admission was assessed by the health care professionals during the routine initial comprehensive assessment process and was recorded in the national terminal cancer patient registry. A follow-up nationwide bereavement survey was conducted, which contained questions regarding decision making processes and the Korean version of the Good Death Inventory. Among the 345 patients included in the final analysis, the majority (68.4%) of the patients were aware of the terminal illness. Awareness of the terminal illness tended to reduce discordances in care decision making (adjusted odds ratio = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.29-1.07), and increased the patients' own decision making when there were discordances between patients and their families (adjusted odds ratio = 3.79; 95% CI: 1.31-10.94). The Good Death Inventory score was significantly higher among patients who were aware of their terminal illnesses compared with those who were not (5.04 vs. 4.80; p = 0.013) and especially in the domains of 'control over the future' (5.18 vs. 4.04; p terminal illness had beneficial effect on the harmonious decision making, patient autonomy, and patient's quality of death. Disclosure of terminal illness should be encouraged. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Nurses experiences in palliative care of terminally-ill HIV patients in a level 1 district hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bam, Nokwanda E; Naidoo, Joanne R

    2014-07-30

    Whilst the discourse of palliative care in HIV management is largely documented and regarded as being an essential component, various authors have further argued that within the context of HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa, palliative care and exploration of the dimensions thereof is largely lacking. This article presents the lived experiences of nurses involved in palliative care, thus providing the perspective of nurses and the multi-faceted dimensions of the nature of caring inherent. This study explored the respondents' understanding of the concepts 'caring' and 'terminal patient' and described the experiences of nurses caring for terminally-ill patients with HIV and how these experiences influence the nature of care rendered. Qualitative research using Husserl's approach of phenomenology design underpinned the study and Giorgi's steps of analysis were used to make meaning of the data. The concept 'caring' was experienced by the nurses as transforming the patients' quality of life through supportive care and hope for life. Palliative care made the nurses conscious of their own mortality, enabling them to be more sensitive, compassionate and dedicated to caring for their patients. The findings described the social networking that enabled nurses to collaborate with colleagues in the interdisciplinary teams and shared knowledge, skills and support within the palliative care team in order to optimise patient outcomes. Nurses with prolonged involvement in caring for terminally-ill patients with HIV experienced helplessness and emotional stress. Recommendations based on the results are that training in psychological and holistic care of the patient, professional counselling and stress management services are needed to support the nurse in this context.

  5. The ABCDE of good care: A thematic analysis on the art of caring for terminally ill patients in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Seng Beng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The first and foremost requisite of caring is to treat patients as persons, not as diseases or bed-numbers. A qualitative study was conducted to explore the perception of good care from the point of view of 13 terminally ill patientsand 8 caregiving family members of the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The results were thematically analyzed. Five basic themes were generated: (1 Attitude, (2 Behaviour, (3 Communication, (4 Duty and (5 Environment—ABCDE. The results may provide useful insight into the art of caring.

  6. Nurses experiences in palliative care of terminally-ill HIV patients in a level 1 district hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nokwanda E. Bam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whilst the discourse of palliative care in HIV management is largely documented and regarded as being an essential component, various authors have further argued that within the context of HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa, palliative care and exploration of the dimensions thereof is largely lacking. This article presents the lived experiences of nurses involved in palliative care, thus providing the perspective of nurses and the multi-faceted dimensions of the nature of caring inherent. Objectives: This study explored the respondents’ understanding of the concepts ‘caring’ and ‘terminal patient’ and described the experiences of nurses caring for terminally-ill patients with HIV and how these experiences influence the nature of care rendered. Methods: Qualitative research using Husserl’s approach of phenomenology design underpinned the study and Giorgi’s steps of analysis were used to make meaning of the data. Results: The concept ‘caring’ was experienced by the nurses as transforming the patients’ quality of life through supportive care and hope for life. Palliative care made the nurses conscious of their own mortality, enabling them to be more sensitive, compassionate and dedicated to caring for their patients. The findings described the social networking that enabled nurses to collaborate with colleagues in the interdisciplinary teams and shared knowledge, skills and support within the palliative care team in order to optimise patient outcomes. Conclusion: Nurses with prolonged involvement in caring for terminally-ill patients with HIV experienced helplessness and emotional stress. Recommendations based on the results are that training in psychological and holistic care of the patient, professional counselling and stress management services are needed to support the nurse in this context.

  7. Group therapy with the terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, I D; Greaves, C

    1977-04-01

    The authors describe their four-year experience with a therapy group for patients with metastatic carcinoma. Patients in the group are helped by helping one another, by moving out of a morbid self-absorption, and by finding that they have much of value to share and to teach. The most important aspect of the group experience is the "presence" it offers; patients find support and the opportunity to express their needs and fears openly. The authors believe that group therapy is a valuable modality for the treatment of terminally ill patients and that much can be learned from such groups for the everyday therapy of the living.

  8. The Effect of Social Support and Meaning of Life on the Quality-of-Life Care for Terminally Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobríková, Patricia; Pčolková, Dušana; AlTurabi, Layla Khalil; West, Daniel J

    2015-11-01

    This study examines the effect of 2 indicators on quality of life (QOL): social support and meaning of life for terminally ill patients. These 2 indicators are very important from a psychological and spiritual point of view. The findings suggest that there is a statistically significant correlation between meaning of life and QOL (r = .610, P life fulfillment for dying patients. A significant relationship exists in survival of life meaningfulness and satisfaction with social support. In conclusion, experiencing one's life as meaningful is positively related to the well-being for dying patients. Social support provided by a close relative had a positive influence on the patient's meaning of life and overall life satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Sites that cope, cure and commemorate: weblogs of terminally Ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena, M.; Ngwenya, N.; Hinerman, N.; Glahn, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    This text investigates weblogs of terminally ill created by patients to express emotions about dying and death, as well as to reflect about their life and how they want to be remembered. The authors analysed weblogs of terminally ill employed as research instruments in English hospices as well as

  10. Knowledege And Attitudes Of Terminally Ill Patents And Their Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledege And Attitudes Of Terminally Ill Patents And Their Family To Pallative Care And Hospice Services In Nigeria. ... Ninety four [72.3%] had no knowledge of PC&H regardless of level of education and social status. 109 [84%] agreed that symptoms of the terminally ill patients should be treated to improve their quality ...

  11. Evaluation of inpatient multidisciplinary palliative care unit on terminally ill cancer patients from providers' perspectives: a propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shao-Yi; Dy, Sydney; Fang, Pai-Han; Chen, Ching-Yu; Chiu, Tai-Yuan

    2013-02-01

    The effectiveness of inpatient palliative care units, a complex intervention, is challenging to evaluate due to methodological and practical difficulties. We conducted a study to evaluate providers' perceived effectiveness of one such unit. A non-concurrent, prospective, controlled study using the Audit Scale for good death services as an indicator of process of care and the Good Death Scale as the outcome of provider assessment of quality of dying was conducted. Eighty of 212 terminally ill cancer patients were matched from a tertiary medical center in Taiwan. Patients in the unit served as the intervention group and patients in the oncology ward served as controls. Multiple logistic regression was applied to estimate the propensity of choosing the unit for each patient, and linear regression analysis was conducted to identify predictive factors for mean change scores of the Good Death Scale. Male gender (P < 0.001, 95% confidence interval = 0.73-2.43) was associated with better quality of dying while having hepatocellular carcinoma (P < 0.004, 95% confidence interval = -2.22 to -0.44) was associated with worse quality. For those in the unit, higher total Audit Scale scores were positively related to the outcome of quality of dying. The unit (P < 0.001, 95% confidence interval = 8.67-12.97) and higher Good Death Scale at admission (P < 0.001, 95% confidence interval = 0.44-1.13) were predictors of Audit Scale scores. Admission to a palliative care unit was associated with higher provider assessments of quality of dying for terminally ill cancer patients. These units should be considered as options for hospitals looking for ways to improve the quality of dying for patients.

  12. The experience and expectations of terminally ill patients receiving music therapy in the palliative setting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi He Mabel, Leow; Drury, Vicki Blair; Hong, Poon Wing

    2010-01-01

    Music therapy is a popular form of complementary therapy used in the hospice in Western countries, as people who are terminally ill have several needs arising directly from the disease process. In the area of palliative care, no systematic review has been conducted on the experience of patients using music therapy from the qualitative perspective. Hence, a synthesized summary of the experience of music therapy is presented. The aim of this review was to critically analyse and synthesize existing evidence related to terminally ill patients' experiences of using music therapy in the palliative setting. This review considered quantitative descriptive studies, and qualitative research with adult participants who were terminally ill receiving palliative care in a hospital, an in-patient hospice, a nursing home, or their own homes, regardless of their diagnosis who had undergone at least one music therapy session with a trained music therapist and were not cognitively impaired. Healthcare workers who have witnessed patients participating in music therapy were also included in the review. Only published primary research studies were included in the review. This review was limited to papers in English. A three-step search strategy was undertaken. First, an initial limited search of CINAHL and MEDLINE was done. Second, an extensive search using all identified keywords and index terms across all included databases was done. Finally, a hand search of the reference lists and bibliographies of included articles was conducted METHODOLOGICAL QUALITY: Papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using the standardised critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (QARI) for qualitative papers, and Joanna Briggs Institute Meta Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI) for quantitative descriptive papers

  13. Sequential Assessments of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Scale Enhance Prognostic Value in Patients With Terminally Ill Cancer Receiving Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Meng-Ting; Liu, Chien-Ting; Hung, Yu-Shin; Kao, Chen-Yi; Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the utility of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance scale assessments on days 1 and 8 of palliative care, as well as scale change between these assessments, as prognostic tools for patients with terminally ill cancer. A total of 2392 patients with terminally ill cancer who received palliative care between January 2006 and December 2011 at a single medical center were analyzed. Our study showed that the ECOG scale is a useful prognostic tool to predict life expectancy in patients with terminally ill cancer. The ECOG scale assessments at different time points under palliative care were independent predictors for overall survival. The combined ECOG scale assessments on days 1 and 8 predicted survival more precisely than using day 1 ECOG scale assessment alone. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Spiritual Well-being May Reduce the Negative Impacts of Cancer Symptoms on the Quality of Life and the Desire for Hastened Death in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Chih; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality is a central component of the well-being of terminally ill cancer patients. The aim of this study was to examine the mediating or moderating role of spiritual well-being in reducing the impact of cancer-related symptoms on quality of life and the desire for hastened death in terminally ill cancer patients. Eighty-five terminally ill cancer patients were assessed using the Taiwanese version of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General, the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, and the Schedule of Attitudes Toward Hastened Death. Spiritual well-being was significantly negatively correlated with symptom severity (r = -0.46, P life (r = -0.54) and positively correlated with hopelessness (r = 0.51, P life. Spiritual well-being was a partial mediator between symptom severity and the desire for hastened death. The meaning subscale of spiritual well-being was a more significant predictor of the desire for hastened death and quality of life than the faith subscale was. Spiritual well-being may reduce the negative impacts of cancer on quality of life and the desire for hastened death. Appropriate spiritual care may reduce the negative impact of severe cancer symptoms on quality of life and the desire for hastened death in terminally ill cancer patients.

  15. Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: a comparative survey of physicians, terminally ill cancer patients, and the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Almazor, M E; Belzile, M; Bruera, E

    1997-02-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the legalization of euthanasia. The attitudes and beliefs of the general public and physicians appear to differ; the views of patients have not been adequately explored. During 1995, we conducted a simultaneous survey in the province of Alberta, Canada, of a random sample of 1,240 individuals from the general population, 179 physicians, and 62 consecutive patients with terminal cancer. The same instrument was administered to the public and physicians through telephone interview, and to patients in a face-to-face interview. Statements related to the legalization of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide were scored using 1-to-7 Likert agreement scales. A slight majority of members of the public and terminally ill patients (50% to 60%) agreed with the legalization of euthanasia and assisted suicide, while most physicians (60% to 80%) opposed it. In multivariate analysis, independent associations with support of active end of life measures included the following: group surveyed, strength of religious beliefs, religion (highest support by individuals with no religion), education (lower education associated with higher support), and the perception of burden on families, and physical and emotional suffering by cancer patients. In all groups, a marked polarization of attitudes was observed, with most individuals either strongly agreeing or strongly disagreeing with the statements in the survey. Although a slight majority of the public supported euthanasia, one third opposed it. Most physicians opposed these interventions and appeared not to be willing to perform these procedures if legalized. Our findings suggest that legalization at this time could be highly divisive and controversial from a societal perspective.

  16. [Ethics in intensive care and euthanasia : With respect to inactivating defibrillators at the end of life in terminally ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, H-J

    2017-04-01

    In critically ill patients, intensive care medical procedures allow diseases to be cured or controlled that were considered incurable many years ago. For patients with terminal heart failure or heart disease with other severe comorbidities (cancer, stroke), the questions whether the deactivation of defibrillators is appropriate or must be regarded as active euthanasia may arise. Notable cases from the author's hospital are analyzed. The literature on the topic euthanasia and basic literature regarding defibrillator therapy are discussed. It is undisputed that patients as part of their self-determination have the right to renounce treatment. Active euthanasia and the thereby deliberate induction of death is prohibited by law in Germany and will be prosecuted. Passive euthanasia is the omission or reduction of possibly life-prolonging treatment measures. Passive euthanasia requires the patient's consent and is legally and ethically permissible. Indirect euthanasia takes into account acceleration of death as a side effect of a medication. Unpunishable assisted suicide ("assisted suicide") is the mere assistance of self-controlled and self-determined death. Assisted suicide is fundamentally not a criminal offense in Germany. Deactivation of a defibrillator is a treatment discontinuation, which is only permitted in accordance with the wishes of the patient. It is not a question of passive or active euthanasia. Involvement of a local ethics committee and/or legal consultation is certainly useful and sometimes also allows previously unrecognized questions to be answered.

  17. [The terminally ill patient. Grupo de Estudios de Etica Cliínica de la Sociedad Médica de Santiago].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The classification of a patient as terminally ill is based on an expert diagnosis of a severe and irreversible disease and the absence of an effective available treatment, according to present medical knowledge. Terminal diseases must not be confused with severe ones, since the latter may be reversible with an adequate and timely treatment. The physician assumes a great responsibility at the moment of diagnosing a patient as terminally ill. The professional must assume his care until the moment of death. This care must be oriented to the alleviation of symptoms and to provide the best possible quality of life. Also, help must be provided to deal with personal, legal and religious issues that may concern the patient.

  18. Bleeding risk of terminally ill patients hospitalized in palliative care units: the RHESO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, B; Picard, S; Guirimand, F; Chapelle, C; Danel Delerue, M; Celarier, T; Ciais, J-F; Vassal, P; Salas, S; Filbet, M; Gomas, J-M; Guillot, A; Gaultier, J-B; Merah, A; Richard, A; Laporte, S; Bertoletti, L

    2017-03-01

    Essentials Bleeding incidence as hemorrhagic risk factors are unknown in palliative care inpatients. We conducted a multicenter observational study (22 Palliative Care Units, 1199 patients). At three months, the cumulative incidence of clinically relevant bleeding was 9.8%. Cancer, recent bleeding, thromboprophylaxis and antiplatelet therapy were independent risk factors. Background The value of primary thromboprophylaxis in patients admitted to palliative care units is debatable. Moreover, the risk of bleeding in these patients is unknown. Objectives Our primary aim was to assess the bleeding risk of patients in a real-world practice setting of hospital palliative care. Our secondary aim was to determine the incidence of symptomatic deep vein thrombosis and to identify risk factors for bleeding. Patients/Methods In this prospective, observational study in 22 French palliative care units, 1199 patients (median age, 71 years; male, 45.5%), admitted for the first time to a palliative care unit for advanced cancer or pulmonary, cardiac or neurologic disease were included. The primary outcome was adjudicated clinically relevant bleeding (i.e. a composite of major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding) at 3 months. The secondary outcome was symptomatic deep vein thrombosis. Results The most common reason for palliative care was cancer (90.7%). By 3 months, 1087 patients (91.3%) had died and 116 patients had presented at least one episode of clinically relevant bleeding (fatal in 23 patients). Taking into account the competing risk of death, the cumulative incidence of clinically relevant bleeding was 9.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.3-11.6). Deep vein thrombosis occurred in six patients (cumulative incidence, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0.2-1.1). Cancer, recent bleeding, antithrombotic prophylaxis and antiplatelet therapy were independently associated with clinically relevant bleeding at 3 months. Conclusions Decisions regarding the use of thromboprophylaxis in palliative

  19. Pre-loss symptoms related to risk of complicated grief in caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Maria Giulia; Biancosino, Bruno; Grassi, Luigi

    2014-05-01

    A number of studies have underlined a 10-20% prevalence of complicated grief (CG) among caregivers of cancer patients. The study aimed at examining the relationship between pre-loss criteria for CG and post-loss diagnosis of CG and at evaluating the validity and factor structure of a predictive tool, the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG), in order to identify the risk of developing CG in a sample of Italian caregivers. Sixty family members of terminally ill patients admitted to hospice and receiving a Palliative Prognostic Score (PaP) predictive 30 day survival time Grief (Post-loss interview-PLI). Caseness for CG was shown in 18.3% of caregivers at T1. ICG-PL score (T0) were higher among those who developed CG at T1 than non-cases. A cut off score ≥49 on the ICG-PL (AUC=0.98) maximized sensitivity (92%) and specificity (98%) on caseness at T1. Pre-loss criteria related to traumatic distress, separation distress and emotional symptoms in general were significantly related to a post-loss diagnosis of CG, while no effect was shown on duration of pre-loss distress. The use of short screening tools, like the ICG-PL, may help health care professionals to identify subjects at risk for CG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Care of terminally-ill patients: an opinion survey among critical care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Conclusion: Training background and level of seniority in critical care provider does not impact opinion on most of end of life issues related to care of ... Patient's age, diagnosis, ICU stay and religious factors have been identified as factors ..... medical and nursing care for patients labeled no code. Intensivists practicing in the ...

  1. Factors associated with preference for dying at home among terminally ill patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Andersen, Marianne; Ullersted, Maria P; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An important element in end-of-life care advocacy is to meet patients' end-of-life preferences. Most Scandinavian patients die in hospitals even though the majority prefers to die at home. Earlier studies have shown socio-economic differences in relation to dying at home, but more...... knowledge is needed in relation to preferences for place of death. Hence, on valid Danish register-based socio-economic data, we aimed to investigate whether demographic and socio-economic factors were associated with preference for dying at home. METHOD: Population-based, historic cohort study among 282...... relatives of deceased patients who died of cancer in Denmark in 2006. Bereaved relatives were asked to state patient's preference concerning place of death at the beginning and end of the palliative period. These data were recently combined with updated, extensive demographic and socio-economic data from...

  2. End of life care for terminally ill-patients in North West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jabbari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays chronic disease and number of elderly population climb in low and middle-income countries and need for high-quality hospice care services for them. The aim of this study was to review the experience of hospitalized end of life (EOL patients and their family’s regarding hospice care. Methods: In this qualitative study with the phenomenological approach, 20 patients and their families were chosen using purposive sampling to achieve data saturation from the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences Hospitals, Iran. The required data were collected using in deep semi-structured interviews and analyzed using Diekelmann method. Results: Patients and their family’s experiences included 7 main themes: lack of special education for healthcare providers, preferences, financial problems, health care quality, lack of providing information to patients and their families, limitation in life due to disease, burdens to EOL care for family. Conclusion: Due to the lack of experience in hospice care in Iran, patients, families and health care provider not have adequate knowledge about hospice. The cost of this service is high, and qualities of these services are low. Furthermore provide educational courses for patients, families and health care provider and decrease of cost and improve of quality are necessary.

  3. Psychological distress, health, and socio-economic factors in caregivers of terminally ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Kjaergaard; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2016-01-01

    At være pårørende til en terminalt syg patient er belastende. For at undersøge hvordan disse pårørende klarer rollen som pårørende, blev en landsdækkende undersøgelse af pårørende til terminalt syge iværksat. De pårørende blev kontaktet via breve til patienter med terminaltilskud i 2012 og 3,635 ...... for støtte under patienten terminale sygdomsforløb....

  4. Population pharmacodynamic modelling of midazolam induced sedation in terminally ill adult patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, L. G.; de Winter, B. C. M.; Masman, A. D.; van Dijk, M.; Baar, F. P. M.; Tibboel, D.; Koch, B. C. P.; van Gelder, T.; Mathot, R. A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Midazolam is the drug of choice for palliative sedation and is titrated to achieve the desired level of sedation. A previous pharmacokinetic (PK) study showed that variability between patients could be partly explained by renal function and inflammatory status. The goal of this study was to combine

  5. The evaluation of the relationship between the level of disclosure of cancer in terminally ill patients with cancer and the quality of terminal care in these patients and their families using the Support Team Assessment Schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Nobuhisa; Hata, Yoshinobu; Onishi, Hideki; Ishida, Mayumi

    2013-06-01

    To examine the relationship between informing patients of cancer and the quality of terminal care. This was a study of 87 consecutive terminally ill cancer patients who died during the last 27-month period. Notification of cancer was classified into 4 groups (A, B, C, and D, respectively): "nondisclosure," "disclosure of cancer diagnosis," "disclosure of life threatening," and "disclosure of poor prognosis." We evaluated the quality of palliative care using Support Team Assessment Schedule-Japanese (STAS-J). A, B, C, and D groups included 8, 22, 37, and 20 cases, respectively. Regarding physical symptoms, no marked difference was noted. Anxiety was significantly reduced, and the recognition of disease conditions and the level of communication were significantly higher in the groups that received specific information (P terminal care.

  6. Nurses' attitudes towards artificial food or fluid administration in patients with dementia and in terminally ill patients: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryon, E; de Casterlé, B Dierckx; Gastmans, C

    2008-06-01

    Although nurses have an important role in the care process surrounding artificial food or fluid administration in patients with dementia or in terminally ill patients, little is known about their attitudes towards this issue. The purpose of this study was to thoroughly examine nurses' attitudes by means of a literature review. An extensive systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Cinahl, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, FRANCIS, Philosopher's Index and Social Sciences Citation Index was conducted to identify pertinent articles published from January 1990 to January 2007. Nurses' arguments for or against could be categorised as ethical-legal, clinical or social-professional. The most important arguments explicitly for artificial food and fluid administration in patients with dementia or in terminally ill patients were sanctity of life, considering artificial food and fluid administration as basic nursing care, and giving reliable nutrition, hydration or medication. An explicit counter-argument was the high cost of treatment. Arguments used by opponents and proponents were quality of life and dignified death. The arguments were not strikingly different for the two patient populations. It turned out that the nurses' ethical arguments remarkably reflected the current ethical debate. But some of their clinical presuppositions contradicted current clinical evidence. The interaction between clinical facts and ethical reflections makes the findings of this review extremely relevant for clinical ethics. A large need exists to clearly communicate to nurses the latest clinical evidence and the main results of ongoing ethical debates.

  7. PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Olesen, Frede

    that is vital to further improve palliative care in the primary sector.AIM. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of palliative home care with focus on the GP's role based on evaluations by relatives of recently deceased cancer patients and professionals from both the primary and secondary health care......) The primary sector needs easy access to specialist advise, supervision and empowerment. 4) Better and easier communication pathways are important, both within the primary sector and across the sectors to improve accessibility.CONCLUSION. Our study shows a need for improvements in palliative home care...... and provides important knowledge about how these improvements are achieved.The GPs want closer supervision and improved shared care. They want to be key persons in palliative home care, but to fill this role it is vital that they take or are given the responsibility in a very transparent way, i.e.: A way...

  8. A Structured Approach to End-of-Life Decision Making Improves Quality of Care for Patients With Terminal Illness in a Teaching Hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Ama Kyerewaa; Johnson McGee, Summer; Opare-Lokko, Edwina Addo; Gyakobo, Mawuli Kotope

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether a structured approach to end-of-life decision-making directed by a compassionate interdisciplinary team would improve the quality of care for patients with terminal illness in a teaching hospital in Ghana. A retrospective analysis was done for 20 patients who consented to participate in the structured approach to end-of-life decision-making. Twenty patients whose care did not follow the structured approach were selected as controls. Outcome measures were nociceptive pain control, completing relationships, and emotional response towards dying. These measures were statistically superior in the study group compared to the control group. A structured approach to end-of-life decision-making significantly improves the quality of care for patients with terminal illness in the domains of pain control, completing relationships and emotional responses towards dying. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Meaning of care for terminally Ill HIV-infected patients by HIV-infected peer caregivers in a simulation-based training program in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghee; Shin, Gisoo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simulation-based training program for people living with HIV (PLWH) as peer caregivers who would take care of terminally ill, HIV-infected patients. We used qualitative research methods and standardized patients to explore the meaning of caring for patients as peer caregivers. Study participants included 32 patients registered as PLWH at the South Korea Federation for HIV/AIDS. The meanings of peer caregiving were categorized into four dimensions: physical, psychological, relational, and economic. Our study had benefits in knowledge acquisition for caregivers as well as care recipients, empathy with HIV-infected care recipients, improvement in self-esteem and social participation, and financial self-sufficiency to enable independent living for caregivers. The simulation training program for PLWH peer caregivers for terminally ill HIV-infected patients demonstrated value, for both PLWH caregivers and terminally ill HIV-infected patients in South Korea, to improve the quality of care. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Clinical features and prognosis of terminally ill patients in a geriatric long-term care hospital with particular regard to the implications of artificial nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishi, Ryuji; Higashi, Takuya; Akaishi, Yasuhiro; Arai, Masayoshi; Minemawari, Yoshimori

    2007-03-01

    To clarify the clinical features of terminally ill patients in our hospital and elucidate the implications of administering artificial nutrition. Between April 2004 and March 2005, we assessed 155 patients who died in Nishimaruyama Hospital--a geriatric long-term care facility in Sapporo. We analyzed their clinical backgrounds on admission, the clinical course up to the terminal stage of the illness, and the outcome of patients who received artificial nutrition. In 95 patients, the main cause of the terminal illness was infection. The symptoms of these patients, such as cerebral infarction and cognitive dysfunction, deteriorated progressively, and eventually, eating became difficult. At this point, alternative methods for providing nutrition were discussed. For 60 patients (41 died of acute disease and 19, of advanced cancers), artificial nutrition was not considered. Artificial nutrition was administered to 63 patients; tube feeding was carried out in 30 patients. Because of repeated aspiration pneumonia, 14 of these 30 patients eventually underwent intravenous hyperalimentation (IVH). Thirty-three patients directly underwent IVH. Thirty-two patients did not undergo any feeding course. The mean survival times of the tube feeding and non-artificial nutrition groups were 827 and 60 days, respectively. The difference in the survival times was statistically significant. The outcome of patients who were placed on tube feeding was good. This may be because we selected those patients considered most suitable for tube feeding or IVH. The criteria that were used to select an appropriate method for providing nutrition varied, although the patients in our hospital requested palliative care.

  11. Terminal weaning or immediate extubation for withdrawing mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients (the ARREVE observational study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, René; Le Gouge, Amélie; Kentish-Barnes, Nancy; Cottereau, Alice; Giraudeau, Bruno; Adda, Mélanie; Annane, Djillali; Audibert, Juliette; Barbier, François; Bardou, Patrick; Bourcier, Simon; Bourenne, Jeremy; Boyer, Alexandre; Brenas, François; Das, Vincent; Desachy, Arnaud; Devaquet, Jérôme; Feissel, Marc; Ganster, Frédérique; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maïté; Grillet, Guillaume; Guisset, Olivier; Hamidfar-Roy, Rebecca; Hyacinthe, Anne-Claire; Jochmans, Sebastien; Jourdain, Mercé; Lautrette, Alexandre; Lerolle, Nicolas; Lesieur, Olivier; Lion, Fabien; Mateu, Philippe; Megarbane, Bruno; Merceron, Sybille; Mercier, Emmanuelle; Messika, Jonathan; Morin-Longuet, Paul; Philippon-Jouve, Bénédicte; Quenot, Jean-Pierre; Renault, Anne; Repesse, Xavier; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Robin, Ségolène; Roquilly, Antoine; Seguin, Amélie; Thevenin, Didier; Tirot, Patrice; Vinatier, Isabelle; Azoulay, Elie; Reignier, Jean

    2017-12-01

    The relative merits of immediate extubation versus terminal weaning for mechanical ventilation withdrawal are controversial, particularly regarding the experience of patients and relatives. This prospective observational multicentre study (ARREVE) was done in 43 French ICUs to compare terminal weaning and immediate extubation, as chosen by the ICU team. Terminal weaning was a gradual decrease in the amount of ventilatory assistance and immediate extubation was extubation without any previous decrease in ventilatory assistance. The primary outcome was posttraumatic stress symptoms (Impact of Event Scale Revised, IES-R) in relatives 3 months after the death. Secondary outcomes were complicated grief, anxiety, and depression symptoms in relatives; comfort of patients during the dying process; and job strain in staff. We enrolled 212 (85.5%) relatives of 248 patients with terminal weaning and 190 relatives (90.5%) of 210 patients with immediate extubation. Immediate extubation was associated with airway obstruction and a higher mean Behavioural Pain Scale score compared to terminal weaning. In relatives, IES-R scores after 3 months were not significantly different between groups (31.9 ± 18.1 versus 30.5 ± 16.2, respectively; adjusted difference, -1.9; 95% confidence interval, -5.9 to 2.1; p = 0.36); neither were there any differences in complicated grief, anxiety, or depression scores. Assistant nurses had lower job strain scores in the immediate extubation group. Compared to terminal weaning, immediate extubation was not associated with differences in psychological welfare of relatives when each method constituted standard practice in the ICU where it was applied. Patients had more airway obstruction and gasps with immediate extubation. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01818895.

  12. The role of general practitioners in continuity of care at the end of life: a qualitative study of terminally ill patients and their next of kin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, Eva; Deschepper, Reginald; Van Der Kelen, Greta; Bernheim, Jan L; Mortier, Freddy; Vander Stichele, Robert; Deliens, Luc

    2007-07-01

    Exploring terminal patients' perceptions of GPs' role in delivering continuous end-of-life care and identifying barriers to this. Qualitative interview study with patients (two consecutive interviews). Primary care Belgium. Seventeen terminally ill cancer patients, informed about diagnosis and prognosis. Terminal patients attribute a pivotal role to GPs in different aspects of two types of continuity. Relational continuity: having an ongoing relationship with the same GP, of which important aspects are eg, keeping in touch after referral and feeling responsible for the patient. Informational continuity: use of information on past events and personal circumstances to provide individualised care, of which important aspects are eg, exchange of information between GPs, specialists and care facilities. Patients also identify barriers to continuity eg, lack of time and of GPs' initiative. At the end of life when physicians can no longer rely on biomedical models of diagnosis-therapy-cure, patients' perspectives are of utmost importance. This qualitative study made it possible to gain insights into terminal patients' perceptions of continuous primary end-of-life care. It clarifies the concept and identifies barriers to it.

  13. Longitudinal changes and predictors of prolonged grief for bereaved family caregivers over the first 2 years after the terminally ill cancer patient's death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-I; Prigerson, Holly G; Li, Chung-Yi; Chou, Wen-Chi; Kuo, Su-Ching; Tang, Siew Tzuh

    2016-05-01

    A significant minority of bereaved caregivers experience prolonged grief. However, few longitudinal studies have examined prolonged grief, especially in an Asian context. We explored longitudinal changes and factors predicting prolonged grief in bereaved caregivers of terminally ill Taiwanese cancer patients. Observational, prospective, and longitudinal. Prolonged grief symptoms were measured with the PG-13 at 6, 13, 18, and 24 months postloss. A convenience sample of 493 caregivers (83.3% participation rate) of terminally ill cancer patients was recruited from a medical center in Taiwan. The prevalence of prolonged grief decreased significantly over time from the patient's death (7.73%, 1.80%, 2.49%, and 1.85% at 6, 13, 18, and 24 months postloss, respectively, p grief was significantly higher if they had severe preloss depressive symptoms, negatively perceived their relative's dying situation, and were poorly prepared for the patient's death. However, the likelihood of prolonged grief decreased significantly with greater perceived concurrent social support and subjective caregiving burden right before the patient's death. Prolonged grief in bereavement diminished over time and was predicted by modifiable factors before, during, and after bereavement. To facilitate bereavement adjustment and avoid prolonged grief, healthcare professionals should develop and provide at-risk caregivers with effective interventions starting when patients are still alive to improve their dying experience, to facilitate preparedness for the patient's forthcoming death, to alleviate caregivers' preloss depressive symptoms, and to enhance their perceived postloss social support. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Dying patients' need for emotional support and personalized care from physicians: perspectives of patients with terminal illness, families, and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich, Marjorie D; Curtis, J Randall; Ambrozy, Donna A; Carline, Jan D; Shannon, Sarah E; Ramsey, Paul G

    2003-03-01

    This study addressed the emotional and personal needs of dying patients and the ways physicians help or hinder these needs. Twenty focus groups were held with 137 individuals, including patients with chronic and terminal illnesses, family members, health care workers, and physicians. Content analyses were performed based on grounded theory. Emotional support and personalization were 2 of the 12 domains identified as important in end-of-life care. Components of emotional support were compassion, responsiveness to emotional needs, maintaining hope and a positive attitude, and providing comfort through touch. Components of personalization were treating the whole person and not just the disease, making the patient feel unique and special, and considering the patient's social situation. Although the levels of emotional support and personalization varied, there was a minimal level, defined by compassion and treating the whole person and not just the disease, that physicians should strive to meet in caring for all dying patients. Participants also identified intermediate and advanced levels of physician behavior that provide emotional and personal support.

  15. 42 CFR 418.22 - Certification of terminal illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification of terminal illness. 418.22 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.22 Certification of terminal illness. (a) Timing of certification—(1) General rule. The hospice must obtain written...

  16. Ever decreasing circles: terminal illness, empowerment and decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Kate; Cert, P G; MacLeod, Rod; Kent, Bridle

    2010-06-01

    Empowerment is the personal and political processes patients go through to enhance and restore their sense of dignity and self-worth. However, there is much rhetoric surrounding nurses facilitating patients' daily choices and enabling empowerment. Furthermore, there is frequently an imbalance of power sharing, with the patient often obliged to do what the health professional wants them to do. This phenomenological study describes the lived experience of patients attending an outpatient clinic of a community hospice. A qualitative study using Max van Manen's phenomenological hermeneutic method was conducted to explore issues surrounding empowerment and daily decision-making with terminally ill patients. The participants' stories became a stimulus for learning about the complexities of autonomy and empowerment. It also engendered reflection and analysis of issues related to power and control inequities in current nursing practices. The results revealed not only the themes of chaoticum, contracting worlds and capitulation, but that health professionals should be mindful of the level of control they exert. Within the palliative care setting they need to become partners in care, enhancing another person's potential for autonomous choice. Empowerment must not be somethingthat simply occurs from within, nor can it be done by another. Intentional efforts by health professionals must enable terminally ill people to be able to stay enlivened and connected with a modicum of autonomy and empowerment over daily decisions, no matter how mundane or monumental they might be.

  17. Patient awareness of prognosis, patient-family caregiver congruence on the preferred place of death, and caregiving burden of families contribute to the quality of life for terminally ill cancer patients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Siew Tzuh; Liu, Tsang-Wu; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Chang, Gee-Chen; Liu, Li-Ni

    2008-12-01

    The main goal of end-of-life care is to achieve the best quality of life (QOL) for patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of (1) the patients' awareness of their prognosis, (2) the extent of patient-family caregiver congruence on the preferences for end-of-life care options, and (3) the perceived caregiving burden of family caregivers when they provide end-of-life care to their dying relative, on the QOL for terminally ill cancer patients in Taiwan. A total of 1108 dyads of patient-family caregiver from 24 hospitals throughout Taiwan were one-time surveyed. Predictors of the QOL were identified by multiple regression analysis. Controlling for the effects of age, financial status, and symptom distress, a novel finding of this study was that the patient awareness of prognosis, patient-family caregiver congruence on the preferred place of death, and the subjective family caregiving burden had a significant impact on the QOL of Taiwanese terminally ill cancer patients. QOL is not only related to the unavoidable decline in physical condition and daily functioning of the dying patient but is also related to domains that, as death approaches, have the potential to show improvement through the efforts of health-care professionals, such as presenting prognostic information to optimize the patients' understanding and assists them with psychological adjustments, facilitating patient-family caregiver congruence on the end-of-life care decision regarding the place of death and lightening the caregiving burden of family caregivers. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Autonomy and paternalism in geriatric medicine. The Jewish ethical approach to issues of feeding terminally ill patients, and to cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, A J; Sonnenblick, M

    1998-02-01

    Respecting and encouraging autonomy in the elderly is basic to the practice of geriatrics. In this paper, we examine the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and "artificial" feeding in a geriatric unit in a general hospital subscribing to jewish orthodox religious principles, in which the sanctity of life is a fundamental ethical guideline. The literature on the administration of food and water in terminal stages of illness, including dementia, still shows division of opinion on the morality of withdrawing nutrition. We uphold the principle that as long as feeding by naso-gastric (N-G) or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) does not constitute undue danger or arouse serious opposition it should be given, without causing suffering to the patient. This is part of basic care, and the doctor has no mandate to withdraw this. The question of CPR still shows much discrepancy regarding elderly patients' wishes, and doctors' opinions about its worthwhileness, although up to 10 percent survive. Our geriatric patients rarely discuss the subject, but it is openly ventilated with families who ask about it, who are then involved in the decision-making, and the decision about CPR or "do-not-resuscitate" (DNR) is based on clinical and prognostic considerations.

  19. West of the Rockies Kindness and the end of life.(physician kindness toward terminally ill patients)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rousseau, Paul

    2001-01-01

    ... of a significantly altered and limited life expectancy. Kindness transcends the physician-patient relationship and generates an elemental human bond that may also exhibit caring, compassion, and empathy; however, such attributes are not cardinal to the concept of kindness, but rather nurture and enhance kindness. Physicians may find kindness a simple undertakin...

  20. Strategy of coping with end-stage disease and cancer-related fatigue in terminally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modlińska, Aleksandra; Kowalik, Bożena; Buss, Tomasz; Janiszewska, Justyna; Lichodziejewska-Niemierko, Monika

    2014-11-01

    The aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship between strategy of coping with end-stage disease and cancer-related fatigue. The study was conducted using the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist, Brief Fatigue Inventory, and Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer scale to specify patient's strategy of coping. Finally, 51 hospice care patients with cancer were analyzed. The majority of responders adopted 1 of the 2 styles; avoidance (belongs to adaptive coping) or anxious preoccupation (destructive or maladaptive). Less often moderate fatalism and helpless/hopeless (H/H) or fighting spirit were observed. Significant correlation has been found between H/H or fatalism strategy and fatigue. High level of fatigue had a negative impact on almost all aspects of daily living among people with H/H or fatalism strategy. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. [N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide value for prediction of mortality among critically ill patients in different age groups in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailing; Wang, Hongping; Lou, Yunpeng; Miao, Wenli; Sha, Ning

    2014-07-01

    To investigate N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) cutoff value for the mortality in different age groups in critically ill patients. A retrospective study was conducted. 295 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of 401st Hospital of PLA from January 2011 to October 2012 were divided into two groups according to age [group with agegroup with age≥ 65 years old (n=190)]. The concentrations of serum NT-proBNP, hematocrit (HCT), procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein(CRP), serum creatinine(SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), acute physiology and chronic health evaluationII (APACHEII) score and probability of survival (PS) were recorded within 24 hours. The primary outcome was ICU mortality. Receiver operator characteristic curve (ROC curve) was used to evaluate the value of NT-proBNP for predicting the mortality. (1) There were no significant differences in the length of stay in ICU, mechanical ventilation rate, the mortality, the incidence of cardiovascular disease, digestive disease, neurologic disease, and the number of patients having received operation, HCT, PCT and CRP between the two groups (all P>0.05). The percentage of the male, the APACHEII score, the percentage of respiratory disease, and NT-proBNP in group with age≥65 years old were higher than those of the group with agegroup with age≥65 years old were lower than those of the group with age agegroup with age≥65 years old and the entire group [0.825 (0.738-0.892) vs. 0.664 (0.592-0.731) and 0.725 (0.670-0.775), Z1=-2.835, P1=0.005; Z2=-1.995, P2=0.046]. (3) The sensitivity (76.10% vs. 64.10%), specificity (82.35% vs. 67.12%), positive predictive value (90.0% vs. 75.8%), and negative predictive value (62.2% vs. 53.8%) with cutoff value of NT-proBNP (2 882 ng/L) in group with agegroup with age≥65 years old. NT-proBNP cutoff value in different age groups for the prediction of mortality in the critically ill patients maybe more objective and accurate.

  2. Depressão e ansiedade nos cuidadores de mulheres em fase terminal de câncer de mama e ginecológico Depression and anxiety in caregivers of terminally-ill breast and gynecological cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Rezende

    2005-12-01

    patients with terminal breast or gynecological cancer. METHODS: for this cross-sectional study, 133 informal caretakers of terminally-ill breast and gynecologic cancer patients were included. Patients were hospitalized for palliative care in the Oncology Clinic of the "Centro de Atenção Integral à Saúde da Mulher (Campinas, Brasil from August 2002 to May 2004. Seventy-one of the patients had breast cancer and 62 had gynecological malignancies. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD was applied to these informal caretakers, in order to detect anxiety and depression, and they were also interviewed to provide additional information regarding their age, gender, religion, relation to patient, current occupation, if they cared for other people, whether their routine had changed and whether other people helped them to care for the patient. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR and its confidence interval (CI, used to assess the relationship between the diagnoses of anxiety and depression among the informal caretakers. For multiple analyses, the stepwise criterion for variable selection was used. RESULTS: 43% percent of the patients identified their daughters as their main caretaker, and 24%, their husbands. Most of the caretakers were over 35 years old (63%, 68% were female, 59% were unemployed, 47% cared for another person and 84% referred that his/her routine had changed because of caring. Anxiety was detected in 99 caretakers (74.4% and depression in 71 (53.4%. Anxiety and depression were strongly correlated (odds ratio 5.6; 95% confidence interval 2.2 to 15.9. Bivariate analysis disclosed that the patients' husbands were less affected by depression, but multivariate analysis revealed that only the fact of being male was related to a lower prevalence of anxiety. CONCLUSION: caring for terminally-ill cancer patients led to high prevalence of anxiety and depression. Only men and the patients' husbands were found to have a lower prevalence of

  3. Life stories of families with a terminally ill child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hechter

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Family units with a terminally ill child have a tendency to withdraw and this isolation may lead to problems in their mental health. A tendency with psychologists, clergy and helpers from other professions is to act as ideal experts on the lives of saddened people. From painful personal experience, this does not seem to enable acquiescence. Therefore, the aim of research on families with terminally ill children, was to explore and describe their lives and to develop an approach to facilitate their families to obtain acquiescence. In this article however, attention will be given to the life-world of families with terminally ill children. The research consists of two phases. In phase one the experiences of four families with terminally ill children are explored and described by means of phenomenological, unstructured, in-depth interviews. In phase two an acquiescence approach, which was designed for educational psychologists to facilitate families with terminally ill children to achieve acquiscence, is described. This approach is based on results from phase one. This article focuses on phase one. In this phase four families were interviewed individually, in the privacy of their homes. The interviews were audiotaped, and were transcribed for the purpose of data gathering. The data was analysed according to Tesch’s method and a literature control was performed to verify the results. Guba’s model for the validity of qualitative research was used.

  4. Death--whose decision? Euthanasia and the terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, S I; Walters, J W

    2000-04-01

    In Australia and Oregon, USA, legislation to permit statutory sanctioned physician-assisted dying was enacted. However, opponents, many of whom held strong religious views, were successful with repeal in Australia. Similar opposition in Oregon was formidable, but ultimately lost in a 60-40% vote reaffirming physician-assisted dying. This paper examines the human dilemma which arises when technological advances in end-of-life medicine conflict with traditional and religious sanctity-of-life values. Society places high value on personal autonomy, particularly in the United States. We compare the potential for inherent contradictions and arbitrary decisions where patient autonomy is either permitted or forbidden. The broader implications for human experience resulting from new legislation in both Australia and Oregon are discussed. We conclude that allowing autonomy for the terminally ill, within circumscribed options, results in fewer ethical contradictions and greater preservation of dignity.

  5. O posicionamento do enfermeiro frente à autonomia do paciente terminal El posicionamiento del enfermero frente a la autonomía de lo paciente terminal The attitude of nurses face the autonomy of the terminally ill patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cristine de Oliveira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um estudo de abordagem qualitativa. Foi buscado no discurso dos enfermeiros que lidam com pacientes fora de possibilidades terapêuticas de cura, a compreensão do significado da autonomia do paciente, a forma pela qual o profissional reconhece esse direito e como valida-o durante o processo de morrer desses pacientes. O estudo foi realizado no setor de Cuidados Paliativos do Hospital de Clínicas de Uberlândia. Como resultados observou-se que os enfermeiros definem autonomia, reconhecem-na como direito dos pacientes e tentam respeitá-la, assumem também que se angustiam diante de algumas situações já que percebem contradições em seu discurso e prática diária e por isso manifestam a necessidade de mais discussão e espaço para que os serviços convivam melhor com a vontade e os direitos dos pacientes.Se trata de un estudio con abordaje cualitativo. Fue buscado en el discurso de los enfermeros que se relacionan con pacientes que están fuera de posibilidades terapéuticas de cura, la comprensión del significado de la autonomía del paciente, la forma por la cual el profesional reconoce ese derecho y cómo lo valida durante el proceso de morir de los mismos. El estudio fue realizado en el sector de Cuidados Paliativos del Hospital de Clínicas de Uberlândia. Los enfermeros definen la autonomía, la reconocen como derecho de los pacientes, intentan respetarla, asumen que si se angustian frente a algunas situaciones, perciben contradicciones en su discurso y práctica diaria por eso reconocen que necesitan de más discusión y más espacio para que los servicios convivan mejor con la la voluntad y los derechos de los pacientes.This research attends an study with qualitative aproach. Its aim were to analyze the nursing concept of autonomy of terminal patients, their attitude face an autonomy of terminal patient demostration and what is the nurse perspective in the presence of autonomy while has being structure in Brazil. This

  6. Integrated Care for the Terminally Ill: Variations in the Utilization of Formal Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Allan R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A review of 85 patients who received home care for terminal illness showed that a small proportion of patients use a relatively high volume of both in-patient and home care services. Data suggest that there are two dimensions of service utilization: a medical dimension and a social dimension. (Author/RC)

  7. Palliative sedation at home for terminally ill children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewska-Eksterowicz, Aleksandra; Przysło, Łukasz; Fendler, Wojciech; Stolarska, Małgorzata; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2014-11-01

    The presence of symptoms that are difficult to control always requires adjustment of treatment, and palliative sedation (PS) should be considered. We analyzed our experience in conducting PS at home for terminally ill children with cancer during a seven-year period. We performed a retrospective analysis of medical records of children with cancer treated at home between the years 2005 and 2011. We analyzed the data of 42 cancer patients (18% of all patients); in 21 cases, PS was initiated (solid tumors n = 11, brain tumors [5], bone tumors [4], leukemia [1]). Sedation was introduced because of pain (n = 13), dyspnea (9), anxiety (5), or two of those symptoms (6). The main drug used for sedation was midazolam; all patients received morphine. There were no significant differences in the dose of morphine or midazolam depending on the patient's sex; age was correlated with an increase of midazolam dose (R = 0.68; P = 0.005). Duration of sedation (R = 0.61; P = 0.003) and its later initiation (R = 0.43; P = 0.05) were correlated with an increase of the morphine dose. All patients received adjuvant treatment; in patients who required a morphine dose increase, metoclopramide was used more often (P = 0.0002). Patients did not experience any adverse reactions. Later introduction of sedation was associated with a marginally higher number of intervention visits and a significantly higher number of planned visits (R = 0.53; P = 0.013). Sedation may be safely used at home. It requires close monitoring and full cooperation between the family and hospice team. Because of the limited data on home PS in pediatric populations, further studies are needed. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. End of Life (Supporting a Terminally Ill Loved One)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clergy may also be of great help if religion is important to the patient. You can encourage ... Aug. 14, 2015. Rosenblatt L, et al. Psychosocial issues in advanced illness. http://www.uptodate.com/home. ...

  9. Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-Based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    34survival"[All Fields] OR "survival"[ MeSH Terms]). To retrieve RCTs in PubMed , we employed strategies suggested by Haynes14 with the following...Decision Curve Analysis: An application to hospice referral for terminal patients. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2011 Dec 23;11(1):77. PubMed PMID...for eliciting decision makers’ preferences and decision-making. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2010;10:51. PubMed PMID: 20846413. Pubmed Central PMCID

  10. Clinical Factors Associated With Adherence to the Premedication Protocol for Withdrawal of Mechanical Ventilation in Terminally Ill Patients: A 4-Year Experience at a Single Medical Center in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Hui; Huang, Pei-Wei; Hung, Chia-Yen; Lee, Shu-Hui; Kao, Chen-Yi; Wang, Hung-Ming; Hung, Yu-Shin; Su, Po-Jung; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2017-01-01

    Data on end-of-life care practices in Asia are scarce. This study aimed to analyze the clinical factors associated with the recommended premedication protocol for mechanical ventilation withdrawal, in Taiwan. A total of 135 terminally ill patients who had mechanical ventilation withdrawn between 2013 and 2016 from a single medical center in Taiwan were enrolled. A premedication protocol of morphine and midazolam intravenous bolus was routinely recommended for the patients before mechanical ventilation withdrawal. Receipt of opioids and/or benzodiazepines during the withdrawal process was defined as full (both), partial (1 drug), and no (none) adherence. The clinical factors relevant to the adherence of recommended premedication protocol for mechanical ventilation withdrawal were analyzed. Overall, 126 (93.3%) patients died, 8 (5.9%) patients were transferred to other institutions for further care, and 1 (0.7%) patient was discharged to home after mechanical ventilation withdrawal. The median survival time was 45 minutes, and 102 (75.6%) patients died within 1 day after the withdrawal process. The full, partial, and no adherence rates for premedication guideline were 17.8%, 40.0%, and 42.2%, respectively. The main diagnosis of cancer, receipt of hospice care, and preservation of spontaneous respiration were independent variables associated with the partial or full adherence to the premedication protocol. Our data show that adherence to the premedication protocol for mechanical ventilation withdrawal in terminally ill patients was inadequate in Taiwan. Promoting hospice care and educating medical personnel in the compassionate withdrawal of mechanical ventilation, especially in patients with noncancer disease, are warranted.

