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Sample records for terminalia fagifolia combretaceae

  1. Gastric Antiulcerogenic and Hypokinetic Activities of Terminalia fagifolia Mart. & Zucc. (Combretaceae

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    Paulo Humberto M. Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute toxicity, the antioxidant activity, and the pharmacological activity on the gastrointestinal tract of rodents of the ethanolic extract (TFEE from the bark of Terminalia fagifolia Mart. & Zucc. (Combretaceae and of its aqueous (TFAqF, hydroalcoholic (TFHAF, and hexanic (TFHEXF partition fractions have been evaluated. TFEE presented low acute toxicity, antioxidant, and antiulcerogenic activity against ethanol-induced ulcers, which was partially blocked by pretreatment with L-NAME and indomethacin. It reduced the total acidity and raised the pH of gastric secretion. Additionally, TFEE delayed gastric emptying and slightly inhibited the small intestinal transit and also presented a weakly antidiarrheal activity. The antiulcerogenic and antioxidant activity were also detected in TFAqF and TFHAF but not in TFHEXF. The antisecretory and gastroprotective activity of TFEE partially involve the nitric oxide and prostaglandin participation. Nevertheless, TFEE, TFAqF, and TFHAF drastically reduced the mucus layer adhered to the gastric wall of rats treated with ethanol or indomethacin. Complementary studies are required in order to clarify the paradox of the presence of a gastroprotector activity in this plant that, at the same time, reduces the mucus layer adhered to the gastric wall.

  2. The development of Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae) in clinical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Anwesa; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Rabi Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants are part and parcel of human society to combat diseases from the dawn of civilization. Terminalia chebula Retz. (Fam. Combretaceae), is called the ‘King of Medicine’ in Tibet and is always listed at the top of the list of ‘Ayurvedic Materia Medica’ because of its extraordinary power of healing. The whole plant possesses high medicinal value and traditionally used for the treatment of various ailments for human beings. Some of the folklore people used this plant in the treatment of asthma, sore throat, vomiting, hiccough, diarrhea, dysentery, bleeding piles, ulcers, gout, heart and bladder diseases. The plant has been demonstrated to possess multiple pharmacological and medicinal activities, such as antioxidant, antimicrobial, antidiabetic, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, antiproliferative, radioprotective, cardioprotective, antiarthritic, anticaries, gastrointestinal motility and wound healing activity. But no systematic updated information on the therapeutic effectiveness of Terminalia chebula, a popular herbal remedy in India and South-East Asia has so far been reported. This review highlights an updated information particularly on the phytochemistry and various pharmacological and medicinal properties of Terminalia chebula Retz. and some of its isolated compounds, along with their safety evaluation. This may provide incentive for proper evaluation of the plant as medicinal agent against the human diseases and also to bridge the lacunae in the existing literature and future scope which may offer immense opportunity for researchers engaged in validation of the traditional claims and development of safe and effective botanical medicine. PMID:23620847

  3. Terminalia catappa L. (tropical almond) ofCombretaceae is a large ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Terminalia catappa L. (tropical almond) ofCombretaceae is a large handsome deciduous tree which branches in horizontal whorls. Leaves are simple and large which turn red before falling. Flowers are small, both bisexual and male, are borne in spike inflorescences. Fruits are ellipsoidal, slightly bilaterally compressed ...

  4. Terminalia (Combretaceae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    utilized for different purposes such as environmental conservation, beautification, parks and habitat and as shade creating plants and domestic source of fuel in the Central Niger Delta. .... (salt mangrove forest, and fresh water raffia swamp forest) and the tropical rainforest. The ecological amplitude of the two species of.

  5. Chemical constituents and antioxidant activity from leaves extracts of Terminalia fagifolia Mart. et Zucc; Constituintes quimicos e atividade antioxidante de extratos das folhas de Terminalia fagifolia Mart. et Zucc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, Mariane Cruz Costa; Chaves, Mariana H. [Universidade Federal do Piaui (UFPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica], e-mail: mariana@ufpi.br; Rinaldo, Daniel; Vilegas, Wagner; Vieira Junior, Gerardo Magela [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica

    2009-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation of ethanolic leaves extracts of T. fagifolia led to the isolation of (+)-catechin, sitosterol-3-O-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside, {alpha} and {beta} tocopherol, a mixture of lupeol, {alpha} and {beta}-amyrin, sitosterol and a mixture of glucoside flavonoids (CP-13). The structures of these compounds were identified by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectral analysis and comparison with literature data. Absolute configuration of the catechin was determinate by circular dichroism. Antioxidant activity (EC{sub 50}), evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhidrazyl (DPPH) assay system, decreased in the order: (+)-catechin > hydroalcoholic fraction > CP-13 > aqueous fraction > EtOH extract. (author)

  6. Semente de amendoeira (Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae como substrato para o cultivo de orquídeas epífitas = Tropical almond seeds (Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae as a substrate for epiphytic orchid cultivation

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    Marcus Nascimento Santos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O uso de semente de Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae como substrato para o cultivo de orquídeas das espécies Oncidium flexuosum Sims, Dendrobium nobile Lindl. e Brassavola tuberculata Hook. foi comparado ao do xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. Esta espécie é muito usada para o cultivo de orquídeas, mas está ameaçada de extinção e com a sua exploração proibida por lei. Ao final de 12 meses de cultivo, foram avaliadas as seguintes variáveis: altura da parte aérea, diâmetro dos pseudobulbos, número de pseudobulbos e pH.Não houve interação significativa entre substratos e espécies para as variáveis avaliadas. As orquídeas desenvolvidas em substrato de T. catappa e em xaxim apresentaram alturas da parte aérea, diâmetro dos pseudobulbos e número de pseudobulbos equivalentes. O substrato de T. catappa apresentou baixa velocidade de decomposição, o que manteve a sua boa capacidade de aeração, desenvolvimento das raízes e valor de pH próximo ao encontrado para o xaxim. O uso de T. catappa apresentou-se viável como substituto ao xaxim para o cultivo das orquídeas avaliadas.The use of Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae seeds as a substrate for growing orchids of the species Oncidium flexuosum Sims, Dendrobium nobile Lindl. and Brassavola tuberculata Hook was compared to the tree fern fiber Dicksonia sellowiana Hook, largely used for that purpose. This species is endangered and its exploitation is prohibited by law. After twelve months, the following parameters were evaluated: aerial part height, pseudo bulb diameter, number of pseudo bulbs and pH of substrate. There was no significant interaction between substrates and species for the evaluated parameters. The orchids developed on T. catappa substrate and tree fern fiber showed similar aerial parts, diameter and number of pseudo bulbs. T. catappa substrate showed a low rate of decomposition, which maintained good aeration capacity, root development and pH values close to

  7. Ethnobotany, phytochemistry, toxicology and pharmacological properties of Terminalia sericea Burch. ex DC. (Combretaceae) - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongalo, N I; McGaw, L J; Segapelo, T V; Finnie, J F; Van Staden, J

    2016-12-24

    The use of medicinal plants in the treatment of infections is ancient. A wide variety of ethnotherapeutic properties and pharmacological actions has been attributed to Terminalia sericea. Studies by various groups of investigators reveal that it is a multipurpose medicinal plant used mostly in the treatment of diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, skin rashes, tuberculosis and other infections. The current paper is aimed at providing an overview of the ethnomedicinal uses, toxicology, pharmacology and the phytochemistry of Terminalia sericea. Information was retrieved using various search engines, including Pubmed, Science Direct, Google Scholar, Scielo, SciFinder and Scopus. The key words used included Terminalia sericea, secondary metabolites, phytochemistry, biological activity, pharmacology, ethnobotanical survey, medicinal uses, safety, toxicology and other related words. Terminalia sericea is an important medicinal plant which possesses anti-HIV, anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, anticancer, lipolytic, wound healing, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activity, as the most valuable biological activities, thus lending pharmacological support to the plant's folkloric uses in indigenous medicine. Toxicologically, the extracts and isolated compounds from the plant species may have mild toxic effects. Phytochemically, the plant species possesses valuable compounds including triterpenes, alkaloids and flavonoids which may well contribute to its biological activity. Terminalia sericea contains secondary metabolites which are valuable in the treatment of a variety of human infections, including community acquired infections which may be prevalent in developing countries. The degree of toxicity reported in various extracts warrants further exploration of the cytotoxicity of the plant species, both against normal human cell lines and in vivo. Moreover, the acetylcholinesterase inhibitory and anti-inflammatory effects also need to be further

  8. Variação estrutural quantitativa no lenho de Terminalia ivorensis A. Chev., Combretaceae

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    Urbinati Cláudia V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de analisar a variação anatômica ao longo do caule de Terminalia ivorensis, estudaram-se amostras de madeira de três indivíduos, nos planos radial e axial. Para tal, corpos de prova foram obtidos a partir de discos de madeira, de 2 em 2cm, no sentido medula-câmbio. A metodologia usada para desenvolver o trabalho foi aquela tradicionalmente recomendada para estudos em anatomia vegetal. A descrição anatômica realizada seguiu as recomendações do IAWA Committee. No sentido radial do caule, alguns elementos anatômicos apresentaram tendências de variação definidas e significativas estatisticamente quando aplicado o teste Tukey para comparação de médias. São eles: freqüência, diâmetro e comprimento dos elementos de vaso, freqüência de raios/mm linear, comprimento dos raios em número de células, e comprimento e espessura da parede das fibras. Já no sentido axial, todas as variáveis analisadas não se mostraram estatisticamente significativas. Os resultados observados devemse, principalmente, à caracterização bem definida dos lenhos juvenil e adulto na madeira de Terminalia ivorensis.

  9. Compounds from Terminalia mantaly L. (Combretaceae Stem Bark Exhibit Potent Inhibition against Some Pathogenic Yeasts and Enzymes of Metabolic Significance

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    Marthe Aimée Tchuente Tchuenmogne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathogenic yeasts resistance to current drugs emphasizes the need for new, safe, and cost-effective drugs. Also, new inhibitors are needed to control the effects of enzymes that are implicated in metabolic dysfunctions such as cancer, obesity, and epilepsy. Methods: The anti-yeast extract from Terminalia mantaly (Combretaceae was fractionated and the structures of the isolated compounds established by means of spectroscopic analysis and comparison with literature data. Activity was assessed against Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. krusei using the microdilution method, and against four enzymes of metabolic significance: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, human erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase I and II, and glutathione S-transferase. Results: Seven compounds, 3,3′-di-O-methylellagic acid 4′-O-α-rhamnopyranoside; 3-O-methylellagic acid; arjungenin or 2,3,19,23-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oïc acid; arjunglucoside or 2,3,19,23-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oïc acid glucopyranoside; 2α,3α,24-trihydroxyolean-11,13(18-dien-28-oïc acid; stigmasterol; and stigmasterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside were isolated from the extract. Among those, 3,3′-di-O-methylellagic acid 4′-O-α-rhamnopyranoside, 3-O-methylellagic acid, and arjunglucoside showed anti-yeast activity comparable to that of reference fluconazole with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC below 32 µg/mL. Besides, Arjunglucoside potently inhibited the tested enzymes with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 below 4 µM and inhibitory constant (Ki <3 µM. Conclusions: The results achieved indicate that further SAR studies will likely identify potent hit derivatives that should subsequently enter the drug development pipeline.

  10. Effect of compression pressure, preservative, and storage with potassium chloride on the microbiological quality of tablets formulated with Terminalia randii Gum (Combretaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluremi, Bolaji Bosede; Bamiro, Oluyemisi Adebowale; Idowu, Abel Olusola; Oduneye, Olayinka Annegret

    2012-10-01

    Gums are used as binders in tablets and also as emulsion stabilisers, suspending agents and thickeners in syrups. The need for other natural gums apart from the conventional gums to be employed as binding agents in tablets formulation led to this study. A gum obtained from the incised trunk of Terminalia randii (Combretaceae) was evaluated for the effect of compression pressure, methyl paraben preservative and storage with potassium chloride, on the microbial load of tablets formulated with the gum. The microbial load was determined by surface spread method on the processed gum at suitable dilutions, and tablets formulated from the gum at different compression pressures. The formulated tablets were evaluated for microbial load, also when stored in potassium chloride for 8 and 12 weeks with and without preservation with 1% Methyl Paraben. In each case the compressed tablets were incubated in 0.1% peptone water as control. The microbial load recorded reflected generally, reduction in microbial counts in tablets formulated with the gum as a binder both in terms of compression at different pressures and when the different compression pressures were associated with or without 1% methyl paraben in the presence of potassium chloride. Comparatively, the processed gum showed higher microbial load than the pressure compressed tablets. Besides the different compression pressures, duration of storage was also found to cause reduction of microbial load, particularly in the formulated tablets compressed with methyl paraben stored in potassium chloride such that after 8 weeks, the microbial load was zero. The studies showed that compression pressures and duration of storage caused marked reduction in microbial load of the tablets formulated with the processed gum of Terminalia randii as a binder.

  11. Beach almond (Terminalia catappa, Combretaceae) seed production and predation by scarlet macaws (Ara macao) and variegated squirrels (Sciurus variegatoides).

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    Henn, Jonathan J; McCoy, Michael B; Vaughan, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of ecological impacts of exotic beach almond (Terminalia catappa) in the central Pacific of Costa Rica are little known, but studies have found this species to be a potentially important food source for endangered scarlet macaws (Ara macao). In this study, reproductive phenology and seed predation by variegated squirrels (Sciurus variegatoides) and scarlet macaws were measured during March and April 2011 on beaches of central Pacific coastal Costa Rica. Seed productivity and predation levels were quantified on a weekly basis for 111 beach almond trees to assess the importance of beach almond as a food source for scarlet macaws and the extent of resource partitioning between seed predators. Seed production of the trees was great (about 194 272 seeds) and approximately 67% of seeds were predated by seed predators. Macaws consumed an estimated 49% of seeds while squirrels consumed 18%. Additionally, evidence of resource partitioning between squirrels and macaws was found. Scarlet macaws preferred to feed on the northern side and edge of the canopy while squirrels preferred to feed on the southern and inside parts of the canopy. Both species ate most seeds on the ocean side of the tree. Despite the status of this tree as an exotic species, the beach almond appears to be an important resource for scarlet macaw population recovery. The resource produced by this tree should be taken into account as reforestation efforts continue in Costa Rica.

  12. Antiinflammatory and immunomodulatory activity of an ethanolic extract from the stem bark of Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae): In vitro and in vivo evidences.

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    Abiodun, Oyindamola O; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Gomez-Caravaca, Ana Maria; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Utrilla, M Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-11-04

    Terminalia catappa Linn (Combretaceae) is a medicinal plant with anti-inflammatory, anti-diarrhoeal and antioxidant properties, frequently found in tropical regions. Considering its characteristics, it could be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, which is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and an immune dysfunction. Thus this study evaluates the immunomodulatory properties and the intestinal anti-inflammatory effect of an ethanolic extract of the stem bark of T. catappa (ETCB) both in vitro (in RAW 264.7 macrophages) and in vivo, in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. The phenolic compounds in ETCB were identified and quantified using HPLC-DAD-qTOF-MS. The immunomodulatory activity ETCB was tested in vitro by determining the macrophage production of IL-1β and nitrites. In vivo studies were performed in the TNBS model of rat colitis. ETCB was given (25, 50 and 100mg/kg/day) orally for two days prior to colitis induction and thereafter for 7 days. Response to treatment was assessed by scoring the gross appearance of the colon, and determining myeloperoxidase activity, gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α, IL-23 and IL-6, chemokines, inducible nitric oxide synthase and proteins crucial in the maintenance of the intestinal mucosal barrier integrity like mucins (MUC-2, MUC-3) and villin. ETCB was able to inhibit IL-1β and nitrite production in vitro in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Moreover, treatment of TNBS colitic rats with ETCB resulted in a decreased colonic damage score and weight/length ratio. It also reduced the colonic neutrophil infiltration indicated by a lower myeloperoxidase activity and prevented the depletion of colonic glutathione levels in colitic rats. In addition, treatment with ETCB down-regulated the gene expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-23, IL-6 and CINC-1) and iNOS in colitic rats. Moreover, the gene expression of mucosal barrier proteins like MUC-2, MUC

  13. The use of a rat model to evaluate the in vivo toxicity and wound healing activity of selected Combretum and Terminalia (Combretaceae species extracts

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    Peter Masoko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a fundamental response to tissue injury and several natural products have been shown to accelerate the healing process. The present study was undertaken to determine the safety and efficacy of the topical treatment of acetone leaf extracts of Combretum imberbe, Combretum nelsonii,Combretum albopuntactum and Terminalia sericea based on their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Four circular full-thickness skin wounds were made on the backs of eight anaesthetised Wistar rats using aseptic techniques. The treatments were administrated topically using 10% and 20% concentrations of each extract in aqueous cream in separate treatments. Indications of erythema, exudate, crust formation,swelling and ulceration were used to determine the wound healing process. All of the wounds closed completely within 17 days. Throughout the experiment, a subcutaneous probe was used to determine that the body temperature and body weight of the rats were within the normal range. C. imberbe and C. nelsonii extracts accelerated wound healing, but there was no significant difference in wound contraction using 10% and 20% concentrations of the extracts in cream. The results also showed the potential usefulness of this model to measure accelerating wound healing.The extracts could perhaps overcome defects associated with healing failure in chronic wounds and prevent secondary bacterial and fungal infections.

  14. Characterization and Quantification of Compounds in the Hydroalcoholic Extract of the Leaves from Terminalia catappa Linn. (Combretaceae and Their Mutagenic Activity

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    Francisco José Mininel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia is a genus of Combretaceous plants widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Thus, the aim of this study was to quantify the majority compounds of the hydroalcoholic extract (7 : 3, v/v of the leaves from T. catappa by HPLC-PDA, chemically characterize by hyphenated techniques (HPLC-ESI-IT-MSn and NMR, and evaluate its mutagenic activity by the Salmonella/microsome assay on S. typhimurium strains TA98, TA97a, TA100, and TA102. The quantification of analytes was performed using an external calibration standard. Punicalagin is the most abundant polyphenol found in the leaves. The presence of this compound as a mixture of anomers was confirmed using HPLC-PDA and 1H and 13C NMR. Mutagenic activity was observed in strains TA100 and TA97a. As the extract is a complex mixture of punicalagin, its derivatives, and several other compounds, the observed mutagenicity may be explained in part by possible synergistic interaction between the compounds present in the extract. These studies show that mutagenic activity of T. catappa in the Ames test can only be observed when measured at high concentrations. However, considering the mutagenic effects observed for T. catappa, this plant should be used cautiously for medicinal purposes.

  15. Characterization and Quantification of Compounds in the Hydroalcoholic Extract of the Leaves from Terminalia catappa Linn. (Combretaceae) and Their Mutagenic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mininel, Francisco José; Leonardo Junior, Carlos Sérgio; Espanha, Lívia Greghi; Resende, Flávia Aparecida; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Vilegas, Wagner; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner

    2014-01-01

    Terminalia is a genus of Combretaceous plants widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Thus, the aim of this study was to quantify the majority compounds of the hydroalcoholic extract (7 : 3, v/v) of the leaves from T. catappa by HPLC-PDA, chemically characterize by hyphenated techniques (HPLC-ESI-IT-MSn) and NMR, and evaluate its mutagenic activity by the Salmonella/microsome assay on S. typhimurium strains TA98, TA97a, TA100, and TA102. The quantification of analytes was performed using an external calibration standard. Punicalagin is the most abundant polyphenol found in the leaves. The presence of this compound as a mixture of anomers was confirmed using HPLC-PDA and 1H and 13C NMR. Mutagenic activity was observed in strains TA100 and TA97a. As the extract is a complex mixture of punicalagin, its derivatives, and several other compounds, the observed mutagenicity may be explained in part by possible synergistic interaction between the compounds present in the extract. These studies show that mutagenic activity of T. catappa in the Ames test can only be observed when measured at high concentrations. However, considering the mutagenic effects observed for T. catappa, this plant should be used cautiously for medicinal purposes. PMID:24734110

  16. ANTISICKLING ACTIVITY OF TERMINALIA CATAPPA LEAVES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of Terminalia catappa L. family Combretaceae, a fruit bearing tree, popular in folkloric medicine for the treatment of sickle ... The method employed involved the inhibition of sodium metabisulphite-induced sickling of HbSS red blood cells collected from confirmed non-crisis sickle cell ...

  17. Pharmacognostic studies of the leaves of terminalia macroptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... extractive value, 12.7%w/w, water soluble extractive value, 17.0%w/w. These results can be used in the identification and preparation of a monograph on the plant. Keywords: Terminalia macroptera, combretaceae, leaves, pharmacognostic evaluation. Nigerian Journal of Natural Products and Medicine Vol. 9 2005: 14-18 ...

  18. Antibacterial properties studies of trunk barks of terminalia ivorensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus infections are a worldwide concern. Terminalia ivorensis, of Combretaceae family plant, is widely used traditional medicinal in Côte d'Ivoire to treat dermal diseases (affection in which ...

  19. Potential therapeutic applications for Terminalia chebula in Iranian traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokar, Assie; Masoomi, Fatemeh; Sadeghpour, Omid; Nassiri-Toosi, Mohsen; Hamedi, Shokouhsadat

    2016-04-01

    Terminalia chebula (family: Combretaceae) is widely used in the traditional medicine of India and Iran to treat diseases that include dementia, constipation, and diabetes. This tree is known in Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) as halileh or halilaj and the fruit is used to develop treatments. It is described in ITM as an astringent that has a "cold" and "dry" temperament. References to the medicinal properties of Terminalia chebula were collected from important ITM sources and from modern medical databases (PubMed, Scirus, ScienceDirect, and Scopus). The medicinal properties described for this tree in ITM were compared with those reported in studies of modern phytotherapy. The results confirm that the tree referred to as halileh in traditional books is the Terminalia chebula used in present-day studies. Treatments that have not been evaluated in modern phytotherapy but have been traditionally treated with Terminalia chebula include fever, and psychological and psychiatric issues. This article confirms the medicinal uses of Terminalia chebula.

  20. Biological activity of Terminalia arjuna on Human Pathogenic Microorganisms

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    Tariq Javed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available World’s population relies chiefly on traditional medicinal plants, using their extracts or active constituents. Terminalia arjuna of family Combretaceae reported to be effective as aphrodisiac, expectorant, tonic, styptic, antidysenteric, sweet, acrid, purgative, laxative, astringent, diuretic, astringent, cirrhosis, cardioprotective and cancer treatment.   In present study, antibacterial, antifungal, brine shrimp lethality and phytotoxic effect of Terminalia arjuna was performed. Our results showed that methanolic extract of Terminalia arjuna leaves has moderate antifungal effect against Microsporm canis and fruit extract possess good antibacterial activity against Staphylococus aureus  and  Preudomonas aeroginosa. Moreover, Dichloromethane extract of Terminalia arjuna bark and fruit posses moderate phytotoxic activity. 

  1. Simultaneous determination and characterization of tannins and triterpene saponins from the fruits of various species of terminalia and phyllantus emblica using UPLC-UV-MS method: application to triphala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terminalia is a genus of large trees of the flowering plant family Combretaceae, comprising around 100 species distributed in tropical regions of the world. The fruits and bark of different species of Terminalia have been used since ancient times for the treatment of various ailments. Some of its sp...

  2. Wood anatomy of the Combretaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van G.J.C.M.

    1979-01-01

    The wood anatomy of all genera of the Combretaceae (Meiostemon excepted) is described in detail on the basis of 120 samples representing 90 species from 19 genera. Additional data from the literature are added. The structural variation of the vestured pits is described and classified. There are two

  3. Use of wood characters in the Identification of Terminalia spp in Sri Lanka

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    ND Ruwanpathirana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available 250 timber species are being used by the timber industry in Sri Lanka and among them major timber consumers are housing developer, furniture manufacturer and wood fabricators.  Once the tree is felled, the identification of the tree become very difficult and need of relying on their macroscopic/ microscopic features and physical properties of timber become necessary. Timber identification is necessary for right use of timber and to check on fraud in timber trading as some timber traders   mix or sell low price different type of timber species deceiving customers implying them to be valuble timbers in order to increase their profit margin. 0 Five timber species of Terminalia namely Terminalia arjuna (Kumbuk, Terminalia bellirica (Bulu, Terminalia catappa (Kottamba, Terminalia chebula (Aralu and  Terminalia parviflora (Hampalanda of the family of Combretaceae were studied anatomically in search of sufficient  features  by which one Terminalia sp can be separated from the other . The examination of the transverse section of wood with a hand lens (x25 does not provide adequate reliable information to differentiate one species from the other for identification due to resemblance of wood structure of five Terminalia spp. Hence for the anatomical examination, transverse section (T.S., radial longitudinal section (R.L.T. and tangential longitudinal section (T.L.S. were obtained using the microtome. In this study, some important wood anatomical and non anatomical features were studied according to IAWA ( 1989. It was found that all the Terminalia spp had diffuse porous wood having vessels mainly solitary and occasionally in 2 -3 vessels of radial multiples. Mean vessel diameter and vessel diameter range were recorded respectively  as 241  µm and 172-331 µm in  Terminallia arjuna,  169 µm and 107-204 µm in Terminalia bellirica , 240 µm and 169-309 µm in Terminallia catappa, 115 µm and 68-175 µm inTerminalia chebula and 124 µm and 75

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of Terminalia paniculata bark extract against acute and chronic inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Sahil; Nandakumar, K; Nayak, Pawan G; Bansal, Punit; Mudgal, Jayesh; Mor, Vijay; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Lobo, Richard

    2011-03-24

    Terminalia paniculata Roxb. (Family-Combretaceae) is a wild tree commonly used in traditional ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammation of parotid glands and in menstrual disorders. To explore the folk use of Terminalia paniculata on pharmacological grounds to evaluate the scientific basis of anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of Terminalia paniculata was studied against carrageenan-induced hind paw edema, air pouch inflammation and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats. The aqueous extract of Terminalia paniculata bark (TPW) was administered at the concentrations of 100, 200 and 400mg/kg body weight. TPW showed significant (p400mg/kg) also reduced the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration (50.92 ± 5.71%) and myeloperoxidase activity (49.31 ± 5.24%) in air pouch exudates. TPW (200mg/kg) exhibits anti-rheumatic and analgesic activities by improving the altered haematological milieu (ESR, CRP, RF, WBC, RBC and Hb) and also by inhibiting the flexion scores and radiographic changes in CFA-induced arthritis. This extract also had significant (p<0.05) effects on the occurrence of secondary lesions compared to CFA control. Terminalia paniculata bark may be a potential preventive or therapeutic candidate for the treatment of chronic inflammation and arthritis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and anxiolytic activities of methanolic extract of Terminalia citrina leaves

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    Narhari Das

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and anxiolytic effects of methanolic extracts of Terminalia citrina (T. citrina leaves (Family: Combretaceae. Methods: The antinociceptive activity was evaluated by acetic acid induced writhing method and radiant heat tail flick method while anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by human red blood cell membrane stabilization method and anxiolytic activity by elevated plus maze model. Results: The methanolic extract of T. citrina leaves showed significant antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anxiolytic effects in dose dependent manner compared to their respective standard drugs. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that T. citrina possesses antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anxiolytic effects.

  6. Hypolipidemic activity of Haritaki (Terminalia chebula in atherogenic diet induced hyperlipidemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Maruthappan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Haritaki (Terminalia chebula family Combretaceae is an important plant used traditionally for medicinal purposes. It is component of the classic Ayurvedic combination called "Triphala". Hyperlipidemia was induced by treated orally with atherogemc diet. In atherogenic diet induced hyperlipidemic model, the rats receiving treatment with Haritaki showed significant reduction in total cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein and elevation of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Haritaki was found to possess significant hypolipidemic activity. The results also suggest that Haritaki at 1.05 and 2.10 mg/kg b.wt. concentrations are an excellent lipid-lowering agent.

  7. HYPOLIPIDEMIC ACTIVITY OF HARITAKI (TERMINALIA CHEBULA IN ATHEROGENIC DIET INDUCED HYPERLIPIDEMIC RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Maruthappan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Haritaki (Terminalia chebula family Combretaceae is an important plant used traditionally for medicinal purposes. It is component of the classic Ayurvedic combination called “Triphala”. Hyperlipidemia was induced by treated orally with atherogenic diet. In atherogenic diet induced hyperlipidemic model, the rats receiving treatment with Haritaki showed significant reduction in total cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein and elevation of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Haritaki was found to possess significant hypolipidemic activity. The results also suggest that Haritaki at 1.05 and 2.10 mg/kg b.wt. concentrations are an excellent lipid-lowering agent.

  8. TERMINALIA SUPERBA MINALIA SUPERBA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    2010-04-01

    Apr 1, 2010 ... determined. This timber specie gained wide acceptance by Nigerian construction industry, especially for roof truss construction. The strength class of Terminalia superba according to NCP 2 [14] is N6. ..... Grown Abura Timber Bridge Beam Subjected to. Bending and Deflection Forces”, Nigerian Journal of.

  9. Triterpenoids from two Terminalia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytochemical investigations of Terminalia arjuna bark and Terminalia chebula fruits resulted in the isolations of 12 triterpenoids including two new oleanane type triterpene glucosyl esters ajunglucosides IV (1) and V (2) from the n-BuOH layer of MeOH extract of the bark of T. arjuna as well as nin...

  10. Catálogo sistemático dos pólens das plantas arbóreas do Brasil Meridional: IV - Thymelaeaceae, Lythraceae, Lecythidaceae, Rhizophoraceae e Combretaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortrud Monika Barth

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available Es wurden pollenmorphologisch diejenigen Arten der vorliegenden Familien untersucht, welche als Baeume in den suedbrasilianischen Waeldern auftreten, mit Ausnahme der krautigen Heimia myrtifolia. Gekennzeichnet durch drei einfache Colpori laesst sich die Gruppe von Buchenavia kleinii, Laguncularia racemosa (Combretaceae, Heimia myrtifolia (Lythraceae und Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae bilden. Wegen ihrer Pseudocolpi oder aehnlichen Laengsstreifen einer duenneren Sexine stellen die Pollenkoerner von Combretum futicosum, Terminalia autralis (Combretaceae und Lafoensia pacari (Lythraceae eine andere Gruppe dar. Daphnopsis (Thymelaeaceae besitzt 10 - 14 gleichmaessing verteilte Poren und eine Oerflaechenstruktur die der des Croton-Types der Euphorbiaceen sehr nahe kommt. Cariniana estrellensis (Lecythidaceae, mit nur drei Colpi, nimmt auch eine gesonderte Position ein. Es bestehen Beziehungen zwischen der Morphologie der Pollenkoerner der oben bearbeiteten Familien und jenen der Guttiferales und Rosales.

  11. Antioxidant activities of leaf galls extracts of Terminalia chebula (Gaertn.) Retz. (Combretaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshwarappa, Ravi Shankara Birur; Ramachandra, Y L; Subaramaihha, Sundara Rajan; Subbaiah, Sujan Ganapathy Pasura; Austin, Richard Surendranath; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals are implicated in several metabolic diseases and the antioxidant therapy has gained an utmost importance in the treatment. The medicinal properties of plants have been investigated and explored for their potent antioxidant activities to counteract metabolic disorders. In this study, the chemical composition and free radical scavenging potential of leaf gall extracts (ethanol, petroleum ether, chloroform and aqueous) of Terminelia chebula is evaluated, which is extensively used in the preparation of traditiona medications to treat various metabolic diseases. The presences of phenolics, flavonoids, triterpens, saponins, glycosides, phytosterols, reducing sugars were identified in the extracts according to standard procedures. The free radical scavenging activities of the extract were also analysed by standard procedures. The methanol extract had the highest total phenolic and flavonoid content. The antioxidant activities of leaf gall extracts were examined using diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH), Super oxide radical scavenging, Hydroxyl scavenging and ferric reducing power (FRAP) methods. In all the methods, the ethanolic extract showed higher free radical scavenging potential than all the other extracts. As the higher content of both total phenolics and flavonoids were found in the ethanolic extract, so the significantly high antioxidant activity can be positively correlated to the high content of total polyphenols/flavonoids of the ethanol extract. The results of this study confirm the folklore use of T. chebula leaves gall extracts as a natural antioxidant and justify its ethnobotanical use. Further, the results of antioxidant properties encourage the use of T. chebula leave gall extracts for medicinal health, functional food and nutraceutical applications.

  12. Terminalia arjuna, a herbal remedy against environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 429 due to AFB1 to 141 due to 5th concentration of Terminalia extracts at 32 h of exposure. Conclusion: The ameliorating potential of Terminalia extracts was dose and time dependant. Keywords: Ayurvedic medicine; Carcinogen; Chromosomal aberration; Sister chromatid exchange; Replication index; Terminalia arjuna ...

  13. Revisiting Terminalia arjuna – An Ancient Cardiovascular Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shridhar Dwivedi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia arjuna, commonly known as arjuna, belongs to the family of Combretaceae. Its bark decoction is being used in the Indian subcontinent for anginal pain, hypertension, congestive heart failure, and dyslipidemia, based on the observations of ancient physicians for centuries. The utility of arjuna in various cardiovascular diseases needs to be studied further. Therefore, the present review is an effort to give a detailed survey of the literature summarizing the experimental and clinical studies pertinent to arjuna in cardiovascular disorders, which were particularly performed during the last decade. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical studies of arjuna were retrieved through the use of PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane databases. Most of the studies, both experimental and clinical, have suggested that the crude drug possesses anti-ischemic, antioxidant, hypolipidemic, and antiatherogenic activities. Its useful phytoconstituents are: Triterpenoids, β-sitosterol, flavonoids, and glycosides. Triterpenoids and flavonoids are considered to be responsible for its beneficial antioxidant cardiovascular properties. The drug has shown promising effect on ischemic cardiomyopathy. So far, no serious side effects have been reported with arjuna therapy. However, its long-term safety still remains to be elucidated. Though it has been found quite useful in angina pectoris, mild hypertension, and dyslipidemia, its exact role in primary/secondary coronary prevention is yet to be explored.

  14. A Review on Potential Mechanisms of Terminalia chebula in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir R. Afshari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current management of Alzheimer’s disease (AD focuses on acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs and NMDA receptor antagonists, although outcomes are not completely favorable. Hence, novel agents found in herbal plants are gaining attention as possible therapeutic alternatives. The Terminalia chebula (Family: Combretaceae is a medicinal plant with a wide spectrum of medicinal properties and is reported to contain various biochemicals such as hydrolysable tannins, phenolic compounds, and flavonoids, so it may prove to be a good therapeutic alternative. In this research, we reviewed published scientific literature found in various databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Science, Scirus, and Google Scholar, with the keywords: T. chebula, AD, neuroprotection, medicinal plant, antioxidant, ellagitannin, gallotannin, gallic acid, chebulagic acid, and chebulinic acid. This review shows that T. chebula extracts and its constituents have AChEI and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, all of which are currently relevant to the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

  15. Anogeissus sericea var. nummalaria King ex Duthie (Combretaceae ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anogeissus sericea var. nummalaria King ex Duthie (Combretaceae) is moderate sized multipurpose hard wood tree of dry deciduous forests with drooping branches and yellow to brownish-yellow flowers. it is endemic to Rajasthan and is considered to be a threatened tree of the region due to over exploitation for timber ...

  16. FLAVONOIDS AND ANTI-OXIDANT ACTIVITY MEDIATED GASTROPROTECTIVE ACTION OF LEATHERY MURDAH, TERMINALIA CORIACEA (ROXB.) WIGHT & ARN. LEAF METHANOLIC EXTRACT IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Khan, Mohammed Safwan; Nazan, Shaaz; Mat Jais, Abdul Manan

    2017-01-01

    Leathery Murdah, Terminalia coriacea (Roxb.) Wight & Arn. from family Combretaceae is used in Ayurveda and Siddha traditional systems of medicine to heal ulcers. The present study was conducted to assess the gastroprotective effect and understand the fundamental mechanism of action of Leathery Murdah, Terminalia coriacea (Roxb.) Wight & Arn. Leaf Methanolic Extract. The test extract was screened for anti-ulcer activity by Aspirin induced ulcerogenesis in pyloric ligation and ethanol induced gastric ulcers at three doses - 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg, p.o. using Ranitidine 50 mg/kg and Misoprostol 100 μg/kg as standard drug in respective models. Seven parameters were carefully examined, that is, ulcer index, total protein, mucin, catalase, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase levels and histopathology. High Performance Liquid Chromatographic - Ultra Violet profiling and Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectral analysis of crude Terminalia coriacea leaves methanolic extract were carried out as a part of chemical characterization to identify bioactive compounds. All the test doses exhibited significant gastroprotective function, particularly the higher doses demonstrated improved action. The results revealed a significant increase in the levels of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and Mucin with reduction in ulcer index, the levels of total protein, and malondialdehyde. Histopathological observations also illustrated the gastroprotective effect of Terminalia coriacea leaves methanolic extract. Terminalia coriacea leaves methanolic extract exhibited strong anti-oxidant and anti-secretory activities mediated gastroprotection besides inducing the gastric mucosal production. The observed pharmacological response can be attributed to the flavonoidal compounds namely - Quercetin-3-O-rutinoside, Luteolin-7-O-glucoside, Myricetin hexoside, Quercetin-3-O-glucoside, Isorhamnetin-3-O-rhamnosylglucoside and Isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside identified in the extract for the first time with

  17. FLAVONOIDS AND ANTI-OXIDANT ACTIVITY MEDIATED GASTROPROTECTIVE ACTION OF LEATHERY MURDAH, TERMINALIA CORIACEA (ROXB. WIGHT & ARN. LEAF METHANOLIC EXTRACT IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Safwan ALI KHAN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Leathery Murdah, Terminalia coriacea (Roxb. Wight & Arn. from family Combretaceae is used in Ayurveda and Siddha traditional systems of medicine to heal ulcers. OBJECTIVE The present study was conducted to assess the gastroprotective effect and understand the fundamental mechanism of action of Leathery Murdah, Terminalia coriacea (Roxb. Wight & Arn. Leaf Methanolic Extract. METHODS The test extract was screened for anti-ulcer activity by Aspirin induced ulcerogenesis in pyloric ligation and ethanol induced gastric ulcers at three doses - 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg, p.o. using Ranitidine 50 mg/kg and Misoprostol 100 μg/kg as standard drug in respective models. Seven parameters were carefully examined, that is, ulcer index, total protein, mucin, catalase, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase levels and histopathology. High Performance Liquid Chromatographic - Ultra Violet profiling and Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectral analysis of crude Terminalia coriacea leaves methanolic extract were carried out as a part of chemical characterization to identify bioactive compounds. RESULTS All the test doses exhibited significant gastroprotective function, particularly the higher doses demonstrated improved action. The results revealed a significant increase in the levels of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and Mucin with reduction in ulcer index, the levels of total protein, and malondialdehyde. Histopathological observations also illustrated the gastroprotective effect of Terminalia coriacea leaves methanolic extract. CONCLUSION Terminalia coriacea leaves methanolic extract exhibited strong anti-oxidant and anti-secretory activities mediated gastroprotection besides inducing the gastric mucosal production. The observed pharmacological response can be attributed to the flavonoidal compounds namely - Quercetin-3-O-rutinoside, Luteolin-7-O-glucoside, Myricetin hexoside, Quercetin-3-O-glucoside, Isorhamnetin-3-O-rhamnosylglucoside and

  18. Morfologia de frutos, sementes e plântulas de castanheira (Terminalia catappa L. - COMBRETACEAE Morphology of the fruit, the seed and the seedlings of chestnut tree (Terminalia catappa L. - COMBRETACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia de Azevedo Ivani

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de descrever morfologicamente os frutos, sementes e plântulas de castanheira. Foi feita a biometria dos frutos e das sementes e sua caracterização quanto à forma, por meio de mensurações com paquímetro e observações realizadas em estereomicroscópio com câmara clara. Os frutos de castanheira são carnosos, indeiscentes, do tipo nucóide, glabros, de coloração verde a vinácea, projeção das nervuras carpelares externamente evidentes, com epicarpo delgado, mesocarpo carnoso e esponjoso de coloração vinácea, com feixes vasculares conspícuos em corte transversal. Geralmente, cada fruto contém apenas uma semente. As sementes são exalbuminosas, de formas alongadas e cilíndricas, recobertas por endocarpo rígido de coloração marrom; possuem cerca de 2,5cm, 0,7cm e 0,7cm, de comprimento, largura e espessura, respectivamente. A germinação das sementes de castanheira é epígea, e a plantula é fanerocotiledonar.The work was carried out with the objective of describing morphologically the fruits, seeds and seedlings of chestnut tree. It was made the biometry of the fruits and seeds with a digital pachymeter and its characterization in relation to the shape, in stereomicroscope with clear chamber. It can be evidenced that the chestnut tree fruits are fleshly, indehiscent, nucoid, glabrous, from green to purple coloration, with evident projection of the carpel ribbings, with a fleshly and spongy epicarp and mesocarp, of purple color, with conspicuous vascular bundle in transversal cut. Generally, it has a seed per fruit. The seeds are unalbuminous, of prolongated and cylindrical shape and recovered with a rigid endocarp of brown coloration. The seeds possess about 2,5; 0,7 and 0,7 cm, of length, width and thickness, respectively. The germination of the seeds of chestnut tree is epigeal and the seedling is fanerocotyledonary.

  19. Phytochemical Screening and Antimicrobial Activities of Terminalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The powdered leaf of Terminalia catappa was extracted using ethanol and partitioned into n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous methanol fractions. Test for the presence of secondary metabolites showed the presence of alkaloids, reducing sugars, saponins, tannins, resins and steroids in ethanol soluble ...

  20. Identification of Allelochemicals from Terminalia Chebula

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Develop a method of weed control by using allelopathic plant. (ii). Quantify the allelopathic potential of Terminalia Chebula on weeds. (iii). Identify the plant parts that are the most important source of allelopathic substances. (iv). Identification of phenolic acids (Allelochemicals). Methodology. Mature fresh leaves and barks of ...

  1. Identification of Allelochemicals from Terminalia Chebula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was an experiental research to identify the chemicals contained in terminalia chebula.The dried leaves and barks were ground to a fine powder in a Wiley Mill (40 mesh), using this powder for aqueous extract prepared by the method of Heisey (1990). Bioassay studies were also carried out following the method of ...

  2. Antidepressant like effects of hydrolysable tannins of Terminalia catappa leaf extract via modulation of hippocampal plasticity and regulation of monoamine neurotransmitters subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Y; Ramya, E M; Navya, K; Phani Kumar, G; Anilakumar, K R

    2017-02-01

    Terminalia catappa L. belonging to Combretaceae family is a folk medicine, known for its multiple pharmacological properties, but the neuro-modulatory effect of TC against chronic mild stress was seldom explored. The present study was designed to elucidate potential antidepressant-like effect of Terminalia cattapa (leaf) hydro-alcoholic extract (TC) by using CMS model for a period of 7 weeks. Identification of hydrolysable tannins was done by using LC-MS. After the CMS exposure, mice groups were administered with imipramine (IMP, 10mg/kg, i.p.) and TC (25, 50 and 100mg/kg of TC, p.o.). Behavioural paradigms used for the study included forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and sucrose preference test (SPT). After behavioural tests, monoamine neurotransmitter, cortisol, AchE, oxidative stress levels and mRNA expression studies relevant to depression were assessed. TC supplementation significantly reversed CMS induced immobility time in FST and other behavioural paradigms. Moreover, TC administration significantly restored CMS induced changes in concentrations of hippocampal neurotransmitters (5-HT, DA and NE) as well as levels of acetyl cholinesterase, cortisol, monoamine oxidases (MAO-A, MAO-B), BDNF, CREB, and p-CREB. It suggests that TC supplementation could supress stress induced depression by regulating monoamine neurotransmitters, CREB, BDNF, cortisol, AchE level as well as by amelioration of oxidative stress. Hence TC can be used as a complementary medicine against depression-like disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Terminalia arjuna, a herbal remedy against environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammad Sultan Ahmad

    2013-11-23

    Nov 23, 2013 ... Biol Interact 2004;149:107–15. [20] Loeb LA, Loeb KR, Anderson JP. Multiple mutations and · cancer. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2003;100:776–81. [21] Saxena M, Faridi U, Mishra R, Gupta MM, Singh D. Cytotoxic · agents from Terminalia arjuna. Planta Med 2007;73(14):1486–90. [22] Scassellati-Sforzolini G, ...

  4. Antimicrobial activity and brine shrimp toxicity of extracts of Terminalia brownii roots and stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapingu Modest C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ternimalia brownii Fresen (Combretaceae is widely used in traditional medicine to treat bacterial, fungal and viral infections. There is a need to evaluate extracts of this plant in order to provide scientific proof for it's wide application in traditional medicine system. Methods Extraction of stem bark, wood and whole roots of T. brownii using solvents of increasing polarity, namely, Pet ether, dichloromethane, dichloromethane: methanol (1:1, methanol and aqua, respectively, afforded dry extracts. The extracts were tested for antifungal and antibacterial activity and for brine shrimp toxicity test. Results Extracts of the stem bark, wood and whole roots of T. brownii exhibited antibacterial activity against standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, and Bacillus anthracis and the fungi, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Aqueous extracts exhibited the strongest activity against both bacteria and fungi. Extracts of the roots and stem bark exhibited relatively mild cytotoxic activity against brine shrimp larvae with LC50 values ranging from 113.75–4356.76 and 36.12–1458.81 μg/ml, respectively. The stem wood extracts exhibited the highest toxicity against the shrimps (LC50 values 2.58–14.88 μg/ml, while that of cyclophosphamide, a standard anticancer drug, was 16.33 (10.60–25.15 μg/ml. Conclusion These test results support traditional medicinal use of, especially, aqueous extracts for the treatment of conditions such as diarrhea, and gonorrhea. The brine shrimp results depict the general trend among plants of the genus Terminalia, which are known to contain cytotoxic compounds such as hydrolysable tannins. These results warrant follow-up through bioassay-directed isolation of the active principles.

  5. Antimicrobial activity and brine shrimp toxicity of extracts of Terminalia brownii roots and stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbwambo, Zakaria H; Moshi, Mainen J; Masimba, Pax J; Kapingu, Modest C; Nondo, Ramadhani SO

    2007-01-01

    Background Ternimalia brownii Fresen (Combretaceae) is widely used in traditional medicine to treat bacterial, fungal and viral infections. There is a need to evaluate extracts of this plant in order to provide scientific proof for it's wide application in traditional medicine system. Methods Extraction of stem bark, wood and whole roots of T. brownii using solvents of increasing polarity, namely, Pet ether, dichloromethane, dichloromethane: methanol (1:1), methanol and aqua, respectively, afforded dry extracts. The extracts were tested for antifungal and antibacterial activity and for brine shrimp toxicity test. Results Extracts of the stem bark, wood and whole roots of T. brownii exhibited antibacterial activity against standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, and Bacillus anthracis and the fungi, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Aqueous extracts exhibited the strongest activity against both bacteria and fungi. Extracts of the roots and stem bark exhibited relatively mild cytotoxic activity against brine shrimp larvae with LC50 values ranging from 113.75–4356.76 and 36.12–1458.81 μg/ml, respectively. The stem wood extracts exhibited the highest toxicity against the shrimps (LC50 values 2.58–14.88 μg/ml), while that of cyclophosphamide, a standard anticancer drug, was 16.33 (10.60–25.15) μg/ml. Conclusion These test results support traditional medicinal use of, especially, aqueous extracts for the treatment of conditions such as diarrhea, and gonorrhea. The brine shrimp results depict the general trend among plants of the genus Terminalia, which are known to contain cytotoxic compounds such as hydrolysable tannins. These results warrant follow-up through bioassay-directed isolation of the active principles. PMID:17394672

  6. Anti-Atherogenic Activity of Ethanolic Fraction of Terminalia arjuna Bark on Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Subramaniam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis which results from gradual deposition of lipids in medium and large arteries is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Terminalia arjuna is a herb of Combretaceae family which contains hypolipidemic compounds and flavonoids with high antioxidative properties. This study was conducted to determine the effect of ethanolic fraction of T. arjuna on blood lipids and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat diet (HFD. Twenty New Zealand rabbits of either sex were randomly divided into five groups: the first two were normal diet group and HFD (21% fat group and the remaining three groups received high cholesterol diet supplemented with standard drug (Atorvastatin 10 mg kg−1 body weight, T. arjuna ethanolic fraction (100 and 200 mg kg−1 body weight, respectively. The concentration of total cholesterol (TC, low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL cholesterol and high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol was determined in rabbits at the start of the experiment, at the 14th, 30th days and at the end of the study. Anti-atherogenic index was calculated from the lipid profile of the rabbits before sacrifice. At the end of the experimental period, the aorta was removed for assessment of atherosclerotic plaques. Results show that T. arjuna significantly decreases TC, LDL and TG levels and increases HDL and lessens atherosclerotic lesion in aorta (P < .05. Hence T. arjuna extract can effectively prevent the progress of atherosclerosis. This is likely due to the effect of T. arjuna on serum lipoproteins and its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  7. Phytochemical and Anti-sickling Activities of Terminalia catappa Linn.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An ethnobotanical survey revealed that the dried fallen leaves of Terminalia catappa Linn. are used locally in various parts of Nigeria for the management of sickle cell anaemia. This research investigated if Terminalia catappa leaf interferes with the basic mechanism of erythrocyte sickling. Powdered dried fallen leaves of ...

  8. Litterfall and Nutrient Returns in Isolated Stands of Terminalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Litterfall and Nutrient Returns in Isolated Stands of Terminalia catappa Trees in the Rainforest Area of Southern Nigeria. ... has implications in returning nutrient elements to the soils of the rainforest ecosystem. Keywords: Litterfall, Nutrient returns, Seasonal variation, Southern Nigeria, Terminalia catappa, Tropical rainforest.

  9. Antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of Terminalia stenostachya and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Plants that belong to the Combretaceae family have long history of use in the traditional medicine systems of Africa and Asia for treatment of diseases and ... and Mycobacterium indicus pranii, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholera, Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, ...

  10. Antibacterial, anti-HIV-1 protease and cytotoxic activities of aqueous ethanolic extracts from Combretum adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mushi, Novatus F; Mbwambo, Zakaria H; Innocent, Ester; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2012-01-01

    .... This study focused on the investigation of antibacterial activity, anti-HIV-1 protease activity, toxicity properties and classes of phytochemicals in extracts from C. adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae...

  11. Study on osteopotential activity of Terminalia arjuna bark extract ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bark extract of Terminalia arjuna (TA) possesses potent medical properties and therefore, holds a reputed position in both Ayurvedic and Unani systems of medicine. Bone substitutes play an inevitable role in traumatic bone damages. Growth factors induce osteoinductivity, but suffer from limitations such as high cost and ...

  12. Ursane Triterpenoids from the Bark of Terminalia arjuna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five ursane type triterpene glucosyl esters including a new one, 2a,3ß-dihydroxyurs-12,18-dien-28-oic acid 28-O-ß-D-glucopyranosyl ester (1) were isolated from the bark of Terminalia arjuna, along with two known phenolic compounds. It is the first report of ursane type of triterpenoids from this spi...

  13. Fusarium Damping-off of two Timber Species ( Terminalia Ivorensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of the damping–off disease of two timber species Terminalia ivorensis and Nauclea diderrichii sown in ground granite, sharp river sand, topsoil and sawdust was assessed at the nursery site of the Department of. Forestry and Wildlife Management, University of Port Harcourt. The experiment was laid out in a ...

  14. 1 Antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of Terminalia stenostachya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dropsy, enteralgia, eye diseases, general fatigue, hiccups, jaundice, loss of appetite, malaria, menorrhagia ... T. stenostachya is a small tree or shrub 4-5m high, usually found in wooded grassland of Malawi ... Roots and stem barks of Terminalia spinosa, (voucher specimen with collection No: 3602) were collected from ...

  15. Immunomodulatory Activity of Alcohol Extract of Terminalia chebula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cytokines, namely, IL-2, IL-10 and TNF-α expression in spleen cells, were determined by real time polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) Results: Terminalia chebula extract (100 mg/kg/p.o.) increased the level of liver mitochondrial enzymes CAT and SO) as well as GSH but decreased the level of LPO in the liver when ...

  16. Effect of Terminalia chebula fruit extract on lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of aqueous extract of the Terminalia chebula was studied in male albino rats to explore its activities on testis. 1.0 ml of aqueous extract of T. chebula (500 mg/kg body weight) was given orally for 45 days. The activity of lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase were significantly increased but the concentration ...

  17. Effects of dietary levels of chemically treated Terminalia catappa fruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment to investigate the replacement value of Terminalia catappa fruit waste (TCFW) for maize in the diet of pullet chicks was carried out. ... TCFW was subjected to povidone to detoxify the phytotoxins and supplemented with or without Xylanase to degrade the high fibre and included in diets at 0, 30.6 and 63.52% ...

  18. Phytochemical, antimicrobial and antiplasmodial investigations of Terminalia brownii

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stem bark of Terminalia brownii was collected from Machakos county, Kenya, in November 2011, and identified at the University Herbarium, School of Biological Sciences, University of Nairobi, where a voucher specimen (JM2011/502) was deposited. The stem bark was air dried in shade and pulverized....

  19. Neuroprotective effect of Terminalia chebula extracts and ellagic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the common neurodegenerative disorders among elderly. The purpose of this study was to determine the neuroprotective effect and mechanisms of action underlying the Terminalia chebula extracts and ellagic acid by using beta-amyloid25-35 (Aβ25-35)-induced cell toxicity ...

  20. Effect of Terminalia chebula fruit extract on lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... 100 g of powdered nuts of T. chebula were extracted in 200 ml of water by ... to dryness. The dried extract (20 g) was dissolved in 40 ml of water ... Table 1. Changes in the biochemical and antioxidant enzyme contents in. Terminalia chebula extract treated rats. Parameters. Control. Treatment. Proteina.

  1. Comparisons of nutritional potentials of Terminalia catapa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports experiments designed to assess the performance of goats fed Terminalia catappa (Indian almond) and Acalypha wilkesiana (Red acalypha) and an appraisal of the nutrient contents of each plant. Ten West African dwarf goats (bucks) aged 10 – 12 months weighing 5.50 to 9.25kg body weight were ...

  2. Investigations on the Potential of Indian Almond Tree ( Terminalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potentials of Indian almond tree leaf (Terminalia catappa) as anaesthetic agent in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) were investigated. Juvenile (mean length 26.64 cm ± 3.11SD; mean weight 356.21 g ±12.91SD) and adult fish (mean length 52.13 cm ± 12.91SD; mean weight 1100.30 g ± 41.61SD) were exposed to the ...

  3. Chemical, morphological, and thermogravimetric of Terminalia catappa Linn

    OpenAIRE

    SANTOS,Orquídea Vasconcelos dos; LORENZO,Natasha Dantas; Lannes,Suzana Caetano da Silva

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the chemical composition, morphology, and the thermogravimetric behavior of the pulp of Terminalia catappa, also known as tropical almond. The analytical results show, based mainly on its lipid content, that this fruit has a considerable energy value. Its fiber content contributes to enhance the functional properties of the fruit. Morphological characteristics show a spongy-like structure with dispersion of starch granules and high concentration of f...

  4. Antidiabetic and renoprotective effects of the chloroform extract of Terminalia chebula Retz. seeds in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

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    Rao Nalamolu

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Terminalia chebula (Combretaceae has been widely used in Ayurveda for the treatment of diabetes. In the present investigation, the chloroform extract of T. chebula seed powder was investigated for its antidiabetic activity in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using short term and long term study protocols. The efficacy of the extract was also evaluated for protection of renal functions in diabetic rats. Methods The blood glucose lowering activity of the chloroform extract was determined in streptozotocin-induced (75 mg/kg, i.p.; dissolved in 0.1 M acetate buffer; pH 4.5 diabetic rats, after oral administration at the doses of 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg in short term study. Blood samples were collected from the eye retro-orbital plexus of rats before and also at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 h after drug administration and the samples were analyzed for blood glucose by using glucose-oxidase/peroxidase method using a visible spectrophotometer. In long term study, the extract (300 mg/kg was administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, daily for 8 weeks. Blood glucose was measured at weekly intervals for 4 weeks. Urine samples were collected before the induction of diabetes and at the end of 8 weeks of treatments and analyzed for urinary protein, albumin and creatinine levels. The data was compared statistically using one-way ANOVA with post-hoc Dunnet's t-test. Results The chloroform extract of T. chebula seeds produced dose-dependent reduction in blood glucose of diabetic rats and comparable with that of standard drug, glibenclamide in short term study. It also produced significant reduction in blood glucose in long term study. Significant renoprotective activity is observed in T. chebula treated rats. The results indicate a prolonged action in reduction of blood glucose by T. chebula and is probably mediated through enhanced secretion of insulin from the β-cells of Langerhans or through extra pancreatic mechanism. The

  5. Terminalia arjuna in Chronic Stable Angina: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Navjot Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Terminalia arjuna is a popular Indian medicinal plant with its bark been used for over centuries as cardiotonic. The bark has been found to contain several bioactive compounds including saponins and flavonoids. A number of experimental and clinical studies have been conducted to explore therapeutic potential of Terminalia arjuna in cardiovascular ailments specially in patients of coronary heart disease. A number of narrative reviews have been done but no systematic review has been conducted to date. Objective. To systematically review and conduct a meta-analysis on the available literature evaluating the efficacy of Terminalia arjuna in patients of chronic stable angina. Study selection. We included randomised, pseudo-randomized and before-after comparative studies which compared Terminalia arjuna/commercial preparation of Terminalia arjuna with current standard/ conventional treatment regimens in patients with chronic stable angina. Findings. Studies were found to be of poor methodological design. We found no significant difference in the Terminalia arjuna group as compared to control arm in the outcomes for which we were able to pool data and undertake meta-analysis. Conclusions. Currently, the evidence is insufficient to draw any definite conclusions in favour of or against Terminalia arjuna in patients of chronic stable angina. Further, well-controlled multicentric clinical trials need to be conducted in large number of patients to explore the therapeutic potential of Terminalia arjuna if any.

  6. In vivo Anti-plasmodial Activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Terminalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Terminalia catappa (Tropical almond) is used traditionally in the management of fever, cough, wounds and various ulceration. Oral acute toxicity of the ethanolic leaf extract of Terminalia catappa was evaluated in mice using modified Lorke's method. The ethanolic leaf extract was evaluated for in vivo anti-plasmodial activity ...

