WorldWideScience

Sample records for terminal complement complex

  1. Complement activation in leprosy: a retrospective study shows elevated circulating terminal complement complex in reactional leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia El Idrissi, N; Hakobyan, S; Ramaglia, V; Geluk, A; Morgan, B Paul; Das, P Kumar; Baas, F

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium leprae infection gives rise to the immunologically and histopathologically classified spectrum of leprosy. At present, several tools for the stratification of patients are based on acquired immunity markers. However, the role of innate immunity, particularly the complement system, is largely unexplored. The present retrospective study was undertaken to explore whether the systemic levels of complement activation components and regulators can stratify leprosy patients, particularly in reference to the reactional state of the disease. Serum samples from two cohorts were analysed. The cohort from Bangladesh included multi-bacillary (MB) patients with (n = 12) or without (n = 46) reaction (R) at intake and endemic controls (n = 20). The cohort from Ethiopia included pauci-bacillary (PB) (n = 7) and MB (n = 23) patients without reaction and MB (n = 15) patients with reaction. The results showed that the activation products terminal complement complex (TCC) (P ≤ 0·01), C4d (P ≤ 0·05) and iC3b (P ≤ 0·05) were specifically elevated in Bangladeshi patients with reaction at intake compared to endemic controls. In addition, levels of the regulator clusterin (P ≤ 0·001 without R; P < 0·05 with R) were also elevated in MB patients, irrespective of a reaction. Similar analysis of the Ethiopian cohort confirmed that, irrespective of a reaction, serum TCC levels were increased significantly in patients with reactions compared to patients without reactions (P ≤ 0·05). Our findings suggests that serum TCC levels may prove to be a valuable tool in diagnosing patients at risk of developing reactions. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  2. Terminal complexes of the complement system: new structural insights and their relevance to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Bryan Paul; Walters, David; Serna, Marina; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-11-01

    Complement is a key component of innate immunity in health and a powerful driver of inflammation and tissue injury in disease. The biological and pathological effects of complement activation are mediated by activation products. These come in two flavors: (i) proteolytic fragments of complement proteins (C3, C4, C5) generated during activation that bind specific receptors on target cells to mediate effects; (ii) the multimolecular membrane attack complex generated from the five terminal complement proteins that directly binds to and penetrates target cell membranes. Several recent publications have described structural insights that have changed perceptions of the nature of this membrane attack complex. This review will describe these recent advances in understanding of the structure of the membrane attack complex and its by-product the fluid-phase terminal complement complex and relate these new structural insights to functional consequences and cell responses to complement membrane attack. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Inhibition of the Membrane Attack Complex by Dengue Virus NS1 through Interaction with Vitronectin and Terminal Complement Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Jonas Nascimento; da Silva, Emiliana Mandarano; Allonso, Diego; Coelho, Diego Rodrigues; Andrade, Iamara da Silva; de Medeiros, Luciano Neves; Menezes, Joice Lima; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2016-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people worldwide and is a major public health problem. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a conserved glycoprotein that associates with membranes and is also secreted into the plasma in DENV-infected patients. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We first identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV2 NS1 binding partner by using a yeast two-hybrid system. This interaction was further assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. The NS1-VN complex was also detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the DENV2 NS1 protein, either by itself or by interacting with VN, hinders the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and C9 polymerization. Finally, we showed that DENV2, West Nile virus (WNV), and Zika virus (ZIKV) NS1 proteins produced in mammalian cells inhibited C9 polymerization. Taken together, our results points to a role for NS1 as a terminal pathway inhibitor of the complement system. Dengue is the most important arthropod-borne viral disease nowadays and is caused by dengue virus (DENV). The flavivirus NS1 glycoprotein has been characterized functionally as a complement evasion protein that can attenuate the activation of the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which DENV NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV NS1 binding partner, and the NS1-VN complex was detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the NS1-VN complex inhibited membrane attack complex (MAC) formation, thus interfering with the complement terminal pathway. Interestingly

  4. [Terminal complement complex (TCC) levels in urine in patients with renal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, K

    2001-03-01

    The terminal complement complex (TCC) has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of proteinuria not only in experimental nephritis but also in human glomerulonephritis. In order to clarify the clinical significance of TCC, the author investigated a total of 129 pediatric patients with the following glomerular diseases: idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS; 40 cases), IgA nephropathy (IgAN; 48 cases), mesangio-capillary glomerulonephritis (MPGN; 16 cases), lupus nephritis (LN; 16 cases), purpura nephritis (5 cases) and membranous nephritis (4 cases). Results were analyzed in relation to the responsiveness to steroid treatment in INS and the degree of proteinuria and histopathologic severity in glonerulonephritis groups. In 40 patients who underwent renal biopsy, the localizations of vitronectin and clusterin, both of which are regulatory proteins for TCC, were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy in conjunction with that of TCC for the study of the mechanism of local defense in glomerulonephritis. The urinary TCC levels were elevated in 9 (90%) of 10 patients with steroid-resistant INS, while they were elevated only in 2 of 30 steroid-responsive patients. In glomerulonephritis groups, urinary TCC levels were elevated in 13 of 48 patients with IgAN, 6 of 16 with MPGN, 8 of 16 with LN, 2 of 5 purpural nephritis and 1 of 4 with membranous nephritis. Urinary TCC levels correlated with histological severity in IgAN and showed a reciprocal relation to C3 levels in MPGN and LN. Immunofluorescence findings showed that localization of TCC was quite similar to that of C3 in glomerulonephritis groups. Vitronectin and clusterin were also demonstrated to deposit in similar pattern to TCC. These results suggest that in INS urinary TCC levels could predict the responsiveness to steroid therapy and might be useful as a non-invasive diagnostic method in differential diagnosis of INS. In IgAN, urinary TCC could be a useful marker of histologic severity. The

  5. Deposition of C3, the terminal complement complex and vitronectin in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, P; Lyon, H; Christoffersen, P

    1993-01-01

    -dependent cytotoxic mechanisms in the pathogenesis. Therefore, we investigated liver biopsy specimens from 21 patients with PBC, six patients with PSC and six controls for complement deposits by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against C3d, the terminal complement complex (TCC......) and vitronectin (S-protein). We found C3d, TCC and vitronectin deposits only in the portal tracts. C3d and TCC were present in the walls of the hepatic arteries and in the connective tissue stroma but never around the bile ducts. We found vitronectin deposits throughout the connective tissue, often independent...... of the TCC deposits. When vitronectin and TCC were co-localized, the staining patterns were inverse; that is, intense staining for TCC accompanied weak staining for vitronectin and vice versa. Occasionally complete dissociation between TCC and vitronectin staining was observed. Deposits of TCC...

  6. Polyphosphate suppresses complement via the terminal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Jovian M; Foley, Jonathan H; Krisinger, Michael J; Ocariza, Linnette Mae; Lei, Victor; Wasney, Gregory A; Lameignere, Emilie; Strynadka, Natalie C; Smith, Stephanie A; Morrissey, James H; Conway, Edward M

    2014-01-30

    Polyphosphate, synthesized by all cells, is a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate. When released into the circulation, it exerts prothrombotic and proinflammatory activities by modulating steps in the coagulation cascade. We examined the role of polyphosphate in regulating the evolutionarily related proteolytic cascade complement. In erythrocyte lysis assays, polyphosphate comprising more than 1000 phosphate units suppressed total hemolytic activity with a concentration to reduce maximal lysis to 50% that was 10-fold lower than with monophosphate. In the ion- and enzyme-independent terminal pathway complement assay, polyphosphate suppressed complement in a concentration- and size-dependent manner. Phosphatase-treated polyphosphate lost its ability to suppress complement, confirming that polymer integrity is required. Sequential addition of polyphosphate to the terminal pathway assay showed that polyphosphate interferes with complement only when added before formation of the C5b-7 complex. Physicochemical analyses using native gels, gel filtration, and differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that polyphosphate binds to and destabilizes C5b,6, thereby reducing the capacity of the membrane attack complex to bind to and lyse the target cell. In summary, we have added another function to polyphosphate in blood, demonstrating that it dampens the innate immune response by suppressing complement. These findings further establish the complex relationship between coagulation and innate immunity.