  11. Copeptin Predicts Mortality in Critically Ill Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Honeder, Maria C.; Lenz, Max; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Huber, Kurt; Speidl, Walter S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit exhibit a high mortality rate irrespective of the cause of admission. Besides its role in fluid and electrolyte balance, vasopressin has been described as a stress hormone. Copeptin, the C-terminal portion of provasopressin mirrors vasopressin levels and has been described as a reliable biomarker for the individual?s stress level and was associated with outcome in various disease entities. The aim of this study was t...

  12. Nurses' identification of important yet under-utilized end-of-life care skills for patients with life-limiting or terminal illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Lynn F; Shannon, Sarah E; Engelberg, Ruth; Dotolo, Danae; Silvestri, Gerard A; Curtis, J Randall

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to identify nurses' perspectives on nursing skills that are important yet under-utilized in end-of-life care. A 45-item survey was administered to nurses (n = 717) in four U.S. states with a response rate of 79%. We identified skills that were endorsed by more than 60% of nurses as extremely important and also endorsed as not currently practiced by more than 25% of nurses. We used Chi square statistics to examine professional characteristics associated with ratings of end-of-life care skills including practice settings, years of experience, and end-of-life care education. Content analysis was used to examine nurses' responses to open-ended questions. Nineteen items were endorsed as extremely important and also ranked as under-utilized. These end-of-life care skills included communication skills, symptom management competencies especially those concerning anxiety and depression, and issues related to patient-centered care systems. Four complementary themes emerged from qualitative analysis of nurses' comments, which supported the quantitative findings. This study provides a summary of skills nurses feel are important and under-utilized in their care of patients with life-limiting illnesses. The findings support the need to target both nursing education and healthcare system interventions to improve the use of practical end-of-life care skills by nurses with a focus on communication and symptom management skills.

  13. Should heart failure be regarded as a terminal illness requiring palliative care? A study of heart failure patients', carers' and clinicians' understanding of heart failure prognosis and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Rachel; Close, Helen; Hancock, Helen; Hungin, A Pali S

    2017-12-01

    Communication and planning for heart failure (HF) care near the end of life is known to be complex. Little is known about how the patient experience of palliative assessment and communication needs change over time, and how this might inform management. Our aim was to explore experiences of giving or receiving a prognosis and advanced palliative care planning (ACP) for those with HF. We carried out a longitudinal grounded theory study, employing in-depth interviews with 14 clinicians (primary and secondary care) and observations of clinic and home appointments, followed by a series of interviews with 13 patients with HF and 9 carers. Overall, the majority of participants rejected notions of HF as a terminal illness in favour of a focus on day-to-day management and maintenance, despite obvious deterioration in disease stage and needs over time. Clinicians revealed frustration about the uncertain nature of HF prognosis, leading to difficulties in planning. Others highlighted the need to deliver problem-based, individualised care but felt constrained sometimes by the lack of multidisciplinary ACP. Patients reported an absence of prognostic discussions with clinicians. This is the first study exploring the experiences of prognostic communication at all stages of HF. Findings raise questions regarding the pragmatic utility of the concept of HF as a terminal illness and have implications for future HF care pathway development. Findings support the incorporation of a problem-based approach to management, which recognises the importance of everyday functioning for patients and carers as well as the opportunity for ACP. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Psychological and psychiatric symptoms of terminally ill patients with cancer and their family caregivers in the home-care setting: A nation-wide survey from the perspective of bereaved family members in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayakawa, Makoto; Ogawa, Asao; Konno, Michiko; Kurata, Akiko; Hamano, Jun; Morita, Tatsuya; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Aoyama, Maho; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-12-01

    The psychological and psychiatric symptoms of terminally ill cancer patients are highly problematic and have been associated with greater burden among caregivers. Until now, the extent of these problems in the home care setting was unclear. This retrospective study was conducted as part of a nationwide survey from the perspective of bereaved family members in Japan (J-HOPE3). The bereaved family members rated the symptoms of delirium and suicidal ideation of patients with cancer, and the sleeplessness and depressed mood of family caregivers utilizing home care services in the one month before the patients' deaths. Regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with caregivers' sleeplessness or depressed mood. Of the 532 subjects analyzed, between 17% and 65% of patients experienced various symptoms of delirium, and 27% suicidal ideation. Among family caregivers, 60% experienced sleeplessness and 35% experienced depressed mood at least once during the week. Caregivers' psychological symptoms were associated with their own poor health status, being the spouse of the patient, and the patients' psychological or psychiatric symptoms. To manage patients' symptoms, 11% of caregivers had consulted psychiatrists or psychologists while another 11% wanted to do so. Psychological problems assessed were common among patients with cancer and their family caregivers in the one month of home care prior to the patient's death. An effective complementary care system, run by home-visit physicians, nurses, and experts in mental disorders, is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Decade of Changes in Family Caregivers' Preferences for Life-Sustaining Treatments for Terminally Ill Cancer Patients at End of Life in the Context of a Family-Oriented Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Siew Tzuh; Wen, Fur-Hsing; Liu, Li Ni; Chiang, Ming-Chu; Lee, Shiuyu C K; Chou, Man Chun; Feng, Wei-Lien; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Liu, I-Ping; Kuo, Ya-Hui; Chi, Shu Ching; Lee, Kwo C

    2016-05-01

    Temporal changes in different family caregiver cohorts' preferences for life-sustaining treatments (LSTs) at end of life (EOL) have not been examined nor have the concept of whether caregivers' LST preferences represent a homogeneous or heterogeneous construct. Furthermore, LST preferences are frequently assessed from multiple treatments, making clinical applications difficult/infeasible. To identify parsimonious patterns and changes in the pattern of LST preferences for two independent cohorts of family caregivers for terminally ill Taiwanese cancer patients. Preferences for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intensive care unit care, cardiac massage, intubation with mechanical ventilation, intravenous nutritional support, tube feeding, and dialysis were assessed among 1617 and 2056 family caregivers in 2003-2004 and 2011-2012, respectively. Patterns and changes in LST preferences were examined by multigroup latent class analysis. Five distinct classes were identified: uniformly preferring, uniformly rejecting, uniformly uncertain, and favoring nutritional support but rejecting or uncertain about other treatments. Class probability significantly decreased from 29.3% to 23.7% for the uniformly rejecting class, remained largely unchanged for the uniformly preferring (16.9%-18.6%), and favoring nutritional support but rejecting (37.1%-37.5%) or uncertain about other treatments (8.0%-10.4%) classes, but significantly increased from 7.0% to 11.5% for the uniformly uncertain class over time. Family caregivers' LST preferences for terminally ill cancer patients are a heterogeneous construct and shifted from uniformly rejecting all LSTs toward greater uncertainty. Surrogate EOL-care decision making may be facilitated by earlier and thorough assessments of caregivers' LST preferences and tailoring interventions to the unique needs of caregivers in each class identified in this study. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier

  16. A review on how meditation could be used to comfort the terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Michael Stephen; Vernon, Bryan

    2015-10-01

    Our objective was to review how meditation could comfort the terminally ill. Our methodology was a literature search, which included books, journals, papers in collections, and online databases. The main search engines employed were Google Scholar and the Durham University Library. The main databases consulted were the Christian Meditation Centre, Project Meditation, and Stress-Related Facts and Well-Being at Monash. We were specifically interested in data acquired from clinical and nonclinical trials. The arguments needed to be based on qualitative and quantitative scientific data. Papers were published between 1985 and 2014. We then subdivided the review into three subcategories: physical, emotional, and self-awareness. When reviewing each category, we put our results into tabular form. In each table, we noted the percentage of terminally ill patients (TIPs) and non-terminally ill patients (NTIPs), and whether meditation had comforted them. Our review demonstrated that there are many areas that have yet to be researched. First, very little work has been done on how meditation affects the physical health of TIPs, including such variables as blood pressure, chronic pain, and sleeping patterns. However, no research has been done on heart disease, hypertension, depression, among others. Second, virtually no research has been conducted on how meditation affects the mental health of TIPs. Notably neglected areas include anxiety, compliance, depression, and stress. Third, no research has been done on whether meditation increases self-awareness in TIPs. In each of these cases, most NTIPs reacted positively; however, no research has been done on why TIPs reacted differently. Our results demonstrate the need for further research on how meditation affects terminally ill patients. In turn, this would enrich the debate on whether meditation should be prescribed for the dying.

  17. Cuidando da família de pacientes em situação de terminalidade internados na unidade de terapia intensiva Caring for the families of terminally ill patients in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Soares

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O cuidado dos familiares é uma das partes mais importantes do cuidado global dos pacientes internados nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTI. No contexto de um paciente terminal ou no qual as perspectivas de recuperação são muito improváveis, esta face do cuidado assume uma importância ainda maior, pois na maioria das vezes o paciente não estará desperto, e será preciso lidar e cuidar dos seus familiares. Os familiares têm necessidades específicas e apresentam freqüências elevadas de estresse, distúrbios do humor e ansiedade durante o acompanhamento da internação na UTI, e que muitas vezes persistem após a morte do seu ente querido. CONTEÚDO: Foram selecionados artigos sobre o cuidado de familiares de pacientes em situação de terminalidade na UTI publicados nos últimos 20 anos na PubMed. CONCLUSÕES: A literatura recente está repleta de evidências de que estratégias voltadas para os familiares como a melhoria da comunicação, da prevenção de conflitos e do conforto espiritual, para citar algumas, resultam em maiores satisfação e percepção da qualidade da assistência prestada ao paciente na UTI.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Caring for the families is one of the major tasks of the global care of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. In the context of a terminally ill patient or a patient in whom the recovery from the acute illness is unlikely, dealing with and caring for their family members becomes even more important as the patient will not be awake in most of situations. Family members have specific needs and present with high incidence of symptoms of stress, depression, anxiety and related disorders during the ICU of their beloved one, which can even persist late after the patient's death. CONTENTS: Review of selected studies on the care of family members of patients at the end-of-life admitted to the ICU published at the PubMed database during the last 20 years. CONCLUSIONS

  18. Good and bad dying from the perspective of terminally ill men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Elizabeth K; Pearlman, Robert A

    2004-05-10

    Understanding the range of patients' views about good and bad deaths may be useful to clinicians caring for terminally ill patients. Our current understanding of good and bad deaths, however, comes primarily from input from families and clinicians. This study aimed to learn how terminally ill men conceptualize good and bad deaths. We conducted semistructured interviews with 26 men identified as having terminal heart disease or cancer. Participants described good and bad deaths in a section of open-ended questions. Participants also answered closed-ended questions about specific end-of-life scenarios. The open-ended questions were tape recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory methods. The closed-ended questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics. We found heterogeneity in responses to questions about good deaths, bad deaths, and preferred dying experiences. Participants voiced multiple reasons for why dying in one's sleep led to a good death and why prolonged dying or suffering led to a bad death. Participants did not hold uniform views about the presence of others at the very end of life or preferred location of dying. In discussing the end of life with terminally ill patients, clinicians may want to identify not only their patients' views of good and bad deaths but also how the identified attributes contribute to a good or bad death. The discussion can then focus on what might interfere with patients' attainment of their preferred dying experience and what may be available to help them achieve a death that is most consistent with their wishes.

  19. [NURSING ACTION BEFORE THE TERMINAL PATIENT PHYSICAL CARE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Sevilla, David; Juarez Vela, Raúl; Pellicer García, Begoña; Redondo Castán, Luis Carlos; Ramón Arbués, Enrique; López Martín, Inmaculada; De Blas Gómez, Irene; Alburquerque Medina, Eulalia

    2014-11-01

    Palliative care is a group of actions performed by nurses in order to increase the comfort and well-being of patients with terminal illnesses. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines this term as: An approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual [1]. Cicely Mary Strode Saunders is considered as the precursor of the palliative care, who explained the need to change the Palliative Care Units in order to improve the quality of life of patients with terminal illnesses. Palliative care is necessary for patients with a terminal illness. In such cases, the life expectancy is less than six months. Human being is considered a biopsychosocial model. For this reason, the nurse must take into account all the requirements arising from these three dimensions of the human being. In this essay, we deal with palliative care in patients with terminal illnesses, considering the role of the nurse as an important reference when teaching palliative care to the main carer.

  20. The illness/non-illness model: hypnotherapy for physically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navon, Shaul

    2014-07-01

    This article proposes a focused, novel sub-set of the cognitive behavioral therapy approach to hypnotherapy for physically ill patients, based upon the illness/non-illness psychotherapeutic model for physically ill patients. The model is based on three logical rules used in differentiating illness from non-illness: duality, contradiction, and complementarity. The article discusses the use of hypnotic interventions to help physically ill and/or disabled patients distinguish between illness and non-illness in their psychotherapeutic themes and attitudes. Two case studies illustrate that patients in this special population group can be taught to learn the language of change and to use this language to overcome difficult situations. The model suggests a new clinical mode of treatment in which individuals who are physically ill and/or disabled are helped in coping with actual motifs and thoughts related to non-illness or non-disability.

  1. Caring for families of the terminally ill in Malaysia from palliative care nurses' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Pathma; Lee, Susan; O'Connor, Margaret; Barnett, Tony

    2014-01-01

    To describe the process that nurses experienced in engaging with families in Malaysian palliative care settings and the challenges they faced. In palliative care settings, nurses and the terminally ill person's family members interact very closely with each other. It is important for nurses to work with families to ensure that the care of the terminally ill person is optimised. A qualitative design using grounded theory methods was used to describe how nurses engaged with families and the challenges they faced. Twenty-two nurses from home care and inpatient palliative care settings across Malaysia participated in this study. Data were collected through seven interviews and eight focus group discussions conducted between 2007-2009. The main problem identified by nurses was the different expectations to patient care with families. The participants used the core process of Engaging with families to resolve these differences and implemented strategies described as Preparing families for palliative care, Modifying care and Staying engaged to promote greater consistency and quality of care. When participants were able to resolve their different expectations with families, these resulted in positive outcomes, described as Harmony. However, negative outcomes of participants not being able to resolve their different expectations with families were Disharmony. This study highlights the importance of engaging and supporting families of the terminally ill as well as providing a guide that may be used by nurses and carers to better respond to families' needs and concerns. The study draws attention to the need for formal palliative care education, inclusive of family care, to enable nurses to provide the terminally ill person and their family effective and appropriate care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Delirium in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooter, A J C; Van De Leur, R R; Zaal, I J

    2017-01-01

    Delirium is common in critically ill patients and associated with increased length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and long-term cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of delirium has been explained by neuroinflammation, an aberrant stress response, neurotransmitter imbalances, and

  3. Length of home hospice care, family-perceived timing of referrals, perceived quality of care, and quality of death and dying in terminally ill cancer patients who died at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Akemi; Morita, Tatsuya; Kawagoe, Shohei; Shimizu, Megumi; Ozawa, Taketoshi; An, Emi; Kobayakawa, Makoto; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to clarify the length of home hospice care, family-perceived timing of referrals, and their effects on the family-perceived quality of care and quality of death and dying of terminally ill cancer patients who died at home and identify the determinants of perceived late referrals. A multicenter questionnaire survey was conducted involving 1,052 family members of cancer patients who died at home supported by 15 home-based hospice services throughout Japan. A total of 693 responses were analyzed (effective response rate, 66 %). Patients received home-based hospice care for a median of 35.0 days, and 8.0 % received home hospice care for less than 1 week. While 1.5 % of the families reported the timing of referrals as early, 42 % reported the timing as late or too late. The families of patients with a length of care of less than 4 weeks were more likely to regard the timing of referrals as late or too late. The patients of family members who regarded the timing of referrals as late or too late had a significantly lower perceived quality of care (effect size, 0.18; P = 0.039) and lower quality of death and dying (effect size, 0.15, P = 0.063). Independent determinants of higher likelihoods of perceived late referrals included: frequent visits to emergency departments, patient being unprepared for worsening condition, and patient having concerns about relationship with new doctor. Discharge nurse availability was independently associated with lower likelihoods of perceived late referrals. A significant number of bereaved families regarded the timing of referrals to home hospices as late, and the perceived timing was associated with the family-perceived quality of care and quality of death and dying. Systematic strategies to overcome the barriers related to perceived late referrals are necessary.

  4. Relatives' Perspective on the Terminally Ill Patients Who Died after Euthanasia or Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Interview Study in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Jean-Jacques; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.; Muller, Martien T.; van der Wal, Gerrit; van der Heide, Agnes; van der Maas, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    This study used retrospective interviews with 87 relatives to describe the experiences of patients who died by euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (EAS) in the Netherlands. Most of the patients suffered from cancer (85%). The relatives were most often a partner (63%) or a child (28%) of the patient. Before explicitly requesting EAS most…

  5. Factors affecting caregiver burden of terminally ill adults in the home setting - A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He Leow, Mabel Qi; Wai Chi Chan, Sally

    2011-01-01

    from the JBI-MAStARI (Joanna Briggs Institute-Meta Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument). Quantitative data were extracted from included papers using standardised data extraction tools from the JBI-MAStARI. Findings were presented in narrative form, as statistical pooling was not possible. Seven studies were included in the review. All the studies used a cross-sectional descriptive survey for the collection of data. Four main factors that influenced caregivers' perception of caregiving burden were identified: 1. Caregiver characteristics, 2. Patient characteristics, 3. Social support, and 4. Caregivers' personal protective resources. Caregiver characteristics, patient characteristics, social support, and attitude of caregiver towards the caregiving situation, were found to influence caregivers' perceived caregiving burden. Additional support is required for caregivers who are employed, known to have financial difficulties, caring for patient indicating symptom distress, and caring for a patient at the terminal stage (Level III). Future studies may attempt to develop a framework to identify factors that impact on caregiver burden. More studies on caregiver burden in males, caregiver burden of patients who were at the terminal stages of the various chronic illnesses should be explored.

  6. Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Stiggelbout AM, De Haes J. Patient preference for cancer therapy: an overview of measurement approaches. Journal of Clinical Oncology . 2001;19(1):220-30...life hospital costs in cancer patients : do advance directive or routes of hospital admission make a difference? Oncology 2011;80:118–22. 4...found in the following collections Ethics (33 articles) Geriatric medicine (94 articles) Health services research (491 articles) Palliative care (28 articles) Patient -centred medicine (151 articles)

  7. The role of the psychologist in determining competence for assisted suicide/euthanasia in the terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, K M; Dobson, K S

    2000-08-01

    This paper discusses the history of assisted suicide/euthanasia and public attitudes in Canada; discusses depression in the terminally ill and the potential role of the psychologist in the assisted suicide/euthanasia process; and specifically addresses the importance of determining competence in terminally ill patients. One area in which the services of psychologists have not been used to their fullest potential is in the care of the terminally ill, particularly in helping them make end-of-life decisions. It is very important that individuals making end-of-life decisions be used to assessed for mental disorders in order to ensure that they are able to make competent decisions. If assisted suicide and euthanasia were to become legalized, psychologists should be involved in the assessment process in order to determine competency.

  8. Hypernatremia in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Gregor; Funk, Georg-Christian

    2013-04-01

    Hypernatremia is common in intensive care units. It has detrimental effects on various physiologic functions and was shown to be an independent risk factor for increased mortality in critically ill patients. Mechanisms of hypernatremia include sodium gain and/or loss of free water and can be discriminated by clinical assessment and urine electrolyte analysis. Because many critically ill patients have impaired levels of consciousness, their water balance can no longer be regulated by thirst and water uptake but is managed by the physician. Therefore, the intensivists should be very careful to provide the adequate sodium and water balance for them. Hypernatremia is treated by the administration of free water and/or diuretics, which promote renal excretion of sodium. The rate of correction is critical and must be adjusted to the rapidity of the development of hypernatremia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of terminally ill cancer- vs. non-cancer patients in specialized palliative home care in Germany - a single service analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stiel, Stephanie; Heckel, Maria; Seifert, Andreas; Frauendorf, Tobias; Hanke, Roland Martin; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ...). More insights into specialized palliative home care (SPHC) in NCAs are needed. Retrospective analysis and group comparisons between CAs and NCAs of anonymous data of all patients cared for between December 2009 and June 2012 by one SPHC team in Germany...

  10. The meaning of spirituality and spiritual care among the Hong Kong Chinese terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Esther; Wong, Frances; Wong, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore the phenomenon of spirituality and spiritual care among terminally ill Chinese patients. Meeting a patient's spiritual needs is a fundamental part of holistic nursing care. In the Western literature, spirituality is related to connectedness, faith, and hope. Contemporary scholars in the West suggest that spirituality is a broader term than religion. Phenomenological interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 15 terminally ill Chinese patients in 2007. Participants found the term spirituality an abstract concept and described it as a unique personal belief which gives strength and relates to meaning of life. Spirituality is integrated with the body and mind and is a multidimensional concept. The acceptance of death as a process in life and 'letting go' leads to serenity and peace of mind. Other important themes include how the meaning of life is derived through relationships and connectedness, self-reflection of responsibilities, and obligations fulfilled. Inner spiritual well-being is attained from having faith and knowing possibilities in life and after death. Participants did not expect nurses to provide spiritual care, but when quality interpersonal care was given it gave them strength and spiritually supportive. If healthcare professionals can provide a compassionate and loving environment that facilitates acceptance and hope, the spiritual life of patients is enhanced. For dying individuals to experience love and for them to be understood as valuable even when no longer economically productive are both experiences of healing.

  11. Delirium in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slooter, A J C; Van De Leur, R R; Zaal, I J

    2017-01-01

    Delirium is common in critically ill patients and associated with increased length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and long-term cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of delirium has been explained by neuroinflammation, an aberrant stress response, neurotransmitter imbalances, and neuronal network alterations. Delirium develops mostly in vulnerable patients (e.g., elderly and cognitively impaired) in the throes of a critical illness. Delirium is by definition due to an underlying condition and can be identified at ICU admission using prediction models. Treatment of delirium can be improved with frequent monitoring, as early detection and subsequent treatment of the underlying condition can improve outcome. Cautious use or avoidance of benzodiazepines may reduce the likelihood of developing delirium. Nonpharmacologic strategies with early mobilization, reducing causes for sleep deprivation, and reorientation measures may be effective in the prevention of delirium. Antipsychotics are effective in treating hallucinations and agitation, but do not reduce the duration of delirium. Combined pain, agitation, and delirium protocols seem to improve the outcome of critically ill patients and may reduce delirium incidence. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Perspectives of cardiac care unit nursing staff about developing hospice services in iran for terminally ill cardiovascular patients: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Azami-Aghdash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was conducted aiming to determine the points of view of cardiac care units′ nursing staff about designing and providing Hospice services in Iran for cardiovascular patients in the final stages of life. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study, the perspectives of 16 Cardiac Care Unit (CCU nurses selected purposefully among hospitals of Tabriz-Iran University of Medical Sciences were investigated using semi-structured interviews and were analyzed in content analysis method. Results: 33 themes were finally extracted. Some nurses were for and some were against designing and providing Hospice services in Iran. The main reasons identified for supporting this plan included: Possibility of designing and providing these services consistent with high ethical values of Iranian society; approval of authorities due to increasing the load of chronic diseases and aged population; need of families due to the problems in taking care of patients and life concerns; better pain relief and respectful death; decrease of costs as a result of lower usage of diagnostic-therapeutic services, less use of expensive facilities and drugs, and better usage of hospital beds. Conclusion: Growing load of chronic diseases has made the need for Hospice as a necessary issue in Iran. In order to provide these services, studying the viewpoints of health service providers is inevitable. Therefore using and applying the results of this study in planning and policy making about designing and providing these services in Iran for cardiovascular patients in their final stages of lives could be helpful.

  13. Are life-extending treatments for terminal illnesses a special case? Exploring choices and societal viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Neil; van Exel, Job; Mason, Helen; Godwin, Jon; Collins, Marissa; Donaldson, Cam; Baker, Rachel

    2017-12-16

    Criteria used by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to assess life-extending, end-of-life (EoL) treatments imply that health gains from such treatments are valued more than other health gains. Despite claims that the policy is supported by societal values, evidence from preference elicitation studies is mixed and in-depth research has shown there are different societal viewpoints. Few studies elicit preferences for policies directly or combine different approaches to understand preferences. Survey questions were designed to investigate support for NICE EoL guidance at national and regional levels. These 'Decision Rule' and 'Treatment Choice' questions were administered to an online sample of 1496 UK respondents in May 2014. The same respondents answered questions designed to elicit their agreement with three viewpoints (previously identified and described) in relation to provision of EoL treatments for terminally ill patients. We report the findings of these choice questions and examine how they relate to each other and respondents' viewpoints. The Decision Rule questions described three policies: DA - a standard 'value for money' test, applied to all health technologies; DB - giving special consideration to all treatments for terminal illnesses; and DC - giving special consideration to specific categories of treatments for terminal illnesses e.g. life extension (as in NICE EoL guidance) or those that improve quality-of-life (QoL). Three Treatment Choices were presented: TA - improving QoL for patients with a non-terminal illness; TB - extending life for EoL patients; and TC - improving QoL at the EoL. DC received most support (45%) with most respondents giving special consideration to EoL only when treatments improved QoL. The most commonly preferred treatment choices were TA (51%) and TC (43%). Overall, this study challenges claims about public support for NICE's EoL guidance and the focus on life extension at EoL and substantiates

  14. The search for a higher power among terminally ill people with no previous religion or belief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Margery

    2012-08-01

    In a palliative care setting, there is evidence from the practice of spiritual care delivery to suggest that some terminally ill patients may seek, with varying degrees of openness and articulation, to connect with a higher power, or God, despite having expressed no previous interest in religion or belief. Developing a better understanding of the thoughts and feelings of such patients requires insight into the initial triggers of their search. In this small qualitative study involving six patients, fear, hope, and a natural connection are posited as possible prompts. The results highlight the complexity of ambivalent feelings toward a transcendent being that can be the focus of anger and blame while simultaneously offering a source of comfort and hope for an afterlife. Moreover, the study revealed something of the extent to which health professionals may feel limited in facilitating necessary discussion by a need to protect patients and themselves from entering an unfamiliar and complex area.

  15. Physiotherapy in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosino, N; Janah, N; Vagheggini, G

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged stay in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) can cause muscle weakness, physical deconditioning, recurrent symptoms, mood alterations and poor quality of life. Physiotherapy is probably the only treatment likely to increase in the short- and long-term care of the patients admitted to these units. Recovery of physical and respiratory functions, coming off mechanical ventilation, prevention of the effects of bed-rest and improvement in the health status are the clinical objectives of a physiotherapy program in medical and surgical areas. To manage these patients, integrated programs dealing with both whole-body physical therapy and pulmonary care are needed. There is still limited scientific evidence to support such a comprehensive approach to all critically ill patients; therefore we need randomised studies with solid clinical short- and long-term outcome measures. Copyright © 2011 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Graaff Fuusje M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants and their families in the Netherlands. Methods Questionnaires were sent to home care organizations and GPs working in areas where most of these migrants are living. 93 nurses and 78 GPs provided information about their experiences and opinions regarding home care for this group of patients. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results GPs refer relatively few patients from these migrant groups to home care. They often find it difficult to assess the needs of these patients and their families. In 40% of the GPs' cases in which terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants were not referred to home care, the GP regretted this afterwards: the patients had not received sufficient qualified care, and their informal carers had often become overburdened. In addition, home care nurses often express dissatisfaction with the home care given to terminally ill Turkish or Moroccan patients, because of communication problems, the patients' lack of knowledge of the disease, or difficulties in making suitable appointments with the patient or with the family. Conclusion Nurses and GPs cite chiefly similar factors influencing access to and use of home care as family members did in a previous study. However, according to GPs and nurses, the main barrier to the use of home care concerns communication problems, while relatives cited the preference for family care as the main reason for abstaining from the use of home care.

  17. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Fuusje M; Francke, Anneke L

    2009-01-26

    Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants and their families in the Netherlands. Questionnaires were sent to home care organizations and GPs working in areas where most of these migrants are living. 93 nurses and 78 GPs provided information about their experiences and opinions regarding home care for this group of patients. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. GPs refer relatively few patients from these migrant groups to home care. They often find it difficult to assess the needs of these patients and their families. In 40% of the GPs' cases in which terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants were not referred to home care, the GP regretted this afterwards: the patients had not received sufficient qualified care, and their informal carers had often become overburdened.In addition, home care nurses often express dissatisfaction with the home care given to terminally ill Turkish or Moroccan patients, because of communication problems, the patients' lack of knowledge of the disease, or difficulties in making suitable appointments with the patient or with the family. Nurses and GPs cite chiefly similar factors influencing access to and use of home care as family members did in a previous study. However, according to GPs and nurses, the main barrier to the use of home care concerns communication problems, while relatives cited the preference for family care as the main reason for abstaining from the use of home care.

  18. Family members' views on the benefits of harp music vigils for terminally-ill or dying loved ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzini, Linda; Rakoski, Alexa; Cohn, Sharilyn; Mularski, Richard A

    2015-02-01

    Music-thanatology is a palliative modality that uses harp and voice to provide bedside vigils, particularly for terminally ill or actively dying. We sought to determine the benefits of music vigils for terminally ill patients. Survey of 55 family members, whose terminally ill loved one experienced a music vigil during hospitalization, regarding effects on the patient's breathing, relaxation, comfort, pain and ability to sleep. Written comments on negative and positive results of the vigils were coded using content analysis. Family members perceived that the vigils resulted in modest improvement in the patients' breathing, relaxation, comfort, and ability to sleep, with fewer positive effects on pain, and almost no negative effects. Open ended comments focused on the positive benefit in increasing calm, relaxation, comfort. Comments on the positive effects for the family were almost as common as comments on the positive results for the patient. The use of music-vigils in palliative care should be investigated more extensively as our study supports that this intervention has benefits, almost no risk, minimal cost, and may improve patient-family experience of the dying process.

  19. Extensions to regret-based decision curve analysis: an application to hospice referral for terminal patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Barnes, Laura E; Hozo, Iztok; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Despite the well documented advantages of hospice care, most terminally ill patients do not reap the maximum benefit from hospice services, with the majority of them receiving hospice care either prematurely or delayed...

  20. Nutritional assessment of the critically ill patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Nutritional status screening, assessment and monitoring is essential in the critically ill patient to reduce morbidity and mortality and to decrease ... Obesity is known to have an influence on the outcome of patients with critical illness. .... Use due care in interpreting fluid balance in the septic patient. Central venous ...

  1. Concepts and definitions for "actively dying," "end of life," "terminally ill," "terminal care," and "transition of care": a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Nooruddin, Zohra; Didwaniya, Neha; Dev, Rony; De La Cruz, Maxine; Kim, Sun Hyun; Kwon, Jung Hye; Hutchins, Ronald; Liem, Christiana; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The terms "actively dying," "end of life," "terminally ill," "terminal care," and "transition of care" are commonly used but rarely and inconsistently defined. We conducted a systematic review to examine the concepts and definitions for these terms. We searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, and CINAHL for published peer-reviewed articles from 1948 to 2012 that conceptualized, defined, or examined these terms. Two researchers independently reviewed each citation for inclusion and then extracted the concepts/definitions when available. We also searched 10 dictionaries, four palliative care textbooks, and 13 organization Web sites, including the U.S. Federal Code. One of 16, three of 134, three of 44, two of 93, and four of 17 articles defined or conceptualized actively dying, end of life, terminally ill, terminal care, and transition of care, respectively. Actively dying was defined as "hours or days of survival." We identified two key defining features for end of life, terminally ill, and terminal care: life-limiting disease with irreversible decline and expected survival in terms of months or less. Transition of care was discussed in relation to changes in 1) place of care (e.g., hospital to home), 2) level of professions providing the care (e.g., acute care to hospice), and 3) goals of care (e.g., curative to palliative). Definitions for these five terms were rarely found in dictionaries, textbooks, and organizational Web sites. However, when available, the definitions were generally consistent with the concepts discussed previously. We identified unifying concepts for five commonly used terms in palliative care and developed a preliminary conceptual framework toward building standardized definitions. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Attitudes of acutely ill patients towards euthanasia in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R C S; Chien, Wai-Tong

    2007-01-01

    The global euthanasia debate by health care professionals has raised important ethical issues concerning the professional duties and responsibilities of nurses caring for terminal patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of acutely ill patients towards the practice of euthanasia in Hong Kong. A modified form of the 23-item Questionnaire for General Household Survey scale was used. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted with a stratified sample of in-patients recruited from a wide variety of departments in a regional, acute general hospital. Seventy-seven out of 129 patients responded (59.7%) and a high proportion of patients agreed with the use of euthanasia in the following circumstances: 'where they were a third party', if 'someone they loved' was affected, or if 'they themselves were the patient'. Of the 77 patients, 54 agreed with active euthanasia (70.1%) and 65 with passive (84.4%). The results also indicated that a few socio-demographic characteristics (such as age, gender and household income) statistically significantly correlated with patients' attitudes towards euthanasia. These findings highlight that Chinese patients with acute illness generally accept the use of euthanasia. Further research on the attitudes and perceptions of patients towards the use of euthanasia is recommended, particularly in diverse groups of Chinese and Asian patients with acute or terminal illness.

  3. What Proportion of Terminally Ill and Dying People Require Specialist Palliative Care Services?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, around 55 million people die each year worldwide. That number is expected to increase rapidly with accelerating population aging. Despite growth in the number of palliative care specialists and specialist services in most countries, the prospect of an increasing number of terminally ill and dying persons is daunting. This paper attempts to answer the question: what proportion of terminally ill and dying persons require specialist palliative care services? To address this question and highlight which persons require specialist palliative care, the current state of access to specialist palliative care services and specialists in Canada and other countries is highlighted, along with available evidence-based information on specialist services utilization and the care needs of terminally ill and dying persons. Current evidence and information gaps reveal that this question cannot be answered now, but it should be answered in advance of a crisis of unmet end-of-life care needs with the rising death toll.

  4. Copeptin Predicts Mortality in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Honeder, Maria C; Lenz, Max; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Huber, Kurt; Speidl, Walter S

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit exhibit a high mortality rate irrespective of the cause of admission. Besides its role in fluid and electrolyte balance, vasopressin has been described as a stress hormone. Copeptin, the C-terminal portion of provasopressin mirrors vasopressin levels and has been described as a reliable biomarker for the individual's stress level and was associated with outcome in various disease entities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission are associated with 30-day mortality. In this single-center prospective observational study including 225 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary medical ICU at a university hospital, blood was taken at ICU admission and copeptin levels were measured using a commercially available automated sandwich immunofluorescent assay. Median acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 20 and 30-day mortality was 25%. Median copeptin admission levels were significantly higher in non-survivors as compared with survivors (77.6 IQR 30.7-179.3 pmol/L versus 45.6 IQR 19.6-109.6 pmol/L; p = 0.025). Patients with serum levels of copeptin in the third tertile at admission had a 2.4-fold (95% CI 1.2-4.6; p = 0.01) increased mortality risk as compared to patients in the first tertile. When analyzing patients according to cause of admission, copeptin was only predictive of 30-day mortality in patients admitted due to medical causes as opposed to those admitted after cardiac surgery, as medical patients with levels of copeptin in the highest tertile had a 3.3-fold (95% CI 1.66.8, p = 0.002) risk of dying independent from APACHE II score, primary diagnosis, vasopressor use and need for mechanical ventilation. Circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission independently predict 30-day mortality in patients admitted to a medical ICU.

  5. Glucose metabolism in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Møller, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    glucose (BG). This is taken advantage of in the treatment of patients with T2DM, for whom GLP-1 analogs have been introduced during the recent years. Infusion of GLP-1 also lowers the BG level in critically ill patients without causing severe hypoglycemia. The T2DM and critical illness share similar...

  6. Chloramphenicol with fluid and electrolyte therapy cures terminally ill green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) with chytridiomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sam; Speare, Rick; Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F

    2012-06-01

    Terminal changes in frogs infected with the amphibian fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) include epidermal degeneration leading to inhibited epidermal electrolyte transport, systemic electrolyte disturbances, and asystolic cardiac arrest. There are few reports of successful treatment of chytridiomycosis and none that include curing amphibians with severe disease. Three terminally ill green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) with heavy Bd infections were cured using a combination of continuous shallow immersion in 20 mg/L chloramphenicol solution for 14 days, parenteral isotonic electrolyte fluid therapy for 6 days, and increased ambient temperature to 28 degrees C for 14 days. All terminally ill frogs recovered rapidly to normal activity levels and appetite within 5 days of commencing treatment. In contrast, five untreated terminally ill L. caerulea with heavy Bd infections died within 24-48 hr of becoming moribund. Subclinical infections in 15 experimentally infected L. caerulea were cured within 28 days by continuous shallow immersion in 20 mg/L chloramphenicol solution without adverse effects. This is the first known report of a clinical treatment protocol for curing terminally ill Bd-infected frogs.

  7. Physiotherapy in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ambrosino

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged stay in Intensive Care Unit (ICU can cause muscle weakness, physical deconditioning, recurrent symptoms, mood alterations and poor quality of life.Physiotherapy is probably the only treatment likely to increase in the short- and long-term care of the patients admitted to these units. Recovery of physical and respiratory functions, coming off mechanical ventilation, prevention of the effects of bed-rest and improvement in the health status are the clinical objectives of a physiotherapy program in medical and surgical areas. To manage these patients, integrated programs dealing with both whole-body physical therapy and pulmonary care are needed.There is still limited scientific evidence to support such a comprehensive approach to all critically ill patients; therefore we need randomised studies with solid clinical short- and long-term outcome measures. Resumo: Uma estadia prolongada na Unidade de Cuidados Intensivos (UCI pode causar fraqueza muscular, descondicionamento físico, sintomas recorrentes, alterações de humor e má qualidade de vida.A fisioterapia é, provavelmente, o único tratamento com potencial para aumentar nos cuidados a curto e longo prazo aos pacientes internados nestas unidades. A recuperação das funções físicas e respiratórias, retirar a ventilação mecânica, prevenção de efeitos do repouso na cama e melhoria do estado de saúde são objectivos clínicos de um programa de fisioterapia nas áreas médicas e cirúrgicas. Para tratar estes pacientes, são necessários programas integrados que englobem tanto a fisioterapia global como os cuidados respiratórios necessários.A evidência científica para apoiar esta abordagem abrangente para todos os doentes críticos é ainda limitada; portanto, são necessários estudos aleatorizados com medidas de resultados a curto e longo prazo. Keywords: Rehabilitation, Mechanical ventilation, Physiotherapy, Weaning, Palavras-chave: Reabilitação, Ventilação mec

  8. Physiotherapy in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ambrosino

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged stay in Intensive Care Unit (ICU can cause muscle weakness, physical deconditioning, recurrent symptoms, mood alterations and poor quality of life. Physiotherapy is probably the only treatment likely to increase in the short- and long-term care of the patients admitted to these units. Recovery of physical and respiratory functions, coming off mechanical ventilation, prevention of the effects of bed-rest and improvement in the health status are the clinical objectives of a physiotherapy program in medical and surgical areas. To manage these patients, integrated programs dealing with both whole-body physical therapy and pulmonary care are needed. There is still limited scientific evidence to support such a comprehensive approach to all critically ill patients; therefore we need randomised studies with solid clinical short- and long-term outcome measures. Resumo: Uma estadia prolongada na Unidade de Cuidados Intensivos (UCI pode causar fraqueza muscular, descondicionamento físico, sintomas recorrentes, alterações de humor e má qualidade de vida. A fisioterapia é, provavelmente, o único tratamento com potencial para aumentar nos cuida-dos a curto e longo prazo aos pacientes internados nestas unidades. A recuperação das funções físicas e respiratórias, retirar a ventilação mecânica, prevenção de efeitos do repouso na cama e melhoria do estado de saúde são objectivos clínicos de um programa de fisioterapia nas áreas médicas e cirúrgicas. Para tratar estes pacientes, são necessários programas integrados que englobem tanto a fisioterapia global como os cuidados respiratórios necessários. A evidência científica para apoiar esta abordagem abrangente para todos os doentes críticos é ainda limitada; portanto, são necessários estudos aleatorizados com medidas de resultados a curto e longo prazo. Keywords: Rehabilitation, Mechanical ventilation, Physiotherapy, Weaning, Palavras chave: Reabilitação, Ventilação mec

  9. Illness representations in patients with hand injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2009-07-01

    Differences in illness perception about hand injury may partly explain the variation in health behaviours such as adherence to post-operative therapy, coping strategy, emotional response and eventual clinical outcome. This study examined the illness perception of patients with hand injuries in the acute trauma setting.

  10. Time and life perception in the terminally ill: its utility in screening for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julião, Miguel; Oliveira, Fátima; Nunes, Baltazar; Barbosa, António

    2013-11-01

    The objective was to explore the utility of a new three-item depression screening tool concerning time and life perception (TLP-3), compared with the DSM-IV criteria. This was a cross-sectional study of 63 Portuguese terminally ill patients, from May 2010 to November 2012. Patients were eligible if they fulfilled the following inclusion criteria: age ≥18 years old; having a life-threatening disease with prognosis of 6 months or less; no evidence of dementia or delirium, based on documentation within the medical chart or by clinical consensus; Mini Mental State score ≥20; being able to read and speak Portuguese; and provision of written informed consent. Participants were assessed for depression using DSM-IV criteria and the newly developed TLP-3. Screening performance for depression using the TLP-3 compared with DSM-IV was calculated using measures of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values. Logistic regression was calculated with the aim of identifying variables with the best predictive ability for diagnosing depression. After logistic regression analysis was made to all three items composing TLP-3, only two items were maintained (OR=2.9, 95% CI [0.9-8.7]; OR=7.6, 95% CI [0.9-65.3], respectively). This final regression model composed of two questions (TLP-2) was able to diagnose correctly 70% of the depressed patients with a sensitivity of 63% and a specificity of 74%. The area under the ROC curve was 72% (95% CI [59-85]). TLP-3 is a novel and clinically applicable approach to assessing depression among palliative care patients. Further investigation is needed on the psychological significance of time and life perception distortions, and its possible application to screen for depression among patients nearing end of life.

  11. Nutritional requirements of the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel L

    2004-02-01

    The presence or development of malnutrition during critical illness has been unequivocally associated with increased morbidity and mortality in people. Recognition that malnutrition may similarly affect veterinary patients emphasizes the need to properly address the nutritional requirements of hospitalized dogs and cats. Because of a lack in veterinary studies evaluating the nutritional requirements of critically ill small animals, current recommendations for nutritional support of veterinary patients are based largely on sound clinical judgment and the best information available, including data from experimental animal models and human studies. This, however, should not discourage the veterinary practitioner from implementing nutritional support in critically ill patients. Similar to many supportive measures of critically ill patients, nutritional interventions can have a significant impact on patient morbidity and may even improve survival. The first step of nutritional support is to identify patients most likely to benefit from nutritional intervention. Careful assessment of the patient and appraisal of its nutritional needs provide the basis for a nutritional plan, which includes choosing the optimal route of nutritional support, determining the number of calories to provide, and determining the composition of the diet. Ultimately, the success of the nutritional management of critically ill dogs and cats will depend on close monitoring and frequent reassessment.

  12. [Medicines reconciliation in critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Martin, C; Aquerreta, I; Faus, V; Idoate, A

    2014-01-01

    Medicines reconciliation plays a key role in patient safety. However, there is limited data available on how this process affects critically ill patients. In this study, we evaluate a program of reconciliation in critically ill patients conducted by the Intensive Care Unit's (ICU) pharmacist. Prospective study about reconciliation medication errors observed in 50 patients. All ICU patients, excluding patients without regular treatment. Reconciliation process was carried out in the first 24h after ICU admission. Discrepancies were clarified with the doctor in charge of the patient. We analyzed the incidence of reconciliation errors, their characteristics and gravity, the interventions made by the pharmacist and their acceptance by physicians. A total of 48% of patients showed at least one reconciliation error. Omission of drugs accounted for 74% of the reconciliation errors, mainly involving antihypertensive drugs (33%). An amount of 58% of reconciliation errors detected corresponded to severity category D. Pharmacist made interventions in the 98% of patients with discrepancies. A total of 81% of interventions were accepted. The incidence and characteristics of reconciliation errors in ICU are similar to those published in non-critically ill patients, and they affect drugs with high clinical significance. Our data support the importance of the stablishment of medication reconciliation proceedings in critically ill patients. The ICU's pharmacist could carry out this procedure adequately. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  13. Perceived illness intrusion among patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapat Usha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis therapy is extremely stressful as it interferes with all spheres of daily acti-vities of the patients. This study is aimed at understanding the perceived illness intrusion among pa-tients on hemodialysis (HD and to find the association between illness intrusion and patient demo-graphics as well as duration of dialysis. A cross sectional study involving 90 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD stage V, on HD was performed during the period from 2005 to 2006. The subjects included were above 18 years of age, willing, stable and on dialysis for at least two months. Patients with psychiatric co-morbidity were excluded. A semi-structured interview schedule covering socio-demographics and a 13 item illness intrusion checklist covering the various aspects of life was ca-rried out. The study patients were asked to rate the illness intrusion and the extent. The data were ana-lyzed statistically. The mean age of the subjects was 50.28 ± 13.69 years, males were predominant (85%, 73% were married, 50% belonged to Hindu religion, 25% had pre-degree education, 25% were employed and 22% were housewives. About 40% and 38% of the study patients belonged to middle and upper socio-economic strata respectively; 86% had urban background and lived in nuclear fami-lies. The mean duration on dialysis was 24 ± 29.6 months. All the subjects reported illness intrusion to a lesser or greater extent in various areas including: health (44%, work (70% finance (55%, diet (50% sexual life (38% and psychological status (25%. Illness had not intruded in areas of rela-tionship with spouse (67%, friends (76%, family (79%, social (40% and religious functions (72%. Statistically significant association was noted between illness intrusion and occupation (P= 0.02.

  14. A longitudinal study of end-of-life preferences of terminally-ill people who live alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Samar M; Skett, Kim

    2013-09-01

    As a home death seems to be the perceived ideal, terminally ill people who live alone are at a disadvantage in terms of their place of care and death and little is known about their end-of-life preferences. This study aimed at eliciting patient preferences for their place of care and death longitudinally at two points during their illness trajectory, and reporting on the extent they were able to achieve their place of choice or congruence between preferred and actual place of death. A questionnaire was administered by a researcher in the patients' homes during two visits, 6-12 weeks apart depending on patient prognosis. Forty-three patients of Silver Chain Hospice Care Service in Western Australia participated during 2009-2010. The results indicated that preferences were in favour of either a home or hospice death, with more preferring home as a place of death rather than a place of care. However, overall congruence between preferred and actual place of death was between 53% and 41% dependent on whether it was based on first or second visit preferences respectively. This is the first longitudinal study to elicit the end-of-life preferences of terminally ill people who live alone. As home may not be the preferred location for dying for many patients (nearly half of the patients in this study), ability to die in the place of choice needs to be looked at as a possible indicator of meeting patient needs or as a quality measure in end-of-life care. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. [Observation of critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Hesselfeldt, R.; Lippert, A.

    2009-01-01

    . MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective observational study at Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. Study personnel measured vital signs on all patients present on five wards during the evening and night and interviewed nursing staff about patients with abnormal vital signs. Subsequently, patient records were...... not measured. In two out of three patients, staff decided to intervene because of abnormal vital signs measured by study personnel, indicating a need to reevaluate monitoring routines at general wards Udgivelsesdato: 2009/2/9...

  16. [Metabolic emergencies in critically ill cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namendys-Silva, Silvio A; Hernández-Garay, Marisol; García-Guillén, Francisco J; Correa-García, Paulina; Herrera Gómez, Angel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2013-11-01

    Severe metabolic alterations frequently occur in critically ill cancer patients; hypercalcemia, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia, tumor lysis syndrome, metabolic complications of renal failure and lactic acidosis. Cancer patients with metabolic emergencies should be treated in a medical oncology department or an intensive care unit. Most metabolic emergencies can be treated properly when they are identified early. The clinician should consider that the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients depends on their primary disease, comorbidities and organ failure. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. [Spiritual care model for terminal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ju-Fen; Lin, Ya-Ching; Huang, Pai-Ho; Wei, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Jia-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Providing spiritual care to patients with advanced cancer may improve the quality of life of these patients and help them experience a good death. Cancer patients are eager for additional spiritual care and for a sense of peace at the end of their life. However, spirituality is an abstract concept. The literature on spiritual care focuses primarily on elaborations of spirituality theory. Thus, first-line medical care professionals lack clear guidelines for managing the spiritual needs of terminal cancer patients. The purposes of this article were to: 1) introduce a spiritual care model based on the concept of repair and recovery of relationships that addresses the relationship between the self and God, others, id, and objects and 2) set out a four-step strategy for this model that consists of understanding, empathizing, guiding, and growing. This article provides operational guidelines for the spiritual care of terminal cancer patients.

  18. Illness perceptions of cancer patients: relationships with illness characteristics and effects on coping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, E.P.C.; Rijken, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Illness perceptions have proven to be predictive of coping and adjustment in many chronically ill patients. Insights into illness perceptions of cancer patients are however scarce. The purpose of the present study was to explore how people with cancer perceive their illness. Moreover, we

  19. Perceived Social Support among Mentally Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandana Pokharel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social support is the perception that one is cared for, has assistance available from significant others and its benefit is by buffering stress by influencing the ability to adjust and live with illness. Social support can uplift the quality and subjective wellbeing of people. The objective of this study was to examine the perceived social support and factors influencing it among mentally ill patients. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out. Ninety cases aged more than 18 years visiting outpatient of psychiatric department and diagnosed as a case of mental illness for at least a year were included. Instruments used were self-developed proforma and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Interview technique was used to collect the data. Results: Majority (60% of the patients perceive social support from family, 28% of the patients perceive social support from significant others. Regression analysis showed that the perceived social support is influenced by employment status, type of family one lives in and physical illness. It is not influenced by gender, subjective financial status and frequency of hospitalization. Conclusion: Perceived social support is influenced by employment status, type of family one lives in and physical illness. Majority (60% of the patients perceive social support from family.