  7. Antibacterial and Antioxidant Properties of the Methanolic Extract of the Stem Bark of Pteleopsis hylodendron (Combretaceae

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    Aristide Laurel Mokale Kognou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pteleopsis hylodendron (Combretaceae is used in Cameroon and West Africa folk medicine for the treatment of various microbial infections (measles, chickenpox, and sexually transmitted diseases. The antibacterial properties of the methanolic extract and fractions from stem bark of Pteleopsis hylodendron were tested against three Gram-positive bacteria and eight Gram-negative bacteria using Agar-well diffusion and Broth microdilution methods. Antioxidant activities of the crude extract and fractions were investigated by DPPH radical scavenging activity and β-carotene-linoleic acid assays. The methanolic extract and some fractions exhibited antibacterial activities that varied between the bacterial species (ID = 0.00–25.00 mm; MIC = 781–12500 μg/mL and 0.24–1000 μg/mL. The activity of the crude extract is, however, very weak compared to the reference antibiotics (MIC = 0.125–128 μg/mL. Two fractions (FE and FF showed significant activity (MIC = 0.97 μg/mL while S. aureus ATCC 25922 was almost resistant to all the tested fractions. In addition, the crude extract and some fractions showed good antioxidant potential with inhibition values ranging from 17.53 to 98.79%. These results provide promising baseline information for the potential use of this plant as well as some of the fractions in the treatment of infectious diseases and oxidative stress.

  8. Establecimiento in vitro de Terminalia amazonia (Gmel.) Excell

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez-Álvarez, Dawa; Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica; Abdelnour-Esquivel, Ana; Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

    2014-01-01

    Terminalia amazonia es una especie nativa utilizada para la reforestación por sus características de rápido crecimiento y madera de buena calidad. El objetivo principal de este trabajo fue determinar la condiciones necesarias para el establecimiento in vitro de dicha especie, por lo cual se trabajó con plantas provenientes de campo y de invernadero, a estas últimas se les establecieron condiciones sanitarias, posteriormente se evaluó el efecto de dos agentes desinfectantes, hipocloritode sodi...

  9. Bioinspired reduced graphene oxide nanosheets using Terminalia chebula seeds extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Vankayala, Raviraj; Kalluru, Poliraju; Pamanji, Sreedhara Reddy

    2015-06-01

    A green one step facile synthesis of graphene nanosheets by Terminalia chebula (T. chebula) extract mediated reduction of graphite oxide (GO) is reported in this work. This method avoids the use of harmful toxic reducing agents. The comparative results of various characterizations of GO and T. chebula reduced graphene oxide (TCG) provide a strong indication of the exclusion of oxygen containing groups from graphene oxide and successive stabilization of the formed reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The functionalization of reduced graphene oxide with the oxidized polyphenols causes their stability by preventing the aggregation. We also have proposed how the oxidized polyphenols are accountable for the stabilization of the formed graphene sheets.

  10. Extraction of antibacterial active compounds from dry leaves of African plants of the Combretaceae family

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    Stefano Banfi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The dry leaves of two African plants of the Combretaceae family, furnished by the botanist of the St. Jean de Dieu hospital of Tangueità (Benin, central Africa,were extracted with a sequence of 5 solvents with increasing polarity (from cyclohexane to water.The raw materials, obtained from these extractions following solvent evaporations, were tested for antibiotic activity against gram negative and gram positive bacterial strains. According to the results of a modified Kirby-Bauer test, no promising effect was obtained against Gram negative bacteria while interesting dose-effect activities were observed against Gram positive strains. In particular, from G. senegalensis active compounds were found in the low polarity extract (dichloromethane which, at a concentration of 800 μg/disk (13 mm diameter disk, resulted in a grow inhibition crown of 4.7 mm and 2.6 mm on Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus MSSA, respectively. An higher amount of the aqueous extract (4760 μg/disk also produced a good result as 5.7 mm and 5.0 mm crowns were observed. The extracts from C. micranthum showed an inhibiting effect in the more polar extracts (i.e. from ethanol and water which gave 1 mm of grow inhibition crown on both strains at a concentration of 1000 μg/disk. The most promising extract from each plant was partially purified and then tested on some clinical relevant bacterial strains: S. aureus MRSA, Clostridium difficile, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Corynebacterium striatum, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Haemophylus influenzae, Escherichia coli, obtaining a good killing effects on the Gram positive bacteria of the panel.

  11. Comparison of pharmacokinetic profiles of Terminalia phenolics after intragastric administration of the aqueous extracts of the fruit of Terminalia chebula and a Mongolian compound medicine-Gurigumu-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Ajala, Olusegun S; Wang, Chun-Ying; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yao, Jia-Huan; Zhang, Hai-Peng; Jukov, Azzaya; Ma, Chao-Mei

    2016-06-05

    The dried fruit of Terminalia chebula (fructus chebulae) is an important Traditional Medicine used for intestinal and hepatic detoxification. Gurigumu-7 which is made of fructus chebulae and 6 other traditional medicines is one of the most frequently used compound Mongolian and Tibet medicines for liver diseases. Terminalia phenolics are considered as the bioactive constituents of fructus chebulae and consequently of Gurigumu-7. To compare the pharmacokinetic profiles of Terminalia phenolics after intragastric administration of the aqueous extracts of fructus chebulae and Gurigumu-7 and to evaluate the possible influence of intestinal bacterial metabolism on these pharmacokinetic profiles. An ultra performance liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry method was established and validated for simultaneously determining the pharmacokinetic profiles of seven Terminalia phenolics after intragastric administration of pure compounds, fructus chebulae extract, and Gurigumu-7 extract. In vitro rat fecal lysates experiments were carried out to explore the metabolic discrepancy between fructus chebulae and Gurigumu-7. Seven Terminalia phenolics were detected in rat plasma after intragastric administration of the aqueous extracts of fructus chebulae and Gurigumu-7. Administration of Gurigumu-7 could promote the absorption and increase the Cmax and AUC values of these phenolic constituents compared to fructus chebulae administration. The fecal lysates studies showed that the Terminalia phenolics in Gurigumu-7 were less rapidly bio-transformed than those in fructus chebulae. This may be a contributing factor to the pharmacokinetic discrepancy between the phenolics in fructus chebulae and Gurigumu-7. Administration of Gurigumu-7 could increase the absorption of Terminalia phenolics through slowing down the intestinal bacteria metabolism. These results provide, in part, an in vivo rationale for the formulation of the traditional Mongolia / Tibet medicine

  12. Generic status of Quisqualis (Combretaceae, with notes on the taxonomy and distribution of Q. parviflora

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    M. Jordaan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic status of Quisqualis L., a genus closely related to and sometimes considered congeneric with Combretum Loefl., is discussed. The genus Quisqualis is maintained to accommodate selected African, Indian, Asian and Malesian species (including Q. indica L. and Q. parviflora Sond.. Diagnostic characters for Quisqualis include: leaves with abundant subepidermal crystalliferous idioblasts, each containing a large druse of calcium oxalate; leaves, stems and flowers with stalked glands but no scales; persistent petiole bases that develop into curved spines; petals well developed; hypanthium tubular or cylindrical, usually longer than 20 mm; stamens and style not or scarcely exserted; style adnate to hypanthium for more than half its length. Quisqualis shares a number of morphological similarities with Combretum Loefl. subgen. Cacoucia (Aubl. Exell & Stace sect. Poivrea (Comm. ex DC. G.Don. Some species of Combretaceae from West, West Central and East Africa have the style adnate to the upper hypanthium and display features reminiscent of both Quisqualis and Combretum. These species also have characters of their own and in the past were placed in different sections under Combretum. It is suggested that at least some of these species may be best classified in genera distinct from Combretum and Quisqualis, one of which is Campylogyne Hemsley. Combretum s.str. is defined on the basis of a combination of characters and includes species of which the upper hypanthium is variable in shape, but when tubular or cylindrical, then always shorter than 20 mm. Other diagnostic characters include: stamens exserted well beyond petals; style exserted and free, but when shortly adnate to upper hypanthium (only at the base or for a short distance, then stamens long-exserted. It is suggested that different pollination strategies have developed independently in the Combretum–Quisqualis clade, resulting in convergent morphological trends in floral morphology

  13. In vitro studies reveal antiurolithic effect of Terminalia arjuna using quantitative morphological information from computerized microscopy

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    A. Mittal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: For most cases, urolithiasis is a condition where excessive oxalate is present in the urine. Many reports have documented free radical generation followed by hyperoxaluria as a consequence of which calcium oxalate (CaOx deposition occurs in the kidney tissue. The present study is aimed to exam the antilithiatic potency of the aqueous extract (AE of Terminalia arjuna (T. arjuna. Materials and Methods: The antilithiatic activity of Terminalia arjuna was investigated in vitro nucleation, aggregation and growth of the CaOx crystals as well as the morphology of CaOx crystals using the inbuilt software ‘Image-Pro Plus 7.0’ of Olympus upright microscope (BX53. Antioxidant activity of AE of Terminalia arjuna bark was also determined in vitro. Results: Terminalia arjuna extract exhibited a concentration dependent inhibition of nucleation and aggregation of CaOx crystals. The AE of Terminalia arjuna bark also inhibited the growth of CaOx crystals. At the same time, the AE also modified the morphology of CaOx crystals from hexagonal to spherical shape with increasing concentrations of AE and reduced the dimensions such as area, perimeter, length and width of CaOx crystals in a dose dependent manner. Also, the Terminalia arjuna AE scavenged the DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals with an IC50 at 13.1µg/mL. Conclusions: The study suggests that Terminalia arjuna bark has the potential to scavenge DPPH radicals and inhibit CaOx crystallization in vitro. In the light of these studies, Terminalia arjuna can be regarded as a promising candidate from natural plant sources of antilithiatic and antioxidant activity with high value.

  14. Utilization of barks of terminalia species from Uttar Pradesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, K.; Lal, J.; Swalen, M.

    1977-01-01

    Terminalia crenulata bark is being used to produce oxalic acid on a commercial scale in Maharashtra and Gujarat states in India. Investigation of potential for oxalic production from the bark of a related species indicated that T. arjuna and T. alata were most suitable, with oxalic acid content ranging 13 to 21% for samples from various locations. T. Bellirica was also suitable, with an oxalic acids content of 12 to 19%. Bark of T. chebula had a lower content of oxalic acid, 7 to 5%. For each sample, MC, ash content, and tannin content were also measured. Variation in tannin and oxalic acid contents within the same species could not be directly related to regional factors such as soil and climate.

  15. Incorporating trnH-psbA to the core DNA barcodes improves significantly species discrimination within southern African Combretaceae

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    Jephris Gere

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the discriminatory power of the core DNA barcodes (rbcLa + matK for land plants may have been overestimated since their performance have been tested only on few closely related species. In this study we focused mainly on how the addition of complementary barcodes (nrITS and trnH-psbA to the core barcodes will affect the performance of the core barcodes in discriminating closely related species from family to section levels. In general, we found that the core barcodes performed poorly compared to the various combinations tested. Using multiple criteria, we finally advocated for the use of the core + trnH-psbA as potential DNA barcode for the family Combretaceae at least in southern Africa. Our results also indicate that the success of DNA barcoding in discriminating closely related species may be related to evolutionary and possibly the biogeographic histories of the taxonomic group tested.

  16. Formulation and characterization of a cream containing terminalia chebula extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Naveed; Khan, Ali B; Muhammad, Said; Ahmed, Mahmood; Khan, Haji M Shoaib; Rasool, Fatima; Saeed, Tariq

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to formulate a water-in-oil emulsion (formulation) of Terminalia chebula versus its vehicle (base) as control, and investigate its effects on skin melanin, skin erythema, skin moisture content, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Base containing no active material, and formulation containing 5% concentrated extract of T. chebula, were developed. Different stability parameters were monitored at 8, 25, and 40 °C, as well as 40 °C + 75% relative humidity, for a period of 4 weeks. It was concluded that the creams remained stable at all storage conditions. Both base and formulation were applied to the cheeks of human volunteers for a period of 8 weeks. Different skin parameters were monitored every week to measure any effect produced by these creams. Changes in TEWL produced by base and formulation were insignificant (p > 0.05) with respect to time while significant (p ≤ 0.05) with respect to base and formulation. The skin moisture content increased after the application of formulation throughout the study period; this effect was insignificant (p > 0.05) with respect to time while significant (p ≤ 0.05) with respect to base and formulation. Both base and formulation showed insignificant (p > 0.05) effects on skin melanin content with respect to time. Skin erythema was reduced by the formulation. Both base and formulation produced statistically insignificant (p > 0.05) effects on skin sebum. Both creams were aesthetic with respect to sensory evaluation. T. chebula topical cream showed a positive rejuvenating effect on human skin. Hopefully, this study will encourage more attention towards the research and utilization of herbal medicines. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Environ: E00206 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :C01424], Luteoic acid Terminalia chebula [TAX:155022] Same as: D09139 Combretaceae (Indian-almond family) Terminalia chebula fruit; Standards for non-pharmacopoeial crude drugs ...

  18. Environ: E00206 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D:C01424], Luteoic acid Terminalia chebula [TAX:155022] Same as: D09139 Combretaceae (Indian-almond family) Terminalia chebula fruit; Standards for non-pharmacopoeial crude drugs ...

  19. Comparative study of the antioxidant and reactive oxygen species scavenging properties in the extracts of the fruits of Terminalia chebula, Terminalia belerica and Emblica officinalis

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    Biswas Santanu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS has been implicated in several diseases, and hence natural antioxidants have significant importance in human health. The present study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant and reactive oxygen species scavenging activities of Terminalia chebula, Terminalia belerica and Emblica officinalis fruit extracts. Methods The 70% methanol extracts were studied for in vitro total antioxidant activity along with phenolic and flavonoid contents and reducing power. Scavenging ability of the extracts for radicals like DPPH, hydroxyl, superoxide, nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen, hypochlorous acid were also performed to determine the potential of the extracts. Results The ability of the extracts of the fruits in exhibiting their antioxative properties follow the order T. chebula >E. officinalis >T. belerica. The same order is followed in their flavonoid content, whereas in case of phenolic content it becomes E. officinalis >T. belerica >T. chebula. In the studies of free radicals' scavenging, where the activities of the plant extracts were inversely proportional to their IC50 values, T. chebula and E. officinalis were found to be taking leading role with the orders of T. chebula >E. officinalis >T. belerica for superoxide and nitric oxide, and E. officinalis >T. belerica >T. chebula for DPPH and peroxynitrite radicals. Miscellaneous results were observed in the scavenging of other radicals by the plant extracts, viz., T. chebula >T. belerica >E. officinalis for hydroxyl, T. belerica >T. chebula >E. officinalis for singlet oxygen and T. belerica >E. officinalis >T. chebula for hypochlorous acid. In a whole, the studied fruit extracts showed quite good efficacy in their antioxidant and radical scavenging abilities, compared to the standards. Conclusions The evidences as can be concluded from the study of the 70% methanol extract of the fruits of

  20. New anti-HIV-1, antimalarial, and antifungal compounds from Terminalia bellerica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsaraj, R; Pushpangadan, P; Smitt, U W

    1997-01-01

    A bioactivity-guided fractionation of an extract of Terminalia bellerica fruit rind led to the isolation of two new lignans named termilignan (1) and thannilignan (2), together with 7-hydroxy-3',4'-(methylenedioxy)flavan (3) and anolignan B (4). All four compounds possessed demonstrable anti-HIV-...

  1. Terminalia gum as a directly compressible excipient for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamiro, Oluyemisi A; Odeku, Oluwatoyin A; Sinha, Vivek R; Kumar, Ruchita

    2012-03-01

    The exudates from the incised trunk of Terminalia randii has been evaluated as controlled release excipient in comparison with xanthan gum and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) using carvedilol (water insoluble) and theophylline (water soluble) as model drugs. Matrix tablets were prepared by direct compression and the effects of polymer concentration and excipients-spray dried lactose, microcrystalline cellulose and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate on the mechanical (crushing strength (CS) friability (F) and crushing strength-friability ratio (CSFR)) and drug release properties of the matrix tablets were evaluated. The drug release data were fitted into different release kinetics equations to determine the drug release mechanism(s) from the matrix tablets. The results showed that the CS and CSFR increased with increase in polymer concentration while F decreased. The ranking of CS and CSFR was HPMC > terminalia > xanthan while the ranking was reverse for F. The ranking for t(25) (i.e. time for 25% drug release) at a polymer concentration of 60% was xanthan > terminalia = HPMC. The dissolution time, t(25), of theophylline matrices was significantly lower (p excipients used with the release mechanisms varying from Fickian to anomalous. Terminalia gum compared favourably with standard polymers when used in controlled release matrices and could serve as a suitable alternative to the standard polymers in drug delivery.

  2. Ultrastructure of the male terminalia of Cochliomyia hominivorax and C. macellaria

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    Antônio Cesar Rios Leite

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Cochliomyia hominivorax and C. macellaria are species that cause primary and secondary myiasis, respectively of medical and veterinary importance in the New World. The male terminalia of both insects show morphological differences that are now described from scanning electron microscope (SEM observations.

  3. Ultrastructure of the male terminalia of Cochliomyia hominivorax and C. macellaria

    OpenAIRE

    Antônio Cesar Rios Leite

    1995-01-01

    Cochliomyia hominivorax and C. macellaria are species that cause primary and secondary myiasis, respectively of medical and veterinary importance in the New World. The male terminalia of both insects show morphological differences that are now described from scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations.

  4. Hepatoprotective activity of Terminalia paniculata against paracetamol induced hepatocellular damage in Wistar albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eesha, B R; Mohanbabu Amberkar, V; Meena Kumari, K; Sarath, Babu; Vijay, M; Lalit, M; Rajput, R

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of Terminalia paniculata against paracetamol induced hepatic damage in rats. The plant material was shade dried, powdered and extracted with ethanol. Liv 52 and silymarin were used as standard drugs and 2% gum acacia as a control (vehicle). Alteration in the levels of biochemical markers of hepatic damage like AST, ALT, ALP and lipid peroxides were tested, and phytochemical tests were also performed. Paracetamol (2 g/kg) increased the serum levels of alanine aminotransfer (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and the lipid peroxides. Treatment of Liv 52, silymarin and ethanolic extract of Terminalia paniculata (200 mg/kg) altered levels of biochemical marker and showed significant hepatoprotective activity. Ethanolic extract revealed the presence of phenolic compound and flavanoids. Our findings suggested that ethanolic bark extract of Terminalia paniculata possessed hepatoprotective activity in a dose dependent manner. Terminalia paniculata possesses hepatoprotective activity. It could be an effective and promising preventive agent against PCT induced hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of oral administration of Terminalia chebula on gastric emptying: an experimental study.

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    Tamhane M

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia chebula is a commonly advocated agent in Ayurveda for improving gastrointestinal motility. Charles Foster rats (150-200 gms of either sex were divided into four groups as follows--Group 1 (n = 15 normal animals; Group II (n = 6 rats administered metoclopramide (1.35 mg/kg; Group III (n = 8 rats given atropine (0.45 mg/kg. These agents were injected intramuscularly, 30 mins before the experiment. Rats from Group IV (n = 8 were administered Terminalia chebula (100 mg/kg/day for 15 days orally. Metoclopramide and atropine have established prokinetic and antikinetic activities respectively and are therefore included for comparison. All rats were then given a test meal of methyl cellulose (1.5% mixed with phenol red (50 mg/100 ml orally and gastric emptying was measured 20 mins later. Gastric emptying of normal rats (Group I was found to be 51.6 +/- 7.79%. Metoclopramide significantly increased the gastric emptying (76.33 +/- 12.37%; p < 0.01 and atropine inhibited the motility (% gastric emptying being 7.26 +/- 19.76%; p < 0.01. Terminalia chebula was found to increase the percent gastric emptying (86.57 +/- 6.65%; p < 0.01. Thus from this study it appears that Terminalia chebula can serve as an useful alternative to prokinetic drugs available today.

  6. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles (Green-gold Using Leaf Extract of Terminalia Catappa

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    Balaprasad Ankamwar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of eco-friendly nanoparticles is evergreen branch of nanoscience for biomedical application. Low cost of synthesis and non toxicity are main features make it more attractive potential option for biomedical field and elsewhere. Here, we report the synthesis of gold nanoparticles in aqueous medium using Terminalia catappa (Almond leaf extract as the reducing and stabilizing agent. On treating chloroauric acid solutions with Terminalia catappa (TC leaf extract rapid reduction of chloroaurate ions is observed leading to the formation of highly stable gold nanoparticles in solution. TEM analysis of the gold nanoparticles indicated that they ranged in size from 10 to 35 nm with average size of 21.9 nm.

  7. Studies on Flowability, Compressibility and In-vitro Release of Terminalia Chebula Fruit Powder Tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satya Prakash, Singh; Patra, Ch Niranjan; Santanu, Chakraborty; Hemant Kumar, Pandit; Patro, V Jagannath; Devi, M Vimala

    2011-01-01

    The dried fruit of Terminalia chebula is widely used for its laxative properties. The objective of the present study was to examine the flowability and compressibility of Terminalia chebula fruit powder, subsequently developing its tablet formulations by utilizing wet granulation and direct compression technology. Initial studies on flowability and compressibility revealed that the fruit powder flows poorly, is poorly compressible and mucilaginous in nature. The consolidation behaviors of the fruit powder and of its tablet formulations were studied using the Kawakita, Heckel and Leuenberger equations. Kawakita analysis revealed reduced cohesiveness hence improved flowability was achieved in formulations prepared by direct compression and the wet granulation technique. The Heckel plot showed that the Terminalia chebula fruit powder when formulated using direct compression showed initial fragmentation followed by plastic deformation and that the granules exhibited plastic deformation without initial fragmentation. The compression susceptibility parameter obtained from the Leuenberger equation for compacts formed by using the direct compression and wet granulation techniques indicated that the maximum crushing strength is reached faster and at lower compression pressures. The Tannin content (with reference to standard tannin) in fruit powder and tablet formulations was determined by UV spectrophotometry at 273 nm. The in-vitro dissolution study in simulated SGF (without enzymes) showed more than a 90% release of tannin from the tablets with in 1 h. The brittle fracture index value revealed that tablets prepared from granules showed less fracture tendency in comparison to those formed by direct compression formulation. From this study, it was concluded that the desired flowability, compressibility and compactibility of Terminalia chebula fruit powder can be obtained by using the direct compression and wet granulation techniques. PMID:24250371

  8. Cytoprotective role of the aqueous extract of Terminalia chebula on renal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tayal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Kidney stone is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. Calcium oxalate (CaOx has been shown to be the main component of the majority of stones formed in the urinary system of the patients with urolithiasis. The present study evaluates the antilithiatic properties of Terminalia chebula commonly called as "harad" which is often used in ayurveda to treat various urinary diseases including kidney stones. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The antilithiatic activity of Terminalia chebula was investigated on nucleation and growth of the calcium oxalate crystals. The protective potency of the plant extract was also tested on oxalate induced cell injury of both NRK-52E and MDCK renal epithelial cells. RESULTS: The percentage inhibition of CaOx nucleation was found 95.84% at 25µg/mL of Terminalia chebula aqueous extract which remained almost constant with the increasing concentration of the plant extract; however, plant extract inhibited CaOx crystal growth in a dose dependent pattern. When MDCK and NRK-52E cells were injured by exposure to oxalate for 48 hours, the aqueous extract prevented the injury in a dose-dependent manner. On treatment with the different concentrations of the plant extract, the cell viability increased and lactate dehydrogenase release decreased in a concentration dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that Terminalia chebula is a potential candidate for phytotherapy against urolithiasis as it not only has a potential to inhibit nucleation and the growth of the CaOx crystals but also has a cytoprotective role.

  9. Complement Fixing Polysaccharides from Terminalia macroptera Root Bark, Stem Bark and Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan-Feng Zou; Bing-Zhao Zhang; Hilde Barsett; Kari Tvete Inngjerdingen; Drissa Diallo; Terje Einar Michaelsen; Berit Smestad Paulsen

    2014-01-01

    The root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera were sequentially extracted with ethanol, 50% ethanol-water, and 50 °C and 100 °C water using an accelerated solvent extractor. Ten bioactive purified polysaccharide fractions were obtained from those crude extracts after anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The polysaccharides and their native extracts were characterized with respect to molecular weight, chemical compositions and effects in the complement assay. The ch...

  10. Ethnopharmacological Approaches for Therapy of Jaundice: Part II. Highly Used Plant Species from Acanthaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Asteraceae, Combretaceae, and Fabaceae Families

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    Devesh Tewari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In many developing countries, jaundice is the common symptom of hepatic diseases which are a major cause of mortality. The use of natural product-based therapies is very popular for such hepatic disorders. A great number of medicinal plants have been utilized for this purpose and some facilitated the discovery of active compounds which helped the development of new synthetic drugs against jaundice. However, more epidemiological studies and clinical trials are required for the practical implementation of the plant pharmacotherapy of jaundice. The focus of this second part of our review is on several of the most prominent plants used against jaundice identified in the analysis performed in the first part of the review viz. Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f. Nees, Silybum marianum (L. Gaertn., Terminalia chebula Retz., Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and some species of genus Phyllanthus. Furthermore, we discuss their physiological effects, biologically active ingredients, and the potential mechanisms of action. Some of the most important active ingredients were silybin (also recommended by German commission, phyllanthin and andrographolide, whose action leads to bilirubin reduction and normalization of the levels of relevant serum enzymes indicative for the pathophysiological status of the liver.

  11. Flora da Paraíba, Brasil: Combretaceae Flora of Paraíba, Brazil: Solanum L., Solanaceae

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    Maria Iracema Bezerra Loiola

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se o tratamento taxonômico da família Combretaceae como parte do projeto "Flora da Paraíba", que vem sendo realizado com o objetivo de identificar e catalogar as espécies da flora local. As identificações, descrições e ilustrações botânicas foram efetuadas pela análise morfológica de amostras frescas e espécimes herborizados, com o auxílio da bibliografia e análise de tipos, complementadas pelas observações de campo. Foram registradas 11 espécies subordinadas a cinco gêneros: Buchenavia (1, Combretum (8, Conocarpus (1 e Laguncularia (1. Algumas espécies possuem distribuição restrita aos manguezais, como Conocarpus erectus L. e Laguncularia racemosa (L. C.F. Gaertn., à Caatinga, como Combretum glaucocarpum Mart., C. leprosum Mart. e C. hilarianum D. Dietr., e a Floresta Atlântica, como Buchenavia tetraphylla (Aubl. R.A. Howard, Combretum fruticosum (Loefl. Stuntz e C. laxum Jacq.This taxonomic treatment of the genus Solanum is part of the "Flora da Paraíba" project which aims to identify and catalogue the species of the local flora. Botanical collections, field observations and morphological studies were done for identification, description and botanical illustration of the plant species, also supported by the literature and analysis of Brazilian and foreign herbaria, plus specimens from EAN and JPB herbaria. Twenty two species of Solanum were recorded in the state of Paraíba: Solanum agrarium Sendtn., S. americanum Mill., S. asperum Rich., S. asterophorum Mart., S. caavurana Vell., S. capsicoides All., S. crinitum Lam., S. jabrense Agra & M.Nee, S. melissarum Bohs, S. ovum-fringillae (Dunal Bohs, S. palinacanthum Dunal, S. paludosum Moric., S. paniculatum L., S. paraibanum Agra, S. polytrichum Moric., S. rhytidoandrum Sendtn., Solanum sp., S. stagnale Moric., S. stipulaceum Roem. & Schult., S. stramoniifolium Jacq., S. swartzianum Roem. & Schult. and S. torvum Sw. Three species are new records for Paraíba: S

  12. Incorporating trnH-psbA to the core DNA barcodes improves significantly species discrimination within southern African Combretaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gere, Jephris; Yessoufou, Kowiyou; Daru, Barnabas H.; Mankga, Ledile T.; Maurin, Olivier; van der Bank, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies indicate that the discriminatory power of the core DNA barcodes (rbcLa + matK) for land plants may have been overestimated since their performance have been tested only on few closely related species. In this study we focused mainly on how the addition of complementary barcodes (nrITS and trnH-psbA) to the core barcodes will affect the performance of the core barcodes in discriminating closely related species from family to section levels. In general, we found that the core barcodes performed poorly compared to the various combinations tested. Using multiple criteria, we finally advocated for the use of the core + trnH-psbA as potential DNA barcode for the family Combretaceae at least in southern Africa. Our results also indicate that the success of DNA barcoding in discriminating closely related species may be related to evolutionary and possibly the biogeographic histories of the taxonomic group tested. PMID:24453555

  13. Induction of Biomolecules in Mature Leaves of Terminalia arjuna Due to Feeding of Antheraea mylitta Drury

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    G. Abraham

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia arjuna is an important food plant of the tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury. In this study, we investigated the induction of biomolecules in mature leaves of these plants subjected to insect feeding. Increase in total tannin content, lipid peroxidation, and trypsin inhibitor activity have been observed in mature leaves damaged by the insects. The growth rate of Vth instar larvae of A. mylitta fed on previously damaged foliage reduced by 87.1%. Induction of biomolecules for defense mechanisms in relation to herbivore damage has been discussed.

  14. Physicochemical properties of Terminalia catappa seed oil as a novel dietary lipid source

    OpenAIRE

    Janporn, Supatcha; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chavasit, Visith; Pan, Min-Hsiung; Chittrakorn, Sasivimon; Ruttarattanamongkol, Khanitta; Weerawatanakorn, Monthana

    2015-01-01

    Terminalia catappa Linn (TC) is an ornamental tree planted extensively in many countries. It has been known for a long time that the seeds are edible but no research has focused on the realm of its use as food. Our previous data showed that the seed contains high levels of oil content (600 g/kg) and possesses the optimum fatty acid balance indicated in fat dietary guidelines. This study aims to investigate the physical and chemical properties and the possibility of using TC seed oil as a new ...

  15. Hypoglycemic Effect of Terminalia Chebula Retz. Fruit on Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

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    Ei Pye Phyo Aung

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the hypoglycemic effect of ethanolic extract of terminalia chebula Retz. fruits on alloxaninduced diabetic rats compared with standard oral hypoglycemic drug, metformin. Methods: A randomized controlled experimental animal study was done. 30 Wistar albino rats were induced diabetes by alloxan (100 mg/kg. 80%-ethanolic extraction of fruits of terminalia chebula Retz. was performed by using Soxhlet extraction method. Group 1 was normal control. Group 2 was alloxan-induced diabetic control, group 3 was metformin 100 mg/kg standard group, groups 4, 5 and 6 were extracts 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg orally administered fruit extract for 28-days, respectively. Fasting blood glucose (FBG levels were measured at the end of the first, second, third and fourth weeks by using standardized glucometer. Results: At the end of first, second, third and fourth weeks, the FBG levels of diabetic control were 325.7±28.2, 308.5±69.8, 322.7±65.8 and 369.2±57.4 mg/dL, those of metformin (100 mg/kg were 76.2±9.5, 92.5±14.9, 94.5±17.9 and 90.8±9.9 mg/dL, those of the terminalia chebula Retz. extract 100 mg/kg were 232.5±78.6, 122.8±41.4, 109.2±33.6 and 132.3±41.1 mg/dL, extract 200 mg/kg were 82.7±8.2, 82.7±8.2, 89.7±9.8 and 89±15.2 mg/dL, and extract 400 mg/kg were 80.2±9, 83.5±7.1, 91±11.5 and 82.7±5.9 mg/dL, respectively. When all treatment groups were compared with diabetic control, the FBG levels were significantly reduced (p<0.001. There was no significant difference in FBG levels between standard group and extract (200 and 400 mg/kg groups. Conclusion: The 80%-ethanolic extract of terminalia chebula Retz. has significant hypoglycemic effect on alloxaninduced diabetic rats and it was comparable with standard drug, metformin. The effective dose was 200 to 400 mg/kg.

  16. Anti-colon cancer activity of endophytic fungal strains from Terminalia chebula Rezt

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    Mohammad Shoeb

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Endophytic microorganisms are fungi or bacteria that live inside the healthy tissues of the host plants causing no apparent symptoms of diseases. Five endophytic fungal strains labeled as IR-1, IR-2, IR-4, IR-6 and IR-7 (identified as Penicillium thiomii were isolated from the medicinal plant of Terminalia chebula Retz by culture and sub-culture. The ethyl acetate extract of fungal strains, IR-4, IR-6 and IR-7 inhibited the growth of CaCo-2 colon cancer cell lines in MTT assay with IC50 values of 55, 44 and 67 µg/mL, respectively.

  17. Variations des apports de litière et d'éléments minéraux dans les plantations de limba (Terminalia superba au Congo

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    Kokolo, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations in Litter Production and Nutrient Supply in Plantations of Limba (Terminalia superba in Congo. A study was carried out in a chronosequence of Terminalia superba (7, 12 and 48 years and a nearby natural forest. The results show that the peaks of litterfall take place in rainy season contrary to the majority of the forest formations of the humid tropical zone. The return of nutrients to the soil via the leaf litter is higher in plantations than in forest. The calcium released from the leaf litter was up to 175 kg.ha-1.year1. The values obtained indicate a moderate nutrient use efficiency by Terminalia superba.

  18. Analysis of phytochemical profile of Terminalia arjuna bark extract with antioxidative and antimicrobial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shreya; Patra, Arpita; Samanta, Animesh; Roy, Suchismita; Mandal, Arpita; Mahapatra, Tapasi Das; Pradhan, Shrabani; Das, Koushik; Nandi, Dilip Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate phytochemical screening, antimicrobial activity and qualitative thin layer chromatographic separation of flavonoid components, antioxidant activity and total flavonoid compound of Terminalia arjuna. Methods For phytochemical screening, some common and available standard tests were done. Antimicrobial bioassay was done through agar well diffusion method. Detection of antioxidant activity and flavonoid compounds were done through thin layer chromatography. Total antioxidant activity was measured by 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) in colorimetric method. Aluminum chloride colorimetric method was used for total flavonoid determination. Results Phytochemical screening showed the active compounds presence in high concentration, such as phytosterol, lactones, flavonoids, phenolic compounds and tannins and glycosides. The antimicrobial activity of extract showed that greater inhibition zone against Gram negative bacteria than Gram positive bacteria. This methanolic extract showed a promising antioxidant activity, as absorption of DPPH redicles decreased in DPPH free radical scavenging assay. Flavonoids components having antioxidant property present in the methanol extract at a level of 199.00 mg quercetin equivalent/g of dried methanol extract in colorimetric method. Conclusions The Terminalia arjuna bark extract revealed the presence of bio-active constituents which are known to exhibit medicinal as well as physiological activities. PMID:24093787

  19. Terminalia catappa as bioindicator of environmental pollution in Cubatao city by SR-TXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana; Geraldo, Simoni Michetti, E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Dept. de Saneamento e Ambiente; Barroso, Regina Cely, E-mail: cely_barroso@hotmail.co [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada; Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de, E-mail: aesvives@unimep.b [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo; Cardoso, Simone Coutinho, E-mail: simone@if.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Inst. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    Fertilizer industries are considered the main environmental polluting of fluoride (F) and the industrial complex of the city of Cubatao, SP, Brazil, is an important fertilizer producer. This study aimed to evaluate the local pollution for toxic elements and its comparison with fluoride concentration using the urban vegetation as biomarker. For this, leaves of Terminalia catappa (popularly known for Hat-of-sun or Almond tree of the beach) were tested. The leaves were collected in the winter of 2007 in the industrial region around the fertilizer plants and other industries, in the municipal urban areas of Cubatao and Santos cities. The samples were dehydrated, powdered and submitted to an acid digestion for multi-elemental determination by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (SR-TXRF). All the measurements were performed at Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory. The results obtained by SR-TXRF were compared to fluoride determinations. The variance analysis showed the correlation between F and S concentrations (p<0.05). The concentrations of these elements are concentrated around the fertilizer industries (p< 0.05). Using SR-TXRF was possible to determine several elements as: Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr and Pb in the leaves of Terminalia catappa. Chromium in the areas near to fertilizer industries and also in Santos city which is considered as a control area, present concentrations higher than 18 mg kg{sup -1}, this is considered a toxic value (author)

  20. Analysis of phytochemical profile of Terminalia arjuna bark extract with antioxidative and antimicrobial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shreya; Patra, Arpita; Samanta, Animesh; Roy, Suchismita; Mandal, Arpita; Mahapatra, Tapasi Das; Pradhan, Shrabani; Das, Koushik; Nandi, Dilip Kumar

    2013-12-01

    To investigate phytochemical screening, antimicrobial activity and qualitative thin layer chromatographic separation of flavonoid components, antioxidant activity and total flavonoid compound of Terminalia arjuna. For phytochemical screening, some common and available standard tests were done. Antimicrobial bioassay was done through agar well diffusion method. Detection of antioxidant activity and flavonoid compounds were done through thin layer chromatography. Total antioxidant activity was measured by 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) in colorimetric method. Aluminum chloride colorimetric method was used for total flavonoid determination. Phytochemical screening showed the active compounds presence in high concentration, such as phytosterol, lactones, flavonoids, phenolic compounds and tannins and glycosides. The antimicrobial activity of extract showed that greater inhibition zone against Gram negative bacteria than Gram positive bacteria. This methanolic extract showed a promising antioxidant activity, as absorption of DPPH redicles decreased in DPPH free radical scavenging assay. Flavonoids components having antioxidant property present in the methanol extract at a level of 199.00 mg quercetin equivalent/g of dried methanol extract in colorimetric method. The Terminalia arjuna bark extract revealed the presence of bio-active constituents which are known to exhibit medicinal as well as physiological activities. Copyright © 2013 Asian Pacific Tropical Biomedical Magazine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioactivity guided isolation of the antifungal components in sawdust extracts of Piptadeniatrum africanum, and Terminalia ivorensis

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    Olajuyigbe A.O

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The antifungal activities of extracts from fresh sawdust of Piptadeniatrum africanum,and Terminalia ivorensis was determined using the agar well diffusion method. Aqueous, methanol, chloroform,and n-hexane extracts obtained from the sawdust samples were tested against fungi isolated from some decayed wood samples.Methodology and Results: Fungal isolates included: Aspergillus. niger, Aspergillus. flavus, Aspergillus. fumigates, Aspergillus. wentii, Aspergillus. tamari, and Penicillium. chrysogenum (please write the microorganisms’ name in full when first time introducing them. Results of inhibitory activities showed that the chloroform extracts showed the highest inhibitory abilities with zones of inhibition ranging from 14 mm-24 mm for P. africanum, and 11 mm-15 mm for T. ivorensis. However, the aqueous extracts exhibited the least antifungal activity with zones of inhibition ranging between 10 mm-13 mm and 8 mm-11 mm respectively.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The major secondary plant metabolites identified are alkaloids, anthraquinones, anthraglycosides, arbutin, glycosides, flavonoids, phenolics, saponins, coumarins and valepotriates. The antifungal components in P. africanum were identified to be 3, 7, 8, 3'–Tetramethoxy-6–C-methyl-5, 4'–dihydroxyflavone and 3–methoxy–6–C–methyl–3',4',5,7,8–pentahydroxyflavone while Terminalia ivorensis contained 5,7,8-Trihydroxy-2′5′-methoxy-3′,4′-methylenedioxyisoflavanone as the bioactive component.

  2. Use of ethanol extracts of Terminalia chebula to prevent periodontal disease induced by dental plaque bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongsung; Nho, Youn Hwa; Yun, Seok Kyun; Hwang, Young Sun

    2017-02-16

    The fruit of the Terminalia chebula tree has been widely used for the treatment of various disorders. Its anti-diabetic, anti-mutagenic, anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-viral effects have been studied. Dental plaque bacteria (DPB) are intimately associated with gingivitis and periodontitis. In the quest for materials that will prove useful in the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease, we investigated the preventive effects of an ethanol extract of Terminalia chebula (EETC) on DPB-induced inflammation and bone resorption. The anti-bacterial effect of EETC was analyzed using the disc diffusion method. The anti-inflammatory effect of EETC was determined by molecular biological analysis of the DPB-mediated culture cells. Prevention of osteoclastic bone resorption by EETC was explored using osteoclast formation and pit formation assays. EETC suppressed the growth of oral bacteria and reduced the induction of inflammatory cytokines and proteases, abolishing the expression of PGE2 and COX-2 and inhibiting matrix damage. By stimulating the DPB-derived lipopolysaccharides, EETC inhibited both osteoclast formation in osteoclast precursors and RANKL expression in osteoblasts, thereby contributing to the prevention of bone resorption. EETC may be a beneficial supplement to help prevent DPB-mediated periodontal disease.

  3. Terminalia bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb. fruit mitigates CCl4 induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Jayesh; Lal Raisa, Helen; A, Vysakh; Eldhose, Binil; M S, Latha

    2017-09-01

    Terminalia bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb. is a medicinal plant used for the treatment of various ailments in the traditional system of medicine like Ayurveda where it has been prescribed as a rejuvenator and general health tonic. The fruit of the plant is one of the components of the age old ayurvedic formulation-'Triphala'. The present study evaluates curative effect of aqueous acetone extract of Terminalia bellirica fruits (AATB) against CCl4 induced oxidative stress and liver damage in an animal model. Two doses of the fruit extract (200mg/kg body weight and 400mg/kg body weight) were investigated for the beneficial effects. At the end of the treatment, liver function markers (ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, LDH, total bilirubin, total protein, albumin, globulin, albumin-globulin ratio) as well as hepatic oxidative stress markers (SOD, CAT, GSH) were evaluated. Treatment with AATB significantly restored the parameters towards normal level as compared to the elevated biochemical markers in the CCl4 treated animals. Reversal to normal tissue architecture was observed in histological evaluation. The results of AATB (400mg/kg) were found comparable with that of standard drug silymarin in all the parameters. The above findings suggest the therapeutic potential of the plant in alleviating hepatic oxidative stress and tissue damage, hence the traditional use of the plant in this regard stands justified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Terminalia Chebula (Haritaki on Serum Aspartate Aminotransferase, Alanine Aminotransferase in Paracetemol induced liver damage in Wister Albino Rats

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    Tania Yeasmin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver plays a major role in detoxification and excretion of many endogenous and exogenous compounds. Any injury may lead to severe liver damage and impairment of liver function. Harbal plants such as Terminalia chebula (Haritaki may have free radical scavenging activity thereby can be used for the prevention and treatment of liver damage. Objective: To observe the effect of Terminalia chebula on paracetamol induced changes of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT in Wister albino rats. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka from January to December’ 2013. Total 44 rats with age 90 to 120 days, weighing between 150 to 200 gm were selected. After acclimatization for 14 days, they were divided into base line control (BC, n=11, paracetamol treated control (PC, n=11,Terminalia chebula pretreated and paracetamol treated (TCP-PCT n=11 and paracetamol pretreated and Terminalia chebula treated group (PCP-TCT, n=11. All groups received basal diet for 21 consecutive days. In addition to basal diet, rats of BC received propylene glycol (2ml/kg body weight, orally and PC received single dose of paracetamol suspension (750mg/kg body weight, orally on 21st day. Rats of TCP-PCT received Terminalia chebula extract (200 mg/kg body weight, orally for 21 consecutive days and paracetamol suspension (750mg/kg body weight, orally on 21st day. Again, rats of PCP-TCT received paracetamol suspension (750mg/kg body weight, orally on the 1st day and Terminalia chebula extract (200 mg/kg body weight orally for 21 consecutive days. All rats were sacrificed on 22nd day and then blood samples were collected. For assessment of liver function serum AST and ALT levels were estimated by using standard laboratory kits. The statistical analysis was done by one way ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test as applicable. Results: The mean serum AST and ALT levels were

  5. Anti Bacterial Efficacy of Terminalia Chebula, Terminalia Bellirica, Embilica Officinalis and Triphala on Salivary Streptococcus Mutans Count - A Linear Randomized Cross Over Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Smariti; Lakshminarayan, Nagesh; Gudli, Shanmukha; Kumar, Manish

    2017-02-01

    From the oral health perspective, it is well established that microorganisms have an important role in caries aetiology. From the dawn of civilization, herbal plants have served an array of roles. Triphala a tradtional herbal Ayurvedic formula consists of three native fruits of india including Terminalia Chebula (T. chebula), Terminalia Bellirica (T. bellirica) and Embilica Officinalis (E. officinalis). As per Ayurvedic Formulary of India (AFI) Triphala is prepared by combining a 1:1:1 mixture of ground dry fruits called myrobalans. Till date, an inadequate number of clinical researches on herb based mouth rinses have been reported in Asia, especially in India and other Southeast Asian countries (where these products are most accepted and widely used). The present study was planned to assess the effectiveness of Triphala with its three constituents. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Triphala, T. chebula, T. bellirica and E. officinalis aqueous extract rinses separately on Streptococcusmutans count at various time intervals. This is a double-blind, linear cross over, within group experimental trial conducted among subjects visiting the Department of Public Health Dentistry aged 15 to 40 years. In this design, subjects received all of the treatments sequentially in time. The independent variables to be assessed in this study were all the four interventions of herbal preparations used and the dependent variable assessed is anti bacterial efficacy. Each subject receives two or more different treatments. All the subjects were exposed to all four interventions: 1) T. chebula; 2) T. bellirica; 3) E. officinalis; and 4) Triphala and were provided 15 ml of the freshly prepared 10% rinse. The subjects were instructed not to eat or drink between salivary samples collection. Post rinse unstimulated salivary samples were collected at five minutes and 60 minutes intervals. All the salivary samples were transferred immediately to microbiological

  6. Physicochemical properties of Terminalia catappa seed oil as a novel dietary lipid source

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    Supatcha Janporn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia catappa Linn (TC is an ornamental tree planted extensively in many countries. It has been known for a long time that the seeds are edible but no research has focused on the realm of its use as food. Our previous data showed that the seed contains high levels of oil content (600 g/kg and possesses the optimum fatty acid balance indicated in fat dietary guidelines. This study aims to investigate the physical and chemical properties and the possibility of using TC seed oil as a new dietary lipid. The effects of extraction conditions, partial refining process, and storage stability on TC oil properties were conducted compared with soybean oil. The results showed that physicochemical properties including the density, refractive index, melting point, acidity, free fatty acid, saponification value, unsaponifiable, peroxide, and fatty acid composition of the extracted oil were comparable with soybean oil and their values followed the dietary standard of edible oil.

  7. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of Combretin A and Combretin B isolated from Combretum fragrans F. HOFFM (Combretaceae) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbiantcha, Marius; Almas, Jabeen; Dawe, Amadou; Faheem, Aisha; Sidra, Zafar

    2017-11-20

    Previous pharmacological and phytochemical studies showed that, Combretum fragrans F. HOFFM (Combretaceae) is a Cameroonian medicinal plant possessing numerous therapeutic virtues and rich in various active secondary metabolites. In this study, we investigate in vivo anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity and, in vitro anticancer, anti-TNFα, ROS and NO-inhibitory activities of Combretum A and Combretin B, two triterpenes cycloartane-type isolated from the leaves of Combretum fragrans. The effect on ROS, TNF-α and NO production, anticancer activity and cytotoxicity assay were done using chemiluminescence technique, ELISA kit, colorimetric method, MCF-7 cells and MTT assay, respectively. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities were estimated using a model of acetic acid, formalin and carrageenan. Combretin A and Combretin B significantly (p < 0.001) inhibited extracellular ROS production. These compounds also significantly (p < 0.001) reduced TNF-α and NO production. Moreover, these compounds decreased cell viability of MCF-7 cell lines. For acetic acid- or formalin-induced pain, as well as carrageenan-induced acute inflammation, Combretin A and Combretin B exhibited significant (p < 0.001) anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. Anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and anticancer potential associated with inhibitory effects on ROS, TNFα and NO production in this study show that, Combretin A and Combretin B could be considered as the promising chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer treatment and inflammatory disease.

  8. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Combretum molle (Combretaceae) against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from crossbred dairy cows with clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regassa, Fekadu; Araya, Mengistu

    2012-08-01

    Following the rapidly expanding dairy enterprise, mastitis has remained the most economically damaging disease. The objective of this study was mainly to investigate the in vitro antibacterial activities of ethanol extracts of Combretum molle (R.Br.Ex.G.Don) Engl & Diels (Combretaceae) against antibiotic-resistant and susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from clinical cases of bovine mastitis using agar disc diffusion method. The leaf and bark extracts showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus at concentrations of 3 mg/ml while the stem and seed extract did not show any bioactivity. Although both leaf and bark extracts were handled in the same manner, the antibacterial activity of the bark extract against the bacterial strains had declined gradually to a lower level as time advanced after extraction. The leaf extract had sustained bioactivity for longer duration. The susceptibility of the bacteria to the leaf extract is not obviously different between S. aureus and S. agalactiae. Also, there was no difference in susceptibility to the leaf extract between the antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-sensitive bacteria. Further phytochemical and in vivo efficacy and safety studies are required to evaluate the therapeutic value of the plant against bovine mastitis.

  9. Tannin extracts from immature fruits of Terminalia chebula Fructus Retz. promote cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Diao, Yunpeng; Zhang, Houli; Wang, Shouyu; Zhang, Zhen; Yu, Bo; Huang, Shanshan; Yang, Hong

    2011-10-07

    Tannins extracted from immature fruits of Terminalia chebula Fructus Retz. are considered as effective components promoting the process of wound healing. The objective of this study is to explore the optimal extraction and purification technology (OEPT) of tannins, while studying the use of this drug in the treatment of a cutaneous wound of rat as well as its antibacterial effects. The content of tannin extracts was measured by the casein method, and antibacterial ability was studied by the micro-dilution method in vitro. In wound healing experiment, animals in group Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ were treated with vaseline ointment, tannin extracts (tannin content: 81%) and erythromycin ointment, respectively (5 mg of ointment were applied on each wound). To evaluate the process of wound healing, selected pharmacological and biochemical parameters were applied. After optimal extraction and purification, content of tannin extracts was increased to 81%. Tannin extracts showed the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella Pneumonia in vitro. After excision of wounds, on days 7 and 10, the percent of wound contraction of group Ⅱ was higher than that of group Ⅰ. After being hurt with wounds, on days 3, 7, and 10, the wound healing quality of group Ⅱ was found to be better than that of group Ⅰ in terms of granulation formation and collagen organization. After wound creation, on day 3, the vascular endothelial growth factor expression of group Ⅱ was higher than that of group Ⅰ. The results suggest that tannin extracts from dried immature fruits of Terminalia chebula Fructus Retz. can promote cutaneous wound healing in rats, probably resulting from a powerful anti-bacterial and angiogenic activity of the extracts.

  10. Tannin extracts from immature fruits of Terminalia chebula Fructus Retz. promote cutaneous wound healing in rats

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    Yu Bo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tannins extracted from immature fruits of Terminalia chebula Fructus Retz. are considered as effective components promoting the process of wound healing. The objective of this study is to explore the optimal extraction and purification technology (OEPT of tannins, while studying the use of this drug in the treatment of a cutaneous wound of rat as well as its antibacterial effects. Methods The content of tannin extracts was measured by the casein method, and antibacterial ability was studied by the micro-dilution method in vitro. In wound healing experiment, animals in group Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ were treated with vaseline ointment, tannin extracts (tannin content: 81% and erythromycin ointment, respectively (5 mg of ointment were applied on each wound. To evaluate the process of wound healing, selected pharmacological and biochemical parameters were applied. Results After optimal extraction and purification, content of tannin extracts was increased to 81%. Tannin extracts showed the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella Pneumonia in vitro. After excision of wounds, on days 7 and 10, the percent of wound contraction of group Ⅱ was higher than that of group Ⅰ. After being hurt with wounds, on days 3, 7, and 10, the wound healing quality of group Ⅱ was found to be better than that of group Ⅰ in terms of granulation formation and collagen organization. After wound creation, on day 3, the vascular endothelial growth factor expression of group Ⅱ was higher than that of group Ⅰ. Conclusion The results suggest that tannin extracts from dried immature fruits of Terminalia chebula Fructus Retz. can promote cutaneous wound healing in rats, probably resulting from a powerful anti-bacterial and angiogenic activity of the extracts.

  11. Antioxidant and Hypoglycemic Activities of Leaf Extracts of Three Popular Terminalia Species

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    Aditya Arya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to ascertain the antioxidant and hypoglycemic activity of methanolic extracts of the leaves of Terminalia arjuna, T. bellerica, and T. chebula. Extracts were evaluated for total phenolic, flavonoid, and tannin content, and in vitro antioxidant potential with DPPH, ORAC, and FRAP assays. The extracts' hypoglycemic activities were evaluated by hypoglycemic screening and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in normal rats. The methanolic extracts of T. chebula leaves exhibited the highest quantity of total phenolic and flavonoid content, followed by those of T. bellerica and T. arjuna. T. arjuna contained more tannin than T. bellerica did, but less than that of T. chebula. The scavenging capacity of T. chebula for the antioxidant DPPH was the highest of the extracts tested, as it recorded the lowest IC50 value of all 3 extracts. Likewise, the results attributed the T. chebula extract with the highest oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC. In the FRAP assay, the extracts' ferric reducing antioxidant abilities were T. arjuna > T. chebula > T. bellerica. This correlates the potential of polyphenolic content enriched with antioxidant capabilities and substantiates the results of the hypoglycemic screening and OGTT, which determined that the T. chebula extract had a better hypoglycemic effect in normal and glucose-induced hyperglycemic rats (p <0.001 than that of T. bellerica and T. arjuna, respectively. The use of these Terminalia species as food supplements may help in reducing oxidative stress and related diabetic complications. The phytoconstituents responsible for the hypoglycemic activity need to be isolated to elucidate the relationship between the extracts' antioxidant capacity and their hypoglycemic effects.

  12. Sorption study of methylene blue on activated carbon prepared from Jatropha curcas and Terminalia catappa seed coats

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    Ismaila Olalekan Saheed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work targets the effectiveness of the prepared activated carbon from Jatropha curcas and Terminalia catappa seed coats for the sorption of methylene blue (MB from aqueous solution. The prepared Jatropha activated carbon (JAC and Terminalia activated carbon (TAC were characterised using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Branauer- Emmett-Teller (BET surface area analysis. Effect of initial concentration, pH, contact time, adsorbent dose and temperature on the sorption experiments were studied and the adsorption capacity of these adsorbents were found to be 37.84 mg/g and 17.44 mg/g for methylene blue uptake by JAC and TAC respectively. The experimental data were analysed using Langmuir, Fruendlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The data fitted best into Langmuir isotherm for Methylene blue-JAC and Methylene blue-TAC systems. The kinetic studies fitted into pseudo second order kinetics model. The process chemistry was exothermic.

  13. Effect of microwave irradiation time on the physical properties of Terminalia catappa fruit shells-based activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awitdrus, Annur, Al; Farma, Rakhmawati; Iwantono, Deraman, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) from Terminalia catappa fruit shells has been produced through microwave irradiation assisted chemical activation. Potassium hydroxide (KOH) was used as activating agent with ratio of mass percentage of pre-carbonized of Terminalia catappa fruit shells and KOH of 2:1. The AC was irradiated using microwave with the output power of 630 Watt and different irradiation time of 15, 20, and 25 minutes. The physical properties of ACs i.e. microstructures, surface morphology, and BET surface area were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm, respectively. Interlayer spacing d002 and d100, and stack width La increased, and stack height Lc decreased with increasing irradiation time. The N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm data of the ACs showed the BET surface area of 365 and 300 m2/g for AC15 and AC25, respectively.

  14. Effects of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) and Terminalia arjuna (Arjuna) on physical performance and cardiorespiratory endurance in healthy young adults.

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    Sandhu, Jaspal Singh; Shah, Biren; Shenoy, Shweta; Chauhan, Suresh; Lavekar, G S; Padhi, M M

    2010-07-01

    Several medicinal plants have been described to be beneficial for cardiac ailments in Ayurveda like Ashwagandha and Arjuna. Ashwagandha-categorised as Rasayanas, and described to promote health and longevity and Arjuna primarily for heart ailments. coronary artery disease, heart failure, hypercholesterolemia, anginal pain and can be considered as a useful drug for coronary artery disease, hypertension and ischemic cardiomyopathy. There are no scientific clinical studies showing effect of both these drugs on exercise performance after regular administration when given as supplements The present study was therefore designed and performed to assess the effects of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) and Terminalia arjuna (Arjuna) individually and as a combination on maximum velocity, average absolute and relative Power, balance, maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max) and blood pressure in humans. Forty normal healthy. Subjects (either sex, mean age 20.6 ± 2.5yrs and mean Body Mass Index 21.9 ± 2.2) were recruited after written informed consent was obtained. Institutional Ethics Committee permission was also obtained. Thirty participants were assigned to experimental group of which 10 received standardized root extracts of Withania somnifera, 10 received standardized bark extract of Terminalia arjuna and the rest of the 10 received standardized root extract of Withania somnifera in addition to bark extract of Terminalia arjuna both. Both the drugs were given in the form of capsules (dosage 500mg/day for both the drugs). Ten participants received placebo (capsules filled with flour). All the subjects continued the regimen for 8 weeks. All variables were assessed before and after the course of drug administration Our study showed that Withania somnifera increased velocity, power and VO2 max whereas Terminalia arjuna increased VO2 max and lowered resting systolic blood pressure. When given in combination, the improvement was seen in all parameters except balance and diastolic

  15. Use of an aqueous extract of Terminalia chebula as an anticaries agent: A clinical study

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    Carounanidy Usha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant-derived medicines have been a part of our traditional health care system, and the antimicrobial properties of plant-derived compounds are well documented. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of an aqueous extract of Terminalia chebula (a medicinal plant on salivary samples and its potential for use as an anticaries agent in the form of mouthwash. A concentrated aqueous extract was prepared from the fruit of T. chebula . A mouth rinse of 10% concentration was prepared by diluting the extract in sterile distilled water. The efficacy of the mouth rinse was assessed by testing on 50 salivary samples. Salivary samples were collected from subjects assessed to be at high risk for caries. Salivary pH, buffering capacity, and microbial activity were assessed before rinsing, immediately after, and 10 min, 30 min, and 1 h after rinsing. There was an increase in the pH and buffering capacity and decrease in microbial count. An aqueous extract of T. chebula used as a mouth rinse seems to be an effective anticaries agent.

  16. Physicochemical properties of Terminalia catappa seed oil as a novel dietary lipid source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janporn, Supatcha; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chavasit, Visith; Pan, Min-Hsiung; Chittrakorn, Sasivimon; Ruttarattanamongkol, Khanitta; Weerawatanakorn, Monthana

    2015-06-01

    Terminalia catappa Linn (TC) is an ornamental tree planted extensively in many countries. It has been known for a long time that the seeds are edible but no research has focused on the realm of its use as food. Our previous data showed that the seed contains high levels of oil content (600 g/kg) and possesses the optimum fatty acid balance indicated in fat dietary guidelines. This study aims to investigate the physical and chemical properties and the possibility of using TC seed oil as a new dietary lipid. The effects of extraction conditions, partial refining process, and storage stability on TC oil properties were conducted compared with soybean oil. The results showed that physicochemical properties including the density, refractive index, melting point, acidity, free fatty acid, saponification value, unsaponifiable, peroxide, and fatty acid composition of the extracted oil were comparable with soybean oil and their values followed the dietary standard of edible oil. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Effects of Terminalia bellerica Roxb. methanolic extract on mouse immune response in vitro

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    Aurasorn Saraphanchotiwitthaya1

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of Terminalia bellerica methanolic extract (0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 500 g/ml on the mouse immune system were investigated in vitro. Phagocytic activity and lymphocyte proliferation were assayed. The results indicated the effect of the extract (500 g/ml on the stimulation of macrophage phagocytosis, through the production of superoxide anions and acid phosphatase, with a phagocytic index (PI value of approximately 1.5 and 1.3, respectively. For the lymphocyte proliferation assay, the extract (500 g/ml with phytohemagglutinin exhibited maximal activation, with a stimulation index (SI value of approximately 5.8. With concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, and pokeweed mitogen, similar activation (SI 4.5 of lymphocyte proliferation was observed. However, at low concentrations (0.1 g/ml, T. bellerica extract with concanavalin A and pokeweed mitogen caused suppressant activity (SI 0.7. The results suggested that the effect of extract on T-lymphocyte proliferation occurred through the same mechanism as phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A and B-lymphocyte proliferation through T-cell independent and T-cell dependent mechanisms, in manners similar to lipopolysaccharide and pokeweed mitogen respectively. It might be concluded that the methanolic extract of T. bellerica affected the mouse immune system, specifically both the cellular and humoral immune response in vitro, corresponding with its folklore applications. These results can be further applied to the treatment of human immune mediated diseases.