  7. Molecular interplay between bacteria and the terminal complement pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, E.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    The plasma proteins of the complement system fulfill important immune defense functions, including opsonization of bacteria for phagocytosis, generation of chemo-attractants and direct bacterial killing via assembly of the Membrane Attack Complex (MAC or C5b-9 complex). The terminal complement

  8. The effect of normovolemic modified ultrafiltration on inflammatory mediators, endotoxins, terminal complement complexes and clinical outcome in high-risk cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N; Bakhtiary, F; Grün, V; Weber, C F; Strasser, C; Moritz, A

    2013-07-01

    The clinical benefit of normovolemic modified ultrafiltration (N-MUF) after cardiac surgery is still debated. As we have shown in a previous publication, there is a significant improvement in platelet function, so we were interested in whether ultrafiltration can reduce plasma levels of endotoxins, terminal complement complexes and cytokines after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in adults with increased risk profiles. In this single-center, prospective, randomized trial, fifty high-risk patients (mean logistic EuroSCORE II: 17.5%) who underwent cardiac surgery were randomized. After CPB, Group 1 (n = 25) served as the control and in, Group 2 (n= 25), an N-MUF of 3000 ml was performed, using a BC140plus filter after weaning from CPB. Blood samples were taken after the induction of anesthesia, before CPB, before CPB weaning, 30 minutes after CPB and at 6, 24 and 48 hours postoperatively. Primary outcomes were plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), terminal complement complex (C5b9) and cytokines (IL-6, IL-10, IL-1beta, TNF-α). Secondary outcomes focused on differences in the clinical outcome. A significant reduction in LBP concentration (preoperatively: 23.8±8.4 pg/ml, postoperatively: 14.2±12.9 pg/ml) and C5b9 (preoperatively: 4.18±2.6 pg/ml, postoperatively: 3.05±2.39 pg/ml) were detected 6 hours after N-MUF. In the N-MUF group, significantly lower concentrations of lactate could be detected in the early postoperative period. Furthermore, postoperative chest tube blood loss was significantly lower in the N-MUF group at 24 and 48 hours. N-MUF leads to a significant reduction of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and terminal complement complex and was associated with reduced blood loss and postoperative lactate concentrations shortly after surgery.

  9. C-Reactive Protein Binds to Cholesterol Crystals and Co-Localizes with the Terminal Complement Complex in Human Atherosclerotic Plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilely, Katrine; Fumagalli, Stefano; Rosbjerg, Anne

    2017-01-01

    was the strongest mediator of C1q binding and also the pentraxin that most potently elevated C1q-mediated complement activation. In a phagocytic assay using whole blood, we confirmed that phagocytosis of CC is complement dependent and initiated by C1q-mediated activation. The pathophysiological relevance......Inflammation is a part of the initial process leading to atherosclerosis and cholesterol crystals (CC), found in atherosclerotic plaques, which are known to induce complement activation. The pentraxins C-reactive protein (CRP), long pentraxin 3 (PTX3), and serum amyloid P component (SAP) are serum...

  10. Complexity of Terminating Preference Elicitation

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Toby

    2009-01-01

    Complexity theory is a useful tool to study computational issues surrounding the elicitation of preferences, as well as the strategic manipulation of elections aggregating together preferences of multiple agents. We study here the complexity of determining when we can terminate eliciting preferences, and prove that the complexity depends on the elicitation strategy. We show, for instance, that it may be better from a computational perspective to elicit all preferences from one agent at a time...

  11. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes. Solubilization inhibition and complement factor levels in SLE patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, Ivan; Kappelgaard, E

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-two of 36 serum samples from 19 SLE patients showed reduced capacity to mediate complement-dependent solubilization of immune complexes (IC). SLE patients with nephritis exerted the lowest complement-mediated solubilization capacity (CMSC) whereas sera from patients with inactive disease...

  12. Complement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the liquid portion of your blood. The complement system is a group of proteins that move freely ... a role in the development of inflammation. The complement system protects the body from infections, dead cells and ...

  13. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes and their interaction with complement C3 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ivan; Baatrup, Gunnar; Jepsen, H H

    1985-01-01

    Some of the molecular events in the complement (C)-mediated solubilization of immune complexes (IC) have been clarified in recent years. The solubilization is primarily mediated by alternative C pathway proteins whereas factors in the classical pathway accelerate the process. Components of the me......Some of the molecular events in the complement (C)-mediated solubilization of immune complexes (IC) have been clarified in recent years. The solubilization is primarily mediated by alternative C pathway proteins whereas factors in the classical pathway accelerate the process. Components...

  14. Characterization of early and terminal complement proteins associated with polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro and in vivo after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvan Manuel D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system has been suggested to affect injury or disease of the central nervous system (CNS by regulating numerous physiological events and pathways. The activation of complement following traumatic CNS injury can also result in the formation and deposition of C5b-9 membrane attack complex (C5b-9/MAC, causing cell lysis or sublytic effects on vital CNS cells. Although complement proteins derived from serum/blood-brain barrier breakdown can contribute to injury or disease, infiltrating immune cells may represent an important local source of complement after injury. As the first immune cells to infiltrate the CNS within hours post-injury, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs may affect injury through mechanisms associated with complement-mediated events. However, the expression/association of both early and terminal complement proteins by PMNs has not been fully characterized in vitro, and has not observed previously in vivo after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI. Method We investigated the expression of complement mRNAs using rt-PCR and the presence of complement proteins associated with PMNs using immunofluroescence and quantitative flow cytometry. Results Stimulated or unstimulated PMNs expressed mRNAs encoding for C1q, C3, and C4, but not C5, C6, C7 or C9 in culture. Complement protein C1q or C3 was also detected in less than 30% of cultured PMNs. In contrast, over 70% of PMNs that infiltrated the injured spinal cord were associated with C1q, C3, C7 and C5b-9/MAC 3 days post-SCI. The localization/association of C7 or C5b-9/MAC with infiltrating PMNs in the injured spinal cord suggests the incorporation or internalization of C7 or C5b-9/MAC bound cellular debris by infiltrating PMNs because C7 and C5b-9/MAC were mostly localized to granular vesicles within PMNs at the spinal cord epicenter region. Furthermore, PMN presence in the injured spinal cord was observed for many weeks post-SCI, suggesting that this

  15. Label-free quantitative proteomic analysis reveals strong involvement of complement alternative and terminal pathways in human glomerular sclerotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Xu, Bo; Kinoshita, Naohiko; Yoshida, Yutaka; Tasaki, Masayuki; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Magdeldin, Sameh; Yaoita, Eishin; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2015-06-18

    Since glomerular sclerosis frequently accompanies various glomerular diseases at the end stages, it is challenging to differentiate ubiquitous biological processes underlying this pathology from those critically involved in specific diseases. Furthermore, in-depth proteomic profile of human glomerular sclerosis remains limited. In this study, human glomeruli with intermediate (i-GS) and advanced (GS) sclerotic lesions, which were excluded from specific renal diseases and assumed to be aging-related, were laser captured from macroscopically normal cortex distant from urological carcinoma, and subjected to label-free quantitative proteomic analysis. We explicate an evident increase of membrane attack complex in i-GS and GS with an up-going tendency, which is accompanied by increasing of inhibitory regulators of alternative and terminal pathways. GO annotation and IPA pathway analysis agree to these results. Proteomic findings are validated by immunohistochemical studies which indicate that alternative and terminal pathways are positively involved in the glomerular sclerosis seen in distinct renal diseases. Furthermore, proteomic analysis also demonstrates remarkable increases of complement factor B in GS and TGF-ß1 in both GS and i-GS. Identification of complement factor B implicates that on-site activation of alternative pathway may occur in injured glomeruli and stepwise increase of TGF-ß1 suggests its contribution to the progression of glomerulosclerosis. This study provides in-depth quantitative proteomic profiles of human glomeruli with intermediate and advanced sclerotic lesions. It reveals that the over-expression of alternative and terminal pathway components is significantly involved in human glomerulosclerosis seen in distinct renal diseases. Proteomic identification of the increased TGF-ß1 provides supporting evidence for the role of podocyte apoptosis leading to human glomerulosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Conserved Patterns of Microbial Immune Escape: Pathogenic Microbes of Diverse Origin Target the Human Terminal Complement Inhibitor Vitronectin via a Single Common Motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresia Hallström

    Full Text Available Pathogenicity of many microbes relies on their capacity to resist innate immunity, and to survive and persist in an immunocompetent human host microbes have developed highly efficient and sophisticated complement evasion strategies. Here we show that different human pathogens including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, acquire the human terminal complement regulator vitronectin to their surface. By using truncated vitronectin fragments we found that all analyzed microbial pathogens (n = 13 bound human vitronectin via the same C-terminal heparin-binding domain (amino acids 352-374. This specific interaction leaves the terminal complement complex (TCC regulatory region of vitronectin accessible, allowing inhibition of C5b-7 membrane insertion and C9 polymerization. Vitronectin complexed with the various microbes and corresponding proteins was thus functionally active and inhibited complement-mediated C5b-9 deposition. Taken together, diverse microbial pathogens expressing different structurally unrelated vitronectin-binding molecules interact with host vitronectin via the same conserved region to allow versatile control of the host innate immune response.