  20. Effectiveness of palliative home-care services in reducing hospital admissions and determinants of hospitalization for terminally ill patients followed up by a palliative home-care team: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolfi, Mirko; Buja, Alessandra; Zanardo, Chiara; Marangon, Chiara Francesca; Manno, Pietro; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that most patients in the terminal stages of cancer would benefit from palliative home-care services. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of appropriate palliative home-care services in reducing hospital admissions, and to identify factors predicting the likelihood of patients treated at home being hospitalized. Retrospective cohort study. We enrolled all 402 patients listed by the Local Health Authority No. 5, Veneto Region (North-East Italy), as dying of cancer in 2011. Of the cohort considered, 39.9% patients had been taken into care by a palliative home-care team. Irrespective of age, gender, and type of tumor, patients taken into care by the palliative home-care team were more likely to die at home, less likely to be hospitalized, and spent fewer days in hospital in the last 2 months of their life. Among the patients taken into care by the palliative home-care team, those with hematological cancers and hepatocellular carcinoma were more likely to be hospitalized, and certain symptoms (such as dyspnea and delirium) were predictive of hospitalization. Our study confirms the effectiveness of palliative home care in enabling patients to spend the final period of their lives at home. The services of a palliative home-care team reduced the consumption of hospital resources. This study also provided evidence of some types of cancer (e.g. hematological cancers and hepatocellular carcinoma) being more likely to require hospitalization, suggesting the need to reconsider the pathways of care for these diseases.

  1. Melatonin Secretion Pattern in Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Holst, René; Jennum, Poul

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients have abnormal circadian and sleep homeostasis. This may be associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The aims of this pilot study were (1) to describe melatonin secretion in conscious critically ill mechanically ventilated patients and (2) to describe whether melaton...... secretion in these patients. Remifentanil did not affect melatonin secretion but was associated with lower risk of atypical sleep pattern. REM sleep was only registered during the period of nonsedation.......Critically ill patients have abnormal circadian and sleep homeostasis. This may be associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The aims of this pilot study were (1) to describe melatonin secretion in conscious critically ill mechanically ventilated patients and (2) to describe whether melatonin...... secretion and sleep patterns differed in these patients with and without remifentanil infusion. Eight patients were included. Blood-melatonin was taken every 4th hour, and polysomnography was carried out continually during a 48-hour period. American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria were used for sleep...

  2. The incretin effect in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Janum, Susanne; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    is mediated by the incretin hormones GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), is impaired in critically ill patients. METHODS: The incretin effect (i.e., the relative difference between the insulin response to oral and intravenous glucose administration) was investigated in a cross......-sectional case-control study. Eight critically ill patients without diabetes admitted to a mixed intensive care unit and eight healthy control subjects without diabetes, matched at group level by age, sex and body mass index, were included in the study. All subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT...

  3. Psychoneuroimmunology in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKeyser, Freda

    2003-02-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is the study of the interactions among behavior, neural, and endocrine functions and the immune system. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the evidence concerning interactions among behavior, the neuroendocrine system, and the immune system, and to show how this evidence relates to critical care patients. It has been shown that the immune function of many patients in the intensive care unit is suppressed as a result of trauma, sepsis, or profound physiologic and psychological stress. Three of the most common stressors among patients in the intensive care unit are pain, sleep deprivation, and fear or anxiety. Findings have shown each of these stressors to be associated with decreased immune functioning. Nurses have an important responsibility to protect their patients from infection and promote their ability to heal. Several actions are suggested that can help the nurse achieve these goals. It is hoped that nurses would keep these interactions in mind while caring for their patients in the intensive care unit.

  4. Self-Deception in Terminal Patients: Belief System at Stake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echarte, Luis E; Bernacer, Javier; Larrivee, Denis; Oron, J V; Grijalba-Uche, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A substantial minority of patients with terminal illness hold unrealistically hopeful beliefs about the severity of their disease or the nature of its treatment, considering therapy as curative rather than palliative. We propose that this attitude may be understood as self-deception, following the current psychological theories about this topic. In this article we suggest that the reason these patients deceive themselves is to preserve their belief systems. According to some philosophical accounts, the human belief system (HBS) is constituted as a web with a few stable central nodes - deep-seated beliefs - intimately related with the self. We hypothesize that the mind may possess defensive mechanisms, mostly non-conscious, that reject certain sensory inputs (e.g., a fatal diagnosis) that may undermine deep-seated beliefs. This interpretation is in line with the theory of cognitive dissonance. Following this reasoning, we also propose that HBS-related self-deception would entail a lower cognitive load than that associated with confronting the truth: whereas the latter would engage a myriad of high cognitive functions to re-configure crucial aspects of the self, including the setting of plans, goals, or even a behavioral output, the former would be mostly non-conscious. Overall, we believe that our research supports the hypothesis that in cases of terminal illness, (self-)deceiving requires less effort than accepting the truth.

  5. Self-deception in terminal patients: belief system at stake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E Echarte

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A substantial minority of patients with terminal illness hold unrealistically hopeful beliefs about the severity of their disease or the nature of its treatment, considering therapy as curative rather than palliative. We propose that this attitude may be understood as self-deception, following the current psychological theories about this topic. In this article we suggest that the reason these patients deceive themselves is to preserve their belief systems. According to some philosophical accounts, the human belief system (HBS is constituted as a web with a few stable central nodes –deep seated beliefs– intimately related with the self. We hypothesize that the mind may possess defensive mechanisms, mostly non-conscious, that reject certain sensory inputs (e.g., a fatal diagnosis that may undermine deep-seated beliefs. This interpretation is in line with the theory of cognitive dissonance. Following this reasoning, we also propose that HBS-related self-deception would entail a lower cognitive load than that associated with confronting the truth: whereas the latter would engage a myriad of high cognitive functions to re-configure crucial aspects of the self, including the setting of plans, goals, or even a behavioral output, the former would be mostly non-conscious. Overall, we believe that our research supports the hypothesis that in cases of terminal illness, (self-deceiving requires less effort than accepting the truth.

  6. Fear of Death, Mortality Communication, and Psychological Distress among Secular and Religiously Observant Family Caregivers of Terminal Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachner, Yaacov G.; O'Rourke, Norm; Carmel, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that caregivers and terminally ill patients face substantial difficulties discussing illness and death. Existing research, however, has focused primarily on the experience of patients. The current study compared responses as well as the relative strength of association between mortality communication, fear of death, and…

  7. Melatonin Secretion Pattern in Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Holst, René; Jennum, Poul

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients have abnormal circadian and sleep homeostasis. This may be associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The aims of this pilot study were (1) to describe melatonin secretion in conscious critically ill mechanically ventilated patients and (2) to describe whether melatonin...... secretion and sleep patterns differed in these patients with and without remifentanil infusion. Eight patients were included. Blood-melatonin was taken every 4th hour, and polysomnography was carried out continually during a 48-hour period. American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria were used for sleep...... scoring if sleep patterns were identified; otherwise, Watson's classification was applied. As remifentanil was periodically administered during the study, its effect on melatonin and sleep was assessed. Melatonin secretion in these patients followed a phase-delayed diurnal curve. We did not observe any...

  8. Insulin therapy in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellahham, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia frequently occurs with acute medical illness, especially among patients with cardiovascular disease, and has been linked to increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Even patients who are normoglycemic can develop hyperglycemia in response to acute metabolic stress. An expanding body of literature describes the benefits of normalizing hyperglycemia with insulin therapy in hospitalized patients. As a result, both the American Diabetes Association and the American College of Endocrinology have developed guidelines for optimal control of hyperglycemia, specifically targeting critically ill, hospitalized patients. Conventional blood glucose values of 140–180 mg/dL are considered desirable and safely achievable in most patients. More aggressive control to insulin administration, which can then be transitioned to subcutaneous insulin therapy in those patients who require continued insulin maintenance. This article reviews the data establishing the link between hyperglycemia and its risks of morbidity and mortality, and describes strategies that have proven effective in maintaining glycemic control in high-risk hospitalized patients. PMID:21191429

  9. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaff Fuusje M; Francke Anneke L

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants and their families in the Netherlands. Methods Questionnaires were sent to home care organizations and GPs working in areas where most of t...

  10. Illness perceptions of cancer patients: relationships with illness characteristics and coping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, P.; Rijken, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Illness perceptions have proven to be predictive of coping and adjustment in many chronically ill patients. However, insights into illness perceptions of cancer patients are scarce. The purpose of the present study was to explore how a heterogeneous sample of cancer patients perceive

  11. Energy expenditure of acutely ill hospitalised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gariballa Salah

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To measure energy expenditure of acutely ill elderly patients in hospital and following discharge in the community. Design Sixty-three consecutive hospitalised acutely ill elderly patients were recruited. Eight patients were studied to assess the reliability of the Delta Tract Machine as a measure of energy expenditure; 35 patients had their energy expenditure studied in hospital on two occasions and 20 patients had their energy expenditure measured in hospital and at 6 weeks in the community Results Men had higher basal energy expenditure (BMR values compared to women however the difference was not statistically significant [Men, mean (SD 1405 (321 Kcal, women 1238 (322 kcal; mean difference (95% CI 166 kcal (-17 to 531, p = 0.075]. After adjusting for age, gender and body mass index both medication and C-reactive protein (CRP, concentrations showed significant correlation with measured energy expenditure in hospital, (r = -0.36, "p Conclusion Tissue inflammation and medications were associated with change in measured energy expenditure in acutely ill patients.

  12. Communication with older, seriously ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Liesbeth M; Lindenberger, Elizabeth; van Weert, Julia C M

    2015-05-01

    This article describes effective communication strategies in caring for older, seriously ill patients and their surrogates/caregivers. Specific skills in three core functions are highlighted: (i) empathic communication (ii) information provision and (iii) enabling decision making. Empathy skills include using 'NURSE' statements and assuring a continuous relationship. Tailored information and empathic communication can be used to facilitate information processing and overcome age-related communication barriers. Eliciting patients' goals of care is critical in decision making. Surrogates need assistance when making decisions for patients and often themselves have support and information needs. Suggestions are made to ensure patients' and caregivers' needs are met. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Attitudes toward euthanasia among Polish physicians, nurses and people who have no professional experience with the terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebocka, A; Gawor, A; Ostrowski, F

    2013-01-01

    Euthanasia is an issue that generates an extensive social debate. Euthanasia is generally classified as either active or passive. The former is usually defined as taking specific steps to cause the patient's death, while the latter is described as withdrawal of medical treatment with the deliberate intention of bringing the patient's life to an end. The dispute on euthanasia involves a multitude of aspects including religious, legal, cultural, ethical, medical, and spiritual issues. The purpose of the present study was to examine the views of medical professionals toward the highly controversial issue of euthanasia. Accordingly, the research has been conducted among a group of Polish nurses and physicians working in Intensive Care and Oncology Units. Their views have been compared to those of the control group, which included the members of the general public, who do not work in medical profession. It was expected that the education and training and the day-to-day exposure to vegetative patients might influence the views of medical personnel concerning euthanasia. The research demonstrated that the members of all groups supported liberal views. Conservative views were not popular among the respondents. The physicians turned out to be the least conservative group. The survey has also demonstrated that there is a broad consensus that informational and psychological support should be provided to terminally ill patients and their relatives. The attitude toward the passive form of euthanasia seems to have broad support. In particular doctors tend to approve this form of bringing a terminally ill patient's life to an end. The active euthanasia is regarded with much less favor and physicians, in particular, appear to disapprove of it.

  14. The Role of a Training Protocol in Formulating Patient Instructions as to Terminal Care Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursztajn, Harold

    1977-01-01

    The author proposes the training of physicians in the use of a protocol to help a patient draw up a Living Will. The successful use of such a training protocol could begin to meet the existing need for a more structured education in the care of the terminally ill and to minimize uncertainty by achieving standards of uniformity in this aspect of…

  15. Vancomycin pharmacokinetics in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaud, J J; Regnier, B; Inglebert, F; Faurisson, F; Bauchet, J; Vachon, F

    1984-12-01

    Peak and trough vancomycin serum levels were measured in 37 severely ill patients following dosing using the Moellering nomogram. The peak and trough serum concentrations were 61.2 +/- 23 and 22.6 +/- 16.5 mg/l, respectively, and higher than expected. Vancomycin pharmacokinetics obtained from 10 other patients were also studied. In five patients with a creatinine clearance greater than 1 ml min-1 kg-1, a mean plasma elimination half-life of 7.8 +/- 2.8 h was calculated. In the five other patients with markedly reduced renal function (creatinine clearance less than or equal to 1 ml min-1 kg-1), the mean elimination half-life was 18.3 +/- 10.2 h. A correlation was observed between the vancomycin and creatinine clearance. Important inter-patient variations of vancomycin clearance for the same creatinine clearance was also noted. Tubular damage in critically ill patients with severe sepsis may explain our results of the decreased vancomycin elimination.

  16. When Terminal Illness Is Worse Than Death: A Multicenter Study of Health-Care Providers' Resuscitation Desires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Luis O; Einav, Sharon; Varon, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    To investigate how a terminal illness may affect the health-care providers' resuscitation preferences. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 9 health-care institutions located in 4 geographical regions in North and Central America, investigating attitudes toward end-of-life practices in health-care providers. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and χ2 test for the presence of associations ( P code status and their preference for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in case of terminal illness. A total of 852 surveys were completed. Among the respondents, 21% (n = 180) were physicians, 36.9% (n = 317) were nurses, 10.5% (n = 90) were medical students, and 265 participants were other staff members of the institutions. Most respondents (58.3%; n = 500) desired "definitely full code" (physicians 73.2%; n = 131), only 13.8% of the respondents (physicians 8.33%; n = 15) desired "definitely no code" or "partial support," and 20.9% of the respondents (n = 179; among physicians 18.4%; n = 33) had never considered their code status. There was an association between current code status and resuscitation preference in case of terminal illness ( P code status and terminal illness code preference among physicians ( P = .290) and nurses ( P = .316), whereupon other hospital workers were more consistent ( P < .01, Cramer V = .291). Doctors and nurses have different end-of-life preferences than other hospital workers. Their desire to undergo CPR may change when facing a terminal illness.

  17. Fluid resuscitation for critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-hu ZHOU

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluid overload is frequently found in patients with intravenous fluid resuscitation, and recent studies showed the potential risks of fluid overload for organ failure and mortality. To avoid volume overload and its associated complications, strategies to identify fluid responsiveness are necessary. Apart from the amount of fluid utilized for resuscitation, the type of fluid used also impacts patient outcome. In recent years, there has also been an increasing focus on comparing various resuscitation fluids with respect to both benefits and risks. In this article, through analyzing the impact of fluid overload on patient outcome, we describe the differences in static and dynamic estimates of fluid responsiveness, and review the current literature regarding choice of intravenous fluids for resuscitation in critically ill patients to help clinicians to make appropriative decision on intravenous fluids prescription and to optimize patient outcome. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.02.04

  18. Supporting Muslim Patients During Advanced Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Nathan A; Siddiqui, Ejaz A; Koenig, Harold G

    2017-01-01

    Religion is an important part of many patients' cultural perspectives and value systems that influence them during advanced illness and toward the end of life when they directly face mortality. Worldwide violence perpetrated by people identifying as Muslim has been a growing fear for people living in the US and elsewhere. This fear has further increased by the tense rhetoric heard from the recent US presidential campaign and the new presidential administration. For many, this includes fear of all Muslims, the second-largest religious group in the world with 1.6 billion adherents and approximately 3.5 million in the US alone. Patient-centered care requires health professionals to look past news headlines and unchecked social media so they can deliver high-quality care to all patients. This article explores areas of importance in the context of advanced illness for practitioners of Islam. These include the conditions needed for prayer, the roles of medical treatment and religious authority, the importance of modesty, the religious concordance of clinicians, the role of family in medical decision making, advance care planning, and pain and symptom management. Initial recommendations to optimize care for Muslim patients and their families, informed by the described tenets of Muslim faith, are provided for clinicians and health systems administrators. These include Islamic cultural awareness training for staff, assessment of patients and families to determine needs, health education and decision-making outreach, and community health partnerships with local Islamic institutions.

  19. Psychological responses to terminal illness and eventual death in Koreans with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung-Ah; Miller, Jean R; Lee, Won-Hee

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study describes the psychological responses of Korean participants with terminal cancer (stages III-IV) from time of diagnosis to death. Eighteen participants, ages 48 to 73, were interviewed at various phases of dying. Using analytic induction, three categories (nonacceptance, resignation, submission), characteristic patterns of responses over the course of illness and typical responses within categories were generated. Nonaccepters denied the possibility of death while struggling to live; their typical response was resistance. Resigners displayed sorrow, thoughts about their destiny, and growing acceptance of their fate. Their typical response was nonresistance. Submitters were shocked initially, searched for God's will, and prepared for death with hope. Their typical response was hopeful that God would care for them and their families. Participants' ages, physical pain, burden to family, and beliefs played important roles in the patterns of responses.

  20. Comparison of medical expenditure according to types of hospice care in patients with terminal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Taekyu; Nam, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Mi Sun; Yoon, Kyung Sook; Kim, Bong-Seog

    2013-02-01

    Hospice care is perceived as enhancing life quality for patients with advanced, incurable illness, but cost comparisons to nonhospice patients are difficult to make. Several studies demonstrated that palliative hospice care reduced medical expenditure in terminally ill patients compared with that of nonhospice care. Patients with terminal cancer who were registered in Hospice Care Program (HCP) by the written consent and died during same admission period in Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul, Korea, between January 2009 and December 2009 were included. We compared medical expenditure according to the ward type (hospice ward and general ward) in patients who received palliative hospice care in Seoul Veterans Hospital, Korea. The daily total average expenditure for each inpatient was 193 930 and 266 161 in the hospice and general ward, respectively (P = .001). Daily expenditure of parenteral nutrition and laboratory blood tests/X-ray was also significantly lower in hospice ward compared with general ward (P = .002 and P = .006), respectively; 12 (17%) of 72 patients had been admitted in the intensive care unit during hospice care period in general ward (P = .014); 1 (3%) of 32 patients received blood products in hospice ward, but 13 (18%) patients received blood products in general ward during palliative hospice care (P = .039). Hospice ward type in palliative hospice therapy may contribute to reduce economic medical costs as well as to more specific total care for terminally ill patients with cancer.

  1. Impact of palliative care consultative service on disease awareness for patients with terminal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Hung, Yu-Shin; Kao, Chen-Yi; Su, Po-Jung; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Chen, Jen-Shi; Liau, Chi-Ting; Lin, Yung-Chang; Liaw, Chuang-Chi; Wang, Hung-Ming

    2013-07-01

    Awareness of the status of disease among terminally ill cancer patients is an important part of the end-of-life care. We have evaluated how palliative care consultative service (PCCS) affects patient disease awareness and determined who may benefit from such services in Taiwan. In total, 2,887 terminally ill cancer patients consecutively received PCCS between January 2006 and December 2010 at a single medical center in Taiwan, after which they were evaluated for disease awareness. At the beginning of PCCS, 31 % of patients (n = 895) were unaware of their disease status. The characteristics of these 895 patients were analyzed retrospectively to determine variables pertinent to patient disease awareness after PCCS. In total, 485 (50 %) of the 895 patients became aware of their disease at the end of PCCS. Factors significantly associated with higher disease awareness included a longer interval between the date of hospital admission and that of PCCS referral (>4 weeks versus ≤2 weeks), a longer duration of PCCS (>14 days versus ≤7 days), the male gender, divorced marital status (versus married), and family awareness (versus lack of family awareness). Lower disease awareness was associated with older age (age > 75 years versus age = 18-65 years), referral from non-oncology departments, and primary cancer localization (lung, colon-rectum, or urological versus liver). Disease awareness is affected by multiple factors related to the patients, their families, and the clinicians. The promotion of PCCS increased disease awareness among terminally ill cancer patients in Taiwan.

  2. Appropriate antibiotic therapy in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Pieralli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients in and outside Intensive Care Units. Early hemodynamic and respiratory support, along with prompt appropriate antimicrobial therapy and source control of the infectious process are cornerstone management strategies to improve survival. Antimicrobial therapy should be as much appropriate as possible, since inappropriate initial antimicrobial therapy is associated with poorer outcome in different clinical settings. When prescribing antibiotic therapy, drug’s characteristics, along with dosing, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic properties related to the drug and to the clinical scenario should be well kept in mind in order to achieve maximal success.

  3. Should we mobilise critically ill patients? A review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Enda D

    2009-12-01

    Neuromuscular weakness, a frequent complication of prolonged bed rest and critical illness, is associated with morbidity and mortality. Mobilisation physiotherapy has widespread application in patients hospitalised with non-critical illness.

  4. Illness denial questionnaire for patients and caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Ferrario S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Rossi Ferrario,1 Ines Giorgi,2 Paola Baiardi,3 Laura Giuntoli,4 Gianluigi Balestroni,1 Paola Cerutti,1 Marina Manera,2 Paola Gabanelli,2 Valentina Solara,5 Roberta Fornara,6 Michela Luisetti,1 Pierangela Omarini,1 Giovanna Omarini,1 Giulio Vidotto4 1Psychology Unit, Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri SpA SB, Veruno, NO, Italy; 2Psychology Unit, 3Scientific Direction, Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri SpA SB, Pavia, Italy; 4Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 5Department of Neurology, ALS Centre, “Maggiore della Carita`” University Hospital, Novara, Italy; 6Psychology Unit, SS Trinità Hospital, Borgomanero, NO, Italy Purpose: Interest in assessing denial is still present, despite the criticisms concerning its definition and measurement. We tried to develop a questionnaire (Illness Denial Questionnaire, IDQ assessing patients’ and caregivers’ denial in relation to their illness/disturbance. Patients and methods: After a preliminary study, a final version of 24 dichotomous items (true/false was selected. We hypothesized a theoretical model with three dimensions: denial of negative emotions, resistance to change, and conscious avoidance, the first two composing the actual Denial and the last representing an independent component of the illness denial behavior. The IDQ was administered to 400 subjects (219 patients and 181 caregivers together with the Anxiety–Depression Questionnaire – Reduced form (AD-R, in order to assess concurrent validity. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α and McDonald’s ω, and test–retest analysis were performed. Results: CFA and internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α: 0.87–0.96 indicated a clear and meaningful three-factor structure of IDQ, for both patients and caregivers. Further analyses showed good concurrent validity, with Denial and its subscale negatively associated with anxiety and depression and

  5. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland N. Dickerson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed.

  6. Intrahospital transport of critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waydhas, C

    1999-01-01

    This review on the current literature of the intrahospital transport of critically ill patients addresses type and incidence of adverse effects, risk factors and risk assessment, and the available information on efficiency and cost-effectiveness of transferring such patients for diagnostic or therapeutic interventions within hospital. Methods and guidelines to prevent or reduce potential hazards and complications are provided. A Medline search was performed using the terms 'critical illness', 'transport of patients', 'patient transfer', 'critical care', 'monitoring' and 'intrahospital transport', and all information concerning the intrahospital transport of patients was considered. Adverse effects may occur in up to 70% of transports. They include a change in heart rate, arterial hypotension and hypertension, increased intracranial pressure, arrhythmias, cardiac arrest and a change in respiratory rate, hypocapnia and hypercapnia, and significant hypoxaemia. No transport-related deaths have been reported. In up to one-third of cases mishaps during transport were equipment related. A long-term deterioration of respiratory function was observed in 12% of cases. Patient-related risk indicators were found to be a high Therapeutic Intervention Severity Score, mechanical ventilation, ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure and high injury severity score. Patients' age, duration of transport, destination of transport, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, personnel accompanying the patient and other factors were not found to correlate with an increased rate of complications. Transports for diagnostic procedures resulted in a change in patient management in 40-50% of cases, indicating a good risk:benefit ratio. To prevent adverse effects of intrahospital transports, guidelines concerning the organization of transports, the personnel, equipment and monitoring should be followed. In particular, the presence of a critical care physician during

  7. Nutritional Assessment in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Hejazi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition is an important factor in the survival of critically ill patients. The purpose of the present study was to assess the nutritional status of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU on the days of admission and discharge via a detailed nutritional assessment. Methods: Totally, 125 patients were followed up from admission to discharge at 8ICUs in Shiraz, Iran. The patients’ nutritional status was assessed using subjective global assessment (SGA, anthropometric measurements, biochemical indices, and body composition indicators. Diet prescription and intake was also evaluated. Results: Malnutrition prevalence significantly increased on the day of discharge (58.62% compared to the day of admission (28.8% according to SGA (P<0.001. The patients’ weight, mid-upper-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, and calf circumference decreased significantly as well (P<0.001. Lean mass weight and body cell mass also decreased significantly (P<0.001. Biochemical indices showed no notable changes except for magnesium, which decreased significantly (P=0.013. A negative significant correlation was observed between malnutrition on discharge day and anthropometric measurements. Positive and significant correlations were observed between the number of days without enteral feeding, days delayed from ICU admission to the commencement of enteral feeding, and the length of ICU stay and malnutrition on discharge day. Energy and protein intakes were significantly less than the prescribed diet (26.26% and 26.48%, respectively. Conclusion: Malnutrition on discharge day increased in the patients in the ICU according to SGA. Anthropometric measurements were better predictors of the nutritional outcome of our critically ill patients than were biochemical tests.

  8. Palliativ behandling af patienter med terminal kronisk obstruktiv lungesygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian; Nielsen, Thyge L; Steffensen, Ida E

    2011-01-01

    Terminal chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and advanced cancer have similar prognosis and symptom burden. However, palliative care of patients with terminal COPD has been neglected in Denmark. We describe the symptoms of terminal COPD and suggest criteria for defining the palliative...

  9. in Critically Ill Patients: Success and Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrate anticoagulation has risen in interest so it is now a real alternative to heparin in the ICUs practice. Citrate provides a regional anticoagulation virtually restricted to extracorporeal circuit, where it acts by chelating ionized calcium. This issue is particularly true in patients ongoing CRRT, when the “continuous” systemic anticoagulation treatment is per se a relevant risk of bleeding. When compared with heparin most of studies with citrate reported a longer circuit survival, a lower rate of bleeding complications, and transfused packed red cell requirements. As anticoagulant for CRRT, the infusion of citrate is prolonged and it could potentially have some adverse effects. When citrate is metabolized to bicarbonate, metabolic alkalosis may occur, or for impaired metabolism citrate accumulation leads to acidosis. However, large studies with dedicated machines have indeed demonstrated that citrate anticoagulation is well tolerated, safe, and an easy to handle even in septic shock critically ill patients.

  10. Infections in critically ill burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, F; Mas, D; Rubio, M; Garcia-Hierro, P

    2016-04-01

    Severe burn patients are one subset of critically patients in which the burn injury increases the risk of infection, systemic inflammatory response and sepsis. The infections are usually related to devices and to the burn wound. Most infections, as in other critically ill patients, are preceded by colonization of the digestive tract and the preventative measures include selective digestive decontamination and hygienic measures. Early excision of deep burn wound and appropriate use of topical antimicrobials and dressings are considered of paramount importance in the treatment of burns. Severe burn patients usually have some level of systemic inflammation. The difficulty to differentiate inflammation from sepsis is relevant since therapy differs between patients with and those without sepsis. The delay in prescribing antimicrobials increases morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the widespread use of antibiotics for all such patients is likely to increase antibiotic resistance, and costs. Unfortunately the clinical usefulness of biomarkers for differential diagnosis between inflammation and sepsis has not been yet properly evaluated. Severe burn injury induces physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These alterations impact antimicrobials distribution and excretion. Nevertheless the current available literature shows that there is a paucity of information to support routine dose recommendations. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  11. Ethical dilemma: offering short-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for terminally ill children who are not candidates for long-term mechanical circulatory support or heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Venkat; Costello, John P; Peer, Syed M; Klugman, Darren; Nath, Dilip S

    2014-04-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in terminally ill pediatric patients who are not candidates for long-term mechanical circulatory support or heart transplantation requires careful deliberation. We present the case of a 16-year-old female with a relapse of acute lymphoid leukemia and acute-on-chronic cardiomyopathy who received short-term ECMO therapy. In addition, we highlight several ethical considerations that were crucial to this patient's family-centered care and demonstrate that this therapy can be accomplished in a manner that respects patient autonomy and family wishes.

  12. Nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandagi Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The care of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU is a primary component of modern medicine. ICUs create potential for recovery in patients who otherwise may not have survived. However, they may suffer from problems associated with of nosocomial infections. Nosocomial infections are those which manifest in patients 48 hours after admission to hospital. Nosocomial infections are directly related to diagnostic, interventional or therapeutic procedures a patient undergoes in hospital, and are also influenced by the bacteriological flora prevailing within a particular unit or hospital. Urinary tract infections are the most frequent nosocomial infection, accounting for more than 40% of all nosocomial infections. Critical care units increasingly use high technology medicine for patient care, hemodynamic monitoring, ventilator support, hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, and a large battery of powerful drugs, particularly antibiotics to counter infection. It is indeed a paradox that the use of high-tech medicine has brought in its wake the dangerous and all too frequent complication of nosocomial infections

  13. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, F.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care

  14. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, F.M. de; Francke, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care

  15. Dysglycemia in Critically Ill Patients: Common Problems and Future Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvin Sanaie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of blood glucose (BG in the critically ill became a topic of great interest following the publication of the landmark single-center surgical ICU study targeting euglycemia (80 to 110 mg/dL in Leuven, Belgium, in 2001 (1. This study resulted in thousands of protocols and guidelines promoting 'tight' BG control . The failure to show the same results and high incidence of hypoglycemia in following trials have resulted in controversy in blood glucose management in critically ill patients. Analysis of dysglycemia in critically ill patients should include markers of three domains: hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability (2,3. Thus, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and blood glucose variability should all be regarded as independent predictors of adverse outcomes in critically ill patients. Agus et al., in their multicenter study (4, showed that critically ill children with hyperglycemia did not benefit from strict glycemic control to a target glucose of 80-110 mg/dL compared to 150-180 mg/dL and patients in lower treatment target showed an insignificant 90-day mortally rate compared to other group. There are so many reasons to describe these controversies: In LEUVEN III study (5, despite a 25% hypoglycemia incidence, tight glycemic control had a significant treatment effect; nevertheless, in Agus et al. study, despite a lower incidence of hypoglycemia, treatment effect was not significant. The reasons can be explained with the fact that first trials were single centered open label studies which were terminated at early stages of the study because of observed benefits which may have exaggerated the treatment effect. Also, the observed difference was found in subgroup analysis which could have been due to chance factor. Findings from RCTs conducted on critically ill adults and children strongly suggest that the largest benefit for blood glucose control can be expected if the difference in blood glucose concentrations between the

  16. Quality of life and uncertainty in illness for chronic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria Caruso; Maria Daniela Giammanco; Lara Gitto

    2014-01-01

    The experience of chronic illness, together with physical impairment and hospitalization in some cases, can be a difficult occurrence to manage. Illness determines changes in patients’ life style and limitations, that often cause psychological distress. It may happen that patients neither understand the meaning of the events correlated with illness, nor can predict when such events will occur. This uncertainty augments the negative impact of the state of chronic illness on patients’ quality o...

  17. Air Transportation of Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Rodionov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the Napoleonic wars, balloon evacuation of the wounded was the first to be made in the history when Paris was being defended. In the USA, casualty helicopters are being used in 20% of cases on evacuating the victims from the accident scene and in 80% during interhospital transportation. Russia also shows an ambiguous approach to employing air medical service — from the wide use of air transportation in the country’s regions that are difficult of access to its almost complete refusal in the regions with the well-developed transportation system. Long-distance transportation of critically ill patients by chartered or commercial planes is the reality of our time. In each region, continuing specialized teams of qualified medical workers who have a good knowledge of altitude pathophysiology and handle the obligatorily certified equipment should be created on the basis of large-scale medical centers.

  18. [Enteral feeding tubes for critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, J; Bein, T; Wiese, C H R; Graf, B M; Zausig, Y A

    2011-04-01

    The use of enteral feeding tubes is an important part of early enteral feeding in intensive care medicine. In other faculties with non-critically ill patients, such as (oncologic) surgery, neurology, paediatrics or even in palliative care medicine feeding tubes are used under various circumstances as a temporary or definite solution. The advantage of enteral feeding tubes is the almost physiologic administration of nutrition, liquids and medication. Enteral nutrition is thought to be associated with a reduced infection rate, increased mucosal function, improved immunologic function, reduced length of hospital stay and reduced costs. However, the insertion and use of feeding tubes is potentially dangerous and may be associated with life-threatening complications (bleeding, perforation, peritonitis, etc.). Therefore, the following article will give a summary of the different types of enteral feeding tubes and their range of application. Additionally, a critical look on indication and contraindication is given as well as how to insert an enteral feeding tube.

  19. Lateral positioning for critically ill adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Nicky; Bucknall, Tracey; Faraone, Nardene M

    2016-05-12

    Critically ill patients require regular body position changes to minimize the adverse effects of bed rest, inactivity and immobilization. However, uncertainty surrounds the effectiveness of lateral positioning for improving pulmonary gas exchange, aiding drainage of tracheobronchial secretions and preventing morbidity. In addition, it is unclear whether the perceived risk levied by respiratory and haemodynamic instability upon turning critically ill patients outweighs the respiratory benefits of side-to-side rotation. Thus, lack of certainty may contribute to variation in positioning practice and equivocal patient outcomes. To evaluate effects of the lateral position compared with other body positions on patient outcomes (mortality, morbidity and clinical adverse events) in critically ill adult patients. (Clinical adverse events include hypoxaemia, hypotension, low oxygen delivery and global indicators of impaired tissue oxygenation.) We examined single use of the lateral position (i.e. on the right or left side) and repeat use of the lateral position (i.e. lateral positioning) within a positioning schedule. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1950 to 23 May 2015), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1937 to 23 May 2015), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (1984 to 23 May 2015), Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1901 to 23 May 2015), Web of Science (1945 to 23 May 2015), Index to Theses in Great Britain and Ireland (1950 to 23 May 2015), Trove (2009 to 23 May 2015; previously Australasian Digital Theses Program (1997 to December 2008)) and Proquest Dissertations and Theses (2009 to 23 May 2015; previously Proquest Digital Dissertations (1980 to 23 May 2015)). We handsearched the reference lists of potentially relevant reports and two nursing journals. We included randomized and quasi-randomized trials examining effects of

  20. Providing Informal Care in Terminal Illness: An Analysis of Preferences for Support Using a Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jane; Kenny, Patricia; Hossain, Ishrat; Street, Deborah J; Knox, Stephanie A

    2014-08-01

    The trend for terminally ill patients to receive much of their end-of-life care at home necessitates the design of services to facilitate this. Care at home also requires that informal care be provided by family members and friends. This study investigated informal carers' preferences for support services to aid the development of end-of-life health care services. This cross-sectional study used 2 discrete choice experiments to ascertain the preferences of carers supporting patients with different levels of care need, determined by the assistance needed with personal care and labeled High Care (HC) and Low Care (LC). The sample included 168 informal carers of people receiving palliative care at home from 2 palliative care services in Sydney, Australia. Data were collected in face-to-face interviews; carers chose between 2 hypothetical plans of support services and their current services. Data were analyzed with generalized multinomial logit models that were used to calculate the impact of each attribute on the probability of a carer choosing a service plan. Preferred support included nursing services; the probability of choosing a plan increased significantly if it included nurse home visits and phone advice (P situation. The most valued services are those that support carers in their caregiving role; however, supportive care preferences vary with the different circumstances of patients and carers. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Vitamin D deficiency in critically ill patients with traumatic injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Dickerson, Roland N.; Van Cleve, Jonathan R.; Swanson, Joseph M.; Maish, George O.; Minard, Gayle; Croce, Martin A.; Brown, Rex O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D depletion has been associated with increased rate of infections, lengthened hospital stay, and worsened mortality for critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and variables associated with vitamin D deficiency in critically ill patients with severe traumatic injuries. Methods Critically ill adult patients admitted to the trauma intensive care unit (ICU) between June 2013 and June 2014, referred to the nutrition support service for ...

  2. Palliativ behandling af patienter med terminal kronisk obstruktiv lungesygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian; Nielsen, Thyge L; Steffensen, Ida E

    2011-01-01

    Terminal chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and advanced cancer have similar prognosis and symptom burden. However, palliative care of patients with terminal COPD has been neglected in Denmark. We describe the symptoms of terminal COPD and suggest criteria for defining the palliative...... phase of the disease. Furthermore we discuss the prognostic and ethical challenges for patients, their families and their caregivers. Finally, we summarize the current evidence for palliative treatment of dyspnoea and ways to evaluate response to treatment....

  3. [Palliative care of patients with terminal obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Plessen, Christian; Nielsen, Thyge L; Steffensen, Ida E; Larsen, Shuruk Al-Halwai; Taudorf, Ebbe

    2011-10-17

    Terminal chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and advanced cancer have similar prognosis and symptom burden. However, palliative care of patients with terminal COPD has been neglected in Denmark. We describe the symptoms of terminal COPD and suggest criteria for defining the palliative phase of the disease. Furthermore we discuss the prognostic and ethical challenges for patients, their families and their caregivers. Finally, we summarize the current evidence for palliative treatment of dyspnoea and ways to evaluate response to treatment.

  4. Cuidador principal de paciente oncológico fora de possibilidade de cura, repercussões deste encargo El cuidador principal del paciente oncológico, repercusiones de esta responsabilidad The main caregiver of onchologic terminally ill patient, repercussions of this incunbency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Záu Serpa de Araújo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: identificar o perfil dos cuidadores de pacientes oncológicos; averiguar as atividades executadas, mudanças e dificuldades. Foi aplicado um questionário estruturado fechado. Dos 53 cuidadores, 48 eram do sexo feminino. 92% eram membros da família. A maioria era mulher, ela tem, historicamente, função cuidadora da família. Eles tiveram problemas financeiros porém a relação afetiva melhorou. Os cuidados de higiene, alimentação, medicação eram de responsabilidade do cuidador, essas atividades aumentaram a sobrecarga e surgiram repercussões negativas de natureza física e/ou psíquica. 60% responderam que o local mais conveniente para a ocorrência do óbito do paciente seria no hospital e 40% em casa. Há nítida distinção entre os cuidados com os pacientes e morte, os cuidadores cuidam, de fato, da vida.OBJETIVOS: identificar el perfil de los cuidadores del enfermo terminal, investigar las actividades, los cambios y las dificultades que ocurrieron. Los investigadores aplicaran un cuestionario. De los 53 cuidadores, 48 eran mujeres. 92% tenían algún grado de parentesco con el paciente. A pesar de los problemas financieros, los cuidadores afirmaron que su relación ha mejorado. Los cuidados de higiene, alimentación, medicación son de responsabilidad de los cuidadores. Aumentaron la sobrecarga y, surgieron repercusiones negativas de naturaleza física y psíquica. 60% de los cuidadores dijeron que el lugar más conveniente de la muerte era el hospital y 40% eligieron hogar. Existe una distinción entre los cuidados con el paciente y el proceso de muerte, los cuidadores cuidan de facto de la vida.OBJECTIVES: to identify the profile of the caregivers of terminally ill patient, to inquire the activities, changes and difficulties. The researchers applied a questionnaire. From all the 53 caregivers, 48 were female. 92% of the caregivers were relative to the patient. Despite of the financial problems, their relationship

  5. Remifentanil in critically ill cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruggeri Laura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Remifentanil has a unique pharmacokinetic profile, with a rapid onset and offset of action and a plasmatic metabolism. Its use can be recommended even in patients with renal impairment, hepatic dysfunction or poor cardiovascular function. A potential protective cardiac preconditioning effect has been suggested. Drug-related adverse effects seem to be comparable with other opioids. In cardiac surgery, many randomized controlled trials demonstrated that the potential benefits of the use of remifentanil not only include a profound protection against intraoperative stressful stimuli, but also rapid postoperative recovery, early weaning from mechanical ventilation, and extubation. Remifentanil shows ideal properties of sedative agents being often employed for minimally invasive cardiologic techniques, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation and radio frequency treatment of atrial flutter, or diagnostic procedures such as transesophageal echocardiography. In intensive care units remifentanil is associated with a reduction in the time to tracheal extubation after cessation of the continuous infusion; other advantages could be more evident in patients with organ dysfunction. Effective and safe analgesia can be provided in case of short and painful procedures (i.e. chest drain removal. In conclusion, thanks to its peculiar properties, remifentanil will probably play a major role in critically ill cardiac patients.

  6. Complex suffering related to the terminal phase of illness, death and grieving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klikovac Tamara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to consider the issues related to the terminal phase of illness, death and loss in the family, the process of grieving and coping with the loss of the loved one, primarily from the psychological aspect. The main focus of the paper is the attempt to demystify the covered subject matter on the one hand, and on the other to clarify the psychological dimension of various problems that can be caused by a disease with inevitable death. The death of the youngest member of the family is a particularly difficult issue both for theoretical considerations and for practical work. The complex suffering of people who are faced with an incurable disease and particularly the suffering of children and adolescents are not talked about, written about or discussed in our environment, and consequently adequate models of psychological support and psychotherapeutic help which would be aimed both at the individual and the family are not developed in practice. .

  7. Diagnosis of Sepsis in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Romasheva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to ascertain the informative value of determining procalcitonin in the diagnosis of critical conditions and in the evaluation of the efficiency of performed therapy.Subjects and methods. Sixty patients aged 25—50 years (38.1±11.2 years who had signs of the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome, including 30 (50.0% patients with severe sepsis, 21 (35.0% with septic shock, 3 (5.0% with meningitis of varying etiology, 2 (3.3% with Candida infection, and 1 (1.7% with vasculitis, and 3 (5.0% with pulmonary thromboembolism, were examined. In all the patients, serum procalcitonin was determined by an RCTv-Q test (BRAHMS in the first 24 hours of stay in an intensive care unit (ICU and 72 hours after the initiation of multicomponent therapy.Results. Patients with severe sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction has a positive test with a plasma procalcitonin level of 2 ng/ml or higher in 100% of cases. In meningitis, the concentration of procalcitonin was 0.5 to 2 ng/ml; in Candida infection and thrombovasculi-tis, that was as high as 0.5 ng/ml. A negative test was obtained in pulmonary thromboembolism. Extracorporeal treatments (continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration on a PRISMA apparatus were used as part of complex therapy in 14 patients with septic shock and multiple organ dysfunctions. In 9 (64.3% of them, its concentration decreased to a varying degree, blood acid-base balance became normal, vital functions stabilized; 5 (13.5% died.Conclusion. Procalcitonin is a highly specific marker of sepsis. In patients with severe sepsis, lower procalcitonin concentrations and septic shock suggests the efficiency of the performed therapy in this category of patients. Procalcitonin may be recognized to be a reliable parameter of the monitoring of not only the severity of bacterial infection, but also the evaluation of the efficiency of treatment in critically ill patients in an ICU. 

  8. Anemia and Blood Transfusions in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamran Athar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is common in critically ill patients. As a consequence packed red blood cell (PRBC transfusions are frequent in the critically ill. Over the past two decades a growing body of literature has emerged, linking PRBC transfusion to infections, immunosuppression, organ dysfunction, and a higher mortality rate. However, despite growing evidence that risk of PRBC transfusion outweighs its benefit, significant numbers of critically ill patients still receive PRBC transfusion during their intensive care unit (ICU stay. In this paper, we summarize the current literature concerning the impact of anemia on outcomes in critically ill patients and the potential complications of PRBC transfusions.

  9. Hyperglycaemia and mortality in critically ill patients. A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian; Toft, Palle; Jørgensen, Hans Skriver

    2004-01-01

    To describe hyperglycaemia as a possible marker of morbidity and mortality in critically ill medical and surgical patients admitted to a multidisciplinary ICU.......To describe hyperglycaemia as a possible marker of morbidity and mortality in critically ill medical and surgical patients admitted to a multidisciplinary ICU....

  10. Illness Beliefs Predict Mortality in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedhara, Kavita; Dawe, Karen; Miles, Jeremy N V; Wetherell, Mark A; Cullum, Nicky; Dayan, Colin; Drake, Nicola; Price, Patricia; Tarlton, John; Weinman, John; Day, Andrew; Campbell, Rona; Reps, Jenna; Soria, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Patients' illness beliefs have been associated with glycaemic control in diabetes and survival in other conditions. We examined whether illness beliefs independently predicted survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. Patients (n=169) were recruited between 2002 and 2007. Data on illness beliefs were collected at baseline. Data on survival were extracted on 1st November 2011. Number of days survived reflected the number of days from date of recruitment to 1st November 2011. Cox regressions examined the predictors of time to death and identified ischemia and identity beliefs (beliefs regarding symptoms associated with foot ulceration) as significant predictors of time to death. Our data indicate that illness beliefs have a significant independent effect on survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. These findings suggest that illness beliefs could improve our understanding of mortality risk in this patient group and could also be the basis for future therapeutic interventions to improve survival.

  11. Moral and Legal Issues Surrounding Terminal Sedation and Physician Assisted Suicide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bradley, Constance

    2002-01-01

    Assisted suicide has been an issue for terminally ill patients for many years. This is because patients who suffer from terminal illnesses are forced to make difficult choices at the end of their lives...

  12. Do illness perceptions predict health outcomes in primary care patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frostholm, Lisbeth; Oernboel, Eva; Christensen, Kaj S

    2007-01-01

    patients, (2) patients without chronic disorders presenting physical disease, and (3) patients presenting medically unexplained symptoms (MUS). RESULTS: Negative illness perceptions were associated with poor physical and mental health at baseline. They most strongly predicted changes in health status...... at follow-up for the whole group of patients. Patients presenting with MUS had more negative illness perceptions and lower mental and physical components subscale of the SF-36 scores at all time points. CONCLUSIONS: Patients' perception of a new or recurrent health problem predicts self-reported physical......OBJECTIVE: Little is known about whether illness perceptions affect health outcomes in primary care patients. The aim of this study was to examine if patients' illness perceptions were associated with their self-rated health in a 2-year follow-up period. METHODS: One thousand seven hundred eighty...

  13. Dying at home: nursing of the critically and terminally ill in private care in Germany around 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Karen

    2009-06-01

    Over the last twenty years, 'palliative care' has evolved as a special nursing field in Germany. Its historic roots are seen in the hospices of the Middle Ages or in the hospice movement of the twentieth century. Actually, there are numerous everyday sources to be found about this subject from the nineteenth century. The article at hand deals with the history of nursing the terminally ill and dying in domestic care in the nineteenth century. Taking care of and nursing the dying was part of everyday routine in the nursing care as practiced by the deaconesses and sisters in those days. Mit der Seelenpflege bei den unheilbar Kranken und Sterbenden schufen die Kaiserswerther Diakonissen sich einen von Arzten unabhängigen Kompetenzbereich. Meine Analysen zur Privatpflege zeigen jedoch darüber hinaus, dass die in ihrer Aufmerksamkeit auf das Mutterhaus ausgerichteten Diakonissen auch in Leibespflege sehr viel unabhängiger von den Arzten zu agieren schienen als die freien Krankenschwestern. The article takes a look not only at the actual nursing activities but also at the relationship between the sisters and their patients and their relatives and the family doctor. On the basis of the recorded letters which the nurses wrote to the deaconess motherhouse in Kaiserswerth, it is also possible to analyze how the deaconesses communicated and reflected their actions at the deathbed.

  14. Extensions to regret-based decision curve analysis: an application to hospice referral for terminal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Barnes, Laura E; Hozo, Iztok; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2011-12-23

    Despite the well documented advantages of hospice care, most terminally ill patients do not reap the maximum benefit from hospice services, with the majority of them receiving hospice care either prematurely or delayed. Decision systems to improve the hospice referral process are sorely needed. We present a novel theoretical framework that is based on well-established methodologies of prognostication and decision analysis to assist with the hospice referral process for terminally ill patients. We linked the SUPPORT statistical model, widely regarded as one of the most accurate models for prognostication of terminally ill patients, with the recently developed regret based decision curve analysis (regret DCA). We extend the regret DCA methodology to consider harms associated with the prognostication test as well as harms and effects of the management strategies. In order to enable patients and physicians in making these complex decisions in real-time, we developed an easily accessible web-based decision support system available at the point of care. The web-based decision support system facilitates the hospice referral process in three steps. First, the patient or surrogate is interviewed to elicit his/her personal preferences regarding the continuation of life-sustaining treatment vs. palliative care. Then, regret DCA is employed to identify the best strategy for the particular patient in terms of threshold probability at which he/she is indifferent between continuation of treatment and of hospice referral. Finally, if necessary, the probabilities of survival and death for the particular patient are computed based on the SUPPORT prognostication model and contrasted with the patient's threshold probability. The web-based design of the CDSS enables patients, physicians, and family members to participate in the decision process from anywhere internet access is available. We present a theoretical framework to facilitate the hospice referral process. Further rigorous

  15. Extensions to Regret-based Decision Curve Analysis: An application to hospice referral for terminal patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsalatsanis Athanasios

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the well documented advantages of hospice care, most terminally ill patients do not reap the maximum benefit from hospice services, with the majority of them receiving hospice care either prematurely or delayed. Decision systems to improve the hospice referral process are sorely needed. Methods We present a novel theoretical framework that is based on well-established methodologies of prognostication and decision analysis to assist with the hospice referral process for terminally ill patients. We linked the SUPPORT statistical model, widely regarded as one of the most accurate models for prognostication of terminally ill patients, with the recently developed regret based decision curve analysis (regret DCA. We extend the regret DCA methodology to consider harms associated with the prognostication test as well as harms and effects of the management strategies. In order to enable patients and physicians in making these complex decisions in real-time, we developed an easily accessible web-based decision support system available at the point of care. Results The web-based decision support system facilitates the hospice referral process in three steps. First, the patient or surrogate is interviewed to elicit his/her personal preferences regarding the continuation of life-sustaining treatment vs. palliative care. Then, regret DCA is employed to identify the best strategy for the particular patient in terms of threshold probability at which he/she is indifferent between continuation of treatment and of hospice referral. Finally, if necessary, the probabilities of survival and death for the particular patient are computed based on the SUPPORT prognostication model and contrasted with the patient's threshold probability. The web-based design of the CDSS enables patients, physicians, and family members to participate in the decision process from anywhere internet access is available. Conclusions We present a theoretical

  16. Factors that affect quality of dying and death in terminal cancer patients on inpatient palliative care units: perspectives of bereaved family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Young; Chang, Yoon Jung; Song, Hye Young; Jho, Hyun Jung; Lee, Myung Kyung

    2013-04-01

    There is an increasing use of palliative care units (PCUs) for the treatment of terminally ill cancer patients. Thus, it is important to evaluate the care and quality of life of terminally ill cancer patients treated in PCUs so that improvements can be made. Limited research has investigated the quality of dying and death in PCUs. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with the quality of dying and death for terminally ill cancer patients in PCUs. Data were collected from 570 bereaved family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients. All patients were registered and died in one of the 40 inpatient PCUs designated by the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare. We assessed the perceived timing of referral to a PCU; the quality of end-of-life cancer care with the Care Evaluation Scale; and the quality of dying and death with the Good Death Inventory. The perception of appropriate timing of referral, use of a community-based PCU, and higher quality of cancer care as assessed by the Care Evaluation Scale were associated with good dying and death in all domains of the Good Death Inventory. The good quality of end-of-life care in a PCU improves the quality of dying in terminally ill cancer patients. The data have the potential to guide the development of interventions aimed at achieving a good quality of dying for patients with terminal cancer. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quality of life and uncertainty in illness for chronic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Caruso

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The experience of chronic illness, together with physical impairment and hospitalization in some cases, can be a difficult occurrence to manage. Illness determines changes in patients’ life style and limitations, that often cause psychological distress. It may happen that patients neither understand the meaning of the events correlated with illness, nor can predict when such events will occur. This uncertainty augments the negative impact of the state of chronic illness on patients’ quality of life. The present study has the purpose to examine the correlations between uncertainty due to  chronic disease and patients’ quality of life, keeping into account the diverse coping strategies adopted and the anxiety/depression feelings developed during hospitalization. There is an inverse correlation between chronic patients’ quality of life and the diverse dimensions of uncertainty in illness as identified by the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale. The paper suggests how uncertainty hampers the possibility that patients choose coping strategies, involving their active management of illness. The lower the uncertainty, the higher is the possibility of activate coping mechanisms based on the acceptance of illness, together with a reflexive attitude concerning the actions to be taken to reduce the risk of anxiety/depression during hospitalization. Finally, the present study presents some policy implications, suggesting how the medical staff should not only treat patients, but also help patients to elaborate problem solving strategies and to positively accept their chronic health state.