  18. In Vitro Anticancer Activities of Anogeissus latifolia, Terminalia bellerica, Acacia catechu and Moringa oleiferna Indian Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Kawthar A E; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Saxena, Ajit K

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate in vitro anti-proliferative potential of extracts from four Indian medicinal plants, namely Anogeissus latifolia, Terminalia bellerica, Acacia catechu and Moringa oleiferna. Their cytotoxicity was tested in nine human cancer cell lines, including cancers of lung (A549), prostate (PC-3), breast (T47D and MCF-7), colon (HCT-16 and Colo-205) and leukemia (THP-1, HL-60 and K562) by using SRB and MTT assays. The findings showed that the selected plant extracts inhibited the cell proliferation of nine human cancer cell lines in a concentration dependent manner. The extracts inhibited cell viability of leukemia HL-60 and K562 cells by blocking G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Interestingly, A. catechu extract at 100 μg/mL induced G2/M arrest in K562 cells. DNA fragmentation analysis displayed the appearance of a smear pattern of cell necrosis upon agarose gel electrophoresis after incubation of HL-60 cells with these extracts for 24 h.

  19. Antifungal activity of gallic acid purified from Terminalia nigrovenulosa bark against Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dang-Minh-Chanh; Seo, Dong-Jun; Lee, Hyang-Burm; Kim, In-Seon; Kim, Kil-Yong; Park, Ro-Dong; Jung, Woo-Jin

    2013-03-01

    The antifungal activities of methanolic extracts from Terminalia nigrovenulosa bark (TNB) was investigated for effects on the initial growth of mycelia against Fusarium solani. The ethyl acetate fraction separated from TNB demonstrated the highest antifungal activity against F. solani. The antifungal compound was isolated from TNB using silica gel column and Sephadex LH-20 chromatography combined with thin-layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. Structural identification of the antifungal compound was conducted using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The purified antifungal compound was gallic acid (GA) or 3,4,5-trihydroxy benzoic acid. Purified-GA possesses the high antifungal activity against F. solani, and that antifungal activity was dosage-dependent. The hyphae became collapsed and shrunken after 24 h incubation with GA (500 ppm). In pot experiments, the application of TNB crude extract was found to be effective in controlling the cucumber Fusarium root rot disease by enhancing activities of chitinase, peroxidase thereby promoting the growth of plants. The applied TNB extract significantly suppressed root rot disease compared to control. It resulted in 33, 75 and 81% disease suppression with 100, 500 and 1000 ppm of TNB crude extract, respectively. The study effectively demonstrated biological activities of the TNB extract, therefore suggesting the application of TNB for the control of soil-borne diseases of cucumber plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Terminalia chebula extract at room temperature and their antimicrobial studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Sinha, Madhulika; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Ghosh, Asit Ranjan; Siva Kumar, Koppala; Sreedhara Reddy, Pamanji

    2012-06-01

    A green rapid biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using Terminalia chebula (T. chebula) aqueous extract was demonstrated in this present study. The formation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) at 452 nm using UV-visible spectrophotometer. The reduction of silver ions to silver nanoparticles by T. chebula extract was completed within 20 min which was evidenced potentiometrically. Synthesised nanoparticles were characterised using UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The hydrolysable tannins such as di/tri-galloyl-glucose present in the extract were hydrolyzed to gallic acid and glucose that served as reductant while oxidised polyphenols acted as stabilizers. In addition, it showed good antimicrobial activity towards both Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus ATCC 25923) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli ATCC 25922). Industrially it may be a smart option for the preparation of silver nanoparticles.

  1. Modulatory effects of Terminalia arjuna against domoic acid induced toxicity in Caco-2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, E M; Kumar, G Phani; Anand, T; Anilakumar, K R

    2017-08-01

    Domoic acid is a potent marine algal toxin produced by diatomic genus of Pseudo-nitzschia causing amnesic shell fish poisoning. Domoic acid toxicosis mainly involves excitotoxic effects coupled with oxidative stress. The present study was aimed to evaluate the protective effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of Terminalia arjuna (TA) against domoic acid induced toxic effects in Caco-2 cell line. It was observed that the toxicity induced by domoic acid in Caco-2 cells was mediated by oxidative insult leading to morphological changes, DNA damage and apoptosis. In our study pre-treatment of the cells with TA (10, 20 and 30 μg/ml) showed significant protection against domoic acid induced morphological, oxidative and apoptotic damages in a dose dependent manner. The effect of phytocompounds present in TA viz., kaempferol and arjungenin showed significant protection against domoic acid induced toxicity in Caco-2 cell line. Hence, it could be inferred that the protective effect of TA extract against domoic acid induced toxicity could be due to the individual or synergistic effects of kaempferol and argungenin. However, further clinical studies are warranted to consider TA as a natural remedy to prevent amnesic shell fish poisoning.

  2. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity, and Neuroprotective Effect of Terminalia chebula Retzius Extracts

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    Chia Lin Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine phytochemical compositions, chemiluminescence antioxidant activities, and neuroprotective effects on PC12 cells for water, methanol, and 95% ethanol extracts of the air-dried fruit of Terminalia chebula Retzius. The water extract afforded the greatest yield, and total phenolic and tannin content. The methanol extract yielded the greatest total triterpenoid content. Based on four chemiluminescence antioxidant assays, the three extracts showed various degrees of antioxidant activity. The methanol extract showed good antioxidant activity based on the horseradish peroxidase-luminol-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 assay. The water extract appeared to have good antioxidant activities in cupric sulfate-Phen-Vc-H2O2 and luminol-H2O2 assays. Pyrogallol-luminol assay showed the 95% ethanol extract to have good antioxidant activity. The methanol and water extracts presented neuroprotective activities on H2O2-induced PC12 cell death at 0.5–5.0 μg/mL. Further investigations are necessary to verify these activities in vivo.

  3. Complement Fixing Polysaccharides from Terminalia macroptera Root Bark, Stem Bark and Leaves

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    Yuan-Feng Zou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera were sequentially extracted with ethanol, 50% ethanol-water, and 50 °C and 100 °C water using an accelerated solvent extractor. Ten bioactive purified polysaccharide fractions were obtained from those crude extracts after anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The polysaccharides and their native extracts were characterized with respect to molecular weight, chemical compositions and effects in the complement assay. The chemical compositions showed that the polysaccharides are of pectic nature. The results indicated that there was no great difference of the complement fixation activities in the crude extracts from the different plant parts when extracting with the accelerated solvent extraction system. The purified polysaccharide fractions 100WTSBH-I-I and 100WTRBH-I-I isolated from the 100 °C water extracts of stem and root bark respectively, showed the highest complement fixation activities. These two fractions have rhamnogalacturonan type I backbone, but only 100WTSBH-I-I contains side chains of both arabinogalactan type I and II. Based on the yield and activities of the fractions studied those from the root bark gave highest results, followed by those from leaves and stem bark. But in total, all plant materials are good sources for fractions containing bioactive polysaccharides.

  4. Complement fixing polysaccharides from Terminalia macroptera root bark, stem bark and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Bing-Zhao; Barsett, Hilde; Inngjerdingen, Kari Tvete; Diallo, Drissa; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2014-06-06

    The root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera were sequentially extracted with ethanol, 50% ethanol-water, and 50 °C and 100 °C water using an accelerated solvent extractor. Ten bioactive purified polysaccharide fractions were obtained from those crude extracts after anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The polysaccharides and their native extracts were characterized with respect to molecular weight, chemical compositions and effects in the complement assay. The chemical compositions showed that the polysaccharides are of pectic nature. The results indicated that there was no great difference of the complement fixation activities in the crude extracts from the different plant parts when extracting with the accelerated solvent extraction system. The purified polysaccharide fractions 100WTSBH-I-I and 100WTRBH-I-I isolated from the 100 °C water extracts of stem and root bark respectively, showed the highest complement fixation activities. These two fractions have rhamnogalacturonan type I backbone, but only 100WTSBH-I-I contains side chains of both arabinogalactan type I and II. Based on the yield and activities of the fractions studied those from the root bark gave highest results, followed by those from leaves and stem bark. But in total, all plant materials are good sources for fractions containing bioactive polysaccharides.

  5. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-, and positive-controlled clinical pilot study to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of standardized aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula and Terminalia bellerica in subjects with hyperuricemia

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    Usharani P

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pingali Usharani,1 Chandrasekhar Nutalapati,1 Venkata Kishan Pokuri,1 Chiranjeevi Uday Kumar,1 Gangadhar Taduri,21Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2Department of Nephrology, Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences, Panjagutta, Hyderabad, India Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of standardized aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula and Terminalia bellerica versus febuxostat and placebo on reduction in serum uric acid levels in subjects with hyperuricemia. Materials and methods: A total of 110 eligible subjects with hyperuricemia were enrolled and randomized to either of the five treatment groups – T. chebula 500 mg twice a day (BID, T. bellerica 250 mg BID, T. bellerica 500 mg BID, placebo BID, and febuxostat 40 mg once daily plus an identical placebo – for a duration of 24 weeks. Serum uric acid levels were measured at baseline and at the end of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 weeks. Statistical analysis was done using GraphPad Prism Software 4. Results and interpretation: All active treatment groups showed a reduction in serum uric acid levels compared to baseline and placebo. Significant reduction in mean serum uric acid levels started as early as 4 weeks following treatment, compared to baseline, with T. bellerica (500 and 250 mg, febuxostat (P<0.001, and T. chebula 500 mg (P<0.01; an increase in serum uric acid levels was seen with placebo (P<0.05. The serum uric acid levels became steady after 16 weeks of treatment and remained the same until the end of 24 weeks. The reduction of serum uric acid levels in the T. bellerica 500 mg group was nearly twice that of the T. chebula 500 mg group as well as T. bellerica 250 mg group at all time points. T. bellerica 500 mg reduced serum uric acid levels from 8.07±0.87 to 5.78±0.25 compared to febuxostat, which reduced serum uric acid levels from 8.53±0.97 to 4.28±0.67 (P<0.001 at the end of 24 weeks. The efficacy of T. bellerica appeared to be dose dependent

  6. Fatick, Sénégal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    31 juil. 2014 ... Celastraceae. Maytenus. Neocarya macrophylla (Sabine) Prance. Gr2, Gr3, Gr4, Gr5. Chrysobalanaceae. Neocarya. Combretum glutinosum Perrott. ex DC. Gr1, Gr2, Gr4, Gr5. Combretaceae. Combretum. Combretum micranthum G. Don. Gr2, Gr4,. Combretaceae. Combretum. Terminalia macroptera Guill ...

  7. Effect of Terminalia chebula and Allium sativum on in vivo methane emission by sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, A K; Kamra, D N; Bhar, R; Kumar, R; Agarwal, N

    2011-04-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate some plant parts (already tested for their antimethanogenic activity in in vitro gas production test in the authors' laboratory) as feed additive to combat methane emission from sheep. Sixteen male sheep with average body weight of 29.96±1.69 kg (22 months of age) were divided into four groups in a randomized block design. The animals were fed on a diet containing forage to concentrate ratio of 1:1. The concentrate fraction composed (in parts) of maize grain, 32; wheat bran, 45; deoiled soybean meal, 20; mineral mixture, 2 and common salt, 1. The four treatments were control (without additive), seed pulp of Terminalia chebula (Harad), bulb of Allium sativum (Garlic) and a mixture (Mix) of the latter two in equal proportions at the rate of 1% of dry matter (DM) intake. There was no effect on DM intake due to the inclusion of these feed additives. The digestibilities of DM and organic matter tended to be higher (pMethane emission (L/kg digested DM intake) as estimated by open circuit respiration chamber and methane energy loss as per cent of digestible energy intake tended to be lower in T. chebula (p=0.09) and Mix (p=0.08) groups compared with control. The data indicated that T. chebula showed antimethanogenic activity, whereas both T. chebula and A. sativum improved nutrient digestibility. Therefore, these two plants appear to be suitable candidates for use as feed additive to mitigate methane emission and to improve nutrient utilization by sheep. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Phytochemical Characterization of Terminalia catappa Linn. Extracts and Their antifungal Activities against Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terças, Analucia G.; Monteiro, Andrea de Souza; Moffa, Eduardo B.; dos Santos, Julliana R. A.; de Sousa, Eduardo M.; Pinto, Anna R. B.; Costa, Paola C. da Silva; Borges, Antonio C. R.; Torres, Luce M. B.; Barros Filho, Allan K. D.; Fernandes, Elizabeth S.; Monteiro, Cristina de Andrade

    2017-01-01

    Terminalia catappa Linn bark is used to treat dysentery by various populations in Southeast Asian countries, and its leaves have also been used in traditional medicine to treat hepatitis in India and the Philippines. Here, the antifungal actions of crude hydro-alcoholic extract (TcHE) and fractions from T. catappa leaves were assessed via the agar diffusion and microdilution tests on Candida reference strains and clinical isolates from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Additionally, the potential cytotoxic effects of TcHE were assessed on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). T. catappa fractions and sub-fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with electron impact (GC/MS/EI), high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry “electrospray” ionization in positive mode (HPLC/MS/MS/ESI+) and hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1HNMR). TcHE and its fractions were able to inhibit the growth of all tested Candida strains with the n-butanol (FBuOH) fraction presenting the best antifungal activity. Testing of different FBuOH sub-fractions (SF) showed that SF10 was the most active against Candida spp. Fractioning of SF10 demonstrated that 5 out of its 15 sub-fractions were active against Candida spp., with SF10.5 presenting the highest activity. Chemical analysis of SF10 detected hydrolysable tannins (punicalin, punicalagin), gallic acid and flavonoid C-glycosides. Overall, the results showed that T. catappa L. leaf extract, fractions and sub-fractions were antifungal against Candida spp. and may be useful to treat diseases caused by this fungus. PMID:28443078

  9. In vitro propagation, encapsulation, and genetic fidelity analysis of Terminalia arjuna: a cardioprotective medicinal tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit K; Harish; Rai, Manoj K; Phulwaria, Mahendra; Agarwal, Tanvi; Shekhawat, N S

    2014-07-01

    The present study described an improved and reproducible in vitro regeneration system for Terminalia arjuna using nodal segment explants obtained from a mature plant. Shoot tips excised from in vitro proliferated shoots were encapsulated in 3 % sodium alginate and 100 mM CaCl2[Symbol: see text]2H2O for the development of synthetic seeds which may be applicable in short-term storage and germplasm exchange of elite genotype. Shoot multiplication was significantly influenced by a number of factors, namely types and concentrations of plant growth regulators, medium composition, repeated transfer of mother explants, subculturing of in vitro regenerated shoot clumps, agar concentrations, and temperature. Maximum numbers of shoots (16.50 ± 3.67) were observed on modified Murashige and Skoog (MMS) medium containing 0.5 mg l(-1) of benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 0.1 mg l(-1) of naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). To shortening the regeneration pathway, rooting of micropropagated shoots under in vitro condition was excluded and an experiment on ex vitro rooting was conducted and it was observed that the highest percentage of shoots rooted ex vitro when treated with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA, 250 mg l(-1)) + 2-naphthoxy acetic acid (NOA, 250 mg l(-1)) for 5 min. The well-developed ex vitro rooted shoots were acclimatized successfully in soilrite under greenhouse conditions with 80 % survival of plants. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis confirmed that all the regenerated plants were genetically identical to the mother plant, suggesting the absence of detectable genetic variation in the regenerated plantlets. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on synthetic seed production as well as ex vitro rooting and genetic fidelity assessment of micropropagated shoots of T. arjuna.

  10. Anti-leishmanial and Anti-cancer Activities of a Pentacyclic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Terminalia arjuna Roxb (Combretaceae) is commonly known as Arjjhan and Arjun in Bengal, India. The anti-leishmanial and anticancer activities of a pentacyclic triterpenoid isolated from its leaves were evaluated. Methods: Dried and crushed leaves of Terminalia arjuna were de-fatted with petroleum ether ...

  11. Partial characterization of protein extracted from Terminalia catappa seed behaving as lectin that is capable of mouse sperm agglutination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryanto, Hery; Kamilah, Santi Nurul

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this research is to partially characterize proteins extracted from Terminalia catappa seeds that behave like lectin, being capable of mouse sperm agglutination. Cotyledons of the seed were extracted in homogenizing PBS buffer. The supernatant was precipitated with ammonium sulfate to a final concentration of 50% (w/v), then dialyzed with 2 kinds of dialysis tubes, i.e. 6000 and 12000 MWCO. The precipitated proteins were then diluted in 0.9% (w/v) NaCl. Next, dialysis fractions of the precipitated protein were used for the mouse sperm agglutination test. Protein from the dialysis fraction of 6000 MWCO tube could agglutinate mouse sperm. The quantitation of protein was carried out by using the Bradford Coomassie kit from crude extract to dialyzed fractions. Both dialyzed fractions were also run on SDS-PAGE to see the protein profiles.

  12. Trial Germination of Coastal Vegetation (Terminalia catappa, Calophyllum inophylum L., and Barringtonia asiatica in the Kima Atas Permanent Nursery

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    Ady Suryawan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It was estimated that North Sulawesi needs 9,870,093.33 coastal vegetation seeds to rehabilitate the damage of coastal ecosystems which reach 14,805.14 ha, where the largest area 13.884 ha located in other land use. This study aims to provide information of seed germination techniques in Permanent Nursery Kima Atas, Manado. Research was arranged in complete randomized design as factorial with three replications. Ketapang (Terminalia cattapa will obtain high viability in fluctuation of temperature and humidity, i.e used sand media, without wildlings and placed under 25% shade and rain. Keben (Baringtonia asiatica through the incision and decay that placed in the open location will obtain viability until 90% within 2 months. Nyamplung (Calophyllum inophyllum requires shell splitting in order to improve the viability and it can be done by cracking and stripping.

  13. Green synthesis of zinc oxide nano-sized spherical particles using Terminalia chebula fruits extract for their photocatalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, N.; Chand, Subhash; Gathania, Arvind K.

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the green synthesis of ZnO nano-sized spherical particles (ZnO-NPs) using aqueous fruits extract of Terminalia chebula. The Structural, morphological and optical properties of green-synthesized ZnO-NPs are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, field emission-scanning electron microscope, ultraviolet-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy techniques. The results show that the synthesized nanoparticles have stable hexagonal wurtzite structure, and roughly spherical in shape. To explore the photocatalytic activity of the ZnO-NPs the photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) dye is investigated. The results reveal that ZnO-NPs prepared through green synthesis route are found to be efficient in the degradation of RhB dye.

  14. Sucrose fatty esters from underutilized seed oil of Terminalia catappa as potential steel corrosion inhibitor in acidic medium

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    Adewale Adewuyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of metals is a common problem which requires definite attention. In response to this, the oil was extracted from the seed of Terminalia catappa and used to synthesize sucrose fatty esters via simple reaction mechanism which was considered eco-friendly and sustainable. The corrosion inhibition capacity of sucrose fatty esters for mild steel in 1 M HCl was studied using the weight loss method. It was shown that sucrose fatty ester inhibited corrosion process of mild steel and obeyed Langmuir isotherm. Corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency of sucrose fatty esters were found to reduce with increase of immersion time. The study presented sucrose fatty ester as a promising inhibitor of mild steel corrosion in acidic medium.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of Terminalia chebula fruits on diazinon-induced liver toxicity and oxidative stress in rats

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    Raheleh Ahmadi-Naji

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diazinon causes oxidative stress and dysfunction of the liver. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of Terminalia chebula, on some biochemical and histopathological parameters of liver tissue in diazinon-administered rats. Materials and Methods: Wistar rats were orally administered with 25 mg/kg body weight diazinon. Vehicle (distilled water and silymarin (50 mg/kg body weight were used as the negative and positive control groups, respectively. Diazinon-administered groups were treated with T.chebula (Terminalia chebula fruit extract (200, 400, and 800 mg/kg. After 15 days of treatment, the blood specimens and liver samples were examined. Results: In diazinon-treated group, the levels of serum urea, high density lipoprotein (HDL, and liver superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and vitamin C significantly decreased (p

  16. Uji Aktivitas Antioksidan Dengan Metode Linoleat-tiosianat Serta Penentuan Kadar Fenolik Dan Flavonoid Total Ekstrak Etanol Daun Ketapang (Terminalia Catappa L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Muryati, Sri; Yuniawati, Devi Ray; Mutiara, Erlita Verdia

    2009-01-01

    Antioxidant is a chemical compound that can prevent free radical reactions in the body. Ethanolic extract of ketapang leaves (Terminalia catappa L.) contain some phenolic compounds among others tannin, phenolic acids and flavonoid that can act as antioxidants. The aim of this research is to know the antioxidant activity of the ethanolic extract of ketapang leaves based on linoleanic-thiocyanic method. The determination of the total phenolic flavonoid content was done to know the effect of the...

  17. Study on antifungal potency of Terminalia cattapa, Piper betle, Psidium guajava, and Andrographis peniculata on the growth of Aphanomyces in vitro

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    Sri Nuryati

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available An effort to prevent aquatic fungi  Aphanomyces sp. infection on fish using natural material can be an economically way, easy to find the materials, easy to apply and safe for environment.  The antifungal potency and efficacy of scalded-leaf extract of Terminalia cattapa, Piper betle, Psidium guajava and Andrographis peniculata on prevention of Aphanomyces sp. growth in vitro in GYA medium.  Scalding was performed in the water at 50°C. Concentration of leaf extracts tested was 0, 10, 20, 40 and 80 g/L.  The results of study showed that Terminalia cattapa in a dosage of 40 g/L had the best prevention activity, followed by Piper betle in the same dosage.  Psidium guajava and Andrographis peniculata had no prevention activity on growth of Aphanomyces sp. Keywords: antifungal, Terminalia cattapa, Piper betle, Psidium guajava, Andrographis peniculata growth, Aohanomyces sp.   ABSTRAK Upaya penanggulangan infeksi cendawan akuatik Aphanomyces sp. pada ikan menggunakan bahan alami dapat menjadi cara yang ekonomis ekonomis, bahan mudah didapat, mudah diterapkan dan aman bagi lingkungan. Potensi antifungi dan efektivitas ekstrak seduh daun ketapang (Terminalia cattapa, sirih (Piper betle, jambu biji (Psidium guajava dan sambiloto (Andrographis peniculata terhadap penghambatan pertumbuhan Aphanomyces sp. dilakukan secara in vitro dalam media biakan GYA. Penyeduhan dilakukan menggunakan pelarut air dengan suhu 50°C. Konsentrasi yang diuji adalah 0, 10, 20, 40 dan 80 gr/L untuk masing-masing bahan. Aktivitas penghambatan paling baik terhadap cendawan diperoleh dari ekstrak seduh daun ketapang 40 g/L dan diikuti oleh ekstrak seduh daun sirih dengan konsentrasi yang sama.  Jambu biji dan sambiloto tidak menunjukkan aktivitas penghambatan terhadap pertumbuhan Aphanomyces sp. Kata kunci: antifungi, ketapang, sirih, jambu biji, sambiloto dan Aphanomyces sp.

  18. Enzyme inhibition, antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities, and brine shrimp toxicity of extracts from the root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan-Feng; Ho, Giang Thanh Thi; Malterud, Karl Egil; Le, Nhat Hao Tran; Inngjerdingen, Kari Tvete; Barsett, Hilde; Diallo, Drissa; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2014-09-11

    The root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera have been traditionally used against a variety of ailments such as wounds, hepatitis, malaria, fever, cough, and diarrhea as well as tuberculosis and skin diseases in African folk medicine. Boiling water extracts of Terminalia macroptera, administered orally, are the most common preparations of this plant used by the traditional healers in Mali. This study aimed to investigate the inhibition of the activities of α-glucosidase, 15-lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase, DPPH scavenging activity, complement fixation activity and brine shrimp toxicity of different extracts obtained by boiling water extraction (BWE) and by ASE (accelerated solvent extraction) with ethanol, ethanol-water and water as extractants from different plant parts of Terminalia macroptera. 27 different crude extracts were obtained by BWE and ASE from root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera. The total phenolic and carbohydrate contents, enzyme inhibition activities (α-glucosidase, 15-lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase), DPPH scavenging activity, complement fixation activity and brine shrimp toxicity of these extracts were evaluated. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied for total biological activities evaluation. Several of the extracts from root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera obtained by BWE and ASE showed potent enzyme inhibition activities, radical-scavenging properties and complement fixation activities. None of the extracts are toxic against brine shrimp larvae in the test concentration. Based on the results from PCA, the ASE ethanol extracts of root bark and stem bark and the low molecular weight fraction of the 50% ethanol-water extract of leaves showed the highest total biological activities. The boiling water extracts were less active, but the bark extracts showed activity as α-glucosidase inhibitors and radical scavengers, the leaf extract being less active. The observed enzyme

  19. Reducing power and iron chelating property of Terminalia chebula (Retz. alleviates iron induced liver toxicity in mice

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    Sarkar Rhitajit

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 70% methanol extract of Terminalia chebula Retz. fruit (TCME was investigated for its in vitro iron chelating property and in vivo ameliorating effect on hepatic injury of iron overloaded mice. Methods The effect of fruit extract on Fe2+-ferrozine complex formation and Fe2+ mediated pUC-18 DNA breakdown was studied in order to find the in vitro iron chelating activity. Thirty-six Swiss Albino mice were divided into six groups of: blank, patient control and treated with 50, 100, 200 mg/kg b.w. of TCME and desirox (standard iron chelator drug with Deferasirox as parent compound. Evaluations were made for serum markers of hepatic damage, antioxidant enzyme, lipid per oxidation and liver fibrosis levels. The reductive release of ferritin iron by the extract was further studied. Results In vitro results showed considerable iron chelation with IC50 of 27.19 ± 2.80 μg/ml, and a significant DNA protection with [P]50 of 1.07 ± 0.03 μg/ml along with about 86% retention of supercoiled DNA. Iron-dextran injection (i.p. caused significant increase in the levels of the serum enzymes, viz., alanine aminotransferase (ALAT, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and Bilirubin, which were subsequently lowered by oral administration of 200 mg/kg b.w. dose of the fruit extract by 81.5%, 105.88%, 188.08% and 128.31%, respectively. Similarly, treatment with the same dose of the extract was shown to alleviate the reduced levels of liver antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase and non-enzymatic reduced glutathione, by 49.8%, 53.5%, 35.4% and 11% respectively, in comparison to the iron overloaded mice. At the same time, the fruit extract effectively lowered the iron-overload induced raised levels of lipid per oxidation, protein carbonyl, hydroxyproline and liver iron by 49%, 67%, 67% and 26%, respectively, with oral treatment of 200 mg/kg b.w. dose of TCME. The fruit extract

  20. Importance de la méthode de coupe sur la régénération de Combretaceae du Bassin arachidier sénégalais

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    Faye, E.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance of the Harvest Method on the Regeneration of Combretaceae in the Senegalese Groundnut Basin. In order to develop recommendations for sustainable management of key fuel wood resources in the Senegalese Groundnut Basin, different diameters and heights of harvesting were tested on Guiera senegalensis J.F. Gmel and Combretum glutinosum Perr. The experimental design is adapted to the usual local harvesting period (May and to the traditional tools (machete. Three factors were studied: species, height (ground level (RT, 20 and 50 cm and diameter (0-10 and 10-20 cm. For each species, each treatment is represented by 15 individuals. Results from field observations and analysis of variance on the number of stems and growth variables (height and diameter suggest a high survival rate (100%, a higher number of stems at 20 and 50 cm cutting height, a slow height growth of stems from ground level stumps (RT, and a larger diameter growth of G. senegalensis. For sustainable management of the studied Combreteceae species in the Groundnut Basin, 20 cm cutting height of all individuals would be appropriate.

  1. Effects of an oil spill on the leaf anatomical characteristics of a beach plant (Terminalia catappa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punwong, Paramita; Juprasong, Yotin; Traiperm, Paweena

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the short-term impacts of an oil spill on the leaf anatomical structures of Terminalia catappa L. from crude oil leakage in Rayong province, Thailand, in 2013. Approximately 3 weeks after the oil spill, leaves of T. catappa were collected along the coastline of Rayong from one affected site, five adjacent sites, and a control site. Slides of the leaf epidermis were prepared by the peeling method, while leaf and petiole transverse sections were prepared by paraffin embedding. Cell walls of adaxial epidermal cell on leaves in the affected site were straight instead of the jigsaw shape found in leaves from the adjacent and control sites. In addition, the stomatal index of the abaxial leaf surface was significantly lower in the affected site. Leaf and petiole transverse sections collected from the affected site showed increased cuticle thickness, epidermal cell diameter on both sides, and palisade mesophyll thickness; in contrast, vessel diameter and spongy mesophyll thickness were reduced. These significant changes in the leaf anatomy of T. catappa correspond with previous research and demonstrate the negative effects of oil spill pollution on plants. The anatomical changes of T. catappa in response to crude oil pollution are discussed as a possible indicator of pollution and may be used in monitoring crude oil pollution.

  2. Effect of Extracts of Terminalia chebula on Proliferation of Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts Cells: An Alternative Approach for Wound Healing

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    Dolly Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia chebula is one of the traditional medicines used in the treatment of many diseases. In the present work, different concentrations of various organic and aqueous extracts (solvent-free of T. chebula were tested on fibroblast (L929 and keratinocytes cells to evaluate its biocompatible concentration by using MTT and live-dead viability/cytotoxic assay. These extracts were found to be effective in decreasing the ammonia accumulation in the media, thereby reducing its toxic effect on cells. DPPH assay further confirmed the free-radical scavenging ability of the extracts which increased with the increase in concentration of each extract. Cell proliferation/apoptosis, cytoskeletal structure, and ECM production were further evaluated by live-dead assay and phalloidin/cytokeratin staining, respectively. The cytoskeletal structure and ECM secretion of the cells treated with extracts showed higher cellular activity in comparison to control. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the effect of these extracts of T. chebula on both types of skin cells and optimized concentration in which it could be used as a bioactive component for wound healing applications by increasing cell proliferation and decreasing free-radical production without affecting the normal cellular matrix. It can also find applications in other therapeutics applications where ammonia toxicity is a limiting factor.

  3. New polyhydroxytriterpenoid derivatives from fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. and their α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Young; Yang, Heejung; Kim, Hyun Woo; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Three new polyhydroxytriterpenoid derivatives, 23-O-neochebuloylarjungenin 28-O-β-d-glycopyranosyl ester (1), 23-O-4'-epi-neochebuloylarjungenin (2), and 23-O-galloylpinfaenoic acid 28-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl ester (17) were isolated from the fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. along with fourteen known ones. Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data and acid hydrolysis. After evaluating for Baker's yeast α-glucosidase, rat intestinal α-glucosidase, and porcine pancreatic α-amylase inhibitory activities of all the isolated compounds, 23-O-galloylarjunolic acid (11, IC50 21.7μM) and 23-O-galloylarjunolic acid 28-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl ester (12, IC50 64.2μM) showed potent inhibitory activities against Baker's yeast α-glucosidase compared to the positive control, acarbose (IC50 174.0μM). However, all the tested compounds except for the positive control, acarbose, had no or only weak inhibitory activity against rat intestinal α-glucosidase and porcine pancreatic α-amylase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antitussive Activity of the Water-Extracted Carbohydrate Polymer from Terminalia chebula on Citric Acid-Induced Cough

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    Gabriela Nosalova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia chebula, a medicinal plant, is widely used in the management of various diseases. As the water extract of its dried ripe fruit is a frequently used preparation, we decided to look for bioactive polysaccharide in this extract. We demonstrate that the obtained polysaccharide fraction, CP, contained a highly branched arabinogalactan protein having a 1→3-, 1→6- and 1→3,6-linked β-D-Galp together with 1→5- and 1→3-linked α-L-Araf and nonreducing end units of α-L-Araf. This polymer possesses strong antitussive property. Our results showed that the number of citric acid-induced cough efforts decreased significantly after the oral application of polysaccharide fraction in a dose of 50 mg kg−1 body weight. Its antitussive efficacy was higher than cough suppressive effect of standard drug codeine. Therefore, traditional aqueous extraction method provides a major polysaccharide, which induces a pharmacological effect: this could represent an attractive approach in phytotherapeutic managements.

  5. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades. PMID:27117478

  6. Antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic activities of Terminalia pallida Linn. fruits in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats

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    M T Sampathkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia contributes significantly in the manifestation and development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD. Although synthetic lipid-lowering drugs are useful in treating hyperlipidemia, there are number of adverse effects. So the current interest has stimulated the search for new lipid-lowering agents with minimal side effects from natural sources. The present study was designed to investigate the antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic potentiality of ethanolic extract of Terminalia pallida fruits in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. T. pallida fruits ethanolic extract (TPEt was prepared using Soxhlet apparatus. Sprague-Dawley male rats were made hyperlipidemic by giving high fat diet, supplied by NIN (National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India. TPEt was administered in a dose of 100 mg/kg.b.w./day for 30 days in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. The body weights, plasma lipid, and lipoprotein levels were measured before and after the treatment. TPEt showed significant antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic activities as evidenced by significant decrease in plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels coupled together with elevation of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and diminution of atherogenic index in high fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats. There was a significantly reduced body weight gain in TPEt-treated hyperlipidemic rats than in the control group. The present study demonstrates that TPEt possesses significant antihyperlipidemic and antiatherogenic properties, thus suggesting its beneficial effect in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Terminalia cuneata and its catalytic action in reduction of direct yellow-12 dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Lee, Yong Rok; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan

    2016-05-01

    Facile green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using aqueous bark extract of Terminalia cuneata has been reported in this article. The effects of concentration of the extract, reaction time and pH were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Appearance of yellow color with λmax around ~ 420 nm suggested the formation of AgNPs. The stable AgNPs were further characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS) with zeta potential and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. The synthesized AgNPs were in the size range of 25-50 nm with a distorted spherical shape identified from HR-TEM analysis. The catalytic activity of AgNPs on the reduction of direct yellow-12 using NaBH4 was analyzed using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. This study showed the efficacy of biogenic AgNPs in catalyzing the reduction of direct yellow-12.

  8. Preparation and properties of cellulose nanocomposite films with in situ generated copper nanoparticles using Terminalia catappa leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthulakshmi, L; Rajini, N; Nellaiah, H; Kathiresan, T; Jawaid, M; Rajulu, A Varada

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) were in situ generated inside cellulose matrix using Terminalia catappa leaf extract as a reducing agent. During this process, some CuNPs were also formed outside the matrix. The CuNPs formed outside the matrix were observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Majority of the CuNPs formed outside the matrix were in the size range of 21-30nm. The cellulose/CuNP composite films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic, X-Ray diffraction and thermogravimetric techniques. The crystallinity of the cellulose/CuNP composite films was found to be lower than that of the matrix indicating rearrangement of cellulose molecules by in situ generated CuNPs. Further, the expanded diffractogram of the composite films indicated the presence of a mixture of Cu, CuO and Cu2O nanoparticles. The thermal stability of the composites was found to be lower than that of the composites upto 350°C beyond which a reverse trend was observed. This was attributed to the catalytic behaviour of CuNPs for early degradation of the composites. The composite films possessed sufficient tensile strength which can replace polymer packaging films like polyethylene. Further, the cellulose/CuNP composite films exhibited good antibacterial activity against E.coli bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hepatoprotective Effect of Terminalia chebula against t-BHP-Induced Acute Liver Injury in C57/BL6 Mice

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    Min-Kyung Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify the hepatoprotective effects of Terminalia chebula water extract (TCW and its corresponding pharmacological actions using C57/BL6 mice model of tert-butylhydroperoxide-(t-BHP- induced acute liver injury. Mice were orally administered with TCW (0, 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg or gallic acid (100 mg/kg for 5 days before t-BHP (2.5 mM/kg injection. Liver enzymes, histopathology, oxidative stress parameters, antioxidant components, and inflammatory cytokines were examined 18 h after t-BHP injection. t-BHP injection caused dramatic elevation of serum AST, ALT, and LDH level, while TCW pretreatment notably attenuated these elevations. Inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were notably increased in hepatic tissues, and then these were efficiently attenuated by TCW pretreatment. t-BHP injection notably increased malondialdehyde, total reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide in the liver tissue, while it markedly dropped the antioxidant activities including total antioxidant capacity, total glutathione contents, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase. TCW pretreatment remarkably ameliorated these alterations, and these effects were relevant to gene expressions. Histopathological examinations supported the above findings. Collectively, these findings well prove that TCW beneficially prevents acute and severe liver injury and clarify its corresponding mechanisms involved in the inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines.

  10. Terminalia chebula Extract Protects OGD-R Induced PC12 Cell Death and Inhibits LPS Induced Microglia Activation

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    Hocheol Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia chebula, native to Southeast Asia, is a popular medicinal plant in Ayurveda. It has been previously reported to have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory efficacy. In this study, we aimed to investigate if fruit extract from T. chebula might protect neuronal cells against ischemia and related diseases by reduction of oxidative damage and inflammation in rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 using in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation (OGD-R ischemia and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 induced cell death. Cell survival was evaluated by a 2-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Free radical scavenging, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide inhibition were measured by diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, thiobarbituric acid (TBA and Griess reagent, respectively. We found that T. chebula extract: (1 increases the survival of cells subjected to OGD-R by 68%, and H2O2 by 91.4%; (2 scavenges the DPPH free radical by 96% and decreases malondialdehyde (MDA levels from 237.0 ± 15.2% to 93.7 ± 2.2%; (3 reduces NO production and death rate of microglia cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. These results suggest that T. chebula extract has the potential as a natural herbal medicine, to protect the cells from ischemic damage and the possible mechanism might be the inhibition of oxidative and inflammatory processes.

  11. Aqueous Extract of Terminalia chebula Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells Via a Mechanism Involving Mitochondria-mediated Pathways

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    Meiling Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to evaluate the aqueous extract of Terminalia chebula activity, and the main pathway was detected on lung cancer by extracts of T. chebula. Aqueous extract of T. chebula was separated using a zeolite, and five fractions of T. chebula extract were obtained and analyzed by ultraviolet (UV and infrared (IR spectroscopy. Antiproliferative activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT methods against human lung cancer (A549 and mouse lung cancer cell line LLC. T. chebula acts by regulating the Bcl-2 family protein-mediated mitochondrial pathway detected by western blot. Fraction 4 of the T. chebula extract showed much function and was thus studied further. Fraction 4 increased the activation of caspase-3, induced PARP cleavage, and promoted cytochrome c release into the cytoplasm. These data suggest that T. chebula acts by regulating the Bcl-2 family protein-mediated mitochondrial pathway and provide evidence that T. chebula deserves further investigation as a natural agent for treating and preventing cancer.

  12. Evaluation of in vitro antimicrobial potential and GC–MS analysis of Camellia sinensis and Terminalia arjuna

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    Divya Gupta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, Camellia sinensis and Terminalia arjuna are being used widely to cure various diseases like cardiovascular diseases, cancer etc. In the present study, extracts of these plants were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogenic bacteria viz. E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and fungus C. albicans. In-vitro inhibition of these pathogenic microorganisms produced inhibition zone ranging from 9 to 18 mm. MIC values of these plant extracts ranged from 6.25 to 12.5 mg/ml. MBC of C. sinensis for E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus was found to be 50 and 12.5 mg/ml, respectively. In case of T. arjuna, the MBC of all the tested microorganisms was found to be 25 mg/ml. The MFC of C. sinensis and T. arjuna against C. albicans was observed to be 50 and 25 mg/ml, respectively. GC–MS analysis of C. sinensis and T. arjuna extract identified 13 and 21 compounds, respectively.

  13. Immunomodulating pectins from root bark, stem bark, and leaves of the Malian medicinal tree Terminalia macroptera, structure activity relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan-Feng; Barsett, Hilde; Ho, Giang Thanh Thi; Inngjerdingen, Kari Tvete; Diallo, Drissa; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2015-02-11

    The root bark, stem bark, and leaves of Terminalia macroptera were sequentially extracted with ethanol, 50% ethanol-water, and 50°C water using an accelerated solvent extractor (ASE). Six bioactive purified pectic polysaccharide fractions were obtained from the 50°C crude water extracts after anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The root bark, stem bark, and leaves of T. macroptera were all good sources for fractions containing bioactive polysaccharides. The high molecular weight fraction 50WTRBH-I-I, being the most active fraction in the complement fixation test, has a highly ramified rhamnogalacturonan type I (RG-I) region with arabinogalactan type II (AG-II) side chains. The most abundant fractions from each plant part, 50WTRBH-II-I, 50WTSBH-II-I, and 50WTLH-II-I, were chosen for pectinase degradation. The degradation with pectinase revealed that the main features of these fractions are that of pectic polysaccharides, with hairy regions (RG-I regions) and homogalacturonan regions. The activity of the fractions obtained after pectinase degradation and separation by gel filtration showed that the highest molecular weight fractions, 50WTRBH-II-Ia, 50WTSBH-II-Ia, and 50WTLH-II-Ia, had higher complement fixation activity than their respective native fractions. These results suggest that the complement fixation activities of these pectins are expressed mainly by their ramified regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Atividade microbiana de solo e serapilheira em áreas povoadas com Pinus elliottii e Terminalia ivorensis Microbial activity of soil and litter in areas with forest stands of Pinus elliottii e Terminalia ivorensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Mundstock Xavier de Carvalho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, as espécies Pinus elliottii e Terminalia ivorensis vêm sendo indicadas para reflorestamento. No entanto, pouco se sabe sobre as características ecológicas destas florestas, o ciclo de nutrientes e suas conseqüências sobre a produtividade e sustentabilidade sob condições tropicais. Visando melhor compreender a dinâmica do C nestes ecossistemas, objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar a atividade microbiana do solo, serapilheira e da mistura solo + serapilheira em povoamentos florestais de P. elliottii e T. ivorensis. Amostras de solos e serapilheira foram incubadas e a atividade microbiana avaliada por meio da evolução de CO2. Ao final da incubação, a respiração acumulada foi superior para a serapilheira de T. ivorensis. Os demais substratos com serapilheira não diferiram entre si, mas diferiram do solo sob T. ivorensis, que, por sua vez, diferiu do solo sob P. elliottii. Nas condições testadas, a incorporação de solo à serapilheira, bem como a incorporação alternada de solo de um povoamento à serapilheira de outro, não promoveu aumentos significativos na respiração da serapilheira, mostrando que as características químicas da própria serapilheira alteram mais fortemente sua velocidade de degradação que as características químicas e microbianas do solo onde é incorporada.In Brazil, the species Pinus elliottii and Terminalia ivorensis are being recommended for reforestation. However, little is known about the ecological characteristics of such forests, the nutrient cycle and possible consequences on yields and sustainability under tropical conditions. For a better understanding of the C dynamic in these ecosystems, this study aimed to evaluate the microbial activity of soil, litter, and the mixture of soil + litter in forest stands of P. elliottii and T. ivorensis. Samples of soil, litter and mixture were incubated and the microbial activity was evaluated on the basis of CO2 released. At the end of

  15. Folk medicine Terminalia catappa and its major tannin component, punicalagin, are effective against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P S; Li, J H; Liu, T Y; Lin, T C

    2000-05-01

    Terminalia catappa L. is a popular folk medicine for preventing hepatoma and treating hepatitis in Taiwan. In this paper, we examined the protective effects of T. catappa leaf water extract (TCE) and its major tannin component, punicalagin, on bleomycin-induced genotoxicity in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. Pre-treatment with TCE or punicalagin prevented bleomycin-induced hgprt gene mutations and DNA strand breaks. TCE and punicalagin suppressed the generation of bleomycin-induced intracellular free radicals, identified as superoxides and hydrogen peroxides. The effectiveness of TCE and punicalagin against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity could be, at least in part, due to their antioxidative potentials.

  16. Consumo de almendro de playa (Terminalia catappa) y uso de hojas como herramienta por parte del ave Ara ambiguus (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae) en Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Villegas-Retana, Sergio A; Araya-H, David

    2017-01-01

    Hay pocos estudios sobre la dieta en aves neotropicales, incluidos lo psitácidos. La lapa verde (Ara ambiguus) se alimenta de las semillas del almendro de montaña (Dipteryx panamensis), titor (Sacoglottis trichogyna) y otras especies. Sin embargo no hay reportes de esta especie alimentándose de almendro de playa (Terminalia catappa). Aquí informamos que lo hace y que usa hojas como herramienta. Su consumo podría deberse a la falta de frutos de D. panamensis y S. trichogyna, y al alto valor nu...

  17. Intracellular and membrane-damaging activities of methyl gallate isolated from Terminalia chebula against multidrug-resistant Shigella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Saurabh; Sarkar, Prodipta; Saha, Dhira R; Patra, Amarendra; Ramamurthy, T; Bag, Prasanta K

    2015-08-01

    Shigella spp. (Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri, Shigella boydii and Shigella sonnei) cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis), which is characterized by bloody mucous diarrhoea. Although a variety of antibiotics have been effective for treatment of shigellosis, options are becoming limited due to globally emerging drug resistance. In the present study, in vitro antibacterial activity of methyl gallate (MG) isolated from Terminalia chebula was determined by performing MIC, minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) and time-kill kinetic studies. Bacterial membrane-damaging activity of MG was determined by membrane perturbation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cellular drug accumulation, cell infection and assessment of intracellular activities of MG and reference antibiotics were performed using HeLa cell cultures. The bactericidal activity of MG against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Shigella spp. in comparison with other commonly used drugs including fluoroquinolone was demonstrated here. TEM findings in the present study revealed that MG caused the total disintegration of inner and outer membranes, and leakage of the cytoplasmic contents of S. dysenteriae. The level of accumulation of MG and tetracycline in HeLa cells incubated for 24  h was relatively higher than that of ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid (ratio of intracellular concentration/extracellular concentration of antibiotic for MG and tetracycline>ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid). The viable number of intracellular S. dysenteriae was decreased in a time-dependent manner in the presence of MG (4 × MBC) and reduced to zero within 20  h. The significant intracellular activities of MG suggested that it could potentially be used as an effective antibacterial agent for the treatment of severe infections caused by MDR Shigella spp.

  18. Analysis of sea almond (Terminalia catappa) cracking sites used by wild Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falótico, Tiago; Spagnoletti, Noemi; Haslam, Michael; Luncz, Lydia V; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda; Gumert, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Nut-cracking is shared by all non-human primate taxa that are known to habitually use percussive stone tools in the wild: robust capuchins (Sapajus spp.), western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus), and Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea). Despite opportunistically processing nuts, Burmese long-tailed macaques predominantly use stone tools to process mollusks in coastal environments. Here, we present the first comprehensive survey of sea almond (Terminalia catappa) nut-cracking sites created by macaques. We mapped T. catappa trees and nut-cracking sites that we encountered along the intertidal zone and forest border on the coasts of Piak Nam Yai Island, Thailand. For each nut-cracking site, we measured the physical properties (i.e., size, weight, use-wear) of hammer stones and anvils. We found that T. catappa trees and nut-cracking sites primarily occurred on the western coast facing the open sea, and cracking sites clusters around the trees. We confirmed previous results that nut cracking tools are among the heaviest tools used by long-tailed macaques; however, we found our sample of T. catappa stone tools lighter than a previously collected sea almond sample that, unlike our sample, was collected immediately after use within the intertidal zone. The difference was likely the result of tidal influences on tool-use sites. We also found that tool accumulations above the intertidal region do not resemble those within them, possibly leading to incomplete assessments of macaque stone tools through archaeological techniques that would use these durable sites. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Anti-Hyperglycemic Effect of Chebulagic Acid from the Fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz

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    Yan Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we firstly compared rat intestinal α-glucosidase inhibitory activity by different ethanol-aqueous extractions from the dried fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. The enzymatic assay showed that the 80% ethanol extract was more potent against maltase activity than both 50% and 100% ethanol extracts. By HPLC analysis, it was determined that the 80% ethanol extract had a higher content of chebulagic acid than each of 50% or 100% ethanol extract. Next, we investigated how efficiently chebulagic acid could inhibit sugar digestion by determining the glucose level on the apical side of the Caco-2 cell monolayer. The result showed that the maltose-hydrolysis activity was down-regulated by chebulagic acid, which proved to be a reversible inhibitor of maltase in Caco-2 cells. On the other hand, chebulagic acid showed a weak inhibition of sucrose-hydrolysis activity. Meanwhile, chebulagic acid did not have an obvious influence on intestinal glucose uptake and was not effective on glucose transporters. Further animal studies revealed that the oral administration of chebulagic acid (100 mg/kg body weight significantly reduced postprandial blood glucose levels by 11.1% in maltose-loaded Sprague-Dawley (SD rats compared with the control group, whereas the oral administration of chebulagic acid did not show a suppressive effect on postprandial hyperglycemia in sucrose- or glucose-loaded SD-rats. The results presented here suggest that chebulagic acid from T. chebula can be used to control blood glucose and manage type 2 diabetes, although clinical trials are needed.

  20. Quercus infectoria and Terminalia chebula decrease melanin content and tyrosinase activity in B16/F10 cell lines

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    Akram Jamshidzadeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: One of the most complained skin cares in ethnic skin like Asian women is hyperpigmentation, and lightening preparations have been long-standing desired. Due to the side effects of current drugs, medicinal plants have attracted more attentions as a source of novel drugs. Mazo (Quercus infectoria galls and Terminalia chebula fruits have been suggested in Persian Traditional Medicine as a safe treatment for hyperpigmentation. Aims: To evaluate the cytotoxicity and the effect on melanin synthesis in B16/F10 melanoma of Q. infectoria and T. chebula extracts. Methods: After collection and scientific authentication, plants were extracted by maceration method with methanol and were standardized based on total phenolic content. MTT assay and colorimetric method were used for cytotoxicity and determination of melanin content and tyrosinase activity in B16/F10 cells, respectively. Kojic acid was used as a reference compound. Results: Total phenolic content of Q. infectoria and T. chebula was determined as 287.34 ± 4.21 and 172.61 ± 8.67 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dried extract, respectively. Both plants decreased cell viability at 100 µg/mL and significantly reduced intercellular melanin to 66.25% and 71.1%, respectively in comparison to kojic acid (56.63% at 50 µg/mL. In the same concentration, 65.7% and 71.2% tyrosinase activity was inhibited by Q. infectoria and T. chebula, which significantly were different from control (p<0.001. Conclusions: These findings suggest that both plants especially Q. infectoria could inhibit melanogenesis in non-toxic concentrations and would be a good candidate for further studies.

  1. Terminalia chebula Fructus Inhibits Migration and Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Production of Inflammatory Mediators in RAW 264.7

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    Hyun-Ho Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and neointima formation after angioplasty involves vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs migration and proliferation followed by inflammatory responses mediated by recruited macrophages in the neointima. Terminalia chebula is widely used traditional medicine in Asia for its beneficial effects against cancer, diabetes, and bacterial infection. The study was designed to determine whether Terminalia chebula fructus water extract (TFW suppresses VSMC migration and proliferation and inflammatory mediators production in macrophage (RAW 264.7. Our results showed that TFW possessed strong antioxidative effects in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH scavenging and lipid peroxidation assays. In addition, TFW reduced nitric oxide (NO production, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression in RAW 264.7 cells. Also, TFW inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB induced VSMC migration as determined by wound healing and Boyden chamber assays. The antimigratory effect of TFW was due to its inhibitory effect on metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 expression, focal adhesion kinase (FAK activation, and Rho-family of small GTPases (Cdc42 and RhoA expression in VSMCs. Furthermore, TFW suppressed PDGF-BB induced VSMC proliferation by downregulation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs signaling molecules. These results suggest that TFW could be a beneficial resource in the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  2. The structure and musculature of male terminalia in the tribe Xanthorhoini Pierce and related tribes (Lepidoptera: Geometridae: Larentiinae), with particular reference to the Palaearctic and Australian regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The musculature of the male genitalia was reviewed for the tribe Xanthorhoini and related tribes (Lepidoptera, Geometridae, Larentiinae). The genitalia morphology of males of 11 species was discussed and illustrated, and nine paired and unpaired genital muscles identified. Muscles m1, m2(10), m5(7), m6(5), m7(6), m8(3) and m21 have similar position in all species considered in the paper. Comparative morphology of the male terminalia and position of extensors of the valvae m3(2) and flexors m4 confirmed the previously uncertain separation of Euphyiini and Scotopterygini. Cataclysmini share musculature characters with the tribe Xanthorhoini. The generic affiliation of Xanthorhoe biriviata (Borkhausen) is questionable considering an unusual location of muscles m4. Generally, the places of attachment of the muscles m3(2) and m4 to the sclerites afford valuable characters for the higher classification of this group.

  3. APROVECHAMIENTO DE LAS CARACTERÍSTICAS NUTRICIONALES DEL ALMENDRO DE LA INDIA (Terminalia catappa L. COMO SUPLEMENTO EN LA ALIMENTACIÓN ANIMAL

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    Guillermo Arrázola P

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar nutricionalmente la semilla del almendro de la india (Terminalia catappa para tres estados de madurez: E1 verde; E2 intermedio y E3 maduro, como una alternativa de suplemento en la alimentación animal. Materiales y métodos. Se determinaron las características fisicoquímicas de la pulpa de los frutos y se les extrajo la semilla a la cual se les realizó el análisis bromatológico mediante los métodos oficiales de análisis químico AOAC. A la grasa extraída de la semilla se le realizó un perfil de composición de ácidos grasos por medio de la técnica de cromatografía gaseosa acoplada a espectrometría de masas. Resultados. Para la semilla se obtuvo en promedio: grasa 54%, proteína 24%, ceniza 4%, fibra 12% y humedad 45%. Los datos se procesaron utilizando un análisis de varianza (ANOVA. Los estados de madurez, presentaron diferencias estadísticas (p£0,05 de composición para la semilla; mientras que para las variables fisicoquímicas de la pulpa, pH, acidez y grados Brix, arrojaron resultados no significativos. El perfil de ácidos grasos del aceite de la semilla para E1, E2 y E3, mostraron similitud en ciertos componentes. Conclusión. Teniendo en cuenta la composición nutricional de la semilla de almendro (Terminalia catappa y su elevado valor en proteína (24%, grasa (54%, fibra (12%, es posible su aprovechamiento para la industrialización e inclusión en concentrados para la alimentación animal.

  4. The Effects of Terminalia catappa L. Leaves Extract on the Water Quality Properties, Survival and Blood Profile of Ornamental fish (Betta sp Cultured

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    Rudy Agung Nugroho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to determine the phytochemicals content of Terminalia catappa leaves extract (TCL and its effects on the survival and blood profiles of ornamental fish (Betta sp Ninety fish were randomly assigned into six triplicates groups and reared in various concentration of TCL: 0 (control, 125, 250, 375, 500, 625 ppm for 30 days. Temperature, Dissolve oxygen (DO, and pH were monitored during the trial. After 30 days, survival, Red Blood Cells (RBC, White Blood Cells (WBC, haemoglobin (Hb, lymphocyte, and total protein serum (TPS were analyzed. Based on the phytochemicals test, saponin, triterpenoid, quinon, phenolic, tannin, and flavonoid were detected on the TCL. Temperature and DO were not affected by any concentration of TCL. The lowest pH (5.05 was found in fish medium immersed with 625 ppm of TCL. Adding TCL above 375 ppm resulted in significantly higher survival, RBC, and Hb. The highest WBC was found in fish immersed with 625 ppm whereas the lowest lymphocyte was found in fish immersed with 375 of TCL. However, immersing any various concentration of TCL did not affect on the TPS. In summary, immersing TCL above 375 ppm is beneficial to enhance survival, RBC, WBC, and Hb of Betta sp.How to CiteNugroho, R. A., Manurung, H., Saraswati, D., Ladyescha, D. & Nur, F. M. (2016. The Effects of Terminalia catappa L. Leaves Extract on the Water Quality Properties, Survival and Blood Profile of Ornamental fish (Betta sp Cultured. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(2, 240-247.

  5. Laguncularia recemosa (L.) Gaertner f. (Family Combretaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The morphology, phytochemistry, ecology and distribution of Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertner f., (basionym: Conocarpus racemosa L.), in the Niger Delta area was investigated in this study. The data showed that Laguncularia racemosa is a small tree or shrub 30 cm in diameter and about 6 m in height, growing on ...

  6. Laguncularia recemosa (L.) Gaertner f. (Family Combretaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    ABSTRACT: The morphology, phytochemistry, ecology and distribution of Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertner f., (basionym: Conocarpus racemosa L.), in the Niger Delta area was investigated in this study. The data showed that Laguncularia racemosa is a small tree or shrub 30 cm in diameter and about 6 m in height,.

  7. Antioxidant and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Activities of Ethyl Acetate Extract ofTerminalia chebula: Cell-freeIn vitroandIn silicoStudies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajmohamed, Mohamed Asik; Natarajan, Suganthy; Palanisamy, Premkumar; Abdulkader, Akbarsha Mohammad; Govindaraju, Archunan

    2017-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by memory loss and impaired cognitive function. Cholinergic enzyme deficiency and oxidative stress are the two major factors implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. The symptomatic treatment, as of now, is the use of cholinesterase inhibitors toward cholinergic "downturn." Therefore, there is a search for compounds that will be useful in focused therapies. There has been suggestion that Terminalia chebula fruit would be a potential source. To assess the anticholinesterase and antioxidant activities of T. chebula fruit which is widely practiced in the Ayurvedic medicines for memory enhancement. Ethyl acetate extract of T. chebula fruit (TCEA) was subjected to phytochemical investigation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibitory activities and cell-free antioxidant activity. TCEA was further subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS) analysis. The bioactive compounds were analyzed for molecular docking with AChE and BuChE proteins. TCEA exhibited potent AChE and BuChE inhibitory activities comparable to the standard drug donepezil. In vitro cell-free antioxidant assays demonstrated that TCEA possesses excellent free radical scavenging activity, reducing power, and potent metal-chelating activity. Total polyphenolic content of TCEA was 596.75 ± 0.35 µg gallic acid equivalents/mg of extract, which correlates with the antioxidant activity of TCEA. Molecular docking of compounds expounded in GC-MS analysis for AChE and BuChE enzyme activities revealed that methyl N-(N-benzyloxycarbonyl-beta-l-aspartyl)-beta-d-glucosaminide as the most potent compound with good predicted activities. Overall, the results revealed that the bioactive molecule methyl N-(N-benzyloxycarbonyl-beta-l-aspartyl)-beta-d-glucosaminide present in TCEA is a potential depressant for the treatment of AD and related neurodegenerative disorders. The present study was

  8. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Terminalia ivoriensis A. Chev. (Combretaceae) is an Ivorian medicinal plant. There is little ethnobotanical and almost no chemical information available for this species. The aim of this study was to isolate phenolic compounds from T. ivoriensis. In this way, its ethyl acetate extract (Ea) was fractionated by silica gel column ...