  17. Coordinating Tectons: Bipyridyl Terminated Allenylidene Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cifuentes, Marie P.; Humphrey, Mark G.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Lengkeek, Nigel A.; Petrie, Simon; Sanford, Vanessa; Schauer, Phil A.; Skelton, Brian W.; Stranger, Robert; White, Allan H. (UWA); (ANU)

    2009-01-15

    A series of complexes with {pi}-conjugated carbon chains terminated by bipyridyl moieties has been prepared. These allenylidene complexes were derived from 9-hydroxy-9-ethynyl-4,5-diazafluorene, the preparation of which is reported; the new allenylidene complexes are highly colored with the cumulated carbon chain terminating in a bipyridyl unit providing a site for further coordination. The synthesis, characterization, and X-ray structure determination of trans-[MCl(P{intersection}P){sub 2}{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}(4,5-diazafluoren-9-yl)]PF{sub 6} (M = Ru, P{intersection}P = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm), 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe), 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe); M = Os, P{intersection}P = dppm) are described. The effect of the variation in metal and ligand on electronic and electrochemical characteristics of these complexes has been investigated by using UV-vis, solution electrochemistry, and a combination of these techniques in spectroelectrochemical experiments. DFT calculations have been performed on trans-[RuCl(P{intersection}P){sub 2}{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}C{sub {double_bond}}(4,5-diazafluoren-9-yl)]{sup q} (P{intersection}P = dppm, bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (dmpm); q = -1, 0, +1, +2) and subsequently solvent-corrected calculations with use of COSMO were also undertaken to examine the nature of electronic transitions in various oxidation states.

  18. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first...... demonstrates that details of the coordination geometry affect the carbide chemical shift equally as much as variations in the nature of the auxiliary ligands. Furthermore, the kinetics of formation of the sqaure pyramidal dicyano complex, trans-[RuC(CN)2(PCy3)2], from RuC has been examined and the reaction...... found to be quite sluggish and of first order in both RuC and cyanide with a rate constant of k = 0.0104(6) M–1 s–1. Further reaction with cyanide leads to loss of the carbide ligand and formation of trans-[Ru(CN)4(PCy3)2]2–, which was isolated and structurally characterized as its PPh4+ salt....

  19. Regulation of complement membrane attack complex formation in myocardial infarction.

    OpenAIRE

    Väkevä, A.; Laurila, P; Meri, S.

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the complement (C) system is involved in the development of tissue injury of myocardial infarction. As it is not known why the strictly controlled C system starts to react against autologous heart tissue, we have analyzed the expression of various membrane regulators of C (CR1, DAF, MCP, CD59, C8 binding protein) and the pattern of deposition of C components and plasma C regulators (C4b binding protein and vitronectin) in normal (n = 7) and infarcted (n = 13...

  20. A standardized method for quantitating the complement-mediated immune complex solubilizing capacity of human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G; Peterson, I; Svehag, S E

    1983-01-01

    A standardized radioassay for measuring the complement-mediated immune complex solubilizing capacity (CMSC) and the initial kinetics of the solubilization (IKS) reaction is described. The total complement (C)-mediated solubilizing capacity was determined after incubation of diluted serum and 125I...

  1. Structural Basis for Eculizumab-Mediated Inhibition of the Complement Terminal Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Janus Asbjørn; zhang, yuchun; Johnson, Krista

    2016-01-01

    Eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody approved for treatment of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and atypical hemolytic uraemic syndrome. Eculizumab binds complement component C5 and prevents its cleavage by C5 convertases, inhibiting release of both the proinflamma......Eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody approved for treatment of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and atypical hemolytic uraemic syndrome. Eculizumab binds complement component C5 and prevents its cleavage by C5 convertases, inhibiting release of both...

  2. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R.; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Daly, Mark J.; Carroll, Michael C.; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A.; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T. R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Cairns, Murray J.; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C. K.; Chen, Ronald Y. L.; Chen, Eric Y. H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodríguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; O'Dushlaine, Colm; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietiläinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Söderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H. M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wu, Jing Qin; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Børglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia's strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging

  3. Collectin-11/MASP complex formation triggers activation of the lectin complement pathway--the fifth lectin pathway initiation complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Collectins and ficolins are important in the clearance of endogenous and exogenous danger materials. A new human collectin-11 was recently identified in low concentration in serum in complex with mannose-binding lectin (MBL)/ficolin-associated serine proteases. Collectin-11 binds to carbohydrate...... residues present on various microorganisms. Thus, we hypothesized that collectin-11 could be a novel initiation molecule in the lectin pathway of complement. We can show that collectin-11 associates with all the known MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3) as well as the lectin...... complement complex on C. albicans. Moreover, spiking collectin-11-depleted serum, which did not mediate complement activation, with recombinant collectin-11 restored the complement activation capability. These results define collectin-11 as the fifth recognition molecule in the lectin complement pathway...

  4. THE ROLE OF THE N-TERMINAL DOMAIN OF THE COMPLEMENT FRAGMENT RECEPTOR, C5L2, IN LIGAND BINDING

    OpenAIRE

    Scola, Anne-Marie; Higginbottom, Adrian; Lynda J Partridge; Reid, Robert C.; Woodruff, Trent; Taylor, Stephen M.; Fairlie, David P.; Monk, Peter N.

    2006-01-01

    C5L2 is a new cellular receptor found to interact with the human anaphylatoxins complement factor C5a and its C-terminal cleavage product C5a des Arg. The classical human C5a receptor (C5aR) preferentially binds C5a, with a 10-100-fold lower affinity for C5a des Arg. In contrast, C5L2 binds both ligands with nearly equal affinity. C5aR presents acidic and tyrosine residues in its N-terminus that interact with the core of C5a while a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices inter...

  5. Upregulation of Early and Downregulation of Terminal Pathway Complement Genes in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue and Adipocytes in Acquired Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Kaye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important mediator of obesity-related complications such as the metabolic syndrome but its causes and mechanisms are unknown. As the complement system is a key mediator of inflammation, we studied whether it is activated in acquired obesity in subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT and isolated adipocytes. We used a special study design of genetically matched controls of lean and heavy groups, rare monozygotic twin pairs discordant for body mass index (BMI [n = 26, within-pair difference (Δ in body mass index, BMI >3 kg/m2] with as much as 18 kg mean Δweight. Additionally, 14 BMI-concordant (BMI <3 kg/m2 served as a reference group. The detailed measurements included body composition (DEXA, fat distribution (MRI, glucose, insulin, adipokines, C3a and SC5b-9 levels, and the expression of complement and insulin signaling pathway-related genes in AT and adipocytes. In both AT and isolated adipocytes, the classical and alternative pathway genes were upregulated, and the terminal pathway genes downregulated in the heavier co-twins of the BMI-discordant pairs. The upregulated genes included C1q, C1s, C2, ficolin-1, factor H, receptors for C3a and C5a (C5aR1, and the iC3b receptor (CR3. While the terminal pathway components C5 and C6 were downregulated, its inhibitor clusterin was upregulated. Complement gene upregulation in AT and adipocytes correlated positively with adiposity and hyperinsulinemia and negatively with the expression of insulin signaling-related genes. Plasma C3a, but not SC5b-9, levels were elevated in the heavier co-twins. There were no differences between the co-twins in BMI-concordant pairs. Obesity is associated with increased expression of the early, but not late, complement pathway components and of key receptors. The twins with acquired obesity have therefore an inflated inflammatory activity in the AT. The results suggest that complement is likely involved in orchestrating clearance of apoptotic debris