  18. Bienestar espiritual de enfermos terminales y de personas aparentemente sanas The spiritual wellbeing of terminally ill people and the spiritual well being of apparently healthy people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Sánchez Herrera

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: el objetivo principal del estudio fue describir y comparar el bienestar espiritual de personas con enfermedad terminal con el de personas aparentemente sanas. Metodología: se desarrolló con un método cuantitativo, descriptivo, comparativo. Incluyó 44 pacientes hospitalizados en la Clínica Luís Carlos Galán y 44 personas con características similares y aparentemente sanas. Para la medición del bienestar espiritual se empleó la Escala de Bienestar Espiritual de Ellison®. Resultados: el nivel general de bienestar espiritual de las personas con enfermedad terminal es alto, los niveles del componente religioso y el componente existencial del nivel de bienestar son medios. En las personas aparentemente sanas el nivel de bienestar general y por componentes es alto. Conclusión: al comparar el bienestar espiritual entre las personas con enfermedad terminal y las personas aparentemente sanas del estudio, se encontró un mayor bienestar espiritual general y del componente existencial en el grupo de las personas aparentemente sanas. No se encontró diferencia en el nivel de bienestar de la dimensión religiosa entre los grupos.Objective: The main objective of the study was to describe and compare the spiritual wellbeing of people with terminal illness with the spiritual well being of apparently healthy people. Methodology: the study was developed with a quantitative, descriptive and comparative approach. It included 44 patients hospitalized at the Luis Carlos Galan Clinic and 44 people with similar characteristics but apparently healthy. The spiritual well being was measured with the Ellison Spiritual Wellbeing Scale®. Results: the general level of spiritual well being of the people with terminal illness was high as well as its religious component. The level of the existential component of the spiritual well being in the same group was medium. In the apparently healthy people the general level of spiritual wellbeing and the level of

  19. [Terminal patient home care: the family caregivers perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Stefanie Griebeler; Quintana, Alberto Manuel; Denardin-Budó, Maria de Lourdes; de Moraes, Natália de Andrade; Lüdtke, Manoela Fonseca; Cassel, Paula Argemi

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at getting to know the relationships built among patients, family caregivers and the health care team, during home care,from the perspective of the family caregiver It is a qualitative study with 11 family caregivers of terminal patients, registered on a home care service of a university hospital in the South of Brazil. Data collection was carried out through narrative interviews that were recorded transcribed and analyzed through content analysis. Three categories were built from data analysis: relationships among the family caregiver, the patient and the health care team; awareness of the patient's terminal condition. the caregiver's perspective; and situation in which patients are unaware of their terminal condition. They approach how the home care relationships are established among the caregivers, such as health care professionals and family caregivers, and the people who are taken care of such as the patients, highlighting the importance of communication in such care related context.

  20. Many Terminal Cancer Patients Remain in Denial

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... professionals should appropriately assess patients' readiness for prognostic information," said study leader Siew-Tzuh Tang, a professor at Chang Gung University School of Nursing in Taiwan. Doctors should respect patients' reluctance to confront their poor prognosis if they ...

  1. [Citomegalovirus reactivation in critical ill intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Esper, Raúl

    2011-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a β herpesvirus and a significant human pathogen. After primary infection establishes life long latency. In immunocompetent individuals cell-mediated host immune responses prevent the development of overt CMV disease. It has increasingly come to be recognized that critically ill patients are at risk for CMV reactivation from the latency. The risk factors associated to CMV reactivation in the critically ill are infection, sepsis, trauma, transfusions, major surgery, prolonged mechanical ventilation, steroids and vasopressors. In the pathogenesis are involved immunodysfunction and imbalance in immunomodulatory mediators principally tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). Several studies have shown an association between CMV reactivation in immunocompetent critically ill patients and poor clinical outcomes. Further studies are warranted to identify subsets of patients who are at risk of developing CMV reactivation and to determine the role of antiviral agents on clinically outcomes in critically ill patients.

  2. Apixaban versus enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis in medically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Leizorovicz, Alain; Kakkar, Ajay K

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of prolonging prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism in medically ill patients beyond hospital discharge remain uncertain. We hypothesized that extended prophylaxis with apixaban would be safe and more effective than short-term prophylaxis with enoxaparin....

  3. Estudo fenomenológico sobre a visita domiciliária do enfermeiro à família no processo de terminalidade Estudio fenomenológico sobre la visita a domicilio del enfermero a la familia durante un proceso terminal Phenomenological study about the nurse's home care for families of terminally ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Helena Valente

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pesquisa qualitativa e fenomenológica que teve como proposta compreender o fenômeno: Enfermeiros que atuam no PSF e o cuidado, em domicilio, à família que vivencia, nele, ao término de um dos seus membros. O estudo foi realizado com enfermeiros que atuam na Região Sudeste do município de São Paulo, SP. Utilizou-se como referencial teórico a fenomenologia existencial. Com este estudo foi possível desvelar que essa vivência significou para os enfermeiros um momento para estar-com-a-família em uma situação existencial de perda e morte, construindo no domicílio uma rede de proteção para que o processo de terminalidade de um de seus membros fosse o mais ameno possível. Apesar de ter sido permeada por um cuidado de enfermagem repleto de humanidade, significando uma vivência única e singular, foi também uma experiência difícil, desgastante, representando situações geradoras de agravos a sua saúde enquanto trabalhador.Investigación cualitativa y fenomenológica que tuvo como propuesta comprender el fenómeno: Enfermeros que actúan en el PSF y el cuidado, a domicilio, a la familia que experimenta, en él, el término de uno de sus miembros. El estudio fue realizado con enfermeros que actúan en la Región Sudeste del municipio de São Paulo, SP. Se utilizó como marco teórico la fenomenología existencial. Con este estudio fue posible revelar que esa vivencia significó, para los enfermeros, un momento para estar con la familia en una situación existencial de pérdida y muerte, construyendo en el domicilio, una red de protección para que el proceso terminal de uno de sus miembros fuese lo más ameno posible. A pesar de haber sido otorgado un cuidado de enfermería repleto de humanidad, significando una experiencia única y singular, fue también una experiencia difícil, desgastante, representando situaciones generadoras de agravios a su salud, en cuanto trabajador.The present study is a qualitative and phenomenological

  4. [Illness Concepts of Patients with Schizophrenia: A Triangulation Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigand, Moritz E; Reichhardt, Lea; Lang, Fabian U; Krumm, Silvia; Jäger, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Objective Therapists' and patients' concepts of illness often show severe discrepancies. This study explores the illness concepts of patients with schizophrenic disorders (n = 40). Methods Two German scales were used, the "Causal Belief Questionnaire" and the "Illness Concept Scale for Schizophrenic Patients". We compared our data with data published previously. A semi structured interview was performed in a convenience sample (n = 7). Results The domains "trust in medication" and "trust in the treating physician" yielded high scores, yet in comparison with data published 30 years ago, trust in medication is unaltered, while trust in psychiatrists is even slightly lower. Recent psychosocial factors scored high as a possible cause of mental illness. Several patients felt responsible for being mentally ill. No patient in the interview mentioned the neurotransmitter hypothesis of schizophrenia. Conclusion Illness concepts of patients with schizophrenic disorders are a complex phenomenon. Triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods proves to be a promising approach for future studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Extending life for people with a terminal illness: a moral right and an expensive death? Exploring societal perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Neil; Baker, Rachel M; Mason, Helen; Williamson, Laura; van Exel, Job; Deogaonkar, Rohan; Collins, Marissa; Donaldson, Cam

    2015-03-07

    Many publicly-funded health systems apply cost-benefit frameworks in response to the moral dilemma of how best to allocate scarce healthcare resources. However, implementation of recommendations based on costs and benefit calculations and subsequent challenges have led to 'special cases' with certain types of health benefits considered more valuable than others. Recent debate and research has focused on the relative value of life extensions for people with terminal illnesses. This research investigates societal perspectives in relation to this issue, in the UK. Q methodology was used to elicit societal perspectives from a purposively selected sample of data-rich respondents. Participants ranked 49 statements of opinion (developed for this study), onto a grid, according to level of agreement. These 'Q sorts' were followed by brief interviews. Factor analysis was used to identify shared points of view (patterns of similarity between individuals' Q sorts). Analysis produced a three factor solution. These rich, shared accounts can be broadly summarised as: i) 'A population perspective - value for money, no special cases', ii) 'Life is precious - valuing life-extension and patient choice', iii) 'Valuing wider benefits and opportunity cost - the quality of life and death'. From the factor descriptions it is clear that the main philosophical positions that have long dominated debates on the just allocation of resources have a basis in public opinion. The existence of certain moral positions in the views of society does not ethically imply, and pragmatically cannot mean, that all are translated into policy. Our findings highlight normative tensions and the importance of critically engaging with these normative issues (in addition to the current focus on a procedural justice approach to health policy). Future research should focus on i) the extent to which these perspectives are supported in society, ii) how respondents' perspectives relate to specific resource allocation

  6. Impact of combined hospice care on terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Song-Seng; Rau, Kung-Ming; Huang, Chih-Fang

    2011-06-01

    Many patients with advanced cancer will develop physical and psychological symptoms related to their disease. These symptoms are infrequently treated by conventional care. Palliative care programs have been developed to fill this gap in care. However, there are limited beds in hospice units. To allow more terminal cancer patients to receive care from a hospice team, a combined hospice care system was recently developed in Taiwan. This study is a report of our experiences with this system. From January to December 2009, terminal cancer patients who accepted consultation from a hospice team for combined hospice care were enrolled in the study. Demographic data, clinical symptoms, referring department, type of cancer, and outcome were analyzed. A total of 354 terminal cancer patients in acute wards were referred to a hospice consulting team. The mean patient age was 61 years, and the proportion of males was 63.28%. After combined hospice care, there was a significant improvement in the sign rate of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders from 41.53% to 71.47% (p care also enabled 64.21% of terminal cancer patients who were not transferred to hospice ward to receive combined care by a hospice consulting team while in acute wards, thus increasing the hospice utilization of terminal cancer patients. The major symptoms presented by the patients were pain (58%), dyspnea (52%), constipation (45%), and fatigue (23%). Through the hospice consulting system, hospice combined care has a positive effect on the utilization of hospice care, rate of DNR signing and quality of end-of-life care for terminal cancer patients.

  7. Hospice Counsellor Facing the Grief of the Terminally Ill Child and Its Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Godawa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The child’s illness, suffering and death provoke many emotions in the family. The ill child and its family both experience grief which is an emotional reaction to the danger of losing health or life. Support offered by home hospices for children aims at overcoming the destructive influence of illness. A hospice counsellor’s task is to improve the ill child and its family’s quality of life. He is helping the family overcome grief and prepare for the child’s death. The hospice team supports the family members who experience anticipatory and later, actual mourning. Preventing pathological effects of grief is a basic challenge for people who offer help.

  8. Gender differences in the evolution of illness understanding among patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kalen; Prigerson, Holly G; Paulk, Elizabeth; Temel, Jennifer; Finlay, Esme; Marr, Lisa; McCorkle, Ruth; Rivera, Lorna; Munoz, Francisco; Maciejewski, Paul K

    2013-09-01

    Patient understanding of advanced metastatic disease is central to decisions about care near death. Prior studies have focused on gender differences in communication style rather than on illness understanding. : To evaluate gender differences in terminal illness acknowledgement (TIA), understanding that the disease is incurable and the advanced stage of the disease. To evaluate gender differences in patients' reports of discussions of life expectancy with oncology providers and its effect on differences in illness understanding. Coping with Cancer 2 patients (N = 68) were interviewed before and after a visit with their oncology providers to discuss scan results. At the prescan interview, there were no statistically significant gender differences in patient measures of illness understanding. At the postscan interview, women were more likely than men to recognize that their illness was incurable (Adjusted Odds Ratio, [AOR] = 5.29; P = .038), know that their cancer was at an advanced stage (AOR = 6.38; P = .013), and report having had discussions of life expectancy with their oncologist (AOR = 4.77; P = .021). Controlling discussions of life expectancy, women were more likely than men to report that their cancer was at an advanced stage (AOR = 9.53; P = .050). Controlling for gender, discussions of life expectancy were associated with higher rates of TIA (AOR = 4.65; P = .036) and higher rates of understanding that the cancer was incurable (AOR = 4.09; P = .085). Due largely to gender differences in communication, women over time have a better understanding of their illness than men. More frequent discussions of life expectancy should enhance illness understanding and reduce gender differences.

  9. Illnesses in siblings of US patients with bipolar disorder relate to multigenerational family history and patients severity of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert M; Altshuler, Lori L; Kupka, Ralph; McElroy, Susan L; Frye, Mark A; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Keck, Paul E; Nolen, Willem A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder from the US have more early-onset illness and a greater familial loading for psychiatric problems than those from the Netherlands or Germany (abbreviated here as Europe). We hypothesized that these regional differences in illness burden would extend to the patients siblings. Outpatients with bipolar disorder gave consent for participation in a treatment outcome network and for filling out detailed questionnaires. This included a family history of unipolar depression, bipolar disorder, suicide attempt, alcohol abuse/dependence, drug abuse/dependence, and "other" illness elicited for the patients' grandparents, parents, spouses, offspring, and siblings. Problems in the siblings were examined as a function of parental and grandparental problems and the patients' adverse illness characteristics or poor prognosis factors (PPFs). Each problem in the siblings was significantly (psiblings, and sibling problems were related to the number of PPFs observed in the patients. Family history was based on patient report. Increased familial loading for psychiatric problems extends through 4 generations of patients with bipolar disorder from the US compared to Europe, and appears to "breed true" into the siblings of the patients. In addition to early onset, a variety of PPFs are associated with the burden of psychiatric problems in the patients' siblings and offspring. Greater attention to the multigenerational prevalence of illness in patients from the US is indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Illness cognitions, doctor-patient communication and prescription ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the 45 patients studied 23 (51%) were not adherent with prescription medication. Major findings were that doctor-patient communication, most illness cognitions, and healthy behaviour of the patient were not associated with adherence behaviour. Perceived stress and the belief of incurability of hypertension were, ...

  11. Adrenal insufficiency in critically ill septic patients at Dr George ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    patients with septic shock.5 It is important to recognize these patients since this disorder has a high mortality if untreated.6. The most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in critically ill patients is sepsis and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).5,7 This is presumably due to the circulating suppressive ...

  12. Helping Patients With Physical Illness Cope With Hospitalization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their illness, allaying the fear and anxiety of the patients about outcomes of medical treatments (surgical operation and death), providing support for patients' psychological adjustment to hospitalization and encouraging the patients to get well. It was recommended in the paper that the nurses and the medical social workers ...

  13. Illness perceptions and quality of life among tuberculosis patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: This study aimed to answer the following research question: What is the level of illness perceptions and quality of life among TB patients in Gezira state?. Methods: A descriptive study design was used. Newly diagnosed smear positive TB patients registered in Gezira state in 2010 (n=425) formed the study population.

  14. Oral hygiene care in critically ill patients | Human | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral hygiene care includes a combination of nursing activities that are often placed very low on the priority care list for a critically ill patient. This may have detrimental implications for the patient. A literature review was done to identify and describe the available evidence related to the beneficial effects of oral hygiene care ...

  15. Adrenal insufficiency in critically ill septic patients at Dr George ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rationale: Adrenal insufficiency occurs with varying frequency in critically ill patients. It is usually associated with a high mortality and poor clinical outcome. Objective: To determine the incidence of adrenal failure in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to our intensive care unit. Design: Prospective ...

  16. Illness perceptions and quality of life among tuberculosis patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: TB patients saw TB as having minor consequences, TB not being very well controlled by treatment, and TB as last- ing long as a disease; they ... physical quality of life while concern about illness was associated with poor mental quality of life. Conclusion: The ..... status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Journal of.

  17. Low but Sufficient Anidulafungin Exposure in Critically Ill Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wanrooy, Marjolijn J. P.; Rodgers, Michael G. G.; Uges, Donald R. A.; Arends, Jan P.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Werf, van der Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    The efficacy of anidulafungin is driven by the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)/MIC ratio. Patients in intensive care may be at risk for underexposure. In critically ill patients with an invasive Candida infection, the anidulafungin exposure and a possible correlation with disease

  18. ILLNESS IS WORK: Revisiting the concept of illness careers and recognizing the identity work of patients with ME/CFS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grue, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The concept of careers has an extensive history in the sociology of health and illness. Among other things, the notion of a career has been used to describe the changing identities of patients diagnosed with mental illness, to identify distinct stages in the progression of various illnesses, and to recognize the cooperative efforts of hospitalized patients. However, the career concept may be reanalyzed as part of an analytical metaphor that makes salient both the agency of people with illnesses and the social structures in which they are enmeshed. This metaphor, ILLNESS IS WORK, can valorize and aid understanding of the identity work and actions of patients with chronic illnesses, particularly illnesses with a low degree of social recognition and medical prestige such as myalgic encephalopathy and chronic fatigue syndrome. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Relatives to Critically Ill Patients Have No Sense of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jannie; Andresen, Kristoffer; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    shown that relatives do not always receive the attention they need from health professionals. There is a lack of studies that focus on relatives' satisfaction and involvement during their family members' hospitalization. Design. A mixed methods design was chosen. Methods. A quantitative study......Aims and Objective. To investigate the relatives' satisfaction and involvement on a general surgery ward regarding the critically ill patient. Introduction. Relatives to critically ill patients are affected both physically and mentally during the hospitalization of a family member. Research has...... was conducted with 27 relatives to critically ill patients. All participated in a questionnaire and out of the 27 relatives, six participated in qualitative in-depth interviews. Results. The questionnaire revealed that relatives were dissatisfied with care and involvement. For further exploration...

  20. The lived experiences of spiritual suffering and the healing process among Taiwanese patients with terminal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Chung-Ching; Shih, Fu-Jin; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Lin, Hsiao-Wei; Hsiao, Fei-Hsiu; Chen, Yu-Ting

    2008-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore the lived experiences of spiritual suffering and the change mechanism in healing processes among Taiwanese patients with terminal cancer. The approach to this study was phenomenological-hermeneutic. Twenty-one patients with terminal cancer were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview that dealt with their experiences of spiritual suffering and the healing process. This study was conducted in the inpatient unit of the oncology department in two general hospitals. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and later analysed using the approach of narrative analysis. According to the results of case narration, the causes of spiritual suffering included cancer, known as a life-threatening illness, physical pain, treatment complications, uncertain illness progression, disability problems and lack of support. Patients turned to internal resources (including regarding the suffering as a life challenge, volunteering to help other cancer patients and searching for life wisdoms) and external resources (including peer support groups and family support) as they endured spiritual suffering. Taiwanese patients turned to Eastern and Western philosophies of Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism and Christianity as methods to interpret their spiritual suffering. Patients' positive views of misfortune because of cancer and sufficient social supports were the key elements of the healing process to alleviate spiritual suffering. Nurses who learn to participate in suffering assessment are better able to understand spiritual needs of cancer patients. Cancer patients' views on the change mechanism in healing processes could provide essential information for nurses in developing an effective intervention programme. If nurses consider cultural factors that shape patients' experiences of spiritual suffering and the healing process, they could learn how to meet the needs of patients better from different cultural backgrounds.

  1. The critically ill obstetric patient - Recent concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Trikha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU present a challenge to an intensivist because of normal physiological changes associated with pregnancy and puerperium, the specific medical diseases peculiar to pregnancy and the need to take care of both the mother and the foetus. Most common causes of admission to an ICU for obstetric patients are eclampsia, severe preeclampsia, haemorrhage, congenital and valvular heart disease, septic abortions, severe anemia, cardiomyopathy and non-obstetric sepsis. The purpose of this review is to present the recent concepts in critical care management of obstetric patients with special focus mainly on ventilatory strategies, treatment of shock and nutrition. The details regarding management of individual diseases would not be discussed as these would be beyond the purview of this article. In addition, some specific issues of importance while managing such patients would also be highlighted.

  2. Illness Perception and Depression of Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Uysal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim:In this study illness perception and depression levels were determined in type 2 diabetic patients using brief illness perception questionnaire and geriatric depression questionnaire, and the relationship between diabetic parameters and these data were examined. Material and Methods:The study was conducted on type 2 diabetic patients that were registered in Family Medicine outpatient clinic of Cinar County Hospital. Brief illness perception questionnaire and geriatric depression questionnaire were applied to patients that were selected for sampling. Results:Mean brief illness perception scale score and geriatric depression scale score were 50,76±10,2[range 32-70] and 14,33±5,1[range 5-24] respectively. In 23,6% of cases GDS score was normal. In 57,5% of cases mild depression and in 18,9% of cases severe depression were detected. According to HbA1c values in 35,4% of cases diabetes was found under control (HbA1c ≤ 6,9, and in 64,6% of cases it was out of control (HbA1c ≥ 7,0. It was found that, the relations between illness duration, medicine type, blood glucose regulation and illness perception and depression levels were statistically meaningful. Conclusion: Our study indicates that blood glucose regulation was far away from the targets and also indicates that illness perception and deperession data were related with different parameters of diabetes. It's clear that, if the diabetic patient has mood disorder, if the patient could not understand prognosis and complications of disease and if the patient did not believe his control over disease or treatment it would be difficult to achieve target blood glucose levels. This study suggests that, during planning of customized treatment for a patient, including of illness perception and depression data to this process would improve patient involvement and treatment success. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 31-40

  3. Nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris; Snell, David

    2016-11-10

    Critical illness in the developing world is a substantial burden for individuals, families, communities and healthcare services. The management of these patients will depend on the resources available. Simple conditions such as a fractured leg or a strangulated hernia can have devastating effects on individuals, families and communities. The recent Lancet Commission on Global Surgery and the World Health Organization promise to strengthen emergency and essential care will increase the focus on surgical services within the developing world. This article provides an overview of nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia, a lower middle income country (LMIC) in sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. The Jewish patient and terminal dehydration: a hospice ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodell, J; Weng, M A

    2000-01-01

    Culturally competent nursing care regarding the ethical dilemma of terminal dehydration (withholding or withdrawing food and fluid) for the Jewish hospice patient involves applying the ethical principles of justice, autonomy, beneficence, and nonmaleficence to nursing interventions by identifying outcomes that focus on the high value Jews place on life; avoiding stereotyping as to what it means to be Jewish; knowledge of various Jewish traditions surrounding death and dying; and good communication with the patient and his or her family.

  5. Perceived illness intrusions among continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Bapat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the perceived illness intrusion of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD patients, to examine their demographics, and to find out the association among demographics, duration of illness as well as illness intrusion, 40 chronic kidney disease stage V patients on CAPD during 2006-2007 were studied. Inclusion criteria were patients′ above 18 years, willing, stable, and completed at least two months of dialysis. Those with psychiatric co-morbidity were excluded. Sociodemographics were collected using a semi-structured interview schedule. A 14-item illness intrusion checklist covering various aspects of life was administered. The subjects had to rate the illness intrusion in their daily life and the extent of intrusion. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi square test of association. The mean age of the subjects was 56.05 ± 10.05 years. There was near equal distribution of gender. 82.5% were married, 70.0% belonged to Hindu religion, 45.0% were pre-degree, 25.0% were employed, 37.5% were housewives and 30.0% had retired. 77.5% belonged to the upper socioeconomic strata, 95.0% were from an urban background and 65.0% were from nuclear families. The mean duration of dialysis was 19.0 ± 16.49 months. Fifty-eight percent of the respondents were performing the dialysis exchanges by themselves. More than 95.0%were on three or four exchanges per day. All the 40 subjects reported illness intrusion in their daily life. Intrusion was perceived to some extent in the following areas: health 47.5%, work 25.0%, finance 37.5%, diet 40.0%, and psychological 50.0%. Illness had not intruded in the areas of relationship with spouse 52.5%, sexual life 30.0%, with friends 92.5%, with family 85.5%, social functions 52.5%, and religious functions 75.0%. Statistically significant association was not noted between illness intrusion and other variables. CAPD patients perceived illness intrusion to some extent in their daily life

  6. The illness trajectory experienced by patients having spine fusion surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    The illness trajectory of spine fusion patients. A feeling of being (in)visible Background Research shows that being a back patient is associated with great personal cost, and that back patients who undergo so-called spine fusion often experience particularly long and uncoordinated trajectories....... The patients describe a feeling of being mistrusted and thrown around in the system. It is the aim of this study to examine how spine fusion patients experience their illness trajectory and hospitalisation. Methods The study is based on qualitative interviews, and the data analysis is inspired by the French...... system and healthcare professionals are often dismissed as irrelevant. It is also evident that spine fusion patients are denied the opportunity to verbalise what it feels like to, for example, be ”a person in constant pain” or someone who ”holds back” to avoid being an inconvenience. These feelings...

  7. Advances in Biomarkers in Critical Ill Polytrauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru F; Sandesc, Dorel; Dumache, Raluca; Cradigati, Carmen A; Sarandan, Mirela; Nartita, Radu; Popovici, Sonia E; Bedreag, Ovidiu H

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the cases of critically ill polytrauma patients is given by both the primary, as well as the secondary, post-traumatic injuries. The severe injuries of organ systems, the major biochemical and physiological disequilibrium, and the molecular chaos lead to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in this type of patient. The 'gold goal' in the intensive therapy of such patients resides in the continuous evaluation and monitoring of their clinical status. Moreover, optimizing the therapy based on the expression of certain biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity is extremely important because of the clinical course of the critically ill polytrauma patient. In this paper we wish to summarize the recent studies of biomarkers useful for the intensive care unit (ICU) physician. For this study the available literature on specific databases such as PubMed and Scopus was thoroughly analyzed. Each article was carefully reviewed and useful information for this study extracted. The keywords used to select the relevant articles were "sepsis biomarker", "traumatic brain injury biomarker" "spinal cord injury biomarker", "inflammation biomarker", "microRNAs biomarker", "trauma biomarker", and "critically ill patients". For this study to be carried out 556 original type articles were analyzed, as well as case reports and reviews. For this review, 89 articles with relevant topics for the present paper were selected. The critically ill polytrauma patient, because of the clinical complexity the case presents with, needs a series of evaluations and specific monitoring. Recent studies show a series of either tissue-specific or circulating biomarkers that are useful in the clinical status evaluation of these patients. The biomarkers existing today, with regard to the critically ill polytrauma patient, can bring a significant contribution to increasing the survival rate, by adapting the therapy according to their expressions. Nevertheless, the necessity remains to

  8. [Quality of diagnosis information given to terminal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font-Ritort, Sergi; Martos-Gutiérrez, José Antonio; Montoro-Lorite, Mercedes; Mundet-Pons, Lluís

    To determine the information that terminal cancer patients have about their diagnosis, identifying key words used, and quantifying the conspiracy of silence. A cross-sectional, analytical study was conducted by reviewing the hospice support team data base which contains the medical history and a semi-structured interview with terminal cancer patients in the first visit to the hospice. Demographic and socioeconomic data was collected, as well as relevant clinical information (diagnosis, prevalent symptoms, number of symptoms, patient functionality, QoL, information given, and words used). Out of total of sample of 723 records, 77.87% (95% CI: 74.70-80.74) of the patients were properly informed about their diagnosis. The most used words were cancer in 26% of the patients, tumour in 51.59%, and for the remaining 10.65%, the word inflammation was used. Statistically significant differences of information were found between sexes, age, types of cancer, and hospital ward. Terminal cancer patients have knowledge on their diagnosis, suggesting that the conspiracy of silence is present to a lesser extent. This knowledge is transmitted using different words and with euphemisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Ethics research in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estella, A

    2017-12-29

    Research in critical care patients is an ethical obligation. The ethical conflicts of intensive care research arise from patient vulnerability, since during ICU admission these individuals sometimes lose all or part of their decision making capacity and autonomy. We therefore must dedicate effort to ensure that neither treatment (sedation or mechanical ventilation) nor the disease itself can affect the right to individual freedom of the participants in research, improving the conditions under which informed consent must be obtained. Fragility, understood as a decrease in the capacity to tolerate adverse effects derived from research must be taken into account in selecting the participants. Research should be relevant, not possible to carry out in non-critical patients, and a priori should offer potential benefits that outweigh the risks that must be known and assumable, based on principles of responsibility. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  10. Do Illness Perceptions in Patients with Fibromyalgia Differ Across Countries? A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppens, Kevin; Neels, Hedwig; van Wilgen, C. Paul; Roussel, Nathalie; Heyrman, Annette; Lambrecht, Luc; van Ittersum, Miriam W.; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Illness perceptions, i.e. how patients think about their illness in terms of identity, cause and consequences, are important, as negative illness perceptions are associated with maladaptive illness behavior, more dysfunctioning, poor treatment adherence and treatment outcome. As illness

  11. Predictive value of low interleukin-33 in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Stojkovic, Stefan; Lenz, Max; Brekalo, Mira; Huber, Kurt; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Demyanets, Svitlana; Speidl, Walter S

    2017-09-30

    Patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit (ICU) are characterized by an activated immune system and exhibit a high mortality rate irrespective of the underlying cause of admission. Interleukin (IL)-33 has been shown to be protective in experimental sepsis models and it has been demonstrated that circulating levels of its "decoy" receptor soluble ST2 (sST2) are associated with outcome in critically ill patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether circulating IL-33 is associated with 30-day mortality in patients admitted to a medical ICU. In this prospective, observational study, both IL-33 and sST2 levels were assessed in 223 consecutive patients at ICU admission using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). During the 30-day follow-up, 58 patients (26%) died. Circulating IL-33 was detectable in 166 patients and in 57 patients, serum IL-33 was below the detection limit. Both detectable IL-33 and sST2 below the median were strong predictors of survival in critically ill patients independent of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score. IL-33 and sST2 predicted risk independent from each other. Patients with both, non-detectable levels of IL-33 and sST2 levels above the median, showed a dramatically increased mortality risk (HR 6.9 95% CI 3.0-16.2; p<0.001). Low levels of IL-33 and increased levels of sST2 predict mortality risk in critically ill patients independent from each other and APACHE II score. Both together showed additive predictive value suggesting a pathogenic role of the IL-33/ST2 system in critically ill patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality of life changes and intensive care preferences in terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Cheol; Keam, Bhumsuk; Yun, Young Ho; Ahn, Hong Yup; Kim, Young-Ae

    2015-10-01

    There is scarce research on the short-term fluctuations in end-of-life (EoL) care planning for seriously ill patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the stability of preferences regarding treatment in an intensive care unit (ICU) and identify the factors associated with changes in preferences in terms of quality of life (QoL). A prospective examination on preference changes for ICU care in 141 terminal cancer patients was conducted. Patients were categorized according to their change in preference during the final two months of their lives into four categories: (1) the keep-accept group, (2) the keep-reject group, (3) the change to accept group, and (4) the change to reject group. Using multiple logistic analyses, we explored the association between patient demographics, health-related QoL, and changes in ICU preference. The overall stability of ICU preferences near the end of life was 66.7% (κ = 0.33, p care [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) toward accept 12.35, p = 0.021; aOR toward reject 10.56, p = 0.020] than unmarried patients. Patients with stable physical function tended to accept ICU care (aOR = 5.05, p = 0.023), whereas those with poor performance (aOR = 5.32, p = 0.018), worsened QoL (aOR = 8.34, p = 0.007), or non-aggravated fatigue (aOR = 8.36, p = 0.006) were more likely to not accept ICU care. The attitudes of terminally ill cancer patients regarding ICU care at the end of life were not stable over time, and changes in their QoL were associated with a tendency to change their preferences about ICU care. Attention should thus be paid to patients' QoL changes to improve medical decision making with regard to EoL care.

  13. Antithrombin III for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Wetterslev, Jørn; Ravn, Frederikke B

    2016-01-01

    organ failure (MOF) was a MD of -1.24 (95% Cl -2.18 to -0.29, I2 statistic = 48%, random-effects model, 3 trials, 156 participants, very low quality of evidence) and for patients with an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score (APACHE) at II and III the MD was -2.18 (95% Cl -4.36 to -0...

  14. Parenting challenges in the setting of terminal illness: a family-focused perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaider, Talia I; Salley, Christina G; Terry, Rachel; Davidovits, Michael

    2015-03-01

    In the advanced stages of illness, families with dependent children experience disruption across all dimensions of family life. The need for family support during palliative care is well recognized, yet little is understood about how parents and their children navigate these difficult circumstances. This review summarizes the current body of research on parenting challenges in advanced cancer. To date, the study of parental cancer has focused predominantly on the early stages of disease and its impact on children and adolescents. Less is known about how families with minor children prepare for parental loss. Evidence suggests that having dependent children influences parents' treatment decisions at the end of life, and that a central concern for children and parents is optimizing time spent together. Parents may feel an urgency to engage in accelerated parenting, and maintaining normalcy remains a consistent theme for the ill and healthy parent alike. There is a growing evidence base affirming the importance of responsive communication prior to death. Advancing knowledge about the parenting experience at the end of life is critical for ensuring effective support to the entire family, as it accommodates and prepares for the loss of a vital member.

  15. 'The real stuff': implications for nursing of assessing and measuring a terminally ill person's quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annells, M; Koch, T

    2001-11-01

    Two quality of life (QoL) assessment and measurement tools, the Client Generated Index (CGI) and the McGill Quality of Life (MQOL) questionnaires, were trialled within district nursing palliative care to test usefulness and feasibility for holistic intervention selection, individualized palliative care planning, and measurement of the quality of dying. The specific focus of this paper is to discuss the less tangible outcomes of the trial, which illuminate the partly 'hidden' value and nature of clinical nursing. These outcomes include awareness that the use of such tools may: by actual administration of the tool be, in and of itself, a therapeutic nursing action; focus on 'the real stuff from the client's perspective, that which matters most to the terminally ill client, but may not be classically considered as prompting nursing intervention; and facilitate 'the real stuff' of nursing, perhaps known but not usually articulated by nurses, and which usually does not feature on care plans nor in time allocation schedules.

  16. Changing Attitudes Toward Euthanasia and Suicide for Terminally Ill Persons, 1977 to 2016: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attell, Brandon K

    2017-01-01

    Several longitudinal studies show that over time the American public has become more approving of euthanasia and suicide for terminally ill persons. Yet, these previous findings are limited because they derive from biased estimates of disaggregated hierarchical data. Using insights from life course sociological theory and cross-classified logistic regression models, I better account for this liberalization process by disentangling the age, period, and cohort effects that contribute to longitudinal changes in these attitudes. The results of the analysis point toward a continued liberalization of both attitudes over time, although the magnitude of change was greater for suicide compared with euthanasia. More fluctuation in the probability of supporting both measures was exhibited for the age and period effects over the cohort effects. In addition, age-based differences in supporting both measures were found between men and women and various religious affiliations.

  17. Causes of death in critically ill multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamyan, A; Brandtner, H; Grinzinger, S; Chroust, V; Bacher, C; Otto, F; Reisp, M; Hauer, L; Sellner, J

    2017-10-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience higher mortality rates as compared to the general population. While the risk of intensive care unit (ICU) admission is also reported to be higher, little is known about causes of death CoD in critically ill MS patients. To study the causes of death (CoD) in the series of critically ill patients with MS verified by autopsy. We reviewed hospital electronic charts of MS patients treated at the neurological ICU of a tertiary care hospital between 2000 and 2015. We compared clinical and pathological CoD for those who were autopsied. Overall, 10 patients were identified (seven female; median age at death 65 years, range 27-80), and six of them were autopsied. The median MS duration prior to ICU admission was 27.5 years (range 1-50), and the median EDSS score at the time of ICU admission was 9 (range 5-9.5). The median length of ICU stay was 3 days (range 2-213). All the individuals in our series had experienced respiratory insufficiency during their ICU stay. The autopsy examination of brain tissue did not reveal evidences of MS lesions in one patient. In another patient, Lewy bodies were found on brain immunohistochemistry. Mortality in critically ill MS patients is largely driven by respiratory complications. Sporadic disparities between clinical and pathological findings can be expected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Citrate Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Zheng

    Full Text Available Regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA is gaining popularity in continous renal replacement therapy (CRRT for critically ill patients. The risk of citrate toxicity is a primary concern during the prolonged process. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of citrate in critically ill patients with AKI, and used the kinetic parameters to predict the risk of citrate accumulation in this population group undergoing continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH with RCA.Critically ill patients with AKI (n = 12 and healthy volunteers (n = 12 were investigated during infusing comparative dosage of citrate. Serial blood samples were taken before, during 120 min and up to 120 min after infusion. Citrate pharmacokinetics were calculated and compared between groups. Then the estimated kinetic parameters were applied to the citrate kinetic equation for validation in other ten patients' CVVH sessions with citrate anticoagulation.Total body clearance of citrate was similar in critically ill patients with AKI and healthy volunteers (648.04±347.00 L/min versus 686.64±353.60 L/min; P = 0.624. Basal and peak citrate concentrations were similar in both groups (p = 0.423 and 0.247, respectively. The predicted citrate curve showed excellent fit to the measurements.Citrate clearance is not impaired in critically ill patients with AKI in the absence of severe liver dysfunction. Citrate pharmacokinetic data can provide a basis for the clinical use of predicting the risk of citrate accumulation.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00948558.

  19. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-02-04

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel "myths" about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of "near zero" PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting "near zero" catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of "near zero" PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition.

  20. Rivaroxaban for Thromboprophylaxis in Acutely Ill Medical Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Alexander T.; Spiro, Theodore E.; Büller, Harry R.; Haskell, Lloyd; Hu, Dayi; Hull, Russell; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Merli, Geno; Schellong, Sebastian; Spyropoulos, Alex C.; Tapson, Victor; Cohen, A. T.; Haskell, L.; Hu, D.; Hull, R.; Mebazaa, A.; Merli, G.; Schellong, S.; Spiro, T.; Spyropoulos, A. C.; Tapson, V.; Francis, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Leizorovicz, A.; Lowe, G.; Roberts, R.; Brandges, D.; Kolbach, D.; Limburg, M. L.; Mac Gillavry, M. R.; Otten, H. M.; Peters, R. G. J.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Robben, S.; Voorend, M.; Hemmrich, M.; Li, L.; Meng, I.; Mühlhofer, E.; Beckmann, H.; Desanctis, Y.; Duszczyszyn, A.; Fielding, L.; Twomey, T.; Müller, K.; Byra, W.; Nessel, C.; Atkinson, Sarah; Bottaro, F. J.; Caberlotto, O.; Grand, B.; Hendler, H.; Hojman, M.; Mykietiuk, A.; Salerno, R.; Baker, R.; Carroll, P.; Chong, B.; Colquhoun, D.; Gan, E.; Hall, S.; Jackson, D.; Leyden, M.; Salem, H.; Serisier, D.; Balcke, P.; Bauer, B.; Bauer, N. C.; Erlacher, L.; Fortunat, W.; Grafl, E.; Keil, F.; Kirchmair, P.; Pilger, E.; Schönherr, H.-R.; Siostrzonek, P.; Weidinger, F.; Weltermann, A.; Wenisch, C.; Blockmans, D.; Delobbe, A.; Hendrickx, K.; Jacquy, C.; Soupart, A.; Striekwold, H.; van Hoof, M.-E.; Vanden Abeele, A.; van Roey, G.; van Zandweghe, L.; Bizzacchi, J. M. A.; Cavalheiro, C.; Chamone, D.; Fiss, E.; Garicochea, B.; Lopes, A. C.; Rocha Moreira, R. C.; van Bellen, B.; Dimov, D.; Ivanov, Y.; Lyubenov, L.; Milanov, S.; Mincheva, V.; Nenkova, S.; Popov, D.; Taseva, M.; Bergeron, C.; Boulanger, J.-M.; Buck, B.; Daneault, N.; Desai, H.; Dube, F.; Kutsogiannis, D. J.; Miron, M.-J.; Moddel, G.; Shuaib, A.; Silver, F.; Stotts, G.; Verreault, S.; Bugedo, G.; Torres, H.; Chen, K.-N.; Chen, P.; Chen, R. C.; Chen, Y.; Gai, L.; Gao, Q.; Guo, S.; Hu, T.; Hua, Q.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, W.; Li, Y.-S.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, Y.; Qi, G.; Qin, X.; Shen, C.; Sun, S.; Sun, Y.; Wan, Q.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wu, C.; Wu, J.; Wu, S.; Xian, S.; Xiu, Q.; Xu, B.; Yan, X.; Yang, K.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, D. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, Y.; Botero, R.; Cedano, J. E.; Fajardo, D.; Gómez, L. F.; Jaramillo, C. F.; Rada, R.; Uribe, L. G.; Velásquez, J. C.; Bergovec, M.; Hajnsek, S.; Knezevic, A.; Samarzija, M.; Steiner, R.; Zupancic-Salek, S.; Fiksa, J.; Gorican, K.; Linhart, A.; Macel, I.; Mayer, O.; Prochazka, V.; Sedlacek, J.; Avnstrøm, S.; Nielsen, H.; Nielsen, T.; Østergaard, O. V.; Tuxen, C.; Kolbassova, O.; Lember, M.; Marandi, T.; Uuetoa, T.; Karmakoski, J.; Lassila, R.; Aquilanti, S.; Bergmann, J.-F.; Brisot, D.; Debourdeau, P.; Duchemin, A.; Farge-Bancel, D.; Fournier, C.; Galinier, M.; Lacroix, P.; Lambert, M.; Le Jeunne, C.; Lorcerie, B.; Mahe, I.; Marquette, C.-H.; Mismetti, P.; Mottier, D.; Proust, A.; Quere, I.; Rihani, R.; Schmidt, J.; Stephan, D.; Vital-Durand, D.; Barth, J.; Beyer-Westendorf, J.; Borst, M.; Dormann, A.; Drouven, F.-M.; Espinola-Klein, C.; Heintges, T.; Hindahl, H.; Klotz, T.; Lawall, H.; Leschke, M.; Milstrey, H.-R.; Möbius-Winkler, S.; Mühlbauer, B.; Niederau, C.; Petermann, W.; Pohl, C.; Ringe, J.-D.; Sanner, B.; Scharrer, I.; Schmidt-Lucke, J. A.; Schöffauer, I.; Stoelben, E.; Theelen, W.; Veltkamp, R.; vom Dahl, J.; Apsokardos, S.; Babalis, D.; Bassaris, H.; Karafoulidou, A.; Katsivas, A.; Panoutsopoulos, G.; Patsilinakos, S.; Skoutelis, A.; Toubis, M.; Vlastos, F.; Wong, L. K. S.; Wong, R. S. M.; Frankfurter, Z.; Nagy, F.; Jakab, G.; Kondakor, I.; Nikl, J.; Nyirati, G.; Szakacs, Z.; Szegedi, N.; Avvaru, G.; Bhairappa, S.; Cheviri, A. N.; Gadkari, M.; Grant, P.; Kuchimanchi, K.; Kumar, K. P.; Mahajan, A.; Naik, A.; Oomman, A.; Raghu, C.; Ramanathan, R. M. P. L.; Talwar, D.; Whig, J.; Kalim, H.; Machfoed, M. H.; Tambunan, K. L.; Elias, M.; Elias, N.; Hayek, T.; Lishner, M.; Oren, S.; Osamah, H.; Sthoeger, Z.; Telman, G.; Zeltser, D.; Zimlichman, R.; Ageno, W.; Agnelli, G.; Berrettini, M.; Bondi, M.; Buzzoni, R.; Castaman, G.; de Blasio, A.; de Gaudenzi, E.; Falanga, A.; Fontanella, A.; Giorgi Pierfranceschi, M.; Landolfi, R.; Lodigiani, C.; Morra, E.; Parise, P.; Pini, M.; Pizzini, A.; Poggio, R.; Quintavalla, R.; Siragusa, S.; Violi, F.; Ando, S.; Fujimoto, K.; Fukui, K.; Funada, J.; Hataji, O.; Ibata, H.; Ichinose, T.; Ikefuji, H.; Imai, S.; Ito, K.; Kani, H.; Kato, M.; Momiyama, Y.; Nishi, S.; Mekaru, S.; Mio, T.; Nagaoka, M.; Nakagawa, H.; Nakamura, Y.; Okazaki, O.; Oshiro, K.; Ozawa, T.; Saito, T.; Sakagami, S.; Shimizu, A.; Shiohira, Y.; Tanaka, E.; Uchiyama, T.; Utsugisawa, K.; Tsuji, T.; Wada, A.; Yamada, N.; Bang, S.-M.; Chung, C.-S.; Kang, D. W.; Kim, Y.-K.; Lee, Y.-S.; YeunOh, D.; Yoon, B.-W.; Aizsilniece, I.; Krievins, D.; Kupcs, U.; Pontaga, N.; Rozitis, V.; Stukena, I.; Alekniene, B.; Bagdonas, A.; Basijokiene, V.; Butkiene, Z.; Griskeviciene, V.; Gumbrevicius, G.; Norviliene, R.; Petrauskiene, R.; Stonkus, S.; Vitkauskas, A.; Muller, P.; Rauh, S.; Chin, S. P.; Sim, K. H.; Wan Azman, B. W. A.; Cardoza Amador, J. I.; Gallegos Martínez, J.; Gómez Lara, M.; González Garza, J.; Hernández Gaeta, D. E.; Herver Cabrera, M. J.; Nares Ochoa, F.; Perea Sánchez, R. A.; Romero López, C.; Tanaka Chávez, A.; Vázquez López, M. Á; Velasco Rodríguez, V. M.; Dees, A.; de Kreuk, A. M.; Fijnheer, R.; ten Cate, H.; Jackson, S.; Ockelford, P.; Simpson, D.; Ghanima, W. K.; Schjesvold, F. H.; Stokstad, I.; Torp, R.; Aziz, Z.; Rizvi, N.; Tayyab, G. N.; Arrieta Días, F.; Castillo Leon, R.; Cotrina, R.; Moncada Vilela, Z.; Salas Pérez, M.; Salazar Candiotti, O. C.; Ulloa Pérez, V. R.; Biedrzycka, M.; Bojarska-Los, M.; Goch, A.; Gorska, M.; Gutowska-Jablonska, M.; Jahnz-Rozyk, K.; Krysiak, W.; Mirek-Bryniarska, E.; Ogorek, M.; Sydor, A.; Szczeklik, A.; Walasek, L.; Wrzesinski, K.; Zechowicz, T.; Bettencourt, P.; Ducla Soares, J.; Ferreira, A.; Ferreira, F.; Gomes, F.; Martins, A.; Mello e Silva, A.; Providência, L.; Rodrigues, T.; Santos, F.; Aroutynov, G.; Ershova, O.; Fedorova, T.; Glezer, M. G.; Khatkova, S.; Moiseev, V.; Shilkina, N.; Sotnikov, A.; Chua, G.; Gan, H. W.; Ng, A. W. K.; Ong, T. H.; Tan, R. S.; Tang, O. T.; Gaspar, L.; Kovar, F.; Spisak, V.; Stevlik, J.; Szentivanyi, M.; Flezar, M.; Gorjup, V.; Jereb, M.; Sok, M.; Tratar, G.; Zvan, B.; Adler, D.; Bloy, B.; Dreosti, L. M.; Engelbrecht, J. M.; Janse van Rensburg, H.; Koegelenberg, C. F. N.; Nortje, H.; Quinton, S.; Rabie, W. J.; Rapoport, B. L.; Roodt, A.; Smith, C.; Steenkamp, F. W. F. J.; van Nieuwenhuizen, E.; van Zyl, L.; Bisbe, J.; Castro, A.; Cereto Castro, F.; Conget, F.; Guil, M.; Monreal, M.; Nieto Rodríguez, J.-A.; Tirado Miranda, R.; Tolosa, C.; Trujillo Santos, J.; Villalta, J.; Bertholds, E.; Cwikiel, M.; Laska, A.-C.; Östergren, J.; Själander, A.; Svensson, P.; Timberg, I.; Torstensson, I.; Wiklund, P. G.; Banyai, M.; Baumgartner, I.; Imhof, A.; Jeanneret, C.; Nussbaumer, P.; Schifferli, J. A.; Chuang, K. Y.-C.; Guo, B.-F.; Lee, J. T.; Lin, Y.-H.; Shyu, K.-G.; Permpikul, C.; Pothirat, C.; Wattanathum, A.; Goker, E.; Ilerigelen, B.; Kucukoglu, S.; Nalbantgil, S.; Sirin, H.; Yilmaz, U.; Genyk, S.; Goncharova, Y.; Karpenko, O.; Korzh, O.; Koval, V.; Legkonogov, O.; Perepeliuk, M.; Polyakov, A.; Ryabichenko, T.; Skrebkov, V.; Sorkin, V.; Svyshchenko, Y.; Tseluyko, V.; Vakaliuk, I.; Vatutin, M.; Voronkov, L.; Cohen, A.; Durairaj, R.; Elliott, M.; Kesteven, P.; Luckit, J. K.; Rafferty, P.; Scully, M.; Albrecht, C. R.; Anderson, S.; Benninghoff, M.; Bidair, M.; Birch, T. A.; Brensilver, J.; Chastain, S.; Chen, D.; Comerota, A. J.; Concha, M.; Conrad, S. A.; Cox, M. J.; Daboul, N. Y.; Dexter, J.; Dietrich, D. W.; Fei, R. H.; Fontes, M. L.; French, W. J.; Gonzales, E.; Hazelrigg, M. R.; Heller, B. N.; Heyder, A. M.; Hill, G. T.; Jaffer, A. K.; Jetty, P.; Johnson, G.; Kaatz, S.; Kazimir, M.; Lavender, R. C.; Lawton, C. B.; Lerner, R.; Light, R. W.; Ling, T. G.; Mahal, S.; Manos, P.; Masson, J.; Maynor, K.; McLafferty, R. B.; Mehra, P.; Merli, G. J.; Minkowitz, H. S.; Murray, R. M.; Nadar, V.; Nathanson, A.; Patton, W. F.; Peberdy, M.; Plautz, M.; Pokharel, P.; Quintana, O. E.; Rajamani, K.; Rastogi, P.; Reiter, W. M.; Reyes, J. A.; Schuller, D.; Seibert, A.; Sharma, A.; Simmons, J.; Soff, G. A.; Stein, R. W.; Stoltz, S.; Suen, J.; Thurm, C.; Toe, W.; Updegrove, J. D.; Ward, J. A.; Waxman, K.; Welker, J.; Whittier, F. C.; Wright, P. E.; Wun, T.; Yusen, R. D.; Ziedalski, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinically appropriate duration of thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized patients with acute medical illnesses is unknown. In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral rivaroxaban administered for an extended period, as compared with

  1. Antithrombin III for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Wetterslev, Jørn; Ravn, Frederikke B

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Antithrombin III (AT III) is an anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties. We assessed the benefits and harms of AT III in critically ill patients. METHODS: We searched from inception to 27 August 2015 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CAB, BIOSIS and CINAHL. We included randomized cont...