  9. Screening Of Twenty-Four South African Combretum And Six ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dried leaves of Combretum and Terminalia species (Combretaceae) were extracted with acetone, hexane, dichloromethane and methanol. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates were developed under saturated conditions and sprayed with 0.2% 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) in methanol for antioxidant ...

  10. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Masoko, P. Vol 4, No 2 (2007) - Articles Screening Of Twenty-Four South African Combretum And Six Terminalia Species (Combretaceae) For Antioxidant Activities Abstract PDF · Vol 7, No 2 (2010) - Articles Antibacterial activity of extracts of three croton species collected in Mpumalanga region in South Africa Abstract PDF ...

  11. 1825-IJBCS-Article-Sandong Rodigue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Celastraceae. 14. Waf roua. Parkia biglobosa. Mimosaceae. 15. Foreu. Senna siamea. Caesalpiniaceae. 16. Chechem. Terminalia brownii. Combretaceae. 17. Wandar. Ziziphus mauritiana. Rhamnaceae. * espèces citées comme ayant disparu dans le parc. Tableau 4: Estimation par intervalles de confiance de certaines ...

  12. Evaluation of anti-obesity activities of ethanolic extract of Terminalia paniculata bark on high fat diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mopuri, Ramgopal; Ganjayi, Muniswamy; Banavathy, Kruthika S; Parim, Brahma Naidu; Meriga, Balaji

    2015-03-24

    The prevalence and severity of obesity and associated co-morbidities are rapidly increasing across the world. Natural products-based drug intervention has been proposed as one of the crucial strategies for management of obesity ailments. This study was designed to investigate the anti-obesity activities of ethanolic extract of Terminalia paniculata bark (TPEE) on high fat diet-induced obese rats. LC-MS/MS analysis was done for ethanolic extract of T. paniculata bark. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into six groups of six each, normal diet fed (NC), high fat diet-fed (HFD), HFD+ orlistat (standard drug control) administered, and remaining three groups were fed with HFD + TPEE in different doses (100,150 and 200 mg/kg b. wt). For induction of obesity rats were initially fed with HFD for 9 weeks, then, (TPEE) was supplemented along with HFD for 42 days. Changes in body weight, body composition, blood glucose, insulin, tissue and serum lipid profiles, atherogenic index, liver markers, and expression of adipogenesis-related genes such as leptin, adiponectin, FAS, PPARgamma, AMPK-1alpha and SREBP-1c, were studied in experimental rats. Also, histopathological examination of adipose tissue was carried out. Supplementation of TPEE reduced significantly (P obesity activities of TPEE promoting it as a formidable candidate to develop anti obesity drug.

  13. Chemopreventive effect of punicalagin, a novel tannin component isolated from Terminalia catappa, on H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-Shern; Li, Jih-Heng

    2006-05-05

    Terminalia catappa and its major tannin component, punicalagin, have been characterized to possess antioxidative and anti-genotoxic activities. However, their effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated carcinogenesis are still unclear. In the present study, H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells were used to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of T. catappa water extract (TCE) and punicalagin. In the cell proliferation assay, TCE and punicalagin suppressed the proliferation of H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells with a dose-dependent manner but only partially affected non-transformed NIH3T3 cells proliferation. The differential cytotoxicity of TCE/punicalagin on the H-ras-transformed and non-transformed NIH3T3 cells indicated the selectivity of TCE/punicalagin against H-ras induced transformation. TCE or punicalagin treatment reduced anchorage-independent growth that could be due to a cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. The intracellular superoxide level, known to modulate downstream signaling of Ras protein, was decreased by punicalagin treatments. The levels of phosphorylated JNK-1 and p38 were also decreased with punicalagin treatments. Thus, the chemopreventive effect of punicalagin against H-ras induced transformation could result from inhibition of the intracellular redox status and JNK-1/p38 activation.

  14. Curative effect of Terminalia chebula extract on acetic acid-induced experimental colitis: role of antioxidants, free radicals and acute inflammatory marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, M K; Goel, Shalini; Ghatule, R R; Singh, A; Nath, G; Goel, R K

    2013-10-01

    The present study has evaluated the healing effects of extract of dried fruit pulp of Terminalia chebula (TCE) on acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis in rats. TCE (600 mg/kg) showed healing effects against AA-induced colonic damage score and weight when administered orally daily for 14 days. TCE was further studied for its effects on various physical (mucus/blood in stool and stool frequency, food and water intake and body weight changes), histology, antibacterial activity and free radicals (NO and LPO), antioxidants (SOD, CAT and GSH) and myeloperoxidase in colonic tissue. Intra-colonic AA administration increased colonic mucosal damage and inflammation, mucus/bloody diarrhoea, stool frequency, but decreased body weight which were reversed by TCE and sulfasalazine (SS, positive control) treatments. TCE showed antibacterial activity and both TCE and SS enhanced the antioxidants, but decreased free radicals and myeloperoxidase activities affected in acetic acid-induced colitis. TCE indicated the presence of active principles with proven antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and free radical scavenging and healing properties. Thus, TCE seemed to be safe and effective in healing experimental colitis.

  15. An in vitro analysis of the total phenolic content, antioxidant power, physical, physicochemical, and chemical composition of Terminalia Catappa Linn fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues Marques

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the antioxidant, total phenolic, and physicochemical properties of in vitro Terminalia Catappa Linn (locally called castanhola using the DPPH assay. The castanhola fruits had an average weight of 19.60 ± 0.00 g, combining shell, pulp, and seed weight, and a soluble solids content of 8 °Brix. The chemical composition was determined with predominance of carbohydrates (76,88 ± 0,58%.The titration method was used to determine Vitamin C content using 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCFI, known as reactive Tillmans resulting in no significant levels. Aqueous extracts of castanhola pulp showed a higher concentration of phenolics, 244.33 ± 18.86 GAE.g-1 of fruit, and alcoholic extracts, 142.84 ± 2.09 GAE.g-1 of fruit. EC50 values of the aqueous extract showed a greater ability to scavenge free radicals than the alcoholic extracts. The fruit had a significant content of phenolic compounds and high antioxidant capacity.

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, PHYSICO-CHEMICAL AND ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES OF OILS EXTRACTED BY TRADITIONAL AND HEXANE METHODS FROM TERMINALIA CATAPPA L. KERNELS

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    Bérenger A. L. Ladele

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The comparative study of physico-chemical characteristics of Terminalia catappa L. kernel oils extracted by two methods has been done. The oil yields were 28.13 % and 61.78 % respectively for traditional and hexane methods and the fatty acid profiles showed palmitic acid (40.79 % and 40.03 % respectively oleic acid (25.55 % and 26.09 % respectively, linoleic acid (26.72 % and 26.64 % respectively and stearic acid (4.35 % and 4.49 % respectively as major components. The oils extracted by the two ways showed similar physico-chemical properties, good calorific values and non-toxicity against Artemia salina L. Oil obtained by traditional method exhibited more antioxidant capacity (1.40 than the hexane one (0.15. This traditional method helps to extract 45 % of the total oil. It gives oil free of organic solvent, with good physico-chemical properties that could be useful as edible oil and for industrial applications.

  17. GC-MS analysis of leaf extracts of Terminalia macroptera and Dioclea reflexa, two medicinal plants used for the treatment of respiratory tract disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Ibibia Edewor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the phytochemicals that are present in two medicinal plants which are used for the treatment of respiratory tract infections by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer. Methods: The plant leaves were extracted with n-hexane and methanol separately. Both extracts were analyzed for present phytochemicals using the method described by Harborne, 1985 while only methanol extracts were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis. Results: Phytochemical screening of the methanolic extracts of Terminalia macroptera (T. macroptera revealed the presence of glycosides, tannins, flavonoids, saponins and steroids while that of Dioclea reflexa (D. reflexa showed the presence of flavonoids, saponins and steroids. The n-hexane extracts were devoid of the screened phytochemicals. Twelve and twenty-five compounds were identified in the leaves of T. macroptera and D. reflexa respectively. These compounds were fatty acids, fatty acid esters, other esters, heterocyclics and phenolics. The most abundant compound in T. macroptera was benzenetriol (53.30% while the predominant compounds in D. reflexa were dodecanoic acid, methyl ester (15.31%, 5, 5, 8a-trimethyl-3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 8a-hexahydro-2H-chromene (9.73%, 10-octadecenoic acid, methyl ester and 2-hexadecanoic acid, methyl ester (8.95%. Benzofuran, 2, 3-dihydro, 3, 7, 11, 15- tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol and hexadecanoic acid, methyl ester were common in both plant extracts. The antimicrobial properties of the leaves of these plants could be responsible for their use in the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Conclusions: Some of the identified phytochemicals in the plant leaves are responsible for its use in the treatment of respiratory tract infections.

  18. Sodium metabisulfite–induced polymerization of sickle cell hemoglobin incubated in the extracts of three medicinal plants (Anacardium occidentale, Psidium guajava, and Terminalia catappa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikezie, Paul Chidoka

    2011-01-01

    Background: The exploitation and utilization of vast varieties of herbal extracts may serve as alternative measures to deter aggregation of deoxygenated sickle cell hemoglobin (deoxyHbS) molecules. Objective: The present in vitro study ascertained the capacity of three medicinal plants, namely, Anacardium occidentale, Psidium guajava, and Terminalia catappa, to alter polymerization of HbS. Materials and Methods: Spectrophotometric method was used to monitor the level of polymerization of hemolysate HbS molecules treated with sodium metabisulfite (Na2 S2 O5) at a regular interval of 30 s for a period of 180 s in the presence of separate aqueous extracts of A. occidentale, P. guajava, and T. catappa. At time intervals of 30 s, the level of polymerization was expressed as percentage of absorbance relative to the control sample at the 180th s. Results: Although extracts of the three medicinal plants caused significant (P guajava exhibited the highest capacity to reduced polymerization of deoxyHbS molecules. Whereas at t > 60 s, extract concentration of 400 mg% of A. occidentale activated polymerization of deoxyHbS molecules by 6.23±1.34, 14.53±1.67, 21.15±1.89, and 24.42±1.09%, 800 mg% of T. catappa at t > 30 s gave values of 2.50±1.93, 5.09±1.96, 10.00±0.99, 15.38±1.33, and 17.31±0.97%. Conclusion: The capacity of the three medicinal plants to interfere with polymerization of deoxyHbS molecules depended on the duration of incubation and concentration of the extracts. PMID:21716622

  19. A controlled study to investigate anti-diarrhoeal effect of the stem-bark fractions of Terminalia avicennioides in laboratory animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M. Suleiman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the shortcomings associated with modern synthetic antidiarrhoeal drugs, it is important to find newer, safer and cheaper antidiarrhoeal agents from natural sources. The study was conducted to evaluate the anti-diarrhoeal activity of the fractions of the stem-bark of Terminalia avicennioides in laboratory animal models. The effect of different concentrations (1.0 × 10−3, 2.0 × 10−3, 4.0 × 10−3 and 8.0 × 10−3 mg/mL of the aqueous methanol (AMF, ethyl acetate (EAF and hexane (HXF fractions of T. avicennioides were tested against spontaneous and acetylcholine-induced contractions of rabbit jejunum as well as on histamine-induced contraction of guinea pig ileum. Similarly, the effects of the AMF on gastro-intestinal transit time, castor oil-induced diarrhoea and castor oil-induced enteropooling were evaluated. The AMF, EAF and HXF at concentrations of 1.0 × 10−3, 2.0 × 10−3, 4.0 × 10−3 and 8.0 × 10−3 mg/mL attenuated the contractile effects of both the spontaneous and acetylcholine-induced contractions of rabbit jejunum and that of histamine-induced contraction of guinea pig ileum in a concentration-dependent manner. The AMF at doses of 200, 300 and 500 mg/kg produced significant (p < 0.05 reductions in gastrointestinal transit time of charcoal and incidence of castor oil-induced diarrhoea in mice relative to the untreated control. Similarly, at doses of 300 and 500 mg/kg, AMF significantly (p < 0.05 reduced the weight and volume of intestinal fluid in the treated mice when compared to the untreated animals. The results of this study showed that the stem-bark of T. avicennioides possesses spasmolytic effect and could be a potential antidiarrhoeal agent. However, detailed pharmacological trials are required to justify the clinical use of the plant for treating diarrhoea.

  20. LC-MS/MS Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Phenolic Compounds and Pentacyclic Triterpenes in Antifungal Extracts of Terminalia brownii (Fresen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enass Y. A. Salih

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Decoctions and macerations of the stem bark and wood of Terminalia brownii Fresen. are used in traditional medicine for fungal infections and as fungicides on field crops and in traditional granaries in Sudan. In addition, T. brownii water extracts are commonly used as sprays for protecting wooden houses and furniture. Therefore, using agar disc diffusion and macrodilution methods, eight extracts of various polarities from the stem wood and bark were screened for their growth-inhibitory effects against filamentous fungi commonly causing fruit, vegetable, grain and wood decay, as well as infections in the immunocompromised host. Ethyl acetate extracts of the stem wood and bark gave the best antifungal activities, with MIC values of 250 µg/mL against Nattrassia mangiferae and Fusarium verticillioides, and 500 µg/mL against Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. Aqueous extracts gave almost as potent effects as the ethyl acetate extracts against the Aspergillus and Fusarium strains, and were slightly more active than the ethyl acetate extracts against Nattrassia mangiferae. Thin layer chromatography, RP-HPLC-DAD and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, were employed to identify the chemical constituents in the ethyl acetate fractions of the stem bark and wood. The stem bark and wood were found to have a similar qualitative composition of polyphenols and triterpenoids, but differed quantitatively from each other. The stilbene derivatives, cis- (3 and trans- resveratrol-3-O-β-galloylglucoside (4, were identified for the first time in T. brownii. Moreover, methyl-(S-flavogallonate (5, quercetin-7-β-O-di-glucoside (8, quercetin-7-O-galloyl-glucoside (10, naringenin-4′-methoxy-7-pyranoside (7, 5,6-dihydroxy-3′,4′,7-tri-methoxy flavone (12, gallagic acid dilactone (terminalin (6, a corilagin derivative (9 and two oleanane type triterpenoids (1 and (2 were characterized. The flavonoids, a corilagin derivative and terminalin, have not been

  1. LC-MS/MS Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Phenolic Compounds and Pentacyclic Triterpenes in Antifungal Extracts of Terminalia brownii (Fresen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Enass Y A; Fyhrquist, Pia; Abdalla, Ashraf M A; Abdelgadir, Abdelazim Y; Kanninen, Markku; Sipi, Marketta; Luukkanen, Olavi; Fahmi, Mustafa K M; Elamin, Mai H; Ali, Hiba A

    2017-12-13

    Decoctions and macerations of the stem bark and wood of Terminalia brownii Fresen. are used in traditional medicine for fungal infections and as fungicides on field crops and in traditional granaries in Sudan. In addition, T. brownii water extracts are commonly used as sprays for protecting wooden houses and furniture. Therefore, using agar disc diffusion and macrodilution methods, eight extracts of various polarities from the stem wood and bark were screened for their growth-inhibitory effects against filamentous fungi commonly causing fruit, vegetable, grain and wood decay, as well as infections in the immunocompromised host. Ethyl acetate extracts of the stem wood and bark gave the best antifungal activities, with MIC values of 250 µg/mL against Nattrassia mangiferae and Fusarium verticillioides, and 500 µg/mL against Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. Aqueous extracts gave almost as potent effects as the ethyl acetate extracts against the Aspergillus and Fusarium strains, and were slightly more active than the ethyl acetate extracts against Nattrassiamangiferae. Thin layer chromatography, RP-HPLC-DAD and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), were employed to identify the chemical constituents in the ethyl acetate fractions of the stem bark and wood. The stem bark and wood were found to have a similar qualitative composition of polyphenols and triterpenoids, but differed quantitatively from each other. The stilbene derivatives, cis- (3) and trans- resveratrol-3-O-β-galloylglucoside (4), were identified for the first time in T. brownii. Moreover, methyl-(S)-flavogallonate (5), quercetin-7-β-O-di-glucoside (8), quercetin-7-O-galloyl-glucoside (10), naringenin-4'-methoxy-7-pyranoside (7), 5,6-dihydroxy-3',4',7-tri-methoxy flavone (12), gallagic acid dilactone (terminalin) (6), a corilagin derivative (9) and two oleanane type triterpenoids (1) and (2) were characterized. The flavonoids, a corilagin derivative and terminalin, have not been identified before

  2. Estudio preliminar de la biología reproductiva Terminalia oblonga (Surá en la región Huetar Norte, Costa Ria

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    Elizabeth Arnáez

    Full Text Available Para el proceso de domesticación de especies, es necesario la determinación de los ciclos reproductivos de las especies forestales, especialmente de aquellas que se encuentran en peligro de extinción y que se desean utilizar en proyectos de reforestación. El objetivo fue conocer algunos aspectos del comportamiento fenológico y el desarrollo ontogénico de Terminalia oblonga (surá en la Región Huetar Norte. El trabajo de campo se llevó a cabo de enero de 1996 a diciembre de 1998, en la Región Huetar Norte de Costa Rica, en 4 zonas bioclimáticas diferentes de la Región. En cada sitio se seleccionaron 10 árboles, para un total de 40 individuos observados. Los árboles seleccionados se visitaron cada mes, con el fin de determinar épocas de floración (salida de brotes florales, apertura de la flor, salida del fruto, maduración y la caída de este,dispersión de frutos y semillas, brotadura vegetativa y hojas. Mensualmente, se recopiló información climática, donde se tomó en cuenta: precipitación, temperatura, humedad relativa y brillo solar. Estos datos se emplearon para hacer las correlaciones con los resultados de las diferentes expresiones fenológicas. Se hizo una descripción de las piezas reproductivas y vegetativas, con base en material en fresco y con el apoyode microscopía electrónica de barrido. Además, se hicieron estudios químicos y estructurales del suelo en cada uno de los sitios de estudio. Se observó que la brotadura de las hojas de esta especie se mantiene durante todo el año, siendo mayor en julio y diciembre en la mayoría de las zonas y en algunas ocasiones puede llegar a estar casi ausente. El follaje se mantiene relativamente constante casi todo el año, con muy poca defoliación. La brotadura floral generalmente se observa de octubre a enero, e incluso febrero en algunas zonas. La floración se nota de noviembre a febrero y la maduración de los frutos de diciembre a marzo y hasta en abril en algunas

  3. Chemical constituents and in Vitro biological screening of dehydroacetic extracts of 3 African toothpicks

    OpenAIRE

    Kadja, Amani Brice; Békro, Yves-Alain; Pirat, Jean-Luc; Mamyrbekova Bekro, Janat Akhanovna; Volle, Jean-Noël; Lecouvey, Marc; Boyer-Lavergne, Marie Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The chemical and biological survey has been achieved on the stems of Erythrophleum africanum (Fabaceae), Terminalia albida (Combretaceae) and Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides (Rutaceae), from 3 African plants used as toothpicks. The mineral quantification using the scanning electron microscope, highlight the presence of Al, Cl, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P, S, Si with a relative abundance in K and Ca, when the organic characterization by UPLC revealed the existence of phytophenols notably epigallocatechin g...

  4. Synergistic antibiofilm efficacy of a gallotannin 1,2,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose from Terminalia chebula fruit in combination with gentamicin and trimethoprim against multidrug resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Anwesa; Chattopadhyay, Rabi Ranjan

    2017-01-01

    In recent years the emergence of multiple drug resistance microbes has become a global public health problem. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate possible antibiofilm efficacy of a gallotannin 1,2,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose from Terminalia chebula fruits alone and in combination with gentamicin and trimethoprim against preformed biofilms of multidrug-resistant (MDR) uropathogenic E. coli isolates using microbroth dilution, checkerboard titration and kill kinetics methods. Test gallotannin showed > 50% antibiofilm efficacy after 24 h when administered alone whereas gentamicin and trimethoprim failed to do so. But in combination, test gallotannin/gentamicin and test gallotannin/trimethoprim showed 71.24±6.75% and 93.4±8.46% antibiofilm activity respectively. On the basis of FICI values, test gallotannin/gentamicin showed synergistic interactions against 71.42% and test gallotannin/trimethoprim against 85.71% biofilm forming test bacterial isolates. Kill-kinetics study confirmed their synergistic interactions. Thus, gentamicin and trimethoprim in combination with test gallotannin may have potential for treatment of urinary tract infections caused by biofilm forming MDR uropathogenic E. coli.

  5. In vitro modulatory effects of Terminalia arjuna, arjunic acid, arjunetin and arjungenin on CYP3A4, CYP2D6 and CYP2C9 enzyme activity in human liver microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Varghese

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia arjuna is a tree having an extensive medicinal potential in cardiovascular disorders. Triterpenoids are mainly responsible for cardiovascular properties. Alcoholic and aqueous bark extracts of T. arjuna, arjunic acid, arjunetin and arjungenin were evaluated for their potential to inhibit CYP3A4, CYP2D6 and CYP2C9 enzymes in human liver microsomes. We have demonstrated that alcoholic and aqueous bark extract of T. arjuna showed potent inhibition of all three enzymes in human liver microsomes with IC50 values less than 50 μg/mL. Arjunic acid, arjunetin and arjungenin did not show significant inhibition of CYP enzymes in human liver microsomes. Enzyme kinetics studies suggested that the extracts of arjuna showed reversible non-competitive inhibition of all the three enzymes in human liver microsomes. Our findings suggest strongly that arjuna extracts significantly inhibit the activity of CYP3A4, CYP2D6 and CYP2C9 enzymes, which is likely to cause clinically significant drug–drug interactions mediated via inhibition of the major CYP isozymes.

  6. Synergistic antibiofilm efficacy of a gallotannin 1,2,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose from Terminalia chebula fruit in combination with gentamicin and trimethoprim against multidrug resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwesa Bag

    Full Text Available In recent years the emergence of multiple drug resistance microbes has become a global public health problem. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate possible antibiofilm efficacy of a gallotannin 1,2,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose from Terminalia chebula fruits alone and in combination with gentamicin and trimethoprim against preformed biofilms of multidrug-resistant (MDR uropathogenic E. coli isolates using microbroth dilution, checkerboard titration and kill kinetics methods. Test gallotannin showed > 50% antibiofilm efficacy after 24 h when administered alone whereas gentamicin and trimethoprim failed to do so. But in combination, test gallotannin/gentamicin and test gallotannin/trimethoprim showed 71.24±6.75% and 93.4±8.46% antibiofilm activity respectively. On the basis of FICI values, test gallotannin/gentamicin showed synergistic interactions against 71.42% and test gallotannin/trimethoprim against 85.71% biofilm forming test bacterial isolates. Kill-kinetics study confirmed their synergistic interactions. Thus, gentamicin and trimethoprim in combination with test gallotannin may have potential for treatment of urinary tract infections caused by biofilm forming MDR uropathogenic E. coli.

  7. Combretum woodii (Combretaceae) leaf extracts have high activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the exception of the water extract, which had no antibacterial activity, the other extracts were bioactive with at least one of them exhibiting minimum inhibitory concentration values of 0.04 mg/ml against Staphylococcus ... These solvents also had higher antibacterial activity than more polar or non-polar extractants.

  8. Effectiveness of mouthrinse formulated from ethanol extract of Terminalia chebula fruit on salivary Streptococcus mutans among 12 to 15 year old school children of Belgaum city: A randomized field trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Nayak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Dental caries is the most prevalent oral disease. Streptococcus mutans plays a major role in the occurrence of dental caries. Many antibacterial agents have been developed against dental caries. However, they lack the qualities of an ideal agent. Thus presently, antibacterial activity of herbal agents is being extensively studied. Materials and Methods: In the present study, ethanol extract of Terminalia chebula was prepared and mouthrinse was formulated. A total of 60 children meeting the inclusion criteria were randomly divided into study and control group and respective mouthrinses were administered. Salivary Streptococcus mutans count was assessed at 5 and 60 minutes after rinsing and compared with baseline values. Substantivity of the rinse was assessed among 10 children. Mouthrinse was given to the children and salivary Streptococcus mutans counts were assessed at baseline, 6 and 12 hours postrinsing. Mann-Whitney U test was used to assess the variance of factors like Decayed Missed Filled Teeth, plaque scores, and gingival scores. ANCOVA (Analysis of covariance was used to determine the change in salivary Streptococcus mutans colony forming units taking baseline values as covariates. Results: It was observed that there was 44.42% reduction in salivary Streptococcus mutans colony forming units 5 minutes after rinsing as compared with baseline values and 64.14% reduction in Streptococcus mutans colony forming units at 60 minutes after rinsing as compared with baseline values. There was a reduction of 35.48% in salivary Streptococcus mutans colony forming units at 60 minutes after rinsing as compared with 5 minutes sample. Conclusion: Streptococcus mutans counts were low up to 6 hours postrinsing among 80% of the children.

  9. Artemita bicolor Kertész, novo sinônimo de Artemita podexargenteus Enderlein, (Diptera, Stratiomyidae com notas nas terminálias masculina e feminina Artemita bicolor Kertész, new synonym of Artemita podexargenteus Enderlein, (Diptera, Stratiomyidae with notes on male and female terminalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Ururahy-Rodrigues

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O gênero de Stratiomyidae, Artemita Walker, 1854 esta representado na região Neotropical por 14 espécies, seis das quais ocorrem no Brasil. Apesar das importantes revisões de KERTÉSZ (1914 e JAMES (1971 o conhecimento sobre a variação morfológica no grupo ainda é rudimentar, principalmente com relação a terminália. Neste trabalho, com base na morfologia da terminália Artemita bicolor Kertész, 1914 é proposta como sinônimo júnior de Artemita podexargenteus Enderlein, 1914 e a última é redescrita.The Stratiomyidae genus Artemita Walker, 1854 is represented in the Neotropical Region by 14 species, 6 of which occur in Brazil. Despite of the important revisions by KERTÉSZ (1914 and JAMES (1971 knowledge of morphological variation within the group is rudimentary, mainly with respect to the terminalia. In this work, Artemita bicolor Kertész, 1914 is proposed as a junior synonym of Artemita podexargenteus Enderlein, 1914 and the latter is redescribed based on terminalia morphology.

  10. Eight new species of Oragua Melichar, 1926 (Insecta: Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) from Amazonas State, Brazil, with description of the female terminalia of Oragua jurua Young, 1977, and new records for the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camisão, Beatriz M; Cavichioli, Rodney R; Takiya, Daniela M

    2014-07-29

    The thirty known species of Oragua are distributed from southern Mexico to Argentina. Seventeen species are recorded from Brazil, but only O. elegantula Young, 1977, O. insipida Young, 1977, and O. jurua Young, 1977 are recorded from Amazonas State. Oragua partitula (Jacobi, 1905) is herein firstly recorded from Brazil, ocurring in Amazonas State. The aim of the study was to describe eight new species of Oragua, to provide a key to males of the species of the genus that are recorded from Amazonas State and to study in detail the female terminalia of these new species. Also, the female of O. jurua Young, 1977 is herein described for the first time. Oragua alerochae sp. nov. has the external color pattern similar to O. bifasciata Cavichioli, 2000, however, the head is darker, the forewings are paler and the stripes are thinner, aedeagus is much more curved with long apical processes, and apex of paraphyses rami are curved. Oragua aurantimaculata sp. nov. is similar externally to O. elegantula and Oragua jau sp. nov. as they share the body brown with three orange maculae on crown and orange maculae on forewings, but it has the aedeagus with shaft enlarged medially with a pair of apical processes curved anteriorly and connective more slender. Oragua bella sp. nov. is dark with orange spots, aedeagus with basal elongated processes extending to the apex of the pygofer, with the basal portion enlarged and narrowing toward the apex. Oragua copiosa sp. nov. is dark with small pale dots all over the body, paraphyses rami are slender and their apices expanded, and styles with hooked apex, extending posteriorly beyond the connective apex. Oragua gracilenta sp. nov. has the external color similar to O. galerula, but it can be distinguished by the brown ground color, absence of two maculae near median line just before posterior margin on pronotum and apex of rami of paraphyses bifurcate and not truncate. Oragua jau sp. nov. has the external color similar to O. elegantula, but

  11. Phytochemical Screening and Antimicrobial Activities of Terminalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    showed activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi at 500μg/disc, while ethanol and aqueous methanol fractions were active only on Salmonella typhi at concentrations of 300 – 500μg/disc. The present study revealed that the plant extracts contain phytochemicals responsible for the activity against ...

  12. Identification of Allelochemicals from Terminalia Chebula

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    in agroecosystem. KEY WORDS: Terminnlia chebula, Cassia occidentals, Crotalaria retusa and allelo chemicals. Introduction. Plants produce a large variety of secondary products containing hydroxylated aromatics rings these substance are classified as allelochemicals, most of which are synthesized from phenylalanine, a.

  13. Aqueous extract of Terminalia avicennioides (Guillperr) ameliorates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    104 parasite per rat) intraperitoneally (i.p.) with the parasite and treated with 200 mg/kg b.w. of ATAfor six consecutive days; Negative control [rats (n=9) were not infected but administered 300 μL 100mM phosphate buffer saline pH 7.2, for six ...

  14. Total phenolics and antioxidant activity of five medicinal plant; Fenois totais e atividade antioxidante de cinco plantas medicinais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Cleyton Marcos de M.; Silva, Hilris Rocha e; Vieira-Junior, Gerardo Magela; Ayres, Mariane Cruz C.; Costa, Charllyton Luis S. da; Araajo, Delton Servulo; Cavalcante, Luis Carlos D.; Barros, Elcio Daniel S.; Araujo, Paulo Breitner de M.; Brandao, Marcela S.; Chaves, Mariana H. [Universidade Federal do Piaui, Teresina, PI (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: mariana@ufpi.br

    2007-03-15

    This paper describes total phenolics content and antioxidant activity in the ethanolic extract of leaves, bark and roots of five medicinal plants: Terminalia brasiliensis Camb., Terminalia fagifolia Mart. and Zucc., Copernicia cerifera (Miller) H.E. Moore, Cenostigma macrophyllum Tul. var. acuminata Teles Freire and Qualea grandiflora Mart. The total phenolics content of the plant extracts, determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, varied from 250.0 {+-}8,2 to 763,63 {+-}13.03 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g dry EtOH extract. The antioxidant activity of extracts was evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay system. Extract of bark from T. brasiliensis, the most active, with an EC{sub 50} value of 27.59 {+-} 0.82 {mu}g/mL, was comparable to rutin (EC{sub 50} = 27.80 {+-} 1.38) and gallic acid (EC{sub 50} = 24.27 {+-} 0.31), used as positive controls. The relationship between total phenolic content and antioxidant activity was positive and significant for T. brasiliensis, C. macrophyllum and C. cerifera. (author)

  15. Seed dispersal and predation of Buchenavia tomentosa Eichler (Combretaceae in a Cerrado sensu stricto, midwest Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Farias

    Full Text Available Abstract The ecology of seed dispersal is critical to understand the patterns of distribution and abundance of plant species. We investigated seed dispersal aspects associated with the high abundance of Buchenavia tomentosa in the Serra Azul State Park (PESA. We estimated fruit production and conducted fruit removal experiments. We carried out diurnal and nocturnal observations on frugivory as well as germination tests. Fruiting occurred in the dry season and totaled 1,365,015 ± 762,670 fruits.ha–1. B. tomentosa fruits were utilized by eight animal species. The lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris was considered the main seed disperser. Leafcutter ants (Atta laevigata and Atta sexdens participated in the seed cleaning and occasionally dispersed seeds. The beetle Amblycerus insuturatus, blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna and red-and-green macaw (Ara chloropterus were considered pre-dispersal seed predators. The seeds manually cleaned presented higher germination rate (100% and speed index (4.2 seeds.d–1 than that of seeds with pulp. Germination of seeds found in tapirs’feces was 40%, while for the seeds without pulp it was 25%. The high abundance of B. tomentosa in the cerrado of PESA may be due to massive fruit production, low rates of seed predation, and efficient seed dispersal by tapirs, occurring before the rains which promote germination and recruitment of this species.

  16. A note on Combretum subgenus Combretum section Macrostigmatea (Com-bretaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Hennessy

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The history of Combretum section Macrostigmatea, its circumscription and its representation in the Flora of southern Africa region are provided. A specimen from northern Botswana, Miller B/1199. initially misidentified as C. engleri. is shown to be C. kirkii, the first record of this taxon in the  FSA region.  Combretum mkuzense is placed in synonymy in C.  zeyheri section Spathulipetala.

  17. Pollinator responses to floral colour change, nectar, and scent promote reproductive fitness in Quisqualis indica (Combretaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Juan; Wang, Gang; Sui, Yi; Wang, Menglin; Zhang, Ling

    2016-04-13

    Floral colour change is visual signals for pollinators to avoid old flowers and increase pollination efficiency. Quisqualis indica flowers change colour from white to pink to red may be associated with a shift from moth to butterfly pollination. To test this hypothesis, we investigated Q. indica populations in Southwest China. Flowers secreted nectar continuously from the evening of anthesis until the following morning, then decreased gradually with floral colour change. The scent compounds in the three floral colour stages were similar; however, the scent composition was different, and the scent emission rate decreased from the white to red stage. Dichogamy in Q. indica prevents self-pollination and interference of male and female functions. Controlled pollinations demonstrated that this species is self-incompatible and needs pollinators for seed production. Different pollinators were attracted in each floral colour stage; mainly moths at night and bees and butterflies during the day. Observations of open-pollinated inflorescences showed that white flowers had a higher fruit set than pink or red flowers, indicating the high contribution of moths to reproductive success. We concluded that the nectar and scent secretion are related to floral colour change in Q. indica, in order to attract different pollinators and promote reproductive fitness.

  18. Sinopsis preliminar de las especies colombianas del género Combretum (Combretaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quiñones M. Luz Mila

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary synopsis of the genus Combretum in Colombia is presented, including a key to the Colombian species, descriptions, photographs and notes on distribution. Eleven species have so far be en found in the country.Se presenta una sinopsis preliminar del género Combretum para Colombia. Se incluyen una clave, descripciones, fotografías y datos sobre distribución de las 11 especies que se registran en el país.

  19. Contribuição ao conhecimento de Spilogona Schnabl: redescrição de espécies neotropicais, descrição das terminálias e chave para as espécies latino-americanas (Diptera, Muscidae, Coenosiinae Contribution to the knowledge of Spilogona Schnabl: redescriptions of species, descriptions of the terminalia and key to the Latin American species (Diptera, Muscidae, Coenosiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia S. Couri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Spilogona Schnabl (Diptera, Muscidae, Coenosiinae, Limnophorini está representado na América Latina por oito espécies. O exame de material tipo de quatro espécies - S. golbachi Snyder, S. hirticeps (Stein, S. trichops (Stein e S. semicinerea (Stein, a primeira depositada na Fundación e Instituto Miguel Lillo (Argentina e as demais no Stlaatliches Museum für Tierkunde (Alemanha permitiu a redescrição dos adultos e a descrição com ilustrações das terminálias masculinas e femininas, as três últimas, pela primeira vez.Spilogona Schnabl (Diptera, Muscidae, Coenosiinae, Limnophorini is represented in Latin America by eight species. The examination of type-material of four species - S. golbachi Snyder, S. hirticeps (Stein, S. trichops (Stein and S. semicinerea (Stein, the first one deposited at Fundación e Instituto Miguel Lillo (Argentina and the others at Stlaatliches Museum für Tierkunde (Germany, enabled the redescription of the adults and the description with illustrations of the male and female terminalia, the last three for the first time.

  20. Pharmacognostic studies of the leaves of terminalia macroptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microscopic features include the following parenchyma cells, stomata (anisocytic, anomocytic, actionocytic), trichomes (uniseriate, multicellular 2-4 cells), rosettes or prism of calcium oxalate crystals,phloem fibres, reticulate xyem vessels, dosiventral leaf with single row of palisade cells below the upper epidermis, secretory ...

  1. Antibacterial properties studies of trunk barks of terminalia ivorensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory of chemistry Organic Structural, Unity of Formation and Research of Sciences of the Structure of the mate- rial and of ... dicinal in Côte d'Ivoire to treat dermal diseases (affection in which Staphylococci are implied) including local inflammation and also to ..... pingu C. M. and Nondo S. R. Antimicrobial activity and.

  2. The emulsifying Properties of Terminalia randii baker F. Gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 2 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Terminalia Ivorensis A.Chev and Nauclea Diderrichii De Wild

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Agriculture, University of Port Harcourt, PMB 5323, Port Harcourt, Rivers. State. Nigeria. Okereke, V. C. - Department of Crop and Soil Science, Faculty of. Agriculture, University of ..... and Ponderosa pine seeds in Argentina. Seed science and technology. 30:559-566. Maramorosch, K., Shikata, E and Shiyan, L. 1982: Little ...

  4. Study on osteopotential activity of Terminalia arjuna bark extract ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    reputed position in both Ayurvedic and Unani systems of medicine. Bone substitutes play an inevitable role in traumatic bone damages. Growth factors induce osteoinductivity, but suffer from limitations such as high cost and side effects. This study aims to evaluate the osteoinductive potential of bark extract of TA in bone ...

  5. Relationship between Height and Stump Diameter for Terminalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Residual analysis showed conformity with the assumption of independence errors in regression analysis. The equations were validated using another set of trees that were not part of those used for estimating the model parameters. No significant difference (p > 0.05) was obtained when the predicted and the observed ...

  6. Characterization of Terminalia catappa linn oil, Linn oil-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compatibilities in terms of physico-chemical properties of the fuels used. Hence the importance of using fuels with appropriate physico-chemical properties in C.I. engines. This need for using fuels with appropriate physico-chemical properties, the ...

  7. Biomass yield and modeling of logging residues of Terminalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Residues generated were found to be highest in the tree branches, followed by the stem and the foliage. The contribution of the various biomass components in relation to the total residue biomasses were 45.84% stem, 47.85% branch and 6.29% foliage. The use of Dbh as an independent variable in the prediction of ...

  8. Terminalia catappa , an anticlastogenic agent against MMS induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects: Anticarcinogenic potential of methanolic extract of T. catappa has been tested against the carcinogenicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in the in vitro and in vivo models. Methods: The parameters for evaluation included chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and replication ...

  9. Terminalia catappa, an anticlastogenic agent against MMS induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammad Sultan Ahmad

    2014-05-13

    May 13, 2014 ... Subjects: Anticarcinogenic potential of methanolic extract of T. catappa has been tested against the carcinogenicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in the in vitro and in vivo models. Methods: The parameters for evaluation included chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chroma- tid exchanges (SCEs) ...

  10. 14 antimalaria activity of ethanolic extracts of leaves of terminalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    chromatography that led to the isolation of two pure compounds TC1-02-1 and TC1-02-64. Compound TC1-02-64 .... Weight and Thin. Layer Chromatographic analysis on pooled fraction .... Conclusively, this work provides a scientific basis for.

  11. Acute and subchronic toxicity studies of ethanol extract of Terminalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link ...

  12. Land use and land use change effects on nitrous oxide emissions in the seasonally dry ecosystems of Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyamadzawo, G; Chirinda, Ngoni; Mapanda, F

    2012-01-01

    . The savanna woodlands cover over 95% of Zimbabwe’s forest area, and are divided into five woodland types: Acacia, miombo, mopane, teak (Baikiaea Plurijuga) and Terminalia-Combretaceae. This review is aimed at exploring the effects of land-use changes and land management practices on N2O emissions in Zimbabwe......Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas (GHG) with a considerable warming potential and involvement in the destruction of stratospheric ozone. The conversion of savannas to agricultural land has the potential of changing the characteristics and gas exchange of the ecosystems dramatically....... Available data on N2O emission were collected from standing and deforested miombo woodlands, grasslands and agricultural lands. Estimated mean annual N2O emissions from savanna ecosystems in Zimbabwe were 17.1 Gg N2O, while annual fluxes from arable land (cultivated and fallow) was 3.19 Gg N2O. Biogenic N2O...

  13. Effects of an experimental oil spill (bunker on seedling survival and growth rate of Laguncularia racemosa (Combretaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanoela Nardes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of bunker oil on survival and growth rate of Laguncularia racemosa were tested using 60 seedlings planted in small plastic bags (experimental unit. One of the six treatments was randomly assigned to each bag: 0 mL (control, 10 mL, 20 mL, 30 mL, 40 mL e 50 mL of bunker oil spilled in each bag. The experiment was monitored weekly for 20 weeks. The results were analyzed by repeated measure ANOVA and linear regression. In the first seven weeks, we observed chlorosis, loss of leafs and death rate significantly superior to plants of all treatments compared to the control group. Persistent effects like reduction of stem growth and leaf production was proportional to the initial oil concentration. The plants from control and 10 mL treatments were significantly superior to all remaining treatments in height, leaf number and healthy level. Results indicated that L. racemosa seedlings suffer both lethal and sublethal effects from exposition to bunker oil exposure.

  14. Especies maderables y no maderables con sustancias colorantes utilizadas para el teñido y pintado de telas en 19 comunidades indígenas de la región Ucayali, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Riveros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo de investigación se llevó a cabo en 19 comunidades indígenas de la etnia Shipibo-Conibo, en la Región Ucayali, con el objetivo de determinar que especies maderables y no  maderables son utilizadas, como materia prima para teñir o dibujar líneas en las telas, con el diseño característico de este grupo étnico.  La metodología utilizada fue descriptiva, con visitas a las diferentes comunidades indígenas, talleres participativos, conversaciones con los artesanos más experimentados y colecta botánica de las especies señaladas por ellos.  Se logró determinar que las especies con sustancias de coloración más utilizadas son Swietenia macrophylla (caoba, Trichilia maynasiana, Trichilia poeppigiana  (Meliaceae, Terminalia oblonga, Terminalia sp., Buchenavia parvifolia (Combretaceae, y Picramnia juniniana (Simaroubaceae. Las tonalidades que proporcionan son rojos, café oscuro, café claro y en el caso de Picramnia juniniana, lila. Los componentes químicos encontrados en las sustancias colorantes fueron taninos, flavonoides, lactonas y quinonas.

  15. Especies maderables y no maderables con sustancias colorantes utilizadas para el teñido y pintado de telas en 19 comunidades indígenas de la región Ucayali, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Riveros

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo de investigación se llevó a cabo en 19 comunidades indígenas de la etnia Shipibo-Conibo, en la Región Ucayali, con el objetivo de determinar que especies maderables y no  maderables son utilizadas, como materia prima para teñir o dibujar líneas en las telas, con el diseño característico de este grupo étnico.  La metodología utilizada fue descriptiva, con visitas a las diferentes comunidades indígenas, talleres participativos, conversaciones con los artesanos más experimentados y colecta botánica de las especies señaladas por ellos.  Se logró determinar que las especies con sustancias de coloración más utilizadas son Swietenia macrophylla (caoba, Trichilia maynasiana, Trichilia poeppigiana  (Meliaceae, Terminalia oblonga, Terminalia sp., Buchenavia parvifolia (Combretaceae, y Picramnia juniniana (Simaroubaceae. Las tonalidades que proporcionan son rojos, café oscuro, café claro y en el caso de Picramnia juniniana, lila. Los componentes químicos encontrados en las sustancias colorantes fueron taninos, flavonoides, lactonas y quinonas.

  16. Terminalia mjuna (Roxb.ex DC) Wight & Am. of COl11bretaceae is a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... white and borne 011 branched inflorescences. Fruit is ovoid lrvith 5-7 angles or 'wings. Bark is astringent, sweet, acrid, cooling, aphrodisiac, demulcent, cardiotonic, antidysenteric, urinary astringent, expectorant, alexiteric and tollie. It is useful ill ulcers, urethrorrhea, leucorrhoea, diabetes, anaemia, cardiopathy, cirrhosis ...

  17. 18, 19-Secooleanane Type Triterpene Glycosyl Esters from the Bark of Terminalia arjuna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five novel 18,19-secooleanane type triterpene glycosides, 1-5, were isolated from the MeOH extract of the bark of Teminalia arjuna, along with nine known oleanane triterpenoids. The structures of the new compounds were determined by spectroscopic analyses, including 2D NMR, HRESIMS and CD spectra....

  18. Healing effect of Terminalia chebula Retz extract on second-degree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TCRE) on second- degree burns in rats. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, weighing 200 – 220 g, were subjected to deep second- degree skin burns by electrical scald instrument. The animals were divided into three groups as follows:.

  19. Preservation of Natural Colorant Extract of Jalawe Fruit Peel (Terminalia bellirica in Water-Based Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edia Rahayuningsih

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this study is to preserve natural colorant extract of jalawe fruit peel in water-based solution during storing. The specific objectives in this research are finding suitable type and amount of antimicrobial compound to prevent biological degradation of the natural colorant jalawe extract, as well as determining the colorant half-life by evaluating its degradation rate. The colorant extract solution was added to a reactor followed by addition of an antimicrobial compound. Samples were taken at certain periods of time and they were then centrifuged to separate the flock from the mixture. The amounts of colorant compound in the solution and microbes in the flock were analyzed using a gravimetric method. The results showed that solutions of formaldehyde in water and chitosan in acetic acid could inhibit the degradation of jalawe extract. The most effective concentrations of formaldehyde and chitosan in the jalawe extract were 0.015 and 0.125%, respectively, with respect to total volume of the extract. The half-life of jalawe extract in a water based solution with the addition of formaldehyde and chitosan was 140 and 180 days respectively, while that without any addition of the antimicrobial compounds was 25 days.

  20. Healing effect of Terminalia chebula Retz extract on second-degree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Pharmaceutical Abstract, Chemical Abstracts, Embase, Index Copernicus, EBSCO, African. Index Medicus, JournalSeek, Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Directory of Open Access Journals. (DOAJ), African Journal Online, Bioline International, Open-J-Gate and Pharmacy Abstracts. INTRODUCTION.

  1. Uji Aktivitas Antibakteri Ekstrak Metanol, Etil Asetat dan n-Heksan Daun Ketapang (Terminalia catappa L)

    OpenAIRE

    Sinaga, Donna Rosmery E

    2017-01-01

    150822007 Ketapang leaf powder was extracted by maceration using methanol solvent for 24 hours. Screening test of ketapang leaf extract from methanol extract, ethyl acetate and n-hexane showed positive result on flavonoid, tannin and terpenoide compounds. Result of antibacterial activity test with agar diffusion method toward methanol extract, ethyl acetate and n-hexan from ketapang leaf showed that inhibitory effect of bacterial growth was better with effective inhibition zone against Str...

  2. Optimization of Gallic Acid Production from Terminalia Chebula by Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lokeswari

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for producing gallic acid by microbiological hydrolysis of the tannins of myrobalan seed powder is described in the present work. Hydrolysis of gallotannins of the substrate to gallic acid by Aspergillus niger MTCC 282 was studied. A simple extraction procedure is used. Fungal mycelia pre-induced with 5 g/L gallotannin was used as inoculums. Optimal conditions of production were determined using various parameters including gallotannin concentration, nutritional source and metal ions are determined. Gallotannin is hydrolyzed with acid, and gallic acid in the hydrolyses is then assayed using rhodanine. This method is very specific: no interferences from other plant phenolics, including ellagic acid and condensed tannin, have been observed. The yield of gallic acid with respect to gallotannins present in the substrate is estimated. Yields of gallic acid are about 74% with respect to gallotannin concentration, which suggests that this method is exploitable industrially for the manufacturing trimethoprim drug.

  3. Coptis chinensis and Myrobalan (Terminalia chebula Can Synergistically Inhibit Inflammatory Response In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enhui Cui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of Coptis chinensis plus myrobalan (CM in vitro and in vivo. Methods. The inflammation in mouse peritoneal macrophages was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Animal models were established by using ear swelling and paw edema of mouse induced by xylene and formaldehyde, respectively. In vitro, cytotoxicity, the phagocytosis of macrophages, the levels of nitric oxide (NO, induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in cell supernatant were detected. In vivo, swelling rate and edema inhibitory rate of ear and paw were observed using CM-treated mice. Results. At 150–18.75 μg·mL−1, CM had no cytotoxicity and could significantly promote the growth and the phagocytosis of macrophages and inhibit the overproduction of NO, iNOS, TNF-α, and IL-6 in macrophages induced by LPS. In vivo, pretreatment with CM, the ear swelling, and paw edema of mice could be significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner, and the antiedema effect of CM at high dose was better than dexamethasone. Conclusion. Our results demonstrated that Coptis chinensis and myrobalan possessed synergistically anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, which indicated that CM had therapeutic potential for the prevention and treatment of inflammation-mediated diseases.

  4. ACUTE ANXIOLYTIC ACTIVITY OF AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF TERMINALIA CHEBULA FRUIT PULP IN RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrashekar R.; Manohar V. R; Rao S. N.

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety is a general term for several disorders that cause nervousness, fear, apprehension and worry. These disorders affect how we feel and behave and they can even manifest as real physical symptoms. Mild anxiety is vague and unsettling, while severe anxiety can be extremely debilitating, having a serious impact on daily life.When anxiety becomes excessive, it may fall under the classification of an anxiety disorder. Most of the times, benzodiazepines (BZDs) remains the major class of compo...

  5. Methanol Extract from Anogeissus leiocarpus (DC Guill. et Perr. (Combretaceae Stem Bark Quenches the Quorum Sensing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Ouedraogo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to its extensive arsenal of virulence factors and inherent resistance to antibiotics, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a threat particularly in immunocompromised patients. Considering the central role of quorum sensing in the production of virulence factors, inhibition of bacterial communication mechanism constitute an opportunity to attenuate pathogenicity of bacteria resistant to available antibiotics. Our study aimed to assess the anti-quorum sensing activity of Anogeissus leiocarpus, traditionally used in Burkina Faso, for the treatment of infected burn wounds. Methods: Investigations were carried out on methanol extract from A. leiocarpus stem bark. The reporter strains Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and P. aeruginosa PAO1 derivatives were used to evidence any interference with the bacterial quorum sensing and expression of related genes. P. aeruginosa PAO1 was used to measure the impact on pyocyanin production. Results: At a sub-inhibitory concentration (100 µg/mL, A. leiocarpus methanol extract quenched the quorum sensing mechanism of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by down-streaming the rhlR gene, with a subsequent reduction of pyocyanin production. Moreover, the antioxidant polyphenols evidenced are able to reduce the oxidative stress induced by pyocyanin. Conclusion: The antioxidant and anti-quorum sensing activities of A. leiocarpus stem bark could justify its traditional use in the treatment of infected burn wounds.

  6. Natural Products Useful in Respiratory Disorders: Focus on Side-Effect Neutralizing Combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif-Ullah; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2015-06-10

    This review summarizes literature related to medicinal plants reputed in traditional medical systems for treatment of asthma and coughs. The plants that are pharmacologically investigated for their effectiveness in such conditions, along with respective experimental protocol details, are also discussed. Some of plant origin compounds, which are considered useful as antitussive and antiasthmatic agents, are described as well. Chrysoeriol, a constituent of Aspalathus linearis (Fabaceae) was observed to be selective for relaxant effect in airways (through K + channel activation), compared with other smooth muscles. We reported that Hypericum perforatum (Hyperieaceae), Andropogon muricatus (Poaceae), Juniper excelsa (Coniferae) and Nepeta cataria (Lamiaceae) exhibit bronchodilatory action, mediated through combination of Ca ++ antagonist and phospohodiesrase inhibitory mechanisms, which scientifically explains their medicinal use in asthma. Hyocyamus niger (Solanaceae), Artemisia vulgaris (Compositae), Fumaria parviflora (Fumariaceae) and Terminalia bellerica (Combretaceae) caused bronchodilation via dual blockade of muscarinic receptors and Ca ++ influx. Acorus calamus (Araceae), Carum roxburghianum (Apiaceae), Lens culinaris (Fabaceae) and Lepidium sativum (Cruciferae) mediate bronchodilatation through multiple pathways: anticholinergic and inhibition of Ca ++ channels and PDE enzyme(s). In conclusion, this review presents an analysis of different novel combinations of pharmacological activities in medicinal plants with side effect-neutralizing/synergistic potential, setting new trends in the therapeutic options for hyperactive respiratory disorders such as asthma and cough. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Contribuição ao conhecimento da sistemática e biologia de buprestídeos minadores do gênero Pachyschelus Solier, 1833: (Coleoptera, Buprestidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Kogan

    1963-12-01

    Full Text Available Buprestid leaf-miners are generally included in the subtribe Trachytes. The genera belonging to this subtribe are commonly very rich in number of species and their systematics envolves huge difficulties. On the other hand the biological knowledge on those insects is very poor. The A. tries to clarify the systematical status of two species of Pachyschelus - P. subundulatus Kerr. and P. fulgidipennis Lucas, and redescribes also P. binderi Obenberger. The hosts of the first two species are recorded, namely: Terminalia catappa (Combretaceae - host-plant of P. subundulatus and Luhea spp. (Tiliaceae - host-plant of P. fulgidipennis. The mines, developmental stages and habits of the three species are described and is made a full redescription of the adults, both male and female. The study is based on reared material from mined leaves, as well as insects assembled in several brazilian collections, both private and public ones. The importance of some biological facts as well as some morphological characters are stressed. The knowledge of the host-plants and the shape and other structural features of the mine were found to be helpfull to the identification of the species. Some morphological features of adults also prooved to be of systematical value. Besides the female pygidium and the male genitalia, the tibiae of the third pair of legs show some intersting structural details, reasonably alike in both sexes and quite different in each species.

  8. 76 FR 69693 - Tolerance Crop Grouping Program III

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ...; Okari nut, Terminalia kaernbachii Warb.; Pachira nut, Pachira insignis (Sw.) Savigny; Peach palm nut... (Molina) K. Koch) Okari nut (Terminalia kaernbachii Warb.) Pachira nut (Pachira insignis (Sw.) Savigny...

  9. Sifat Antioksidan, Kandungan Fenolat Total Dan Flavonoid Total Ekstrak Kulit Batang Mertapang (Terminalia Copelandii Elmer) [Antioxidant Properties, Total Phenolic and Total Flavonoid Content of Mertapang (Terminalia Copelandii Elmer) Bark Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Murningsih, Tri

    2012-01-01

    The antioxidant properties of methanolic extract of T. copelandii Elmer bark have been evaluated by using free radical (DPPH) scavenging assay, reduction power and ß-caroten bleaching assay. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and “butylated hydroxytoluene” (BHT) were used as positive control or antioxidant standard. Total phenolic content was estimated by using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and expressed in gallic acid (Gallic Acid Equivalent), while total flavonoid content was estimated by using aluminium ...

  10. Antioxidant activities of some local bangladeshi fruits (Artocarpus heterophyllus, Annona squamosa, Terminalia bellirica, Syzygium samarangense, Averrhoa carambola and Olea europa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubir, Titov

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, antioxidant activities of the fruits of A. heterophyllus, A. squamosa, T. bellirica, S. samarangense, A. carambola and O. europa were investigated. For this, at first matured fruits of them were sliced into small pieces and dried in the sun and finally crushed in a grinder to make powder. Ethanolic extracts of fruit powder were prepared using 99.99% ethanol. The antioxidative activities of these extracts were determined according to their abilities of scavenging 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical. It was demonstrated that all the ethanolic extracts of A. heterophyllus, A. squamosa, T. bellirica, S. samarangense, A. caranbola and O. europa showed antioxidant activities. The IC50 of the ethanolic extracts of A. heterophyllus, A. squamosa, T. bellirica, S. samarangense, A. carambola and O. europa were 410, 250, 34, 200, 30 and 76 microg/mL, respectively. Among them, A. carambola showed the highest antioxidant activities followed by T. bellirica, O. europa, S. samarangense, A. squamosa and A. heterophyllus indicating that fruits of A. carambola, T. bellirica and O. europa are very beneficial to human health.

  11. Inhibitory activities of selected Sudanese medicinal plants on Porphyromonas gingivalis and matrix metalloproteinase-9 and isolation of bioactive compounds from Combretum hartmannianum (Schweinf) bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohieldin, Ebtihal Abdalla M; Muddathir, Ali Mahmoud; Mitsunaga, Tohru

    2017-04-20

    Periodontal diseases are one of the major health problems and among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Porphyromonas gingivalis is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium which has been strongly implicated in the etiology of periodontitis. Additionally, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) is an important factor contributing to periodontal tissue destruction by a variety of mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the selected Sudanese medicinal plants against P. gingivalis bacteria and their inhibitory activities on MMP-9. Sixty two methanolic and 50% ethanolic extracts from 24 plants species were tested for antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis using microplate dilution assay method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The inhibitory activity of seven methanol extracts selected from the 62 extracts against MMP-9 was determined by Colorimetric Drug Discovery Kit. In search of bioactive lead compounds, Combretum hartmannianum bark which was found to be within the most active plant extracts was subjected to various chromatographic (medium pressure liquid chromatography, column chromatography on a Sephadex LH-20, preparative high performance liquid chromatography) and spectroscopic methods (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)) to isolate and characterize flavogalonic acid dilactone and terchebulin as bioactive compounds. About 80% of the crude extracts provided a MIC value ≤4 mg/ml against bacteria. The extracts which revealed the highest potency were: methanolic extracts of Terminalia laxiflora (wood; MIC = 0.25 mg/ml) followed by Acacia totrtilis (bark), Ambrosia maritima (aerial part), Argemone mexicana (seed), C. hartmannianum (bark), Terminalia brownii (wood) and 50% ethanolic extract of T. brownii (bark) with MIC values of 0.5 mg/ml. T. laxiflora (wood) and C. hartmannianum (bark) which belong to combretaceae family showed an inhibitory activity over 50% at

  12. Hydrolyzable Tannins (Chebulagic Acid and Punicalagin) Target Viral Glycoprotein-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions To Inhibit Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Entry and Cell-to-Cell Spread▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chen, Ting-Ying; Chung, Chueh-Yao; Noyce, Ryan S.; Grindley, T. Bruce; McCormick, Craig; Lin, Ta-Chen; Wang, Guey-Horng; Lin, Chun-Ching; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common human pathogen that causes lifelong latent infection of sensory neurons. Non-nucleoside inhibitors that can limit HSV-1 recurrence are particularly useful in treating immunocompromised individuals or cases of emerging acyclovir-resistant strains of herpesvirus. We report that chebulagic acid (CHLA) and punicalagin (PUG), two hydrolyzable tannins isolated from the dried fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae), inhibit HSV-1 entry at noncytotoxic doses in A549 human lung cells. Experiments revealed that both tannins targeted and inactivated HSV-1 viral particles and could prevent binding, penetration, and cell-to-cell spread, as well as secondary infection. The antiviral effect from either of the tannins was not associated with induction of type I interferon-mediated responses, nor was pretreatment of the host cell protective against HSV-1. Their inhibitory activities targeted HSV-1 glycoproteins since both natural compounds were able to block polykaryocyte formation mediated by expression of recombinant viral glycoproteins involved in attachment and membrane fusion. Our results indicated that CHLA and PUG blocked interactions between cell surface glycosaminoglycans and HSV-1 glycoproteins. Furthermore, the antiviral activities from the two tannins were significantly diminished in mutant cell lines unable to produce heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate and could be rescued upon reconstitution of heparan sulfate biosynthesis. We suggest that the hydrolyzable tannins CHLA and PUG may be useful as competitors for glycosaminoglycans in the management of HSV-1 infections and that they may help reduce the risk for development of viral drug resistance during therapy with nucleoside analogues. PMID:21307190

  13. Hydrolyzable tannins (chebulagic acid and punicalagin) target viral glycoprotein-glycosaminoglycan interactions to inhibit herpes simplex virus 1 entry and cell-to-cell spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chen, Ting-Ying; Chung, Chueh-Yao; Noyce, Ryan S; Grindley, T Bruce; McCormick, Craig; Lin, Ta-Chen; Wang, Guey-Horng; Lin, Chun-Ching; Richardson, Christopher D

    2011-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common human pathogen that causes lifelong latent infection of sensory neurons. Non-nucleoside inhibitors that can limit HSV-1 recurrence are particularly useful in treating immunocompromised individuals or cases of emerging acyclovir-resistant strains of herpesvirus. We report that chebulagic acid (CHLA) and punicalagin (PUG), two hydrolyzable tannins isolated from the dried fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae), inhibit HSV-1 entry at noncytotoxic doses in A549 human lung cells. Experiments revealed that both tannins targeted and inactivated HSV-1 viral particles and could prevent binding, penetration, and cell-to-cell spread, as well as secondary infection. The antiviral effect from either of the tannins was not associated with induction of type I interferon-mediated responses, nor was pretreatment of the host cell protective against HSV-1. Their inhibitory activities targeted HSV-1 glycoproteins since both natural compounds were able to block polykaryocyte formation mediated by expression of recombinant viral glycoproteins involved in attachment and membrane fusion. Our results indicated that CHLA and PUG blocked interactions between cell surface glycosaminoglycans and HSV-1 glycoproteins. Furthermore, the antiviral activities from the two tannins were significantly diminished in mutant cell lines unable to produce heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate and could be rescued upon reconstitution of heparan sulfate biosynthesis. We suggest that the hydrolyzable tannins CHLA and PUG may be useful as competitors for glycosaminoglycans in the management of HSV-1 infections and that they may help reduce the risk for development of viral drug resistance during therapy with nucleoside analogues.