  6. Structure and activation of C1, the complex initiating the classical pathway of the complement cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Simon A; Sander, Bjoern; Jensen, Rasmus K; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Golas, Monika M; Jensenius, Jens C; Hansen, Annette G; Thiel, Steffen; Andersen, Gregers R

    2017-01-31

    The complement system is an important antimicrobial and inflammation-generating component of the innate immune system. The classical pathway of complement is activated upon binding of the 774-kDa C1 complex, consisting of the recognition molecule C1q and the tetrameric protease complex C1r2s2, to a variety of activators presenting specific molecular patterns such as IgG- and IgM-containing immune complexes. A canonical model entails a C1r2s2 with its serine protease domains tightly packed together in the center of C1 and an intricate intramolecular reaction mechanism for activation of C1r and C1s, induced upon C1 binding to the activator. Here, we show that the serine protease domains of C1r and C1s are located at the periphery of the C1r2s2 tetramer both when alone or within the nonactivated C1 complex. Our structural studies indicate that the C1 complex adopts a conformation incompatible with intramolecular activation of C1, suggesting instead that intermolecular proteolytic activation between neighboring C1 complexes bound to a complement activating surface occurs. Our results rationalize how a multitude of structurally unrelated molecular patterns can activate C1 and suggests a conserved mechanism for complement activation through the classical and the related lectin pathway.

  7. Human IgG is produced in a pro-form that requires clipping of C-terminal lysines for maximal complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Bremer, E. T. J.; Beurskens, F. J.; Voorhorst, M.

    2015-01-01

    G hexamerization at the cell surface. Here we demonstrate that C-terminal lysines may interfere with this process, leading to suboptimal C1q binding and CDC of cells opsonized with C-terminal lysine-containing IgG. After we removed these lysines with a carboxypeptidase, maximal complement activation was observed...... are produced in a pro-form in which charged C-termini interfere with IgG hexamer formation, C1q binding and CDC. To allow maximal complement activation, C-terminal lysine processing is required to release the antibody's full cytotoxic potential.......Human IgG is produced with C-terminal lysines that are cleaved off in circulation. The function of this modification was unknown and generally thought not to affect antibody function. We recently reported that efficient C1q binding and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) requires Ig...

  8. Circulating immune complexes and complement concentrations in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Jans, H

    1982-01-01

    A prospective evaluation of circulating immune complexes (CIC) and the activity of the complement system was undertaken in 53 alcoholic patients just before diagnostic liver biopsy. Circulating immune complexes were detected in 39% of patients with alcoholic steatosis (n = 26), 58% of patients...... with alcoholic hepatitis (n = 12), and 60% of patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 15). No significant difference was found between the three group of patients. The activity of the complement system was within reference limits in the majority of patients and only slight differences were detected between...... the three groups. No significant differences were observed in liver biochemistry and complement concentrations in CIC-positive and CIC-negative patients. Detection of CIC in patients with alcoholic liver disease does not seem to be of any diagnostic value or play any pathogenic role. The high prevalence...

  9. A Rare Terminal Dinitrogen Complex of Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mock, Michael T.; Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; O' Hagan, Molly J.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2011-10-12

    The reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia from N2 and H2 is currently carried out by the Haber-Bosch process, an energy intensive process that requires high pressures and high temperatures and accounts for the production of millions of tons of ammonia per year. The development of a catalytic, energy-efficient process for N2 reduction is of great interest and remains a formidable challenge. In this communication, we are reporting the preparation, characterization and computational electronic structure analysis of a rare 'Chatt-type' ((P-P)2M(N2)2, P-P = diphosphine ligand) complex of chromium, cis-[Cr(N2)2(PPh2NBn2)2] and its reactivity with CO. This complex is supported by the diphosphine ligand PPh2NBn2, containing non-coordinating pendant amine bases, to serve as proton relays. Future studies for this complex are aimed at answering fundamental questions regarding the role of proton relays in the second coordination sphere in their ability to facilitate proton movement from an external acid to metal-bound dinitrogen ligands in the challenging multi-proton/electron reduction of N2 to ammonia.

  10. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway Specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Sofia; Jensen, Jan Kristian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-01-01

    The lectin (LP) and classical (CP) pathways are two of the three main activation cascades of the complement system. These pathways start with recognition of different pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and include identical steps of proteolytic activation of complement component C4......, formation of the C3 proconvertase C4b2, followed by cleavage of complement component C2 within C4b2 resulting in the C3 convertase C4b2a. Here we describe the solution structures of the two central complexes of the pathways, C3 proconvertase and C3 convertase, as well as the unbound zymogen C2 obtained...... to the crystal structure of the AP C3 convertase C3bBb which is in accordance with their identical functions in cleaving the complement proteins C3 and C5....

  11. Reduced complement-mediated immune complex solubilizing capacity and the presence of incompletely solubilized immune complexes in SLE sera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, I; Jensenius, J C

    1983-01-01

    Reduced complement-mediated solubilization (CMS) of pre-formed immune complexes (IC) was demonstrated in sera from 11 out of 12 SLE patients. The presence of incompletely solubilized endogeneous IC in SLE sera was indicated by the following findings: (1) When IC positive SLE sera with reduced CMS...... capacity were mixed with normal donor sera they inhibited the CMS of the latter sera. (2) Resuspended PEG (2.75%) precipitates obtained from SLE sera inhibited the CMS of normal donor sera. (3) Non-solubilized or incompletely complement solubilized IC in SLE sera give a strong response in the PEG-CC assay...

  12. The Staphylococcus aureus protein Sbi acts as a complement inhibitor and forms a tripartite complex with host complement Factor H and C3b.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Haupt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, similar to other pathogens, binds human complement regulators Factor H and Factor H related protein 1 (FHR-1 from human serum. Here we identify the secreted protein Sbi (Staphylococcus aureus binder of IgG as a ligand that interacts with Factor H by a-to our knowledge-new type of interaction. Factor H binds to Sbi in combination with C3b or C3d, and forms tripartite SbiratioC3ratioFactor H complexes. Apparently, the type of C3 influences the stability of the complex; surface plasmon resonance studies revealed a higher stability of C3d complexed to Sbi, as compared to C3b or C3. As part of this tripartite complex, Factor H is functionally active and displays complement regulatory activity. Sbi, by recruiting Factor H and C3b, acts as a potent complement inhibitor, and inhibits alternative pathway-mediated lyses of rabbit erythrocytes by human serum and sera of other species. Thus, Sbi is a multifunctional bacterial protein, which binds host complement components Factor H and C3 as well as IgG and beta(2-glycoprotein I and interferes with innate immune recognition.

  13. Terminal tungsten pnictide complex formation through pnictaethynolate decarbonylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, Maximilian; Transue, Wesley J; Cummins, Christopher C

    2017-09-26

    Tungsten(iv) tetrakis(2,6-diisopropylphenoxide) (1) has been demonstrated to be a competent platform for decarbonylative formation of anionic terminal pnictide complexes upon treatment with pnictaethynolate anions: cyanate, 2-phosphaethynolate, and 2-arsaethynolate. These transformations constitute the first examples of terminal phosphide and arsenide complex formation at a transition metal center from OCP- and OCAs-, respectively. The phosphide and arsenide complexes are also the first to be isolated in a tetragonal, all-oxygen ligand environment. The scalar NMR coupling constants between tungsten-183 and nitrogen-15 or phosphorus-31 have been measured and contextualized using natural bond orbital (NBO) methods in terms of s orbital character in the σ bonding orbital and pnictide lone pair.