  2. Sleep disturbances in critically ill patients in ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Ording, H; Jennum, P

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disturbances in the intensive care unit (ICU) seem to lead to development of delirium, prolonged ICU stay, and increased mortality. That is why sufficient sleep is important for good outcome and recovery in critically ill patients. A variety of small studies reveal pathological sleep patterns...

  3. Ventilator-associated pneumonia in critically ill African patients on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stress ulcer prophylaxis is an integral part of the care of the critically ill. Agents that alter gastric pH may predispose these patients to gastric colonisation, with subsequent pneumonia and/or sepsis. Cytoprotective agents such as sucralfate preserve gastric acidity and may be protective. Objective: To determine ...

  4. Critically ill obstetric and gynaecological patients in the intensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To document mortality among critically ill obstetric and gynaecological patients requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission and to investigate whether any poor prognostic features could allow for earlier and more aggressive intervention. Study design: A retrospective study of all obstetric apd gynaecological ...

  5. Predictors of maternal mortality among critically ill obstetric patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    haemorrhage and severe preeclampsia or eclampsia. The mean duration of admission was higher among ... maternal health (MDG-5), the management of critically ill obstetric patients stands as an important component. ... of severe preeclampsia and eclampsia, multiple organ failure, late presentation and lack of antenatal ...

  6. Coagulation and complement system in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, H; Stephan, B; Pindur, G

    2015-01-01

    Activation of coagulation and inflammatory response including the complement system play a major role in the pathogenesis of critical illness. However, only limited data are available addressing the relationship of both pathways and its assessment of a predictive value for the clinical outcome in intense care medicine. Therefore, parameters of the coagulation and complement system were studied in patients with septicaemia and multiple trauma regarded as being exemplary for critical illness. 34 patients (mean age: 51.38 years (±16.57), 15 females, 19 males) were investigated at day 1 of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU). Leukocytes, complement factors C3a and C5a were significantly (p complement system as part of the inflammatory response is a significant mechanism in septicaemia, whereas loss and consumption of blood components including parts of the coagulation and complement system is more characteristic for multiple trauma. Protein C in case of severe reduction might be of special concern for surviving in sepsis. Activation of haemostasis was occurring in both diseases, however, overt DIC was not confirmed in this study to be a leading mechanism in critically ill patients. MOF score, lactate, C1-inhibitor and prothrombin time have been the only statistically significant predictors for lethal outcome suggesting that organ function, microcirculation, haemostasis and inflammatory response are essential elements of the pathomechanism and clinical course of diseases among critically ill patients.

  7. Pattern of psychiatric illnesses among elderly patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However relatively few studies have been conducted on the pattern of psychiatric illnesses among the elderly in this environment. More over , with changing demographics, there is a need for more information. Objective: The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine the sociodemographic and clinical variables of patients ...

  8. [The microbiome of the gut in critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberger, B; Rauscher, C

    2015-10-01

    The complexity and diversity of the human intestinal microbiome has only recently been characterized. The multiple metabolic and immunologic effects of the bacterial flora have demonstrated the symbiosis between the microbiome and its host. This symbiosis is disturbed in a multitude of diseases, especially in critically ill patients. A review of the changes in the intestinal microbiome of critically ill patients and the use of probiotics. Nonsystematic literature search in PubMed on the topics: (1) changes in the intestinal microbiome in critically ill patients, (2) interventions using probiotics in critically ill patients, and (3) use of fecal transplantation in Clostridium difficile colitis. Trauma, sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and other conditions lead to shifts in the composition of the intestinal microbiome, which are correlated with clinical outcome. The most obvious change is a profound loss of obligate anaerobe bacteria, leading also to metabolic changes. Probiotics have been used in several studies and show efficacy in the reduction of infectious complication but not in overall mortality. C. difficile colitis as the model disease for a disturbed microbiome can be treated effectively by transfer of donor feces, which also restores the diversity of the microbiome. Taking into account the successful intervention of fecal transplantation on the intestinal microbiome, new products developed using the current knowledge of the intestinal microbiome could be more effective.

  9. Functional adrenal insufficiency among critically ill patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hyponatremia, hypoglycemia, hyperkalemia, postural hypotension and the use of ketoconazole were not associated with FAI in this study. Conclusion: The diagnosis of FAI should be considered in severely ill patients with stage IV HIV disease using rifampicin or those found to have unexplained eosinophilia. Further studies ...

  10. Monitoring nutrition therapy in the critically ill patient with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Roland N; Drover, John W

    2011-09-01

    Obesity compounds the metabolic response to critical illness and augments the consequences of overfeeding. Effective monitoring is essential for the prevention of, or to avoid, worsening of preexistent morbidities associated with obesity during the implementation of specialized nutrition support. This monitoring should guide the clinician toward the selection of appropriate therapeutic options to reduce complications from significant hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hypercapnia, fluid overload, and worsening of hepatic steatosis. Conventional nutrition outcome markers should be employed, with their limitations understood, when used for the critically ill obese patient.

  11. Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Aged Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Palli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aging is associated with renal structural changes and functional decline. The attributable risk for renal dysfunction from radiocontrast agents in critically ill older patients has not been well established. Methods. In this prospective study, we assessed the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN in critically ill patients with stable renal function who underwent computed tomography with intravenous contrast media. Patients were categorized into two age groups: <65 (YG or ≥65 years old (OG. CIN was defined as 25% or greater increase from baseline of serum creatinine or as an absolute increase by 0.5 mg/dL until the 5th day after the infusion of contrast agent. We also evaluated the alterations in oxidative stress by assessing serum 8-isoprostane. Results. CIN occurred in 5 of 13 OG patients (38.46% whereas no YG patient presented CIN (P=0.015. Serum creatinine kinetics in older patients demonstrated a rise over five days following contrast infusion time while a decline was observed in the YG (P=0.005. Conclusions. Older critically ill patients are more prone to develop renal dysfunction after the intravenous infusion of contrast agent in relation to their younger counterparts.

  12. Care fragmentation, quality, and costs among chronically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Brigham R; Joynt, Karen E; Rebitzer, James B; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-05-01

    To assess the relationship between care fragmentation and both quality and costs of care for commercially insured, chronically ill patients. We used claims data from 2004 to 2008 for 506,376 chronically ill, privately insured enrollees of a large commercial insurance company to construct measures of fragmentation. We included patients in the sample if they had chronic conditions in any of the following categories: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, or migraine. We assigned each patient a fragmentation index based on the patterns of care of their primary care provider (PCP), with care patterns spread across a higher number of providers considered to be more fragmented. We used regression analysis to examine the relationship between fragmentation and both quality and cost outcomes. Patients of PCPs in the highest quartile of fragmentation had a higher chance of having a departure from clinical best practice (32.8%, vs 25.9% among patients of PCPs in the lowest quartile of fragmentation; P fragmentation had higher rates of preventable hospitalizations (9.1% in highest quartile vs 7.1% in lowest quartile; P fragmentation was associated with $4542 higher healthcare spending ($10,396 in the highest quartile vs $5854 in the lowest quartile; P < .001). We found similar or larger effects on quality and costs among patients when we examined the most frequently occurring disease groups individually. Chronically ill patients whose primary care providers offer highly fragmented care more often experience lapses in care quality and incur greater healthcare costs.

  13. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness in Gorgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkar, Mohammad Zaman; Sanagoo, Akram; Zargarani, Fatemeh; Jouybari, Leila; Marjani, Abdoljalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is commonly associated with cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric mental illness. Hence, we aimed to assess the metabolic syndrome among severe mental illness (SMI). Materials and Methods: The study included 267 patients who were referred to the psychiatric unit at 5th Azar Education Hospital of Golestan University of Medical Sciences in Gorgan, Iran. Results: The mean waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the SMI with metabolic syndrome, but the high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol was significantly lower. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI patients was 20.60%. There were significant differences in the mean of waist circumference, systolic (except for women) and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and fasting blood glucose in men and women with metabolic syndrome when compared with subjects without metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI women was higher than men. The most age distribution was in range of 30-39 years old. The most prevalence of metabolic syndrome was in age groups 50-59 years old. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was increased from 30 to 59 years old. Conclusion: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with SMI in Gorgan is almost similar to those observed in Asian countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was lower than western countries. These observations may be due to cultural differences in the region. It should be mention that the families of mental illness subjects in our country believe that their patients must be cared better than people without mental illness. These findings of this study suggest that mental illness patients are at risk of metabolic syndrome. According to our results, risk factors such as age and gender differences may play an important role in the presence of metabolic syndrome. In our country, women do less

  14. Stress-Related Mucosal Disease in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Peivandi Yazdi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal damage in Gastro Intestinal (GI system happens due to stress and is more common in upper part of GI tract in patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU. This kind of injuries occurs in critically ill patients. Stress ulcer prophylaxis is necessary and increases the gastric (Power of Hydrogen pH (more than 4 especially in stress exposure time. In this paper we provide an overview of stress ulcer and currently used preventive approaches for this complication in critically ill patients in ICU. Recent promotion in ICU care and increase in scientific knowledge about Stress-Related Mucosal Disease (SRMD risk factors help us to reduce the number of patients develop stress ulcer. Prophylaxis can prevent significant bleeding and mortality.

  15. Communicating with dying patients within the spectrum of medical care from terminal diagnosis to death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich, M D; Curtis, J R; Shannon, S E; Carline, J D; Ambrozy, D M; Ramsey, P G

    2001-03-26

    Efforts to improve communication between physicians and dying patients have been unsuccessful, and guidelines for improving patient-physician communication about end-of-life care are based primarily on expert opinion. This study assessed which aspects of communication between patients and physicians are important in end-of-life care. Twenty focus groups were held with 137 individuals, including patients with chronic and terminal illnesses, family members, health care professionals from hospice or acute care settings, and physicians with expertise in end-of-life care. Focus group analyses determined domains of physician skill at end-of-life care. Communication with patients was identified as one of the most important domains. Analyses of components important in communicating with dying patients and their families were performed. The following 6 areas were of central importance in communicating with dying patients: talking with patients in an honest and straightforward way, being willing to talk about dying, giving bad news in a sensitive way, listening to patients, encouraging questions from patients, and being sensitive to when patients are ready to talk about death. Within these components, subthemes emerged that provide guidelines for physicians and educators. Dying patients also identified the need to achieve a balance between being honest and straightforward and not discouraging hope. Several areas emerged for physicians to focus their attention on when communicating with dying patients. These findings provide guidance in how to improve this communication. They also highlight the need to approach communication about end-of-life care as a spectrum that requires attention from the time of a terminal diagnosis through death.

  16. Hospice offers more palliative care but costs less than usual care for terminal geriatric hepatocellular carcinoma patients: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Hwang, I-Hsuan; Wu, Chen-Yi; Yang, Wang-Hsuan; Li, Chung-Pin

    2013-07-01

    Hospice care is important for patients with terminal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), especially in endemic areas of viral hepatitis. Differences between hospice care and usual care for geriatric HCC inpatients have not yet been explored in a nationwide survey. The study's purpose was to analyze differences between hospice care and usual care for geriatric HCC inpatients in a nationwide survey. This nationwide, population-based study used data obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. Patients with terminal HCC who were ≥65 years old and received their end-of-life care in the hospital between January 2001 and December 2004 were recruited. The comparison group was selected by propensity score matching from patients receiving usual care in acute wards. We enrolled 729 terminal HCC patients receiving inpatient hospice care and 729 matched controls selected from 2482 HCC patients receiving usual care. Hospice care patients were treated mainly by family medicine doctors (36%) and oncologists (26%), while usual care patients were treated mainly by gastroenterologists (60.2%). The natural opium alkaloids were used more in the hospice care group than in the usual care group (72.7% versus 25.5%, Pcare group. HCC patients in hospice wards received more narcotic palliative care, underwent fewer aggressive procedures, and incurred lower costs than those in acute wards. Hospice care should be promoted as a viable option for terminally ill, elderly HCC patients.

  17. [Evaluation and treatment of the critically ill cirrhotic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Javier; Aracil, Carles; Solà, Elsa; Soriano, Germán; Cinta Cardona, Maria; Coll, Susanna; Genescà, Joan; Hombrados, Manoli; Morillas, Rosa; Martín-Llahí, Marta; Pardo, Albert; Sánchez, Jordi; Vargas, Victor; Xiol, Xavier; Ginès, Pere

    2016-11-01

    Cirrhotic patients often develop severe complications requiring ICU admission. Grade III-IV hepatic encephalopathy, septic shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure and variceal bleeding are clinical decompensations that need a specific therapeutic approach in cirrhosis. The increased effectiveness of the treatments currently used in this setting and the spread of liver transplantation programs have substantially improved the prognosis of critically ill cirrhotic patients, which has facilitated their admission to critical care units. However, gastroenterologists and intensivists have limited knowledge of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of these complications and of the prognostic evaluation of critically ill cirrhotic patients. Cirrhotic patients present alterations in systemic and splanchnic hemodynamics, coagulation and immune dysfunction what further increase the complexity of the treatment, the risk of developing new complications and mortality in comparison with the general population. These differential characteristics have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications that must be known by general intensivists. In this context, the Catalan Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology requested a group of experts to draft a position paper on the assessment and treatment of critically ill cirrhotic patients. This article describes the recommendations agreed upon at the consensus meetings and their main conclusions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  18. Palliative care for the terminal heart failure patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Walter L; Long, R Craig; Geraci, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease afflicting millions of patients worldwide. Advances in treatment have allowed sufferers to enjoy overall prolonged survival and enhanced quality of life. Yet, a consequence of these therapeutic successes is that more patients survive to end-stage disease, with severe symptoms, poor quality of life, and no options available to prolong their survival reasonably. End-stage heart failure patients require a comprehensive palliative approach to care during their final months, with treatment goals focusing on symptom relief. Often, specific heart failure therapies can further this cause and should be administered when appropriate to alleviate specific symptoms, while other general palliative measures should also be considered as with other terminal patients. End-of-life palliative strategies must conform to accepted principles of ethical care. Constant communication with patients and families is essential to achieve best treatment goals for this growing segment of the population.

  19. Does Disclosure of Terminal Prognosis Mean Losing Hope? Insights from Exploring Patient Perspectives on Their Experience of Palliative Care Consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulourides Kogan, Alexis; Penido, Marcia; Enguidanos, Susan

    2015-12-01

    A primary barrier to physician disclosure of terminal prognosis is concern that patients will lose hope. Inpatient palliative care (IPC) teams are especially posed to mediate this barrier, but little is known about patient perceptions and experience of IPC. This study aimed to elicit seriously ill patients' perspective and experience of an IPC consultation, and to explore patient attitudes toward information derived from the consultation. An exploratory, qualitative study was conducted at a large nonprofit community hospital in the Los Angeles area. An established IPC team conducted individualized consults with patients and families within 24 hours of referral. Eligible participants were English-speaking adults, aged 18 or over, who had received an IPC consultation within the previous week during their hospitalization. Purposive recruitment of patients was conducted by the IPC social worker. Interviews were conducted at bedside using a semistructured interview protocol employing open-ended questions. Twelve seriously ill patients were interviewed. Four themes were identified from the interview transcripts: (1) holistic care approach, (2) knowledge/information gained, (3) hope and enlightenment, and (4) patient readiness. Results suggest that disclosure of a terminal prognosis does not mean loss of patient hope. Instead, hope was redefined on a goal other than cure. Presenting patients with information and increasing their knowledge about care options and resources may facilitate patients in identifying meaningful goals that are better aligned with their prognosis.

  20. Impact of early elective tracheotomy in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Araújo Marques Correia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tracheotomy is one of the most frequent surgical procedures performed in critically ill patients hospitalized at intensive care units. The ideal timing for a tracheotomy is still controversial, despite decades of experience. OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of performing early tracheotomies in critically ill patients on duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay, overall hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality. METHODS: Retrospective and observational study of cases subjected to elective tracheotomy at one of the intensive care units of this hospital during five consecutive years. The patients were stratified into two groups: early tracheotomy group (tracheotomy performed from day one up to and including day seven of mechanical ventilation and late tracheotomy group (tracheotomy performed after day seven. The outcomes of the groups were compared. RESULTS: In the early tracheotomy group, there was a statistically significant reduction in duration of mechanical ventilation (6 days vs. 19 days; p < 0.001, duration of intensive care unit stay (10 days vs. 28 days; p = 0.001, and incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (1 case vs. 44 cases; p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: Early tracheotomy has a significant positive impact on critically ill patients hospitalized at this intensive care unit. These results support the tendency to balance the risk-benefit analysis in favor of early tracheotomy.

  1. [Impact of early elective tracheotomy in critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Isabel Araújo Marques; Sousa, Vítor; Pinto, Luis Marques; Barros, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Tracheotomy is one of the most frequent surgical procedures performed in critically ill patients hospitalized at intensive care units. The ideal timing for a tracheotomy is still controversial, despite decades of experience. To determine the impact of performing early tracheotomies in critically ill patients on duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay, overall hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality. Retrospective and observational study of cases subjected to elective tracheotomy at one of the intensive care units of this hospital during five consecutive years. The patients were stratified into two groups: early tracheotomy group (tracheotomy performed from day one up to and including day seven of mechanical ventilation) and late tracheotomy group (tracheotomy performed after day seven). The outcomes of the groups were compared. In the early tracheotomy group, there was a statistically significant reduction in duration of mechanical ventilation (6 days vs. 19 days; p<0.001), duration of intensive care unit stay (10 days vs. 28 days; p=0.001), and incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (1 case vs. 44 cases; p=0.001). Early tracheotomy has a significant positive impact on critically ill patients hospitalized at this intensive care unit. These results support the tendency to balance the risk-benefit analysis in favor of early tracheotomy. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Gender disparity in the rate of partner abandonment in patients with serious medical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glantz, Michael J; Chamberlain, Marc C; Liu, Qin; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Edwards, Keith R; Van Horn, Alixis; Recht, Lawrence

    2009-11-15

    Life-threatening illness creates severe stress that may result in marital discord, separation, or divorce and may adversely impact treatment, quality of life, and survival. The few studies that are available to date have suggested that the risk of divorce is not higher in cancer patients, but to the authors' knowledge, no data exist to date that have examined the effect of gender on this rate. A total of 515 patients were prospectively identified as having either a malignant primary brain tumor (N = 214), a solid tumor with no nervous system involvement (N = 193), or multiple sclerosis (N = 108) who were married at the time of diagnosis. Basic demographic information and data regarding marital status were compiled. Patients were followed prospectively from enrollment until death or study termination. Women composed 53% of the patient population. Divorce or separation occurred at a rate similar to that reported in the literature (11.6%). There was, however, a greater than 6-fold increase in risk after diagnosis when the affected spouse was the woman (20.8% vs 2.9%; P divorce in each cohort. Marriage duration at the time of illness was also correlated with separation among brain tumor patients (P = .0001). Patients with brain tumors who were divorced or separated were more likely to be hospitalized, and less likely to participate in a clinical trial, receive multiple treatment regimens, complete cranial irradiation, or die at home (P divorce or separation occurred, quality of care and quality of life were adversely affected.

  3. Patients' and partners' perspectives of chronic illness and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checton, Maria G; Greene, Kathryn; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Venetis, Maria K

    2012-06-01

    are significant differences in (a) how patients and partners experience illness uncertainty and illness interference and (b) how appraisals of illness uncertainty and illness interference influence communication efficacy and health condition management. We discuss the findings and implications of the study.

  4. Echocardiographic Assessment of Preload Responsiveness in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Levitov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid challenges are considered the cornerstone of resuscitation in critically ill patients. However, clinical studies have demonstrated that only about 50% of hemodynamically unstable patients are volume responsive. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that excess fluid resuscitation is associated with increased mortality. It therefore becomes vital to assess a patient's fluid responsiveness prior to embarking on fluid loading. Static pressure (CVP, PAOP and echocardiographic (IVC diameter, LVEDA parameters fails to predict volume responsiveness. However, a number of dynamic echocardiographic parameters which are based on changes in vena-caval dimensions or cardiac function induce by positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising appear to be highly predictive of volume responsiveness.

  5. Perceived training needs of nurses working with mentally ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oranye, Nelson Ositadimma; Arumugam, Utharas; Ahmad, Nora; Arumugam, Marian E

    2016-10-01

    Introductio n: In Malaysia, nurses form a significant part of the clinical mental health team, but the current level of training in mental health results in suboptimal nursing care delivery. For this study 220 registered nurses and medical assistants working with the mentally ill completed a structured questionnaire. The purpose of this study was to explore perceived competence in mental healthcare and the training needs of nurses working with mentally ill patients in inpatient mental healthcare facilities. The skills perceived as important for practicing in mental health varied among the nurse participants. Post basic training in mental health was significantly related to perceived competence in patient mental state assessment (p=0.036), risk assessment for suicide (p=0.024), violence (p=0.044) and self-harm (p=0.013). There is little emphasis on psychosocial skills in current post basic mental health training in Malaysia.

  6. Nutritional risk assessment in critically ill cancer patients: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtenicht, Ana Valéria Gonçalves; Poziomyck, Aline Kirjner; Kabke, Geórgia Brum; Loss, Sérgio Henrique; Antoniazzi, Jorge Luiz; Steemburgo, Thais; Moreira, Luis Fernando

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review the main methods for nutritional risk assessment used in critically ill cancer patients and present the methods that better assess risks and predict relevant clinical outcomes in this group of patients, as well as to discuss the pros and cons of these methods according to the current literature. The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases by searching for the key words "nutritional risk assessment", "critically ill" and "cancer". Only 6 (17.7%) of 34 initially retrieved papers met the inclusion criteria and were selected for the review. The main outcomes of these studies were that resting energy expenditure was associated with undernourishment and overfeeding. The high Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment score was significantly associated with low food intake, weight loss and malnutrition. In terms of biochemical markers, higher levels of creatinine, albumin and urea were significantly associated with lower mortality. The worst survival was found for patients with worse Eastern Cooperative Oncologic Group - performance status, high Glasgow Prognostic Score, low albumin, high Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment score and high alkaline phosphatase levels. Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index values Nutritional Index score was associated with abnormal nutritional status in critically ill cancer patients. Among the reviewed studies that examined weight and body mass index alone, no significant clinical outcome was found. None of the methods reviewed helped to define risk among these patients. Therefore, assessment by a combination of weight loss and serum measurements, preferably in combination with other methods using scores such as Eastern Cooperative Oncologic Group - performance status, Glasgow Prognostic Score and Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment, is suggested given that their use is simple, feasible and useful in such

  7. Vitamin D deficiency in critically ill patients with traumatic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Roland N; Van Cleve, Jonathan R; Swanson, Joseph M; Maish, George O; Minard, Gayle; Croce, Martin A; Brown, Rex O

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D depletion has been associated with increased rate of infections, lengthened hospital stay, and worsened mortality for critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and variables associated with vitamin D deficiency in critically ill patients with severe traumatic injuries. Critically ill adult patients admitted to the trauma intensive care unit (ICU) between June 2013 and June 2014, referred to the nutrition support service for enteral or parenteral nutrition, and had a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH vitamin D) concentration determination were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were stratified as vitamin D sufficient, insufficient, deficient, or severely deficient based on a 25-OH vitamin D concentration of 30-80, 20-29.9, 13.1-19.9, and ≤13 ng/mL, respectively. One hundred and twenty-one patients out of 158 (76 %) patients were vitamin D deficient or severely deficient. Thirty-one patients (20 %) were insufficient and 6 (4 %) had a normal 25-OH vitamin D concentration. 25-OH vitamin D was determined 7.5 ± 5.1 days after ICU admission. African-Americans had a greater proportion of patients with deficiency or severe deficiency compared to other races (91 versus 64 %, P = 0.02). Penetrating gunshot or knife stab injury, African-American race, and obesity (elevated body mass index) were significantly associated with vitamin D deficiency or severe deficiency: OR 9.23 (1.13, 75.40), 4.0 (1.4, 11.58), and 1.12 (1.03, 1.23), P traumatic injuries exhibit vitamin D deficiency or severe deficiency. Penetrating injuries, African-American race, and obesity are significant risk factors for deficiency. Severity of injury, extent of inflammation (elevated C-reactive protein concentration), or hospital admission during the winter season did not significantly influence the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency.

  8. HETEROTOPIC OSSIFICATION IN CRITICAL ILL PATIENTS : A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Christakou; Maria Alimatiri; Alexsandros Kouvarakos; Emmanuel Papadopoulos; Irini Patsaki; Anastasia Kotanidou; Serafeim Nanas

    2013-01-01

    Background of the study:Heterotopic ossification is a bone formation in soft tissues around large joints. It is aserious complication affecting critical ill patients following central nervous system disorders, multiple injuries(e.g., neurological and orthopedic injuries), severe respiratory diseases (e.g., ARDS), and burns. It can havelong-lasting effects on patient’s recovery, functional status and quality of life. The present review examines theincidence, clinical symptoms, pathophysiology,...

  9. Trigger mechanisms of secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, Silke; Veltzke-Schlieker, Wilfried; Adler, Andreas; Schott, Eckart; Hetzer, Roland; Schaffartzik, Walter; Tryba, Michael; Neuhaus, Peter; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In recent years the development of secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients (SSC-CIP) has increasingly been perceived as a separate disease entity. About possible trigger mechanisms of SSC-CIP has been speculated, systematic investigations on this issue are still lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and influence of promoting factors. Methods Temporality, consistency and biological plausibility are essential prerequisites for causal...

  10. La calidad de vida en la fase terminal Life quality for the terminal patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Velásquez Acosta

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se define al paciente tem1inal desde los puntos de vista terapéutico y biológico y se explica cómo el concepto de calidad de vida se puede aplicar a dicho paciente para definir sus prioridades y las de su entorno familiar. Se hace énfasis en los aspectos psicosociales, que el modelo biomédico predominante no tiene en cuenta; de ellos depende en gran medida la calidad de vida; son ellos el económico, el emocional, el espiritual, el intelectual y las relaciones interpersonales, sociales y culturales.

    Terminally III patients are defined from the therapeutic and biologic points of view, and the applicability of the quality of life concept to these patients Is explained. Such quality depends to a great extent, on several psychosocial aspects of life that are not considered by the biomedical model of patient care predominant nowadays and they include the interpersonal, social, and cultural relationships as well as the economic, emotional, spiritual and intellectual ones.

  11. Health-seeking behaviour of mentally ill patients in Enugu, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-03-01

    Mar 1, 2009 ... 340 million people suffer from mental illnesses, with the majority living in the ... options employed by mentally ill patients and their reasons for doing so. .... of where to seek help involves both patients and relatives, health.

  12. Illness perception differences between Russian- and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Nadia; Heruti, Irit; Levy, Sigal; Lulav-Grinwald, Doron; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2014-03-01

    Illness perception influences health and illness behaviors. This study was designed to estimate illness perception differences between Russian-speaking and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients. Changes in illness perception associated with time spent in Israel among Russian-speaking patients were also evaluated. Additionally, we evaluated differences in illness perception of patients exposed to Chernobyl's consequences. A total of 144 oncology patients (77 Hebrew-speaking, 67 Russian-speaking) completed personal data questionnaires and The illness perception questionnaire revised, translated into Russian for this study. Significantly more Russian-speaking oncology patients perceived their illness as chronic and having negative consequences on life (p speaking oncology patients tend to have a more negative perception of cancer compared to Hebrew-speaking patients. Time spent in Israel may create more positive perceptions of cancer among these patients. No illness perception differences were found concerning Chernobyl consequences.

  13. Recent evidence on early mobilization in critical-Ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuest, Kristina; Schaller, Stefan J

    2018-01-17

    To examine the benefits of early mobilization and summarize the results of most recent clinical studies examining early mobilization in critically ill patients followed by a presentation of recent developments in the field. Early mobilization of ICU patients, defined as mobilization within 72 h of ICU admission, is still uncommon. In medical and surgical critically ill patients, mobilization is well tolerated even in intubated patients. In neurocritical care, evidence to support early mobilization is either lacking (aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage), or the results are inconsistent (e.g. stroke). Successful implementation of early mobilization requires a cultural change; preferably based on an interprofessional approach with clearly defined responsibilities and including a mobilization scoring system. Although the evidence for the majority of the technical tools is still limited, the use of a bed cycle ergometer and a treadmill with strap system has been promising in smaller trials. Early mobilization is well tolerated and feasible, resulting in improved outcomes in surgical and medical ICU patients. Implementation of early mobilization can be challenging and may need a cultural change anchored in an interprofessional approach and integrated in a patient-centered bundle. Scoring systems should be integrated to define daily goals and used to verify patients' achievements or identify barriers immediately.

  14. Management of Atrial Fibrillation in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Arrigo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is common in ICU patients and is associated with a two- to fivefold increase in mortality. This paper provides a reappraisal of the management of AF with a special focus on critically ill patients with haemodynamic instability. AF can cause hypotension and heart failure with subsequent organ dysfunction. The underlying mechanisms are the loss of atrial contraction and the high ventricular rate. In unstable patients, sinus rhythm must be rapidly restored by synchronised electrical cardioversion (ECV. If pharmacological treatment is indicated, clinicians can choose between the rate control and the rhythm control strategy. The optimal substance should be selected depending on its potential adverse effects. A beta-1 antagonist with a very short half-life (e.g., esmolol is an advantage for ICU patients because the effect of beta-blockade on cardiovascular stability is unpredictable in those patients. Amiodarone is commonly used in the ICU setting but has potentially severe cardiac and noncardiac side effects. Digoxin controls the ventricular response at rest, but its benefit decreases in the presence of adrenergic stress. Vernakalant converts new-onset AF to sinus rhythm in approximately 50% of patients, but data on its efficacy and safety in critically ill patients are lacking.

  15. Increased serum bicarbonate in critically ill patients: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libório, Alexandre Braga; Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Leite, Tacyano Tavares; de Melo Bezerra, Candice Torres; de Faria, Evandro Rodrigues; Kellum, John A

    2015-03-01

    Although metabolic alkalosis is a common occurrence, no study has evaluated its prevalence, associated factors or outcomes in critically ill patients. This is a retrospective study from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II database. From 23,529 adult patient records, 18,982 patients met the inclusion criteria. Serum bicarbonate levels demonstrated a U-shaped association with mortality with knots at 25 and 30 mEq/l. Of the total included patients, 5,565 (29.3 %) had at least one serum bicarbonate level measurement >30 mEq/l. The majority were exposed to multiple factors that are classically associated with metabolic alkalosis (mainly diuretic use, hypernatremia, hypokalemia and high gastric output). Patients with increased serum bicarbonate exhibited increased ICU LOS, more days on mechanical ventilation and higher hospital mortality. After multivariate adjustment, each 5-mEq/l increment in the serum bicarbonate level above 30 mEq/l was associated with an odds ratio of 1.21 for hospital mortality. The association between increased serum bicarbonate levels and mortality occurs independently of its possible etiologies. An increased serum bicarbonate level is common in critically ill patients; this can be attributed to multiple factors in the majority of cases, and its presence and duration negatively influence patient outcomes.

  16. Total and ionized serum magnesium in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuela, Maria Paz; Guerra, Manuel; Añón, José M; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Zapatero, María Dolores; García-Jalón, Angel; Celaya, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    To assess the alterations in total serum magnesium (tsMg) and ionized serum magnesium (Mg(2+)) and their association with prognosis in critically ill patients. Prospective, cohort study in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a university teaching hospital. Adult patients admitted to the ICU without previous factors influencing magnesium homeostasis were included during a 6-month period. One hundred forty four patients were included. Mean age was 60.6+/-15.4 years; mean APACHE II score was 12.6+/-6.9. Blood samples were collected in the first 24 h after ICU admission and again on the second, third, and last days of stay in the ICU. At ICU admission 52.5% had total hypomagnesemia and 13.5% total hypermagnesemia; with respect to the Mg(2+) 9.7% showed ionized hypomagnesemia and 23.6% ionized hypermagnesemia. Patients who developed ionized hypermagnesemia had higher mortality than patients without ionized hypermagnesemia development (P=0.04). A moderate correlation between tsMg and Mg(2+) concentrations was found; however, a number of patients with total hypomagnesemia (69-85% during the study) had ionized normomagnesemia. The measure of agreement between tsMg and Mg(2+) levels was poor. Magnesium alterations are frequently found in critically ill patients. The usually determined tsMg levels are not a reflection of Mg(2+) levels. Development of ionized hypermagnesemia is associated with prognosis.

  17. Management of Acute Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Deepali; Endicott, Jeffrey; Burry, Lisa; Ramos, Liz; Yeung, Siu Yan Amy; Devabhakthuni, Sandeep; Chan, Claire; Tobia, Anthony; Bulloch, Marilyn N

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 16-31% of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) have an alcohol use disorder and are at risk for developing alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). Patients admitted to the ICU with AWS have an increased hospital and ICU length of stay, longer duration of mechanical ventilation, higher costs, and increased mortality compared with those admitted without an alcohol-related disorder. Despite the high prevalence of AWS among ICU patients, no guidelines for the recognition or management of AWS or delirium tremens in the critically ill currently exist, leading to tremendous variability in clinical practice. Goals of care should include immediate management of dehydration, nutritional deficits, and electrolyte derangements; relief of withdrawal symptoms; prevention of progression of symptoms; and treatment of comorbid illnesses. Symptom-triggered treatment of AWS with γ-aminobutyric acid receptor agonists is the cornerstone of therapy. Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are most studied and are often the preferred first-line agents due to their efficacy and safety profile. However, controversy still exists as to who should receive treatment, how to administer BZDs, and which BZD to use. Although most patients with AWS respond to usual doses of BZDs, ICU clinicians are challenged with managing BZD-resistant patients. Recent literature has shown that using an early multimodal approach to managing BZD-resistant patients appears beneficial in rapidly improving symptoms. This review highlights the results of recent promising studies published between 2011 and 2015 evaluating adjunctive therapies for BZD-resistant alcohol withdrawal such as antiepileptics, baclofen, dexmedetomidine, ethanol, ketamine, phenobarbital, propofol, and ketamine. We provide guidance on the places in therapy for select agents for management of critically ill patients in the presence of AWS. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  18. Ethical dilemmas faced by hospice nurses when administering palliative sedation to patients with terminal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Kay; Plaskota, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Palliative sedation is a method of symptom management frequently used in hospices to treat uncontrolled symptoms at the end of life. There is a substantial body of literature on this subject; however, there has been little research into the experiences of hospice nurses when administering palliative sedation in an attempt to manage the terminal restlessness experienced by cancer patients. Semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of seven hospice nurses who had cared for at least one patient who had undergone palliative sedation within the past year in a hospice in the south of England in the United Kingdom. A phenomenological approach and Colaizzi's stages of analysis were employed to develop themes from the data. Facilitating a "peaceful death" was the primary goal of the nurses, where through the administration of palliative sedation they sought to enable and support patients to be "comfortable," "relaxed," and "calm" at the terminal stage of their illness. Ethical dilemmas related to decision making were a factor in achieving this. These were: medication decisions, "juggling the drugs," "causing the death," sedating young people, the family "requesting" sedation, and believing that hospice is a place where death is hastened. Hospice nurses in the U.K. frequently encounter ethical and emotional dilemmas when administering palliative sedation. Making such decisions about using palliative sedation causes general discomfort for them. Undertaking this aspect of care requires confidence and competence on the part of nurses, and working within a supportive hospice team is of fundamental importance in supporting this practice.

  19. Semiology of subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Bogdan; Beniczky, Simona Alexandra; Demény, Helga; Beniczky, Sándor

    2017-05-01

    to investigate the semiology of subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients, with- versus without nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). 60 consecutive comatose patients, in whom subtle motor phenomena were observed in the intensive care unit (ICU), were analysed prospectively. The semiology of the subtle phenomena was described from video-recordings, blinded to all other data. For each patient, the type, location and occurrence-pattern/duration were described. EEGs recorded in the ICU were classified using the Salzburg criteria for NCSE. only 23% (14/60) of the patients had NCSE confirmed by EEG. None of the semiological features could distinguish between patients with NCSE and those without. In both groups, the following phenomena were most common: discrete myoclonic muscle twitching and discrete tonic muscle activation. Besides these, automatisms and eye deviation were observed in both groups. subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients can raise the suspicion of NCSE. Nevertheless, EEG is needed to confirm the diagnosis, since none of the semiological features are specific. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dissimilary in patients' and spouses' representations of chronic illness: exploration of relations to patient adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.; Ridder, D. de; Bensing, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, the illness representations of patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (n=49) and Addison's Disease (n=52) and those of their spouses were compared. Couples generally held similar views with regard to the dimensions of illness identity and cause but disagreed

  1. Management Issues in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients with Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Omar Z; Burd, Randall S

    2017-10-01

    The management of critically ill pediatric patients with trauma poses many challenges because of the infrequency and diversity of severe injuries and a paucity of high-level evidence to guide care for these uncommon events. This article discusses recent recommendations for early resuscitation and blood component therapy for hypovolemic pediatric patients with trauma. It also highlights the specific types of injuries that lead to severe injury in children and presents challenges related to their management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality.

  3. Mental Representations of Illness in Patients with Gestational Trophoblastic Disease: How Do Patients Perceive Their Condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mattei, Valentina E; Carnelli, Letizia; Mazzetti, Martina; Bernardi, Martina; Di Pierro, Rossella; Bergamini, Alice; Mangili, Giorgia; Candiani, Massimo; Sarno, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Gestational Trophoblastic Disease comprises a group of benign and malignant disorders that derive from the placenta. Using Leventhal's Common-Sense Model as a theoretical framework, this paper examines illness perception in women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Thirty-one women diagnosed with Gestational Trophoblastic Disease in a hospital in Italy were asked to complete the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised to measure the following: illness Identity, illness opinions and causes of Gestational Trophoblastic Disease. High mean scores were observed in the Emotional representations and Treatment control subscales. A significant difference emerged between hydatidiform mole patients and those with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia on the Identity subscale. A significant correlation emerged between "time since diagnosis" and the Treatment control subscale. This study is the first to investigate illness perception in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease. From a clinical perspective the results highlight the need for multidisciplinary support programs to promote a more realistic illness perception.

  4. Values important to terminally ill African American older adults in receiving hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hyunjin

    2014-01-01

    While racial disparity in the use of hospice care by older African Americans is widely acknowledged, little is known about the values that they consider as important in receiving health care services along with direct experiences with having these values respected by hospice care providers. Using individual, face-to-face interviews, data were collected directly from 28 African American hospice patients about their experiences in hospice care. Content analysis was used to identify and categorize themes from multiple readings of the qualitative data. Resulting themes included: dying at home, open communications, independent decision-making, autonomy in daily life, unwillingness to be a burden, and relationships. Through the initial assessment, value preferences can be explored and then shared with hospice team members to ensure that services are provided in such a way that their values and preferences are respected.

  5. Ethical challenges in the care of patients with serious illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, P; Portenoy, R K

    2001-06-01

    The approach to management of patients with advanced disease and serious illness has been strongly influenced by advances in science and technology, the increasing role of ethics in clinical practice, and the recognition of new rights and social changes. At the present time, decision making is modulated by ethical and legal considerations. One of the challenges of clinical practice is to maintain the delicate balance between the technical aspects and the humanistic aspects of care. For the resolution of this challenge, this article proposes an ethical and legal framework that considers the goals of care and respects the basic values of autonomy, beneficence, and justice. Ethical and legal principles complement sound medical practice but should never replace it. At all times, clarification of the medical situation, good communication, and information about state of the art treatment proposals are essential. In the context of advanced illness, the most prominent issues relate to decision making, justice, and research.

  6. Cuando los niños se van: aproximación humanizada al niño en la fase terminal Humanized approach to terminally - ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberio Alvarez Echeverri

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available

    En el presente artículo se Identifican algunos aspectos históricos, culturales y sociales relacionados con la muerte del niño; se explican los diferentes procesos que se dan en quienes sufren una enfermedad Incurable y van hacia la muerte; se discute la estrategia de manejo del peque fío paciente y la ayuda a los padres, hermanos y familiares afligidos. Finalmente, se dan pautas generales para motivar a los profesionales de la salud, a los maestros ya los padres de familia a que dediquen tiempo y estudio a comprender el proceso de fallecimiento del niño ya lograr la ayuda humanitaria que requiere en la fase terminal.

    Several historic cultural and social aspects related to children’s death are identified in this article. The different processes that take place in the person with an irreversible disease are explained. Strategies are discussed for the management of the small patient and for providing help and support to the afflicted parents sibling and other relatives. General guidelines are proposed to motivate parents and teachers to devote time and study to comprehend the process of a child’s death and to give the humanitarian aid requested in the terminal phase.

  7. The experience of family caregivers caring for a terminal patient at home: A research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, J Martín; Olano-Lizarraga, M; Saracíbar-Razquin, M

    2016-12-01

    One of the key aspects of the care of terminal patients is care delivered in their own home. Increasingly, the process of dying is moving from hospitals to homes. Although this process is directly related to the support of the social health environment, the involvement of family caregivers is essential. Given the impact that caring for a terminally ill family member has on people's lives, it is necessary to comprehend their personal experience in a holistic way. To reveal the experience of family caregivers who are caring for a terminal patient in their home. A qualitative systematic review of articles published from 2000 to 2015 was conducted between March and September of 2015. The following databases were consulted: CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, SciELO and Dialnet. After applying the selection criteria, 12 relevant studies were identified. Subsequently, two of the reviewers jointly performed a qualitative content analysis of them. The analysis permitted the caregivers' experiences to be grouped into five themes: 1) Learning the diagnosis: uncertainty about the future and the prospects of death; 2) Feeling the physical and emotional burden of care; 3) Experiencing a limited life; 4) Redefining the relationship with the person being cared for; and 5) Valuing the importance of the support of the environment. This review shows that caring for a family member with advanced illness in the home has a great impact on the personal realm of the caregiver and in the relationship he or she maintains with the ill family member. Being involved in the process of dying translates into a prodigious physical and psychological effort, together with a substantial limitation on the normal development of their own life. Additionally, the caregiver must face and establish a new relationship with the family member, in accordance with the new ethos, without the help of a formal structure providing the necessary support. These results may help to focus attention on family

  8. The Phosphate Levels of Critically ill Patients with Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Turan İnal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The incidence of hypophosphatemia is higher in critically ill patients and prolonged the length of ICU stay and duration of mechanical ventilation. This study evaluated the prognostic value of phosphate levels in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: All patients admitted to the general and surgical intensive care unit (ICU of Trakya University Medical Faculty, with respiratory failure during 1 year period (from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2009, were retrospectively enrolled. The phosphate levels, age, gender, length of ICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, APACHE II scores, medical drug usage and prognosis were recorded. Hypophosphataemia was defined as a level under 2.5 mg/dL and normophosphatemia was defined as a level between 2.5-4.7 mg/dL. Results: 139 patients were retrospectively enrolled into the study, of these, 41% had hypophosphataemia. There was no statistically significant difference in age, gender and APACHE II scores. The length of ICU stay was 20.16±16.31 days in hypophosphatemic patients and 12.62±12.43 days in normophosphatemic patients (p<0.05. The duration of mechanical ventilation was 17.54±16.27 days in hypophosphatemic patients and 9.94±11.55 days in normophosphatemic patients (p<0.05. The usage of catecholamines, beta adrenergic receptor agonists, diuretics and glucocorticoids were higher in hypophosphatemic patients (p<0.05. Conclusion: The duration of mechanical ventilation and the length of ICU stay was prolonged in hypophosphatemic patients with respiratory failure. We suggested to follow the phosphate levels tightly for early diagnosis and treatment of phosphate deficiency. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2011; 9: 19-22

  9. Illness uncertainty in breast cancer patients: validation of the 5-item short form of the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Kari Britt; Aas, Turid; Lode, Kirsten; Gjerde, Jennifer; Lien, Ernst; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Lash, Timothy L; Søiland, Håvard; Lind, Ragna

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have shown that uncertainty about disease and fear of disease progression affects psychosocial adjustment and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to validate a Norwegian short version of the "The Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale" (SF-MUIS) and to examine the impact of uncertainty in illness in breast cancer patients. 209 patients in breast cancer treatment completed questionnaires for SF-MUIS, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-ES), and eight questions concerning quality of the patient information provided (IQP). Relationship between scores on uncertainty in illness and anxiety, depression, social support, emotional well-being, the quality of patient information provided, and age were studied by multiple regression analyses. Ordinal coefficient alpha for the Norwegian version of SF-MUIS was 0.70. Scores on SF-MUIS correlated significantly with scores on HADS (P = 0.001), FACT-ES (P = 0.001), and IQP (P = 0.001) indicating good convergent validity. The patients reported a moderate degree of uncertainty in illness. However, those who had been diagnosed with breast cancer for a year, reported higher scores than those newly diagnosed (P=illness uncertainty (P=uncertainty in breast cancer patients, who reported a moderate degree of uncertainty in illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Concepts and Definitions for “Actively Dying,” “End of Life,” “Terminally Ill,” “Terminal Care,” and “Transition of Care”: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Nooruddin, Zohra; Didwaniya, Neha; Dev, Rony; De La Cruz, Maxine; Kim, Sun Hyun; Kwon, Jung Hye; Hutchins, Ronald; Liem, Christiana; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Context The terms “actively dying,” “end of life,” “terminally ill,” “terminal care,” and “transition of care” are commonly used but rarely and inconsistently defined. Objectives We conducted a systematic review to examine the concepts and definitions for these terms. Methods We searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, and CINAHL for published peer-reviewed articles from 1948 to 2012 that conceptualized, defined, or examined these terms. Two researchers independently reviewed each citation for inclusion and then extracted the concepts/definitions when available. We also searched 10 dictionaries, four palliative care textbooks, and 13 organization Web sites, including the U.S. Federal Code. Results One of 16, three of 134, three of 44, two of 93, and four of 17 articles defined or conceptualized actively dying, end of life, terminally ill, terminal care, and transition of care, respectively. Actively dying was defined as “hours or days of survival.” We identified two key defining features for end of life, terminally ill, and terminal care: life-limiting disease with irreversible decline and expected survival in terms of months or less. Transition of care was discussed in relation to changes in 1) place of care (e.g., hospital to home), 2) level of professions providing the care (e.g., acute care to hospice), and 3) goals of care (e.g., curative to palliative). Definitions for these five terms were rarely found in dictionaries, textbooks, and organizational Web sites. However, when available, the definitions were generally consistent with the concepts discussed previously. Conclusion We identified unifying concepts for five commonly used terms in palliative care and developed a preliminary conceptual framework toward building standardized definitions. PMID:23796586

  11. Feeding the critically ill obese patient: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secombe, Paul; Harley, Simon; Chapman, Marianne; Aromataris, Edoardo

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to identify effective enteral nutritional regimens targeting protein and calorie delivery for the critically ill obese patient on morbidity and mortality.More specifically, the review question is:In the critically ill obese patient, what is the optimal enteral protein and calorie target that improves mortality and morbidity? The World Health Organization (WHO) defines obesity as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair health, or, empirically, as a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m. Twenty-eight percent of the Australian population is obese with the prevalence rising to 44% in rural areas, and there is evidence that rates of obesity are increasing. The prevalence of obese patients in intensive care largely mirrors that of the general population. There is concern, however, that this may also be rising. A recently published multi-center nutritional study of critically ill patients reported a mean BMI of 29 in their sample, suggesting that just under 50% of their intensive care population is obese. It is inevitable, therefore, that the intensivist will care for the critically ill obese patient.Managing the critically ill obese patient is challenging, not least due to the co-morbid diseases frequently associated with obesity, including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidaemia, sleep disordered breathing and respiratory insufficiency, hepatic steatohepatitis, chronic kidney disease and hypertension. There is also evidence that metabolic processes differ in the obese patient, particularly those with underlying insulin resistance, itself a marker of the metabolic syndrome, which may predispose to futile cycling, altered fuel utilization and protein catabolism. These issues are compounded by altered drug pharmacokinetics, and the additional logistical issues associated with prophylactic, therapeutic and diagnostic interventions.It is entirely plausible that the altered metabolic processes observed in the obese

  12. Hypoglycemia and risk of death in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finfer, Simon; Liu, Bette; Chittock, Dean R; Norton, Robyn; Myburgh, John A; McArthur, Colin; Mitchell, Imogen; Foster, Denise; Dhingra, Vinay; Henderson, William R; Ronco, Juan J; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cook, Deborah; McDonald, Ellen; Dodek, Peter; Hébert, Paul C; Heyland, Daren K; Robinson, Bruce G

    2012-09-20

    Whether hypoglycemia leads to death in critically ill patients is unclear. We examined the associations between moderate and severe hypoglycemia (blood glucose, 41 to 70 mg per deciliter [2.3 to 3.9 mmol per liter] and ≤40 mg per deciliter [2.2 mmol per liter], respectively) and death among 6026 critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs). Patients were randomly assigned to intensive or conventional glucose control. We used Cox regression analysis with adjustment for treatment assignment and for baseline and postrandomization covariates. Follow-up data were available for 6026 patients: 2714 (45.0%) had moderate hypoglycemia, 2237 of whom (82.4%) were in the intensive-control group (i.e., 74.2% of the 3013 patients in the group), and 223 patients (3.7%) had severe hypoglycemia, 208 of whom (93.3%) were in the intensive-control group (i.e., 6.9% of the patients in this group). Of the 3089 patients who did not have hypoglycemia, 726 (23.5%) died, as compared with 774 of the 2714 with moderate hypoglycemia (28.5%) and 79 of the 223 with severe hypoglycemia (35.4%). The adjusted hazard ratios for death among patients with moderate or severe hypoglycemia, as compared with those without hypoglycemia, were 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 1.62; P1 day vs. 1 day, P=0.01), those who died from distributive (vasodilated) shock (Pdistributive shock. However, these data cannot prove a causal relationship. (Funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and others; NICE-SUGAR ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00220987.).