  14. Beneficial effect of medicinal plants on the contractility of post-hypoxic isolated guinea pig atria - Potential implications for the treatment of ischemic-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipat, Robbert; Toelsie, Jerry R; Magali, Indira; Soekhoe, Rubaina; Stender, Karin; Wangsawirana, Angelique; Oedairadjsingh, Krishan; Pawirodihardjo, Jennifer; Mans, Dennis R A

    2016-08-01

    Context Ischemic-reperfusion injury is accompanied by a decreased contractility of the myocardium. Positive-inotropic agents have proven useful for treating this condition but may exert serious side-effects. Objective In this study, aqueous preparations from Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench (Malvaceae), Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae), Bixa orellana L. (Bixaceae), Cecropia peltata L. (Moraceae), Erythrina fusca Lour. (Fabaceae), Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) and Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae) were evaluated for their ability to improve the decreased contractility of isolated guinea pig atria after hypoxic stress. Materials and methods Guinea pig atria isolated in Ringer-Locke buffer gassed with 100% O2 at 30 °C were exposed for 5 min to hypoxia, then allowed to recover in oxygenated buffer alone or containing a single plant extract (0.001-1 mg/mL). The contractility (g/s) and beating frequency (beats/min), as well as troponin C contents of the bathing solution (ng/mL), were determined and expressed as means ± SDs. Results The extracts of A. muricata, B. orellana, C. peltata and T. catappa caused an increase in the contractility compared to untreated atria of 340 ± 102%, 151 ± 13%, 141 ± 14% and 238 ± 44%, respectively. However, the latter two preparations increased the troponin C contents of the bathing solution to 36 ± 11 and 69 ± 33, compared to the value of 11 ± 3 ng/mL found with untreated atria. Conclusions Preparations from A. muricata and B. orellana may possess positive-inotropic properties which may improve the contractility of the post-hypoxic myocardium. Studies to assess their usefulness in ischemic-reperfusion injury are warranted.

  15. Plantas e constituintes químicos empregados em Odontologia: revisão de estudos etnofarmacológicos e de avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana in vitro em patógenos orais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R.P. Vieira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Produtos derivados de plantas podem representar estratégia promissora na odontologia. Desse modo, o objetivo deste trabalho foi levantar na literatura os estudos sobre o uso popular de plantas em afecções orais, bem como os estudos de avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana in vitro de extratos vegetais e compostos isolados sobre patógenos orais, no período de 1996 a 2011. Quarenta e sete famílias botânicas foram referidas, com maior número de citações para Anacardiaceae, sendo Anacardium occidentale L., a espécie mais citada. O levantamento sobre estudos de avaliação antimicrobiana relacionou extratos de sessenta e seis espécies vegetais pertencentes a trinta e oito famílias botânicas, destacando-se Anacardiaceae, com pesquisas realizadas de forma predominante com as folhas, investigadas pelo método de difusão em ágar. Cinquenta e oito substâncias isoladas de plantas foram avaliadas, demonstrando que Terminalia chebula Retz (Combretaceae representa a espécie vegetal com atividade antimicrobiana in vitro mais significativa, apresentando halo de inibição de 32,97 mm contra Staphylococcus aureus, microrganismo encontrado em infecções orais; enquanto ácido tetra iso-alfa isolada de Humulus lupulus L. (Canabinaceae apresentou maior halo de inibição para Streptococcus mutans (26,0 mm. Os resultados apresentados devem estimular o desenvolvimento dos estudos de validação na garantia do uso seguro e eficaz de espécies vegetais em odontologia.

  16. Terminalia catappa, an anticlastogenic agent against MMS induced genotoxicity in the human lymphocyte culture and in bone marrow cells of Albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sultan Ahmad

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: Extracts of T. catappa significantly reduced chromosomal aberrations up to 11.65% to 40.30% at different dosages against MMS induced toxicity, similarly sister chromatid exchange was reduced and replication index enhanced in vitro. Similarly in the in vivo experiments, the effective reduction in clastogeny ranges from 19.70% to 40.90%. Their reducing potential was time and dose dependant.

  17. Ellagic acid derivatives from Terminalia chebula Retz. downregulate the expression of quorum sensing genes to attenuate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajal Sarabhai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burgeoning antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa has necessitated the development of anti pathogenic agents that can quench acylhomoserine lactone (AHL mediated QS with least risk of resistance. This study explores the anti quorum sensing potential of T. chebula Retz. and identification of probable compounds(s showing anti QS activity and the mechanism of attenuation of P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: Methanol extract of T. chebula Retz. fruit showed anti QS activity using Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. Bioactive fraction (F7, obtained by fractionation of methanol extract using Sephadex LH20, showed significant reduction (p<0.001 in QS regulated production of extracellular virulence factors in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Biofilm formation and alginate were significantly (p<0.05 reduced with enhanced (20% susceptibility to tobramycin. Real Time PCR of F7 treated P. aeruginosa showed down regulation of autoinducer synthase (lasI and rhlI and their cognate receptor (lasR and rhlR genes by 89, 90, 90 and 93%, respectively. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry also showed 90 and 64% reduction in the production of 3-oxo-C(12HSL and C(4HSL after treatment. Decrease in AHLs as one of the mechanisms of quorum quenching by F7 was supported by the reversal of inhibited swarming motility in F7-treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 on addition of C(4HSL. F7 also showed antagonistic activity against 3-oxo-C(12HSL-dependent QS in E. coli bioreporter. C. elegans fed on F7-treated P. aeruginosa showed enhanced survival with LT50 increasing from 24 to 72 h. LC-ESI-MS of F7 revealed the presence of ellagic acid derivatives responsible for anti QS activity in T. chebula extract. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report on anti QS activity of T. chebula fruit linked to EADs which down regulate the expression of lasIR and rhlIR genes with concomitant decrease in AHLs in P. aeruginosa PAO1 causing attenuation of its virulence factors and enhanced sensitivity of its biofilm towards tobramycin.

  18. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to evaluate analgesic activity of Terminalia chebula in healthy human volunteers using a mechanical pain model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Kishan Pokuri

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: T. chebula significantly increased pain threshold and pain tolerance compared to placebo. Both the study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug in patients suffering from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other painful conditions.

  19. Mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of six Brazilian Byrsonima species assessed by the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espanha, Lívia Greghi; Resende, Flávia Aparecida; de Sousa Lima Neto, José; Boldrin, Paula Karina; Nogueira, Catarine Haidê; de Camargo, Mariana Santoro; De Grandis, Rone Aparecido; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2014-06-05

    In various regions of Brazil, several species of the genus Byrsonima (Malpighiaceae) are widely used to treat gastrointestinal complications. This genus has about 150 species of shrubs and trees distributed over the entire Neotropical region. Various biological activities have been identified in these plants, especially antioxidant, antimicrobial and topical and systemic anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of hydroalcoholic leaf extracts of six species of Byrsonima: B. verbascifolia, B. correifolia, B. coccolobifolia, B. ligustrifolia, B. fagifolia and B. intermedia by the Salmonella microsome assay (Ames test). Mutagenic and antimutagenic activity was assessed by the Ames test, with the Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA100, TA98, TA97a and TA102, with (+S9) and without (-S9) metabolization, by the preincubation method. Only B. coccolobifolia and B. ligustrifolia showed mutagenic activity. However, the extracts of B. verbascifolia, B. correifolia, B. fagifolia and B. intermedia were found to be strongly antimutagenic against at least one of the mutagens tested. These results contribute to valuable data on the safe use of medicinal plants and their potential chemopreventive effects. Considering the excellent antimutagenic activities extracted from B. verbascifolia, B. correifolia, B. fagifolia and B. intermedia, these extracts are good candidate sources of chemopreventive agents. However, B. coccolobifolia and B. ligustrifolia showed mutagenic activity, suggesting caution in their use.

  20. First fossil evidence of Connaraceae R. Br. from Indian Cenozoic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wallichii (Rubiaceae); Memecylon (Melastomaceae);. Litsea glabrata, Actinodaphne malabarica, Cinnamo- mum bejolghota (Lauraceae); Millettia macrostachya. (Fabaceae); Salacia beddomei (Celastraceae); Taber- naemontana coronaria (Apocynaceae); Terminalia catappa,Terminalia chebula, andCombretum chinense.

  1. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attioua

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... Phytochemical and antifungal studies on Terminalia mollis and. Terminalia brachystemma. Fitoterapia 80:369-373. Martino V, Morales J, Martínez-Irujo JJ, Font M, Monge A, Coussio S. (2004). Two ellagitannins from the leaves of Terminalia tri[fllig]ora · with inhibitory activity on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  2. Structural Aspects of Antioxidant and Genotoxic Activities of Two Flavonoids Obtained from Ethanolic Extract of Combretum leprosum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Viau, Cassiana Macagnan; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Pflüger, Pricila; Facundo, Valdir Alves; Saffi, Jenifer

    2016-01-01

    Combretum leprosum Mart., a member of the Combretaceae family, is a traditionally used Brazilian medicinal plant, although no evidence in the literature substantiates its antioxidant action and the safety of its use...

  3. Floristic Composition of Traditional Sacred Landscapes in Bedelle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-21

    Dec 21, 2009 ... and 5 species respectively, Celastraceae,. Combretaceae,. Urticaceae and. Amaranthaceae are composed of 4 species each; and Rutaceae, Moracceae,. Myrsinaceae, Poaceae, Polygonaceae and. Rhamnaceae contain 3 species each. Verbenaceae, Rosaceae, Ranunculaceae,. Protiaceae, Myrtaceae ...

  4. Palaeoecological studies of quaternary sediments from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the palynological study, pollen of open forest types: Alchornea cordifolia, Elaeis guineensis, Asteraceae, among others were recovered, indicating human influence over time. Pollen of Rhizophora sp., Combretaceae/Melastomataceae, Poaceae, Ceratopteris sp., Cyclosorus afer, amongst others; were also represented.

  5. Safety evaluation of Bon-santé cleanser® polyherbal in male Wistar rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kale, O E; Awodele, O

    2016-01-01

    .... Androgenic, antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory potentials as well as chemical compositions of extracts of massularia acuminata, terminalia ivorensis, anogeissus leiocarpus and macuna...

  6. Inhibitor for the Corrosion of Mild Steel in H 2 SO 4 | Patel | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An extract of Terminalia chebula fruits was investigated as a corrosion inhibitor of mild steel in 0.5 M H2SO4 by means of conventional mass loss, electrochemical polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mass loss results showed that the extract of Terminalia chebula is ...

  7. Phytochemical screening and study of comparative antibacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-06-30

    Jun 30, 2013 ... Comparative study on antibacterial activity of Terminalia- catappa on Multiresistant strains. 5040. Phytochemical screening and study of comparative antibacterial activity of aqueous and alcoholic extracts of the leaves and barks of Terminalia catappa on multiresistant strains. Rubens Dinzedi Mbengui1, 2, ...

  8. Intersex (ix) mutations of Drosophila melanogaster cause ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study on the effect of different intersex mutations on genital disc development provides the following major results: (i) similar range of a characteristic array of morphological structures (from almost double sex terminalia to extreme reduction of terminal appendages) was displayed by the terminalia of XX ix1/ix1, XX ...

  9. JOPAT [14th Edition - Jan to Dec 2009

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secretary

    An ethnobotanical survey revealed that the dried fallen leaves of Terminalia catappa Linn. are used locally in various parts of Nigeria for the management of sickle cell anaemia. This research investigated if Terminalia catappa leaf interferes with the basic mechanism of erythrocyte sickling. Powdered dried fallen leaves of ...

  10. 648-IJBCS-Article-Fernand Gbaguibi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR GATSING

    Planta Med., 64: 711-713. Eloff JN, Famakin JO, Katerere DRP. 2005. Combretum woodii (Combretaceae) leaf extracts have high activity against Gram- negative and Gram-positive bacteria. African Journal of Biotechnology, 4(10):. 1161-1166. Harold CN. 1992. The crisis in antibiotic resistance. Science, 257: 1064-1072.

  11. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Badau, SJ. Vol 63, No 4 (2015) - Articles Acute toxicity study and effect of ethanolic leaf extract of Guiera senegalensis J. F. Gmel (combretaceae) on trypanosome Brucei brucei induced pathology in albino rats. Abstract. ISSN: 0378-9721. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  12. Environ: E00276 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00276 Quisqualis fruit Rangoon creeper fruit Crude drug Palmitic acid [CPD:C00249...ate [CPD:C01004], Quisqualic acid [CPD:C08296], Oleanic acid, Phytosterol, Sugar, Glucosazon Quisqualis indica [TAX:3956] ... Combretaceae (Indian-almond family) Rangoon creeper fruit ...

  13. Sireeratawong et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2013) 10 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    Roxb. is an indigenous plant in Southeast Asia and Thailand. It is a plant in the family Combretaceae and commonly known as “Sa Maw Phi Phek” in Thai name (Smitinand, 2001). T. bellerica has been extensively used in Thai traditional medicine for laxative, carminative, astringent, expectorant and tonic (Department of.

  14. Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences - Vol 7, No 2 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of aqueous leaf extract of Combretum Micranthum g. don (Combretaceae) on gastro intestinal smooth muscle. EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ... Fractionation of lead-acid battery soil amended with Biochar · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  15. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tra Bi, H.F.. Vol 10, No 3 (2016) - Articles Evaluation in vitro de l'activité des écorces de tige de Anogeissus leiocarpus (DC) Guill. et Perr. (Combretaceae) sur des bactéries responsables de maladies courantes en Afrique et criblage phytochimique. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1997-342X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  16. Acute toxicity study and effect of ethanolic leaf extract of Guiera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute toxicity study and effect of ethanolic leaf extract of Guiera senegalensis J. F. Gmel (combretaceae) on trypanosome Brucei brucei induced pathology in albino rats. ... were observed at histopathology in some extract treated groups compared to the infected untreated group, suggesting a dose dependent extract activity.

  17. Herbal gardens of India: A statistical analysis report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-29

    Jun 29, 2011 ... Celastraceae. 16. 0. 0. 3. 19. Chenopodiaceae. 3. 2. 0. 0. 5. Cleomaceae. 0. 2. 0. 0. 2. Clusiaceae. 0. 0. 0. 19. 19. Cochlospermaceae. 0. 0. 0. 2. 2. Colchicaceae, Liliaceae. 19. 0. 0. 0. 19. Combretaceae. 3. 0. 1. 128. 132. Commelinaceae. 0. 2. 0. 0. 2. Convolvulaceae. 15. 32. 0. 0. 47. Costaceae. 0. 17. 2. 0.

  18. Five new additions to the flora of Andaman & Nicobar Islands, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rasingam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fioria vitifolia (L. Mattei (Malvaceae, Combretum acuminatum Roxb. (Combretaceae, Marsdenia tinctoria R. Br. (Apocynaceae Phoebe lanceolata (Nees Nees (Lauraceae and Schoenoplectus mucronatus (L. Palla (Cyperaceae collected from Little Andaman Island are reported to be new additions to the flora of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands.   

  19. Distribution Characteristics of Mineral Elements in Tree Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fiifi Baidoo

    The other families comprised Papilionaceae, Apocynaceae, Sterculiaceae, Connaraceae,. Sapindaceae, Laurraceae, Combretaceae, Bombaceae, Bignoniaceae, Ulmaceae, Annonaceae and. Anacardiaceae, and constituted 34.4% (Fig. 1b). A total of 18 different tree species families were identified in AS and 16 in DS ...

  20. Ethnobotanical Survey Of Anti-Asthmatic Plants In South Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plants\\' families represented in the colle ction include,Amaryllidaceae, Apocynaceae, Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Moraceae, Solanaceae, Zingiberaceae and others. Most of the herbs were prescribed along with other recipes, mono-prescription was rare. Modes of administration of the phytomedicines were ...

  1. Phytosterols from the stem bark of Combretum fragrans F. Hoffm AO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nx 6110

    Combretum fragrans F. Hoffm belongs to the. Combretaceae (Combretum) family. The plant grows in wooded or bushy grassland [1]. The powdered bark is used for the treatment of wounds, diarrhoea, syphilis and gonorrhoea [2] and also in fungal, bacterial and inflammatory conditions [3-4]. Only limited pharmacological.

  2. Moisture Absorption in Certain Tropical American Woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-08-01

    Honduras, Honduras 29.8 Increase 30 - 40 percent Cedro Granadino (Ccdrela Tonduzii) Courbaril ( Hymenaea courbaril ; Nargusta (Terminalia amazonia...Guiana Courbaril (Hymer>aea Davisii) Mylady (Aspidosperma cruentum) Courbaril ( Hymenaea courbaril ) Honduras, Br. Honduras Honduras Br«, Guiana

  3. An antifungal property of crude plant extracts from Anogeissus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chloroform, ethanolic, methanolic, ethyl acetate and aqueous root extracts of Anogeissus leiocarpus and Terminalia avicennioides were investigated in vitro for antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium species, Microsporum audouinii and Trichophyton rubrum using radial growth ...

  4. Isolation Of A Stilbene Glycoside And Other Constituents Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... acid arjungenin and a mixture of β-sitosterol and stigmasterol. Structure determination of the isolated compounds was achieved on the basis of spectroscopic measurements. Keywords: Terminalia sericeae, stilbenes, combretastatin, resveratrol, glycosides. African Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine Vol.

  5. Evaluation of phytochemical and antibacterial properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of phytochemical and antibacterial properties of Terminalia avicennioides crude extract against selected bacteria from diarrhoeic patients. F.M. Musa, J.B. Ameh, S.A. Ado, O.S. Olonitola ...

  6. Studies on two polyherbal formulations (ZPTO and ZTO) for comparison of their antidyslipidemic, antihypertensive and endothelial modulating activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aziz, Nauman; Mehmood, Malik Hassan; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2013-01-01

    ...: Zingiber officinalis, P: Piper nigrum, T: Terminalia belerica and O: Orchis mascula, different animal models including, tyloxapol and high fat diet-induced dyslipidemia and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were used...

  7. Antimycobacterial activity of some medicinal plants in Niger state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten Nigerian medicinal plants Abrus precatorius, Annona senegalensis, Anogeissus leiocarpus, Crateva adansonii, Detarium microcarpum, Faba spp, Neocarya macrophylla, Ocimum gratissimum, Securidaca longpenduculata and Terminalia avicennioides used by traditional medicine practitioners for the management of ...

  8. Inhibitor for the Corrosion of Mild Steel in H SO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    electron microscopic studies provided confirmatory evidence of an improved surface condition, due to adsorption, for corrosion protection. KEYWORDS. Terminalia chebula, acid corrosion inhibitor, electrochemical polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, mild steel. 1. Introduction. Large amounts of sulphuric ...

  9. Modelling of excess noise attnuation by grass and forest | Onuu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , guinea grass (panicum maximum) and forest which comprises iroko (milicia ezcelea) and white afara (terminalia superba) trees in the ratio of 2:1 approximately. Excess noise attenuation spectra have been plotted for the grass and forest for ...

  10. Hypoglycemic effect of triphala on selected non insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Sowmya S; Antony, Seema

    2008-01-01

    Modern life style is characterized by high stress, increased automation, junk food consumption and sedentary life style which have lead to the incidence of Diabetes. The study involved selection of NIDDM subjects who were supplemented with Triphala powder called, The Three Myrobalans (Terminalia bellirica- Belliric myrobalan, Terminalia chebula-Inknut, Embilica officinalis - Indian gooseberry) for a period of 45 days. Statistical evaluation of the blood profile showed significant reduction in the blood glucose level of the subjects.

  11. Hypoglycemic effect of triphala on selected non insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Sowmya S.; Antony, Seema

    2008-01-01

    Modern life style is characterized by high stress, increased automation, junk food consumption and sedentary life style which have lead to the incidence of Diabetes. The study involved selection of NIDDM subjects who were supplemented with Triphala powder called, The Three Myrobalans ( Terminalia bellirica - Belliric myrobalan, Terminalia chebula -Inknut, Embilica officinalis - Indian gooseberry) for a period of 45 days. Statistical evaluation of the blood profile showed significant reduction...

  12. C:\\Users\\AISA\\Desktop\\SILUE N..xps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    les Combretaceae, les Mimosaceae, les. Rubiaceae, les Fabaceae et les Anacardiaceae. Cinquante pourcent des espèces utilisées appartiennent à ces six familles. Dans un contexte de réchauffement climatique, d'explosion démographique et de désertification, il est opportun de développer des moyens de régénération ...

  13. Mangrove exploitation effects on biodiversity and ecosystem services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Abdul; Fensholt, Rasmus; Mertz, Ole

    2015-01-01

    alba) belonging to six families (Avicenniaceae, Rhizophoraceae, Euphorbiaceae, Combretaceae, Arecaceae and Sonneratiaceae). Mangrove forests are now dominated by saplings and seedlings, with few trees above 15 cm diameter at breast height. Rhizophora sp. were found to be the most important and dominant...... harvesting on tree biodiversity in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. Using two line transects each in ten mangrove forests, mangrove composition, species dominance, density, frequency, coverage, and stem diameter and diversity were recorded. Interviews detailing provisioning ecosystem services were also conducted...

  14. The interference of methods in the collection of teredinids (Mollusca, Bivalvia) in mangrove habitats Interferência de métodos na coleta de teredinídios (Mollusca, Bivalvia) em habitats de manguezais

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa M. V. Leonel; Lopes,Sônia G. B. C.; Moraes,Daniela T. de; Marcos Aversari

    2006-01-01

    In the estuary of the Mamanguape River (Paraíba, Brazil), a new collection technique was developed and applied with virgin poles of mangrove trees Avicennia schaueriana (Verbenaceae), Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae), and Laguncularia racemosa (Combretaceae), taking into account wood preference, water salinity and depth influence during teredinid larval settlement. Sets of poles were vertically fixed in the riverbed at three sites along a decreasing salinity gradient, where they stayed for ...

  15. 2149-IJBCS-Article-Marcel Badji

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Celastraceae. 1. 1. 0,13. -. -. -. Chrysobalanaceae. 1. 1. 0,13. 1. 1. 0,24. Combretaceae. 2. 3. 48,31. 2. 3. 63,77. Mimosaceae. 2. 2. 1,9. 2. 3. 2,35. Total. 13. 14. 100. 10. 12. 100. Tableau 2 : Valeurs des moyennes des différents paramètres dendrométriques des arbres dans les champs à RNA et dans la zone mise en défens.

  16. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 155 ... ... Incidence of Gummosis and Its Effect on Growth Attributes of Terminalia ivorensis A. Chev. and Taminalia mantaly H. Perrier in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, Abstract PDF. GE Omokhua, UD Chima. Vol 2, No 1 (2013), Inductivism and Science: An Appraisal of Scientific Methodology, Abstract PDF. C C Obi.

  17. Inhibitor for the Corrosion of Mild Steel in H SO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Terminalia chebula, acid corrosion inhibitor, electrochemical polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, mild steel. 1. Introduction. Large amounts of sulphuric acid are used in the chemical in- dustry for the removal of undesired scale and rust. The addition of corrosion inhibitors effectively protects the metal ...

  18. Vegetative propagation of twelve fodder tree species indigenous to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Commiphora africana, Faidherbia albida, Ficus gnaphalocarpa, Guiera senegalensis, Kigelia africana, Pterocarpus erinaceus, Pterocarpus lucens, Pterocarpus santalinoides and Terminalia avicennioides. The series also evaluated the impacts of the size (a. africanantalinoides was revealed to be an easy-to-root species, ...

  19. The frankincense tree of Ethiopia : ecology, productivity and population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eshete Wassie, A.

    2011-01-01

    Keywords: Boswellian papyrifera, Frankincense tree, matrix model, population dynamics,
    population bottleneck, tapping. Combretum – Terminalia woodlands and Acacia – Commiphora woodlands are the two
    dominant vegetation types that cover large parts of the dry land areas in

  20. Lumber recovery efficiency in the Artisanal sector in Cross River ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five commercial timber species selected for the study were milicia excelsa, Pterocarpus osun, Nauclea diderichii, Terminalia ivorensis and Gosswellondedron spp. The study showed that log conversion in the artisanal sector result in a high degree (57%) of wastage of total tree volume while the mean recovery ratio for the ...

  1. Dynamique des peuplements des Parcelles d'Essais Sylvicoles (PES)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    La formation est une savane arbustive, dominée par Detarium microcarpum, Terminalia avicennioides, Vitellaria paradoxa, Combretum racemosum et en minorité par Prosopis africana, Vitex doniana et Pterocarpus erinaceus. Les espèces à croissance relativement rapide sont Detarium microcarpum, Vitellaria paradoxa, ...

  2. Olaniyi, AA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olaniyi, AA. Vol 14 (2009) - Articles Phytochemical and Anti-sickling Activities of Terminalia catappa Linn. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1118-1028. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact ...

  3. Notes and illustrations on Amicitia Emden species (Diptera, Muscidae, Coenosiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couri Márcia S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Amicitia Emden, 1940 is an Afrotropical genus of Coenosiinae (Diptera, Muscidae, with four known species described by Emden (1940: A. insignis, A. lucens, A. modesta and A. seclusa. All examined holotypes are deposited at "The Natural History Museum" (London, UK. Notes on the species and illustrations, especially of the terminalia are presented.

  4. New species of Zygoclistron Rehn, 1905 (Insecta: Orthoptera: Acrididae: Copiocerinae) in the central corridor of the Atlantic Forest biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Daniela Santos Martins; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Domenico, Fernando Campos De; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2016-06-17

    Herein we describe a new species of Copiocerinae, Zygoclistron ruschii Silva n. sp., from Atlantic Forest remnants in southeastern Brazil, collected from the Reserva Biológica Augusto Ruschi in the Santa Teresa municipality, Espírito Santo state, Brazil. The diagnosis of this new species is based on phallic complex and terminalia characters.

  5. LITTERFALL AND NUTRIENT RETURNS IN ISOLATED STANDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    and branch morphology, leaf size and arrangement. The main objective of this study was to examine litter production and nutrient returns through litterfall by isolated stands of Terminalia catappa, and determine the contributions of nutrient elements to the rainforest soil by the isolated exotic, through a direct comparison with.

  6. In vitro study on biomineralization of biphasic calcium phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this study, we report the preparation of a bone graft material, having cylindrical shape, containing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), gelatin (G), chitosan (C) and Terminalia chebula (TC) extract. TC extract was used as a crosslinker that gives stability to bone graft when it is placed in SBF. The graft was stable in ...

  7. Sobre um novo gênero neotrópico da subfamília Tanypodinae (Diptera, Chironomidae On a new neotropical genus of the subfamily Tanypodinae (Diptera, Chironomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião José de Oliveira

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A new neotropical genus and a new species of a non-biting midge for the subfamily Tanypodinae from Brazil are described. The new genus is near Tanypus Meigen, 1803 and Procladius Skuse, 1889, but differs of both by wings and male terminalia.

  8. Antibacterial screening of Five Nigerian Medicinal Plants Against S ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The water and ethanol extracts of five Nigerian medicinal plants: Enantia chlorantha, Terminalia avicennioides, Momordica balsamina, Morinda lucida and mangifera indica used traditionally in treating several ailment of both microbial and non- microbial origins were tested on clinical isolates of salmonella typhi and S.

  9. Evaluation of in vitro antimycobacterial activity of Nigerian plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-03

    Jun 3, 2008 ... obtained after fractionation were the most active fractions for all the plants tested against BCG, having. Anogeissus leiocarpus and Terminalia avicennioides exhibiting the highest activity at 312 and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Fractions Ta5 and Al4 obtained on further purification exhibited most significant.

  10. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anokwuru, CP. Vol 12, No 4 (2015) - Articles Phenolic content distribution and antioxidant activities of Terminalia sericea Burch Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0189-6016. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and ...

  11. A tropical freshwater wetland: I Structure, growth, and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    James A. Allen; Ken W. Krauss; Katherine C. Ewel; Bobby D Keeland; Erick E. Waguk

    2005-01-01

    Forested wetlands dominated by (Terminalia carolinensis) are endemic to Micronesia but common only on the island of Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia. On Kosrae, these forests occur on Nansepsep, Inkosr, and Sonahnpil soil types, which differ in degree of flooding and soil saturation. We compared forest structure, growth, nutrition, and...

  12. Comparative Study of Pre-Germination Treatments and their Effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    tropical genera, example, it occurs in Pterocarpus angolensis, Terminalia superba, Albizia lebbek, Ziziphus spp, Tectona grandis, Eucalyptus pauciflora and several others (Turnbull and Doran, 1987). Physiological dormancy may be caused by the presence of inhibitors or substances that blocks the germination process.

  13. Effect of four medicinal plants on Amyloid-β induced neurotoxicity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methanol extract of the roots of Ziziphus mucronata Willd., Lannea schweinfurthii (Engl.) Engl. and Terminalia sericea Burch. ex DC., were the least toxic to the SH-SY5Ycells at the highest concentration tested (100 ìg/ml). All four plants tested were observed to reduce the effects of Aâ-induced neuronal cell death, ...

  14. Evaluation of in vitro antimycobacterial activity of Nigerian plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The global threat of tuberculosis (TB) demands for search for alternative antimycobacterial drugs. Some Nigerian ... obtained after fractionation were the most active fractions for all the plants tested against BCG, having Anogeissus leiocarpus and Terminalia avicennioides exhibiting the highest activity at 312 and 200 µg/mL ...

  15. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Innocent, E. Vol 10, No 1 (2008) - Articles Repellency property of long chain aliphatic methyl ketones against Anopheles gambiae s.s. Abstract PDF · Vol 4, No 4 (2007) - Articles Isolation Of A Stilbene Glycoside And Other Constituents Of Terminalia sericeae. Abstract PDF · Vol 11, No 1 (2009) - Articles Antimicrobial and ...

  16. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nkunya, MHH. Vol 3, No 3 (2006) - Articles (4-Methoxy-benzo[1,3]dioxol-5-yl)- Phenylmethanone: an antibacterial benzophenone from securidaca longepedunculata. Abstract · Vol 4, No 4 (2007) - Articles Isolation Of A Stilbene Glycoside And Other Constituents Of Terminalia sericeae. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0189-6016.

  17. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Innocent, E. Vol 4, No 4 (2007) - Articles Isolation Of A Stilbene Glycoside And Other Constituents Of Terminalia sericeae. Abstract PDF · Vol 6, No 2 (2009) - Articles Screening of traditionally used plants for in vivo antimalarial activity in mice. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0189-6016. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE ...

  18. Arjunolic acid: A promising new building block for nanochemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arjunolic acid, the major extractable constituent of the heavy wood of Terminalia Arjuna, has the potential to be used as a rigid and functional molecular framework for the construction of nanosized supramolecular architectures and nanomaterials. The nanosized triterpenoid, arjunolic acid, showed efficient gelation of ...

  19. An appraisal of the potency of roots of Anogeissus leiocarpus (DC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. IDAYAT GBADAMOSI

    2014-06-30

    Jun 30, 2014 ... http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/jab.v78i1.10. ABSTRACT. Objective: This study analysed the roots of Anogeissus leiocarpus and Terminalia glaucescens for their chemical constituents and investigated their therapeutic potential in Escherichia coli related infections with a view to combating resistant strains and ...

  20. The antimicrobial activities of methanolic extracts of Eucalyptus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic extracts of leaves of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Terminalia catappa were studied for in vitro microbial activities by agar dilution method. ... Accelerated gradient chromatography (AGC) gave fractions of the extract of T. catappa that were more active on Candida albicans and Escherichia coli than the crude ...

  1. LITTERFALL AND NUTRIENT RETURNS IN ISOLATED STANDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    Keywords: Litterfall, Nutrient returns, Seasonal variation, Southern Nigeria, Terminalia catappa, Tropical rainforest. Introduction. In the tropical rainforests, plants and soils are in equilibrium involving an almost closed cycling of nutrients which is achieved by a very high rate of litter production, rapid mineralization and a.

  2. Le bois du frake issu de plantation exprime aussi de bonnes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mots-clés: Fraké de plantation, cubage, sciage, qualité physique et mécanique, Côte d'Ivoire. English Abstract. Objective: Technological qualities of the mature wood of Terminalia superba (Fraké) from plantation are badly known unlike those from wood from natural forest. Achieved work aimed to show the likeness between ...

  3. Conservation genetics of the frankincense tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekele, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Boswellia papyrifera is an important tree species of the extensive Combretum-Terminalia dry tropical forests and woodlands in Africa. The species produces a frankincense which is internationally traded because of its value as ingredient in cosmetic, detergent, food flavor and perfumes productions,

  4. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Abstract PDF · Vol 16 (2013) - Articles Tolerance study of aqueous extract of Mitracarpus scaber in rabbits. Abstract · Vol 8, No 3 (2014) - Articles Effet antibactérien de l'extrait aqueux de l'écorce de Terminalia glaucescens Planch ex Benth ...

  5. Effect of seed collection times and pretreatment methods on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... collection times and pretreatment methods on germination of Terminalia sericea Burch. ex DC. MG Likoswe, JP Njoloma, WF Mwase, CZ Chilima ... concentrated sulphuric acid (95%) for 3 and 4 h gave poorest germination (0%). However, in the second collection, use of concentrated sulphuric acid for 2 h gave highest ...

  6. Medicinal and Socio-Cultural Importance of Costus Afer (Ker Grawl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Myrianthus arboreus, Combretus species, Terminalia species, Garcinia kola,. Azadirachta indica among ... The stem and juice has traditional use for treatment of cough, measles and malaria in Aluu community of Rivers. State. The juice of C. afer is extracted and used as an instillation for eye inflammation and defects in ...

  7. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okogun, JI. Vol 11 (2006) - Articles Pharmacognostic standardizaion of Andrographis paniculata. Nees. (Acanthaceae) Abstract PDF · Vol 14 (2009) - Articles Phytochemical and Anti-sickling Activities of Terminalia catappa Linn. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1118-1028. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  8. Effect of Chinese medical herbs- burn liniment on deep second ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Burn Liniment (BL) is a popular traditional Chinese medicine formula consisting five herbal medicines (Flos Lonicerae, Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, Pericarpium Granati,Terminalia chebula Retz. and Galla Chinensis), that has been used in China for centuries to cure burn. This study investigated the healing ...

  9. African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development - Vol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of processing on the quality, composition and antioxidant properties of Terminalia catappa (Indian almond) seed oil · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ... Comparison of antimicrobial activities of brine salting, Chlorinated solution and Moringa oleifera plant extracts in fish from Lake Victoria basin of Kenya ...

  10. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 6, No 16 (2007)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Terminalia chebula fruit extract on lipid peroxidation and antioxidative system of testis of albino rats · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. P Lar, N Lar, K Bemis, J Jelpe, L Enzyguirre, L Ayuba, D Zella, P Kanki, JK Carr, W Blattner, AG Abimiku ...

  11. The utilisation and feeding value of milled woody plant species | CH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The utilisation and feeding value of milled woody plant species. Donaldson CH, Niemann PJ, Swart JA. Abstract. Trials were conducted where ground material of Tarchonanthus camphorates, Grewia flava and Terminalia sericea, supplemented with molasses and in some treatments with maize meal and/or urea, were fed to ...

  12. Ecogeographical Amplitude and Habitat of Two Species of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A systematic study involving phytogeography was carried out on two species of the genus-Terminalia in the Central Niger Delta Areas in River State. This research was aimed at establishing their biodynamic distribution and habitat in the study areas using the simple random sampling method based on standard procedure ...

  13. Proximate composition and basic phytochemical assessment of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The nut of the yellow variety had terpenoids and steroids present in it while the nut of the red variety had alkaloids present. Statistical analyses carried out showed that there were no significant differences (p≤0.05) between the two varieties based on their proximate composition. INTRODUCTION. Terminalia catappa is ...

  14. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nguessan, JD. Vol 66 (2013) - Articles Phytochemical screening and study of comparative antibacterial activity of aqueous and alcoholic extracts of the leaves and barks of Terminalia catappa on multiresistant strains. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1997-5902. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  15. A new species of the genus Pygophora Schiner from Laos (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Satoshi; Tachi, Takuji; Praxaysonbath, Bounthob; Suzuki, Dai

    2015-02-24

    Two species of the genus Pygophora Schiner are recognized from Laos. This is the first time the genus is recorded to the country. A new species, Pygophora laoensis sp. nov., is described and P. immaculipennis Frey is newly recorded. Male and female terminalia of both species are illustrated.

  16. Comparative Study of Pre-Germination Treatments and their Effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    superba, Albizia lebbek, Ziziphus spp, Tectona grandis, Eucalyptus pauciflora and several others (Turnbull and Doran, 1987). Physiological dormancy may be .... et al., (2001) who reported that seeds of Terminalia chebula soaked in cold water for 48 hours enhanced growth of seedlings height, number of leaves, stem collar ...

  17. EN 338 Strength Grade and Uncertainty Models of Material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the EN 338 strength class of Nigerian grown Terminalia superba timber specie was determined. This will enable the utilisation of the specie in the design of timber structures using Eurocode 5. The uncertainty models (mean, coefficients of variation and theoretical distribution models) of the tested specie were ...

  18. Grass species composition, yield and quality under and outside tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two-year study was conducted in lightly grazed areas of Matopos Research Station, Zimbabwe, to evaluate the impact of widely spaced trees on understorey grass composition, yield and quality. The study trees were Terminalia sericea and Acacia karroo. Ordination techniques using grass density and biomass as indices ...

  19. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenolic content distribution and antioxidant activities of Terminalia sericea Burch · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... YH Yang, RH Zhao, ZP Hao, L Li, C Xu, YY Cui, 65-71 ... MJG Burquez, MLJ Mosqueda, HR Mendoza, CIS Zarate, LC Miranda, TAC Sanchez, 106-111.

  20. jfewr ©2017 - jfewr Publications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    is the most preferred nest – building support in Abuja campus, Casuarina equisetifolia in Choba campus and. Terminalia mantaly at Delta campus. Some plant species such as ..... SH: Students' Hostel, LH: Lecture Hall, CP: Car Parks, OB: Office Block, FL Farmland, WC: Worship Centre, S: Shop, SF: Secondary. Forest.

  1. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chen, Chien-Chih. Vol 14, No 4 (2017) - Articles Neuroprotective effect of Terminalia chebula extracts and ellagic acid in PC12 cells. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0189-6016. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and ...

  2. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manikandan, M. Vol 2, No 3 (2008) - Articles Identification of Allelochemicals from Terminalia Chebula Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2070-0083. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL ...

  3. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rai, K B. Vol 15, No 3 (2014) - Articles Terminalia catappa, an anticlastogenic agent against MMS induced genotoxicity in the human lymphocyte culture and in bone marrow cells of Albino mice. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1110-8630. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  4. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 452 ... Vol 15, No 3 (2014), Terminalia catappa, an anticlastogenic agent against MMS induced genotoxicity in the human lymphocyte culture and in bone marrow cells of Albino mice, Abstract PDF. M S Ahmad, S Ahmad, M Arshad, K B Rai, M Afzal. Vol 18, No 4 (2017), A comparative study of mutation screening ...

  5. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ndakara, OE. Vol 4, No 3 (2011) - Articles Litterfall and Nutrient Returns in Isolated Stands of Persea gratissima (Avocado Pear) in the Rainforest Zone of Southern Nigeria Abstract PDF · Vol 5, No 1 (2012) - Articles Litterfall and Nutrient Returns in Isolated Stands of Terminalia catappa Trees in the Rainforest Area of ...

  6. In vitro study on biomineralization of biphasic calcium phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, we report the preparation of a bone graft material, having cylindrical shape, containing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), gelatin (G), chitosan (C) and Terminalia chebula (TC) extract. TC extract was used as a crosslinker that gives stability to bone graft when it is placed in SBF. The graft was stable in the SBF ...

  7. Relationship between species composition and homegarden size in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the data, Euphorbiaceae, Solanaceae, Rutaceae, Malvaceae, Caesalpiniaceae, Poaceae and Apocynaceae (in order of decreasing number of species) were the most frequent Families. Taxa such as Musa species, Vernonia amygdalina, Citrus species, Psidium guajava and Terminalia catappa were found to be the ...

  8. Hapalopilus nidulans (Polyporales: Polyporaceae a new record from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.K. Tiwari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hapalopilus nidulans (Polyporales: Polyporaceae is reported for the first time from India. It was collected on stored wood of Anogeissus latifolia, Chloroxylon swietenia, Ougeinia oojeinensis, Shorea robusta and Terminalia tomentosa from forest depots of Chhattisgarh, India. The species is being re-described on the basis of morphology, anatomy and cultural characters.

  9. Ajikah et al (11).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    species level such as Alchornea cordifolia,. Acrostichum aureum, Elaeis guineensis, Syzygium guineense and Terminalia catappa. Others were identified to the family level. These include the family: Poaceae, Adiantaceae, Asteraceae,. Arecaceae, Annonaceae, Caesalpiniaceae,. C y p e r a c e a e , C o m b r e t a c e a e ,.

  10. Adsorption isotherme de l'acide acétique par des charbons d'origine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption properties of six samples of carbons of which two are obtained from AYOUS (Triplochiton Scléroxylon), two from AKOM (Terminalia Superba) and two obtained commercially were studied from their adsorption isotherms of acetic acid at 30° and 45°C. This study has resulted in the determination of the two ...

  11. Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ELLA

    ABSTRACT. Height (H) and Diameter (D) data from Terminalia ivorensis stand were assessed to establish a relationship between height and stump diameter. Two hundred and sixteen (216) individual trees from eighteen randomly selected Temporary sample plots (TSPs) within a forty-year old plantation were used in study ...

  12. Physicochemical Analysis of the Aqueous Extracts of Six Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Six Nigerian Medicinal Plants ... Methods: Physicochemical determinations, including proximate analysis, were done by sensory .... Plant materials. Seeds of Picralima nitida; stem bark of. Detarium microcarpum; seeds of Aframomum melagueta; leaves of Terminalia catappa; pods and roots of Acacia nilotica; and stem.

  13. Control of Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott.) Attack on Milicia excelsa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    species plot (protected by mesh netting: T1), mixed-species plot (Milicia + Terminalia), mixed-species plot with foliar chemical treatment (T3), mono-species with foliar chemical treatment (T4) and untreated mono-species plot of Milicia excelsa ...

  14. Dendrochronology and bark anatomy of the frankincense tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolera Feyissa, M.

    2013-01-01

    Boswellia papyrifera(Burseraceae) trees grow in drylands south of the Sahara. In Ethiopia, it grows in seasonally dry Combretum-Terminalia woodlands. It is a source of frankincense, an economically important olio-gum resin used for cultural and religious ceremonies throughout the world and as raw

  15. Determination of Growth Rate and Age Structure of Boswellia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boswellia papyrifera is a multipurpose deciduous species that grows in Combretum – Terminalia deciduous woodlands of Ethiopia. It is widely known for its commercial frankincense production. The B. papyrifera woodland is under a problematic state of population decline due to heavy encroachment and unsustainable ...

  16. Gondwanamyia, a new empidoid (Diptera genus of uncertain placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Sinclair

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new minute-size empidoid fly genus, Gondwanamyia gen. n. and two new species (G. chilensis Cumming & Saigusa, sp. n., G. zealandica Sinclair & Brooks, sp. n. are described, illustrated, and their distributions mapped. The family and subfamily assignments remain uncertain, but features of the female terminalia potentially suggest Trichopezinae (Brachystomatidae.

  17. Phytogéographie

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Végétation de bas-fond Dominantes : Anogeissus leiocarpus ; Panicum anabaptistum. Dominantes de second rang : Hexalobus monopetalus, Securinega virosa, Sterculia setigera. Compagnes : Crossopteryx febrifuga, Detarium microcarpum, Prosopis africana, Lonchocarpus laxiflorus, Holarrhena floribunda, Sclerocarya birrea, Tamarindus indica, Terminalia avicennioides, Grewia flavescens, Grewia barteri, Combretum nigricans ; Sporobolus pyramidalis. À Ligazan, par exemple...

  18. Description of the female of Ctenodontina nairae Vieira (Diptera, Asilidae, Asilinae, with new distribution records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vieira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Description of the female of Ctenodontina nairae Vieira (Diptera, Asilidae, Asilinae, with new distribution records. The female of Ctenodontina nairae Vieira, 2012 is described for the first time. Description and illustrations of the habitus, wing and terminalia of the female are provided. The distribution is extended to Bolivia and Peru.

  19. Effects of Aqueous Root Bark Extracts of Anogeissusleiocarpus (DC Guill&Perrand TerminaliaavicennioidesGuill&Perr on Redox and Haematological Parameters of Diethylnitrosamine-Administered Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadu Kayode Salau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigated the protective effects of aqueous extracts of Anogeissusleiocarpus (DC Guill&Perr (family: Combretaceae and Terminaliaavicennioides Guill&Perr (family: Combretaceae root barks, as well as their 1:1 (w/w mixture on liver redox and haematological parameters of diethylnitrosamine-treated rats. Methods: Rats were orally administered distilled water, diethylnitrosamine (30 mg/kg body weight once a week on weeks 3 and 4, curcumin (200 mg/kg body weight, extracts and 1:1 mixture (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight for 4 weeks. Malondialdehyde, markers of oxidative stress and hematological indices were evaluated. Results: The extracts and their mixture significantly (P<0.05 reversed the diethylnitrosamine-induced alterations in the levels of liver malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutathione, vitamin C and platelet counts. The other haematological parameters (red blood cell count, haemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, white blood cell count, lymphocyte count and neutrophil count were not affected by diethylnitrosamine and extracts. Conclusion: The extracts possess antioxidant, hepatoprotective and haemoprotective activities that compared well with curcumin. These activities were better exhibited by the mixture than the individual extracts.

  20. [Structure and floristic composition of three oak forests in the northern region of the Central Cordillera in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Juan D; Vélez, Gladys; Yepes, Adriana P

    2009-12-01

    Andean ecosystems harbor a high floristic diversity, which is being threatened by human disturbances such us deforestation and by the expansion of the agricultural frontier. One of these ecosystems are the Andean oak forests dominated by Quercus humboldtii, a threatened species in Colombia. We assessed the floristic composition and structure of three Andean oak forests located in three localities (San Andrés de Cuerquia, Belmira and Guarne) of Antioquia. The main goal was to determine whether these forests showed similarities in their structure and floristic composition. In each site, a permanent plot of 5000 m2 (0.5 ha) was established. All trees with D > or = 10 cm were sampled and identified to species. The Importance Value Index (IVI) was calculated as the sum of relative density (DeR), dominance (DoR) and frequency (FR) of a species. Trees with 5 trees with D > or = 10 cm in the three forests, the number of species ranged from 18 to 54, whilst the number of individuals ranged from 326 to 680. The Guarne oak forest showed the highest species richness. In all sites, Q. humboldtii (Fagaceae) was the most important species in relation to the IVI, while Clusia sp. (Clusiaceae) and Myrsine coriaceae (Myrsinaceae) were the most important species in San Andrés de Cuerquia, Clethra fagifolia (Clethraceae) was important only in Belmira and Myrcia popayanensis (Myrtaceae) was important in Guarne. The families with the highest number of species were Fabaceae, Melastomataceae and Rubiaceae. Floristic similarity among places was low. The size distribution of trees had an inverse J-shape curve for all sites with changes in the abundance for size class. The three oak forests differed in their structure and floristic composition probably because of different disturbance degrees.

  1. Anticandidal efficacy of denture cleansing tablet, Triphala, Aloe vera, and Cashew leaf on complete dentures of institutionalized elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Pooja J.; Hegde, Vijaya; Gomes, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the number of dependent elderly, there is a need to introduce few natural products for denture cleansing, which are easily and economically available. Hence the aim of this study was to compare the anticandidal efficacy of denture cleansing tablet (sodium bicarbonate and sodium perborate monohydrate), Triphala (Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia belerica fruits powders in equal proportion), cashew leaf, Aloe vera and water (control) on complete dentures of institutionalized elderly. Study population consisted of 50 institutionalized elderly of Mangalore, Karnataka, with 10 in each group. Swabs were collected from the dentures before and after the use of denture cleansing tablet, Triphala, cashew leaf, Aloe vera, and water (control). Thereafter, the swabs were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar and the total candida counts were determined. Denture cleansing tablet and Triphala Churna showed a statistically significant reduction in Candida counts (P < 0.05). Denture cleansing tablet and Triphala Churna were found to be more effective. PMID:24812470

  2. Antimicrobial activity of Triphala on Lactobacilli and Candida albicans: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Chainani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine whether Triphala (Terminalia bellerica, Terminalia chebula, Emblica officinalis extract has an antimicrobial activity against Lactobacilli and Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Ethanolic extract of Triphala was prepared by using the cold extraction method. The extract was diluted with an inert solvent, dimethylformamide, to obtain 15 different concentrations of the extract. 0.2% chlorhexidine was used as a positive control and dimethylformamide was used as a negative control. The extract, along with the controls, was subjected to microbiological investigation to determine which concentration among the 15 different concentrations of the extract gave a wider inhibition zone against Lactobacilli and C. albicans. The zones of inhibition were measured in millimeters using a Vernier caliper. Results and Conclusions: Triphala extract demonstrated antimicrobial property against Lactobacilli and C. albicans with maximum zone of inhibition of 22 mm at 6% and 20 mm at 9%.

  3. Anticandidal efficacy of denture cleansing tablet, Triphala, Aloe vera, and Cashew leaf on complete dentures of institutionalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja J Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With an increase in the number of dependent elderly, there is a need to introduce few natural products for denture cleansing, which are easily and economically available. Hence the aim of this study was to compare the anticandidal efficacy of denture cleansing tablet (sodium bicarbonate and sodium perborate monohydrate, Triphala (Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia belerica fruits powders in equal proportion, cashew leaf, Aloe vera and water (control on complete dentures of institutionalized elderly. Study population consisted of 50 institutionalized elderly of Mangalore, Karnataka, with 10 in each group. Swabs were collected from the dentures before and after the use of denture cleansing tablet, Triphala, cashew leaf, Aloe vera, and water (control. Thereafter, the swabs were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar and the total candida counts were determined. Denture cleansing tablet and Triphala Churna showed a statistically significant reduction in Candida counts (P < 0.05. Denture cleansing tablet and Triphala Churna were found to be more effective.

  4. Role of Triphala in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda is considered as the "science of life," because the ancient Indian system of health care focused views of man and his illness. India has an age-old heritage of traditional herbal medicine. Conventional drugs usually provide effective antibiotic therapy for bacterial infections, but there is an increasing problem of antibiotic resistance and a continuing need for new solutions. Hence, now herbal drugs are being preferred to synthetic antibiotics. ′Triphala′ is a well-known powdered preparation in the Indian system of medicine (ISM. It consists of equal parts of the Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia belerica. Currently, Triphala is being extensively researched for its various therapeutic effects including its anti-caries, antioxidant, anti-collagenase, and anti-microbial activities. The present review will focus on the comprehensive appraisal of Triphala and its several applications in dentistry.

  5. Browse Title Index - African Journals Online

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L Zhong, Y Wang, W Peng, Y Liu, J Wan, S Yang, L Li, C Wu, X Zhou. Vol 16, No 5 (2017), Healing effect of Sanguisorba officinalis L extract on second-degree burns in rats, Abstract PDF. Xin Le, You-fen Fan. Vol 15, No 4 (2016), Healing effect of Terminalia chebula Retz extract on second-degree burns in rats, Abstract PDF.

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Few Medicinal Plants against Clinically Isolated Human Cariogenic Pathogens—An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Devapriya, D.; Sathish, Emmanuel S.; S. Jayasurya Kingsley; H. Shyla Jebashree

    2011-01-01

    Hexane, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol extracts of Psidium guajava, Terminalia chebula, Mimusops elengi and Achyranthes aspera were tested against the dental caries causing bacteria Streptococcus mutans and fungus Candida albicans isolated from caries infected patients. All the four extracts of P. guajava showed activity against both S. mutans and C. albicans. Maximum zone of inhibition was observed in ethyl acetate of P. guajava. The four extracts of T. chebula and M. elengi showed anti...

  7. Calycomyza hyptidis Spencer (Diptera,Agromyzidae: descriptions, redescriptions and first record in Ocimum basilicum (Lamiaceae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Rodrigues de Sousa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Calycomyza hyptidis Spencer (Diptera, Agromyzidae: descriptions, redescriptions and first record in Ocimum basilicum (Lamiaceae in Brazil. All phases of the leafminer Calycomyza hyptidis Spencer are for the first time described, including the larva, puparium and adult female. Illustrations are presented for male and female terminalia, mine, larva and pupa. The species is first recorded in leaves of Ocimum basilicum L. (Lamiaceae in Brazil.

  8. Rendimiento en aserrío y procesamiento primario de madera proveniente de plantaciones forestales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Quirós

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de determinar el rendimiento físico o factor de recuperación de madera aserrada en diferentes fases del aserrío y procesamiento primario en trozas de pequeñas dimensiones, se cuantificó el volumen de materia prima rolliza y de los productos aserrados resultantes de 416 trozas, cosechadas en el primer raleo comercial practicado a 3 plantaciones forestales. El estudio incluyó 294 trozas de melina (Gmelina arborea, 97 de acacia (Acacia mangium y 25 de terminalia (Terminalia ivorensis; con volúmenes correspondientes a 23, 11 y 7 m3 rollizos, respectivamente. La madera de acacia y terminalia fue obtenida de una corta intermedia realizada en enero del 2003 en plantaciones de 6 años, de la finca “La Tite”, en La Luisa de Pocosol, San Carlos. Las trozas de melina resultaron de un aclareo de refinamiento, efectuado en una plantación de 8 años, en Río Grande de Paquera, Puntarenas. El rendimiento físico se estimó como el cociente entre el volumen de productos resultante y el correspondiente volumen de madera rolliza. Entre las fases de procesamiento industrial, el estudio incluyó el aserrío, recanteo, despuntado y cepillado. Los rendimientos determinados para melina, acacia y terminalia fueron 39, 30, y 27%, respectivamente. El mayor porcentaje de pérdida en volumen se registró en el paso de madera rolliza a madera aserrada, el cual representó como promedio el 51% del volumen de madera en trozas.

  9. Contributions to the Mosquito Fauna of Southeast Asia. V. Genus Aedes, Subgenus Diceromyia Theobald in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    cereal setae absent. PUPA. The pupae of the Oriental species do not, at this time, pre- sent any clear-cut subgeneric characters. They do, however, have...Northern Rhodesia) and from the Oriental Region: BURMA, CEYLON, INDIA(mainland and Nicobar Islands), INDONESIA, WEST MALAYSIA , PHILIPPINES...bearing several teeth and the absence of cereal setae on the paraproct (the characters of the terminalia fit into Section B, Subsec- tion 3 of the

  10. Safety evaluation of Bon-sant? cleanser? polyherbal in male Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    O.E. Kale; Awodele, O.

    2016-01-01

    Background The potential harm of medicinal herbs has been recently observed following herbal toxicity studies after ingestion of polyherbal remedies. This was the rationale for the food and drug regulatory agency decision for thorough safety evaluation of herbal medicines. Androgenic, antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory potentials as well as chemical compositions of extracts of massularia acuminata, terminalia ivorensis, anogeissus leiocarpus and macuna pruriens respectively have bee...

  11. A NEW SPECIES OF CHLEROGAS FROM THE ANDES OF CENTRAL COLOMBIA (HYMENOPTERA: HALICTIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engel M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTA new species of the long-headed bee genus Chlerogas Vachal (Halictinae:Augochlorini is described and fi gured from a male captured at high elevation in centralColombia. Chlerogas tatamaensis Engel & Gonzalez, new species, is distinguishedfrom its congeners on the basis of integumental coloration and sculpturing as wellas features of the male terminalia. A revised key to the species of Chlerogas isprovided.

  12. DJODJOUWIN 1.xps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP Pro 2000

    La présente étude vise à analyser le comportement de 7 espèces végétales ligneuses : Khaya senegalensis,. Khaya grandifoliola, Holoptelea grandis, Afzelia africana, Terminalia superba, Gmelina arborea et Tectona grandis introduites en plantations d'enrichissement sous 3 types de couvert végétal et de sol. A cet effet, 3.