  14. Structural insights into the initiating complex of the lectin pathway of complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, Troels R; Le, Le T M; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Sander, Bjoern; Golas, Monika M; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Andersen, Gregers R; Thiel, Steffen

    2015-02-03

    The proteolytic cascade of the complement system is initiated when pattern-recognition molecules (PRMs) bind to ligands, resulting in the activation of associated proteases. In the lectin pathway of complement, the complex of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1) initiates the pathway by activating a second protease, MASP-2. Here we present a structural study of a PRM/MASP complex and derive the overall architecture of the 450 kDa MBL/MASP-1 complex using small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy. The serine protease (SP) domains from the zymogen MASP-1 dimer protrude from the cone-like MBL tetramer and are separated by at least 20 nm. This suggests that intracomplex activation within a single MASP-1 dimer is unlikely and instead supports intercomplex activation, whereby the MASP SP domains are accessible to nearby PRM-bound MASPs. This activation mechanism differs fundamentally from the intracomplex initiation models previously proposed for both the lectin and the classical pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The classical and alternative pathways of complement activation play distinct roles in spontaneous C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2004-01-01

    The contributions of the classical (CP) and alternative (AP) pathways of complement activation to the spontaneous deposition of C3 fragments and the formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC) on human B lymphocytes, were assessed by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with autologous......, however, in the nature of the fragments deposited as a result of CP and AP activation: C3b fragments deposited via the CP were extensively ( approximately 90%) converted to the terminal degradation product, C3dg, whereas about 50% of those deposited by the AP persisted as C3b/iC3b fragments. The extent...

  16. Hepatitis C virus suppresses C9 complement synthesis and impairs membrane attack complex function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hangeun; Meyer, Keith; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M; Ray, Ranjit

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins inhibit complement component expression, which may attenuate immunity against infection. In this study, we examined whether HCV regulates the membrane attack complex (MAC) via complement component C9. MAC is composed of C5b to C9 (C5b-9) and mediates cell lysis of invaded pathogens. Liver biopsy specimens from chronically HCV-infected patients exhibited a lower level of C9 mRNA expression than liver biopsy specimens from unrelated disease or healthy control human liver RNA. Hepatocytes infected with cell culture-grown HCV or expressing HCV core protein also displayed significant repression of C9 mRNA and protein levels. Promoter analysis suggested that the T cell factor-4 (TCF-4E) transcription factor is responsible for HCV core-mediated C9 promoter regulation. Sera from chronically HCV-infected patients displayed a lower level of C5b-9 and a reduced antimicrobial effect on model organisms compared to unrelated patient sera or sera from healthy volunteers. Together, these results for C9 regulation by HCV core protein coupled with functional impairment of the membrane attack complex underscore HCV-mediated attenuation of immune mechanisms.

  17. Immune complex modulation by plasma proteins. With special reference to the complement system and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G

    1989-01-01

    The complement (C) system consists of two activation pathways, the classical and the alternative, which may both be activated by immune complexes (IC). C activation products become attached to the IC during activation leading to profound changes in the properties of the complexes. The common...... preformed, fluid phase IC (CMS assay). The CMS was found to be dependent upon the alternative pathway of C and facilitated by the classical. Further studies concerning the influence of C deficiencies or depletion of C factors, the concentration of divalent metallions, the temperature and the ionic strength...... in SLE sera, which showed a reduction in IC size upon incubation with C. A negative correlation between the CMS capacity and the content of CMS inhibitory material was found. The CMS capacity did not correlate to the serum concentration of any of the C factors C3b/C3c, C4, Clq, factor B, factor H...

  18. Immune complex modulation by plasma proteins. With special reference to the complement system and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G

    1989-01-01

    The complement (C) system consists of two activation pathways, the classical and the alternative, which may both be activated by immune complexes (IC). C activation products become attached to the IC during activation leading to profound changes in the properties of the complexes. The common...... inflammation. 5) Tissue damage by activation and/or lysis of bystanding cells. 6) Modulation of B-cell proliferation and differentiation. Activation of the C system by IC is an essential normal component in the clearance of invading foreign material. However, in conditions with a persistent high concentration...... preformed, fluid phase IC (CMS assay). The CMS was found to be dependent upon the alternative pathway of C and facilitated by the classical. Further studies concerning the influence of C deficiencies or depletion of C factors, the concentration of divalent metallions, the temperature and the ionic strength...

  19. Triangle network motifs predict complexes by complementing high-error interactomes with structural information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labudde Dirk

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A lot of high-throughput studies produce protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs with many errors and missing information. Even for genome-wide approaches, there is often a low overlap between PPINs produced by different studies. Second-level neighbors separated by two protein-protein interactions (PPIs were previously used for predicting protein function and finding complexes in high-error PPINs. We retrieve second level neighbors in PPINs, and complement these with structural domain-domain interactions (SDDIs representing binding evidence on proteins, forming PPI-SDDI-PPI triangles. Results We find low overlap between PPINs, SDDIs and known complexes, all well below 10%. We evaluate the overlap of PPI-SDDI-PPI triangles with known complexes from Munich Information center for Protein Sequences (MIPS. PPI-SDDI-PPI triangles have ~20 times higher overlap with MIPS complexes than using second-level neighbors in PPINs without SDDIs. The biological interpretation for triangles is that a SDDI causes two proteins to be observed with common interaction partners in high-throughput experiments. The relatively few SDDIs overlapping with PPINs are part of highly connected SDDI components, and are more likely to be detected in experimental studies. We demonstrate the utility of PPI-SDDI-PPI triangles by reconstructing myosin-actin processes in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and cytoskeleton, which were not obvious in the original PPIN. Using other complementary datatypes in place of SDDIs to form triangles, such as PubMed co-occurrences or threading information, results in a similar ability to find protein complexes. Conclusion Given high-error PPINs with missing information, triangles of mixed datatypes are a promising direction for finding protein complexes. Integrating PPINs with SDDIs improves finding complexes. Structural SDDIs partially explain the high functional similarity of second-level neighbors in PPINs. We estimate that

  20. Statistical Techniques Complement UML When Developing Domain Models of Complex Dynamical Biosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard A; Timmis, Jon; Qwarnstrom, Eva E

    2016-01-01

    Computational modelling and simulation is increasingly being used to complement traditional wet-lab techniques when investigating the mechanistic behaviours of complex biological systems. In order to ensure computational models are fit for purpose, it is essential that the abstracted view of biology captured in the computational model, is clearly and unambiguously defined within a conceptual model of the biological domain (a domain model), that acts to accurately represent the biological system and to document the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. We present a domain model of the IL-1 stimulated NF-κB signalling pathway, which unambiguously defines the spatial, temporal and stochastic requirements for our future computational model. Through the development of this model, we observe that, in isolation, UML is not sufficient for the purpose of creating a domain model, and that a number of descriptive and multivariate statistical techniques provide complementary perspectives, in particular when modelling the heterogeneity of dynamics at the single-cell level. We believe this approach of using UML to define the structure and interactions within a complex system, along with statistics to define the stochastic and dynamic nature of complex systems, is crucial for ensuring that conceptual models of complex dynamical biosystems, which are developed using UML, are fit for purpose, and unambiguously define the functional requirements for the resultant computational model.

  1. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M

    2001-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...

  2. Terminal parent phosphanide and phosphinidene complexes of zirconium(IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, Hannah; Rookes, Thomas M.; Wildman, Elizabeth P.; Wooles, Ashley J.; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Balazs, Gabor; Scheer, Manfred [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2017-06-19

    The reaction of [Zr(Tren{sup DMBS})(Cl)] [Zr1; Tren{sup DMBS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiMe{sub 2}Bu{sup t}){sub 3}] with NaPH{sub 2} gave the terminal parent phosphanide complex [Zr(Tren{sup DMBS})(PH{sub 2})] [Zr2; Zr-P=2.690(2) Aa]. Treatment of Zr2 with one equivalent of KCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and two equivalents of benzo-15-crown-5 ether (B15C5) afforded an unprecedented example (outside of matrix isolation) of a structurally authenticated transition-metal terminal parent phosphinidene complex [Zr(Tren{sup DMBS})(PH)][K(B15C5){sub 2}] [Zr3; Zr=P=2.472(2) Aa]. DFT calculations reveal a polarized-covalent Zr=P double bond, with a Mayer bond order of 1.48, and together with IR spectroscopic data also suggest an agostic-type Zr..HP interaction [ angle {sub ZrPH}=66.7 ] which is unexpectedly similar to that found in cryogenic, spectroscopically observed phosphinidene species. Surprisingly, computational data suggest that the Zr=P linkage is similarly polarized, and thus as covalent, as essentially isostructural U=P and Th=P analogues. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Substrate recognition by complement convertases revealed in the C5–cobra venom factor complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Nick S; Andersen, Kasper R; Braren, Ingke; Spillner, Edzard; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Andersen, Gregers R