  13. 807: melatonin secretion pattern in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Holst, René; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    -ICU assessment in the Neuroscience ICU to increase screening rates and documentation of CAM-ICU screenings in the adult ICUs was conducted at a Midwestern, university affiliated 640-bed medical center. A multi-disciplinary committee met monthly to review implementation steps and educational in-services were...... for the ICU (CAM-ICU) have not been validated for use in neurocritically ill patients. Baseline daily screening rates in four adult ICUs at a single center identified a need to improve delirium assessments for all ICU patients, including Neuroscience ICU patients. Methods: A pilot project implementing CAM...... provided to ICU staff to reinforce correct use and documentation of the CAM-ICU. A goal of 80% was set for twice daily assessments. Results: During a 6 month period, improvements were seen in the screening of over 500 patients in all our ICUs, with the Neuroscience ICU increasing documented assessments...

  14. Hospice assistance offered to the healthy siblings of a terminally ill child [Hospicyjne wsparcie zdrowego rodzeństwa terminalnie chorego dziecka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz GODAWA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A terminally ill child is the focus of attention of its close ones. The family wants to minimise the child’s suffering. Support is also offered by helping organisations. The concentration on the ill child can lead to the situation where the needs of the healthy siblings are neglected. „The total pain” of the ill child includes its family members, therefore, supporting the ill child’s healthy siblings is one of the main goals of children’s hospices. Hospice assistance is based on a family systems theory so the scope of hospice activities is very wide. Although helping the ill child is the priority, the hospices also protect the family from the destructive influence of illness. One of the forms of support offered to the healthy siblings has a psycho-pedagogical dimension. It aims at minimising the negative effects of the child’s illness and helping the siblings to go back to normal life after the child’s death. The interdisciplinary nature of hospice assistance is the chance for successful implementation of these assumptions.

  15. Isolation and Suffering Related to Serious and Terminal Illness: Metaphors and Lessons From Albert Camus' Novel, The Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffuor, Akosua N; Payne, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Health care providers have much to learn from Albert Camus' great novel, The Plague. The Plague tells the story of a bubonic plague epidemic through the lens of doctor-narrator Rieux. In addition to Rieux, this essay also focuses on the perspective of Father Paneloux, a Jesuit priest, who provides important religious commentary on the epidemic, before falling victim to it and dying. Camus' masterful engagement of the metaphor of isolation and its profound impact on suffering emphasizes the important role of community and spiritual perspectives of patients and providers in coping with serious illness, death, and dying. The Plague is relevant today, particularly given the challenges of distancing, alienation, and isolation imposed by not only disease but also by technology and clinical and administrative practices that have unintended consequences of incentivizing separation between patient and healer, thus engendering greater stress and suffering in both. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutritional risk assessment in critically ill cancer patients: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtenicht, Ana Valéria Gonçalves; Poziomyck, Aline Kirjner; Kabke, Geórgia Brum; Loss, Sérgio Henrique; Antoniazzi, Jorge Luiz; Steemburgo, Thais; Moreira, Luis Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the main methods for nutritional risk assessment used in critically ill cancer patients and present the methods that better assess risks and predict relevant clinical outcomes in this group of patients, as well as to discuss the pros and cons of these methods according to the current literature. Methods The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases by searching for the key words “nutritional risk assessment”, “critically ill” and “cancer”. Results Only 6 (17.7%) of 34 initially retrieved papers met the inclusion criteria and were selected for the review. The main outcomes of these studies were that resting energy expenditure was associated with undernourishment and overfeeding. The high Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment score was significantly associated with low food intake, weight loss and malnutrition. In terms of biochemical markers, higher levels of creatinine, albumin and urea were significantly associated with lower mortality. The worst survival was found for patients with worse Eastern Cooperative Oncologic Group - performance status, high Glasgow Prognostic Score, low albumin, high Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment score and high alkaline phosphatase levels. Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index values Nutritional Index score was associated with abnormal nutritional status in critically ill cancer patients. Among the reviewed studies that examined weight and body mass index alone, no significant clinical outcome was found. Conclusion None of the methods reviewed helped to define risk among these patients. Therefore, assessment by a combination of weight loss and serum measurements, preferably in combination with other methods using scores such as Eastern Cooperative Oncologic Group - performance status, Glasgow Prognostic Score and Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment, is suggested given that

  17. Hyperglycemia has a stronger relation trauma patients than in other critically with outcome in ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzang, M; Nijboer, JMM; van der Horst, ICC; Zijlstra, F; ten Duis, HJ; Nijsten, MWN

    Background. Acute hyperglycemia is associated with adverse outcome in critically ill patients. Glucose control with insulin improves outcome in surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patients, but the effect in trauma patients is unknown. We investigated hyperglycemia and outcome in SICU patients with

  18. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-11-04

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  19. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  20. Clostridium Difficile and Fecal Microbial Transplant in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvin Sanaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Critically-ill patients constitute majority of the patients hospitalized in ICU wards (1, 2. This group of patients demands special considerations and measures of care (3-6. Clostridium difficile infection causes dangerous, painful and persistent diarrhea in critically ill patients. Its treatment consists of enteral metronidazol or vancomycin in combination with IV antibiotics cessation. Recently, probiotics have been considered as an alternative treatment for pseudomembranous colitis. In 1958, fecal microbial transplant was first described from healthy individuals to sick patients to displace pathogenic microbes from the intestine by re-establishing a healthy microbial community. Since then, it has gained value as “express stool treatment” or currently known as “fecal transplant”. Last year, FDA classified stool as drug, which typically requires an Investigational New Drug application (IND. However, in July 2013, the FDA issued guidance stating that it would exercise enforcement discretion for physicians administering FMT to treat patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Accordingly, considering stool as a tissue product or giving it its own classification, as FDA approved for blood, would keep patients safe, ensure broad access and facilitate research (7. It should be taken into consideration that some complications might accompany fecal microbial transplant such as making patients susceptible for conditions like obesity or autoimmune disorders. Safety and quality assurance starts from pre-enrollment donor screening, donor testing (17 serological and stool-based assays, donor monitoring and process control. The composition of the bacterial community has been shown to change when stored at -80oC compared to the samples stored at -20oC and it has been recommended to store the samples of intestinal content at -20oC before use for bacterial community analysis, instead of the current practice at -80oC (7, 8. However, if

  1. [Concept analysis of preparatory grief in terminal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung-Sook; Kim, Myoung-Soo; Jung, Jung-Sim; Choi, Nam-Yeoun; Yu, Sung-Mi; Kim, Young-Soon; Ko, Young-Hee

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to conceptualize and clarify a concept of "preparatory grief" in terminal cancer patients. A hybrid model of concept development was applied to develop a concept of preparatory grief, which included a field study carried out in Busan, Korea. Participants of this study were 8 cancer patients. On the basis of our literature, research and clinical experience, the concept of preparatory grief emerged as a complex phenomenon playing an important role in five areas; physical, emotional, interpersonal, religious, and transcendental dimensions. Two new attributes were defined through a field phase; trust of the post-mortal world and a serene state of mind. Indicators reflected attitudes of sadness, worry, regret, capability to adapt and hope. The results of preparatory grief were loss of energy and interest, emotional chaos, contemplation, taciturnity and restoration. Differentiating among preparatory grief and other symptoms in cancer patients is essential because of therapeutic implications. Understanding preparatory grief is necessary in order to manage cancer patients for promoting quality of life so that its application may have a positive impact on the patient's life.

  2. Illness trajectories in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: How illness progression is related to life narratives and interpersonal relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolletta, Sabrina; Gammino, Giorgia Rosamaria; Palmieri, Arianna

    2017-12-01

    To identify illness trajectories in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by analysing personal, social and functional dimensions related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis progression. Previous studies have considered some psychological distinct variables that may moderate illness progression, but no research has combined an extensive qualitative understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients' psychological characteristics and illness progression. A mixed-methods approach was used to combine quantitative and qualitative measures. Illness progression was assessed through a longitudinal design. Eighteen patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis attending a Neurology Department in northern Italy participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews to explore personal experience, and dependency grids to assess the distribution of dependency; ALSFRS-R and neuropsychological screening were, respectively, used to measure physical and cognitive impairment. To assess the progression of the disease, ALSFRS-R was re-administered after 8 months and mortality rate was considered. Data were analysed using the grounded theory approach. Illness progression changed according to the perception of the disease, the trust placed in medical care, self-construction and the distribution of dependency. Based on these categories, cases that had similar experiences were grouped, and four illness trajectories were identified: aggressiveness, threat, constriction and guilt. The findings suggest that it is possible to identify different illness trajectories in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Personalised intervention strategies may be construed based on the different trajectories identified. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Update in the management of critically ill burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, J A; Amaya-Villar, R

    2016-01-01

    The management of critically ill burn patients is challenging. These patients have to be managed in specialized centers, where the expertise of physicians and nursing personnel guarantees the best treatment. Mortality of burn patients has improved over the past decades due to a better understanding of burn shock pathophysiology, optimal surgical management, infection control and nutritional support. Indeed, a more aggressive resuscitation, early excision and grafting, the judicious use of topical antibiotics, and the provision of an adequate calorie and protein intake are key to attain best survival results. General advances in critical care have also to be implemented, including protective ventilation, glycemic control, selective decontamination of the digestive tract, and implementation of sedation protocols. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  4. An assessment tool for acutely ill medical patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Margaret

    2012-01-31

    This article reports the implementation and impact of a standardized systematic evidence-based predictive score for the initial assessment of acutely ill medical patients. The Simple Clinical Score (SCS) was introduced in the A&E department and the medical floor of the authors\\' hospital between June 2007 and July 2008. The SCS was well received by the staff - 67% felt it greatly improved patient assessment and was very valuable for ensuring appropriate placement of the patient after admission and improved the quality of care. This article describes the change process, the pilot evaluation and the training programme undertaken during the implementation of the SCS. It is hoped that this experience will be of value to other project teams who are undertaking similar initiatives.

  5. An assessment tool for acutely ill medical patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Margaret

    2012-01-26

    This article reports the implementation and impact of a standardized systematic evidence-based predictive score for the initial assessment of acutely ill medical patients. The Simple Clinical Score (SCS) was introduced in the A&E department and the medical floor of the authors\\' hospital between June 2007 and July 2008. The SCS was well received by the staff - 67% felt it greatly improved patient assessment and was very valuable for ensuring appropriate placement of the patient after admission and improved the quality of care. This article describes the change process, the pilot evaluation and the training programme undertaken during the implementation of the SCS. It is hoped that this experience will be of value to other project teams who are undertaking similar initiatives.

  6. The role of patients' illness representations in coping and functioning with Addison's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between illness representations, coping behaviour and adaptive outcome in patients with Addison's disease (AD). Design: Cross-sectional. Following Leventhal's self-regulation model (Leventhal, Meyer & Nerenz, 1980), it was hypothesized that illness

  7. Relationship between uncertainty in illness, mood state and coping style in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-ye Yang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Both uncertainty in illness and mood state were related to coping style. These data suggest that nurses should be trained to offer appropriate guidance to help decrease patients' uncertainty in illness and relieve their negative emotions.

  8. Changing Landscape of Dysglycemia Management in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvin Sanaie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available At present, the body of evidence for blood glucose management in critically ill adults and children is not available beyond the point of proof of efficacy. Intensive blood glucose management did not pass the milestones of effectiveness and efficiency, because the multicenter trials could not confirm the results of the single-center studies. A recent review on the glucose management in critically ill adults and children suggests that use of any drug other than insulin for glucose control in intensive care unit is not recommended (1. As we know, the reason for hyperglycemia is increasing counterregulatory hormones and insulin resistance in the target organs. Thus, in some patients who require high doses of insulin for maintenance of normoglycemia, some concerns such as hypoglycemia could be expected. Additionally, insulin therapy can be associated with hypokalemia and hypomagnesaemia which both promote insulin resistance and higher blood glucose levels. Consequently, administration of further insulin is unavoidable which in turn initiates a vicious cycle with adverse outcomes. One of therapeutic options in these situations is using insulin sensitizing agents as an adjunct therapy for glycemic control in critically ill patients. Different studies have proven that metformin, similar to insulin, is of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, improves lipid profile, decreases nursing workload and lowers the incidence of adverse effects related to high-dose insulin therapy without increased risk of lactic acidosis and hypoglycemia (2-4. Therefore, in patients with refractoriness to insulin who require higher doses of insulin, we might consider metformin as a safe adjunct therapy to reach targeted glucose levels. Another important concern about glucose control in critically ill patients is accuracy of glucose measurement in these patients.  The gold standard for blood glucose measurement is performed in a central hospital laboratory with

  9. Determinants of complicated grief in caregivers who cared for terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Wen; Huang, Chia-Tsuan; Yin, Shao-Min; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Chien, Ching-Hsin; Chuang, Hung-Yi

    2010-10-01

    There is little research on determinants and the grief that caregivers experience after their relatives die of cancer. This study evaluated factors which influence complicated grief among caregivers who cared for patients who died of cancer in Taiwan. This prospective study recruited 668 caregivers who cared for terminally ill cancer patients in the hospice ward or who received shared-care consultation. Caregivers were interviewed on the telephone an average 8.9 months after the cancer patients passed away. The Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG), modified for use in a Chinese population, was used to assess the grief status of caregivers. ICG >25 was defined as complicated grief. Our study found that female gender (odds ratio (OR), 2.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.75-2.82), spouse relationship (OR, 1.20; 1.01-1.40), parents-children relationship (OR, 1.70; 1.11-2.31), lack of religious belief (OR, 1.47; 1.19-1.75), unavailable family support (OR, 1.42; 1.03-1.83), and history of mood co-morbidity (OR, 1.41; 1.02-1.83) were risk factors that would predispose towards complicated grief; whereas, longer duration of caring (months, OR, 0.79; 0.69-0.91), medical disease history in the carer (OR, 0.77; 0.57-0.99), and patients being cared for on the hospice ward (OR, 0.60; 0.44-0.77) were factors that would mitigate against complicated grief. These results suggest that clinical professionals who care for terminal cancer patients and their caregivers should pay particular attention to caregivers with these predisposing factors.

  10. Changes in serum cortisol with age in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Elizabeth; Zhu, Jay; Belzberg, Howard

    2002-01-01

    Mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) rises with age, a high basal serum cortisol and a small response to adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) stimulation. Even slight impairment of the adrenal response during severe illness can be lethal. To determine if age is associated with changes in basal or stimulated serum cortisol in critically ill patients. We studied 2 groups of surgical ICU patients with hypotension despite > or = 6 h of catecholamine therapy. Group 1 comprised 7 patients aged 60 (mean 75.8 +/- 10.3) years (p cortisol levels and the serum cortisol response 30 and 60 min after stimulation with low-dose (1 microg) and 2 h later standard-dose (250 microg) ACTH. We also determined the incidence of adrenal insufficiency in each group using standard criteria and compared selected clinical variables. There was no significant difference in the mean serum cortisol at baseline although it tended to be higher in older patients. Group 2 patients had a significantly smaller response to the low-dose test at 30 min (p = 0.002), and to the standard-dose test at both 30 (p = 0.02) and 60 min (p = 0.04). There was no significant difference in the incidence of adrenal insufficiency between the 2 groups: 1/7 or 14.3% in group 1 vs. 1/8 or 12.5% in group 2 (p = 1.0). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean acute physiology score, blood pressure, serum albumin, dopamine, or dobutamine dose (p > 0.05). Creatinine clearance was significantly lower in group 2 (p > 0.001) and endogenous ACTH significantly higher (p = 0.04). Significantly more patients in group 1 (5/7, 72%) than group 2 (1/8, 12.5%) had a diagnosis of trauma on admission (p = 0.04). Seven of the eight patients (88%) in group 2 vs. 1/7 (14%) of patients in group 1 died in the ICU, but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.18). In this small exploratory study, baseline serum cortisol tended to be higher in older patients and older patients had a significantly smaller

  11. Trigger mechanisms of secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Silke; Veltzke-Schlieker, Wilfried; Adler, Andreas; Schott, Eckart; Hetzer, Roland; Schaffartzik, Walter; Tryba, Michael; Neuhaus, Peter; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-03-31

    In recent years the development of secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients (SSC-CIP) has increasingly been perceived as a separate disease entity. About possible trigger mechanisms of SSC-CIP has been speculated, systematic investigations on this issue are still lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and influence of promoting factors. Temporality, consistency and biological plausibility are essential prerequisites for causality. In this study, we investigated the temporality and consistency of possible triggers of SSC-CIP in a large case series. Biological plausibility of the individual triggers is discussed in a scientific context. SSC-CIP cases were recruited retrospectively from 2633 patients who underwent or were scheduled for liver transplantation at the University Hospital Charité, Berlin. All patients who developed secondary sclerosing cholangitis in association with intensive care treatment were included. Possible trigger factors during the course of the initial intensive care treatment were recorded. Sixteen patients (68% males, mean age 45.87 ± 14.64 years) with a confirmed diagnosis of SSC-CIP were identified. Of the 19 risk factors investigated, particularly severe hypotension with a prolonged decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) to <65 mmHg and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) were established as possible triggers of SSC-CIP. The occurrence of severe hypotension appears to be the first and most significant step in the pathogenesis. It seems that severe hypotension has a critical effect on the blood supply of bile ducts when it occurs together with additional microcirculatory disturbances. In critically ill patients with newly acquired cholestasis the differential diagnosis of SSC-CIP should be considered when they have had an episode of haemodynamic instability with a prolonged decrease in MAP, initial need for large amounts of blood transfusions or colloids, and early

  12. Family needs of critically ill patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ping-Ru; Redley, Bernice; Hsiao, Ya-Chu; Lin, Chun-Chih; Han, Chin-Yen; Lin, Hung-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Family members' experience a range of physiological, psychological and emotional impacts when accompanying a critically ill relative in the emergency department. Family needs are influenced by their culture and the context of care, and accurate clinician understanding of these needs is essential for patient- and family-centered care delivery. The aim of this study was to describe the needs of Taiwanese family members accompanying critically ill patients in the emergency department while waiting for an inpatient bed and compare these to the perceptions of emergency nurses. A prospective cross-sectional survey was conducted in a large medical center in Taiwan. Data were collected from 150 family members and 150 emergency nurses who completed a Chinese version of the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Family members ranked needs related to 'communication with family members,' as most important, followed by 'family member participation in emergency department care', 'family member support' and 'organizational comfort'; rankings were similar to those of emergency nurses. Compared to nurses, family members reported higher scores for the importance of needs related to 'communication with family members' and 'family members' participation in emergency department care'. Family members place greater importance than emergency nurses on the need for effective communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Do patients with lung cancer recall physician-initiated discussions about planning for end-of-life care following disclosure of a terminal prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Gillian; Payne, Sheila; Seymour, Jane

    2016-02-03

    Communicating with patients about their prognosis and goals of care, including offering opportunities to engage in advance care planning (ACP) is widely recognised as best practice. Little is known about terminally ill patients' perceptions of communication and ACP practice following disclosure of their terminal prognosis. To examine whether terminally ill patients with lung cancer and their relatives recall conversations with disclosing physicians, about their concerns, goals of care or any offers to engage in ACP. Qualitative study using semistructured interviews with patients and their family members. The study setting was a cancer centre and cancer unit in northern England. 25 patients with advanced lung cancer (18 men and 7 women, aged 47-85) and 19 family members, mainly from lower social economic classes, took part in the study. Participants had little or no recall of physicians initiating discussions about their concerns, or goals of care and did not perceive that they had been provided with either information about or opportunities to engage in ACP. Some participants reported a sense of abandonment following the disclosure of a terminal prognosis. This sense was compounded by a range of difficult emotional experiences following the disclosure. It may be inappropriate to initiate discussions about end-of-life care planning immediately following the disclosure of a terminal prognosis. To avoid patients feeling abandoned physicians need to consider how they or another appropriate person can provide information and opportunities for terminally ill patients to engage in a process of ACP. 06/Q2307/22. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. How Many Nonprotein Calories Does a Critically Ill Patient Require? A Case for Hypocaloric Nutrition in the Critically Ill Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugeles, Saúl J; Ochoa Gautier, Juan B; Dickerson, Roland N; Coss-Bu, Jorge A; Wernerman, Jan; Paddon-Jones, Douglas

    2017-04-01

    Calculation of energy and protein doses for critically ill patients is still a matter of controversy. For more than 40 years of nutrition support, the total amount of nutrients to be delivered to these patients has been calculated based on expert recommendations, and this calculation is based on the administration of nonprotein calories in one attempt to ameliorate catabolic response and avoid the weight loss. New evidence suggests protein delivery is the most important intervention to improve clinical and metabolic outcomes. This article describes the metabolic rationale and the new evidence supporting a change in the approach of metabolic support of the critically ill, proposing a physiological-based intervention supported by the recognition of ancillary characteristics of the metabolic response to trauma and injury. A moderate dose of calories around 15 kcal/kg/d with a delivery of protein of 1.5 g/kg/d appears to be the new recommendation for many hypercatabolic patients in the first week following injury.

  15. Association between illness severity and timing of initial enteral feeding in critically ill patients: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hsiu-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early enteral nutrition is recommended in cases of critical illness. It is unclear whether this recommendation is of most benefit to extremely ill patients. We aim to determine the association between illness severity and commencement of enteral feeding. Methods One hundred and eight critically ill patients were grouped as “less severe” and “more severe” for this cross-sectional, retrospective observational study. The cut off value was based on Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score 20. Patients who received enteral feeding within 48 h of medical intensive care unit (ICU admission were considered early feeding cases otherwise they were assessed as late feeding cases. Feeding complications (gastric retention/vomiting/diarrhea/gastrointestinal bleeding, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, ventilator-associated pneumonia, hospital mortality, nutritional intake, serum albumin, serum prealbumin, nitrogen balance (NB, and 24-h urinary urea nitrogen data were collected over 21 days. Results There were no differences in measured outcomes between early and late feedings for less severely ill patients. Among more severely ill patients, however, the early feeding group showed improved serum albumin (p = 0.036 and prealbumin (p = 0.014 but worsened NB (p = 0.01, more feeding complications (p = 0.005, and prolonged ICU stays (p = 0.005 compared to their late feeding counterparts. Conclusions There is a significant association between severity of illness and timing of enteral feeding initiation. In more severe illness, early feeding was associated with improved nutritional outcomes, while late feeding was associated with reduced feeding complications and length of ICU stay. However, the feeding complications of more severely ill early feeders can be handled without significantly affecting nutritional intake and there is no eventual difference in length of hospital stay or mortality

  16. Illness perceptions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and proliferative lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daleboudt, G M N; Broadbent, E; Berger, S P; Kaptein, A A

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the illness perceptions of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and whether perceptions are influenced by type of treatment for proliferative lupus nephritis. In addition, the illness perceptions of SLE patients were compared with those of patients with other chronic illnesses. Thirty-two patients who had experienced at least one episode of proliferative lupus nephritis were included. Patients were treated with either a high or low-dose cyclophosphamide (CYC) regimen (National Institutes of Health [NIH] vs. Euro-Lupus protocol). Illness perceptions were measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and a drawing assignment. The low-dose CYC group perceived their treatment as more helpful than the high-dose CYC group. In comparison with patients with asthma, SLE patients showed more negative illness perceptions on five of the eight illness perception domains. Drawings of the kidney provided additional information about perceptions of treatment effectiveness, kidney function and patients' understanding of their illness. Drawing characteristics showed associations with perceptions of consequences, identity, concern and personal control. These findings suggest that the type of treatment SLE patients with proliferative lupus nephritis receive may influence perceptions of treatment effectiveness. In addition, patients' drawings reveal perceptions of damage caused by lupus nephritis to the kidneys and the extent of relief provided by treatment. The finding that SLE is experienced as a more severe illness than other chronic illnesses supports the need to more frequently assess and aim to improve psychological functioning in SLE patients.

  17. Diarrhea in Critically Ill Patients: The Role of Enteral Feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito-Ashurst, Ione; Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2016-09-01

    This tutorial presents a systematic approach to the management of diarrhea in the critical care setting. Diarrhea is a common and prevalent problem in critically ill patients. Despite the high prevalence, its management is far from simple. Professionals are confronted with a myriad of definitions based on frequency, consistency, and volume. The causes are complex and multifactorial, yet enteral tube feeding formula is believed to be the perpetrator. Potential causes for diarrhea are discussed, and 3 case reports provide context to examine the treatment from a nutrition perspective. Each scenario is comprehensively addressed discussing potential causes and providing specific clinical strategies contributing to improved bowel function in this patient group. The approach used for diarrhea management is based on a complete understanding of enteral tube formula, their composition, and their impact in the presence of gut dysfunction. Choosing the right feeding formula may positively influence bowel function and contribute to improved nutrition. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. [Tissue oxygen saturation in the critically ill patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruartmoner, G; Mesquida, J; Baigorri, F

    2014-05-01

    Hemodynamic resuscitation seeks to correct global macrocirculatory parameters of pressure and flow. However, current evidence has shown that despite the normalization of these global parameters, microcirculatory and regional perfusion alterations can persist, and these alterations have been independently associated with a poorer patient prognosis. This in turn has lead to growing interest in new technologies for exploring regional circulation and microcirculation. Near infra-red spectroscopy allows us to monitor tissue oxygen saturation, and has been proposed as a noninvasive, continuous and easy-to-obtain measure of regional circulation. The present review aims to summarize the existing evidence on near infra-red spectroscopy and its potential clinical role in the resuscitation of critically ill patients in shock. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of sedation strategies for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutton, Brian; Burry, Lisa D.; Kanji, Salmaan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sedatives and analgesics are administered to provide sedation and manage agitation and pain in most critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. Various sedation administration strategies including protocolized sedation and daily sedation interruption are used to mitigate drug...... pharmacokinetic limitations and minimize oversedation, thereby shortening the duration of mechanical ventilation. At present, it is unclear which strategy is most effective, as few have been directly compared. Our review will use network meta-analysis (NMA) to compare and rank sedation strategies to determine...... will use a validated randomized control trial search filter to identify studies evaluating any strategy to optimize sedation in mechanically ventilated adult patients. Authors will independently extract data from eligible studies in duplicate and complete the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Our outcomes...

  20. Prognosis and predictors of mortality in critically ill elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-de-la-Rica, A; Castro-Arias, C; Latorre, J; Gilsanz, F; Maseda, E

    2017-12-11

    to evaluate mortality of patients≥80 years admitted to the Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU), global hospital mortality and factors related to it. observational retrospective study of patients≥80 years admitted to SICU between June 2012 and June 2015. a total of 299 patients were included, 54 of them died in the SICU (18.1%) and 80 patients (26.8%) died during their hospital stay. SICU mortality was independently related to age (OR=1.125; 95%CI: 1.042-1.215; P=.003), SAPS II (OR=1.026; 95% CI: 1.008-1.044; P=.004), need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) (OR=1.960; 95%CI: 1.046-3.671; P=.036) and need for mechanical ventilation for more than 24hours (OR=2.834; 95%CI: 1.244-6.456; P=.013). Factors independently related to hospital mortality were age (OR=1.125; 95%CI: 1.054-1.192; P<.001), SOFA score (OR=1.154; 95% CI: 1.079-1.235; P<.001), need for RRT (OR=1.924; 95%CI: 1.121-3.302; p=0.018) and need for mechanical ventilation for more than 24hours (OR=3.144; 95% CI: 1.771-5.584; P<.001). In critically ill patients over 80 years hospital mortality was independently related to age, SOFA score, RRT need and need for mechanical ventilation for more than 24hours. Our results raise important issues about end-of-life care and life-sustaining interventions in elderly, critically ill patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding Uncertainty Among Critically Ill Patients in the Intensive Care Unit Using Mishel's Theory of Uncertainty of Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cypress, Brigitte S

    2016-01-01

    The concept uncertainty has been explored in critical care but only among patients with myocardial infarction and post-cardiac catheterization using the Uncertainty in Illness Theory. Uncertainty is also a finding of numerous studies conducted in intensive care units (ICUs) that included only family members as participants of the research. The purpose of this article is to explore, describe, and understand the concept of uncertainty among patients and family members during critical illness in the ICU from the perspective of a phenomenological study with support from other studies published in the literature using Mishel's Theory of Uncertainty in Illness. The concept "uncertainty" as the topic for this article is one of the specific themes illuminated from a qualitative phenomenological study conducted in the ICU in 2010. Five from each category of patients, family members, and nurses were interviewed until data saturation was achieved. The data were analyzed using van Manen's wholistic, selective, and detailed line-by-line approach until themes were illuminated. Uncertainty is a patient-specific theme illuminated in this qualitative phenomenological study not noted among the family members. The patients perceived that they "do not know what is going to happen," "if they are progressing or not," or "if they will make it or not." Uncertainty among patients related to critical illness should be further explored. Patients with different critical care diagnosis should be included as participants.

  2. Relating illness complexity to reimbursement in CKD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessette RW

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Russell W Bessette1, Randy L Carter2,3 1Department of Health Sciences, Institute for Healthcare Informatics, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Population Health Observatory, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA Background: Despite significant investments of federal and state dollars to transition patient medical records to an all-electronic system, a chasm still exists between health care quality and payment for it. A major reason for this gap is the difficulty in evaluating health care outcomes based on claims data. Since both payers and patients may not appreciate how illness complexity impacts treatment outcomes, it is difficult to determine fair provider compensation. Objectives: Chronic kidney disease (CKD typifies these problems and is often associated with comorbidities that impact cost, health, and work productivity. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate an illness complexity score (ICS based on a linear regression of select blood values that might assist in predicting average monthly reimbursements in CKD patients. A second objective was to compare the results of this ICS prediction to results obtained by prediction of average monthly reimbursement using CKD stage. A third objective was to analyze the relationship between the change in ICS, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, and CKD stage over time to average monthly reimbursement. Methods: We calculated parsimonious values for select variables associated with CKD patients and compared the ICS to ordinal staging of renal disease. Data from 177 de-identified patients over 13 months was collected, which included 15 blood chemistry observations along with complete claims data for all medical expenses. To test for the relationship between average blood chemistry values, stages of CKD, age, and average monthly reimbursement, we modeled an association through a linear regression function of age, eGFR, and the Z-scores calculated from average

  3. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Matos da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%. Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%, followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively. Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed.

  4. Hematological issues in critically ill patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Karen S; DeSancho, Maria T

    2010-01-01

    Patients with solid and hematologic malignancies presenting with major bleeding or thrombotic complications, potentially life-ending events in a cancer patient's clinical course, usually require admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), making their diagnosis and management even more important for the intensivist. Given the significant advances in the diagnosis and treatment of almost all types of cancers in recent years, the intensivist is likely to encounter an ever-increasing number of cancer patients in the ICU setting with these complications. Abnormal hemostasis can occur as a consequence of both the pathology and treatment of cancer. Because cancer can have multiple effects on hemostatic equilibrium, treatment of these complications can be more complex than in the general population. This article reviews the physiology of coagulation and fibrinolysis, with special attention to those aspects that are most frequently altered in the setting of malignancy. The pathophysiology of bleeding and thrombotic complications specific to critically ill cancer patients are then detailed, and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on new cancer medications that have an effect on hemostasis, and on novel clotting and anticoagulant agents that are available to the intensivist for the management of these patients.

  5. Continuous infusion of antibiotics in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuszkiewicz, Piotr; Szałek, Edyta; Tomczak, Hanna; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotics are the most commonly used drugs in intensive care unit patients and their supply should be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic rules. The changes that occur in septic patients who are critically ill may be responsible for subtherapeutic antibiotic concentrations leading to poorer clinical outcomes. Evolving in time the disturbed pathophysiology in severe sepsis (high cardiac output, glomerular hyperfiltration) and therapeutic interventions (e.g. haemodynamically active drugs, mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy) alters antibiotic pharmacokinetics mainly through an increase in the volume of distribution and altered drug clearance. The lack of new and efficacious drugs and increased bacterial resistance are current problems of contemporary antibiotic therapy. Although intermittent administration is a standard clinical practice, alternative methods of antibiotic administration are sought, which may potentialise effects and reduce toxicity as well as contribute to inhibition of bacterial resistance. A wide range of studies prove that the application of continuous infusion of time-dependent antibiotics (beta-lactams, glycopeptides) is more rational than standard intermittent administration. However, there are also studies which do not confirm the advantage of one method over the other. In spite of controversy the continuous administration of this group of antibiotics is common practice, because the results of both studies point to the higher efficacy of this method in critically ill patients. Authors reviewed the literature to determine whether any clinical benefits exist for administration of time-dependent antibiotics by continuous infusion. Definite specification of the clinical advantage of administration this way over standard dosage requires a large-scale multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of omeprazole in critically ill pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, Maria Jose; Colom, Helena; López-Herce, Jesús; Urbano, Javier; González, Rafael; López, Jorge; Manzanares, Cecilia; Carrillo, Angel

    2014-08-01

    To develop a population pharmacokinetic model for intravenous omeprazole in critically ill children. One hundred eighty-six omeprazole concentration-time data from 40 critically ill children were analyzed using the nonlinear mixed-effects approach with the nonlinear mixed-effects modeling software, version 7.2 software. Patients were randomized into 2 groups and received intravenous omeprazole at a dose of 0.5 or 1 mg/kg twice daily. Blood samples were drawn at 0.5, 2, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after the first infusion. The pharmacokinetic profile was best described by a 2-compartment model with a first-order elimination process. Between-patient variability could only be associated with plasma clearance (CL). The typical values for plasma CL were 24.9 L·h·70 kg (10.08%), with a distributional clearance of 53.9 L·h·70 kg (11.00%) and central and peripheral compartment distribution volumes of 4.23 L/70 kg (19.62%) and 674 L/70 kg (0.89%), respectively. Allometric size models seemed to predict changes adequately in all the pharmacokinetic parameters. High values of between-patient variability of CL [75.50% (2.60%)] and residual variability [130.0% (5.26%)] were still found in the final model. Model-based simulations suggested that the most suitable dose was 1 mg/kg because this yielded similar exposure (defined by the area under the concentration-time curve) to that obtained in adults after a 20-mg dose of omeprazole intravenously. An allometric size model allows changes to be predicted in all the pharmacokinetic parameters, making dose adjustment by body weight important to achieve the most effective omeprazole exposure. This is the first step toward a population pharmacokinetic study, including more data to develop a predictable model to be used during therapeutic drug monitoring.

  7. Palliative care versus euthanasia. The German position: the German General Medical Council's principles for medical care of the terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahm, S W

    2000-04-01

    In September 1998 the Bundesärztekammer, i.e., the German Medical Association, published new principles concerning terminal medical care. Even before publication, a draft of these principles was very controversial, and prompted intense public debate in the mass media. Despite some of the critics' suspicions that the principles prepared the way for liberalization of active euthanasia, euthanasia is unequivocally rejected in the principles. Physician-assisted suicide is considered to violate professional medical rules. In leaving aside some of the notions customarily used in the euthanasia debate, e.g., passive euthanasia, the principles emphasize the obligation of physicians to offer and the right of patients to receive palliative care. The principles explicitly list modalities of basic treatment that are indispensable in all cases, such as the obligation to satisfy hunger and thirst. This statement is meant to resolve the dispute on nutrition and hydration at the end of life, as it shifts the focus of care from maintaining physiological parameters to satisfying subjective needs. For patients in a persistent vegetative state, artificial feeding is held to be obligatory. Yet, the principles make reference to recent German jurisdiction which permit the stopping of artificial feeding if it is in accordance with the patient's presumed will. Additionally, the wording concerning this issue is found to remain unclear. Patients' autonomy is strengthened by explicitly welcoming advance directives as a means to ascertain patients' wills. The principles mark some changes compared to earlier documents. They deserve careful analysis and should be considered in the international debate on issues concerning the end of life.

  8. Illness Perceptions in Patients With Fibromyalgia and Their Relationship to Quality of Life and Catastrophizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C. Paul; van Ittersum, Miriam W.; Kaptein, Ad A.; van Wijhe, Marten; van, Wijhe M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. In the last decade, illness perceptions have been identified as mportant in the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM). The aim of the present study was to examine illness perceptions and use of the revised Illness Perception Questionnaire in patients with FM (IPQ-R-FM) and their relationship to

  9. Testing models of care for terminally ill people who live alone at home: is a randomised controlled trial the best approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Samar M; O'Connor, Moira; Breen, Lauren J; Deas, Kathleen; Skett, Kim

    2013-03-01

    This project implemented and evaluated two models of care for terminally ill people living alone at home: installing personal alarms (PA) and providing extra care aide (CA) support. The primary aim was to assess the feasibility of using a randomised controlled trial (RCT) approach with this group. A secondary aim was to assess the potential impact of the models of care on the participants' quality of life, symptom distress, anxiety and depression, and perceived benefits and barriers to their use. The two models of care were piloted in collaboration with Silver Chain Hospice Care Service (SCHCS) in Western Australia during 2009-2010. Using a pilot RCT design, equal numbers of participants were randomised to receive extra CA time, PAs or standard care. Attrition reduced the sample size from 20 in each group to 12, 14 and 17 respectively. The intervention period was between 6 and 12 weeks depending on prognosis. The participants were functionally and psychologically well and the majority lived alone by choice. There were physical and psychological benefits associated with provision of the two models of care, particularly for the group supported by CAs in terms of improved sleeping and appetite. However, the impact was mostly not statistically significant due to small sample sizes. The study has highlighted two methodological challenges: the wide variation in the degree of living alone at home leading to complex inclusion criteria, and an RCT approach with attrition differing across groups and patients not wanting to be included in the assigned group. The RCT approach is not considered appropriate for the 'home alone' palliative care population that would have been better supported by providing each participant with a personalised model of care according to needs. However, the outcomes of the project have prompted changes in SCHCS practice when providing care to these patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Original article Rehabilitation model program for seriously ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Kegye

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients receiving cancer treatment start lifestyle changes mostly at the end of the treatment during the rehabilitation period. Most often, the first step is a dietary change and physical exercises built into the daily routine. Patients who do this in groups led by qualified therapists and based on professional counseling can build more effective and more permanent changes into their life. To develop a complex rehabilitation program which, in the short term, aims to familiarize patients with a lifestyle which harmonizes the physical, mental, spiritual and social spheres of life and, in the long term, to build it into their everyday life in order to ameliorate the physical and mental state and reduce the psychological symptoms and the isolation of patients. The physical component focuses on diet and exercise. The psycho-social-spiritual support focuses on discovering inner sources of strength, developing active coping mechanisms and helping to achieve more open communication. Participants and procedure In February and March 2011, 8 patients treated for malignant tumors participated in the model program. The components of the model program were psychotherapy, physiotherapy, cancer consultation, nutrition counseling, creative activities and walking. Results During the period of the model program the isolation of the patients decreased and their social support and ability of coping with the illness ameliorated. They reported an ease in anxiety and depression in their everyday activities. According to feedback, their communication with each other, with the staff and with their relatives became more open. Altogether this had advantageous effects on the functioning of the ward and the mood of the staff. Conclusions The rehabilitation program confirmed that beside individual psycho-social support, beneficial and economic psycho-social support can be provided for the patients in group form along with the most effective assignment of the

  11. The Optimal Dose of Midazolam for Promoting Sleep in Critically Ill Patients: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Se Joong Kim; Jisoo Park; Yeon Joo Lee; Jong Sun Park; Ho Il Yoon; Jae Ho Lee; Choon Taek Lee; Young Jae Cho

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many critically ill patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) experience sleep disruption. Midazolam is commonly used for the sedation of critically ill patients. This pilot study is aimed to identify the optimal dose of midazolam for achieving sound sleep in critically ill patients. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted in the medical ICU of a tertiary referral hospital. Polysomnography recording was performed over 24 hours to assess the quantity and quality...

  12. How do we approach thrombocytopenia in critically ill patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thachil, Jecko; Warkentin, Theodore E

    2017-04-01

    A low platelet count is a frequently encountered haematological abnormality in patients treated in intensive treatment units (ITUs). Although severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count thrombocytopenia is associated with organ failure and adverse prognosis. The aetiology for thrombocytopenia in ITU is often multifactorial and correcting one aetiology may not normalise the low platelet count. The classical view for thrombocytopenia in this setting is consumption associated with thrombin-mediated platelet activation, but other concepts, including platelet adhesion to endothelial cells and leucocytes, platelet aggregation by increased von Willebrand factor release, red cell damage and histone release, and platelet destruction by the complement system, have recently been described. The management of severe thrombocytopenia is platelet transfusion in the presence of active bleeding or invasive procedure, but the risk-benefit of prophylactic platelet transfusions in this setting is uncertain. In this review, the incidence and mechanisms of thrombocytopenia in patients with ITU, its prognostic significance and the impact on organ function is discussed. A practical approach based on the authors' experience is described to guide management of a critically ill patient who develops thrombocytopenia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Thiamine Levels During Intensive Insulin Therapy in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Snippenburg, Wouter; Reijnders, Mariet G J; Hofhuis, Jose G M; de Vos, Rien; Kamphuis, Stephan; Spronk, Peter E

    2017-10-01

    Thiamine is an essential cofactor in carbohydrate metabolism, and deficiency can therefore cause various organ dysfunctions. Little is known about the prevalence and possible worsening of thiamine deficiency in critically ill patients. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of thiamine deficiency at admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and hypothesized that intensive insulin therapy, aimed at regulating glucose levels, increases thiamine utilization and therefore might cause or worsen deficiency in patients with limited thiamine stores. An observational prospective cohort study was carried out in a medical-surgical ICU in a general teaching hospital in Apeldoorn, the Netherlands. All adults who were treated during that time with intensive insulin therapy were included. Deficiency was defined as a thiamine level Intensive insulin therapy does not appear to cause or worsen thiamine deficiency. However, based on the high prevalence of deficiency at admission, it might be warranted to supplement thiamine in all patients admitted to the ICU, especially when there is an underlying gastrointestinal disease or recent surgery.

  14. Does Mental Illness Stigma Contribute to Adolescent Standardized Patients' Discomfort With Simulations of Mental Illness and Adverse Psychosocial Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D.; Johnson, Samantha; Niec, Anne; Pietrantonio, Anna Marie; High, Bradley; MacMillan, Harriet; Eva, Kevin W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Adolescent mental illness stigma-related factors may contribute to adolescent standardized patients' (ASP) discomfort with simulations of psychiatric conditions/adverse psychosocial experiences. Paradoxically, however, ASP involvement may provide a stigma-reduction strategy. This article reports an investigation of this hypothetical…

  15. Role of Physical Therapy Intervention in Patients With Life-Threatening Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putt, Kaitlyn; Faville, Kelli Anne; Lewis, David; McAllister, Kevin; Pietro, Maria; Radwan, Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    Physical therapy encompasses the skilled treatment and care for patients across the life span through a multitude of different practice settings. This includes caring for individuals within end-of-life or palliative care settings. The goal of treatment in this stage of care is to relieve physical, social, psychological, and spiritual suffering in order to improve overall quality of life in patients with terminal illnesses. There has been limited research conducted to investigate the utilization of physical therapy interventions in palliative care settings. The purpose of this study was to contribute to the current research involving physical therapy and end-of-life care in terms of its efficacy, value, and how this value is perceived by patients and their caregivers. This was completed by independently screening and reviewing the studies that were published between the years 1994 and 2014 and related to this topic. The databases and journals searched included CINAHL, PUBMED, MEDLINE, Cochrane, PEDro, the Journal of Palliative Care, the American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, and Google Scholar. Thirteen qualitative articles were selected which met all inclusion criteria and discussed the role of physical therapy intervention in the palliative care setting. Methodological quality of articles were assessed using the QASP, scale and their findings were summarized and presented in table format. These articles support the utilization of physical therapy in palliative care settings and emphasizes the impact of physical therapy on improving patients' physical, social, and emotional well-being.

  16. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  17. [Vitamin D deficiency and morbimortality in critically ill paediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Soler, Patricia; Morales-Martínez, Antonio; Rosa-Camacho, Vanessa; Lillo-Muñoz, Juan Antonio; Milano-Manso, Guillermo

    2017-08-01

    To determine the prevalence and risks factors of vitamin D deficiency, as well as its relationship with morbidity and mortality in a PICU. An observational prospective study in a tertiary children's University Hospital PICU conducted in two phases: i: cohorts study, and ii: prevalence study. The study included 340 critically ill children with ages comprising 6 months to 16 years old. Chronic kidney disease, known parathyroid disorders, and vitamin D supplementation. Total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured in the first 48hours of admission to a PICU. Parathormone, calcium, phosphate, blood gases, blood count, C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin were also analysed. A record was also made of demographic features, characteristics of the episode, and complications during the PICU stay. The overall prevalence rate of vitamin D deficiency was 43.8%, with a mean of 22.28 (95% CI 21.15-23.41) ng/ml. Patients with vitamin D deficiency were older (61 vs 47 months, P=.039), had parents with a higher level of academic studies (36.5% vs 20%, P=.016), were admitted more often in winter and spring, had a higher PRISM-III (6.8 vs 5.1, P=.037), a longer PICU stay (3 vs 2 days, P=.001), and higher morbidity (61.1% vs 30.4%, P<001) than the patients with sufficient levels of 25(OH)D. Patients who died had lower levels of 25(OH)D (14±8.81ng/ml versus 22.53±10.53ng/ml, P=.012). Adjusted OR for morbidity was 5.44 (95%CI; 2.5-11.6). Vitamin D deficiency is frequent in critically ill children, and it is related to both morbidity and mortality, although it remains unclear whether it is a causal relationship or it is simply a marker of severity in different clinical situations. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Colloids versus crystalloids for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perel, Pablo; Roberts, Ian; Ker, Katharine

    2013-02-28

    Colloid solutions are widely used in fluid resuscitation of critically ill patients. There are several choices of colloid, and there is ongoing debate about the relative effectiveness of colloids compared to crystalloid fluids. To assess the effects of colloids compared to crystalloids for fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (17 October 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library) (Issue 10, 2012), MEDLINE (Ovid) 1946 to October 2012, EMBASE (Ovid) 1980 to October 2012, ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (1970 to October 2012), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (1990 to October 2012), PubMed (October 2012), www.clinical trials.gov and www.controlled-trials.com. We also searched the bibliographies of relevant studies and review articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of colloids compared to crystalloids, in patients requiring volume replacement. We excluded cross-over trials and trials involving pregnant women and neonates. Two review authors independently extracted data and rated quality of allocation concealment. We analysed trials with a 'double-intervention', such as those comparing colloid in hypertonic crystalloid to isotonic crystalloid, separately. We stratified the analysis according to colloid type and quality of allocation concealment. We identified 78 eligible trials; 70 of these presented mortality data.COLLOIDS COMPARED TO CRYSTALLOIDS: Albumin or plasma protein fraction - 24 trials reported data on mortality, including a total of 9920 patients. The pooled risk ratio (RR) from these trials was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93 to 1.10). When we excluded the trial with poor-quality allocation concealment, pooled RR was 1.00 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.09). Hydroxyethyl starch - 25 trials compared hydroxyethyl starch with crystalloids and included 9147 patients. The pooled RR was 1.10 (95% CI 1

  19. Synchronization of Cardio-Respiratory Dynamics in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burykin, Anton; Buchman, Timothy

    2008-03-01

    We studied changes in cardio-respiratory synchronization and dynamics of cardiovascular system during transition from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous respiration in critically ill patients. This observational study exploits a standard clinical practice---the spontaneous breathing trial (SBT). The SBT consists of a period of mechanical ventilation, followed by a period of spontaneous breathing, followed by resumption of mechanical ventilation. We collected continuous respiratory, cardiac (EKG), and blood pressure signals of mechanically ventilated patients before, during and after SBT. The data were analyzed by means of spectral analysis, phase dynamics, and entropy measures. Mechanical ventilation appears to affect not only the lungs but also the cardiac and vascular systems. Spontaneous cardiovascular rhythms are entrained by the mechanical ventilator and are drawn into synchrony. Sudden interruption of mechanical ventilation causes gross desynchronization, which is restored by reinstitution of mechanical ventilation. The data suggest (1) therapies intended to support one organ system may propagate unanticipated effects to other organ systems and (2) sustained therapies may adversely affect recovery of normal organ system interactions.

  20. Relationship between uncertainty in illness, mood state and coping style in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dong-Ye; Ye, Jing-Jing; Zhou, Feng; Li, Jue-jun; Huang, Qiu-yu; Wan, Li-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between uncertainty in illness, mood state and coping style in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in the hospital, in order to identify nursing measures. Methods: Chinese versions of the Mishel Uncertainty In Illness Scale (MUIS), Brief Profile Of Mood States (BPOMS) and Medical Coping Modes Questionnaire (MCMQ) were used to assess uncertainty in illness, mood state and coping style, respectively, in 126 patients with TMD. Results:...

  1. Human Rights That Influence The Mentally Ill Patient In South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Invariably the mentally ill person encounters rejectionand humiliation that are in some way tantamount to a "second illness." The combination either disrupts or puts beyond reach the usual personal and social life stages of marriage, family life, raising children, sexual relationships, the choice of treatment, affordable housing, ...