  13. COMPOSIÇÃO QUÍMICA E TEMPERATURA DE CRISTALIZAÇÃO DE ÉSTERES OBTIDOS DE QUATRO ÓLEOS VEGETAIS EXTRAÍDOS DE SEMENTES DE PLANTAS DO CERRADO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Pierezana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The seed oils from four plants (Scheelea phalerata, Butia capitata, Syagrus romanzoffiana, Terminalia cattapa found in Mato Grosso do Sul were extracted at good yields. Alkaline transesterification of these seed oils to esters using methanol and ethanol was studied and also produced good yields. Oleic acid (30.5/32.3%, lauric acid (30.7/32.9% methyl and ethyl esters, were the main components of transesterification of the oils from Scheelea phalerata and Syagrus romanzoffiana. Lauric acid (42.2%, capric acid (15.9% and caprylic acid (14.6% methyl and ethyl esters were the main ester components of transesterification of the oil from Butia capitata. Oleic acid (37.8%, palmitic acid (33.5% and linoleic acid (22.6% methyl and ethyl esters were the main components of transesterification of oil from Terminalia catappa. Based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC studies, the first crystallization peak temperature of esters was observed. Esters derived from oils of the family Arecaceae (Scheelea phalerata, Butia capitata, Syagrus romanzoffiana showed the lowest points of crystallization, despite having high levels of saturated fat. Esters of Terminalia cattapa oil, rich in unsaturated fat, showed the highest crystallization temperature. This difference in behavior is probably related to the high concentration of esters derived from lauric acid and palmitic acid.

  14. Potential herbs and herbal nutraceuticals: food applications and their interactions with food components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shaik Abdul; Panjagari, Narender Raju; Singh, R R B; Patil, G R

    2015-01-01

    Since ancient times, herbs have been used as natural remedies for curing many physiological disorders. Traditional medicinal literature appreciated their value as nature's gift to mankind for the healing of illnesses. Some of the herbs have also been used for culinary purposes, and few of them have been used in cheese manufacture both as coagulating agents and flavor ingredients. Scientific investigations regarding biological activity and toxicity of chemical moieties present in many herbs have been carried out over a period of time. Consequently, literature related to the use of herbs or their functional ingredients in foods and their interaction with food constituents has been appearing in recent times. This article presents the information regarding some biologically active constituents occurring in commonly used herbs, viz., alkaloids, anthraquinones, bitters, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, and essential oils, their physiological functionalities, and also the description of few herbs of importance, viz., Asparagus racemosus, Withania somnifera, Bacopa monniera, Pueraria tuberose, Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia belerica, Terminalia arjuna, and Aloe vera, in terms of their chemical composition, biological functionality, and toxicity. This article also reviews the use of herbs and their active ingredients in foods and their interactions with different food constituents.

  15. Population Status of Commercially Important Medicinal Plants in Dehradun Forest Division, Uttarakhand (India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninad B. RAUT

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of forest management in the tropics, in recent decades, has shifted from timber production to biodiversity conservation and maintenance of life support system. However, past forestry practices have greatly influenced the structure of plant communities, preponderance of foreign invasive species, populations of high value medicinal plants as well as other non-wood forest products. We assessed the abundance and distribution of medicinal plants in managed and undisturbed forests of Dehradun Forest Division (DFD, Uttarakhand (India. A total of 80 transects (each 1 km long were laid in various categories of forest types in DFD. This paper deals with distribution, availability and regeneration status of five commercially important species viz., Justicia adhatoda, Aegle marmelos, Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia bellirica and Terminalia chebula, across different forest types. The study reveals that open canopy forest patches, Lantana infested patches and Acacia catechu-Dalbergia sissoo (Khair -Shisam woodlands in the eastern part of the DFD have excellent potential for the production and sustainable harvest of Justicia adhatoda. Areas those are less suitable for timber production viz., open hill forests, have greater potential for conservation and development of Aegle marmelos, Phyllanthus emblica and Terminalia bellirica. For the production and management of high value medicinal plants in the DFD these ecological considerations need to be kept in mind.

  16. A randomized field trial to determine the effect of a mouthrinse formulated from ethanol extract of terminaliachebula fruit on salivary parameters among 12-15 year old school children of Belgaum City, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma S Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Dental caries is a multifactorial disease involving interplay of numerous factors such as salivary Streptococcus mutans, flow rate, buffer capacity, pH etc. Hence any therapeutic agent influencing these parameters can be effectively used to interrupt the dental caries process. Thus the present study was conducted to determine the effect of mouthrinse formulated from ethanol extract of Terminalia chebula fruit on salivary parameters. Materials & Method: Ethanol extract of Terminalia chebula fruit was used to formulate the mouthrinse. Sixty randomly selected children participated in the study. Salivary parameters were assessed at baseline, and at various intervals post rinsing. Data was analyzed using ANCOVA and Wilcoxon matched pairs test. Results: No significant variation was observed in the salivary parameters between the two groups at baseline and 5 minutes postrinsing. There was an increase of 5.7%, 4.69%, 3.39% in salivary flow rate, pH and buffer capacity respectively in the study group at 60 minutes as compared to baseline values. Conclusions: Mouthrinse of Ethanol extract of Terminalia chebula has a significant effect on salivary parameters which can help counter the demineralization process.

  17. Thai ethnomedicinal plants as resistant modifying agents for combating Acinetobacter baumannii infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phatthalung Pinanong

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts Background Acinetobacter baumannii is well-recognized as an important nosocomial pathogen, however, due to their intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics, treatment options are limited. Synergistic effects between antibiotics and medicinal plants, particularly their active components, have intensively been studied as alternative approaches. Methods Fifty-one ethanol extracts obtained from 44 different selected medicinal plant species were tested for resistance modifying agents (RMAs of novobiocin against A. baumannii using growth inhibition assay. Results At 250 μg/ml, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Punica granatum, Quisqualis indica, Terminalia bellirica, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia sp. that possessed low intrinsic antibacterial activity significantly enhanced the activity of novobiocin at 1 μg/ml (1/8xminimum inhibitory concentration against this pathogen. Holarrhena antidysenterica at 7.8 μg/ml demonstrated remarkable resistant modifying ability against A. baumannii in combination with novobiocin. The phytochemical study revealed that constituents of this medicinal plant contain alkaloids, condensed tannins, and triterpenoids. Conclusion The use of Holarrhena antidysenterica in combination with novobiocin provides an effective alternative treatment for multidrug resistant A. baumannii infections.

  18. Effect of saline solutions and salt stress on seed germination of some tropical forest tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Agboola

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of several saline solutions (as given by six salts and salt stress (as given by 0.1 - 2m sodium chloride solutions on the germination of seeds of six selected tropical forest tree species was investigated. Saline solutions (0.2m of the six salts used had highly significant effects on seed germination in most of the tree species. Sodium sulphate (Na2So4 permitted germination in the seeds of Ceiba pentandra and Tectona grandis presoaked in its 0.2m solution for 36 and 48h respectively. The Zinc sulphate (ZnSO4 solution enhanced the germination of seeds of Terminalia ivorensis and Terminalia superba. Solution of Potassium per Manganate favoured the germination of seeds of T. grandis, T. ivorensis and T. superba. In general, increase in molar concentration of NaCl adversely affected the germination rate of seeds. Sees of the two Terminalia species could withstand NaCl salt stress. Seeds of T. grandis have high ability to withstand salt stress comparatively.

  19. Magnoliophyta of the partial faunal reserve of Pama, Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guinko, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The partial faunal reserve of Pama is situated in the province of Kompienga, in the South-East of BurkinaFaso, with typical Sudanian savanna vegetation. Adjacent to the Arli National Park and the Pendjari National Park, it ispart of the so-called WAP complex, one of the largest wildlife areas in West Africa. Up to now, only little has beenknown about its flora. The present study aimed at reducing this gap in knowledge, and represents an important tool forconservation and research. The list of species was compiled from the surveys carried out from 2001 to 2004, additionalrelevé data, and herbarium specimens. We found 450 species, which belong to 244 genera and 73 families. The mostspecies-rich family is Poaceae (83 species, followed by Fabaceae (64, Cyperaceae (24, Rubiaceae (22, Euphorbiaceae(20, Combretaceae (15, Asteraceae (14, Caesalpiniaceae (14, Mimosaceae (12, and Convolvulaceae (11.

  20. Consumo de hojas por herbívoros en manglares del estuario del Río Dagua, Costa Pacífica Colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel C. Romero

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaf consumption by herbivores in mangroves of the Dagua river estuary, Pacific coast of Colombia. Herbivore leaf consumption of various mangrove species in relation to environmental factors and leaf hardness were studied in the Dagua river estuary, Colombia. Leaf consumption and damage were assessed by measuring the percentage of area attacked by herbivores, distinguishing between consumption and damage. The species that suffered the highest consumption, such as Avicennia germinans (Avicenniaceae and Laguncularia racemosa (Combretaceae, had softer leaves and less herbivore species when compared with Rhizophora spp. (Rhizophoraceae and Pelliciera rhizophorae (Theaceae. The abundance and diversity of leaf grazing and its variability among mangrove species in the Dagua River estuary, show the importance of the trophic dynamics of live vegetable matter, in spite of their relatively low contribution to removing organic matter. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (4: 1205-1214. Epub 2006 Dec. 15

  1. Arqueobotânica de um sambaqui sul-brasileiro: integrando indícios sobre o paleoambiente e o uso de recursos florestais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Ferreira de Melo Júnior

    Full Text Available Resumo Madeiras in natura são testemunhos raros em sítios arqueológicos de tipologia sambaqui. A partir da evidência de estacas encharcadas de madeira na base do sítio, objetivou-se conhecer as espécies vegetais e a sua funcionalidade no contexto arqueológico do sambaqui Cubatão I, localizado na região norte de Joinville, Santa Catarina, e com base datada de 3480 ± 60 AP. A caracterização da madeira foi realizada por meio de preparações histológicas e seguiu a terminologia proposta pela International Association of Wood Anatomists (IAWA. A determinação dos táxons deu-se mediante comparação em coleção de referência. Foram reconhecidas diferentes espécies madeiráveis de ocorrência natural nos ambientes de manguezal, floresta de terras baixas e restinga. Destacaram-se os seguintes táxons: Andira sp. (Fabaceae, Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae, Bauhinia sp. (Fabaceae, Buchenavia sp. (Combretaceae, Handroanthus sp. (Bignoniaceae, Laguncularia racemosa (Combretaceae, Ocotea sp. (Lauraceae, Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae, Schinus sp. (Anacardiaceae e Xylopia (Annonaceae. Entre as propriedades físicas que conferem qualidade às madeiras identificadas, destaca-se a densidade básica, com valores médios a altos em sua maioria, indicando seu uso potencial em elementos com função estrutural. Dentre as possíveis interpretações, os resultados evidenciam o uso de madeiras para a construção de uma plataforma projetada para dar sustentação ao sítio, possivelmente em função das características plásticas dos solos de manguezal.

  2. Revision of the Neotropical Xanthandrus Verral (Diptera, Syrphidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borges Zuleica M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Neotropical genus Xanthandrus Verral, 1901 is revised. Six species are redescribed: X. bucephalus (Wiedemann, 1830, X. cubanus Fluke, 1936, X. mellinoides (Macquart, 1846, X. mexicanus Curran, 1930, X. nitidulus Fluke, 1937, and X. plaumanni Fluke, 1937. Three species are included based on original descriptions: X. flavomaculatus Shannon, 1927, X. palliatus (Fluke, 1945, and X. simplex (Loew, 1861. New synonyms proposed: Argentinomyia longicornis (Walker, 1837 = Xanthandrus biguttatus Hull, 1945 syn. nov., and Xanthandrus bucephalus (Wiedemann, 1830 = Melanostoma quadrinotata Bigot, 1884 syn. nov. Description of terminalia, a key for Neotropical species, and illustrations are also presented.

  3. Inventario taxonómico de drosophilidae (Diptera) en el Parque Nacional Yasuni, Amazonia Ecuatoriana

    OpenAIRE

    Acurio,Andrea Elizabeth; Rafael,Violeta Lily

    2009-01-01

    En el Parque Nacional Yasuní, reconocido como un sector de alto endemismo y biodiversidad, ubicado al noroeste de la Amazonía Ecuatoriana se realizó el inventario taxonómico de la familia Drosophilidae. Para la captura de los individuos se utilizaron trampas con atrayente de banano y solución de levadura de cerveza. La identificación taxonómica se realizó usando caracteres morfológicos y la terminalia de los machos. En total se colectaron 7425 individuos clasificados en 34 especies de los gén...

  4. Activation of charcoal from wood of some Philippine trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanega, S.M.; Villanueva, E.P.; Banag-Laxamana, N.F.

    1974-01-01

    In further studies on the adsorptive capacity of charcoals made from Philippine woods, charcoals of Agathis philippinesis and Terminalia copelandii were sufficiently activated by heating with ZnCl/sub 2/ at 700/sup 0/C for 4 hours to make them as adsorptive as the commercial active carbons tested. ZnCl/sub 2/ was not, however, as effective in activating charcoals of Dipterocarpus grandiflorus, Leucaena leucocephaloa (L. glauca), Shorea squamata, S. polysperma and Samanea saman. Factors affecting development of adsorptive capacity in the charcoals studied probably included the chemical activator used, the temperature and the duration of heating; an intrinsic factor characteristic of each wood species may also have been involved.

  5. Screening of 34 Indian medicinal plants for antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal Samy, R; Ignacimuthu, S; Sen, A

    1998-09-01

    A total of 34 plant species belonging to 18 different families, selected on the basis of folklore medicinal reports practised by the tribal people of Western Ghats, India, were assayed for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, and Pseudomonas aerogenes (gram-negative bacteria) at 1000-5000 ppm using the disc diffusion method. Of these 16 plants showed activity; among them Cassia fistula, Terminalia arjuna and Vitex negundo showed significant antibacterial activity against the tested bacteria. Our findings confirm the traditional therapeutic claims for these herbs.

  6. IN VITRO ANTIOXIDANT AND α-AMYLASE INHIBITION ACTIVITIES OF PANCHSAKAR CHURNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar B.S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Panchsakar Churna is the composition of Cassia angustifolia, Terminalia chebula, Zingiber officinale, Foeniculum vulgare and Saindhava lavana. Aqueous extract of churna was used to investigate antioxidant activity by ferrous ion chelating assay and ferric reducing power and alpha amylase inhibition activity by dinitrosalicylic acid method (DNSA. Aqueous extract of churna showed maximum ferrous chelating activity - 42.01 and ferric reducing power - 1.5 and 83.33 % of inhibition protein denaturation at 1000 µg/ml. Panchsakar churna showed significant antioxidant and alpha amylase inhibition activities.

  7. Vegetation structure characteristics and relationships of Kalahari woodlands and savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Privette, JL

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available modeling has become widespread (e.g., Potter et al., 1993, 1998; Sellers et al., 1996). Nevertheless, knowledge of vegetation canopy struc- ture remains incomplete in many remote areas, such as sub-Saharan Africa. First, comparatively small changes... 929 460 Colophospermum mopane woodland with patches of Terminalia sericea thicket Harry Oppenheimer Okavango Research Centre; Measurements were 3km east of a permanent flux tower 23.591E Okwa River Crossing, Botswana 22.411S 1089 407 Open Kalahari...

  8. Populações de minhocas em sistemas agroflorestais com café convencional e orgânico Earthworms populations in agroforestry systems with conventional and organic coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria de Aquino

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste estudo, determinar se as populações das minhocas são alteradas em função do manejo do café (Coffea arabica em Turrialba, CostaRica. Os seguintes sistemas de cultivo do café foram estudados: a pleno sol (PS e sombreado com eritrina, Erythrina poeppigiana (E; terminalia, Terminalia amazonia (T e cashá, Chloroleucon eurycyclum (Ab. A hipótese foi de que o manejo orgânico do café e o fornecimento da serapilheira de melhor qualidade favoreceria a diversidade, a densidade e a biomassa das minhocas. As populações das minhocas foram alteradas, em função do manejo com insumos sintéticos ou orgânicos , sendo a densidade menor no café a pleno sol. Entre as espécies utilizadas no sombreamento, a eritrina parece limitar a abundância das minhocas. Contudo, favorece a diversidade das mesmas, tendo sido registradas duas espécies de minhocas com papéis ecológicos diferenciados, Pontoscolex corethrurus, endogeica e Metaphire californica, anécica; ao contrário dos demais tratamentos, onde somente foi encontrada a primeira espécie, considerada cosmopolita com distribuição pantropical.The aim of this study was to determine whether the populations of the earthworms are altered by coffee systems in Turrialba, Costa Rica. The following coffee management systems were studied: the sun and shading with Erythrina poeppigiana; terminalia, Terminalia amazonia or cashá, Chloroleucon eurycyclum. The hypothesis was that the organic management of the coffee and the litter input of better quality would favor the diversity, the density and the biomass of the earthworms. The populations of earthworms were differentiated with the synthetic or organic input. However, the density was lower in the coffee under the sun anyone the used species in the agroforestry, the eritrina seems to limit the abundance of the earthworms, but it favors the diversity of the same ones, being registered two species of earthworms with differentiated

  9. Timber tree regeneration along abandoned logging roads in a tropical Bolivian forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, J.; Severiche, W.; Fredericksen, T.

    2007-01-01

    -eastern Bolivia. Some species benefited from increased light intensities on abandoned logging roads. Others benefited from low densities of competing vegetation on roads with compacted soils. This was the case for the small-seeded species Ficus boliviana C.C. Berg and Terminalia oblonga (Ruiz & Pav.) Steud. Some......Sustainable management of selectively logged tropical forests requires that felled trees are replaced through increased recruitment and growth. This study compares road track and roadside regeneration with regeneration in unlogged and selectively logged humid tropical forest in north...

  10. LEAF LITTER BREAKDOWN RATES AND ASSOCIATED FAUNA OF NATIVE AND EXOTIC TREES USED IN NEOTROPICAL RIPARIA REFORESTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Gutiérrez Isaza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A signature of globalization is the prevalence of exotic trees along reforested urban and rural riparian zones in the Neotropics, but little is known about the instream processing of its leaf litter. In this study, leaf litter breakdown rates were measured during 35 days using mesh bags within a reference headwater stream for seven exotic and three native tree species commonly used in urban and rural reforestation. Artocarpus altilis, Schefflera actinophylla and Terminalia catappa scored the highest mass loss rates (>85 %; mean life: t50 85 %; vida media: t50

  11. A novel high-performance liquid chromatography-electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of guggulsterones, piperine and gallic acid in Triphala guggulu.

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    Muguli, Ganesh; Vadaparthi, P R Rao; Ramesh, B; Gowda, Vishakante; Paramesh, Rangesh; Jadhav, Atul N; Babu, K Suresh

    2015-05-01

    "Triphalaguggulu" is an important Ayurvedic formulation comprising of Guggulu, that is, Commiphora wightii (Arn.) Bhandari as a base wherein powdered fruits of triphala, that is, Phyllanthus emblica L., Terminalia bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb and Terminalia chebula Retz, along with powdered fruit of Piper longum L. are compounded. This polyherbal preparation has been strongly recommended in chronic inflammation, piles, and fistula. However, due to the complexity of compound formulation standardization of commercial products is challenging. In the present communication marker-based standardization of "Triphalaguggulu" preparation using gallic acid (for triphala), piperine (for P. longum L.) and guggulsterones (for guggulu) is reported. These compounds of diverse chemistry were successfully separated on a Waters HR-C18 column by isocratic elution with methanol and water (80:20 v/v) as mobile phase at the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min coupled with photodiode array detector. These optimal chromatographic conditions were used for simultaneous quantification of gallic acid, guggulsterones (E and Z) and piperine in commercial samples by high-performance liquid chromatography-electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry and method was validated as per ICH guidelines.

  12. Evaluation of the Effects of Some Brazilian Medicinal Plants on the Production of TNF-α and CCL2 by THP-1 Cells

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    Grasielle S. Gusman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several plant species are traditionally used in Brazil to treat various inflammatory diseases. Tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 are key inflammatory mediators in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis, respectively; nevertheless, only a few extracts have been assayed against these targets. We herein report the effect of 19 plant extracts on TNF-α and CCL2 release by lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- stimulated THP-1 cells, a human monocytic leukemia cell line, along with their radical scavenging activity on DPPH. The extracts of Caryocar brasiliense, Casearia sylvestris, Coccoloba cereifera, and Terminalia glabrescens inhibited TNF-α production in a concentration-dependent manner. Fractionation of these extracts potentiated the anti-TNF-α effect, which was shown to concentrate in polar fractions, mainly composed by polyphenols. Significant CCL2 inhibition was elicited by Lippia sidoides and Terminalia glabrescens extracts, whose fractionation resulted in highly active low polar fractions. All assayed extracts showed strong radical scavenging activity, but antioxidant activity did not correlate with inhibition of TNF-α or CCL2 production. Our results allowed identifying extracts with selective capacity to block cytokine production; therefore, further purification of these extracts may yield molecules that could be useful in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  13. An herbal formulation for hemorrhoids treatment

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    S. Dehdari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Hemorrhoids is the most painful rectal disease. Straining and pregnancy seem playing chief roles in the development of hemorrhoids. Symptoms of hemorrhoids may include bleeding, inflammation and pain. Despite current medical efforts, many discomforts of hemorrhoids have not been handled. The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate Itrifal-e muqil (IM tablet to achieve desired pharmaceutical properties. Method: Quality control tests of Allium ampeloperasum L, Commiphora mukul (Hook. ex Stocks Engl., Phyllanthus emblica L., Terminalia chebula Retz. and Terminalia bellerica Retz. were performed. Afterwards, different formulations were prepared and their physical properties were evaluated. Subsequently, the formulation was coated and its physicochemical characteristics were assessed. Result: All of the herbs demonstrated good results in quality control tests according to United State Pharmacopeia (USP. Formulation-1 that was completely prepared based on explained manufacturing process of IM in traditional medicine manuscripts did not show suitable pharmaceutical properties. Among different formulations, Formulation-3 that consisted of A. ampeloperasum, C. mukul, P. emblica, T. chebula and T. bellerica, displayed best outcomes through different tests. Conclusion: Modern pharmaceutical approaches can excellently be adapted for IM preparations.

  14. The efficacy and safety of herbal medicines used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia; a systematic review.

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    Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Nayebi, Neda; Moradi, Leila; Mehri, Avin; Larijani, Bagher; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the efficacy and safety of effective herbal medicines in the management of hyperlipidemia in human. PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and IranMedex databases were searched up to 11th May 2010. The search terms were "hyperlipidemia" and ("herbal medicine" or "medicine traditional", "extract plant") without narrowing or limiting search elements. All of the human studies on the effects of herbs with the key outcome of change in lipid profiles were included. Fifty three relevant clinical trials were reviewed for efficacy of plants. This study showed significant decrease in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol after treatment with Daming capsule (DMC), chunghyul-dan, Glycyrrhiza glabra, garlic powder (Allicor), black tea, green tea, soy drink enriched with plant sterols, licorice, Satureja khuzestanica, Monascus purpureus Went rice, Fenugreek, Commiphora mukul (guggul), Achillea wilhelmsii C. Koch, Ningzhi capsule (NZC), cherry, compositie salviae dropping pill (CSDP), shanzha xiaozhi capsule, Ba-wei-wan (hachimijiogan), rhubarb stalk, Silybum marianum, Rheum Ribes and Jingmingdan granule (primrose oil). Conflicting data exist for red yeast rice, garlic and guggul. No significant adverse effect or mortality were observed except in studies with DMC, guggul, and Terminalia belerica, Terminalia chebula, Emblica officinalis, ginger, and garlic powder (Allium sativum). Amongst reviewed studies, 22 natural products were found effective in the treatment of hyperlipidemia that deserve further works to isolate and characterization of their constituents to reach novel therapeutic and more effective agents.

  15. Anti-Proteus activity of some South African medicinal plants: their potential for the prevention of rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Cock, I E; van Vuuren, S F

    2014-02-01

    A wide variety of herbal remedies are used in traditional African medicine to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammation. Thirty-four extracts from 13 South African plant species with a history of ethnobotanical usage in the treatment of inflammation were investigated for their ability to control two microbial triggers for RA (Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris). Twenty-nine of the extracts (85.3 %) inhibited the growth of P. mirabilis and 23 of them tested (67.7 %) inhibited the growth of P. vulgaris. Methanol and water extracts of Carpobrotus edulis, Lippia javanica, Pelargonium viridflorum, Ptaeroxylon obliquum, Syzygium cordatum leaf and bark, Terminalia pruinoides, Terminalia sericea, Warburgia salutaris bark and an aqueous extract of W. salutaris leaf were effective Proteus inhibitors, with MIC values Proteus properties reported here. All extracts with Proteus inhibitory activity were also either non-toxic, or of low toxicity in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. The low toxicity of these extracts and their inhibitory bioactivity against Proteus spp. indicate their potential for blocking the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Immunomodulatory Effects of Triphala and its Individual Constituents: A Review

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    Belapurkar, Pranoti; Goyal, Pragya; Tiwari-Barua, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    The role of plant extracts and Ayurvedic polyherbal preparations in treating various ailments has been acknowledged since time immemorial. Studies based on the effect of these extracts in treatment of different diseases have also been well documented. Indian medicinal literature also emphasizes the synergistic effect of polyherbal drugs in restoring and rejuvenating immune system. This review focuses on the immunomodulatory potential of the polyherbal preparation, Triphala and its three constituents, Terminalia bellerica, Terminalia chebula and Emblica officinalis. The role of Triphala and its extract has been emphasized in stimulating neutrophil function. Under stress condition such as noise, Triphala significantly prevents elevation of IL-4 levels as well as corrects decreased IL-2 and IFN-γ levels. Under the condition of inflammatory stress its immunosuppressive activity is attributed to its inhibitory action on complement system, humoral immunity, cell mediated immunity and mitogen-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation. The aqueous and alcoholic extracts of the individual constituents reportedly enhance especially the macrophage activation due to their free radical scavenging activity and the ability to neutralize reactive oxygen species. This study thus concludes the use of Triphala and its three individual constituents as potential immunostimulants and/or immunosuppressants further suggests them to be a better alternative for allopathic immunomodulators. PMID:25593379

  17. Caracterización química de los extractos colorantes de siete especies forestales y del fijador natural, utilizado en 19 comunidades indígenas de Ucayali, Perú

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    Luisa Riveros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó la caracterización química de las sustancias colorantes provenientes de las 07 especies y del fijador natural identificadas en la primera parte de la investigación, y que son utilizados como materia prima para el teñido de telas y artesanías por 19 comunidades indígenas de la Región Ucayali. Estas especies son: Trichilia maynasiana, Trichilia poeppigiana, Swietenia macrophylla, Buchenavia parvifolia, Terminalia oblonga,  Terminalia sp., y Picramnia juniniana. Los tintes y cortezas de estas especies sometidas a un tamizaje fitoquímico presentaron mayormente taninos, lactonas y flavonoides, en diferentes concentraciones, como principales metabolitos, mientras que la especie Picramia juniniana “ami”, de coloración lila, presento básicamente quinonas. En la arcilla empleada como fijador, denominada greda, barro especial o “mano”, se encontraron 32 elementos químicos con predominancia de silicio y aluminio con un pH ácido, mientras que el fijador reacciona con el tinte formando complejos denominados quelatos los cuales fijan el color sobre las fibras naturales.

  18. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

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    Yoko Miyasaki

    Full Text Available The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii.

  19. A comparison of woody browse selection by hand-raised, boma-adapted and wild black rhinoceros, Diceros bicornis, L. in Matusadona National Park, Zimbabwe

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    G. Matipano

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Differences in woody browse selection between hand-raised (and subsequently released, boma-adapted and wild black rhinoceros, Diceros bicornis, L. were studied in Matusadona National Park between December 1999 and July 2000. Boma-adapted rhinoceros were animals that were subjected to hand-raising and were kept in bomas (enclosures over night. The feeding behaviour was different between the three rhinoceros groups. All rhinoceros groups utilised and selected for a few browse species in common, at different preference levels in the same habitat types according to season. Wild rhinoceroses browsed most in Colophospermum-Terminalia-Combretum woodland in the wet season and in thicket in the dry season. Hand-raised rhinoceroses browsed most in Colophospermum-Terminalia-Combretum woodland and boma-adated rhinos in thickets in both the wet and the early dry seasons. Hand-raised and bomaadapted rhinos changed their habitats less for browse selection than wild rhinos. This can be ascribed to a relative restriction of home range in the hand-raised group and a herding effect for the boma-adapted animals. These situations might have accounted for differences in seasonal browse selection by the rhinoceros groups.

  20. In vitro antiplasmodial and cytotoxic properties of some medicinal plants from western Burkina Faso

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    Souleymane Sanon

    2013-03-01

    Methods: Crude dichloromethane, methanol, water-methanol, aqueous and alkaloids extracts were prepared for 12 parts of 10 plants. Chloroquine-resistant malaria strain K1 was used for the in vitro sensibility assay. The Plasmodium lactacte dehydrogenase technique was used to determine the 50% inhibitory concentration of parasites activity (IC50. The cytotoxic effects were determined with HepG2 cells, using the tetrazolium-based colorimetric technique, and the selectivity index (SI was calculated. Results: Sixty crude extracts were prepared. Seven extracts from Terminalia avicenoides showed IC50  1. The other plants have mostly moderate or no antimalarial effects. Some extracts from Cordia myxa, Ficus capraefolia and Opilia celtidifolia showed cytotoxicity, with an SI ranging between 0.4 and 0.9. Conclusion: Our study showed a good antiplasmodial in vitro activity of Terminalia avicenoides, Combretum collinum and Ficus capraefolia. These three plants may contain antiplasmodial molecules that could be isolated by bio-guided phytochemical studies.

  1. Therapeutic Uses of Triphala in Ayurvedic Medicine

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    Denniston, Kate; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The aim of this article is to review the current literature on the therapeutic uses and efficacy of Triphala. Herbal remedies are among the most ancient medicines used in traditional systems of healthcare such as Ayurveda. Triphala, a well-recognized and highly efficacious polyherbal Ayurvedic medicine consisting of fruits of the plant species Emblica officinalis (Amalaki), Terminalia bellerica (Bibhitaki), and Terminalia chebula (Haritaki), is a cornerstone of gastrointestinal and rejuvenative treatment. Methods: A search of the PubMed database was conducted. Results: In addition, numerous additional therapeutic uses described both in the Ayurvedic medical literature and anecdotally are being validated scientifically. In addition to laxative action, Triphala research has found the formula to be potentially effective for several clinical uses such as appetite stimulation, reduction of hyperacidity, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating, antibacterial, antimutagenic, adaptogenic, hypoglycemic, antineoplastic, chemoprotective, and radioprotective effects, and prevention of dental caries. Polyphenols in Triphala modulate the human gut microbiome and thereby promote the growth of beneficial Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus while inhibiting the growth of undesirable gut microbes. The bioactivity of Triphala is elicited by gut microbiota to generate a variety of anti-inflammatory compounds. Conclusions: This review summarizes recent data on pharmacological properties and clinical effects of Triphala while highlighting areas in need of additional investigation and clinical development. PMID:28696777

  2. Caracterización química de los extractos colorantes de siete especies forestales y del fijador natural, utilizado en 19 comunidades indígenas de Ucayali, Perú

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    Luisa Riveros

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó la caracterización química de las sustancias colorantes provenientes de las 07 especies y del fijador natural identificadas en la primera parte de la investigación, y que son utilizados como materia prima para el teñido de telas y artesanías por 19 comunidades indígenas de la Región Ucayali. Estas especies son: Trichilia maynasiana, Trichilia poeppigiana, Swietenia macrophylla, Buchenavia parvifolia, Terminalia oblonga,  Terminalia sp., y Picramnia juniniana. Los tintes y cortezas de estas especies sometidas a un tamizaje fitoquímico presentaron mayormente taninos, lactonas y flavonoides, en diferentes concentraciones, como principales metabolitos, mientras que la especie Picramia juniniana “ami”, de coloración lila, presento básicamente quinonas. En la arcilla empleada como fijador, denominada greda, barro especial o “mano”, se encontraron 32 elementos químicos con predominancia de silicio y aluminio con un pH ácido, mientras que el fijador reacciona con el tinte formando complejos denominados quelatos los cuales fijan el color sobre las fibras naturales.

  3. Triphala: The Thai traditional herbal formulation for cancer treatment

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    Ariyaphong Wongnoppavich

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Thai herbal plants are widely accepted in alternative medicine for treatment patients suffering deleterious diseases such as cancer. Having a variety of indications, several herbal formulas including Triphala have been routinely used as health tonic in Thai traditional and Ayurvedic medicines. The formulation of Triphala is a mixture of fruits of three plants: Phyllanthus emblica Linn., Terminalia chebula Retz. and Terminalia bellerica (Gaertn. Roxb., all of which were reported to inhibit the growth and induce the death of cancer cells effectively. Therefore, anticancer activities inevitably turn out to be one of the essential properties of Triphala formula as well. It is likely that a number of active compounds in the formula, especially tannins, are the key agents that induce the apoptotic cell death via free radical production in cancer cells. On the other hand, all three fruits of these plants also contain high levels of antioxidants, capable of protecting normal cells from any free radical-mediated injuries effectively. Thus, the paradoxical role of Triphala is cell-type specific and becomes an advantage for usage of this formulation. Furthermore, Triphala has high potentials for inhibition and prevention of mutagenesis and metastasis of cancer cells. Finally, studies in the mechanism of action of Triphala and the product development as well as safety evaluation of the standard herbal extract are definitely required for future pharmacological applications of Triphala as anticancer agents for cancer therapy.

  4. Anti- Sporothrix spp. activity of medicinal plants

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    Stefanie Bressan Waller

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cases of sporotrichosis in humans and animals without satisfactory clinical response have increased, a warning sign of strains resistant to conventional antifungal agents. The urgent search for alternative therapies was an incentive for research on medicinal plants with anti-Sporothrix spp. properties. A bibliographic survey was performed based on scientific papers about in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of essential oils and extracts of plants in differents solvents against the fungal of the Sporothrix schenckii complex. The study methodology consisted of a literature review in Google Scholar, Science Direct, Pubmed, Bireme and Springer link with papers from 1986 to 2015. We found 141 species of plants that were investigated, of which 100 species were concentrated in 39 botanical families that had confirmed anti-Sporothrix activity. Combretaceae, Asteraceae and Lamiaceae represented the botanical families with the greatest number of plants species with antifungal potential, using different methodologies. However, there are few studies with medicinal plants in experimental infection in animals that prove their activity in the treatment of sporotrichosis. It reinforces the need for further research related to standardization of in vitro methodologies and in vivo studies related to safety and to toxicity potential of these plants with anti-Sporothrix spp. activity.

  5. Anticonvulsant studies on a traditional antiepileptic mixture used by the Hausa people of north-western Nigeria

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    U.H. Danmalam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The use of herbal drugs in the treatment of many neurological disorders is gaining popularity in developing countries due to their fewer unwanted side effects, affordability and cultural acceptability. A mixture of three plants roots Calotropis procera (Asclepediaceae, Combretum micranthum (Combretaceae and Ficus abutilifolia (Moraceae has been reported in Hausa traditional treatment of epilepsy. We have reported the evaluation of the acute toxicity and anticonvulsant activity of the ethanol extract of this mixture. Methods: The intra-peritoneal medial lethal dose (LD50 of the aqueous ethanol extract of the mixture as well as its anticonvulsive activity against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 4-amino pyridine (4-AMP and maximum electric shock (MES were evaluated. Results: The mixture at the doses of 25 to 100 mg/kg could not afford a significant protection to mice against PTZ and 4-AMP; however, it significantly delayed the mean onset and reduced the mean recovery time of the animals at the tested doses in 4-AMP test (p

  6. Phytochemical Screening and Acute Toxicity of Aqueous Extract of Leaves of Conocarpus erectus Linnaeus in Swiss Albino Mice

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    DAYANE K.D. NASCIMENTO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mangroves represent areas of high biological productivity and it is a region rich in bioactive substances used in medicine production. Conocarpus erectus (Combretaceae known as button mangrove is one of the species found in mangroves and it is used in folk medicine in the treatment of anemia, catarrh, conjunctivitis, diabetes, diarrhea, fever, gonorrhea, headache, hemorrhage, orchitis, rash, bumps and syphilis. The present study aimed to investigate the acute toxicity of aqueous extract of leaves of C. erectus in Swiss albino mice. The plant material was collected in Vila Velha mangroves, located in Itamaracá (PE. The material was subjected to a phytochemical screening where extractive protocols to identify majority molecules present in leaves were used. The evaluation of acute toxicity of aqueous extract of C. erectus followed the model of Acute Toxicity Class based on OECD 423 Guideline, 2001. The majority molecules were identified: flavonoids, tannins and saponins. The LD50 was estimated at 2,000 mg/kg bw. Therefore, the aqueous extract showed low acute toxicity classified in category 5.

  7. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia

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    Kazhila C. Chinsembu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond. Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach. Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L. Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd. Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants.

  8. Structural Aspects of Antioxidant and Genotoxic Activities of Two Flavonoids Obtained from Ethanolic Extract of Combretum leprosum

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    Cassiana Macagnan Viau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Combretum leprosum Mart., a member of the Combretaceae family, is a traditionally used Brazilian medicinal plant, although no evidence in the literature substantiates its antioxidant action and the safety of its use. We evaluated the antioxidant properties of the ethanolic extract (EE from flowers of C. leprosum and its isolated products 5,3′-dihydroxy-3,7,4′-trimethoxyflavone (FCL2 and 5,3′,4′-trihydroxy-3,7-dimethoxyflavone (FCL5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains proficient and deficient in antioxidant defenses. Their mutagenic activity was also assayed in S. cerevisiae, whereas cytotoxic and genotoxic properties were evaluated by MTT and Comet Assays, respectively, in V79 cells. We show that the EE, FCL2, and FCL5 have a significant protective effect against H2O2. FCL2 showed a better antioxidant action, which can be related to the activation of the 3′-OH in the presence of a methoxyl group at 4′ position in the B-ring of the molecule, while flavonoids did not induce mutagenesis in yeast, and the EE was mutagenic at high concentrations. The toxicity of these compounds in V79 cells increases from FCL2 = FCL5 < EE; although not cytotoxic, FCL5 induced an increase in DNA damage. The antioxidant effect, along with the lower toxicity and the absence of genotoxicity, suggests that FCL2 could be suitable for pharmacological use.

  9. Bioactive Pentacyclic Triterpenes from the Stems of Combretum laxum

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    Eder Bisoli

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Two new triterpene glucosides, β-D-glucopyranosyl 2α,3β,24-trihydroxyolean- 12-en-28-oate and β-D-glucopyranosyl 2α,3β,23,24-tetrahydroxyurs-12-en-28-oate, in addition to nine known compounds belonging to three different triterpene classes (oleanane-, ursane- and lupane-type have been isolated from the stems of a specimen of Combretum laxum growing in the “Pantanal” of the central-western region of Brazil. Among the known triterpenes, β-D-glucopyranosyl 2α,3β,6β-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oate is reported for the first time in the Combretaceae, while bellericoside and asiatic acid are described for the first time in the genus Combretum. The structures of the isolated compounds have been established on the basis of spectral techniques (1D-, 2D-NMR and MS. Their in vitro antifungal activities against standard strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei and Cryptococcus neoformans were also evaluated in this work.

  10. Bioactive pentacyclic triterpenes from the stems of Combretum laxum.

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    Bisoli, Eder; Garcez, Walmir Silva; Hamerski, Lidilhone; Tieppo, Caroline; Garcez, Fernanda Rodrigues

    2008-11-01

    Two new triterpene glucosides, beta-D-glucopyranosyl 2alpha,3beta,24-trihydroxyolean- 12-en-28-oate and beta-D-glucopyranosyl 2alpha,3beta,23,24-tetrahydroxyurs-12-en-28-oate, in addition to nine known compounds belonging to three different triterpene classes (oleanane-, ursane- and lupane-type) have been isolated from the stems of a specimen of Combretum laxum growing in the "Pantanal" of the central-western region of Brazil. Among the known triterpenes, beta-D-glucopyranosyl 2alpha,3beta,6beta-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oate is reported for the first time in the Combretaceae, while bellericoside and asiatic acid are described for the first time in the genus Combretum. The structures of the isolated compounds have been established on the basis of spectral techniques (1D-, 2D-NMR and MS). Their in vitro antifungal activities against standard strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei and Cryptococcus neoformans were also evaluated in this work.

  11. Combretum lanceolatum flowers extract shows antidiabetic activity through activation of AMPK by quercetin

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    Carlos Roberto Porto Dechandt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum Pohl ex Eichler, Combretaceae, flowers extract (ClEtOH in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-diabetic rats were divided into four groups: diabetic control, diabetic treated with 500 mg/kg of metformin and diabetic treated with 250 or 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH for 21 days. The treatment of diabetic rats with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH promoted an increase in the weight of liver, white adipose tissues and skeletal muscles, improving body weight gain. Diabetic rats treated with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH also presented reduction in glycemia, glycosuria and urinary urea levels, and increase in liver glycogen content. HPLC chromatogram showed that quercetin is the major compound in the extract. The phosphorylation levels of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase were increased in liver slices incubated in vitro with 50 µg/mL of ClEtOH, similarly to the incubation with metformin (50 µg/mL or quercetin (10 µg/mL. The antihyperglycemic effect of ClEtOH was similar to that of metformin and appears to be through inhibition of gluconeogenesis, since urinary urea was reduced and skeletal muscle mass was increased. These data indicate that the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum extract could be mediated, at least in part, through activation of adenosine monophosphateactivated protein kinase by quercetin.

  12. Modelo para estimar a área foliar de Combretum leprosum Mart.

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    Willame dos Santos Candido

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Combretum leprosum Mart. -Combretaceae es un arbusto utilizado en la medicina popular del noreste de Brasil como antiulceroso, antihemorrágica y antinociceptiva. En este estudio se desarrolló un modelo para el cálculo de área foliar de Combretum leprosum usando mediciones lineales de longitud (C y ancho máximo (L de la hoja. Se recolectaron 200 láminas de hojas de una población de C. leprosum nativo en un área de conservación de la Caatinga en el campus de la Universidad Federal Rural de la Semi árido en Mossoro, Rio Grande do Norte. Las hojas se obtuvieron de árboles adultos y el área foliar se midió utilizando un integrador (LI-3100, LI-COR. El análisis de regresión se hizo con el programa SAEG. Para estimar el área foliar de C. leprosum se puede utilizar la ecuación lineal simple de regresión A = 0.7103 x (C x L, que es equivalente a tomar 71.03% de los productos de la longitud a lo largo de la nervadura central y el ancho máximo, con un coeficiente de determinación de 0.952617.

  13. Combretum lanceolatum flowers extract shows antidiabetic activity through activation of AMPK by quercetin

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    Carlos Roberto Porto Dechandt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum Pohl ex Eichler, Combretaceae, flowers extract (ClEtOH in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-diabetic rats were divided into four groups: diabetic control, diabetic treated with 500 mg/kg of metformin and diabetic treated with 250 or 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH for 21 days. The treatment of diabetic rats with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH promoted an increase in the weight of liver, white adipose tissues and skeletal muscles, improving body weight gain. Diabetic rats treated with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH also presented reduction in glycemia, glycosuria and urinary urea levels, and increase in liver glycogen content. HPLC chromatogram showed that quercetin is the major compound in the extract. The phosphorylation levels of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase were increased in liver slices incubated in vitro with 50 µg/mL of ClEtOH, similarly to the incubation with metformin (50 µg/mL or quercetin (10 µg/mL. The antihyperglycemic effect of ClEtOH was similar to that of metformin and appears to be through inhibition of gluconeogenesis, since urinary urea was reduced and skeletal muscle mass was increased. These data indicate that the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum extract could be mediated, at least in part, through activation of adenosine monophosphateactivated protein kinase by quercetin.

  14. Mudanças pós-fogo na estrutura e composição da vegetação lenhosa, em um cerrado mesotrófico, no período de cinco anos (1997-2002 em Nova Xavantina - MT

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    Edson de Souza Lima

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Two inventories in an area of cerrado stricto sensu of mesotrophic type, were carried out, the first in 1997 and the second in 2002. The data were collected in 28 contiguous permanent plots with an area of 15 x 15 m each (0.63 ha. All individuals with stems of diameter > 3 cm at 0.30 m above ground level were identified and measured. During the first inventory 1266 individuals belonging to 32 families, 55 genera and 72 species were recorded. While in the second there were 1045 individuals in 33 families, 55 genera and 71 species. The diversity index of Shannon was high in both samples (3.10 and 3.13 nats/ind., respectively. The results show that the fires affected relative species abundance but not overall richness. The families Fabaceae, Vochysiaceae, Malpighiaceae, Erythroxylaceae, Apocynaceae, Combretaceae and Malvaceae showed the highest floristic richness in both inventories. The largest mortality rate occurred in the smallest diameter classes (to about 13 cm, where species recruitment was not high enough to compensate for it. Three rare species were lost between the two inventories and two others appeared. The variations found are in agreement with the patterns of other studies in cerrado vegetation.

  15. An analysis of modern pollen rain from the Maya lowlands of northern Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, T.; Beach, T.; Wahl, D.

    2011-01-01

    In the lowland Maya area, pollen records provide important insights into the impact of past human populations and climate change on tropical ecosystems. Despite a long history of regional paleoecological research, few studies have characterized the palynological signatures of lowland ecosystems, a fact which lowers confidence in ecological inferences made from palynological data. We sought to verify whether we could use pollen spectra to reliably distinguish modern ecosystem types in the Maya lowlands of Central America. We collected 23 soil and sediment samples from eight ecosystem types, including upland, riparian, secondary, and swamp (bajo) forests; pine savanna; and three distinct wetland communities. We analyzed pollen spectra with non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS), and found significant compositional differences in ecosystem types' pollen spectra. Forested sites had spectra dominated by Moraceae/Urticaceae pollen, while non-forested sites had significant portions of Poaceae, Asteraceae, and Amaranthaceae pollen. Upland, bajo, and riparian forest differed in representation of Cyperaceae, Bactris-type, and Combretaceae/Melastomataceae pollen. High percentages of pine (Pinus), oak (Quercus), and the presence of Byrsonima characterized pine savanna. Despite its limited sample size, this study provides one of the first statistical analyses of modern pollen rain in the Maya lowlands. Our results show that pollen assemblages can accurately reflect differences between ecosystem types, which may help refine interpretations of pollen records from the Maya area. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Recommendations of generic names in Diaporthales competing for protection or use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Amy Y; Adams, Gerard C; Cannon, Paul F; Castlebury, Lisa A; Crous, Pedro W; Gryzenhout, Marieka; Jaklitsch, Walter M; Mejia, Luis C; Stoykov, Dmitar; Udayanga, Dhanushka; Voglmayr, Hermann; Walker, Donald M

    2015-06-01

    In advancing to one name for fungi, this paper treats generic names competing for use in the order Diaporthales (Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes) and makes a recommendation for the use or protection of one generic name among synonymous names that may be either sexually or asexually typified. A table is presented that summarizes these recommendations. Among the genera most commonly encountered in this order, Cytospora is recommended over Valsa and Diaporthe over Phomopsis. New combinations are introduced for the oldest epithet of important species in the recommended genus. These include Amphiporthe tiliae, Coryneum lanciforme, Cytospora brevispora, C. ceratosperma, C. cinereostroma, C. eugeniae, C. fallax, C. myrtagena, Diaporthe amaranthophila, D. annonacearum, D. bougainvilleicola, D. caricae-papayae, D. cocoina, D. cucurbitae, D. juniperivora, D. leptostromiformis, D. pterophila, D. theae, D. vitimegaspora, Mastigosporella georgiana, Pilidiella angustispora, P. calamicola, P. pseudogranati, P. stromatica, and P. terminaliae.

  17. The use of ethnobotanicals in the management of inflammation in Nigeria: a review

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    TR Fasola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, one of the leading health issues in recent times call for concern. Many plants used in the management and treatment of inflammation in various parts of Nigeria have not been properly harnessed hence this review. The result of this review revealed that plants commonly used for the treatment of inflammation include: Zingiber officinale, Alstonia boonei, Plumbago zeylanica, Ocimum basilicum, Parquetina nigrescens, Peperomia pellucida, Abrus precatorius, Tetrapleura tetraptera, Alchornea cordifolia, Terminalia ivorensis, Aspilia africana, Ageratum conyzoides and Hymenocardia acida. Altogether 74 plant species are ethnobotanicals used in the management and treatment of inflammation. The plants were enumerated with their family names, common and local names, possible chemical constituents, part(s used, route of administration and subsequent references where available.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v4i2.12620 International Journal of Environment Vol.4(2 2015: 1-18

  18. Graphomya Robineau-Desvoidy from Costa Rica: descriptions and first records (Diptera, Muscidae

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    MS. Couri

    Full Text Available Graphomya Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera, Muscidae occurs in temperate and tropical regions of the world. It is known in the Neotropical Region from fifteen species. The genus is here recorded for the first time from Costa Rica, on the basis of three species: G. auriceps Malloch, 1934; G. mexicana Giglio-Tos, 1893 and G. tropicalis Malloch, 1934. A key for the recognition of these three species is given. G. auriceps is redescribed, including the morphology of male and female terminalia and the male of G. tropicalis is described for the first time. For G. mexicana, a well-known species in the literature, only a brief diagnosis and the material examined are listed.

  19. An important new fossil genus of Berothinae (Neuroptera: Berothidae) from Baltic amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarkin, Vladimir N; Ohl, Michael

    2015-04-10

    Elektroberotha groehni gen. et sp. nov. (Neuroptera: Berothidae) is described from Baltic amber. The genus is assigned to Berothinae based on female terminalia that have the following characteristics: long hypocaudae on gonocoxite 9; sternite 7 that is medially divided into a pair of lateral sclerites; and gonocoxite 8 with a medial process that is very similar to that of some extant berothine genera. The new genus is the first described fossil genus of the subfamily Berothinae. It is noteworthy for the possession of a fully-developed CuP in the hind wing, a vein that is strongly reduced in all other species of the subfamily. The genus Spiroberotha is considered to belong to the Berothinae.

  20. Vibriocidal activity of certain medicinal plants used in Indian folklore medicine by tribals of Mahakoshal region of central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anjana; Patel, Virendra Kumar; Chaturvedi, Animesh Navin

    2009-06-01

    Screening of the medicinal plants and determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A simple in vitro screening assay was employed for the standard strain of Vibrio cholerae, 12 isolates of Vibrio cholerae non-O1, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Aqueous and organic solvent extracts of different parts of the plants were investigated by using the disk diffusion method. Extracts from 16 medicinal plants were selected on account of the reported traditional uses for the treatment of cholera and gastrointestinal diseases, and they were assayed for vibriocidal activities. The different extracts differed significantly in their vibriocidal properties with respect to different solvents. The MIC values of the plant extracts against test bacteria were found to be in the range of 2.5-20 mg/ml. The results indicated that Lawsonia inermis, Saraca indica, Syzygium cumini, Terminalia belerica, Allium sativum, and Datura stramonium served as broad-spectrum vibriocidal agents.

  1. Wave Propagation of Junctional Remodeling in Collective Cell Movement of Epithelial Tissue: Numerical Simulation Study

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    Tetsuya Hiraiwa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available During animal development, epithelial cells forming a monolayer sheet move collectively to achieve the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues. One driving mechanism of such collective cell movement is junctional remodeling, which is found in the process of clockwise rotation of Drosophila male terminalia during metamorphosis. However, it still remains unknown how the motions of cells are spatiotemporally organized for collective movement by this mechanism. Since these moving cells undergo elastic deformations, the influence of junctional remodeling may mechanically propagate among them, leading to spatiotemporal pattern formations. Here, using a numerical cellular vertex model, we found that the junctional remodeling in collective cell movement exhibits spatiotemporal self-organization without requiring spatial patterns of molecular signaling activity. The junctional remodeling propagates as a wave in a specific direction with a much faster speed than that of cell movement. Such propagation occurs in both the absence and presence of fluctuations in the contraction of cell boundaries.

  2. A database on endemic plants at Tirumala hills in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latheef, Shaik Abdul; Prasad, Beerkam; Bavaji, Middi; Subramanyam, Gangapatnam

    2008-01-27

    Medicinal plants play an important role in health care. The use of medicinal plants for treatment is growing in view of cost and non-compliance of modern medicine as in case of non-communicable diseases. Plants such as Boswellia, ovalifoliolata, Cycas beddomei, Pimpinella tirupatiensis, Pterocarpus santalinus, Shorea thumbuggaia, Syzygium alternifolium, Terminalia pallida are endemic to Tirumala hills of seshachalam range falling under the Eastern Ghats of India. These plants species have medicinal properties such as anti-tumorogenic, anti-microbial, purgative, hypoglycemic, abortificient, analgesic, anti-septic, anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory. We created a database named DEPTH in an attempt to communicate data of these plants to the scientific community. DEPTH contains data on scientific name, vernacular name, family name, morphological description, economic importance, known medicinal compounds and medicinal importance. http://svimstpt.ap.nic.in/MedicinalPlants/mainpage.htm.

  3. In vitro anti-plasmodial activity of three herbal remedies for malaria in Ghana: Adenia cissampeloides (Planch.) Harms., Termina liaivorensis A. Chev, and Elaeis guineensis Jacq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Kofi; Sarpong, K; Asare, C; Dickson, R; Amponsah, Ki; Gyan, B; Ofori, M; Gbedema, Sy

    2012-10-01

    Herbal remedies of Adenia cissampeloides, Terminalia ivorensis, and Elaeis guineensis among others have been used in Ghana for the treatment of various ailments including malaria. However, most of these remedies have not been scientifically investigated. This study, therefore, seeks to investigate the anti-plasmodial activity of these plants. The ethanolic extracts of A. cissampeloides stem, T. ivorensis stem bark, and E. guineensis leaves were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Thin blood films were used to assess the level of parasitemia and growth inhibition of the extracts. The IC (50) of A. cissampeloides, T. ivorensis, and E. guineensis were 8.521, 6.949, and 1.195 μg/ml, respectively, compared to artesunate with IC(50) of 0.031 μg/ml. The result of this study appears to confirm the folkloric anti-malarial use these plants.

  4. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity of punicalagin and punicalin on carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C C; Hsu, Y F; Lin, T C; Hsu, F L; Hsu, H Y

    1998-07-01

    Punicalagin and punicalin, isolated from the leaves of Terminalia catappa L., are used to treat dermatitis and hepatitis. Both compounds have strong antioxidative activity. The antihepatotoxic activity of punicalagin and punicalin on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced toxicity in the rat liver was evaluated. Levels of serum glutamate-oxalate-transaminase and glutamate-pyruvate-trans-aminase were increased by administration of CCl4 and reduced by drug treatment. Histological changes around the liver central vein and oxidation damage induced by CCl4 also benefited from drug treatment. The results show that both punicalagin and punicalin have anti-hepatotoxic activity but that the larger dose of punicalin induced liver damage. Thus even if tannins have strong antioxidant activity at very small doses, treatment with a larger dose will induce cell damage.

  5. Bioindicators in the tropical forest of Kaiga environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somashekarappa, H.M.; Narayana, Y.; Radhakrishna, A.P.; Karunakara, N.; Balakrishna, K.M.; Siddappa, K. [Mangalore Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics

    1996-07-01

    Investigations on the natural and artificial fallout radionuclides {sup 210}Po and {sup 137}Cs and the primordial radionuclide {sup 40}K in the prominent tree species of Western Ghat tropical forests near Kaiga have been carried out as a part of baseline background radiation studies in the environment of Kaiga where nuclear power reactors are being installed. The prominent tree species of the region Tectona grandis L.f. and Terminalia paniculata Roth., and the commonly available epiphytic plant species Pterobryopsis tumida (Hook.) Dix. and Cymbidium aliofolium (Lo) Swartz. were chosen and concentrations of {sup 40}K, {sup 210}Po and {sup 137}Cs were measured employing well-established nuclear techniques. The different parts of Cumbidium aloifolium (Lo) Swartz. such as leaves, stem, etc. were analysed to understand the absorption mechanism of fallout radionuclides. From a careful analysis of the results, the epiphytic plant species are identified as bioindicators to monitor fallout radionuclides. (Author).

  6. Production of unusual dispiro metabolites in Pestalotiopsis virgatula endophyte cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Julie Regitze; Olsen, Lars; Stærk, Dan

    2011-01-01

    . Analysis of the fermentation medium extract was performed using an HPLC-PDA-MS-SPE-NMR hyphenated system, which led to the identification of a total of eight metabolites (1-8), six of which are new. Most of the metabolites are structurally related and are derivatives of benzo[c]oxepin, rare among natural......The endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis virgatula, derived from the plant Terminalia chebula and previously found to produce a large excess of a single metabolite when grown in the minimal M1D medium, was induced to produce a variety of unusual metabolites by growing in potato dextrose broth medium...... supported by time-dependent density-functional theory calculations (B3LYP/TZVP level). This work demonstrates that a largely complete structure elucidation of numerous metabolites present in a raw fermentation medium extract can be performed by the HPLC-SPE-NMR technique using only a small amount...

  7. Ethnobotanical survey and in vitro antiplasmodial activity of plants used in traditional medicine in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, S; Ollivier, E; Azas, N; Mahiou, V; Gasquet, M; Ouattara, C T; Nebie, I; Traore, A S; Esposito, F; Balansard, G; Timon-David, P; Fumoux, F

    2003-06-01

    In Burkina Faso, most people in particular, in rural areas, use traditional medicine and medicinal plants to treat usual diseases. In the course of new antimalarial compounds, an ethnobotanical survey has been conducted in different regions. Seven plants, often cited by traditional practitioners and not chemically investigated, have been selected for an antiplasmodial screening: Pavetta crassipes (K. Schum), Acanthospermum hispidum (DC), Terminalia macroptera (Guill. et Perr), Cassia siamea (Lam), Ficus sycomorus (L), Fadogia agrestis (Schweinf. Ex Hiern) and Crossopteryx febrifuga (AFZ. Ex G. Don) Benth. Basic, chloroform, methanol, water-methanol and aqueous crude extracts have been prepared and tested on Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistant W2 strain. A significant activity has been observed with alkaloid extract of P. crassipes (IC(50)agrestis (4

  8. Corrosion inhibition performance of different bark extracts on aluminium in alkaline solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Chaubey

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work shows the effect of stem bark extracts of three trees namely Moringa oleifera (MO, Terminalia arjuna (TA and Mangifera indica (MI on the corrosion behaviour of Aluminium Alloy (AA in 1 M NaOH. The inhibition performance was studied by using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements. Among these extracts, MO exhibited the maximum inhibition efficiency η (% of 85.3% at 0.6 g/L at 303 K. Polarization measurement showed that all the examined extracts are of mixed-type inhibitors. Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm was found to be best fit. Morphology of the surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM which confirmed the existence of a protective film of inhibitor molecule on AA surface.

  9. Revision of Polietina Schnabl & Dziedzicki (Diptera, Muscidae and considerations on its new systematic position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Souto Couri

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Polietina Schnabl & Dziedzicki, 1911 has been placed in different subfamilies mainly based on chaetotaxy and general morphology of adults. This genus has most recently been placed in Reinwardtiinae on the basis of larval characters. The male terminalia, however, indicates that Polietina is phylogenetically close to the basal group of Muscinae. By the analysis of all available type material, the genus and nine species are redescribed: P. bicolor Albuquerque; P. distincta Couri & Lopes; P. flavithorax (Stein; P. major Albuquerque; P. minor Albuquerque; P. orbitalis (Stein; P. rubella (Wulp; P. steini (Enderlein and P. concinna (Wulp which is revalided and lectotype designated. Neotypes are proposed to Polietina flavithorax and to Polietina orbitalis. Polietina wulpi is proposed as a new species. A key is also presented.