    2011-01-01

    Complement acts as a danger-sensing system in the innate immune system, and its activation initiates a strong inflammatory response and cleavage of the proteins C3 and C5 by proteolytic enzymes, the convertases. These contain a non-catalytic substrate contacting subunit (C3b or C4b) in complex with a protease subunit (Bb or C2a). We determined the crystal structures of the C3b homologue cobra venom factor (CVF) in complex with C5, and in complex with C5 and the inhibitor SSL7 at 4.3 Å resolution. The structures reveal a parallel two-point attachment between C5 and CVF, where the presence of SSL7 only slightly affects the C5–CVF interface, explaining the IgA dependence for SSL7-mediated inhibition of C5 cleavage. CVF functions as a relatively rigid binding scaffold inducing a conformational change in C5, which positions its cleavage site in proximity to the serine protease Bb. A general model for substrate recognition by the convertases is presented based on the C5–CVF and C3b–Bb–SCIN structures. Prior knowledge concerning interactions between the endogenous convertases and their substrates is rationalized by this model. PMID:21217642

  4. Synthesis and Reactivity of a Scandium Terminal Hydride: H2  Activation by a Scandium Terminal Imido Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xianghao; Xiang, Li; Lamsfus, Carlos A; Mao, Weiqing; Lu, Erli; Maron, Laurent; Leng, Xuebing; Chen, Yaofeng

    2017-10-20

    Dihydrogen is easily activated by a scandium terminal imido complex containing the weakly coordinated THF. The reaction proceeds through a 1,2-addition mechanism, which is distinct from the σ-bond metathesis mechanism reported to date for rare-earth metal-mediated H2 activation. This reaction yields a scandium terminal hydride, which is structurally well-characterized, being the first one to date. The reactivity of this hydride is reported with unsaturated substrates, further shedding light on the existence of the terminal hydride complex. Interestingly, the H2 activation can be reversible. DFT investigations further eludciate the mechanistic aspects of the reactivity of the scandium anilido-terminal hydride complex with PhNCS but also on the reversible H2 activation process. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M

    2001-01-01

    convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...

  6. A heterodimeric complex of the LRR proteins LRIM1 and APL1C regulates complement-like immunity in Anopheles gambiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Richard H.G.; Steinert, Stefanie; Chelliah, Yogarany; Volohonsky, Gloria; Levashina, Elena A.; Deisenhofer, Johann (CNRS-UMR); (UTSMC)

    2012-01-20

    The leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins LRIM1 and APL1C control the function of the complement-like protein TEP1 in Anopheles mosquitoes. The molecular structure of LRIM1 and APL1C and the basis of their interaction with TEP1 represent a new type of innate immune complex. The LRIM1/APL1C complex specifically binds and solubilizes a cleaved form of TEP1 without an intact thioester bond. The LRIM1 and APL1C LRR domains have a large radius of curvature, glycosylated concave face, and a novel C-terminal capping motif. The LRIM1/APL1C complex is a heterodimer with a single intermolecular disulfide bond. The structure of the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer reveals an interface between the two LRR domains and an extensive C-terminal coiled-coil domain. We propose that a cleaved form of TEP1 may act as a convertase for activation of other TEP1 molecules and that the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer regulates formation of this TEP1 convertase.

  7. Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    reproductive tract of the fe- male. In this regard, seminal plasma is devoid of complement ac- tivity and actually has a strong anti-complement activity (8...article: EA, Ab-sensitized sheep erythrocyte; ES, sheep erythrocyte; PSA, prostate-specific Ag; PVDF, polyvinylidene difluoride. Copyright 2013 by The...addition of sample loading buffer. Proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to PVDF membrane as described above. C3b/iC3b deposition assay Sheep

  8. Complexity of Complement Resistance Factors Expressed by Acinetobacter baumannii Needed for Survival in Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Larrayoz, Amaro F; Elhosseiny, Noha M; Chevrette, Marc G; Fu, Yang; Giunta, Peter; Spallanzani, Raúl G; Ravi, Keerthikka; Pier, Gerald B; Lory, Stephen; Maira-Litrán, Tomás

    2017-10-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen with increasing impact in healthcare settings, due in part to this organism's resistance to many antimicrobial agents, with pneumonia and bacteremia as the most common manifestations of disease. A significant proportion of clinically relevant A. baumannii strains are resistant to killing by normal human serum (NHS), an observation supported in this study by showing that 12 out of 15 genetically diverse strains of A. baumannii are resistant to NHS killing. To expand our understanding of the genetic basis of A. baumannii serum resistance, a transposon (Tn) sequencing (Tn-seq) approach was used to identify genes contributing to this trait. An ordered Tn library in strain AB5075 with insertions in every nonessential gene was subjected to selection in NHS. We identified 50 genes essential for the survival of A. baumannii in NHS, including already known serum resistance factors, and many novel genes not previously associated with serum resistance. This latter group included the maintenance of lipid asymmetry genetic pathway as a key determinant in protecting A. baumannii from the bactericidal activity of NHS via the alternative complement pathway. Follow-up studies validated the role of eight additional genes identified by Tn-seq in A. baumannii resistance to killing by NHS but not by normal mouse serum, highlighting the human species specificity of A. baumannii serum resistance. The identification of a large number of genes essential for serum resistance in A. baumannii indicates the degree of complexity needed for this phenotype, which might reflect a general pattern that pathogens rely on to cause serious infections. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Major histocompatibility complex genes in a Mexican family with deficiency of the second component of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melín-Aldana, H; Reyes, P; Vargas-Alarcón, G; Yamamoto-Furusho, J K; Granados, J

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the second component of the complement system is an uncommon condition that has been reported so far mostly in Caucasians. We describe a Mexican patient with undetectable C2 levels and absence of complement hemolytic activity. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in his family showed that the proband had the MHC haplotypes HLA-A25, B18, DR2, DQ1, SQ042/HLA-A24, B18, DR2, DQ1, SQ042. A strong genetic linkage of the deficiency of the second component of the complement gene and the HLA antigens A25, B18, and DR2, is well established in Caucasian populations. This suggests that the probable origin of the deficiency in our patient was admixture with Caucasian ancestors.

  10. Synergistic enhancement of chemokine generation and lung injury by C5a or the membrane attack complex of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B; Bless, N M

    1999-01-01

    Complement plays an important role in many acute inflammatory responses. In the current studies it was demonstrated that, in the presence of either C5a or sublytic forms of the complement-derived membrane attack complex (MAC), rat alveolar macrophages costimulated with IgG immune complexes...... demonstrated synergistic production of C-X-C (macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant) and C-C (macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha and monocyte chemoattractant-1) chemokines. In the absence of the costimulus, C5a or MAC did not induce chemokine generation....... In in vivo studies, C5a and MAC alone caused limited or no intrapulmonary generation of chemokines, but in the presence of a costimulus (IgG immune complexes) C5a and MAC caused synergistic intrapulmonary generation of C-X-C and C-C chemokines but not of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Under these conditions...

  11. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  12. The novel complement inhibitor human CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) protein promotes factor I-mediated degradation of C4b and C3b and inhibits the membrane attack complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Kalchishkova, Nikolina; Kurbasic, Emila; Jiang, Wen G; Blom, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) is a transmembrane protein containing 15 consecutive complement control protein (CCP) domains, which are characteristic for complement inhibitors. We expressed a membrane-bound fragment of human CSMD1 composed of the 15 C-terminal CCP domains and demonstrated that it inhibits deposition of C3b by the classical pathway on the surface of Chinese hamster ovary cells by 70% at 6% serum and of C9 (component of membrane attack complex) by 90% at 1.25% serum. Furthermore, this fragment of CSMD1 served as a cofactor to factor I-mediated degradation of C3b. In all functional assays performed, well-characterized complement inhibitors were used as positive controls, whereas Coxsackie adenovirus receptor, a protein with no effect on complement, was a negative control. Moreover, attenuation of expression in human T47 breast cancer cells that express endogenous CSMD1 significantly increased C3b deposition on these cells by 45% at 8% serum compared with that for the controls. Furthermore, by expressing a soluble 17-21 CCP fragment of CSMD1, we found that CSMD1 inhibits complement by promoting factor I-mediated C4b/C3b degradation and inhibition of MAC assembly at the level of C7. Our results revealed a novel complement inhibitor for the classical and lectin pathways.