  2. Understanding the mechanisms of glutamine action in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele P. Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine (Gln is an important energy source and has been used as a supplementary energy substrate. Furthermore, Gln is an essential component for numerous metabolic functions, including acid-base homeostasis, gluconeogenesis, nitrogen transport and synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids. Therefore, glutamine plays a significant role in cell homeostasis and organ metabolism. This article aims to review the mechanisms of glutamine action during severe illnesses. In critically ill patients, the increase in mortality was associated with a decreased plasma Gln concentration. During catabolic stress, Gln consumption rate exceeds the supply, and both plasma and skeletal muscle pools of free Gln are severely reduced. The dose and route of Gln administration clearly influence its effectiveness: high-dose parenteral appears to be more beneficial than low-dose enteral administration. Experimental studies reported that Gln may protect cells, tissues, and whole organisms from stress and injury through the following mechanisms: attenuation of NF (nuclear factor-kB activation, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, reduction in neutrophil accumulation, improvement in intestinal integrity and immune cell function, and enhanced of heat shock protein expression. In conclusion, high-doses of parenteral Gln (>0.50 g/kg/day demonstrate a greater potential to benefit in critically ill patients, although Gln pathophysiological mechanisms requires elucidation.A glutamina (Gln é uma importante fonte de energia e tem sido usada como substrato energético suplementar. Além disso, a Gln é um componente essencial para numerosas funções metabólicas tais como: homeostase ácido-base, gliconeogênese, transporte de nitrogênio e síntese de proteínas e ácidos nucléicos. Portanto, a glutamina desempenha um papel importante na homeostase celular e no metabolismo dos órgãos. Esse artigo objetiva rever os mecanismos de ação da glutamina na doen

  3. Psychiatric diagnoses and psychoactive medication use among nonsurgical critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunsch, Hannah; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Johansen, Martin B

    2014-01-01

    , the absolute risk of new psychiatric diagnoses was low but higher than hospitalized patients: 0.5% vs 0.2% over the first 3 months (adjusted HR, 3.42; 95% CI, 1.96-5.99; P general population cohort (0.02%; adjusted HR, 21.77; 95% CI, 9.23-51.36; Pmedication....... CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Prior psychiatric diagnoses are more common in critically ill patients than in hospital and general population cohorts. Among survivors of critical illness, new psychiatric diagnoses and psychoactive medication use is increased in the months after discharge. Our data suggest both......IMPORTANCE: The relationship between critical illness and psychiatric illness is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To assess psychiatric diagnoses and medication prescriptions before and after critical illness. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Population-based cohort study in Denmark of critically ill patients...

  4. Common problems in critically ill obstetric patients, with an emphasis on pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Richard; Mazur, Joseph E; Pastis, Nicholas J; Chang, Eugene; Sahn, Steven A; Boylan, Alice M

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of critically ill obstetric patients can be especially challenging due to the complexity of caring for 2 patients, with a paucity of research to support practice. This review will provide practitioners with primary recommendations for management of the critical illnesses most commonly encountered in pregnancy and will discuss the scientific and clinical merit of these recommendations.

  5. Procalcitonin increase in early identification of critically ill patients at high risk of mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ulrik; Heslet, Lars; Jensen, Tom Hartvig

    2006-01-01

    To investigate day-by-day changes in procalcitonin and maximum obtained levels as predictors of mortality in critically ill patients.......To investigate day-by-day changes in procalcitonin and maximum obtained levels as predictors of mortality in critically ill patients....

  6. Becoming a patient-illness representations of depression of Anglo-Australian and Sri Lankan patients through the lens of Leventhal's illness representational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, Josefine; Mazza, Danielle; Brijnath, Bianca

    2017-11-01

    Depression is prevalent globally. While the uptake of mental health services is poor in the general community, the lack of service engagement is particularly profound in migrant and refugee communities. To understand why there is under-utilisation cross-cultural comparisons of how people make sense of mental illnesses such as depression are essential. To verify how differing cultural aetiologies about depression influence mental health service use, this study investigated illness representational models of depression held by Sri Lankan migrants and Anglo-Australians living with depression. In-depth interviews ( n = 48) were conducted with Sri Lankan migrants and Anglo-Australians living with depression to explore their illness beliefs. Data were analysed using Leventhal's illness representational model. Significant overlaps in illness representational models were noted but distinctive differences were found between causal and chronicity beliefs; Sri Lankan migrants more frequently endorsed depression as a time-limited condition underpinned by situational factors, whereas Anglo-Australians endorsed a chronic, biopsychosocial model of depression. Findings highlight the importance of forging a shared understanding of patient beliefs in the clinical encounter to ensure that interventions are coherent with illness beliefs or at least work towards improving mental health literacy. Differences in illness beliefs also provide insights into possible interventions. For example, psychosocial interventions that align with their illness beliefs may be more suited to Sri Lankan migrants than pharmaceutical or psychological ones.

  7. Patients' Illness Perception as a Tool to Improve Individual Disease Management in Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkert, Stefanie; Lehner-Baumgartner, Eva; Valencak, Julia; Knobler, Robert; Riedl, Elisabeth; Jonak, Constanze

    2018-02-07

    The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) has been shown to assess illness perception reproducibly in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). Illness perception reflects patients' individual concepts of understanding and interpretation of the disease, influencing illness behaviour and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study investigated the clinical relevance of the relationships between illness perception, illness behaviour, and HRQOL in CTCL and cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (CBCL). A total of 92 patients completed the IPQ-R, the Scale for the Assessment of Illness Behavior (SAIB), and a skin-specific HRQOL tool (Skindex-29). Data on illness behaviour were not evidently related to illness perception, whereas illness perception was significantly associated with HRQOL. Both, IPQ-R and HRQOL results correlated with disease entity, stage, and socio-demographics. Only IPQ-R results provided practical information on patients' needs to train personal coping strategies. IPQ-R assessment in CTCL and CBCL might be a useful instrument to improve individual disease management.

  8. Cómo atender a la familia del enfermo terminal How to give attention to the terminal patient's family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Guinart Zayas

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available La falta de literatura médica sobre el enfermo terminal ha sido queja constante de nuestros Médicos de Familia y de nuestros alumnos, más aún si se trata de la atención integral que aporta a esta familia. Ha sido por esto que nuestro personal médico ha vivido situaciones tan dispares en la relación enfermo terminal-familia, que tarda en encontrar el trato adecuado con ambos, en particular con la familia. Aun en el peor de los casos, nuestros médicos y enfermeras deben intentar compartir el sufrimiento de la familia, algo que no resulta difícil, pues ese sufrimiento deja también en este equipo profesional huellas imborrables. En definitiva, lo que dificulta la fluidez de la comunicación en la relación familia-médico-equipo de salud, es la ansiedad.The lack of medical literature about the terminal patient has been a constant complaint of our family physicians and students, much more when it refers to the comprehensive attention they give to this family. That's why our medical personnel has lived so different situations in the terminal patient-family relation due to the delay to find an adequate treatment for both, in particular for the family. Even at worst, our physicians and nurses should try to share the family suffering, somethig that it is not difficult, since this suffering leaves indelible marks on this professional team. Definitely, anxiety is what makes the communication fluidity different in the family-medical team relation.

  9. Caspofungin Population Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Patients Undergoing Continuous Veno-Venous Haemofiltration or Haemodiafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roger, C.; Wallis, S.C.; Muller, L.; Saissi, G.; Lipman, J.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Lefrant, J.Y.; Roberts, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Sepsis and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) can both significantly affect antifungal pharmacokinetics. This study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics of caspofungin in critically ill patients during different CRRT modes. METHODS: Patients receiving caspofungin

  10. Quality of life and uncertainty in illness for chronic patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valeria Caruso; Maria Daniela Giammanco; Lara Gitto

    2014-01-01

    .... This uncertainty augments the negative impact of the state of chronic illness on patients’ quality of life. The present study has the purpose to examine the correlations between uncertainty due...

  11. Conceptualizations of illness among relatives of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villares, Cecília C; Redko, Cristina P; Mari, Jair J

    2017-06-01

    Family concepts of a relative's illness are an important part of the coping process and reveal the cultural construction of the experience of illness. As part of a qualitative study conducted in the Schizophrenia Outpatient Clinic of the Department of Psychiatry, Escola Paulista de Medicina - UNIFESP, 14 relatives of eight outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia were interviewed and invited to talk freely about their ideas and feelings concerning their relative's problem. Qualitative analysis was used to identify categories of illness representations. Three main categories were discussed, including Problema de Nervoso, Problema na Cabeça and Problema Espiritual (Problem of the Nerves, Problem in the Head and Spiritual Problem). The authors present evidence of these categories as cultural constructions, and discuss the relevance of popular notions of illness to the understanding of the course and outcome of schizophrenia, and the planning of culturally meaningful interventions.

  12. Functional Adrenal Insufficiency Among Critically Ill Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOMCS2

    2007-06-02

    Jun 2, 2007 ... Factors predicting FAI on multivariate analysis were use of rifampicin and eosinophilia. ... and factors predicting FAI, as well as the outcome in acutely ill HIV/AIDS ... data; continuous data were compared using Student's t- test.

  13. Illness uncertainty, partner caregiver burden and support, and relationship satisfaction in fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, John W; Olmsted, Maureen E; van Puymbroeck, Christina M

    2006-02-15

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is characterized by uncertainty in diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. This study assessed the role of uncertainty of illness in relationship satisfaction in patients with FMS and osteoarthritis (OA). A total of 51 patients with FMS responded to self-report instruments assessing their uncertainty about their illness, functional ability, average pain, and relationship satisfaction. Their partners independently reported on their sense of caregiver burden and their supportiveness toward the patients. Thirty-two patients with OA and their partners served as a control group. Patients' functional ability and pain were related to partner caregiver burden. Partner caregiver burden was related to lower levels of partner supportiveness for the FMS dyads, but not for the OA dyads. Relationship satisfaction of patients with FMS was related to their higher levels of uncertainty of illness in interaction with their functional disability and pain and their partners' supportiveness. Under high levels of uncertainty of illness, low levels of partner supportiveness were related to lower patient relationship satisfaction, whereas low levels of uncertainty of illness were significant interacting variables in the OA sample. The results suggest that uncertainty of illness is a prominent feature affecting patients with FMS in their relationships with their partners. Suggestions for additional research to explore the role of uncertainty of illness in social relationships are presented, and the therapeutic implications for patient/partner relationships are explored.

  14. Attitudes of the family toward the mentally ill patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, I Campo; Segura, L Yllá; Arrillaga, A Gonzalez-Pinto; Suárez, P Bardají

    2010-01-01

    In this article the attitudes towards mental illness in those families who have mentally ill members is presented in order to compare them with those found 25 years before in a similar research. In order to carry out the survey we used Struening and Cohen's Opinion about Mental Illness (OMI) questionnaire. adapted for use in Spain by Yllá and Guimón (1979). The population studied were the families associations of the mentally ill persons suffering from sychotic and affective disturbance. alcoholism and Alzheimer's dementia; the control group was made up of a number of Civil Servants and another section of health care workers. The samples were collected at random among the associated members. For the study we undertook a factorial analysis of the answers. The first five factors contain the greater part of the accumulated variation. that is to say 34.2%. 19 factors explain the whole 100% of the variation. The five principle factors are: (i) Mental hygiene (14% of the variation). (ii) therapeutic negativism (7% of the variation). (iii) Social reinsertion (4.87% of the variation). which was also similar to the following factor. (iv) social rehabilitation. and (v) authoritarism (3.62% of the variation). The extensive knowledge of these illnesses and a close relationship with those who are ill could be the cause of the large and diverse opinions and that some attitudes are more complex nowadays. According to these five principle factors we can see that the controls are appreciably less authoritarian and restrictive than that of the families of these ill people and that the attitudes vary depending on the age. profession and diagnosis of the illness.

  15. Psychometric Testing of an Arabic Translation of the Revised-Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) for Chronic Illness Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberkane, Salah

    2017-08-01

    Researchers lack a properly validated instrument to measure perceptions of chronic disease in Arabic language contexts. This study aimed to adapt and validate the Revised-Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) for Arabic speaking chronic illness patients. A cross-sectional design was conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the adapted English version of the IPQ-R for Arabic speaking chronic illness patients. The study instrument was an Arabic version of the IPQ-R prepared through a translation process. The reliability and validity of the instrument were assessed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Three hundred and sixteen participants (ages 16-79) from the Batna region in Algeria completed the IPQ-R. A total of 316 (100%) patients responded to this study. Regarding internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha a coefficient was consistently higher than 0.45. Several areas of fit were identified and substantial changes to the measurement model were made, such as the deletion of 22 items from the original 38-item IPQ-R and two items from the original 18 causal items this accounted for 64.63% of the total variance, and the respecification of indicators had to be applied to achieve acceptable model fit. The final model consists of two sections: The 16-item Arabic IPQ-R, which had a good fit; (CMIN/Df = 1.30, P < 0.001, CFI = 0.93, RMSEA = 0.08, SRMR = 0.03), and was similar to the Arabic 16 causal items (CMIN/DF = 1.11, P < 0.001, CFI = 0.95, RMSEA = 0.080, SRMR = 0.02). The factor structure concurred with prior finding despite differences to the type of sample and cultural considerations that might explain these findings. Replication of this study in Algerian patients with specific illness, such as silicosis, breast cancer and multiple sclerosis. Further psychometric testing on other large samples is recommended.

  16. Relevance of Serum Leptin and Leptin-Receptor Concentrations in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Koch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The adipocyte-derived cytokine leptin was implicated to link inflammation and metabolic alterations. We investigated the potential role of leptin components in critically ill patients, because systemic inflammation, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia are common features of critical illness. Upon admission to Medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU, free leptin and soluble leptin-receptor serum concentrations were determined in 137 critically ill patients (95 with sepsis, 42 without sepsis and 26 healthy controls. Serum leptin or leptin-receptor did not differ between patients or controls and were independent of sepsis. However, serum leptin was closely associated with obesity and diabetes and clearly correlated with markers of metabolism and liver function. Leptin-receptor was an unfavourable prognostic indicator, associated with mortality during three years follow-up. Our study indicates a functional role of leptin in the pathogenesis of severe illness and emphasizes the impact of complex metabolic alterations on the clinical outcome of critically ill patients.

  17. Causal attribution and illness perception: a cross-sectional study in Mexican patients with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de-Regil, Lizzette

    2014-01-01

    Health psychology researchers have begun to focus greater attention on people's beliefs about health/illness since these beliefs can clearly affect behavior. This cross-sectional study aimed at (1) identifying the most common factors psychotic patients attribute their illness to and (2) assessing the association between causal attribution and illness perception (cognitive, emotional, and comprehensibility dimensions). Sixty-two patients (56.5% females) who had been treated for psychosis at a public psychiatric hospital in Mexico answered the Angermeyer and Klusmann Illness Attribution Scale and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Results showed that most patients attributed psychosis onset to social factors and that attribution to their personality might have an overwhelmingly negative effect on their lives. Acknowledging psychotic patient attributional beliefs and considering them in clinical practice could improve treatment efficacy and overall recovery success. This is particularly important in psychosis, since symptoms are often severe and/or persistent and require long-term treatment.

  18. Physician reports of terminal sedation without hydration or nutrition for patients nearing death in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van der Heide (Agnes); A.M. Vrakking (Astrid); B.D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen (Bregje); P.J. van der Maas (Paul); G. van der Wal (Gerrit); J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Terminal sedation in patients nearing death is an important issue related to end-of-life care. OBJECTIVE: To describe the practice of terminal sedation in the Netherlands. DESIGN: Face-to-face interviews. SETTING: The Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Nationwide

  19. Belief in supernatural causes of mental illness among Malay patients: impact on treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, S M; Khan, U A; Hasanah, C I

    1996-10-01

    The concept of aetiology of mental illness in 134 Malay patients was investigated by means of a 20-item checklist. About 53% of the patients attributed their illnesses to supernatural agents. Witchcraft and possession by evil spirits were regarded as common causes of illness. The number of patients who believed in supernatural causes of their mental illness was significantly higher among those who had consulted bomohs (Malay traditional healers) than among those who had not consulted them. The belief that mental illness is caused by supernatural agents is firmly held by bomohs, who reinforce this notion in those who seek their advice. Belief in supernatural causes of mental illness was not significantly associated with age, gender, level of education or occupation of the patients. Patients who believed in supernatural causes of mental illness were also found to show poor drug compliance, and the number of such patients at 6 months follow-up was significantly lower than the corresponding figure for those who did not believe in supernatural causes. The importance of understanding the patients' cultural background when treating psychiatric patients is highlighted.

  20. Exploration of health status, illness perceptions, coping strategies, and psychological morbidity in stoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Simon R; Tribbick, Davina; Connell, William R; Castle, David; Salzberg, Michael; Kamm, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    We employed the Common Sense Model (CSM) of illness perceptions to examine the relative contribution of illness perceptions, stoma self-efficacy, and coping strategies in explaining anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with a fecal ostomy. The CSM suggests that the consequences of illness activity, such as psychological distress, are influenced by an individual's illness perceptions as well as what coping strategies they engage in. Descriptive, cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. One hundred fifty adults with a stoma (54 males, and 96 females; mean age 44 years) completed an online survey. Several instruments were used to measure study outcomes, including the Health Perceptions Questionnaire, Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire, Carver Brief Coping Questionnaire, Stoma Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Participants were advised of the study through online forums containing a link to the survey. Outcome measures used in the current study are valid and reliable and have been extensively used in medically ill patients. Using structural equation modeling, the final model provided an excellent fit to the data (χ23= 16.53, P = .22, χ/N = 1.27, SRMR 0.97, CFI > 0.99). There was a direct pathway from health status to illness perceptions months since surgery directly influenced health status, illness beliefs, and adaptive emotion-focused coping (β= .81, P coping. Maladaptive coping mediated the relationship between illness perceptions and depression and anxiety, and adaptive emotion-focused coping mediated the relationship between illness perception and depression. The final model provided support for the CSM, in that illness perceptions were directly related to illness status, and that both illness perceptions and coping strategies directly influenced anxiety and depression. More specifically, maladaptive coping style (eg, ignore problems) exacerbated depression and anxiety symptoms, while self-efficacy and emotion

  1. Food safety for the solid organ transplant patient: preventing foodborne illness while on chronic immunosuppressive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Patricia A C

    2012-12-01

    Issues regarding food safety are seen increasingly in the news; outbreaks of foodborne illness have been associated with public health concerns ranging from mild illness to death. For the solid organ transplant patient, immunosuppressive and antibacterial drugs, which maintain transplant organ function, can expose the transplant patient to increased risk of foodborne illness from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This review article describes the clinical consequences, sources of foodborne illness, and food safety practices needed to minimize risks to the solid organ transplant patient who must take lifelong immunosuppressive drugs. All members of the transplant team share responsibility for education of the solid organ transplant patient in preventing infections. The registered dietitian, as part of the transplant team, is the recognized expert in providing food safety education in the context of medical nutrition therapy to solid organ transplant patients, the patients' caregivers, and other healthcare providers.

  2. Assessing fluid balance in critically ill pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontant, Thomas; Matrot, Boris; Abdoul, Hendy; Aizenfisz, Sophie; Naudin, Jérôme; Jones, Peter; Dauger, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring fluid balance (FB) in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is crucial to assess fluid overload. Pediatric intensivists (PI) frequently use the fluid intake minus output (FIMO) or FIMO with adjustments for insensible fluid loss (AFIMO). However, the accuracy of FIMO/AFIMO has never been tested in critically ill children. We designed a prospective, monocentric cohort study in a PICU of a university hospital. Body weight (BW) was measured in all children consecutively admitted to PICU and 24 h later. Every 12 h, the nurses calculated FIMO/AFIMO. Time burden and convenience of each procedure (median; [interquartile range]) were recorded and compared using a Wilcoxon test. Data were analysed using linear regression (r (2) coefficient) and the Bland-Altman plot (mean difference ± standard deviation; absolute mean difference), with a 300-ml variation of FB considered clinically relevant. Sixty consecutive patients, 304-day [39-1,565] old with admission weight of 9.2 kg [4.4-17.8] were included. Although correlations between FIMO/AFIMO and BW changes (BWC) were strong (r (2) FIMO = 0.63, p < 0.0001 and r (2) AFIMO = 0.72, p < 0.0001, respectively), agreement between FIMO/AFIMO and BWC were over 300 mL (-0.305 ± 0.451, 0.382 L and -0.007 ± 0.447, 0.302 L, respectively). No significant differences were noted between FIMO/AFIMO and BWC measurements for time burden (5 min [5-10] vs. 5 min [5-10], p = 0.84) or convenience (1 min [1-2] vs. 1 min [0-1.3], p = 0.13). Because agreement between FIMO/AFIMO and BWC is poor during the first 24 h after admission into PICU, PIs may reserve FIMO/AFIMO to monitor FB in patients with absolute contraindications of BW measurements.

  3. Comparison of Saudi Arabian hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients' illness perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Abdulhameed A; Alraddadi, Rajaa M; Alharbi, Alwaleed A; Alharbi, Yazeed A

    2017-11-01

    The clinical outcome of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may differ according to their beliefs concerning their illness and its treatment. Both the disease itself and negative perceptions of the illness may increase patients' morbidity and mortality. This study aims to compare hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients' illness perceptions and their related factors. This cross-sectional comparative study was conducted in five dialysis centers. After excluding patients with psychiatric comorbidities, 342 stable dialysis patients (HD, n = 267; PD, n = 75) completed a demographic questionnaire and the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R). The data were analyzed using t-tests and ANOVAs. Out of the 342 patients, 53.8% were male and 46.2% were female. Their mean age was 46.1 ± 16.5 years. Compared to the HD patients, the PD patients perceived their illness to be significantly less chronic (p = .029) and more controllable, whether through personal or treatment control (p = .012, p = .017). Patients' most common cause of attributions were stress, worry, or poor past medical care. PD showed an advantage over HD in terms of perceptions of ESRD chronicity and controllability. Intervention programs targeting illness perception are needed to support dialysis patients.

  4. Clinical studies to investigate pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial agents in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L.C.E. Buijk (Steven)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The intensive care unit (ICU) is an essential part of the surgical department, providing an environment for surveillance and treatment of the critically ill. Patients are admitted either with a life threatening condition due to a critical illness or they need

  5. Theophylline toxicity leading to suicidal ideation in a patient with no prior psychiatric illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kapoor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Suicidal behavior is a common psychiatric emergency and is associated with psychiatric illness and history of prior suicide attempts. Neuropsychiatric manifestations related to theophylline toxicity are well described in literature. We report a case of theophylline toxicity manifesting as suicidal ideation in a patient with no prior psychiatric illness.

  6. Violent victimization of adult patients with severe mental illness: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latalova K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Klara Latalova,1,2 Dana Kamaradova,1,2 Jan Prasko1,2 1Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic; 2Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic Abstract: The aims of this paper are to review data on the prevalence and correlates of violent victimization of persons with severe mental illness, to critically evaluate the literature, and to explore possible approaches for future research. PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched using several terms related to severe mental illness in successive combinations with terms describing victimization. The searches identified 34 studies. Nine epidemiological studies indicate that patients with severe mental illness are more likely to be violently victimized than other community members. Young age, comorbid substance use, and homelessness are risk factors for victimization. Victimized patients are more likely to engage in violent behavior than other members of the community. Violent victimization of persons with severe mental illness has long-term adverse consequences for the course of their illness, and further impairs the quality of lives of patients and their families. Victimization of persons with severe mental illness is a serious medical and social problem. Prevention and management of victimization should become a part of routine clinical care for patients with severe mental illness. Keywords: victimization, violence, severe mental illness, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder

  7. Illness perceptions in dialysis patients and their association with quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, L.; Thong, M.; Dekker, F.W.; Boeschoten, E.W.; Heijmans, M.; Rijken, M.; Weinman, J.; Kaptein, A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study explored illness perceptions of end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on both haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment, and their associations with quality of life. Leventhal's self-regulation model (SRM) was used as a theoretical framework. Illness perceptions

  8. Illness and Treatment Perceptions Are Associated With Adherence to Medications, Diet, and Exercise in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Donkin, Liesje; Stroh, Julia C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate diabetic patients? perceptions of illness and treatments, and explore relationships to adherence and blood glucose control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forty-nine type 1 and one hundred and eight type 2 diabetic patients completed questionnaires assessing illness perceptions, treatment beliefs, and adherence to medications, diet, and exercise. Blood glucose control was assessed from blood tests. RESULTS Patients rated medication more important than diet and exercise, ...

  9. Acid Suppressive Therapy for Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis in Noncritically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Minh T; Monye, Leslie C; Seifert, Charles F

    2015-09-01

    The current literature discourages the use of acid suppressive therapy (AST) for stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) in noncritically ill patients. However, several sources indicate that the majority of noncritically ill patients are given AST for SUP while there may only be a small proportion of high-risk patients who need SUP therapy. There is a new scoring system to aid practitioners in stratifying the risk of stress ulcer-related gastrointestinal bleeding in noncritically ill patients developed by Herzig et al and appropriately prescribe AST for SUP in this population. Our primary objective was to determine the current usage of AST in noncritically ill patients at a tertiary teaching hospital and use the new scoring system to identify non-intensive care unit patients who were inappropriately given AST. We retrospectively determined the percentage of noncritically ill patients who were given AST on medical floors between January 2010 and December 2012. After identifying these patients, we randomly selected a sample and retrospectively collected data from their medical record to determine the gastrointestinal bleeding risk score to determine if the patient was appropriately given AST. Of the 42 600 admissions, 22 949 (53.7%) noncritically ill patients were given AST. A total of 442 patients were randomly selected for data collection and 156 patients were excluded. Gastrointestinal bleeding risk score was calculated in 286 patients. This new risk stratification tool identified 253 (88.5%) patients to have a low (≤7) and low-medium risk score (8-9). A large percentage of noncritically ill patients were given AST during their hospital stay; 88.5% of these medications were given inappropriately to patients who were at extremely low risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Using the above information and the AST prescribing patterns at our institution, we estimate a potential inpatient medication cost savings of $114 622 for the study period. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Piloting a new approach in primary care to identify, assess and support carers of people with terminal illnesses: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carduff, Emma; Jarvis, Alison; Highet, Gill; Finucane, Anne; Kendall, Marilyn; Harrison, Nadine; Greenacre, Jane; Murray, Scott A

    2016-02-11

    General practices in the United Kingdom are encouraged to have a protocol for the identification of carers and a mechanism for social care referral. However, a minority of carers are identified and those caring for someone with a terminal illness often cope until the situation becomes overwhelming. Earlier identification could enable more timely support. The aim of this project was to model and pilot a systematic approach to identify, assess and support carers of people with supportive and palliative care needs in primary care. The intervention was modelled on the Medical Research Council complex intervention framework with a preliminary theoretical phase, which has been reported elsewhere. In this study, which lasted 12 months, four general practices were recruited. Each practice identified a 'carer liaison' person to take the lead in identifying carers, followed by assessment and support using a toolkit modelled from the earlier phase. Qualitative evaluation interviews were conducted with carers who had received the intervention and the carer liaisons and general practitioners in the pilot practices. A stakeholder event was held to disseminate and deliberate the findings. The practices' populations ranged from 5840 to 10832 patients and across the four practices, 83 carers were identified. Thirty six carers were identified from practice registers (disease - 16; palliative care - 9; carer - 11; advanced care plan - 12), whilst 28 were identified opportunistically by practice staff at appointments or at home. Seven carers self-identified. Overall, 81 carers received the carer pack and 25 returned the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) form. Eleven carers received a follow up call from the practice to discuss support and 12 were also referred/signposted for support. Qualitative interviews suggest carers valued connection with their practices but the paperwork in the toolkit was onerous. This approach to identifying and supporting carers was acceptable, but

  11. Changes in circulating blood volume after infusion of hydroxyethyl starch 6% in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P; Andersson, J; Rasmussen, S E

    2001-01-01

    The cardiovascular response to a volume challenge with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) (200/0.5) 6% depends on the relation between the volume of HES 6% infused and the expansion of the blood volume in critically ill patients. However, only relatively limited data exist on the plasma expanding effect...... of infusion of HES 6% in critically ill patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the variation in the expansion of the circulating blood volume (CBV) in critically ill patients after infusion of 500 ml of colloid (HES (200/0.5) 6%) using the carbon monoxide method....

  12. The attitudes of general hospital doctors toward patients with comorbid mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblett, Joanne E; Lawrence, Robert; Smith, Jared G

    2015-01-01

    What are the attitudes of general hospital doctors toward patients with comorbid mental illness? Do certain characteristics of the health professional related to attitude valence to patients with comorbid mental illness? An anonymous questionnaire was sent out to a cohort of doctors working in three General Hospitals in South West London. The questionnaire included vignettes to assess the respondents' attitudes toward eight patients presenting with a physical compliant with different clinical histories, including depression, schizophrenia, personality disorder, diabetes, and criminal behavior. A total of 52 participants completed the questionnaire; 40 females and 12 males. Across all domains, the most positive attitudes were held toward patients without a diagnosis of mental illness. The least positive attitudes were toward patients with schizophrenia, personality disorder, and those classified as "criminals," and negative attitudes relating to the unpredictability of patients was identified in these categories. There was no statistically significant difference in attitudes depending on age or level of training. However, female participants tended to endorse more positive attitudinal responses, most clearly toward patients with depression and heroin addiction. Negative attitudes of doctors were identified toward certain mental illness diagnoses and are likely to contribute the physical health disparity between patients with and without a comorbid mental illness. This raises the question as to how these attitudes can be changed in order to improve the parity of physical health care between patient with and without mental illness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. [Palliative care: communication as a strategy of care for the terminal patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Cristiani Garrido; da Costa, Solange Fátima Geraldo; Lopes, Maria Emília Limeira

    2013-09-01

    Palliative care involves an approach in the field of care for terminal patients and their families that seeks to assure them better quality of life by establishing good communication. The scope of this study was to verify how nurses use communication in the field of palliative care when assisting patients in the terminal phase. This is exploratory research of a qualitative nature in which 28 nurses working in wards of a hospital in the city of Joao Pessoa in the State of Paraíba participated in the period from August to October 2012. A form was used for data collection that was then analyzed using the content analysis technique. Three categories emerged from the analysis of the material: "palliative care and communication - interpersonal relationship between the nurse and the terminal patient"; "communication in palliative care as a strategy for strengthening the bond between the nurse and the terminal patient"; and "the importance of communication between the nurse and the family of the terminal patient under palliative care." The conclusion reached was that communication is seen to be an effective element of care for the patient in the terminal phase and it is extremely important for the promotion of palliative care.

  14. Oral hygiene care in critically ill patients | Human | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A discussion of the available research evidence to guide oral hygiene care activities includes aspects of timing as well as recommended 'tools'. While some nursing-led research has been published on this topic, there is scope for further investigation into oral hygiene care practices in the critically ill. Southern African ...

  15. Insight and illness perception in Mexican patients with psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizzette Gómez-de-Regil

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: The study not only replicates the significant association on insight and illness perception with clinical outcome, but shows how their patterns of interactions are different, reinforcing the idea that they are two distinct factors worthy of being habitually acknowledged in research and clinical practice.

  16. Illness perceptions and quality of life among tuberculosis patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    depression, daily sleep period, treatment period and ac- companying ... egories such as stress, lifestyle, heredity etc. determined by the particular illness ..... their performance at work and generally in life and could lead with ... Harwood Academic; 1997:155–188. 15. Weinman J ... cal College 2010;4(2):133-137. 24. Guo N ...

  17. Liaison psychiatry professionals' views of general hospital care for patients with mental illness: The care of patients with mental illness in the general hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblett, J; Caffrey, A; Deb, T; Khan, A; Lagunes-Cordoba, E; Gale-Grant, O; Henderson, C

    2017-04-01

    Explore the experiences of liaison psychiatry professionals, to gain a greater understanding of the quality of care patients with mental illness receive in the general hospital setting; the factors that affect the quality of care; and their insights on interventions that could improve care. A survey questionnaire and qualitative in depth interviews were used to collect data. Data collection took place at the Royal College of Psychiatrists Faculty of Liaison Psychiatry Annual conference. Qualitative analysis was done using thematic analysis. Areas of concern in the quality of care of patients with co-morbid mental illness included 'diagnostic overshadowing', 'poor communication with patient', 'patient dignity not respected' and 'delay in investigation or treatment'. Eleven contributing factors were identified, the two most frequently mentioned were 'stigmatising attitudes of staff towards patients with co-morbid mental illness' and 'complex diagnosis'. The general overview of care was positive with areas for improvement highlighted. Interventions suggested included 'formal education' and 'changing the liaison psychiatry team'. The cases discussed highlighted several areas where the quality of care received by patients with co-morbid mental illness is lacking, the consequences of which could be contributing to physical health disparities. It was acknowledged that it is the dual responsibility of both the general hospital staff and liaison staff in improving care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Health professionals' detection of depression and anxiety in their patients with diabetes: The influence of patient, illness and psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Kellee M; Pachana, Nancy A; McDermott, Brett M

    2016-08-01

    This study examines how often depression and anxiety, in patients with diabetes, are detected by health professionals; and whether detection is influenced by patient characteristics (age, gender), illness factors (duration of illness, diabetes control), and self-reported levels of depression and anxiety. Prevalence rates of clinically significant depression and anxiety were high (57% and 36%, respectively); however, of those identified, only 44 and 36 per cent, respectively, were detected by staff as depressed or anxious. The only significant predictors of detection were severity of depressive and anxious symptoms. Patient and illness characteristics did not influence whether professionals identified emotional problems in their patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. The correlates of stigma toward mental illness among Jordanian patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Ahmad; Mahroum, Maryam Husnee; Khasawneh, Aws

    2017-05-23

    This study aims to assess the correlates of stigma toward mental illness among patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). One hundred and sixty one Jordanian outpatients suffering from MDD completed the study. Participants completed the demographic questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiological Studies for the intensity of depression, and the Devaluation-Discrimination Scale to assess stigma. Participants reported a moderate level of perceived stigma toward mental illness. Age, perceived pain, the number of relapses, and severity of depressive symptoms were significantly correlated with stigma toward mental illness among the study sample. The severity of depressive symptoms was the strongest correlate of stigma toward mental illness. Factors associated with stigma toward mental illness should be carefully considered when implementing anti-stigma programs for patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Impact of hospital case volume on quality of end-of-life care in terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Toshitaka; Lee, Jason; Otsubo, Tetsuya; Ikai, Hiroshi; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2013-02-01

    Quality of end-of-life (EOL) care is gaining increasing attention. However, the relationship between hospital case volume and performance of benchmark quality indicators is not well characterized. The aim of this study was to determine whether hospital case volume affects EOL care for terminal cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study using claims data of patients who died of cancer at acute-care hospitals in Kyoto prefecture, Japan, between March 2009 and May 2010. Hospitals were grouped into tertiles based on the number of terminal cancer cases. We used multilevel logistic regression models to examine the association of the following quality indicators with the tertiles: opioid use during the last 2 months of life (indicating good quality of care), provision of intensive care unit (ICU) service or life-sustaining treatments during the last month of life (poor quality), and chemotherapy during the last month of life (poor quality). The final sample for analysis consisted of 3294 decedents from 88 hospitals. Significant associations between hospital case volume and quality of EOL care were identified after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics. Small- and medium-volume hospitals were found to be less likely to administer opioids, and medium-volume hospitals were more likely to provide ICU service or life-sustaining treatments when compared with large-volume hospitals. No significant association between chemotherapy use and case volume was observed. The results showed that the case volume of terminally ill cancer patients was associated with several aspects of quality of EOL care.

  1. Predictors of maternal mortality among critically ill obstetric patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. A case control study to evaluate the predictors of maternal mortality ... mechanical ventilation or inotrophic drugs after admission. Conclusion ... if not controlled for. The inclusion criteria were admission into the ICU during pregnancy or within 42 days of its termination and the complete management data must be.

  2. How does uncertainty shape patient experience in advanced illness? A secondary analysis of qualitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etkind, Simon Noah; Bristowe, Katherine; Bailey, Katharine; Selman, Lucy Ellen; Murtagh, Fliss Em

    2017-02-01

    Uncertainty is common in advanced illness but is infrequently studied in this context. If poorly addressed, uncertainty can lead to adverse patient outcomes. We aimed to understand patient experiences of uncertainty in advanced illness and develop a typology of patients' responses and preferences to inform practice. Secondary analysis of qualitative interview transcripts. Studies were assessed for inclusion and interviews were sampled using maximum-variation sampling. Analysis used a thematic approach with 10% of coding cross-checked to enhance reliability. Qualitative interviews from six studies including patients with heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal disease, cancer and liver failure. A total of 30 transcripts were analysed. Median age was 75 (range, 43-95), 12 patients were women. The impact of uncertainty was frequently discussed: the main related themes were engagement with illness, information needs, patient priorities and the period of time that patients mainly focused their attention on (temporal focus). A typology of patient responses to uncertainty was developed from these themes. Uncertainty influences patient experience in advanced illness through affecting patients' information needs, preferences and future priorities for care. Our typology aids understanding of how patients with advanced illness respond to uncertainty. Assessment of these three factors may be a useful starting point to guide clinical assessment and shared decision making.

  3. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midin Marhani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. Methods General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Results Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356 gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298. Conclusions Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented

  4. Supporting cancer patients in illness management: usability evaluation of a mobile app.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Jelena; Kaufman, David R; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-08-13

    , such as type of access terminal (eg, desktop computer, tablet, mobile phone) and phases of illness. Based on the observed results, we proposed design and functionality recommendations that can be used for the development of mobile apps for cancer patients to support their health management process. Understanding and addressing users' requirements is one of the main prerequisites for developing useful and effective technology-based health interventions. The results of this study outline different user requirements related to the design of the mobile patient support app for cancer patients. The results will be used in the iterative development of the Connect Mobile app and can also inform other developers and researchers in development, integration, and evaluation of mobile health apps and services that support cancer patients in managing their health-related issues.

  5. The perfidious experiences of men as palliative caregivers of people living with HIV/AIDS and other terminal illnesses in Botswana. Eclectic data sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Kangethe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim and objective of this scientific research article is to explore the literature with intent to raise attention to the perfidiousness of the experiences of men as palliative caregivers of people living with HIV/AIDS and other terminal illnesses. The article has utilized eclectic data sources in Botswana and elsewhere. The findings indicate that care giving position of men has been found beset by: retrogressive gender unfriendly cultures; patriarchy; weaker gender empowerment campaigns; and inadequate male involvement in care. The article recommends: (1 a paradigm shift of structural gender dynamics; (2 making AIDS care programmes both gender sensitive and gender neutral; (3 Strengthening gender mainstreaming; (4 diluting cultures and patriarchy; (5 and signing and domesticating SADC gender protocol and other gender friendly international agreements by Botswana government.

  6. Illness and treatment perceptions of ESRD patients: different stages, different perceptions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.; Jansen, D.; Rijken, M.; Grootendorst, D.; Dekker, F.; Boeschoten, E.; Kaptein, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to assess illness and treatment perceptions of patients with ESRD in different stages of the treatment process and to examine changes in these perceptions over time. Pre-dialysis patients (n=109), patients up to three years on dialysis (n=69) and patients longer than three years on

  7. Nursing patients with chronic critical illness and their families: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Doris; Blastorah, Margaret; Nusdorfer, Linda; Jeffs, Angie; Jung, Judy; Howell, Doris; Fillion, Lise; Rose, Louise

    2017-07-01

    chronic critical illness (CCI) is a complex syndrome with a high risk of dying in hospital. Intensive care unit nurses are well-positioned to lead conversations integrating palliative and end-of-life care, yet have reported limited involvement. To generate further understanding of nurses' experiences of patients with CCI and their families. This qualitative study followed Thorne's interpretive description methods. In 2012, 16 intensive care unit nurses from one academic hospital participated in interviews. Our primary theme was that of internal tension generated through participants' knowledge of patients' anticipated and protracted dying, while wanting to shield families from suffering. This internal tension resulted from responsibilities to preserve hope for patients and families, while at the same time wanting to provide them prognostic information. Participants experienced challenges of: (i) preserving family trust, (ii) determining when and how to engage families in discussions and (iii) providing possibilities of a 'good' death. A secondary theme described constraints to acting on their insights because of interprofessional team dynamics or limited communication, within the team and with the family. Internal tension, as experienced by participants reflects the challenges of transition from acute to palliation and end-of-life care, made more complex in CCI, because of its poorly defined terminal stage. Nurses' ability to manage the complex process of supporting hope while gradually providing information to build family understanding of CCI highlights their central role in facilitating what and how prognostic information is given, while managing the emotional implications and family response. To better support nurses do this, we advocate for formal structures enabling nurses to participate in decision-making regarding timing of transitions using palliation and end-of-life care. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  8. Psychometric evaluation of the internalized stigma of mental illness scale for patients with mental illnesses: measurement invariance across time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The current investigation examined the psychometric properties of the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI scale in a sample of patients with mental illness. In addition to the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity that previous studies have tested for the ISMI, we extended the evaluation to its construct validity and measurement invariance using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. METHODS: Three hundred forty-seven participants completed two questionnaires (i.e., the ISMI and the Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale [DSSS], and 162 filled out the ISMI again after 50.23±31.18 days. RESULTS: The results of this study confirmed the frame structure of the ISMI; however, the Stigma Resistance subscale in the ISMI seemed weak. In addition, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity were all satisfactory for all subscales and the total score of the ISMI, except for Stigma Resistance (α = 0.66; ICC = 0.52, and r = 0.02 to 0.06 with DSSS. Therefore, we hypothesize that Stigma Resistance is a new concept rather than a concept in internalized stigma. The acceptable fit indices supported the measurement invariance of the ISMI across time, and suggested that people with mental illness interpret the ISMI items the same at different times. CONCLUSION: The clinical implication of our finding is that clinicians, when they design interventions, may want to use the valid and reliable ISMI without the Stigma Resistance subscale to evaluate the internalized stigma of people with mental illness.

  9. Nothing left to chance? The impact of locus of control on physical and mental quality of life in terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alaina J; Thaker, Premal H; Sun, Charlotte C; Urbauer, Diana L; Bruera, Eduardo; Bodurka, Diane C; Ramondetta, Lois M

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate if locus of control (LOC) predicts various quality of life (QOL) and mental well-being measures among terminally ill cancer patients at the time of palliative care consult. Multi-site analysis of patients with advanced cancer being seen as new patients in a Palliative and Supportive Care outpatient clinic. Patients completed the following surveys: locus of control (LOC) scale, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-General (FACT-G), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual (FACIT-Sp), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), and Herth Hope Index (HHI). Regression models were created to examine the effect of LOC upon QOL, symptoms, and other measures of mental well-being. These models adjusted for the effect of age, gender, race, partnership status, education, and months since diagnosis as potential confounders. This study enrolled 100 patients. After adjusting for site, race, and partnership status, higher levels of LOC chance predicted decreased QOL (FACT-G) (p meaning/peace and faith (p ≤ 0.01). Additionally, higher levels of LOC chance predicted decreased hope (HHI) (p ≤ 0.001). Terminally ill cancer patients with a high LOC chance may be at risk for decreased physical and mental well-being at the end of life. Efforts should be made to identify these patients and design interventions to increase their feeling of control over the situation in order to improve physical and mental well-being at the end of life.

  10. The potential of antimicrobials to induce thrombocytopenia in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Maria Egede; Jensen, Jens Ulrik Stæhr; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial-induced thrombocytopenia is frequently described in the literature among critically ill patients. Several antimicrobials have been implicated, although experimental evidence to demonstrate causality is limited. We report, using a randomized trial, the potential of antimicrobials...... to induce thrombocytopenia....

  11. The role of disease management programs in the health behavior of chronically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); S.A. Adams (Samantha); B.J. Hipple Walters (Bethany); A. Tsiachristas (Apostolos); R.A. Bal (Roland); R. Huijsman (Robbert); M.P.M.H. Rutten-van Mölken (Maureen); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Objective: Investigate the effects of disease management program (DMP) implementation on physical activity, smoking, and physical quality of life among chronically ill patients. Methods: This study used a mixed-methods approach involving qualitative (35 interviews

  12. The effects of motivation feedback in patients with severe mental illness : A cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochems, E.C.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; van Dam, A.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Mulder, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of providing clinicians with regular feedback on the patient’s motivation for treatment in increasing treatment engagement in patients with severe mental illness. Methods: Design: cluster randomized controlled trial (Dutch Trials Registry NTR2968).

  13. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Brinkmann, Saskia J. H.; Buijs, Nikki; Beishuizen, Albertus; Bet, Pierre M.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of

  14. Micafungin versus anidulafungin in critically ill patients with invasive candidiasis: A retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Geest (Patrick); N.G. Hunfeld; S.E. Ladage (Sophie E.); A.B.J. Groeneveld (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract_Background:_ In critically ill patients the incidence of invasive fungal infections caused by Candida spp. has increased remarkably. Echinocandins are recommended as initial treatment for invasive fungal infections. The safety and efficacy of micafungin compared to caspofungin is

  15. Diaphragm muscle fiber weakness and ubiquitin-proteasome activation in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijman, P.E.; Beishuizen, A.; Witt, C.C.; Waard, M.C. de; Girbes, A.R.; Spoelstra-de Man, A.M.; Niessen, H.W.; Manders, E.; Hees, H.W.H. van; Brom, C.E. van den; Silderhuis, V.; Lawlor, M.W.; Labeit, S.; Stienen, G.J.; Hartemink, K.J.; Paul, M.A.; Heunks, L.M.A.; Ottenheijm, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: The clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in critically ill patients is evident: it prolongs ventilator dependency, and increases morbidity and duration of hospital stay. To date, the nature of diaphragm weakness and its underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood.

  16. Early intensive care sedation predicts long-term mortality in ventilated critically ill patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shehabi, Yahya; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Reade, Michael C; Bailey, Michael; Bass, Frances; Howe, Belinda; McArthur, Colin; Seppelt, Ian M; Webb, Steve; Weisbrodt, Leonie

    2012-01-01

    .... To investigate the relationships between early sedation and time to extubation, delirium, and hospital and 180-day mortality among ventilated critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Multicenter...

  17. Beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and continuous renal replacement therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ulldemolins, Marta; Vaquer, Sergi; Llauradó-Serra, Mireia; Pontes, Caridad; Calvo, Gonzalo; Soy, Dolors; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    .... This article aims to describe the current clinical scenario for beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and CRRT, to highlight the sources of variability among the different...

  18. Terminal patients' awareness of impending death: the impact upon requesting adequate care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Willems, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    In this qualitative study, 19 Dutch terminal patients and 23 relatives of deceased patients were interviewed. The interviews revealed that a timely request for care and anticipation of "what was going to happen" was determined by the degree to which patients and their relatives realize that the end

  19. Terminal patients' awareness of impending death: the impact upon requesting adequate care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, Anneke L.; Willems, Dick L.

    2005-01-01

    In this qualitative study, 19 Dutch terminal patients and 23 relatives of deceased patients were interviewed. The interviews revealed that a timely request for care and anticipation of "what was going to happen" was determined by the degree to which patients and their relatives realize that the end

  20. Experiences of depression and illness behavior in patients with intractable chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, N; Fruchter, H J; Trief, P

    1983-01-01

    Studied the relationships between depth of depression, anaclitic and introjective depressive experiences, and dimensions of illness behavior in 37 chronic pain patients. Depth of depression and degree of introjective depressive experiences showed similar positive covariation with a broad range of illness behavior: Namely, hypochondriasis, disease conviction, affective inhibition, affective disturbance, and irritability. The findings suggest that depression characterized by feelings of guilt, worthlessness, and self-doubt, rather than themes of abandonment, is associated differentially with disturbances in the illness behavior of chronic pain patients.

  1. How does uncertainty shape patient experience in advanced illness?:A secondary analysis of qualitative data

    OpenAIRE

    Etkind, Simon; Bristowe, Katherine; Bailey, Katherine; Selman, Lucy E; Murtagh, Fliss

    2017-01-01

    Background: Uncertainty is common in advanced illness, but is infrequently studied in this context. If poorly addressed, uncertainty can lead to adverse patient outcomes. Aim: We aimed to understand patient experiences of uncertainty in advanced illness, and develop a typology of patients’ responses and preferences to inform practice.Design: Secondary analysis of qualitative interview transcripts. Studies were assessed for inclusion and interviews were sampled using maximum-variation sampling...

  2. A retrospective, observational study of patient outcomes for critically ill patients receiving parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Glenn; Zaloga, Gary P; Turpin, Robin S; Sanon, Myrlene

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate health care-related utilization for critically ill patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) administered via a premixed multichamber bag (MCB) or compounded solutions (COM). A retrospective database analysis of critically ill patients (intensive care unit stay ≥ 3 days) receiving PN and discharged between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2011, using the Premier Hospital Database. Patients were identified as receiving MCB or COM on the basis of product description codes. Primary outcomes were length of stay (LOS) and total costs. Comorbidities and clinical outcomes were identified using International Classificaion of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis codes. All costs reported were for inpatient services only. Patients receiving MCB and COM were matched on key patient and hospital characteristics using a propensity score methodology. Multivariate regression models for cost and LOS used generalized linear models with a log link and gamma distribution. A total of 42,631 patients met the inclusion criteria (MCB = 5,679; COM = 36,952), and the final matched population included 3,559 patients from each cohort. Baseline patient and hospital characteristics were well matched between groups. Adjusted multivariate models demonstrated a small difference between groups for LOS (MCB = 9.40 days vs. COM = 9.65 days; P = 0.014). In addition, patients receiving MCB incurred approximately 9.1% less in total costs (MCB = $37,790 vs. COM = $41,569; P MCB and COM experienced similar LOS, though patients receiving MCB had significantly lower overall costs. Interpretation of the study findings is subject to several limitations, and additional studies that include explicit identification of the method for compounding are needed. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acceptance of illness and satisfaction with life among malaria patients in rivers state, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme-Ostapowicz, Katarzyna; Krajewska-Kułak, Elżbieta; Nwosu, Paul J C; Kułak, Wojciech; Sobolewski, Marek; Olszański, Romuald

    2014-05-03

    Health condition is one of the basic factors affecting satisfaction with life, and the level of illness acceptance. The purpose of the study was to analyse the level of illness acceptance, the level of satisfaction with life among malaria patients, and the level of trust placed in the physician and the nurse. The study employs the method of diagnostic survey based on standardised AIS and SWLS scales, as well as Anderson and Dedrick's PPTS and PNTS scales. The average AIS level was 12 points, while the average level of SwL at the SWLS scale was 16.5 points. The average level of trust in the physician and the nurse amounted to 50.6 points and 51.4 points, respectively. The correlation between the level of illness acceptance and self-evaluated satisfaction with life was statistically significant, with R = 0.56. The marital status influenced the level of illness acceptance with p satisfaction with life with p satisfaction with life with p patients did not accept their illness, while the level of satisfaction with life was low. The majority of respondents trusted their physician and nurse. There is a statistically significant correlation between the level of illness acceptance and the self-evaluated satisfaction with life. The marital status had a statistically significant effect on the acceptance of illness and the satisfaction with life. The individuals who had a job demonstrated higher levels of quality of life and illness acceptance.