  10. Effects of liana load, tree diameter and distances between conspecifics on seed production in tropical timber trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Kollmann, Johannes Christian; Peña-Claros, Marielos

    2009-01-01

    Seed production in tropical timber trees is limited by abiotic resources, pollination and pre-dispersal seed predation. Resource availability is influenced by the number of competing trees and by lianas that often reach high densities in disturbed parts of tropical forests. The distance between...... conspecifics, number of competing neighbours and tree diameter in the timber trees Cariniana ianeirensis and Terminalia oblonga. The study is based on a large-scale silvicultural experiment in lowland Bolivia. We found that the reproductive status of the two species was negatively correlated with liana cover...... and positively with tree diameter. In C. ianeirensis the most liana-infested trees dispersed fewer seeds. In T. oblonga the intensity of pre-dispersal seed predation decreased with distance to the nearest conspecifics. There was no evidence that seed viability or seed production decreased with distance...

  11. Molecular characterization ofLeishmaniaparasites isolated from sandflies species of a zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Musiyan south west Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavarizadeh, Farzaneh; Khademvatan, Shahram; Vazirianzadeh, Babak; Feizhaddad, Mohammad Hossein; Zarean, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is vector borne parasitic disease, considered as public health problem especially in border of Iran and Iraq, Dehloran County (Musian district). The aim of this study was molecular identification of Leishmania parasites in sandfly as vectors of Leishmaniasis. Totally 280 female sandflies were trapped by sticky traps from 7 rural areas of Musiyan in September-November 2012. All sandflies were identified using morphological characters of the head and abdominal terminalia. DNA was extracted from female sandflies and Leishmania was identified using PCR and sequencing. All 280 trapped sandflies were identified as Phelobotumus Papatasi and Leishmania infections were detected in 3.2 % out of 280 female sandflies. All leishmania were identified as L. major and submitted in Gene bank as: LC014642.1, LC014641.1, LC014640.1 and LC014639.1. Frequency of Phlebotomus Papatasi and infection with L. major in studied regions showed that this vector is dominant in these areas.

  12. Chemical changes during fermentation of Abhayarishta and its standardization by HPLC-DAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Uma Ranjan; Tripathi, Shailendra Mani; Jachak, Sanjay M; Bhutani, Kamlesh Kumar; Singh, Inder Pal

    2010-04-01

    Abhayarishta is an Ayurvedic formulation prepared traditionally by the fermentation of the decoction of Terminalia chebula (pericarp), Vitis vinifera (fruits), Embelia ribes (fruits) and Madhuca indica (flowers). In the present communication, chemical changes occurring during fermentation in Abhayarishta have been studied for the purpose of its standardization. An HPLC-DAD method for quantitative estimation of selected marker constituents in the formulation has been developed and validated. A comparison of decoction and final processed formulation revealed that major polyphenolics (chebulagic and chebulinic acid) of T. chebula were hydrolyzed to their respective monomers and, consequently, there was an increase in the amount of chebulic acid, gallic acid, ellagic acid and ethyl gallate after fermentation. 5-Hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF) was also found in the formulation. Thus, emphasis is laid upon consideration of processing methods of formulation which has been lacking in the standardization of most of Ayurvedic formulations.

  13. Germination des semences, développement et croissance de quelques essences locales en zone forestière

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mapongmetsem, RM.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed Germination, Growth and Development of some Local tree Species of the Forest Zone. Studies were conducted on eight indigenous multipurpose trees species : Alstonia boonei. De Wild, Ceiba pentandra (L. Gearth., Cordia platythyrsa Bark., Milicia excelsa (Welw ce Berg., Pycnanthus angolensis (Welw Warb., Ricinodendron heudelotii (Baill. Pierre ex Pax., Terminalia superba. Engl. et Diels et Triplochiton scleroxylon K. Schum. The objective of the study was to evaluate germination capacity, development and growth rate of the seedlings of the above mentionned species. The results showed that manual of seeds was clearly superior to the use of the other methods. For the initial growth, Ceiba pentandra and Ricinodendron heudelotii had the fastest growth. AH the species developped tap root system.

  14. A comparative evaluation of antibacterial potential of some plants used in indian traditional medicine for the treatment of microbial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi Ranjan Chattopadhyay

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A comparative in vitro antibacterial potential of extracts (aqueous and ethanol of five important medicinal plants (Aegle marmelos, Azadirachta indica, Terminalia chebula, Mangifera indica and Ocimum sanctum were investigated using microbial growth inhibition assays against the common human pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli of clinical origin. All the plant materials showed varying degrees of strain specific inhibitory action and ethanol extract of the plant materials showed higher antibacterial activity than their aqueous counterparts. Besides, T. chebula and A. marmelos had the strongest antibacterial activity out of which, T. chebula possessed a wider spectrum and a superior antibacterial potential over the others. The bioactive compounds of T. chebula might have potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of common bacterial infections.

  15. In vitro screening for anti-cholinesterase and antioxidant activity of methanolic extracts of ayurvedic medicinal plants used for cognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Mathew

    Full Text Available Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase (AChE is still considered as the main therapeutic strategy against Alzheimer's disease (AD. Many plant derived phytochemicals have shown AChE inhibitory activity in addition to the currently approved drugs for AD. In the present study, methanolic extracts of 20 plants used in Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine for improving cognitive function were screened for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity by Ellman's microplate colorimetric method. Out of 20 extracts, Emblica officinalis, Nardostachys jatamansi, Nelumbo nucifera, Punica granatum and Raulfia Serpentina showed IC50 values <100 µg/ml for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Antioxidant activities of these plants were assessed by DPPH scavenging assay. Among the extracts used, antioxidant activity was highest for Terminalia chebula and Emblica officinalis with IC50 values <10 µg/ml. Considering the complex multifactorial etiology of AD, these plant extracts will be safer and better candidates for the future disease modifying therapies against this devastating disease.

  16. Antimicrobial screening of selected flora of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia-Ul-Haq M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanolic extracts of Ferula assafoetida resin, Grewia asiatica leaves, Ipomoea hederacea seeds, Lepidium sativum seeds, Nigella sativa seeds and Terminalia chebula fruits were tested in vitro for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The antibacterial study performed against eight bacterial species viz., Escherichia coli, Citrobacter, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Micrococcus luteus, Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus subtilis indicated that the investigated plants have potent activity against all the tested microorganisms. The antifungal activity of these extracts was performed against nine fungal strains, viz., Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus niger, Yersinia aldovae, Candida albicans, Aspergillus effusus, Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Trichophyton rubrum. The extracts showed moderate as well as significant activity against the different fungal strains.

  17. In-vitro antibacterial effects of extracts of Nigerian tooth-cleaning sticks on periodontopathic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sote, E O; Wilson, M

    1995-01-01

    Aqueous extracts from 8 plants used for tooth-cleaning in Nigeria were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of five periodontopathic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eikenella corrodens and Campylobacter rectus. Extracts of all the plants except that of Massularia acuminata exhibited varying growth inhibitory potentials on the microorganisms. Extract of Terminalia glaucescens showed the widest spectrum of activity, inhibiting the growth of all the tested bacteria except P. gingivalis. These findings corroborate other studies that the plants possess antiplaque properties and suggest that they may be useful tools in preventive dentistry in poor developing countries. However, the bioavailability of the active ingredients of the plants and their long term effects in vivo need to be investigated.

  18. A new species of Lelegeis (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Diaperini from the Atlantic Forest of Brazil

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    Sergio Aloquio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lelegeis Champion, 1886 occurs only in the Neotropical region and comprises four species: L. aeneipennis Champion, 1886 from Mexico; L. apicalis Laporte & Brullé, 1831 from Cuba; L. hispaniolae Triplehorn, 1962 from Haiti and the Dominican Republic; and L. nigrifrons (Chevrolat, 1878 occurring in Brazil, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Venezuela. Here, Lelegeis pytanga sp. nov. is described based on specimens collected in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, and the first detailed description of the sclerites of the male and female terminalia of Lelegeis is produced. The new species can be easily distinguished from the other Lelegeis by its dull reddish brown to reddish orange elytral coloration, while the remaining body surface is dull black. The morphology of Lelegeis and its generic boundaries within Diaperinae are discussed.

  19. Endophytic Fungi of Various Medicinal Plants Collected From Evergreen Forest Baluran National Park and Its Potential as Laboratory Manual for Mycology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Murdiyah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Endophytic fungi found on a variety of medicinal plants may express particular benefit. These fungi provide an alternative to overcome the progressive microbial resistance and as an effort to combat infectious diseases that became one of the leading causes of mortality. The main objective of this study was to isolate endophytic fungi from leaf samples of five medicinal plants species collected from evergreen forests Baluran National Park and its use as laboratory manual for Micology. Research findings showed there were 3 isolates of endophytic fungi isolated from 2 medicinal plants namely Kesambi (Schleicera oleosa and Ketapang (Terminalia catappa. All three isolates formed sporangiophores as asexual reproductive structures, while the structure of sexual still undiscovered therefore its classification has not been determined. The validity tests also showed that the lab manual is feasible for use with the percentage achievement 85.37% and 88.56%.

  20. New Agromyza Fallén (Diptera, Agromyzidae) from Brazil and a key for the Neotropical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Viviane R DE; Couri, Márcia S

    2016-01-01

    Agromyza Fallén (Diptera, Agromyzidae) is a genus of leaf mining flies, including species with high economic importance. The knowledge of this genus is very poor in the neotropics, with 12 known species, only six of them recorded from Brazil. This paper describes two new Agromyza species from "Cerrado" and "Pantanal" biomes and records three other species represented only by females that could not be identified to species level. We also present a taxonomic key to segregate the 14 Neotropical species. The specimens were collected in Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul states and are deposited at Museu de Zoologia, Universidade de São Paulo (São Paulo, Brazil) and Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) collections. The adults were photographed and the male terminalia were dissected and illustrated.

  1. Redescription of Cis taurus (Reitter, 1878) (Coleoptera: Ciidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ester H; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano

    2013-01-09

    Cis taurus (Reitter) is the type-species of Macrocis Reitter, a genus subsequently synonymized with Cis Latreille. It names a diversified but barely studied species-group of Cis, the taurus group. The objective of the present work is to redescribe C. taurus, designate a lectotype and provide the first description of male abdominal terminalia of the species. We also provide new data on its geographic distribution, restricted to three major Mexico mountain ranges: the Sierra Madre Oriental, the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (Sierra Nevada). This is a first and important step in the ongoing revision of the taurus species-group.

  2. Investigation of heavy metals in frequently utilized medicinal plants collected from environmentally diverse locations of north western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhari, Alpana; Sheorayan, Arun; Bajar, Somvir; Sarkar, Susheel; Chaudhury, Ashok; Kalia, Rajwant K

    2013-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of environmental pollution, especially soil contamination with heavy metals has led to their uptake in the human food chains through plant parts. Accumulation and magnification of heavy metals in human tissues through consumption of herbal remedies can cause hazardous impacts on health. Therefore, chemical profiling of nine heavy metals (Mn, Cr, Pb, Fe, Cd, Co, Zn, Ni and Hg) was undertaken in stem and leaf samples of ten medicinal plants (Acacia nilotica, Bacopa monnieri, Commiphora wightii, Ficus religiosa, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Hemidesmus indicus, Salvadora oleoides, Terminalia bellirica, Terminalia chebula and Withania somnifera) collected from environmentally diverse regions of Haryana and Rajasthan states in North-Western India. Concentration of all heavy metals, except Cr, was within permissible limits in the tested stem and leaf samples. Leaf samples had consistently more Cr compared to respective stem samples with highest concentration in leaf samples of Bacopa monnieri (13.19 ± 0.0480 ppm) and stem samples of Withania somnifera (4.93 ± 0.0185 ppm) both collected from Bahadurgarh (heavy industrial area), Haryana. This amount was beyond the permissible limit of 2.0 ppm defined by WHO for raw herbal material. Other two most perilous metals Pb (2.64 ± 0.0260) and Cd (0.04 ± 0.0274) were also recorded in Bahadurgarh region, although below permissible limits. Concentration of Hg remained below detectable levels in all the leaf and stem samples tested. These results suggested that cultivation of medicinal plants and other dietary herbs should be curtailed near environmentally polluted especially industrial areas for avoidance of health hazards.

  3. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of the Common New Zealand Stick Insect Clitarchus hookeri (Phasmatodea) Reveals Genes Involved in Olfaction, Digestion and Sexual Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen; Crowhurst, Ross N; Dennis, Alice B; Twort, Victoria G; Liu, Shanlin; Newcomb, Richard D; Ross, Howard A; Buckley, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Phasmatodea, more commonly known as stick insects, have been poorly studied at the molecular level for several key traits, such as components of the sensory system and regulators of reproduction and development, impeding a deeper understanding of their functional biology. Here, we employ de novo transcriptome analysis to identify genes with primary functions related to female odour reception, digestion, and male sexual traits in the New Zealand common stick insect Clitarchus hookeri (White). The female olfactory gene repertoire revealed ten odorant binding proteins with three recently duplicated, 12 chemosensory proteins, 16 odorant receptors, and 17 ionotropic receptors. The majority of these olfactory genes were over-expressed in female antennae and have the inferred function of odorant reception. Others that were predominantly expressed in male terminalia (n = 3) and female midgut (n = 1) suggest they have a role in sexual reproduction and digestion, respectively. Over-represented transcripts in the midgut were enriched with digestive enzyme gene families. Clitarchus hookeri is likely to harbour nine members of an endogenous cellulase family (glycoside hydrolase family 9), two of which appear to be specific to the C. hookeri lineage. All of these cellulase sequences fall into four main phasmid clades and show gene duplication events occurred early in the diversification of Phasmatodea. In addition, C. hookeri genome is likely to express γ-proteobacteria pectinase transcripts that have recently been shown to be the result of horizontal transfer. We also predicted 711 male terminalia-enriched transcripts that are candidate accessory gland proteins, 28 of which were annotated to have molecular functions of peptidase activity and peptidase inhibitor activity, two groups being widely reported to regulate female reproduction through proteolytic cascades. Our study has yielded new insights into the genetic basis of odour detection, nutrient digestion, and male sexual

  4. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of selected medicinal plants used in Indian traditional medication system in vitro as well as in vivo

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    Rafik U. Shaikh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate in vivo and in vitro anti-inflammatory potential of selected medicinal plants used in Indian traditional medication. The sequentially extracted plant samples as, Cissus quadrangularis, Plumbago zeylanica, Terminalia bellarica and Terminalia chebula in water, ethanol and hexane were evaluated in-vitro for COX-1 and 2 inhibitory and antioxidant activities. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of selected samples showing promising COX-2 inhibition was assessed using carrageenan and Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA induced mice edema animal model. The results obtained reveals that most of the plants were found to inhibit COX-2 activity as compared to COX-1. It was observed that the extracts of T. bellarica (73.34 % and T. chebula (74.81 % showed significant COX-2 selective inhibition as compared to other samples. The ethanol extract of the selected plants demonstrated effective DPPH, OH and superoxide radical scavenging activity. In vivo anti-inflammatory study shows that, T. bellarica and T. chebulla had a significant impact on inhibition of edema formation. The cytotoxicity evaluation study of ethanolic fraction of selected medicinal plants indicates that the selected samples have no effect on cell viability. HPTLC fingerprint of flavonoids of the selected samples was also prepared as a measure of quality control. The results obtained may be useful in strengthening the standardization of the selected botanicals. Moreover the selected plants can be considered as a resource for searching novel anti-inflammatory agents possessing COX-2 inhibition.

  5. An antidiabetic polyherbal phytomedicine confers stress resistance and extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Rathor, Laxmi; Pant, Aakanksha; Awasthi, Harshika; Mani, Dayanandan; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-02-01

    An Ayurvedic polyherbal extract (PHE) comprising six herbs viz. Berberis aristata, Cyperus rotundus, Cedrus deodara, Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia bellirica is mentioned as an effective anti-hyperglycemic agent in 'Charaka Samhita', the classical text of Ayurveda. Previously, antidiabetic drug metformin was found to elicit antiaging effects and PHE was also found to exhibit antidiabetic effects in humans. Therefore, we screened it for its in vivo antioxidant antiaging effect on stress and lifespan using human homologous Caenorhabditis elegans model system. The effect on aging is evaluated by studying effect of PHE on mean survival in worms. The stress modulatory potential was assessed by quantification of intracellular ROS level, autofluorescent age pigment lipofuscin, oxidative and thermal stress assays. Additionally, stress response was quantified using gene reporter assays. The 0.01 µg/ml dose of PHE was able to enhance mean lifespan by 16.09% (P elegans. Furthermore, PHE treated worms demonstrated oxidative stress resistance in both wild type and stress hypersensitive mev-1 mutant along with upregulation of stress response genes sod-3 and gst-4. The delayed aging under stress can be attributed to its direct reactive oxygen species-scavenging activity and regulation of some age associated genes like daf-2, daf-16, skn-1, sod-3 and gst-4 in wild-type worms. Additonally, PHE delayed age related paralysis phenotype in CL4176 transgenic worms. Altogether, our results suggest PHE significantly improves the oxidative stress and life span in C. elegans. Overall the present study suggests this polyherbal formulation might play important role in regultaing aging and related complications like diabetes.

  6. Evaluation of anticataract potential of Triphala in selenite-induced cataract: In vitro and in vivo studies

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    Suresh Kumar Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Triphala (TP is composed of Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia belerica. The present study was undertaken to evaluate its anticataract potential in vitro and in vivo in a selenite-induced experimental model of cataract. In vitro enucleated rat lenses were maintained in organ culture containing Dulbecco′s Modified Eagles Medium alone or with the addition of 100΅M selenite. These served as the normal and control groups, respectively. In the test group, the medium was supplemented with selenite and different concentrations of TP aqueous extract. The lenses were incubated for 24 h at 37°C. After incubation, the lenses were processed to estimate reduced glutathione (GSH, lipid peroxidation product, and antioxidant enzymes. In vivo selenite cataract was induced in 9-day-old rat pups by subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (25 μmole/kg body weight. The test groups received 25, 50, and 75 mg/kg of TP intraperitoneally 4 h before the selenite challenge. At the end of the study period, the rats′ eyes were examined by slit-lamp. TP significantly (P < 0.01 restored GSH and decreased malondialdehyde levels. A significant restoration in the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (P < 0.05, catalase (P < 0.05, glutathione peroxidase (P < 0.05, and glutathione-s-transferase (P < 0.005 was observed in the TP-supplemented group compared to controls. In vivo TF 25mg/kg developed only 20% nuclear cataract as compared to 100% in control. TP prevents or retards experimental selenite-induced cataract. This effect may be due to antioxidant activity. Further studies are warranted to explore its role in human cataract.

  7. Chemopreventive potential of Triphala (a composite Indian drug) on Benzo(a)pyrene induced forestomach tumorigenesis in murine tumor model system

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    Deep, G.; Dhirman, M.; Rao, A.R.; Kale, R.K. [Jawaharlan Nehru Univ., New Delhi (India). Radiation and Cancer Biology Laboratory

    2005-12-15

    The present work is probably the first report on cancer chemopreventive potential of Triphala, a combination of fruit powder of three different plants namely Terminalia chebula, Terminalia belerica and Emblica officinalis. Triphala is a popular formulation of the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Our findings have shown that Triphala in diet has significantly reduced the benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] induced forestomach papillomagenesis in mice. In the short term treatment groups, the tumor incidences were lowered to 77.77% by both doses of Triphala mixed diet. In the case of long-term treatment the tumor incidences were reduced to 66.66% and 62.50% respectively by 2.5% and 5% triphala containing diet. Tumor burden was 7.27{+-}1.16 in the B(a)P treated control group, whereas it reduced to 3.00{+-}0.82 (p<0.005) by 2.5% dose and 2.33 +/- 1.03 (p<0.001) by 5% dose of Triphala. In long-term studies the tumor burden was reduced to 2.17{+-}0.75 (p<0.001) and 2.00{+-}0.71 (p<0.001) by 2.5% and 5% diet of Triphala, respectively. It was important to observe that Triphala was more effective in reducing tumor incidences compared to its individual constituents. Triphala also significantly increased the antioxidant status of animals which might have contributed to the chemoprevention. It was inferred that the concomitant use of multiple agents seemed to have a high degree of chemoprevention potential.

  8. In vitro antiplasmodial and cytotoxic properties of some medicinal plants from western Burkina Faso

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    Souleymane Sanon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resistance of malaria parasites to existing drugs complicates treatment, but an antimalarial vaccine that could protect against this disease is not yet available. It is therefore necessary to find new effective and affordable medicines. Medicinal plants could be a potential source of antimalarial agents. Some medicinal plants from Burkina Faso were evaluated for their antiplasmodial and cytotoxic properties in vitro.Methods: Crude dichloromethane, methanol, water-methanol, aqueous and alkaloids extracts were prepared for 12 parts of 10 plants. Chloroquine-resistant malaria strain K1 was used for the in vitro sensibility assay. The Plasmodium lactacte dehydrogenase technique was used to determine the 50% inhibitory concentration of parasites activity (IC50. The cytotoxic effects were determined with HepG2 cells, using the tetrazolium-based colorimetric technique, and the selectivity index (SI was calculated.Results: Sixty crude extracts were prepared. Seven extracts from Terminalia avicenoides showed IC50 < 5 µg/mL. The IC50 of dichloromethane, methanol, aqueous and alkaloids extracts ranged between 1.6 µg/mL and 4.5 µg/mL. Three crude extracts from Combretum collinum and three from Ficus capraefolia had an IC50 ranging between 0.2 µg/mL and 2.5 µg/mL. Crude extracts from these three plants had no cytotoxic effect, with SI > 1. The other plants have mostly moderate or no antimalarial effects. Some extracts from Cordia myxa, Ficus capraefolia and Opilia celtidifolia showed cytotoxicity, with an SI ranging between 0.4 and 0.9.Conclusion: Our study showed a good antiplasmodial in vitro activity of Terminalia avicenoides, Combretum collinum and Ficus capraefolia. These three plants may contain antiplasmodial molecules that could be isolated by bio-guided phytochemical studies. 

  9. Avaliação de efeitos de espécies de mangue na distribuição de Melampus coffeus (Gastropoda, Ellobiidae no Ceará, nordeste do Brasil Evaluation of local effects of mangrove species on the distribution of Melampus coffeus (Gastropoda, Ellobiidae in Ceara, northeastern Brazil

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    Rafaela C. Maia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Melampus coffeus (Linnaeus, 1758 é um gastrópode pulmonado, macrodetritívoro, importante na transferência de energia em manguezais neotropicais, mas sua distribuição em diferentes escalas espaciais ainda é pouco conhecida nas regiões brasileiras. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a distribuição de M. coffeus com relação: 1 às espécies Rhizophora mangle Rhizophoraceae e Laguncularia racemosa Combretaceae; 2 à posição dos rizóforos de R. mangle e 3 à altura das árvores em diferentes manguezais. O seu comportamento ao longo do ciclo de marés também foi descrito. A densidade de M. coffeus foi similar entre R. mangle e L. racemosa, porém os maiores caramujos foram encontrados nas árvores de R. mangle. A distribuição dos caramujos encontrados no sedimento diferiu em relação aos rizóforos, com maior densidade no centro e o maior tamanho na borda da área amostral. Entretanto, não houve relação com a disponibilidade de recursos alimentares formados por folhas. A densidade também foi maior nos manguezais baixo e médio quando comparados ao alto, porém não foram encontradas diferenças de tamanho dos caramujos em mangues de alturas distintas. Observamos também que, durante a maré alta, M. coffeus sobe nas árvores mais próximas. Estes resultados podem estar relacionados principalmente com a disponibilidade de recursos e abrigos fornecidos por R. mangle. Desta forma, novos estudos sobre a distribuição de M. coffeus sob diversas condições são recomendáveis, já que as regiões de manguezais estão cada vez mais sujeitas a perturbações.Melampus coffeus (Linnaeus, 1758 is a pulmonate, macrodetritivore gastropod, important in energy flows in neotropical mangroves, but its distribution in different spatial scales is still unknown in Brazil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution of M. coffeus: 1 among the mangrove trees Rhizophora mangle Rhizophoraceae and Laguncularia racemosa

  10. Determination of the silvo-melliferous regions of Benin: a nationwide categorisation of the land based on melliferous plants suitable for timber production

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    Felicien Amakpe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Perennial plants are the main pollen and nectar sources for bees in the tropical areas where most of the annual flora are burned in dry seasons. Therefore perennial plants constitute the most reliable bio materials for determining and evaluating the beekeeping regions of the Republic of Benin. A silvo-melliferous region (S-MR is a geographical area characterised by a particular set of homogenous melliferous plants that can produce timber. Using both the prevailing climatic and the agro-ecological conditions six S-MRs could be identified, i.e. the South region, the Common Central region, the Central West region, the Central North region, the Middle North region and the Extreme North region. At the country level, the melliferous plants were dominated by Vitellaria paradoxa which is common to all regions. The most diversified family was the Caesalpiniaceae (12 species followed by the Combretaceae (10 species and Combretum being the richest genus. The effect of dominance is particularly high in the South region where Elaeis guineensis alone represented 72.6% of the tree density and 140% of the total plant importance. The total melliferous plant density varied from 99.3 plants ha^(−1 in the Common Central region to 178.0 plants ha^(−1 in the Central West region. On the basis of nectar and pollen source, the best region for beekeeping is the CentralWest region with 46.7% of nectar producing trees, 9.4% of pollen producing trees and 40.6% of plants that issue both, this in opposition to the South region which was characterised by an unbalanced distribution of melliferous trees.

  11. Mapping and Assessment of Ethno-Medicinal Trees in Built Up Areas - University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria

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    Olatunde Sunday Eludoyin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Several urban tree species are important in ethno-medicine, especially in the developing tropical regions. Their assessment in urban landscapes is becoming an important issue. The study assessed and mapped the ethno-medicinal trees in the built up area land use type of the University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria, with a view to examining their spatial variation in terms of composition and diversity between the residential and non-residential areas of the University Park. Materials and Methods: The study employed the use of geographic information system (ArcGIS 9.3 for the mapping. Built up area land use was subdivided into residential and non-residential where the ethno-medicinal trees were recorded, identified and enumerated. Global positioning system was used to determine the coordinates of each tree. The species composition and diversity were calculated and a comparison was made between the residential and non- residential land use types. The pattern of spread of the ethno-medicinal trees was determined by the nearest neighbour analysis. Results: A total of 37 ethno-medicinal trees species were found in the study area, while the species composition was 499 in the residential area and 438 in the non-residential area. Azadirachta indica was the highest (233 in composition. Ethno-medicinal tree species in the study area consist of 19 families of which Anacardiaceae, Rutaceae, Moraceae and Combretaceae were the highest. Species diversity was higher in the non-residential land use (2.698 than in the residential land use (2.222. Conclusion: The nearest neighbour analysis reveals that the z-score value was higher in the non-residential area (-23.06 than in the residential area (-0.30, but the pattern of distribution in both areas were clustered. The study recommended periodic monitoring and the assessment of ethno-medicinal trees in the study area for conservation purposes.

  12. Late-glacial and Holocene history of the dry forest area in the south Colombian Cauca Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrío, Juan Carlos; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Marchant, Robert; Rangel, Orlando

    2002-10-01

    Two sedimentary cores with pollen, charcoal and radiocarbon data are presented. These records document the Late-glacial and Holocene dry forest vegetation, fire and environmental history of the southern Cauca Valley in Colombia (1020 m). Core Quilichao-1 (640 cm; 3° 6N, 76° 31W) represents the periods of 13 150-7720 14C yr BP and, following a hiatus, from 2880 14C yr BP to modern. Core La Teta-2 (250 cm; 3° 5N, 76° 32W) provides a continuous record from 8700 14C yr BP to modern.Around 13 150 14C yr BP core Quilichao-1 shows an active Late-glacial drainage system and presence of dry forest. From 11 465 to 10 520 14C yr BP dry forest consists mainly of Crotalaria, Moraceae/Urticaceae, Melastomataceae/Combretaceae, Piper and low stature trees, such as Acalypha, Alchornea, Cecropia and Celtis. At higher elevation Andean forest comprising Alnus, Hedyosmum, Quercus and Myricacrop taxa (a.o.

  13. Pleistocene fossil woods from the Okote Member, site FwJj 14 in the Ileret region, Koobi Fora Formation, northern Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Marion K

    2017-11-01

    On the eastern side of Lake Turkana in northern Kenya are extensive Plio-Pleistocene deposits containing a rich diversity of fossil mammals, hominins and flora within the radiometrically dated tuffaceous, lacustrine and fluvial sequence. Reconstruction of this landscape and paleoenvironment are part of an ongoing multinational and multidisciplinary human evolution project in the eastern Turkana Basin. Today there is a huge lake in the Rift Valley but it has fluctuated since the early Pliocene. Silicified wood is fairly common in some areas of the Koobi Fora Formation. One such site is FwJj 14E, alongside one of the tributaries of the Ileret River. Hominin hand and arm bones have been excavated from here in the Okote Member and dated at 1.56-1.36 Ma. The fossils are associated with hominin and bovid footprints. Sixty of the over 100 wood specimens collected have been sectioned and studied. In general the woods have large vessels and an average vulnerability index of 40, which implies a mesic megathermal environment with no water stress. Taxonomically the woods belong to large African families: Caesalpiniaceae (Didelotia idae), Combretaceae (Anogeissus sp.), Putranjivaceae (Euphorbiaceae; Drypetes sp.), Lamiaceae (cf Premna sp.), Malvaceae (Heritiera sp.) and Sapindaceae (Sapindoxylon sp.). Most of these taxa do not occur in the area today because now it is much drier and the local vegetation is predominantly Acacia-Commiphora-Salvadora shrubland. The reconstruction of the paleovegetation supports the interpretation from the fauna, namely, a tall riverine forest with shady refuge trees, possibly some edible fruits, and wooded grassland and more open bushland in the vicinity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Late Pleistocene-Holocene vegetation and climate change in the Middle Kalahari, Lake Ngami, Botswana

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    Cordova, Carlos E.; Scott, Louis; Chase, Brian M.; Chevalier, Manuel

    2017-09-01

    Pollen, spores, and microscopic charcoal from a sediment core from Lake Ngami, in the Middle Kalahari, reflect paleovegetation and paleoclimatic conditions over the last 16,600 cal years BP. The location of Lake Ngami allows for the receipt of moisture sourced from the Indian and/or Atlantic oceans, which may have influenced local rainfall or long distance water transport via the Okavango system. We interpret results of statistical analyses of the pollen data as showing a complex, dynamic system wherein variability in tropical convective systems and local forcing mechanisms influence hydrological changes. Our reconstructions show three primary phases in the regional precipitation regime: 1) an early period of high but fluctuating summer rainfall under relatively cool conditions from ∼16,600-12,500 cal BP, with reduced tree to herb and shrub ratio; 2) an episode of significantly reduced rainfall centered around c. 11,400 cal BP, characterized by an increase in xeric Asteraceae pollen, but persistent aquatic elements, suggesting less rainfall but cool conditions and lower evaporation that maintained water in the basin; and 3) a longer phase of high, but fluctuating rainfall from ∼9000 cal BP to present with more woody savanna vegetation (Vachellia (Acacia) and Combretaceae). We propose a model to relate these changes to increased Indian Ocean-sourced moisture in the late Pleistocene due to a southerly position of the African rain belt, a northerly contraction of tropical systems that immediately followed the Younger Dryas, and a subsequent dominance of local insolation forcing, modulated by changes in the SE Atlantic basin.

  15. Intra-specific differentiation of fungal endosymbiont Alternaria longissima CLB44 using RNA secondary structure analysis and their anti-infective potential.

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    Rao, H C Yashavantha; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2016-08-01

    New antimicrobial agents derived from endosymbio-tic fungi with unique and targeted mode of action are crucially rudimentary to combat multidrug-resistant infections. Most of the fungi isolated as endosymbionts show close morphological feature resemblance to plant pathogenic or free-living forms, and it is difficult to differentiate these different lifestyles. A fungal endosymbiont strain CLB44 was isolated from Combretum latifolium Blume (Combretaceae). CLB44 was then identified as Alternaria longissima based on morphological and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) intervening 5.8S rRNA gene sequence analysis. ITS2 RNA secondary structure analysis was carried out using mfold server with temperature 37 °C, and anti-infective potential was determined by MIC and disk diffusion methods. ITS2 RNA secondary structure analysis clearly distinguished endosymbiotic A. longissima CLB44 from free-living and pathogenic A. longissima members in the same monophyletic clade. Secondary metabolites produced effectively inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa (25 μg/ml), Escherichia coli (25 μg/ml), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (50 μg/ml), Candida albicans (100 μg/ml), and other human pathogens. This study emerges as an innovative finding that explores newly revealed ITS2 RNAs that may be an insight as new markers for refining phylogenetic relations and to distinguish fungal endosymbionts with other free-living or pathogenic forms. A. longissima CLB44, in the emerging field of endosymbionts, will pave the way to a novel avenue in drug discovery to combat multidrug-resistant infections. The sequence data of this fungus is deposited in GenBank under the accession no. KU310611.

  16. Medicinal plants in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Maliheh; Shams-Ardakani, Mohammadreza; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2015-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a small, spiral, Gram-negative bacillus that plays a role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases ranging from asymptomatic gastritis to gastric cancer. Schedule compliance, antibiotic drug resistance, and side-effects of triple or quadruple therapy have led to research for novel candidates from plants. The purpose of this paper is to review the most potent medicinal plants of recently published literature with anti-H. pylori activity. For centuries, herbals have been used by traditional healers around the world to treat various gastrointestinal tract disorders such as dyspepsia, gastritis, and peptic ulcer disease. The mechanism of action by which these botanicals exert their therapeutic properties has not been completely and clearly elucidated. Anti-H. pylori properties may be one of the possible mechanisms by which gastroprotective herbs treat gastrointestinal tract disorders. Electronic databases such as PubMed, Google scholar, EBSCO, and local databases were explored for medicinal plants with anti-H. pylori properties between 1984 and 2013 using key words "medicinal plants" and "Helicobacter pylori" or "anti-Helicobacter pylori". A total of 43 medicinal plant species belonging to 27 families including Amaryllidaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Asclepiadoideae, Asteraceae, Bignoniaceae, Clusiaceae, Chancapiedra, Combretaceae, Cyperaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Geraniaceae, Lamiaceae, Lauraceae, Lythraceae, Menispermaceae, Myristicaceae, Myrtaceae, Oleaceae, Papaveraceae, Plumbaginaceae, Poaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, and Theaceae were studied as herbs with potent anti-H. pylori effects. Traditional folk medicinal use of some of these plants to treat gastric infections is substantiated by the antibacterial activity of their extracts against H. pylori.

  17. Pharmacognostical studies of leaves of Combretum albidum G. Don

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    Ashish S Zalke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Combretum albidum Don belonging to family Combretaceae is an unexplored medicinal plant in the Indian medicinal system. According to ethnobotanical information, the leaves are used in the treatment of peptic ulcer and its fruits are used in diarrhoea and dysentery. Stem bark is used in the treatment of jaundice and skin diseases. The problem encountered in standardisation of this medicinal plant is its identification by source. Materials and Methods: The pharmacognostical studies were carried out in terms of organoleptic, macroscopic, microscopic, physicochemical, florescence and phytochemical analysis. Physicochemical parameters such as total ash, moisture content and extractive values are determined by World Health Organization guidelines. The microscopic features of leaf components are observed with Nikon lab photo device with microscopic units. Results: Macroscopically, the leaves are simple, obovate in shape, acuminate apex, entire margin and smooth surface. Microscopically, the leaves showed a large vascular strand that consists of thick walled xylem elements mixed with xylem fibres and phloem which is present in a thin layer along inner and outer portions of xylem. External to the xylem occur a thin line of sclerenchyma. Powder microscopy revealed glandular trichomes in the adaxial epidermal peelings also shows the non-glandular trichomes fairly common in powder and epidermis with anisocytic stomata. Vessels elements are narrow, long, cylindrical and dense multi-seriate bordered pits. Xylem fibres are thin and long, with thick walls, which are lignified. Preliminary phytochemical screening showed the presence of carbohydrate, glycoside, saponin, flavonoid, phytosterols and phenolic compounds. Conclusions: The results of the study can serve as a valuable source of pharmacognostic information as suitable standards for identification of this plant material in future investigations and applications.

  18. Woody vegetation die off and regeneration in response to rainfall variability in the west African Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Martin; Tappan, G. Gray; Aziz Diouf, Abdoul; Beye, Gora; Mbow, Cheikh; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    The greening in the Senegalese Sahel has been linked to an increase in net primary productivity, with significant long-term trends being closely related to the woody strata. This study investigates woody plant growth and mortality within greening areas in the pastoral areas of Senegal, and how these dynamics are linked to species diversity, climate, soil and human management. We analyse woody cover dynamics by means of multi-temporal and multi-scale Earth Observation, satellite based rainfall and in situ data sets covering the period 1994 to 2015. We find that favourable conditions (forest reserves, low human population density, sufficient rainfall) led to a rapid growth of Combretaceae and Balanites aegyptiaca between 2000 and 2013 with an average increase of 4% woody cover. However, the increasing dominance and low drought resistance of drought prone species bears the risk of substantial woody cover losses following drought years. This was observed in 2014–2015, with a die off of Guiera senegalensis in most places of the study area. We show that woody cover and woody cover trends are closely related to mean annual rainfall, but no clear relationship with rainfall trends was found over the entire study period. The observed spatial and temporal variation contrasts with the simplified labels of “greening” or “degradation”. While in principal a low woody plant diversity negatively impacts regional resilience, the Sahelian system is showing signs of resilience at decadal time scales through widespread increases in woody cover and high regeneration rates after periodic droughts. We have reaffirmed that the woody cover in Sahel responds to its inherent climatic variability and does not follow a linear trend.

  19. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used by communities of Northern Kordofan region, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Mohamed Hammad Adam

    2015-12-24

    The present study provides significant ethnopharmacological information on plant species used in North Kordofan region, western Sudan. The study was undertaken with an aim to document the medicinal uses of the species known to some Northern Kordofan communities. The study was conducted between 2012 and 2013. The plants were identified and voucher specimens prepared. Information was collected by means of semi-structured interviews with 258 informants (195 men and 63 women). In addition, the use value (UV) of the species was determined and the informant consensus factor (ICF) was calculated for the medicinal plants researched in the study. Further analysis was carried out to compare results with previous studies from the study area and other regions of Sudan. A total of 44 plant species representing 24 families were found to be commonly used in the treatment of 73 different human health problems. The families most represented were Leguminosae (18%), Caesalpiniaceae (9%), Malvaceae (9%), Asclepiadaceae (6.8%) and Combretaceae (6.8%). The highest number of plant species are used against digestive system disorders (23 species) followed by microbial infections (21 species) and dermatology (19 species). Among all the plant parts leaves (20%), roots (19%), fruits and bark (14% each) were the most preferred plant parts used by the informants. There was strong agreement among the informants as to the usages of the plants (informant consensus factor 0.63-0.93). The most important plants on the basis of use-value were Acacia nilotica, Acacia seyal, Balanites aegyptiaca, Cassia occidentalis, Cassia senna, Guiera senegalensis and Tamarindus indica. This study has helped to document information that may otherwise be lost to future generations. This is the first ethnobotanical study in which statistical calculations about plants are carried out by means of the ICF and UV methods in the study area. Plants with high ICF and UV values should be subjected for further phytochemical and

  20. Efeito da inundação lateral sobre a distribuição da vegetação ripária em um trecho do rio Cuiabá, MT

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    Ricardo Keichi Umetsu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Estudos hidrológicos e fitossociológicos foram realizados num perfil topográfico de 550 m instalado perpendicularmente ao rio Cuiabá, no Município de Rosário Oeste, MT, para analisar a influência da inundação sobre a distribuição da vegetação ripária. Utilizando os dados fluviométricos da estação de Rosário Oeste de 1966 a 2003, um modelo hidrológico de remanso em regime subcrítico foi ajustado, permitindo estabelecer a série hidrológica na área de estudo. A partir dessa série, os intervalos de recorrência nessa área foram obtidos. Os resultados sugeriram que a margem do canal principal, o canal secundário e o dique marginal, a planície de inundação e o terraço alagam a cada ~1 1,7 ano, ~1,77 2,8 anos, ~3 anos e de ~3,25 a ~39 anos, respectivamente. A espécie Combretum leprosum Mart. (Combretaceae apresentou maior VI na margem do canal principal, Callisthene fasciculata (Spr. Mart. (Vochysiaceae na margem do canal principal e no terraço e Licania parvifolia Huber (Chrysobalanaceae, Cariniana estrellensis (Raddi Kuntze. (Lecythidaceae e Vochysia divergens Pohl. (Vochysiaceae na planície de inundação. Os resultados indicaram que a frequência e, principalmente, o tempo de alagamento são os principais determinantes ecológicos da distribuição das espécies vegetais ao longo do perfil topográfico.

  1. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanol root extracts of some selected Nigerian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, Ismail O; Agbaje, Esther O; Adeyemi, Olufunmilayo O; Shukla, Rakesh

    2014-09-01

    The roots of Alafia barteri Oliver (Apocynaceae), Combretum mucronatum Schumach (Combretaceae) and Capparis thonningii Schum (Capparaceae) are used in Traditional African Medicine to alleviate painful and inflammatory conditions. This study investigated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanol root extracts of Alafia barteri (MeAB), C. mucronatum (MeCM), and Capparis thonningii (MeCT). Analgesic activity of the extracts (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, p.o. 1 h) was evaluated using acetic acid-, formalin- and hot plate-induced pain while anti-inflammatory actions (100 or 200 mg/kg) were investigated using the carrageenan- and xylene-induced edema tests. MeAB, MeCM, and MeCT (200 mg/kg) inhibited acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction by 55.07, 46.67, and 47.25%, respectively. In the formalin test, the index of pain inhibition of early and late phases was, respectively, 47.83 and 81.98% for MeAB, 56.10 and 63.81% for MeCM, and 42.84 and 63.29% for MeCT (200 mg/kg). MeAB and MeCT pretreatments significantly increased the reaction time by 46.67 and 25.53%, respectively, 120 min post-treatment in the hot-plate test. Naloxone (5 mg/kg, s.c.) pretreatment 15 min before extract administration, significantly (p opioid pathway and/or inhibition of chemical mediators of pain and inflammation.

  2. Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in the treatment of animal diarrhoea in Plateau State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offiah, Nkechi V; Makama, Sunday; Elisha, Ishaku L; Makoshi, Micah S; Gotep, Jurbe G; Dawurung, Christiana J; Oladipo, Olusola O; Lohlum, Ann S; Shamaki, David

    2011-07-11

    The use of medicinal plants in the treatment of diseases has generated renewed interest in recent times, as herbal preparations are increasingly being used in both human and animal healthcare systems. Diarrhoea is one of the common clinical signs of gastrointestinal disorders caused by both infectious and non-infectious agents and an important livestock debilitating condition. Plateau State is rich in savannah and forest vegetations and home to a vast collection of plants upheld in folklore as having useful medicinal applications. There is however scarcity of documented information on the medicinal plants used in the treatment of animal diarrhoea in the state, thus the need for this survey. Ten (10) out of 17 Local Government Areas (LGAs), spread across the three senatorial zones were selected. Farmers were interviewed using well structured, open-ended questionnaire and guided dialogue techniques between October and December 2010. Medicinal plants reported to be effective in diarrhoea management were collected using the guided field-walk method for identification and authentication. A total of 248 questionnaires were completed, out of which 207 respondents (83.47%) acknowledged the use of herbs in diarrhoea management, while 41 (16.53%) do not use herbs or apply other traditional methods in the treatment of diarrhoea in their animals. Medicinal plants cited as beneficial in the treatment of animal diarrhoea numbered 132, from which 57(43.18%) were scientifically identified and classified into 25 plant families with the families Fabaceae (21%) and Combretaceae (14.04%) having the highest occurrence. The plant parts mostly used in antidiarrhoeal herbal preparations are the leaves (43.86%) followed by the stem bark (29.82%). The herbal preparations are usually administered orally. Rural communities in Plateau State are a rich source of information on medicinal plants as revealed in this survey. There is need to scientifically ascertain the authenticity of the claimed

  3. Woody Vegetation Die off and Regeneration in Response to Rainfall Variability in the West African Sahel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Brandt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The greening in the Senegalese Sahel has been linked to an increase in net primary productivity, with significant long-term trends being closely related to the woody strata. This study investigates woody plant growth and mortality within greening areas in the pastoral areas of Senegal, and how these dynamics are linked to species diversity, climate, soil and human management. We analyse woody cover dynamics by means of multi-temporal and multi-scale Earth Observation, satellite based rainfall and in situ data sets covering the period 1994 to 2015. We find that favourable conditions (forest reserves, low human population density, sufficient rainfall led to a rapid growth of Combretaceae and Balanites aegyptiaca between 2000 and 2013 with an average increase of 4% woody cover. However, the increasing dominance and low drought resistance of drought prone species bears the risk of substantial woody cover losses following drought years. This was observed in 2014–2015, with a die off of Guiera senegalensis in most places of the study area. We show that woody cover and woody cover trends are closely related to mean annual rainfall, but no clear relationship with rainfall trends was found over the entire study period. The observed spatial and temporal variation contrasts with the simplified labels of “greening” or “degradation”. While in principal a low woody plant diversity negatively impacts regional resilience, the Sahelian system is showing signs of resilience at decadal time scales through widespread increases in woody cover and high regeneration rates after periodic droughts. We have reaffirmed that the woody cover in Sahel responds to its inherent climatic variability and does not follow a linear trend.

  4. Palaeoenvironments during a terminal Oligocene or early Miocene transgression in a fluvial system at the southwestern tip of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. L.; Neumann, F. H.; Cawthra, H. C.; Carr, A. S.; Scott, L.; Durugbo, E. U.; Humphries, M. S.; Cowling, R. M.; Bamford, M. K.; Musekiwa, C.; MacHutchon, M.

    2017-03-01

    A multi-proxy study of an offshore core in Saldanha Bay (South Africa) provides new insights into fluvial deposition, ecosystems, phytogeography and sea-level history during the late Paleogene-early Neogene. Offshore seismic data reveal bedrock topography, and provide evidence of relative sea levels as low as - 100 m during the Oligocene. 3D landscape reconstruction reveals hills, plains and an anastomosing river system. A Chattian or early Miocene age for the sediments is inferred from dinoflagellate taxa Distatodinium craterum, Chiropteridium lobospinosum, Homotryblium plectilum and Impagidinium paradoxum. The subtropical forest revealed by palynology includes lianas and vines, evergreen trees, palms and ferns, implying higher water availability than today, probably reduced seasonal drought and stronger summer rainfall. From topography, sedimentology and palynology we reconstruct Podocarpaceae-dominated forests, Proto-Fynbos, and swamp/riparian forests with palms and other angiosperms. Rhizophoraceae present the first South African evidence of Palaeogene/Neogene mangroves. Subtropical woodland-thicket with Combretaceae and Brachystegia (Peregrinipollis nigericus) probably developed on coastal plains. Some of the last remaining Gondwana elements on the sub-continent, e.g., Araucariaceae, are recorded. Charred particles signal fires prior to the onset of summer dry climate at the Cape. Marine and terrestrial palynomorphs, together with organic and inorganic geochemical proxy data, suggest a gradual glacio-eustatic transgression. The data shed light on Southern Hemisphere biogeography and regional climatic conditions at the Palaeogene-Neogene transition. The proliferation of the vegetation is partly ascribed to changes in South Atlantic oceanographic circulation, linked to the closure of the Central American Seaway and the onset of the Benguela Current 14 Ma.

  5. Effectiveness of native arbuscular mycorrhiza on the growth of four tree forest species from the Santa Marta Mountain, Veracruz (Mexico

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    Yolanda Retama-Ortiz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: The aim of this work was to isolate consortia of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF associated to Liquidambar styraciflua in soils of the Santa Marta Mountain in Veracruz, and to select highly effective mycorrhizal consortia on promoting the growth of four tree forest species with economic and ecological importance. Area of study: Santa Marta Mountain, inside the buffer area of the Los Tuxtlas Biological Reserve in Veracruz (México. Materials and methods: Ten composite samples of rhizosphere soil were collected from L. styraciflua trees of 13-15 cm DBH (diameter at breast height. Roots were fixed in FAA solution to determine the mycorrhizal colonization percentage, the abundance of morphospecies, and its effectiveness in promoting the growth of L. styraciflua, Terminalia amazonia, Cordia alliodora, and Cojoba arborea. Soil physical and chemical characteristics were also analysed, and soil type recognition was performed with the Reference Base for Soil FAO-ISRIC World-SICS. Mycorrhizal colonization was determined by the method of clearing and staining roots with trypan blue; total percentage of colonization was estimated by the Linderman-Biermann method. Spores were extracted for counting and identifying morphospecies from each soil sample, those with more effectiveness were selected and inoculated in the four tree species, based upon a completely random design there were evaluated height, number of leaves, total dry weight and foliar area. Main results: Average mycorrhizal colonization percentage was 45% from natural conditions, samples one and four showed 80% of AMF-colonization. Average number of spores was 617 in 100 g-1 of dry soil. Forty-seven AMF-morphospecies were identified. After eight months significant differences were observed in root colonization, height, number of leaves, total dry weight, leaf area and foliar analysis of N5+, P5+ and K+ on plants inoculated with rhizosphere samples of L. styraciflua. Terminalia

  6. The Roman and Islamic spice trade: New archaeological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Veen, Marijke; Morales, Jacob

    2015-06-05

    Tropical spices have long been utilized in traditional medicine and cuisine. New archaeological evidence highlights temporal changes in the nature and scale of the ancient spice trade and in the ancient usage of these plants. Furthermore, a study of their 'materiality' highlights that the impact of spices extends beyond their material properties. Here the botanical remains of spices recovered from archaeological excavations at a port active in the Roman and medieval Islamic spice trade are evaluated. Recent excavations at Quseir al-Qadim, an ancient port located on the Red Sea coast of Egypt, have provided new evidence for the spice trade. Due to the arid conditions ancient botanical remains were preserved in abundance and these included spices, as well as a wide range of other food plants. Quseir al-Qadim was active as a transport hub during both the Roman and Islamic periods (ca. AD 1-250, known as Myos Hormos, and again during ca. AD 1050-1500, known as Kusayr), and the remains thus facilitate a study of temporal change in the trade and usage of these spices. Standard archaeobotanical methods were used to recover, identify and analyze these remains. At least seven tropical spices were recovered from the excavations, as well as several other tropical imports, including black pepper (Piper nigrum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum), turmeric (Curcuma sp.), fagara (cf. Tetradium ruticarpum), myrobalan (Terminalia bellirica and Terminalia chebula) and betelnut (Areca catechu). A marked contrast between the two chronological periods in the range of spices recovered points to changes in the nature and scale of the trade between the Roman and medieval Islamic periods, while differences in the contexts from which they were recovered help to identify temporal changes in the way in which the spices were utilized during those periods. Archaeological and textual evidence suggest that in antiquity spices were used in ritual (funeral rites

  7. Effectiveness of native arbuscular mycorrhiza on the growth of four tree forest species from the Santa Marta Mountain, Veracruz (Mexico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retama-Ortiz, Y.; Ávila-Bello, C.H.; Alarcón, A.; Ferrera-Cerrato, R.

    2017-11-01

    Aim of the study: The aim of this work was to isolate consortia of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated to Liquidambar styraciflua in soils of the Santa Marta Mountain in Veracruz, and to select highly effective mycorrhizal consortia on promoting the growth of four tree forest species with economic and ecological importance. Area of study: Santa Marta Mountain, inside the buffer area of the Los Tuxtlas Biological Reserve in Veracruz (México). Materials and methods: Ten composite samples of rhizosphere soil were collected from L. styraciflua trees of 13-15 cm DBH (diameter at breast height). Roots were fixed in FAA solution to determine the mycorrhizal colonization percentage, the abundance of morphospecies, and its effectiveness in promoting the growth of L. styraciflua, Terminalia amazonia, Cordia alliodora, and Cojoba arborea. Soil physical and chemical characteristics were also analysed, and soil type recognition was performed with the Reference Base for Soil FAO-ISRIC World-SICS. Mycorrhizal colonization was determined by the method of clearing and staining roots with trypan blue; total percentage of colonization was estimated by the Linderman-Biermann method. Spores were extracted for counting and identifying morphospecies from each soil sample, those with more effectiveness were selected and inoculated in the four tree species, based upon a completely random design there were evaluated height, number of leaves, total dry weight and foliar area. Main results: Average mycorrhizal colonization percentage was 45% from natural conditions, samples one and four showed 80% of AMF-colonization. Average number of spores was 617 in 100 g-1 of dry soil. Forty-seven AMF-morphospecies were identified. After eight months significant differences were observed in root colonization, height, number of leaves, total dry weight, leaf area and foliar analysis of N5+, P5+ and K+ on plants inoculated with rhizosphere samples of L. styraciflua. Terminalia amazonia and

  8. Hábitos alimenticios de la ardilla Sciurus variegatoides (Rodentia: Sciuridae en la Península de Nicoya, Costa Rica

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    Javier Monge

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se determinaron los componentes de la dieta de la ardilla Sciurus variegatoides atrirufus en un área agrícola de la Península de Nicoya, Costa Rica (9º47’ N, 84º56’ W, correspondiente a las zonas de vida Bosque Húmedo Premontano Transición a Basal y Bosque Seco Tropical. Al analizar el contenido estomacal de 120 ardillas, entre febrero de 1987 y enero de 1988, se determinó que los alimentos más importantes fueron el coco (Cocos nucifera, el almendro (Terminalia catappa y el malinche (Delonix regia. Hubo diferencias en el tipo de alimento según la edad. Los adultos consumieron más el coco y los jóvenes el almendro, lo cual se explica por las características del fruto, así como por la arquitectura y acceso al árbol; el almendro aporta mejores condiciones de protección y un recurso alimenticio más accesible, por lo que fue mejor aprovechado por los individuos jóvenes.Feeding habits of the squirrel Sciurus variegatoides (Rodentia: Sciuridae in the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. Food items consumed by the squirrel Sciurus variegatoides atrirufus were determined in an agricultural setting in the Nicoya Península (9º47’ N, 84º56’ W, Costa Rica, where two life zones (Premontane Moist Forest Basal Belt Transition, and Tropical Dry Forest predominate. By analyzing the gut contents of 120 squirrels, from February 1987 through January 1988, it was determined that coconut (Cocos nucifera, indian almond (Terminalia catappa and flamboyant (Delonix regia were the most common dietary items. There were differences in food consumption according to age: adults preferred coconut, whereas young individuals preferred almond. This finding can be explained in terms of fruit characteristics, as well as tree architecture and accessibility for squirrels; almendro trees provide higher protection and a more accessible food resource, so that it was better used by young individuals. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(2: 681-686. Epub 2006 Jun 01.

  9. An enigmatic new stick insect from the Philippine Islands (Insecta: Phasmatodea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardo, Marco; Heller, Philipp

    2012-09-01

    A new genus and species of stick insect is described and figured from Mount Halcon, on the Philippine island of Mindoro. Conlephasma enigma gen. et sp. n. is a stout, flightless, and apparently ground-dwelling species with vivid integumental colors. When disturbed, specimens spray a defensive secretion from the prothoracic exocrine glands. The systematic position of Conlephasma within Euphasmatodea is unclear. The elongated galealobulus and the trichome area located laterally in the galea, represent unusual apomorphic characters of the maxilla that could indicate affinities with Necrosciinae or Pseudophasmatinae. All tibiae exhibit the anareolate condition. Euplantulae are of two types: those of tarsomeres I-IV feature a nubby microstructure, whilst the one on the ventral side of the pretarsus is smooth. Males are characterized by the presence of a well-developed vomer on the tenth abdominal segment. A distinctive and apomorphic trait of female terminalia is represented by the elongated tenth abdominal tergum. Conlephasma can represent an interesting taxon for studies on the evolution of the stick and leaf insects. Copyright © 2012 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. External macro- and micromorphology of the male of the stick insect Hermarchus leytensis (Insecta: Phasmatodea) with phylogenetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardo, Marco; Vallotto, Davide

    2014-04-01

    External morphological features of adult males are described in the stick insect Hermarchus leytensis from the Philippines, a species belonging to the little-known euphasmatodean lineage Stephanacridini. Mouthparts are characterized by some likely specialized features: (1) a dentate dorsal cutting edge on the mandibles; (2) distinct differences in size and shape between the galeae; (3) absence of an apical field of trichomes on the galeae; and (4) lacinial setae not protruding from the mesal margin, which features three bearing-like protuberances. The latter character state represents a very unusual condition, not known in other phasmatodeans or even in polyneopteran insects. A distinctive characteristic of attachment devices is that each euplantula is divided into two separated pads with a smooth microstructure, as it also occurs in some members of the clade Schizodecema. Male terminalia exhibit character states previously unknown in Stephanacridini, including (1) a symmetrical type of vomer and (2) claspers equipped with ∼ 70 very minute ventral teeth on each thorn pad. Potential implications for the systematic placement of H. leytensis are discussed. The results also underline the importance of microanatomical investigations as source of substantial characters for future analyses on phasmatodean systematics. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Prospects of apicultural entrepreneurship in coastal districts of eastern India: a melissopalynological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Debasis; Bhattacharya, Swapan; Ferguson, David K; Bera, Subir

    2014-01-01

    A melissopalynological analysis of fifty-one natural honey samples (twenty four spring, fifteen summer and twelve winter) collected during 2010-2011 from two east-coastal districts (20(0)20/ to 22(0)11/ N, 82(0)39/ to 87(0)01/ E) of Orissa, India was performed. Out of 37 unifloral samples found 25 were contributed by Apis cerana indica, seven by A. dorsata and the remaining five by A. florea. Out of 14 multifloral samples five were contributed by A. cerana indica, five by A. dorsata and the remaining four by A. florea. Principal component analysis confirmed the palynological classification of the unifloral honey samples. Eighty-two bee-plant taxa belonging to forty four families were recovered. The predominant nectariferous taxa of the spring season were Acanthus ilicifolius, Avicennia marina, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, Cocos nucifera, Eucalyptus globulus, Phoenix paludosa, Pongamia pinnata, Prosopis juliflora, Sonneratia apetala and Syzygium cumini. In the summer the predominant nectariferous taxa were Borassus flabellifer, C. nucifera, E. globulus, Syzygium cumini, Terminalia arjuna, Aegiceras corniculatum, P. paludosa and Sonneratia apetala while those of the winter were Brassica nigra, Coriandrum sativum, Zizyphus jujuba, Alstonia scholaris, E. globulus and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Very low (entrepreneurship. This should improve the socio-economic status of the people of this region.