  13. Sheep serum complement sensitisation of sheep erythrocyte-rabbit antibody complexes for haemolysis by guinea-pig complement plus EDTA or Mg2+-EGTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, W; Stankiewicz, M

    1986-01-01

    Sheep erythrocyte (E)-rabbit antibody (A) complexes incubated with sheep serum diluted up to 1:5120 or 1:20480 and washed can be haemolysed by guinea-pig (g-p) serum (complement, C) containing EDTA or Mg2+-EGTA respectively as haemolytic finishing reagents. Sheep E carrying a high dose of rabbit A were necessary for this reaction, particularly with g-p C-EDTA. G-p serum (stored by freezing) was active as a haemolytic finishing reagent with both EDTA and Mg2+-EGTA. Reconstituted freeze-dried g-p serum (also stored by freezing) was haemolytically active with Mg2+-EGTA only. G-p serum preserved by Richardson's method did not function as a finishing reagent with EDTA or Mg2+-EGTA. A non-haemolytic prozone occurred with sheep E-rabbit A treated with dilutions of sheep serum or body fluid up to 1:160, particularly when g-p C (frozen)-EDTA was used as the finishing reagent. Sheep E-rabbit A were sensitized by serum, foetal lamb serum, pericardiac-, synovial- or ovarian follicle-fluids colostrum or milk for haemolysis by g-p C (frozen)-EDTA or -Mg2+-EGTA. With the C3 inhibitors cobra venom factor or salicylaldoxime, serum sensitisation of sheep E-rabbit A for haemolysis by g-p C (frozen)-EDTA or -Mg2+-EGTA was not blocked. Sensitisation by serum heated at 50 degrees C for 30 min (partial inactivation of C2) was incomplete. Inhibitors of C1 (antrypol, chelators of Ca2+ or heating serum at 56 degrees C for 30 min) partially or fully blocked sensitisation for haemolysis by both g-p C (frozen)-EDTA or -Mg2+-EGTA. These results show that at a minimum, components C1, C4 and C2 are present and functionally active in serum and some body fluids of sheep.

  14. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  15. Complement receptors 1 and 2 in murine antibody responses to IgM-complexed and uncomplexed sheep erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rutemark

    Full Text Available Early complement components are important for normal antibody responses. In this process, complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2, expressed on B cells and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs in mice, play a central role. Complement-activating IgM administered with the antigen it is specific for, enhances the antibody response to this antigen. Here, bone marrow chimeras between Cr2(-/- and wildtype mice were used to analyze whether FDCs or B cells must express CR1/2 for antibody responses to sheep erythrocytes (SRBC, either administered alone or together with specific IgM. For robust IgG anti-SRBC responses, CR1/2 must be expressed on FDCs. Occasionally, weak antibody responses were seen when only B cells expressed CR1/2, probably reflecting extrafollicular antibody production enabled by co-crosslinking of CR2/CD19/CD81 and the BCR. When SRBC alone was administered to mice with CR1/2(+ FDCs, B cells from wildtype and Cr2(-/- mice produced equal amounts of antibodies. Most likely antigen is then deposited on FDCs in a way that optimizes engagement of the B cell receptor, making CR2-facilitated signaling to the B cell superfluous. SRBC bound to IgM will have more C3 fragments, the ligands for CR1/2, on their surface than SRBC administered alone. Specific IgM, forming a complex with SRBC, enhances antibody responses in two ways when FDCs express CR1/2. One is dependent on CR1/2(+ B cells and probably acts via increased transport of IgM-SRBC-complement complexes bound to CR1/2 on marginal zone B cells. The other is independent on CR1/2(+ B cells and the likely mechanism is that IgM-SRBC-complement complexes bind better to FDCs than SRBC administered alone. These observations suggest that the immune system uses three different CR1/2-mediated effector functions to generate optimal antibody responses: capture by FDCs (playing a dominant role, transport by marginal zone B cells and enhanced B cell signaling.

  16. Eculizumab-C5 complexes express a C5a neoepitope in vivo: Consequences for interpretation of patient complement analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per H; Thomas, Anub Mathew; Bergseth, Grethe; Gustavsen, Alice; Volokhina, Elena B; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Mollnes, Tom E

    2017-09-01

    The complement system has obtained renewed clinical focus due to increasing number of patients treated with eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody inhibiting cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b. The FDA approved indications are paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, but many other diseases are candidates for complement inhibition. It has been postulated that eculizumab does not inhibit C5a formation in vivo, in contrast to what would be expected since it blocks C5 cleavage. We recently revealed that this finding was due to a false positive reaction in a C5a assay. In the present study, we identified expression of a neoepitope which was exposed on C5 after binding to eculizumab in vivo. By size exclusion chromatography of patient serum obtained before and after infusion of eculizumab, we document that the neoepitope was exposed in the fractions containing the eculizumab-C5 complexes, being positive in this actual C5a assay and negative in others. Furthermore, we confirmed that it was the eculizumab-C5 complexes that were detected in the C5a assay by adding an anti-IgG4 antibody as detection antibody. Competitive inhibition by anti-C5 antibodies localized the epitope to the C5a moiety of C5. Finally, acidification of C5, known to alter C5 conformation, induced a neoepitope reacting identical to the one we explored, in the C5a assays. These data are important for interpretation of complement analyses in patients treated with eculizumab. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Substrate recognition by complement convertases revealed in the C5-cobra venom factor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Nick Stub; Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Braren, Ingke

    2011-01-01

    with a protease subunit (Bb or C2a). We determined the crystal structures of the C3b homologue cobra venom factor (CVF) in complex with C5, and in complex with C5 and the inhibitor SSL7 at 4.3 Å resolution. The structures reveal a parallel two-point attachment between C5 and CVF, where the presence of SSL7 only...

  18. Transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue identifies reduced expression of complement complex C1Q Genes in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peijie; Nicholls, Laura; Assareh, Hassan; Fang, Zhiming; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Assareh, Amelia A; Voineagu, Irina

    2016-06-06

    MECP2, the gene mutated in the majority of Rett syndrome cases, is a transcriptional regulator that can activate or repress transcription. Although the transcription regulatory function of MECP2 has been known for over a decade, it remains unclear how transcriptional dysregulation leads to the neurodevelopmental disorder. Notably, little convergence was previously observed between the genes abnormally expressed in the brain of Rett syndrome mouse models and those identified in human studies. Here we carried out a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue from Rett syndrome brain using both RNA-seq and microarrays. We identified over two hundred differentially expressed genes, and identified the complement C1Q complex genes (C1QA, C1QB and C1QC) as a point of convergence between gene expression changes in human and mouse Rett syndrome brain. The results of our study support a role for alterations in the expression level of C1Q complex genes in RTT pathogenesis.

  19. N-terminal acetylation promotes synaptonemal complex assembly in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinmin; Barroso, Consuelo; Zhang, Pan; Kim, Hyun-Min; Li, Shangtong; Labrador, Leticia; Lightfoot, James; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Colaiácovo, Monica P

    2016-11-01

    N-terminal acetylation of the first two amino acids on proteins is a prevalent cotranslational modification. Despite its abundance, the biological processes associated with this modification are not well understood. Here, we mapped the pattern of protein N-terminal acetylation in Caenorhabditis elegans, uncovering a conserved set of rules for this protein modification and identifying substrates for the N-terminal acetyltransferase B (NatB) complex. We observed an enrichment for global protein N-terminal acetylation and also specifically for NatB substrates in the nucleus, supporting the importance of this modification for regulating biological functions within this cellular compartment. Peptide profiling analysis provides evidence of cross-talk between N-terminal acetylation and internal modifications in a NAT substrate-specific manner. In vivo studies indicate that N-terminal acetylation is critical for meiosis, as it regulates the assembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC), a proteinaceous structure ubiquitously present during meiosis from yeast to humans. Specifically, N-terminal acetylation of NatB substrate SYP-1, an SC structural component, is critical for SC assembly. These findings provide novel insights into the biological functions of N-terminal acetylation and its essential role during meiosis. © 2016 Gao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Heteromeric Complexes of Native Collectin Kidney 1 and Collectin Liver 1 Are Found in the Circulation with MASPs and Activate the Complement System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken L; Brandt, Jette; Andrieu, Jean-Piere

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune system. The complement cascade may be initiated downstream of the lectin activation pathway upon binding of mannan-binding lectin, ficolins, or collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1, alias CL-11) to suitable microbial patterns consisting...... to that of recombinant CL-K1. We conclude that CL-K1 exists in circulation in the form of heteromeric complexes with CL-L1 that interact with MASPs and can mediate complement activation....