  4. Caring for terminal AIDS patients: The experiences of caregivers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caregivers experienced caring for patients as fulfi lling and meaningful to them despite the sadness of death and dying. The participants face the death of their patients daily, from a disease that causes untold suffering to the patients, family members and to the caregivers themselves, who wish they could prevent the anguish ...

  5. Diagnosis and treatment delays among elderly breast cancer patients with pre-existing mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglay, Kristy; Santorelli, Melissa L; Hirshfield, Kim M; Williams, Jill M; Rhoads, George G; Lin, Yong; Demissie, Kitaw

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to compare diagnosis and treatment delays in elderly breast cancer patients with and without pre-existing mental illness. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data including 16,636 women 68+ years, who were diagnosed with stage I-IIIa breast cancer in the United States from 2005 to 2007. Mental illness was identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes recorded on inpatient and outpatient claims during the 3 years prior to breast cancer diagnosis. Patients were classified as having no mental illness, anxiety, depression, anxiety and depression, or severe mental illness (bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorder). Multivariable binomial regression was used to assess the association between mental illness and delays of ≥60 and ≥90 days after adjustment for confounders. Patients with comorbid anxiety and depression had an increased risk for diagnosis delay of ≥90 days from symptom recognition (RR 1.11; 95% CI 1.00, 1.23), and those with severe mental illness had an increased risk for initial treatment delay of ≥60 days from diagnosis (RR 1.36; 95% CI 1.06, 1.74). Patients with any mental illness experienced an increased risk for adjuvant chemotherapy delay of ≥90 days from last operation (RR 1.13; 95% CI 1.01, 1.26) and each category of mental illness, except depression, showed a non-significant trend for this association. Breast cancer patients with mental illness should be closely managed by a cross-functional care team, including a psychiatrist, a primary care physician, and an oncologist, to ensure adequate care is received within an appropriate timeframe.

  6. Supporting Cancer Patients in Illness Management: Usability Evaluation of a Mobile App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David R; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-01-01

    influenced by different context-related factors, such as type of access terminal (eg, desktop computer, tablet, mobile phone) and phases of illness. Based on the observed results, we proposed design and functionality recommendations that can be used for the development of mobile apps for cancer patients to support their health management process. Conclusions Understanding and addressing users’ requirements is one of the main prerequisites for developing useful and effective technology-based health interventions. The results of this study outline different user requirements related to the design of the mobile patient support app for cancer patients. The results will be used in the iterative development of the Connect Mobile app and can also inform other developers and researchers in development, integration, and evaluation of mobile health apps and services that support cancer patients in managing their health-related issues. PMID:25119490

  7. Understanding the suffering of a patient with an illness: signs, context and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso Montoro, César; Siles González, José; Amezcua, Manuel; Bonill de Las Nieves, Candela; Pastor Montero, Sonia; Celdrán Mañas, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the suffering of a patient with an illness, by using a secondary research method, that is, a qualitative meta-study. The primary data source of the meta-study includes "biographical reports". This project is based on a case study, in which the first-hand experiences of a patient with an illness were collected. The findings of the reports were compiled using the Archivos de la Memoria collection of the Index Foundation (Granada, Spain) and journals specialized in editing these materials. A selection of 20 biographical reports was targeted. The results of the meta-study show that suffering is a multidimensional process within a framework of ambiguous feelings. The suffering involves family and social network participation. Patients develop a range of strategies to overcome the illness. One of the effects is the fear of illness relapse or worsening.

  8. Uncertainty of illness relationships with mental health and coping processes in fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, John W; Johnson, Lisa M; Zautra, Alex J; Davis, Mary C

    2006-08-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic musculoskeletal pain condition poorly understood in terms of etiology and treatment by both physicians and patients. This condition of "uncertainty of illness" was examined as a variable involved in the adjustment of FMS patients, relating it to their depression, anxiety, affect, and coping styles. Fifty-one community-residing FMS patients provided self-report information on subsets of adjustment variables. Both cross-sectional and more dynamic longitudinal analyses showed that illness uncertainty was significantly associated with anxiety, negative affect, and avoidant and passive coping. Its positive relationship with depression was eliminated when a control variable, pain helplessness, was included as a covariate. Longitudinally, illness uncertainty interacted with interpersonally stressful daily events in predicting reports of reduced positive affect, suggesting that illness uncertainty acts as a risk factor for affective disturbances during stressful times. Implications of these results for therapeutic interventions are discussed.

  9. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN AWARENESS OF ILLNESS (INSIGHT AND HISTORY OF ADDICTION IN HEROIN-ADDICTED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Giovanni Icro eMaremmani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In a group of 1066 heroin addicts, who were seeking treatment for opioid agonist treatment, we looked for differences in historical, demographic and clinical characteristics, between patients with different levels of awareness of illness (insight. The results showed that, in the cohort studied, a majority of subjects lacked insight into their heroin-use behaviour. Compared with the impaired-insight group, those who possessed insight into their illness showed significantly greater awareness of past social, somatic and psychopathological impairments, and had a greater number of past treatment-seeking events for heroin addiction. In contrast with other psychiatric illnesses, the presence of awareness appears to be related to the passing of time and to the worsening of the illness. Methodologies to improve the insight of patients should, therefore, be targeted more directly on patients early in their history of heroin dependence, because the risk of lack of insight is greatest during this period.

  10. Exploration of the illness uncertainty concept in acute and chronic pain patients vs community patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbain, David A; Bruns, Daniel; Disorbio, John M; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2010-05-01

    Illness uncertainty (IU) theory proposes that patients with chronic illness may have difficulty adjusting to the illness if there is significant diagnostic or prognostic uncertainty. Two dimensions of IU theory are "lack of information about diagnoses or severity of the illness" (LIDSI) and "complexity regarding the health care system" (CRHCS). The primary objective of this study was then to compare the prevalence of IU in community nonpatients, community patients, and rehabilitation patients without pain/chronic pain patients (CPPs)/acute pain patients (APPs) as represented by two items with possible face validity for LIDSI ("doctors puzzled by my problems,"doctors missed something important") and three items with possible CRHCS face validity ("doctors don't believe me,"I need to prove my problem is real,"doctors think my problems are in my head"). The secondary objectives were to determine if the LIDSI items are associated with the CRHCS items and to develop predictor models for the LIDSI items in APPs and CPPs. The Battery for Health Improvement Research (BHI-R) version was administered to a healthy (pain-free) community sample (N = 1,478), community patient sample (N = 158), rehabilitation patients without pain (N = 110), rehabilitation APPs (N = 326), and rehabilitation CPPs (N = 341). The IU LIDSI and CRHCS items were contained within the BHI-R. These five patient groups were compared for the risk of endorsement of these items. Correlations were developed between the LIDSI and CRHCS items in APPs and CPPs. APPs and CPPs that affirmed IU items were compared with those not affirming the item on a wide range of demographic variables and Behavior Health Inventory (BHI 2) scales. Significant variables (P < or = 0.01) were then utilized as independent variables in predictor models for the LIDSI items. Community patients and nonpatients, patients from physical therapy/work hardening/chronic pain/vocational rehabilitation programs, and physicians' offices

  11. Effects of Antegrade Accessory Pathway Conduction on QRS Terminal Vector in Patients with Preexcitation Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renguang; Chen, Q I; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Yingjie; Xu, Zhaolong; Wang, Gaopin

    2017-03-01

    Ventricle preexcitation through accessory pathway changes QRS initial vector, and manifests as delta wave on electrocardiogram (ECG). However, QRS terminal vector can also be affected. A total of 158 patients who had single accessory pathway (AP) with antegrade conduction capacity were included and divided into two groups according to the ECG with or without delta wave. Note that 150 patients had delta wave (overt AP group) on ECG; classical preexcitation syndrome was diagnosed before radiofrequency ablation. Eight patients had no delta wave on ECG (unapparent AP group); preexcitation was induced by transesophageal atrial pacing. ECGs and intracardiac electrogram (IEGM) before and after ablation and during atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia were analyzed. (1) In the overt AP group: QRS terminal vector amplitude and polarity changes were observed in all the 150 patients, and were related to AP location and delta wave polarity. (2) In the unapparent AP group: QRS terminal vector changes were found in two out of eight patients, and the initial activation of ventricle myocardium via AP on IEGM was almost simultaneous with the onset of QRS complex on ECG. It is not only the QRS initial vector, but also the QRS terminal vector that can be changed by the antegrade accessory pathway conduction in patients with preexcitation syndrome. The change of QRS terminal vector is valuable for the diagnosis of atypical preexcitation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  13. Being a fellow patient to a critically ill patient leads to feelings of anxiety - An interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jannie; Bonnevie Lundby, Trine; Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard

    2016-01-01

    of the situation can lead to anxiety, a feeling of being forced into patient inter-action and the lack of professional support. Health professionals should have a central role in supporting the fellow patients and communicating with them about their experiences and this does not seem to be fulfilled sufficiently......Objectives To explore in-patients’ experiences being a fellow patient to patients who become critically ill. Design The study was designed as a qualitative phenomenological study. Setting The study was conducted in a surgical ward of a hospital in Denmark. Subjects Fifteen fellow patients...... to patients, who became critically ill. Results Three key themes emerged from the analysis of the data: patients’ interaction, anxiety, and professional support. These findings demonstrated the importance of understanding how patients experienced being a fellow patient to patients, who become critically ill...

  14. Continuity in care of older people chronically ill patients in a battlefield of competing rationales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, Lis; Delmar, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    perspective in care trajectories of older, chronically ill patients. Although they adhered to these ideals, they rarely pursued them in practice. Hindering factors were: organisational values, episodic focus on patients and lack of time. They felt caught in a value conflict between nursing professional values...... perspective in older, chronically ill patients' care as reflected in nursing staff's communication about the patients. DESIGN: Explorative Participatory Action Research (PAR). SETTING: An acute, general medical ward at a Danish university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Hospital and municipality nurses (n = 29......BACKGROUND: Continuity is crucial when caring for older chronically ill patients. Research has shown that the integration of patients' own perspectives on their situation is of utmost importance for continuity and quality of care. Studies have, however, demonstrated a number of problems with health...

  15. Patients with mental illness as victims of homicide: a national consecutive case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodway, Cathryn; Flynn, Sandra; While, David; Rahman, Mohammed S; Kapur, Navneet; Appleby, Louis; Shaw, Jenny

    2014-07-01

    The media attention received by homicides committed by patients with mental illness is thought to increase stigma. However, people with mental illness can also be victims of violence. We aimed to assess how often victims of homicide are current mental health patients and their relationship to the perpetrators. In a national consecutive case-series study, we obtained data for victims and perpetrators of all confirmed homicides between Jan 1, 2003, and Dec 31, 2005, in England and Wales. We requested information about contact with mental health services in the 12 months before the homicide for all victims and perpetrators. For victims and perpetrators who had contact with mental health services in the 12 months before homicide, we sent questionnaires to the clinician responsible for the patient's care. 1496 victims of confirmed homicide died between Jan 1, 2003, and Dec 31, 2005, in England and Wales. Patients with mental illness were more likely to die by homicide than were people in the general population (incidence rate ratio 2·6, 95% CI 1·9-3·4). 90 homicide victims (6%) had contact with mental health services in the 12 months before their death. 213 patients with mental illness were convicted of homicide in the same 3 year period. 29 of 90 patient victims were killed by another patient with mental illness. In 23 of these 29 cases, the victim and perpetrator were known to each other, and in 21 of these cases, the victims and perpetrators were undergoing treatment at the same National Health Service Trust. In these 29 cases in which patient victims were killed by another patient with mental illness, alcohol and drug misuse (19 victims [66%], 27 perpetrators [93%]) and previous violence (7 victims [24%], 7 perpetrators [24%]) were common in both victims and, particularly, perpetrators. In seven of the 29 cases in which the victim was killed by another patient with mental illness, both victim and perpetrator were diagnosed with schizophrenia. The high risk of

  16. Validity and reliability of a Malay version of the brief illness perception questionnaire for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, Boon-How; Vos, Rimke C; Heijmans, Monique; Shariff Ghazali, Sazlina; Fernandez, Aaron; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Illness perceptions involve the personal beliefs that patients have about their illness and may influence health behaviours considerably. Since an instrument to measure these perceptions for Malay population in Malaysia is lacking, we translated and examined the psychometric properties

  17. Validity and reliability of a Malay version of the brief illness perception questionnaire for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, B.H.; Vos, R.; Heijmans, M.; Metzendorf, M.I.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Illness perceptions involve the personal beliefs that patients have about their illness and may influence health behaviours considerably. Since an instrument to measure these perceptions for Malay population in Malaysia is lacking, we translated and examined the psychometric properties

  18. Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness among Schizophrenic Patients and Their Families (Comparative Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Sahar; Zaki, Rania A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was a comparative study aiming to assess the extent of internalized stigma of mental illness among patients with schizophrenia & identify stigma as perceived by family members caring schizophrenic patients. The study was conducted in two settings 1st clinic was outpatient clinic for psychiatric patient affiliated to Abbasia…

  19. End-of-life issues in caring for patients with dementia: the case for palliative care in management of terminal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Albert M E

    2012-02-01

    The number of people suffering with dementia is increasing in the general population and the trend is projected to continue as people live longer, especially in countries with developed economies. The most common cause of dementia (among the many other causes) is Alzheimer's dementia, which is considered a terminal illness. The disease could eventually lead to death, or death could occur as a consequence of co-morbid physical complications. The problem of end of life (EOL) care for patients suffering from dementia though spoken of and written about, does not get the attention and system support as for example patients suffering from cancer receive. Many reasons have been advanced for the current state of affairs where EOL issues for patients suffering from dementia are concerned. This article attempts to revisit the issues, and the reasons, that may contribute to this. Some guidelines on palliative management in cases of patients suffering from severe dementia exist; the evidence base for these guidelines though is relatively weak. The ethical and legal issues that may influence or impact on the decision to initiate the palliative care pathway in the management of EOL issues for dementia patients in the terminal or end stage of the illness is highlighted. Initiatives by the department of health in England and Wales, and other bodies with interest in dementia issues and palliative care in the United Kingdom to ensure good and acceptable EOL pathways for patients with dementia are mentioned.

  20. Which domains of spirituality are associated with anxiety and depression in patients with advanced illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly S; Tulsky, James A; Hays, Judith C; Arnold, Robert M; Olsen, Maren K; Lindquist, Jennifer H; Steinhauser, Karen E

    2011-07-01

    Anxiety and depression are common in seriously ill patients and may be associated with spiritual concerns. Little research has examined how concerns in different domains of spirituality are related to anxiety and depression. To examine the association of spiritual history and current spiritual well-being with symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients with advanced illness. Cross-sectional cohort study Two hundred and ten patients with advanced illness, of whom 1/3 were diagnosed with cancer, 1/3 COPD, and 1/3 CHF. The mean age of the sample was 66 years, and 91% were Christian. Outcome measures were the Profile of Mood States' Anxiety Subscale (POMS) and 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD). Predictors were three subscales of the Spiritual History Scale measuring past religious help-seeking and support, past religious participation, and past negative religious experiences and two subscales of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Spiritual Well-Being Scale measuring the role of faith in illness and meaning, peace, and purpose in life. We conducted multiple regression analyses, controlling for demographics, disease type and severity, self-rated religiousness/spirituality, and frequency of religious attendance and devotion. In adjusted analyses, greater spiritual well-being, including both beliefs about the role of faith in illness and meaning, peace, and purpose in life were associated with fewer symptoms of anxiety (P ≤ 0.001) and depression (P spiritual history were associated with the outcomes. In this diverse sample of seriously ill patients, current spiritual well-being and past negative religious experiences were associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Healthcare providers should consider asking about current spiritual well-being and past negative religious experiences in their assessment of seriously ill patients with symptoms of anxiety and depression.

  1. Transplant in a patient with comorbid psychiatric illness: an ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyum, Eric N; Brown, Douglas; Zihni, Ahmed M; Keune, Jason D; Hong, Barry A; Kodner, Ira J; Ray, Shuddhadeb

    2014-11-01

    This article addresses a difficult ethical dilemma that transplant surgeons may potentially encounter: whether a patient with a psychiatric illness is a good candidate for a liver transplant. This case study illustrates the challenges involved when considering the ethical principles of patient self-determination, distributive justice of scarce medical resources, "social worth," and protection of vulnerable patient populations. Are patients with psychiatric illness able to provide consent for transplantation? Is it possible to avoid misallocating valuable donor organs and, at the same time, fairly allocate these resources? This article seeks to answer these questions and provide insight into this ethical dilemma.

  2. Controversies in the use of fresh frozen plasma in critically ill small animal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Kari Santoro; Silverstein, Deborah C

    2015-01-01

    To review the literature supporting or discouraging the use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion in critically ill patients. Human and animal publications were searched using PubMed without time limits and the following keywords were used: "fresh frozen plasma," "coagulopathy," "hypocoagulable state," "hypercoagulable states," and "critical illness." The commonly used tests of coagulation (eg, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio) are poorly predictive of clinical bleeding. FFP use in critically ill patients is unlikely to result in improved outcomes and may be associated with increased risks. There is insufficient evidence to make definitive conclusions regarding the use of FFP in critically ill animals, but clinical studies are underway that may provide further data that clarify the optimal use of FFP in animals. The use of FFP in critically ill patients remains controversial. In the absence of clinical bleeding or a risk for clinical bleeding associated with a planned procedure, treatment use of FFP is not recommended in human patients. There are insufficient data in critically ill animals to enable formulation of recommendations. Further research is warranted in dogs and cats to establish evidence-based guidelines. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  3. Perceived social support and the sense of coherence in patient-caregiver dyad versus acceptance of illness in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Małgorzata; Dębska, Grażyna; Wojtyna, Ewa

    2017-12-01

    Acceptance of illness is a significant determinant of further coping with a disease. Development of illness acceptance may be associated with the sense of coherence and perception of social support. Cancer is an example of a crisis situation, which affects both the patient and his/her close relatives. Consequently, acceptance of illness may be influenced by factors originating from both sides of caregiver-patient dyad. The aim of this study was to analyse direct and indirect interrelationships between perceived support and the sense of coherence in patient-caregiver dyad, and acceptance of illness in cancer patients. Cross-sectional study. The study included 80 dyads composed of cancer patients and their caregivers. Only cancer patients undergoing oncological treatment at the time of the study, for at least 3 months but no longer than 12 months, were enrolled. All subjects completed perceived support subscale included in the Berlin Social Support Scales, sense of coherence-29 questionnaire to determine the sense of coherence and Acceptance of Illness Scale. Compared to cancer patients, their caregivers presented with significantly lower levels of perceived social support and weaker sense of coherence. The sense of coherence in caregivers and patients was determined by their perceived support levels. The sense of coherence in caregivers turned out to be a key resource influencing acceptance of illness in cancer patients, both directly and indirectly, via their perceived social support and their sense of coherence. The sense of coherence, an intrinsic psychological factor determined by social support, is an important determinant of illness acceptance. Functioning of cancer patients is also modulated by psychosocial characteristics of their caregivers. Greater support offered to caregivers may substantially strengthen the sense of coherence in caregivers and cancer patients and, therefore, may improve the functioning of patient-caregiver dyad in a situation of

  4. Health Care Providers and Dying Patients: Critical Issues in Terminal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1988-01-01

    Identifies three major areas of concern in relationship between health care providers and dying patients: (1) nature of difficulties and stresses associated with terminal care; (2) education of providers for work; and (3) influence of organizational structure and institutionalized values on services for dying patients and families. Reviews…

  5. Coping with a Terminal Diagnosis: Perspectives from Inside the Patient's Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baman, Jayson R

    2016-01-01

    This vignette describes the evolving and intimate relationship between a medical student and his patient, and their shared journey in accepting the patient's terminal diagnosis. The news of her diagnosis touched all parts of her life, and this account explores those effects on a very personal level.

  6. A comparative study of varying doses of enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Sian; Zincuk, Aleksander; Larsen, Ulla Lei

    2013-01-01

    for general ward patients. Studies conducted in orthopaedic patients demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between anti-Xa levels and wound haematoma and thrombosis. Corresponding levels for critically ill patients may well be higher, but have never been validated in large studies. METHODS: 80......INTRODUCTION: Critically ill patients are predisposed to venous thromboembolism. We hypothesized that higher doses of enoxaparin would improve thromboprophylaxis without increasing the risk of bleeding. Peak anti-factor Xa (anti-Xa) levels of 0.1- 0.4 IU/ml, reflect adequate thromboprophylaxis...... critically ill patients weighing 50 - 90 kilograms were randomised in a double-blinded study to receive subcutaneous (sc) enoxaparin: 40 mg once daily (QD), 30 mg twice daily (BID), 40mg BID, or 1mg/kg QD, each administered for three days. Anti-Xa activity was measured at baseline, and daily at 4, 12, 16...

  7. Physiotherapy for adult patients with critical illness: recommendations of the European Respiratory Society and European Society of Intensive Care Medicine Task Force on Physiotherapy for Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselink, R; Bott, J; Johnson, M; Dean, E; Nava, S; Norrenberg, M; Schönhofer, B; Stiller, K; van de Leur, H; Vincent, J L

    2008-07-01

    The Task Force reviewed and discussed the available literature on the effectiveness of physiotherapy for acute and chronic critically ill adult patients. Evidence from randomized controlled trials or meta-analyses was limited and most of the recommendations were level C (evidence from uncontrolled or nonrandomized trials, or from observational studies) and D (expert opinion). However, the following evidence-based targets for physiotherapy were identified: deconditioning, impaired airway clearance, atelectasis, intubation avoidance, and weaning failure. Discrepancies and lack of data on the efficacy of physiotherapy in clinical trials support the need to identify guidelines for physiotherapy assessments, in particular to identify patient characteristics that enable treatments to be prescribed and modified on an individual basis. There is a need to standardize pathways for clinical decision-making and education, to define the professional profile of physiotherapists, and increase the awareness of the benefits of prevention and treatment of immobility and deconditioning for critically ill adult patients.

  8. Population Pharmacokinetics of Piperacillin in Nonobese, Obese, and Morbidly Obese Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobaid, Abdulaziz S; Wallis, Steven C; Jarrett, Paul; Starr, Therese; Stuart, Janine; Lassig-Smith, Melissa; Mejia, Jenny Lisette Ordóñez; Roberts, Michael S; Roger, Claire; Udy, Andrew A; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2017-03-01

    The treatment of infections in critically ill obese and morbidly obese patients is challenging because of the combined physiological changes that result from obesity and critical illness. The aim of this study was to describe the population pharmacokinetics of piperacillin in a cohort of critically ill patients, including obese and morbidly obese patients. Critically ill patients who received piperacillin-tazobactam were classified according to their body mass index (BMI) as nonobese, obese, and morbidly obese. Plasma samples were collected, and piperacillin concentrations were determined by a validated chromatographic method. Population pharmacokinetic analysis and Monte Carlo dosing simulations were performed using Pmetrics software. Thirty-seven critically ill patients (including 12 obese patients and 12 morbidly obese patients) were enrolled. The patients' mean ± standard deviation age, weight, and BMI were 50 ± 15 years, 104 ± 35 kg, and 38.0 ± 15.0 kg/m(2), respectively. The concentration-time data were best described by a two-compartment linear model. The mean ± SD parameter estimates for the final covariate model were a clearance of 14.0 ± 7.1 liters/h, a volume of distribution of the central compartment of 49.0 ± 19.0 liters, an intercompartmental clearance from the central compartment to the peripheral compartment of 0.9 ± 0.6 liters · h(-1), and an intercompartmental clearance from the peripheral compartment to the central compartment of 2.3 ± 2.8 liters · h(-1) A higher measured creatinine clearance and shorter-duration infusions were associated with a lower likelihood of achieving therapeutic piperacillin exposures in patients in all BMI categories. Piperacillin pharmacokinetics are altered in the presence of obesity and critical illness. As with nonobese patients, prolonged infusions increase the likelihood of achieving therapeutic concentrations. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Psychological process from hospitalization to death among uninformed terminal liver cancer patients in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobori Eiko

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the attitude among doctors toward disclosing a cancer diagnosis is becoming more positive, informing patients of their disease has not yet become a common practice in Japan. We examined the psychological process, from hospitalization until death, among uninformed terminal cancer patients in Japan, and developed a psychological model. Methods Terminal cancer patients hospitalized during the recruiting period voluntarily participated in in-depth interviews. The data were analyzed by grounded theory. Results Of the 87 uninformed participants at the time of hospitalization, 67% (N = 59 died without being informed of their diagnosis. All were male, 51–66 years of age, and all experienced five psychological stages: anxiety and puzzlement, suspicion and denial, certainty, preparation, and acceptance. At the end of each stage, obvious and severe feelings were observed, which were called "gates." During the final acceptance stage, patients spent a peaceful time with family, even talking about their dreams with family members. Conclusion Unlike in other studies, the uninformed patients in this study accepted death peacefully, with no exceptional cases. Despite several limitations, this study showed that almost 70% of the uninformed terminal cancer patients at hospitalization died without being informed, suggesting an urgent need for culturally specific and effective terminal care services for cancer patients in Japan.

  10. Initial Efficacy Testing of an Autobiographical Memory Intervention on Advance Care Planning for Patients With Terminal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohard, Cheryl

    2017-11-01

    To test the efficacy of a novel intervention to facilitate advance care planning.
. Exploratory, quasiexperimental pilot study with two independent groups.
. A large hospice located in the southwestern United States. 
. A convenience sample of 50 participants with terminal cancer enrolled in hospice.
. An autobiographical memory (ABM) intervention used the participants' experiences with cancer and end of life for the purpose of directing advance care planning.
. Two domains of advance care planning, decision making and communication, were measured in relation to 11 variables. The ABM intervention was nonthreatening, short in duration, and easily completed with participants as they recalled, without hesitation, specific personal memories of family and friends who had died and their advance care plans. The Mann-Whitney nonparametric test revealed that participants in the experimental group had a higher average rank than those in the control group for communicating the decision about antibiotics, as well as exhibited a trend toward significance for five other advance care planning variables.
. Findings showed that directive ABMs may be effective in influencing the decision making and communication of advance care planning for terminally ill patients with cancer.
. The current level of understanding about using the ABM intervention suggests that nurses can initiate an advance care planning conversation using this approach.

  11. Powerlessness in Terminal Care of Demented Patients: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlund, Britt Mari; Norberg, Astrid

    1990-01-01

    Interviewed five caregiving nursing staff members involved in dementia care concerning their ambivalent feelings toward spoon-feeding a severely demented patient. Although tube-feeding was regarded as an easier way to provide nourishment, spoon-feeding was preferred because it provided more human contact and love. (Author/NB)

  12. Cultural diversity in physical diseases among patients with mental illnesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jens I; Andersen, Ulla A; Becker, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    in accordance with ICD-10 were also registered. Psychiatric and physical comorbidity were calculated and standardized rate ratio incidences of background populations were our primary measures.Results:Incidence rate ratios were increased for both CVD, DM and overweight in both F2 and F3 in all cultures (Western...... in background populations was seen and was most marked in overweight.Conclusions:Overweight, CVD and DM were increased in schizophrenia spectrum disorders and affective disorders in all three cultures investigated (Western Europe, Nigeria and Japan). Lifestyle diseases were also seen in Nigeria and Japan....... The results from this study indicate that cultural background might be seen as an important factor in dealing with lifestyle diseases among people with a severe mental illness, as it is in the general population....

  13. Applying a coping with stress questionnaire for cancer patients to patients with non-cancer chronic illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orive, Miren; Quintana, Jose M; Vrotsou, Kalliopi; Las Hayas, Carlota; Bilbao, Amaia; Barrio, Irantzu; Matellanes, Begoña; Padierna, Jesús A

    2013-06-01

    One of the few instruments to evaluate coping skills among patients with chronic illnesses is the Cuestionario de Afrontamiento al Estrés para Pacientes Oncológicos (CAEPO), created initially for cancer patients. We evaluate how well CAEPO applies to patients with non-cancer chronic illnesses. A total of 344 patients (115 with chronic hepatitis C, 120 with inflammatory bowel disease and 109 with recurrent vertigo) completed the CAEPO. Exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha provide only partial support for the seven factors suggested by the original CAEPO. A streamlined version with fewer dimensions and items may be a better solution for identifying coping strategies among these patients.

  14. Iatrogenic Opioid Withdrawal in Critically Ill Patients: A Review of Assessment Tools and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ada W; Contreras, Sofia; Mehta, Sangeeta; Korman, Jennifer; Perreault, Marc M; Williamson, David R; Burry, Lisa D

    2017-12-01

    To (1) provide an overview of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and risk factors of iatrogenic opioid withdrawal in critically ill patients and (2) conduct a literature review of assessment and management of iatrogenic opioid withdrawal in critically ill patients. We searched MEDLINE (1946-June 2017), EMBASE (1974-June 2017), and CINAHL (1982-June 2017) with the terms opioid withdrawal, opioid, opiate, critical care, critically ill, assessment tool, scale, taper, weaning, and management. Reference list of identified literature was searched for additional references as well as www.clinicaltrials.gov . We restricted articles to those in English and dealing with humans. We identified 2 validated pediatric critically ill opioid withdrawal assessment tools: (1) Withdrawal Assessment Tool-Version 1 (WAT-1) and (2) Sophia Observation Withdrawal Symptoms Scale (SOS). Neither tool differentiated between opioid and benzodiazepine withdrawal. WAT-1 was evaluated in critically ill adults but not found to be valid. No other adult tool was identified. For management, we identified 5 randomized controlled trials, 2 prospective studies, and 2 systematic reviews. Most studies were small and only 2 studies utilized a validated assessment tool. Enteral methadone, α-2 agonists, and protocolized weaning were studied. We identified 2 validated assessment tools for pediatric intensive care unit patients; no valid tool for adults. Management strategies tested in small trials included methadone, α-2 agonists, and protocolized sedation/weaning. We challenge researchers to create validated tools assessing specifically for opioid withdrawal in critically ill children and adults to direct management.

  15. La ética en la asistencia humanizada al paciente terminal Ethics of humanized assistance to terminal patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Velásquez

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se analizan aspectos éticos de la asistencia a los pacientes terminales; se hace énfasis en la necesidad de que haya una comunicación seria y responsable con ellos y de que se actúe siempre en forma sensible, en el marco de la ética y con miras a proteger sus derechos, en particular su autonomía y dignidad. Se discuten la orden de no resucitar, el suicido ayudado y la eutanasia.

    Ethical aspects concerning the attendance of terminally-111 patients are analyzed. Emphasis is given to the need of having a serious and responsible communication with them, always acting in a sensitive form and within the framework of ethics. The main goal should be to protect the rights of patients specially their autonomy and dignity. The concepts of do-not resucitate, assisted suicide and euthanasia are considered.

  16. The Ethical and Legal Dilemma in Terminating the Physician-Patient Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senderovitch, Helen

    2016-05-01

    A physician-patient relationship is essential for the well-being of the patient, for without a strong and trusting relationship between both individuals, the patient may not receive the best care that they deserve. There are many legal policies and ethical principles a physician must follow when caring for a patient. It is both the legal and moral duty of the physician to act in the best interests of their patients, while making sure to respect them regardless of background and personal behaviours. The relationship is secured with both trust and respect, for without trust, the patient may hold back from stating their conditions which will result in the physician not providing them with all the care they require. Sometimes, lack of some of these key characteristics of the physician-patient relationship and other circumstances, may cause either the patient or the physician to terminate the relationship. Termination of a relationship creates a difficult situation for the patient, and therefore there are only specific situations where a physician may have permission to follow through and terminate their relationship. Both the law and ethical principles play a role in the decisions made by the physician in regards to their relationship with the patient, but regardless, the physician has the obligation to make sure their patient is receiving care by one means or another.

  17. Lived Experiences of "Illness Uncertainty" of Iranian Cancer Patients: A Phenomenological Hermeneutic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Moosa; Rassouli, Maryam; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Brant, Jeannine; Majd, Hamid Alavi

    2016-01-01

    For cancer patients, uncertainty is a pervasive experience and a major psychological stressor that affects many aspects of their lives. Uncertainty is a multifaceted concept, and its understanding for patients depends on many factors, including factors associated with various sociocultural contexts. Unfortunately, little is known about the concept of uncertainty in Iranian society and culture. This study aimed to clarify the concept and explain lived experiences of illness uncertainty in Iranian cancer patients. In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, 8 cancer patients participated in semistructured in-depth interviews about their experiences of uncertainty in illness. Interviews continued until data saturation was reached. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, analyzed, and interpreted using 6 stages of the van Manen phenomenological approach. Seven main themes emerged from patients' experiences of illness uncertainty of cancer. Four themes contributed to uncertainty including "Complexity of Cancer," "Confusion About Cancer," "Contradictory Information," and "Unknown Future." Two themes facilitated coping with uncertainty including "Seeking Knowledge" and "Need for Spiritual Peace." One theme, "Knowledge Ambivalence," revealed the struggle between wanting to know and not wanting to know, especially if bad news was delivered. Uncertainty experience for cancer patients in different societies is largely similar. However, some experiences (eg, ambiguity in access to medical resources) seemed unique to Iranian patients. This study provided an outlook of cancer patients' experiences of illness uncertainty in Iran. Cancer patients' coping ability to deal with uncertainty can be improved.

  18. Do Aspirin and Other Antiplatelet Drugs Reduce the Mortality in Critically Ill Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Lösche

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activation has been implicated in microvascular thrombosis and organ failure in critically ill patients. In the first part the present paper summarises important data on the role of platelets in systemic inflammation and sepsis as well as on the beneficial effects of antiplatelet drugs in animal models of sepsis. In the second part the data of retrospective and prospective observational clinical studies on the effect of aspirin and other antiplatelet drugs in critically ill patients are reviewed. All of these studies have shown that aspirin and other antiplatelet drugs may reduce organ failure and mortality in these patients, even in case of high bleeding risk. From the data reviewed here interventional prospective trials are needed to test whether aspirin and other antiplatelet drugs might offer a novel therapeutic option to prevent organ failure in critically ill patients.

  19. A feasible strategy for preventing blood clots in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (FBI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Sian I.; Zincuk, A.; Larsen, U. L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous pharmacokinetic trials suggested that 40 mg subcutaneous enoxaparin once daily provided inadequate thromboprophylaxis for intensive care unit patients. Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism and yet are often excluded...... from these trials. We hypothesized that for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving continuous renal replacement therapy, a dose of 1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily would improve thromboprophylaxis without increasing the risk of bleeding. In addition, we seek to utilize...... assign eligible critically ill adults with acute kidney injury into a treatment (1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) or control arm (40 mg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) upon commencement of continuous renal replacement therapy.We calculated that with 133 patients in each group...

  20. A protocol of no sedation for critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Thomas; Martinussen, Torben; Toft, Palle

    2010-01-01

    in the control group (n=11, 20%vs n=4, 7%; p=0.0400). INTERPRETATION: No sedation of critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation is associated with an increase in days without ventilation. A multicentre study is needed to establish whether this effect can be reproduced in other facilities. FUNDING......BACKGROUND: Standard treatment of critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation is continuous sedation. Daily interruption of sedation has a beneficial effect, and in the general intesive care unit of Odense University Hospital, Denmark, standard practice is a protocol of no sedation....... We aimed to establish whether duration of mechanical ventilation could be reduced with a protocol of no sedation versus daily interruption of sedation. METHODS: Of 428 patients assessed for eligibility, we enrolled 140 critically ill adult patients who were undergoing mechanical ventilation and were...

  1. [Music therapy used on a patient in the terminal stage of cancer who narrated a tale based on her fantasy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Kato, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    Music therapy was used on a patient in the terminal stage of cancer who described a fantastic tale built around her imagined pregnancy. We believe that psychiatric intervention was successful through the introduction of music therapy as part of her palliative treatment. Particularly notable in this case was that the patient dealt with the development of ascites by telling a fantastic tale related to a pregnancy--i.e., becoming pregnant with the therapist's child. Her tale started by statements such as "I am pregnant and suffering from morning sickness" and "I am in the third month of pregnancy with the child of my therapist." This progressed in parallel with the actual changes in her physiological symptoms. Among the attending physician, the patient, and her family, this imaginary tale was an important means of communication. The theme of pregnancy, love, and family developed from an unconscious dynamic process between the physician and patient, which could be interpreted as a family-related story originating in the mind of a terminally ill patient. Through this family romance with a major theme of pregnancy, the patient was able to sense her physical crises. This process may be thought of as a product of the so-called "mythgenerating capacity" under limited conditions, which was proposed by Ellenberger. Being aware of this situation, the attending physician and others in charge of her care did not insist on negating her story: instead they accepted her fantasy, and through it they succeeded in establishing psychiatric communications. The process may be considered a form of the narrative approach that is currently attracting attention. In this example, the "process of mourning" and "stages of accepting death" in the terminal state found an outlet in the creation of a fantasy. We believe that this case illustrates the important role of communication between the physician and a patient through the acceptance by the former of a fantastic tale given by the latter; and

  2. critically ill obstetric and gynaecological patients in the intensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gynaecological sepsis are rarely seen and management strategies for these patients are poorly documented. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Patients. A retrospective study was undertaken of all obstetric and gynaecological patients admitted to the multidisciplinary ICU .between January 1985 and December 1996 for whom ...

  3. Critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis are at increased risk for extensive gallbladder inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Marios; Ambe, Peter C; Zirngibl, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a common diagnosis and surgery is the standard of care for young and fit patients. However, due to high risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality, surgical management of critically ill patients remains a controversy. It is not clear, whether the increased risk of perioperative complications associated with the management of critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis is secondary to reduced physiologic reserve per se or to the severity of gallbladder inflammation. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis in a university hospital over a three-year-period was performed. The ASA scores at the time of presentation were used to categorize patients into two groups. The study group consisted of critically ill patients with ASA 3 and 4, while the control group was made up of fit patients with ASA 1 and 2. Both groups were compared with regard to perioperative data, postoperative outcome and extent of gallbladder inflammation on histopathology. Two hundred and seventeen cases of acute cholecystitis with complete charts were available for analysis. The study group included 67 critically ill patients with ASA 3 and 4, while the control group included 150 fit patients with ASA 1 and 2. Both groups were comparable with regard to perioperative data. Histopathology confirmed severe cholecystitis in a significant number of cases in the study group compared to the control group (37 % vs. 18 %, p = 0.03). Significantly higher rates of morbidity and mortality were recorded in the study group (p < 0.05). Equally, significantly more patients from the study group were managed in the ICU (40 % vs. 8 %, p = 0.001). Critically ill patients presenting with acute cholecystitis are at increased risk for extensive gallbladder inflammation. The increased risk of morbidity and mortality seen in such patients might partly be secondary to severe acute

  4. Effects of an in-hospital nursing intervention on changing illness perceptions in patients with injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bih-O; Chien, Chi-Sheng; Hung, Chang-Chiao; Chou, Pi-Ling

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a nursing intervention in changing the illness perceptions of injured patients. Illness perceptions have been found to be among the important patient outcomes after an injury. Research has suggested that a designed intervention might be an effective means of shaping injured patients' illness perceptions. An experimental study design was employed. A total of 82 injured patients completed this study, with 42 in the experimental group and 40 in the control group. Data were collected from 2011-2013. A trained nurse practitioner delivered an in-hospital nursing intervention according to self-regulatory theory. The outcome measure was the change in illness perceptions of injury among the patients as measured by the Chinese Illness Perception Questionnaire Revised-Trauma (the Chinese IPQ-R-Trauma), which comprises eight subscales. The experimental and control groups were followed up via telephone survey 3 months after discharge. The generalized estimating equations were used to analyse the data. The results showed statistically significant differences on two subscales of the Chinese IPQ-R-Trauma, Identity and Controllability, before and after the intervention. Results for the remaining six subscales did not change significantly. The findings indicate that the intervention resulted in a decrease in injury-related physical symptoms and in increases in positive perceptions among patients about controlling their postinjury condition. This nursing intervention led to changes in patients' illness perceptions and potentially improved the patients' self-regulation after their injuries. Future research can be conducted to enhance the effectiveness of the intervention protocol. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Emergency nurses' perceptions of sedation management practices for critically ill intubated patients: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varndell, Wayne; Fry, Margaret; Elliott, Doug

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore factors influencing practices in assessing, titrating and managing sedation for the critically ill intubated patients, from the perspective of emergency nurses. The number of critically ill patients presenting to Australian public Emergency Departments has increased by over 30% since 1980. Emergency nurses are increasingly relied upon to manage sedation of critically ill intubated patients. There is little evidence within international literature relating to how emergency nurses accomplish this. Descriptive qualitative study. A purposive sample of 15 experienced emergency nurses participated in semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Transcribed data were analysed using thematic analysis. The qualitative analysis yielded five themes: becoming the resuscitation nurse; becoming confident as the resuscitation nurse; communicating about sedation; visual cues and the vanishing act. The safety and quality of sedation experienced by critically ill intubated patients in ED was the responsibility of emergency nurses, yet uncertainties and barriers were evident. Patient continuity of care, including optimisation of comfort relies upon the knowledge, skills and expertise of the emergency nurse allocated to the resuscitation area. For most nurses transitioning into the resuscitation nurse role, it represents the first time they will have had contact with patients with highly complex needs and sedation. The use of self-directed clinical workbooks and supervised clinical practice alone may be insufficient to adequately prepare nurses for the spectrum of critically ill sedated patients managed in the resuscitation area; a situation made worse in the presence of poor team communication. The findings of this study should assist in the development of policy and formal education of emergency nurses transitioning into the resuscitation area and the management of continuous intravenous sedation to critically ill mechanically ventilated patients is

  6. [Medical care support intervention to the patient and family who has chosen a terminal care at home - an influence of satisfactory experience on the culture of terminal care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Mariko; Kouketsu, Nobuko; Ozaki, Mitsuyo; Tomita, Ikue; Hong, Youngjae; Miura, Hisayuki; Nishikawa, Mitsunori; Yokoe, Yuriko; Nakashima, Kazumitsu

    2010-12-01

    The National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology in Japan implemented a home medical care support system for aged patients in April 2009. In this study, we report a case of terminal care system where a medical care intervention was carried out by a close coordination of visiting nurses and other staffs with a "at-home terminal care" brochure on hand, and we discussed how this system was brought forward satisfactory and how it affected this culture.

  7. Fungal Peritonitis: Underestimated Disease in Critically Ill Patients with Liver Cirrhosis and Spontaneous Peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmer, Tobias; Brandl, Andreas; Rasch, Sebastian; Schmid, Roland M; Huber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous peritonitis, especially spontaneous fungal peritonitis (SFP), is an important and potentially fatal complication in patients with endstage liver disaese. We evaluated potential risk factors, microbiological findings, and outcome of patients with SFP compared to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in critically ill patients. Retrospective analyses of critically ill patients with suspected spontaneous peritonitis. Out of 205 patients, 20 (10%) had SFP, 28 (14%) had SBP, 48 (24%) had peritonitis without microbiological findings (SP) and 109 (52%) had no-peritonitis (NP). APACHE II and SOFA score were significantly higher in patients with SFP (26; 22-28; pperitonitis could be significantly more often found in patients with SFP (65%; pperitonitis was significantly more often in patients with SFP (85%; pperitonitis.

  8. Fatigue in Patients With Advanced Terminal Cancer Correlates With Inflammation, Poor Quality of Life and Sleep, and Anxiety/Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alex Rua; Trufelli, Damila Cristina; Fonseca, Fernando; de Paula, Larissa Carvalho; Giglio, Auro Del

    2016-12-01

    To assess which laboratory and clinical factors are associated with fatigue in patients with terminal cancer. We evaluated 51 patients with advanced incurable solid tumors using the Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire (CFQ) and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) scale for fatigue; the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI-BR) for sleep quality; the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for anxiety and depression; the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Core Quality of Life Questionnaire, Version 3.0 (QLQ C-30); and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) for quality of life. We also analyzed several inflammatory markers and the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS). We observed severe fatigue in 19 (38%) patients (FACIT-F score >36). There was a significant correlation between fatigue as evaluated by the CFQ and quality of sleep and between the CFQ mental fatigue subscale scores and TNF-α level. When fatigue was evaluated using the FACIT-F scale, we observed a significant association between fatigue and anxiety/depression, quality of sleep, mGPS, and hemoglobin levels. Fatigue measured both with the CFQ and FACIT-F scale correlated with poor quality of life according to the EORTC QLQ C-30. In patients with advanced cancer, fatigue is a common symptom associated with the presence of inflammation, poor quality of sleep, depression/anxiety, and poor quality of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Determinants of post-intensive care mortality in high-level treated critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iapichino, G; Morabito, A; Mistraletti, G; Ferla, L; Radrizzani, D; Miranda, DR

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To assess the predictive ability of preillness and illness variables, impact of care, and discharge variables on the post-intensive care mortality. Setting and patients. 5,805 patients treated with high intensity of care in 89 ICUs in 12 European countries (EURICUS-I study) surviving ICU

  10. Changing the obesogenic environment of severe mentally ill residential patients : ELIPS, a cluster randomised study design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijmans, Anne; Jorg, Frederike; Schoevers, Robert A.; Bruggeman, Richard; Stolk, Ronald P.; Corpeleijn, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe mentally ill (SMI) patients have a reduced life expectancy of 13-30 years compared to the general population, largely due to an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviours in SMI patients contribute to this increased risk. The obesogenic living

  11. Malnutrition in the acutely ill patient: is it more than just protein and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnutrition in the acutely ill patient: is it more than just protein and energy? ... This new knowledge creates a new era in nutritional support, where nutritional therapy is presenting the surgical and critical care community with a “unique opportunity” to improve patient outcomes with a safe, relatively inexpensive and effective ...

  12. Bedside percutaneous transseptal mitral commissurotomy under sole transthoracic echocardiographic guidance in a critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Vijay K; Nigam, Arima; Mukhopadhyay, Saibal; Yusuf, Jamal; UmaMahesh, C R; Gupta, Mohit D; Girish, Menahalli Palleda; Sharma, Manish

    2006-04-01

    Percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy is an effective and safe alternative to surgical treatment, in selected patients of rheumatic mitral stenosis. It is usually performed under fluoroscopic guidance in the catheterization laboratory. We report the successful performance of emergency mitral commissurotomy by the Inoue balloon at bedside under sole transthoracic echocardiographic guidance in a critically ill patient.

  13. Illness/treatment perceptions and overprotection as determinants of labour participation in renal patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.; Heijmans, M.; Rijken, M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives (1): To gain insight into the role of illness/treatment perceptions and overprotection in the labour participation and autonomy of patients with renal insufficiency and (2) to develop a protocol to assist renal patients to start, stay or reintegrate on the labour market. Methods (1):

  14. The role of disease management programs in the health behavior of chronically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Adams, Samantha A; Walters, Bethany Hipple; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-04-01

    Investigate the effects of disease management program (DMP) implementation on physical activity, smoking, and physical quality of life among chronically ill patients. This study used a mixed-methods approach involving qualitative (35 interviews with project managers) and quantitative (survey of patients from 18 DMPs) data collection. Questionnaire response rates were 51% (2010; 2619/5108) at T0 and 47% (2011; 2191/4693) at T1. Physical activity and the percentage of smokers improved significantly over time, whereas physical quality of life declined. After adjusting for patients' physical quality of life at T0, age, educational level, marital status, and gender, physical activity at T0 (pmanagers reported that DMPs improved patient-professional interaction. The ability to set more concrete targets improved patients' health behaviors. DMPs appear to improve physical activity among chronically ill patients over time. Furthermore, (changes in) health behavior are important for the physical quality of life of chronically ill patients. Redesigning care systems and implementing DMPs based on the chronic care model may improve health behavior among chronically ill patients. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Elemental composition of blood and hair of mentally–ill patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elemental concentrations of blood and hair of 40 mentally-ill patients and 40 controls (healthy subjects) were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrophotometer (ICP-OES) in order to find out the metal burden of the patients with their level of significance and possible relationship of such ...

  16. Illness representations of type 2 diabetes patients are associated with perceptions of diabetes threat in relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, S.C.M.; Nijkamp, M.D.; Cornel, M.C.; Snoek, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the fight against the type 2 diabetes epidemic, patients might be asked to discuss familial susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in their family. Illness representations of patients (N = 546) were assessed to explore their impact on perceived type 2 diabetes threat in relatives. Reporting high type

  17. Dental Hygiene Students' Preparation for Treatment of Patients with Mental Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Sherry; Reveal, Marge

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 138 dental hygiene programs gathered information on didactic and clinical experiences for preparing students to treat patients with mental illnesses. Although most curricula addressed the issue, inadequate time was allotted. Over half did not provide oral care to these patients; few felt the community's need was met. (MSE)

  18. Identity work and illness careers of patients with medically unexplained symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, Camilla Blach; Buus, Niels; Stenager, Elsebeth

    2018-01-01

    This article reports a case study of the illness career and identity work of patients who have had medically unexplained symptoms for many years with a particular emphasis on their interactions with a specialized and standardized health care system. Patients with medically unexplained symptoms...

  19. Individualised antibiotic dosing for patients who are critically ill: challenges and potential solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberts, J.A.; Abdul-Aziz, M.H.; Lipman, J.; Mouton, J.W.; Vinks, A.A.; Felton, T.W.; Hope, W.W.; Farkas, A.; Neely, M.N.; Schentag, J.J.; Drusano, G.; Frey, O.R.; Theuretzbacher, U.; Kuti, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Infections in critically ill patients are associated with persistently poor clinical outcomes. These patients have severely altered and variable antibiotic pharmacokinetics and are infected by less susceptible pathogens. Antibiotic dosing that does not account for these features is likely to result

  20. Illness perceptions and treatment perceptions of patients with chronic kidney disease: different phases, different perceptions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.L.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Rijken, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Grootendorst, D.C.; Dekker, F.W.; Boeschoten, E.W.; Kaptein, A.A.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the variability of illness and treatment perceptions – that have been found to be associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients' outcomes (e.g., quality of life) – across the CKD trajectory, by investigating whether there are differences in perceptions in patients: (1)