  12. The efficacy of Liv-52 on liver cirrhotic patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled first approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseini, H Fallah; Alavian, S M; Heshmat, R; Heydari, M R; Abolmaali, K

    2005-09-01

    Cirrhosis is the irreversible sequel of various disorders that damage liver cells permanently over time. Presently, the use of herbal medicines for prevention and control of chronic liver diseases is in the focus of attention for both the physicians and the patients; the reasons for such shift toward the use of herbals include the expensive cost of conventional drugs, adverse drug reactions, and their inefficacy. In the present study, the efficacy of herbal medicine Liv-52 (consisting of Mandur basma, Tamarix gallica and herbal extracts of Capparis spinosa, Cichorium intybus, Solanum nigrum, Terminalia arjuna and Achillea millefolium) on liver cirrhosis outcomes was compared with the placebo for 6 months in 36 cirrhotic patients referred to Tehran Hepatic Center. The outcome measures included child-pugh score, ascites, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total billirubin, albumin, prothrombin time, platelet and white blood cells counts. The indices were recorded in all patients before and after 6 months of drug or placebo treatment. The results demonstrated that the patients treated with Liv-52 for 6 months had significantly better child-pugh score, decreased ascites, decreased serum ALT and AST. In placebo administered patients all the clinical parameters recorded at beginning of the study were not significantly different than after 6 months. We conclude that Liv-52 possess hepatoprotective effect in cirrhotic patients. This protective effect of Liv-52 can be attributed to the diuretic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and immunomodulating properties of the component herbs.

  13. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes, and other food spoilage microbes in vacuum packaged West African soft cheese 'wara'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetunji, V O

    2012-12-01

    'Wara' soft cheese is traditionally produced in Nigeria and has a poor microbial quality. This study assessed the survivability of Listeria monocytogenes and other food spoilage microbes (enterobacteriacea, molds and yeasts) in vacuum packaged soft cheese treated independently with Carica papaya (Vcpc), Terminalia cattapa (Vtcc) crude extracts, nisin (Vnc), and the combination of these three treatments (V+3) stored at 15 degrees C and 28 degrees C for a three week storage period. Vacuum packaging did not suppress Listeria monocytogenes, and there were no significant differences in the L. monocytogenes counts throughout the storage weeks (P > 0.05). The enterobacteriacea counts were suppressed to undetectable levels at 15 degrees C storage temperature by the third week of storage in all treatments except the Vnc and V+3. Molds and yeasts were undetectable in all treatments throughout the storage weeks. Significant differences occurred in the microbial count at the two storage temperatures and storage weeks (P soft cheese storage can suppress enterobacteriacea, molds and yeasts. Food technologists developing industrialized 'wara should consider including these extracts and vacuum packaging in their production. Therefore, their use in extension of the shelf-life of soft cheese is recommended.

  14. Physical Characters of Trees And Their Effects on Micro-Climate (Case Study at Urban Forest and Green Open Space at Semarang City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endes N Dahlan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Air temperature in cities are increasing which can cause reduce the human comfort and productivity. Urban forest can make the environment comfortable. The objectiveof the researc hwere: (1. To Determine the effects of urban forest on air temperature and relative humidity, (2. To analyze the effects of physical characters of trees ont he micro-climate amelioration and(3. To Determine species of trees which are very effective for micro-climate amelioration.The results of the research revealed that the average of daily air temperature in the urban forest was 30.2 C with arelative humidityof 74.0%, while the daily air temperature around the urban forest was 31.8 Karakter Fisik Pohon ... (Dahlan E o C with relative humidityof 71.1%. Tree composisitin of all study sites consist of192trees, 29 speciesand 13families. The TinjomoyoForest Tourism has the highest density of trees(406trees/ha, while the lowest in the Parks Minister Supeno (316trees/ha. Value of Key Performance Indicator (KPI of trees based on calculation of tall of trees, diameter of canopies, total leaves area and canopy forms noticed that very effective trees for micro-climate amelioration were: Angsana(Pterocarpus indicus, beringin(Ficus benjamina, flamboyan(Delonix regia , ketapang(Terminalia catappa, mahoni (Swietenia mahogany, andtrembesi (Albizia saman.

  15. SURVEY, IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF INSECT INJURIES IN ORNAMENTAL TREES IN THE URBAN AREA OF GOIÂNIA, GOIÁS STATE, BRASIL LEVANTAMENTO, IDENTIFICAÇÃO E AVALIAÇÃO DOS DANOS DE INSETOS EM ÁRVORES ORNAMENTAIS NA ÁREA URBANA DE GOIÂNIA (GO

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    Antônio Henrique Garcia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    From 1800 ornamental trees sampled in Goiânia urban area, Paquira aquatica represented 62,7 %, Cesalpinia sp. 15,3 %, Bauhinia variegata 10 %, Sapthodea campanulata 6 %, Terminalia catappa 3,2 %, Acacia sp. 1,2%, Ponciana sp. 1,0 %, and other species 1 %. The most frequent insect species observed in P. aquatica were Psylla floccosa ( 92,3%, Steirastoma breve (76,7%, Palindia detracta (63,4%, Phelypera shuppeli (43,4% and Euchroma gigantea (23,7%. The most severe injuries to plants are caused by S. breve, which desiccates trunk and stems, and E. gigantea. Its larvae destroy the whole root system and cause the fall of the tree. Orthezia praelonga was observed in 84,6 % of the sampled B. variegata; in 30 trees 20% died after three years and 40% at the of the fourth year; from 50 seedlings 36% were desiccated after one year and 58% 36 months later. O. praelonga was observed in 94,6% of S. campanulata; in 32 trees 8% were desiccated in one year, 18% in the second and the remaining at the end of the third year. Icerya purchasi was observed in 84,7% of Cesalpinia sp.; from 48 trees 5% were desiccated after six, 16 % two years later and 30% at the end of the fourth year; from 50 seedlings of this species, under intense attack, 78% were desiccated in 15 days. Quesadas gigas e Dorisiana sp. were observed in Acacia sp. In Ponciana sp. it was observed the presence of some species of Scolytidae, Platipodidae and Rhinotermitidae, and no injuries were observed in Terminalia catappa.

    KEY-WORDS:

  16. A review of the genus Drymeia Meigen, 1826 (Diptera: Muscidae) in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokina, Vera S; Pont, Adrian C

    2015-08-14

    A key is provided to the 26 species of the genus Drymeia Meigen, 1826 known from Russia and four additional species that may be found in Russia (D. brumalis (Rondani, 1866), D. cantabrigensis (Huckett, 1965), D. gymnophthalma (Hennig, 1963), D. similis (Malloch, 1918)). The key includes the 10 new species here described from the mountains of South Siberia (D. acrostichalis sp. nov., D. aristata sp. nov., D. cilitarsis sp. nov., D. glabra sp. nov., D. grandis sp. nov., D. grisea sp. nov., D. longiseta sp. nov., D. phaonina sp. nov., D. puchokana sp. nov., D. triseta sp. nov.,) and other two new species from the Russian Arctic (D. cristata sp. nov., D. taymirensis sp. nov.). Five species (D. fasciculata (Stein, 1916), D. firthiana (Huckett, 1965), D. groenlandica (Lundbeck, 1901), D. quadrisetosa (Malloch, 1919), D. neoborealis (Snyder, 1949)) are newly recorded from Russia. Three new synonymies are proposed: D. pribilofensis (Malloch, 1921) (syn: D. inaequalis (Malloch, 1922)), D. setibasis (Huckett, 1965) (syn: D. gymnophthalma sibirica (Lavčiev, 1971, unavailable junior secondary homonym) and D. quadrisetosa (Malloch, 1919) (syn: D. amurensis (Lavčiev, 1971)). The male terminalia and the female ovipositors of the new species are illustrated. New faunistic data are given for some previously described species of Russian Drymeia.

  17. Floristics of mangrove tree species in Angke-Kapuk Protected Forest

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    RUGAYAH

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Angke-Kapuk Protected Forest with total area 44.76 ha is part of the Tegal Alur-Angke Kapuk mangrove forests. Therefore, this forest has important role as an interface between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, whether physical, biological or social-economic aspects, to determine mangrove ecosystem as a productive and unique ecosystem in the coastal area. However, the study of floristic of the mangrove vegetation in this forest has never to be done previously. According to the study on September to November 2003, in this forest found 8 species of mangrove trees. The tree species can be classified into two groups. The first group is true mangroves (7 species, i.e. Avicennia officinalis, Rhizophora apiculata, R. mucronata, R. stylosa, Sonneratia caseolaris (major component, Excoecaria agallocha, and Xylocarpus moluccensis (minor component. The last group is mangrove associate, i.e. Terminalia catappa. In this forest also found 7 tree species, i.e. Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, Calophyllum inophyllum, Cerbera manghas, Paraserianthes falcataria, Tamarindus indicus, Acacia mangium, and A. auriculiformis as introduced species. The growth level of B. gymnorhiza, C. inophyllum and C. manghas up to now is seedling and sapling, while the growth level of another introduced species is till in pole and tree.

  18. Diversity and ecology of Varanus indicus in Pepaya Island at Teluk Cenderawasih National Park, West Irian Jaya

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    DENY ANJELIUS IYAI

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Monitor lizard (Varanidae has dispersed widely in Indonesia, even in Papua. Papua contents of six species. It’s distribution, abundance, both in land and island have been known yet, even carrying capacity of feeding relative limited. However, species extinction rates in nature were increasing both in it. This research was done in Papaya Island in Teluk Cenderawasih National Park, Nabire, Papua since 24th -25th October 2005. Descriptive method was done to answer this study. This research resulted that in Papaya island contents only one species that is Varanus indicus. The V. indicus chosen same habitat in southern part of Papaya island. This species dispersed on 0-4 m above sea level, humidity about 78.6%, and temperature about 23.90C. Vegetation was dominated by coconut (Cocos nucifera, bitangur (Calophyllum inophyllum and tikar (Pandanus sp., papaya (Carica papaya, and ketapang (Terminalia catappa. V. indicus chosen Megapodius reinwadt nest as nesting area. Population of V. indicus was estimated as much 36.3 ≈ 36 pieces by King Method. The nest of V. indicus placed in Cassuarina sp. tree where cutting down. The diet of V. indicus was found such as megapods, sea birds, lizard (sauria, butterflies and bats (Macrochyroptera. People were caused threatened both direct and indirect toward the V. indicus existence.

  19. The use of crude extracts from traditional medicinal plants to eliminate Trichodina sp. in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings

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    Chanagun Chitmanat

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The treatment for ectoparasitic diseases in freshwater fish with formalin seems at present to be ineffective. For this reason it is evidently a useless cost. In addition, formalin possibly leaves toxic residues in fish flesh and in the environment which are eventually harmful to consumers. The alternative way to solve this problem is to use traditional medicinal plants instead. The purpose of this research is to determine the possibility of using garlic (Allium sativum and Indian almond (Terminalia catappa as optional chemicals to treat fish ectoparasites, Trichodina sp. The results showed that crude extracts of either garlic or Indian almond at 800 mg/l significantly (P < 0.05 eliminated Trichodina sp. infections in tilapia (average weight 3.62±0.06 g each. To evaluate the acute toxicity of these products to the host fish, groups of 20 tilapia (same size as abovewere exposed to 3 concentrations of each product for 96 h. Mortality was then determined. The 2 h LC50 for tilapia exposed to crude extract of garlic was 2,259.44 mg/L while the 16 h LC50 for tilapia exposed to Indian almond extract was 46,665.94 mg/L. This information is the beneficial and fundamental knowledge to develop guidelines to reduce the use of chemicals and antibiotics in freshwater fish culture businesses. The research is underway to determine the long-term effect of Indian almond and garlic to tilapia, if any.

  20. Two new species of Mycodrosophila (Diptera, Drosophilidae proposed by molecular and morphological approaches, with a key to American species

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    João Junges

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT There are approximately 130 species of MycodrosophilaOldenberg, 1914 worldwide, although only nine species were recorded in American countries so far, three of which are exclusively Nearctic, five exclusively Neotropical and one found in both biogeographic regions (Mycodrosophila projectans. Such a small number of American species is likely a consequence of collecting bias, which favors the capture of frugivorous drosophilids, and to the general absence of Neotropical Mycodrosophila studies in the last 50 years. Here, we describe two commonly sampled species of Mycodrosophila from the Amazonian and Pampa Brazilian biomes, which share morphological similarities with Mycodrosophila neoprojectans and M. projectans, respectively. We compared sequences of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI, external morphology characteristics and male terminalia among these species. Based on a DNA barcoding approach coupled to morphological differences, we proposed the delimitation of two new species, Mycodrosophila hofmanni sp. nov. and Mycodrosophila valentae sp. nov. An updated key to identifying Neotropical and Nearctic Mycodrosophila species is also provided.

  1. Tool use in urban populations of capuchin monkeys Sapajus spp. (Primates: Cebidae

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    Lucas M. Aguiar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Capuchin monkeys, Sapajus Kerr, 1792, are known for their flexible behavior, including tool use, and their ability to survive in urban forests. We observed capuchin juveniles using wood as hammer and anvil and different materials as sponges (four tool-use events in two geographically distinct urban populations in Brazil, in 2012: two in Goiânia, Central Brazil and two in Foz do Iguaçu, Southern Brazil. In Goiânia, a male used a detached tree branch as a hammer and a buttress root as an anvil to pound a seed of Terminalia Linnaeus. Another male used a small branch with leaves as a dipping tool to access water inside a tree trunk hole. In Foz do Iguaçu, the capuchins used a small branch and a piece of bread to obtain water by dipping them into tree trunk holes. This latter event might be interpreted as a case of self-control, with a familiar food item used as a tool to reach a resource that is difficult to access otherwise. Our observations contribute to the knowledge on the tool-kit of capuchins and we propose that these urban populations should be conserved for scientific evaluations of behavioral flexibility in non-human primates.

  2. A review of five traditionally used anti-diabetic plants of Bangladesh and their pharmacological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafe, Md Rajdoula

    2017-10-01

    Plants are used traditionally throughout the globe to treat various diseases. Traditionally used medicinal plants are an essential part of the health sector in Bangladesh due to its abundance of a vast source of ethno-medicine. Rural people from developing country like Bangladesh are greatly dependent on traditional source of medicine. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing from recent years; therefore various researches are going on to discover better medicine to treat this disease. This study has focused on five plants which are Andrographis paniculata, Ageratum conyzoides, Swertia chirata, Terminalia arjuna, and Azadirachta indica to find out their traditional formulation as anti-diabetic medicine and their pharmacological activity has also been explored through literature search. The available information about traditional anti-diabetic uses of these plants and their pharmacological activities were collected from various electronic sources like Pubmed, SciFinder, Elsevier, Springer, Scopus, Scirus, Science Direct, Google Scholar and Web of Science apart from these locally available books and peer reviewed journal were also used to collect information. This study will help to strengthen the relation between traditional medicine, pharmacology and drug development. A clue may be found from the information provided this review to discover new and better anti-diabetic drugs. Copyright © 2017 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. DIVERSITY OF SOIL ARTHROPOD IN GREEN BARRIER AREA PT. PUSRI

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    Arif Hidayat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted to inventory and identify as well as acknowledge the correlation between vegetation type with soil arthropods in the Green Barrier area of PT Pusri. PT. Pusri green Barrier area is 28 hectares and dominated by 10 types of vegetation, such as, the Angsana (Pterocarpus indicus Wild, Bambu (Bambusa Sp, Beringin (Ficus benyamina, Buah Roda (Hura crepitans L, Jati (Tectona grandis L, Kelampayan (Neolamarckia cadamba , Ketapang (Terminalia catappa L, Mahony (Swietenia macrophylla King, Pulai (Alstonia scholaris, and Sengon (Paraserianthes falcataria L. Soil arthropods were collected by using pit fall traps and funnel barlese-tullgren in every type of vegetation, between July-August 2015. Identification of arthropod genera Identification has been done in Entomology Laboratory of the Agriculture Plant Disease Faculty Sriwijaya University, and analysis of soil organic in the Laboratory of Soil Faculty of Agriculture Sriwijaya University. The results were obtained into 3 classes of soil arthropods belonging to the 10 orders, 28 families and 35 genera. The diversity index value of soil arthropods in various types of vegetation is classified moderately (H= 1-3, and no type of soil arthropods were dominant, mean that soil arthropods with different types spread over in the various types of vegetation in the area of Green Barrier PT. Pusri. Light intensity abiotic factors play an important role in the life of the soil arthropod communities in vegetation Sengon (Paraserianthes falcataria L with a correlation coefficient 1.00 Keywords: soil arthropods, community structure, a biotic factors, Green Barrier PT. Pusri

  4. Inhibition of Propionibacterium acnes lipase by extracts of Indian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, V; Bandivadekar, A; Debjani, D

    2012-06-01

    Lipases play an important role in pathogenesis of acne by hydrolysing sebum triglycerides and releasing irritating free fatty acids in the pilosebaceous follicles. Lipase is a strong chemotactic and proinflammatory antigen. Therefore, lipase has generated a high interest as a pharmacological target for antiacne drugs. The aim of this study was to identify inhibitory effects of plant extracts on the lipase activity of Propionibacterium acnes. Colorimetric microassay was used to determine lipase activity. Extracts from Terminalia chebula and Embelia ribes showed lower IC(50) value (1 μg mL(-1) ) for lipase inhibition as compared to Vitex negundo and Picrorhiza kurroa (19 and 47 μg mL(-1) , respectively). The active component responsible for lipase inhibition was isolated. This study reports for the first time the novel antilipase activity of chebulagic acid (IC(50) : 60 μmol L(-1) ) with minimum inhibitory concentration value of 12.5 μg mL(-1) against P. acnes. The inhibitory potential of plant extracts was further confirmed by plate assay. The organism was grown in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of extracts from P. kurroa, V. negundo, T. chebula, E. ribes and antibiotics such as clindamycin and tetracycline. Extract from T. chebula showed significant inhibition of lipase activity and number of P. acnes. © 2012 The Authors. ICS © 2012 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  5. 5'-NUCLEOTIDASES OF NAJA NAJA KARACHIENSIS SNAKE VENOM: THEIR DETERMINATION, TOXICITIES AND REMEDIAL APPROACH BY NATURAL INHIBITORS (MEDICINAL PLANTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Asd, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Iqbal, Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Khawaja, Naeem Raza; Muneer, Saiqa; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Khan, Muhammad Saqib; Murtaza, Ghulam; Hussain, Izhar

    2016-01-01

    Present study was carried out regarding enzymatic assay for 5'-nucleotidase enzymes present in snake venom Naja naja karachiensis and to evaluate twenty eight medicinal plants as their antidotes. Elevated enzymatic activities i.e., 119, 183, 262 and 335 U/mL were observed in 10, 20, 30 and 40 µg of crude venom, respectively, in dose dependent manner. Among various plant extracts only two (Bauhinia vaiiegate L. and Citms linion (L.) Burm. f.) were found 94% effective at 160 µg to neutralize 112 U/mL activities (p 0.5) while reference standard was proved 93.2% useful at 80 pg to halt 111 U/mL activities. Cedrus deodara G. Don, Enicostemna hyssopifolium (Willd.) Verdoom, Terminalia arjuma Wight & Am. and Zingiber officinalis Rosc. (at 160 µg) were found ≥90% effective (0.5 ≥ p ≥ 0.1) while Citrulus colocynthis, Fogonia cretica L., Rhazya stticta Dcne and Stenolobiun stans (L.) D. Don (at 320 µg) were proved 90% effective (0.05 ≥ p ≥ 0.02). The remaining plant extracts were observed abortive (p ≥ 0.001) in neutralization of 5'-nucleotidases enzymatic actions. This study emphasizes further characterization of active plant extracts to further explore the antivenom influences of these herbal remedies against deleterious effects produced by 5'-nucleotidase enzymes after snake bite envenomation.

  6. Viabilidad y germinación de semillas de tres especies arbóreas nativas de la selva tropical, Chiapas, México

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    Carolina Orantes-García

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Se determinó la proporción de semillas viables y la pérdida de viabilidad debido al periodo de almacenamiento, así como el efecto de tratamientos pregerminativos que favorecen la germinación en semillas deCordia alliodora, Terminalia amazoniayBursera bipinnata, árboles nativos de la selva tropical, Chiapas, México. Se encontró que las semillas recién colectadas presentaron más del 90% de viabilidad, la cual fue disminuyendo hasta mostrar un 15% enB. bipinnata, 34% enC. alliodoray 18% enT. amazoniadespués de 12 meses de almacenamiento. De acuerdo con la germinación acumulada se encontraron diferencias significativas entre los tratamientos (pB. bipinnata63%,C. alliodora62% yT. amazonia54%. En conclusión, para poder obtener un mayor porcentaje de semillas germinadas en poco tiempo, es necesario dar un tratamiento previo a la siembra para las semillas de estas especies. El almacenamiento de las semillas durante un año provocó una declinación en la capacidad germinativa.

  7. Is Drosophila nasuta Lamb (Diptera, Drosophilidae currently reaching the status of a cosmopolitan species?

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    Carlos Ribeiro Vilela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In early March 2015, three males and two females of one unknown species of Drosophila were collected from a compost pile and some garbage cans in the west region of the city of São Paulo, state of São Paulo, Brazil. Morphologically it is easily identified by the presence of the following conspicuous features: a brownish dorsal stripe along pleura, an entirely iridescent silvery-whitish frons when seen directly from the front, and a row of cuneiform setae on anteroventral side of femur of foreleg; the former two traits being more evident in males. The species was easily reared in a modified banana-agar medium and two isofemale lines were established allowing to obtain mitotic cells showing a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 8. Based both on morphological and chromosomal features, in addition to the geographical distribution, we concluded that the unknown flies belong to Drosophila nasuta Lamb, 1914, a tropical species of the nasuta subgroup of the Drosophila immigrans species group. Photomicrographs of male imagines, terminalia, mitotic and meiotic metaphase plates, as well as of female mitotic metaphase, are included.

  8. Metabolomic Tools to Assess the Chemistry and Bioactivity of Endophytic Aspergillus Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfike, Ahmed F; Tate, Rothwelle; Abbott, Gráinne; Young, Louise; Viegelmann, Christina; Schumacher, Marc; Diederich, Marc; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie

    2017-10-01

    Endophytic fungi associated with medicinal plants are a potential source of novel chemistry and biology that may find applications as pharmaceutical and agrochemical drugs. In this study, a combination of metabolomics and bioactivity-guided approaches were employed to isolate secondary metabolites with cytotoxicity against cancer cells from an endophytic Aspergillus aculeatus. The endophyte was isolated from the Egyptian medicinal plant Terminalia laxiflora and identified using molecular biological methods. Metabolomics and dereplication studies were accomplished by utilizing the MZmine software coupled with the universal Dictionary of Natural Products database. Metabolic profiling, with aid of multivariate data analysis, was performed at different stages of the growth curve to choose the optimized method suitable for up-scaling. The optimized culture method yielded a crude extract abundant with biologically-active secondary metabolites. Crude extracts were fractionated using different high-throughput chromatographic techniques. Purified compounds were identified by HR-ESI-MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR. This study introduced a new method of dereplication utilizing both high-resolution mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. The metabolites were putatively identified by applying a chemotaxonomic filter. We also present a short review on the diverse chemistry of terrestrial endophytic strains of Aspergillus, which has become a part of our dereplication work and this will be of wide interest to those working in this field. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  9. AVALIAÇÃO DA QUALIDADE DO SOMBREAMENTO ARBÓREO NO MEIO RURAL

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    Cristiane Guiselini

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Objetivou-se, com este trabalho, avaliar a qualidade das sombras proporcionadas por algumas espécies arbóreas, de forma a quantificar e estabelecer um critério para indicação aos produtores rurais e paisagistas. Foram avaliadas as sombras das espécies: Melia azedarach (Santa Babara, Leucaena leucocephala (Leucena, Terminalia catappa (Chapéu de Sol e Bambusa vulgaris (Bambu cujos dados foram colhidos de hora em hora; no período entre as 9:00 até as 17:00 h, registrou-se: temperatura de bulbo seco, temperatura de bulbo úmido, umidade relativa, temperatura de globo negro e velocidade do vento, com instrumentos localizados debaixo da sombra respectiva e, a partir dos dados coletados, obtiveram-se os índices de conforto térmico: carga térmica radiante (CTR, índice de termômetro de globo negro (WBGT e índice de temperatura e umidade relativa (THI. Os resultados obtidos após a análise estatística dos dados, permitiram concluir que a Leucena possui qualidade de sombra inferior às demais e que o Bambu apresentou melhores características térmicas. A Santa Bárbara e Chapéu de Sol não se diferenciaram estatisticamente e apresentaram valores intermediários.

  10. A charge transfer complex nematic liquid crystalline gel with high electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargavi, R.; Nair, Geetha G.; Krishna Prasad, S.; Majumdar, R.; Bag, Braja G.

    2014-10-01

    We describe the rheological, dielectric and elastic properties of a nematic liquid crystal gel created using an anthrylidene derivative of arjunolic acid, a chiral triterpenoid, obtained from the extracts of the wood of Terminalia arjuna. In this novel gel, having the electron-donor and acceptor components as minority constituents, the gelation and strengthening of charge-transfer complex (CTC) formation are seen to be occurring concomitantly. In addition to being mechanically strong with a large storage modulus, the gel with the maximized CTC exhibits Frank bend elastic constant values that approach nanonewton levels. The highlight of the study is the observation of 4-5 orders of magnitude increase in electrical conductivity for this gel, a value that is higher than even in the CT complexes of 2-d ordered columnar structures. A further important advantage of the present system over the columnar complex is that the high conductivity is seen for ac probing also, and owing to the nematic nature can be switched between its anisotropic limits. Some of these features are ascribed to a specific molecular packing architecture, which reduces the trapping of the charge carriers.

  11. A charge transfer complex nematic liquid crystalline gel with high electrical conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargavi, R.; Nair, Geetha G., E-mail: geeraj88@gmail.com, E-mail: skpras@gmail.com; Krishna Prasad, S., E-mail: geeraj88@gmail.com, E-mail: skpras@gmail.com [Centre for Nano and Soft Matter Sciences, Jalahalli, Bangalore 560013 (India); Majumdar, R.; Bag, Braja G. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore (W) 721 102 (India)

    2014-10-21

    We describe the rheological, dielectric and elastic properties of a nematic liquid crystal gel created using an anthrylidene derivative of arjunolic acid, a chiral triterpenoid, obtained from the extracts of the wood of Terminalia arjuna. In this novel gel, having the electron-donor and acceptor components as minority constituents, the gelation and strengthening of charge-transfer complex (CTC) formation are seen to be occurring concomitantly. In addition to being mechanically strong with a large storage modulus, the gel with the maximized CTC exhibits Frank bend elastic constant values that approach nanonewton levels. The highlight of the study is the observation of 4–5 orders of magnitude increase in electrical conductivity for this gel, a value that is higher than even in the CT complexes of 2-d ordered columnar structures. A further important advantage of the present system over the columnar complex is that the high conductivity is seen for ac probing also, and owing to the nematic nature can be switched between its anisotropic limits. Some of these features are ascribed to a specific molecular packing architecture, which reduces the trapping of the charge carriers.

  12. The Mycetophilaruficollis Meigen (Diptera, Mycetophilidae) group in Europe: elucidating species delimitation with COI and ITS2 sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgenstein, Siiri; Kurina, Olavi; Põldmaa, Kadri

    2015-01-01

    European species of the Mycetophilaruficollis group are compared on the basis of morphology and sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit one (COI) and the ITS2 region of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The study represents the first evaluation of morphology-based species delimitation of closely related fungus gnat species by applying molecular information. Detailed descriptions and illustrations of the male terminalia are presented along with a key for the identification of all nine European species of the group. Phylogenetic analyses of molecular data generally supported the morphological species discrimination. The barcoding region of COI superseded ITS2 rDNA in resolving species. In the COI barcoding region interspecific differences ranged from 2.9 to 10.6% and the intraspecific distance from 0.08 to 0.8%. Only COI data distinguished between the similar and closely related Mycetophilaichneumonea and Mycetophilauninotata of which the latter was observed to include cryptic species. The host range of some species is suggested to be narrower than previously considered and to depend on the forest type. Presented evidence indicates the importance of analysing sequence data of morphologically very similar mycetophages reared from identified host fungi for elucidating species delimitation as well as their geographic and host ranges. New country records, viz. Estonia for Mycetophilaevanida, Georgia for Mycetophilaichneumonea, Mycetophilaidonea and Mycetophilaruficollis, and Norway for Mycetophilastrobli, widen the known distribution ranges of these species.

  13. Anti-pseudomona and Anti-bacilli Activity of Some Medicinal Plants of Iran

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    Gholam Hosein Shahidi Bonjar

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of plants in treatment of burns, dermatophytes, and infectious diseases is common in traditional medicine of Iran. Based on ethno pharmacological and taxonomic information, antibacterial activities of methanol extracts of some medicinal plants of Iran were determined by In Vitro bioassays using agar diffusion-method against standard strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus and B. pumilis at 20 mg/ml. From 180 plant species of 72 families, 78 species (43.3% in 42 families (58.3% showed antibacterial activities against B. cereus (88.4%, B. subtilis (39.7%, B. pumilis (37.1%, P. fluorescens (37.1% and P. aeruginos (10.2%. The most active plant families were Apiaceae, Compositae and Labiatae with 9, 8 and 7 active plant species respectively. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of the active plants were determined using two fold serial dilutions. Most active plant against Bacilli was Myrtus communis L. with MIC of 1.87 mg/ml. For Pseudomonas species, Dianthus caryophyllus L. and Terminalia chebula (Gaertner Retz. were more active with the MIC of 0.46 mg/ml for P. fluorescens and of 1.87 mg/ml for P. aeruginosa respectively.

  14. Effects of punicalagin and punicalin on carrageenan-induced inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C C; Hsu, Y F; Lin, T C

    1999-01-01

    Punicalagin and punicalin were isolated from the leaves of Terminalia catappa L. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of punicalagin and punicalin carrageenan-induced hind paw edema in rats. After evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects, the edema rates were increased by carrageenan administration and reduced by drug treatment. After 4 hr of carrageenan administration, the best effect group was the punicalagin (10 mg/kg) treated group (inhibition rate was 58.15%), and the second was the punicalagin (5 mg/kg)-treated group (inhibition rate was 39.15%). However, even if the anti-inflammatory activity of punicalagin was the same as punicalin at the 5 mg/kg dose, the inhibition effect from larger doses of punicalagin was increased, but there was a decrease with a larger dose of punicalin. The data showed that both punicalagin and punicalin exert anti-inflammatory activity, but treatment with larger doses of punicalin may induce some cell damages.

  15. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of punicalagin and punicalin on acetaminophen-induced liver damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C C; Hsu, Y F; Lin, T C; Hsu, H Y

    2001-05-01

    Punicalagin and punicalin were isolated from the leaves of Terminalia catappa L., a Combretaceous plant distributed throughout tropical and subtropical beaches, which is used for the treatment of dermatitis and hepatitis. Our previous studies showed that both of these compounds exert antioxidative activity. In this study, the antihepatotoxic activity of punicalagin and punicalin on acetaminophen-induced toxicity in the rat liver was evaluated. After evaluating the changes of several biochemical functions in serum, the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were increased by acetaminophen administration and reduced by punicalagin and punicalin. Histological changes around the hepatic central vein and oxidative damage induced by acetaminophen were also recovered by both compounds. The data show that both punicalagin and punicalin exert antihepatotoxic activity, but treatment with larger doses enhanced liver damage. These results suggest that even if punicalagin and punicalin have antioxidant activity at small doses, treatment with larger doses will possibly induce some cell toxicities. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Antimicrobial Activity of Five Herbal Extracts Against Multi Drug Resistant (MDR Strains of Bacteria and Fungus of Clinical Origin

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    Mashiatullah Siddiqui

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial activities of the crude ethanolic extracts of five plants were screened against multidrug resistant (MDR strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Candida albicans. ATCCstrains of Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus bovis, Pseudimonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Candida albicans were also tested. The strains that showed resistance against the maximum number of antibiotics tested were selected for an antibacterial assay. The MDR strains were sensitive to the antimicrobial activity of Acacia nilotica, Syzygium aromaticum and Cinnamum zeylanicum, whereas they exhibited strong resistance to the extracts of Terminalia arjuna and Eucalyptus globulus. Community-acquired infections showed higher sensitivity than the nosocomial infections against these extracts. The most potent antimicrobial plant was A. nilotica (MIC range 9.75-313µg/ml, whereas other crude plant extracts studied in this report were found to exhibit higher MIC values than A. nilotica against community acquired as well as nosocomial infection. This study concludes that A. nilotica, C. zeylanicum and S. aromaticum can be used against multidrug resistant microbes causing nosocomial and community acquired infections.

  17. WOOD PRE-TREATMENT INFLUENCE ON THE HYDRATION OF PORTLAND CEMENT IN COMBINATION WITH SOME TROPICAL WOOD SPECIES

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    Nusirat Aderinsola SADIKU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of three pre-treatment methods on the hydration characteristics of Portland cement in combination with three tropical hardwood species was investigated. The maximum hydration temperature and time to reach maximum hydration temperature were analysed for the wood-cement-water mixtures of the three species after removing inhibitory extractives of wood samples by extraction with 5% Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, cold and hot water after removing inhibitory extractives of wood samples. There were differences in the hydration reaction of the wood species with Portland cement using the different pre-treatment methods. The compatibility of the wood species with Portland cement improved following pre-treatment. Sodium hydroxide pre-treatment had the most significant effect followed by hot water. Terminalia ivorensis (Idigbo, and Antiaris africana (Oriro species showed considerable improvement in their compatibility with Portland cement at 5% Sodium hydroxide pre-treatment with maximum hydration temperature of 65oC where Arere had 60.5oC where both cold and hot water were unable to raise the hydration temperature beyond 55.5oC . This study shows that the wood species requires more than cold and hot water extraction to make them suitable for wood cement composite materials as extraction with sodium hydroxide (1% solution was found to be the most effective treatment for the wood species under investigation.

  18. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

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    Saima Jadoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed.

  19. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Bin Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Khan, Abida Kalsoom; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed.

  20. Efficacy of anthelmintic properties of medicinal plant extracts against Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraj, C; Rahuman, A Abdul

    2011-12-01

    The development of anthelmintic resistance has made the search for alternatives to control gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants imperative. Among these alternatives are several medicinal plants traditionally used as anthelmintics. This present work evaluated the efficacy of ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol dried leaf and seed extracts of five medicinal plants were tested in vitro ovicidal and larvicidal activities on Haemonchus contortus. The in vitro assay was based on egg hatch assay (EHA) and larval development assay (LDA), all plant extracts were evaluated at five concentrations 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 and 3.13 mg/ml. The leaf and seed ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol of Annona squamosa, Eclipta prostrata, Solanum torvum, Terminalia chebula, and Catharanthus roseus extracts were showed complete inhibition (100%) at the maximum concentration tested (50 mg/ml). The overall findings of the present study have shown that our experimental plant extracts contain possible anthelmintic compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Indigenous drugs in ischemic heart disease in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Shridhar; Aggarwal, Amitesh

    2009-11-01

    India is currently facing the silent epidemic of ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, and stroke. Both diabetes and ischemic heart disease appear in Indian people a decade earlier compared to whites. The recent evidence that certain medicinal plants possess hypoglycemic, lipid-lowering, and immunomodulating properties on account of their rich flavonoid and/or other glucose-lowering active constituents merits scientific scrutiny in this regard. The present communication aims to give a brief review of those plants that could be useful in T2DM associated with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and/or dyslipidemia. Aegle marmelos (bael), Allium sativum (garlic), Curcuma domestica (turmeric), Eugenia jambolana (jamun), Murraya koenigii (curry leaves), Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek), and Terminalia arjuna (arjun) have been found to be useful in diabetes associated with ischemic heart disease. Their active biomolecules have been identified. They have also been demonstrated to be safe in long-term use. Further clinical research regarding their potency and efficacy vis-à-vis oral hypoglycemics needs to done.

  2. Effect of extraction solvent/technique on the antioxidant activity of selected medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Bushra; Anwar, Farooq; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2009-06-15

    Theeffects of four extracting solvents [absolute ethanol, absolute methanol, aqueous ethanol (ethanol: water, 80:20 v/v) and aqueous methanol (methanol: water, 80:20 v/v)] and two extraction techniques (shaking and reflux) on the antioxidant activity of extracts of barks of Azadirachta indica, Acacia nilotica, Eugenia jambolana, Terminalia arjuna, leaves and roots of Moringa oleifera, fruit of Ficus religiosa,and leaves of Aloe barbadensis were investigated. The tested plant materials contained appreciable amounts of total phenolic contents (0.31-16.5 g GAE /100g DW), total flavonoid (2.63-8.66 g CE/100g DW); reducing power at 10 mg/mL extract concentration (1.36-2.91), DPPH(.) scavenging capacity (37.2-86.6%), and percent inhibition of linoleic acid (66.0-90.6%). Generally higher extract yields, phenolic contents and plant material antioxidant activity were obtained using aqueous organic solvents, as compared to the respective absolute organic solvents. Although higher extract yields were obtained by the refluxing extraction technique, in general higher amounts of total phenolic contents and better antioxidant activity were found in the extracts prepared using a shaker.

  3. Description of the male of Lepidodexia (Xylocamptopsis teffeensis (Townsend (Diptera, Sarcophagidae

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    Karlla Patrícia Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Description of the male of Lepidodexia (Xylocamptopsis teffeensis (Townsend (Diptera, Sarcophagidae. The male of Lepidodexia (Xylocamptopsis teffeensis (Townsend, 1927 is described and illustrated for the first time based on material housed in the entomological collection of Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (MNRJ. This monotypic subgenus has been recorded in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest, first in the state of Amazonas and now in the state of Pará. The general structure of the male terminalia is similar that of other Lepidodexia, especially of the subgenus Lepidodexia, by the short distiphallus, juxta with apical projection, and vesica with a membranous spinous lobe.Descrição do macho de Lepidodexia (Xylocamptopsis teffeensis (Townsend, 1927 (Diptera: Sarcophagidae. O macho de Lepidodexia (Xylocamptopsis teffeensis é descrito e ilustrado pela primeira vez, com base em material depositado na coleção entomológica do Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (MNRJ. Esse subgênero monotípico tem sido registrado na Floresta Amazônica brasileira, primeiramente no estado do Amazonas e agora no Pará. A estrutura geral da terminália masculina é similar a de outras espécies de Lepidodexia, especialmente do subgênero Lepidodexia, pelo distifalo curto, juxta com projeção apical e vesica com lobo membranoso e espinhoso.

  4. Traditional medicines among the Embu and Mbeere peoples of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareru, P G; Kenji, G M; Gachanja, A N; Keriko, J M; Mungai, G

    2006-08-28

    Ethnobotanical information and traditional medicines were investigated and documented in Embu and Mbeere districts, Eastern Province of Kenya. Oral interviews were obtained from over 100 herbalists, both men and women aged between 40 and 80 years. All the herbalists interviewed were Christians and had little formal education. Non-Christian herbalists were purported to combine herbal medicines with witchcraft and were not interviewed. Of the 40 commonly used herbal plants 25 were used as multi-purpose medicinal plants (mpmp), while 15 were used to treat one disease type. There was a correlation between the outpatient morbidity data at the local District hospital, and the common incident diseases treated by the herbalists. Generally a decoction or infusion of the herb was recommended for the treatment of internal or external condition of the patients. Malaria and typhoid were treatable with a total of 15 and 12 plants respectively and were among the first two commonest diseases found in the study area. Terminalia brownii was found to be the most used medicinal plant either alone or in combination with other herbs. The second and third most utilized medicinal plants were Ovariodendron anisatum and Wurbugia ugadensis respectively.

  5. Aqueous extract of some indigenous medicinal plants inhibits glycation at multiple stages and protects erythrocytes from oxidative damage-an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupe, Rashmi S; Sankhe, Neena M; Shaikh, Shamim A; Phatak, Devyani V; Parikh, Juhi U; Khaire, Amrita A; Kemse, Nisha G

    2015-04-01

    Azadirachta indica, Emblica officinalis, Syzygium cumini and Terminalia bellirica are common in Indian system of traditional medicine for the prevention of diabetes and its complications. The aim of the present study was to comprehensively and comparatively investigate the antiglycation potential of these plant extracts at multiple stages and their possible protective effect against glycated albumin mediated toxicity to erythrocytes. Antiglycation activities of these plant extracts was measured by co-incubation of plant extract with bovine serum albumin-fructose glycation model. The multistage glycation markers- fructosamines (early stage), protein carbonyls (intermediate stage) and AGEs (late stage) are investigated along with measurement of thiols and β aggregation of albumin using amyloid-specific dyes-Congo red and Th T. Protection of erythrocytes from glycated albumin induced toxicity by these plant extracts was assessed by measuring erythrocytes hemolysis, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and intracellular antioxidant capacity. Total phenolics, reducing power and antioxidant activities of the plant extracts were also measured. In vitro glycation assays showed that plant extracts exerted site specific inhibitory effects at multiple stages, with T. bellirica showing maximum attenuation. In erythrocytes, along with the retardation of glycated albumin induced hemolysis and lipid-peroxidation, T. bellirica considerably maintained cellular antioxidant potential. Significant positive correlations were observed between erythrocyte protection parameters with total phenolics. These plant extracts especially T. bellirica prevents glycation induced albumin modifications and subsequent toxicity to erythrocytes which might offer additional protection against diabetic vascular complications.

  6. The phylogeny of Simulium (Chirostilbia (Diptera: Simuliidae and perspectives on the systematics of the genus in the Neotropical Region

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    Leonardo Henrique Gil-Azevedo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, knowledge of Neotropical Simuliidae has been accumulating quickly. However, information about supra-specific relationships is scarce and diagnoses of Simulium subgenera are unsatisfactory. To investigate the relationships among Simulium (Chirostilbia species and test the subgenus monophyly, we performed a cladistic analysis. The ingroup included all species of this subgenus and the outgroup included representatives of the 17 species groups of Neotropical Simulium and three Holarctic species. The study was based on a data matrix with 31 terminal taxa and 45 morphological characteristics of adult, pupa and larva. The phylogenetic analysis under equal weights resulted in eight most-parsimonious trees (length = 178, consistency index = 34, retention index = 67. The monophyly of the S. (Chirostilbia was not supported in our analysis. The Simulium subpallidum species group was closer to Simulium (Psilopelmia and Simulium (Ectemnaspis than to the Simulium pertinax species group. Additionally, we describe the three-dimensional shape of the terminalia of male and female of Simulium (Chirostilbia for the first time and provide comments about the taxonomic problems involving some species of the subgenus: Simulium acarayense, Simulium papaveroi, S. pertinax, Simulium serranum, Simulium striginotum and S. subpallidum.

  7. Study of Herbal Medicine in Zirrah (Touz /Dashtestan/Bushehr province

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    Mohammad ali Ziraee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ethnopharmacology has been seen as a multidisciplinary approach for novel drug discovery by providing valuable data about medicinal plants in different cultures. The aim of this ethnopharmacological study was to identify medicinal plants of the Zirrah (Touz/Dashtestan/Bushehr province in the North of Persian Gulf. Material and Methods: The medical uses of medicinal plants were gathered from 23 local informants by face to face interviews. The relative frequency of citation (FRC and cultural importance (CI indices were calculated. Results: A total of 131 medicinal plants belonging to 62 families were identified. Malva sylvestris, Zataria multiflora, Terminalia chebula, Cuminum cyminum, Foenicum vulgare, Olivera decumbens, Echium amoenum, Teucriuma polium, Cannabis sativa and Papaver somniferum had the highest cultural importance indices. Ducrosia anethifolia Bioss, Nigella sativa, Capparis spinosa and Urtica dioica had the highest FRC indices. The highest medical uses were for gastrointestinal diseases, gynecological diseases and dermatological uses, infectious diseases, nature of cool and metabolic disorders, respectively. Conclusion: There is a vast variety of medicinal plants in Zirrah (Touz/Dashtestan/Bushehr province. Although most of therapeutic applications of these plants in the Zirrah (Touz/Dashtestan/Bushehr province are the same as Iran’s traditional medicine, but the people of this region use some of these plants for some diseases which are unique for this area. Thus, investigation about these plants should be initiated to discover novel drugs for clinical applications.

  8. Diversité floristique sous canopée en plantation forestière de Mangombe-Edea (Cameroun

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    Makombu, G.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Floristic diversity under canopy in forest plantation of Mangombe-Edea (Cameroon. Trees plantation of Mangombe is situated in rain forest of low altitude. Six plots among which one of Mansonia altissima (A.Chev. A.Chev., 2 of Lovoa trichilioides Harms, 3 of Terminalia ivorensis A.Chev. and one perturbed natural forest are concerned by this study. The work consisted to the evaluation of the floristic diversity under canopy in order to appreciate the influence of forest plantation on natural regeneration. A total of 26 families, 42 genders and 46 species were censured. Meliaceae and Apocynaceae are present in all the plots. In plot one of T. ivorensis, M. altissima and natural forest, the low value of equitability of Pielou traduces the dominance of flora by few species and the transitory situation of the ecosystem. On contrary the rest of plots present a good repartition of individuals among the species. One can notice a weak organization of the ecologic system in M. altissima plot, this corresponds to favourable conditions of environment for installation of many species represented by a few number of individuals. Shannon indices, relatively low in plot one of T. ivorensis characterize an ecosystem where one species is dominant. Globally, the regeneration under canopy is reconstituted progressively and remains less diversified than the nearest natural forest. Creation of genetic pool through selective entertainment under canopy will permit polycyclic management of plots for sustainable production of wood.

  9. Biogenic synthesis of selenium nanoparticles and their effect on As(III)-induced toxicity on human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit; Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal

    2014-03-01

    A bioreductive capacity of a plant, Terminalia arjuna leaf extract, was utilized for preparation of selenium nanoparticles. The leaf extract worked as good capping as well as stabilizing agent and facilitated the formation of stable colloidal nanoparticles. Resulting nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. The colloidal solution showed the absorption maximum at 390 nm while TEM and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) indicated the formation of polydispersed, crystalline selenium nanoparticles of size raging from 10 to 80 nm. FT-IR analysis suggested the involvement of O-H, N-H, C=O, and C-O functional group of the leaf extract in particle formation while EDAX analysis indicated the presence of selenium in synthesized nanoparticles. The effect of nanoparticles on human lymphocytes treated with arsenite, As(III), has been studied. Studies on cell viability using MTT assay and DNA damage using comet assay revealed that synthesized selenium nanoparticles showed protective effect against As(III)-induced cell death and DNA damage. Chronic ingestion of arsenic infested groundwater, and prevalence of arsenicosis is a serious public health issue. The synthesized benign nanoselenium can be a promising agent to check the chronic toxicity caused due to arsenic exposure.

  10. Effect of the gene transformer of Anastrepha on the somatic sexual development of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, María-Fernanda; Sánchez, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    The gene transformer (tra) is the key regulatory memory device for sex determination in tephritid insects. The present manuscript addressed the question about the functional conservation of the tephritid Anastrepha Transformer protein to direct somatic sexual development in Drosophila (Drosophilidae). The transformer cDNA of Anastrepha encoding the putative full-length Tra protein was cloned in pUAST and introduced into Drosophila melanogaster. To express this protein, the GAL4-UAS system was used. The Anastrepha Tra protein induced the female-specific splicing of both dsx and fru pre-mRNAs in Drosophila XY male flies, so that these became transformed into females, though this transformation was incomplete (the sexually dimorphic foreleg basitarsus and the external terminalia were monitored). It was found that the degree of female transformation directly depended on the dose of Anastrepha tra and Drosophila transformer-2 (tra-2) genes, and that the Anastrepha Tra-Drosophila Tra2 complex is not as efficient as the Drosophila Tra-Tra2 complex at inducing the female-specific splicing of Drosophila dsx pre-mRNA. This can explain why the Anastrepha Tra protein cannot fully substitute for the endogenous Drosophila Tra protein.

  11. [Antibacterial activity determination of six kinds of natural herbs in yunnan on normal oral predominant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-hong; Liu, Juan; Yang, Li-chuan; Zhang, Can-hua; Li, Gang

    2010-04-01

    To determine the antibacterial activity of six kinds of natural herbs in Yunnan on normal oral predominant bacteria in vitro. Agar dilution method, the antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobes which was recommended by National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standard (NCCLs), was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of herbs to 21 kinds of oral model strains and clinical isolates. The results were expressed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All six kinds of herbs were effective to the oral predominant bacteria. For the ten kinds of cariogenic bacteria, the MIC of caesalpinia sappan lignum was between 5-10 mg x mL(-1), and the MIC of other herbs was above 20 mg x mL(-1). For the eleven kinds of predominant bacteria which normally involved in pulp periapical disease and periodontitis, the MIC of caesalpinia sappan lignum was below 0.062 5 mg x mL(-1), and the MIC of the terminalia chebula retz was between 10-20 mg x mL(-1), and the others were above 20 mg x mL(-1). The six kinds of herbs in Yunnan could be used in treatment or prevention of oral bacterial diseases.

  12. PIGE-PIXE analysis of chewing sticks of pharmacological importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabanji, S. O.; Makanju, O. V.; Haque, A. M. I.; Buoso, M. C.; Ceccato, D.; Cherubini, R.; Moschini, G.

    1996-06-01

    PIGE and PIXE techniques were employed for the determination of the major, minor and trace elemental concentrations in chewing sticks of pharmacological importance namely: Butyrospermum paradoxum, Garcinia kola, Distemonanthus benthamianus, Bridelia ferruginea, Anogeissus leiocarpus, Terminalia glaucescens and Fagara rubescens, respectively. The concentration of fluorine which is very important for human dental enamel was specially determined using the 19F(p, p'γ) 19F reaction. For decades these chewing sticks when used alone without toothpastes have proven to be very efficient, effective and reliable in cleaning the teeth of many people particularly in Nigeria and some other countries in Africa. The teeth of users are usually very strong, clean, fresh and devoid of germs and caries. Even with the advent of modern toothpastes with special additions of fluorine, the use of these popular and efficient chewing sticks is still unabated. Many people including the elite use them solely, a few others combine their use with modern toothpastes and brush. Proton beams produced by the 7 MV CN and 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerators at INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), Padova, Italy were used for the PIGE and PIXE analysis, respectively. Results of this novel study are presented and discussed.

  13. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Sabiha; Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan Bin; Kalsoom Khan, Abida; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed. PMID:26448818

  14. Two new species of Drosophila belonging to the canalinea group (Diptera, rosophilidae Duas novas espécies de Drosophila do grupo canalinea (Diptera, Drosophilidae

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    Vilma Ratcov

    Full Text Available Drosophila piratininga sp. nov. and Drosophila sampa sp. nov., belonging to the canalinea group of the subgenus Drosophila, are described based mostly on wild-caught specimens collected at a forest reserve of the Cidade Universitária "Armando de Salles Oliveira", an urban remnant of the montane Atlantic Forest located at west São Paulo city, state of São Paulo, Brazil. The two species are readily distinguished from each other mostly by having different wing patterns: the main crossveins being remarkably clouded in the first one and unclouded in the latter. Illustrations of terminalia are also provided.Drosophila piratininga sp. nov. e Drosophila sampa sp. nov., espécies neotropicais pertencentes ao grupo canalinea, são descritas no presente artigo. Elas podem ser facilmente separadas com base no padrão das asas, sendo que as duas nervuras transversais são nitidamente esfumaçadas na primeira e hialinas na segunda. As coletas foram realizadas na Reserva Florestal da Cidade Universitária "Armando de Salles Oliveira", um remanescente da Mata Atlântica de planalto localizado na área urbana da zona oeste do município de São Paulo, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Ilustrações detalhadas das terminálias são fornecidas.

  15. Effect of Extraction Solvent/Technique on the Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plant Extracts

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    Bushra Sultana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Theeffects of four extracting solvents [absolute ethanol, absolute methanol, aqueous ethanol (ethanol: water, 80:20 v/v and aqueous methanol (methanol: water, 80:20 v/v] and two extraction techniques (shaking and reflux on the antioxidant activity of extracts of barks of Azadirachta indica, Acacia nilotica, Eugenia jambolana, Terminalia arjuna, leaves and roots of Moringa oleifera, fruit of Ficus religiosa,and leaves of Aloe barbadensis were investigated. The tested plant materials contained appreciable amounts of total phenolic contents (0.31-16.5 g GAE /100g DW, total flavonoid (2.63-8.66 g CE/100g DW; reducing power at 10 mg/mL extract concentration (1.36-2.91, DPPH. scavenging capacity (37.2-86.6%, and percent inhibition of linoleic acid (66.0-90.6%. Generally higher extract yields, phenolic contents and plant material antioxidant activity were obtained using aqueous organic solvents, as compared to the respective absolute organic solvents. Although higher extract yields were obtained by the refluxing extraction technique, in general higher amounts of total phenolic contents and better antioxidant activity were found in the extracts prepared using a shaker.

  16. IDENTIFICATION AND AUTHENTICATION OF DRY SAMPLES OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS USING LEAF EPIDERMAL FEATURES AS MARKER

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    Abdullahi Alanamu ABDULRAHAMAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is the oldest and still the most widely used system of medicine in the world today and they are made exclusively from plants. However, most of these medicines or drugs are adulterated due to lack of proper identification of the plant samples. Method of checking adulteration of drug plants is the main focus of this study. The identification and authentication of dry samples of some medicinal plants were carried out using anatomical features. Twenty-five (25 plants materials were collected in Ibadan and Ilorin, Nigeria. The plants studied include Azardiracta indica, Newboudia leavis, Polyalthia longifolia, Cymbopogon citratus, Anarcardium occidentalis, Nicotiana tobbaccum, Jatropha curcas, Chromoleana odorata, Mangifera indica, Terminalia catappa, Ocimum gratisimum, Morus messosygia, Morinda lucida, Psidium guajava, Vitellaria paradoxa, Annona senegalensis, Vernonia amygdalina, Gliricidium sepium, Ravoulvia vomitora, Telferia occindentalis Citrus aurantifolia, C. limon, C. paradisi and C. sinensis. Leaf epidermal anatomy of these selected plants showed no major variations in stomatal complex types, frequency, size and shape of stomatal cells, epidermal cell wall and trichomes between fresh and dry samples. The variations that occur were between different species but not within species. Leaf epidermal anatomy, therefore, proved to be a significant tool for resolution of taxonomic confusion of dried samples of these plants.

  17. Activity study of biogenic spherical silver nanoparticles towards microbes and oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskote Anand, Kiran Kumar; Mandal, Badal Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The eco-friendly approach for the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (SNP) using Terminalia bellirica (T. bellirica) fruit extract is reported herein. Initially formation of SNP was noticed through visual color change from yellow to reddish brown and further analyzed by surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) band at 429 nm using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Identification of different polyphenols present in T. bellirica extract was done using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Aqueous T. bellirica extract contains high amount of gallic acid which is major secondary metabolite responsible for the reduction and stabilization process. It was established by analyses of extracts before and after reduction using HPLC. Formation of spherical SNP was characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) study revealed crystalline nature of SNP. Presence of different functional groups on the surface of SNP was evidenced by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) study. A plausible mechanism of reduction and stabilization processes involved in the synthesis of stable SNP was also explained based on HPLC and FTIR data. In addition, the synthesized SNP was tested for antibacterial and antioxidant activities. SNP showed good antimicrobial activity against both gram positive (S. aureus) and gram negative (E. coli) bacteria. It also showed good antioxidant activity compared to ascorbic acid as standard antioxidant by using standard DPPH method.

  18. Fauna, Abundance and Dispersion of Sandflies in Three Endemic Areas of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Rural Fars Province

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    F Ahmadipour

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leishmaniasis is one of important tropical diseases caused by Leishmania parasites which is transmitted by biting of female phlebotomine sandfies. Regarding high densities' and distribution of sandflies in majority areas of Iran, understanding of sandflies identification and distribution as vectors is importation to control disease. Methods: This is a descriptive survey which was done temporarily, Sandflies were sampled from 17 villages of three studied regions to coordinate with authorities of sanitary province to provide the necessary facilities .foci using sticky papers and CDC traps. All sandflies were identified based on external and internal morphological characters of the head and abdominal terminalia, which were slide-mounted in Berlese fluid. Results: In total 3178 Sandflies were sampled and identified. Sandfies species are P. papatasi, P. bergeroti, P. alexandri, P. sergenti, P. mongolensis, P. tobbi and S. dentate, S. sintoni and S. tiberiadis. sandfly species identified and separated based on habitat collections. Females analysed according to their gonotrophic stage which majority were unfed. Conclusion: The collections contained the important putative vectors of Leishmaniasis in Iran. P. papatasi was abundant in three study foci. Of the sandflies recorded from Iran, only P. papatasi was judged to be a proven vector of Leishmaniasis. Understanding criteria of vectors, population variations and ecological aspect of sandflies can help to control better of diseases.

  19. GENETIC VARIATION FOR THE SILVICULTURE CARACTER IN THREE ARBOREOUS SPECIES OF THE SOUTH BOLSÃO REGION IN MATO GROSSO DO SUL STATE, BRASIL

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    Helena de Cássia Brassaloti Otsubo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at evaluating genetically the best progenies of Myracrodruon urundeuva, Astronium fraxinifolium e Terminalia argentea from Selvíria, MS, concerning their growing traits. The progeny test was performed by outlining randomized blocks with 28 treatments, 4 repetitions and 10 plants per plot in single rows at 1.5 x 3.0 spacing. At 14 years of age, the progenies were evaluated concerning the traits: height (ALT, m; diameter of the height (DAP, cm; average diameter of the top (DMC, cm; trunk shape (FT, grade scale, ranging from 1 to 5, and survival (SOB, %. The average herdability for the traits studied is considered from medium to highs magnitudes (0.67; 0.57 e 0.83 for DAP, DMC e trunk shape, respectively. More expressive outcomes were obtained from the average of progenies (9.42; 9.40 e 12.83 for DAP, respectively, which indicates that the selection can be effective using such information, not only from the families but also from the individuals for native progenies from the region which indicates a good perspective of genetic variability to be exploited along a genetic breeding program for the studied species and the establishment of strategies for future formation of a seed orchard.

  20. Kinetic Modelling of the Pyrolysis of Biomass for the Development of Charcoal Briquette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Y. R.; Bayu, H. T.; Wintoko, J.; Murachman, B.; Yuliansyah, A. T.; Purwono, S.

    2017-06-01

    Waste of biomass can be utilized as an energy alternative such as a charcoal briquette. In the waste of biomass, there is carbon element bonded in the cellulose which can be utilized as an energy source of solid fuel. Charcoal briquette from waste of biomass can be developed via pyrolysis process. Terminalia Catappa L. and Myristica fragrans (nutmeg seeds shells) shells were used as raw material for the manufacture of charcoal briquettes. Pyrolysis process took place under isothermal conditions at a temperature of 350°C, 400°C, 450°C, 500°C, and 550°C with variation of times were 30 minutes, 60 minutes and 90 minutes. During the pyrolysis process, there were three main components observed, namely liquid (bio oil), gases and solids (char). Data obtained for measuring the kinetics of liquids and gases were taken in interval of 5 minutes. The results showed that the rise in temperature will increase the rate of pyrolysis process and increase the yield of gases and liquids as well as lowering the yield for solid. The best fitted kinetic model is the representation of biomass pyrolysis process involving secondary decomposition of the liquid. The results of briquette development showed that these two biomasses can be used as raw material of energy alternative.