  1. Study of the complexation of oxacillin in 1-(4-Carbomethoxypyrrolidone)-terminated PAMAM dendrimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jon Stefan; Ficker, Mario; Petersen, Johannes Fabritius

    2013-01-01

    The complexation of oxacillin to three generations of 1-(4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone)-terminated PAMAM dendrimers was studied with NMR in CD3OD and CDCl3. The stochiometries, which were determined from Job plots, were found to be both solvent- and generation-dependent. The dissociation constants (Kd......) and Gibbs energies for complexation of oxacillin into the 1-(4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone)-terminated PAMAM dendrimer hosts were determined by (1)H NMR titrations and showed weaker binding of oxacillin upon increasing the size (generation) of the dendrimer....

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of multi-subunit tethering complexes demonstrates an ancient pan-eukaryotic complement and sculpting in Apicomplexa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christen M Klinger

    Full Text Available Apicomplexa are obligate intracellular parasites that cause tremendous disease burden world-wide. They utilize a set of specialized secretory organelles in their invasive process that require delivery of components for their biogenesis and function, yet the precise mechanisms underpinning such processes remain unclear. One set of potentially important components is the multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs, factors increasingly implicated in all aspects of vesicle-target interactions. Prompted by the results of previous studies indicating a loss of membrane trafficking factors in Apicomplexa, we undertook a bioinformatic analysis of MTC conservation. Building on knowledge of the ancient presence of most MTC proteins, we demonstrate the near complete retention of MTCs in the newly available genomes for Guillardiatheta and Bigelowiellanatans. The latter is a key taxonomic sampling point as a basal sister taxa to the group including Apicomplexa. We also demonstrate an ancient origin of the CORVET complex subunits Vps8 and Vps3, as well as the TRAPPII subunit Tca17. Having established that the lineage leading to Apicomplexa did at one point possess the complete eukaryotic complement of MTC components, we undertook a deeper taxonomic investigation in twelve apicomplexan genomes. We observed excellent conservation of the VpsC core of the HOPS and CORVET complexes, as well as the core TRAPP subunits, but sparse conservation of TRAPPII, COG, Dsl1, and HOPS/CORVET-specific subunits. However, those subunits that we did identify appear to be expressed with similar patterns to the fully conserved MTC proteins, suggesting that they may function as minimal complexes or with analogous partners. Strikingly, we failed to identify any subunits of the exocyst complex in all twelve apicomplexan genomes, as well as the dinoflagellate Perkinsus marinus. Overall, we demonstrate reduction of MTCs in Apicomplexa and their ancestors, consistent with modification during

  3. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum complementing chemical component relaxation in complex ventral hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstner, Kristen E; Read, John W; Rodriguez-Acevedo, Omar; Ho-Shon, Kevin; Magnussen, John; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2017-04-01

    A rarely used technique for enabling closure of large ventral hernias with loss of domain is preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum (PPP), which uses intermittent insufflation to gradually stretch the contracted abdominal wall muscles, increasing the capacity of the abdominal cavity. This allows the re-introduction of herniated viscera into the abdominal cavity and assists in closure of giant hernias which may otherwise be considered inoperable. This was a prospective study assessing 16 patients between 2013 and 2015 with multi-recurrent ventral hernia. All patients were treated preoperatively with both Botulinum Toxin A (BTA) injections to the lateral abdominal wall muscles to confer flaccid paralysis, and short-term PPP to passively expand the abdominal cavity. All patients underwent serial abdominal CT imaging, with pre- and post-treatment circumference measurements of the peritoneal cavity and hernia sac, prior to undergoing operative mesh repair of their hernia. The mean hernia defect size was 236 cm2, with mean 28 % loss of domain. The mean overall duration of PPP was 6.2 days. The mean gain in abdominal circumference was 4.9 cm (5.6 %) (p 0.002) after BTA and PPP. Fascial closure and mesh hernia repair were performed in all 16 patients, with no patients suffering from postoperative abdominal hypertension, ventilatory impairment, or wound dehiscence. There are no hernia recurrences to date. Eight patients (50 %) experienced PPP-related complications, consisting of subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, pneumocardium, and metabolic acidosis. No complication required intervention. PPP is a useful adjunct in the repair of complex ventral hernia. It passively expands the abdominal cavity, allowing viscera to re-establish right of domain. At the same time, it helps to minimize the risks of postoperative abdominal compartment syndrome and the sequelae of fascial closure under tension. However, its benefits must be carefully weighed with

  4. Bimolecular Complementation to Visualize Filovirus VP40-Host Complexes in Live Mammalian Cells: Toward the Identification of Budding Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virus-host interactions play key roles in promoting efficient egress of many RNA viruses, including Ebola virus (EBOV or “e” and Marburg virus (MARV or “m”. Late- (L- domains conserved in viral matrix proteins recruit specific host proteins, such as Tsg101 and Nedd4, to facilitate the budding process. These interactions serve as attractive targets for the development of broad-spectrum budding inhibitors. A major gap still exists in our understanding of the mechanism of filovirus budding due to the difficulty in detecting virus-host complexes and mapping their trafficking patterns in the natural environment of the cell. To address this gap, we used a bimolecular complementation (BiMC approach to detect, localize, and follow the trafficking patterns of eVP40-Tsg101 complexes in live mammalian cells. In addition, we used the BiMC approach along with a VLP budding assay to test small molecule inhibitors identified by in silico screening for their ability to block eVP40 PTAP-mediated interactions with Tsg101 and subsequent budding of eVP40 VLPs. We demonstrated the potential broad spectrum activity of a lead candidate inhibitor by demonstrating its ability to block PTAP-dependent binding of HIV-1 Gag to Tsg101 and subsequent egress of HIV-1 Gag VLPs.

  5. Can Nondeterminism Help Complementation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Complementation and determinization are two fundamental notions in automata theory. The close relationship between the two has been well observed in the literature. In the case of nondeterministic finite automata on finite words (NFA, complementation and determinization have the same state complexity, namely Theta(2^n where n is the state size. The same similarity between determinization and complementation was found for Buchi automata, where both operations were shown to have 2^Θ(n lg n state complexity. An intriguing question is whether there exists a type of omega-automata whose determinization is considerably harder than its complementation. In this paper, we show that for all common types of omega-automata, the determinization problem has the same state complexity as the corresponding complementation problem at the granularity of 2^Θ(..

  6. Complement and Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Role of Sublytic Terminal Complement Complex-Induced Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Synthesis in Cardiac Myocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zwaka, Thomas P.; Manolov, Dimitar; Özdemir, Cüneyt; Marx, Nikolaus; Kaya, Ziya; Kochs, Matthias; Höher, Martin; Hombach, Vinzenz; Torzewski, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a syndrome characterized by cardiac enlargement and impaired systolic function of the heart. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a pleiotropic cytokine, seems to play a central role in the progression of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recent data suggest that ongoing inflammation in the myocardium may, in many cases, contribute to the development of disease. Chronic generation of autoantibodies to myocardial antigens or, in some cases, viral infection are pathobiologically invol...

  7. Neutrophil Fc gamma and complement receptors involved in binding soluble IgG immune complexes and in specific granule release induced by soluble IgG immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice, J K; Lachmann, P J

    1997-10-01

    We examined the effect of soluble IgG immune complex (IC) characteristics on the binding of IC to human neutrophils and IC-induced specific granule release of neutrophils via Fc gamma receptors (CD16 and CD32) and complement receptors (CR1 and CR3). A set of soluble IgG IC varying in size, IgG subclass, antigen epitope density and complement (C) incorporation were formed between 5-iodo-4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenacetyl (NIP) coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and chimeric mouse-human anti-NIP monoclonal antibodies (mAb) of all four IgG subclasses. High and low epitope density IC of all four IgG subclasses induced specific granule release with C, but in the absence of C only IgG1 and IgG3 IC were functionally active. The Fc gamma and C receptors responsible for IgG IC-induced specific granule release and IC binding were determined using mAb specific for the ligand binding sites of CD16, CD32 and CR3, and recombinant soluble CR1. Each defined IC displayed a unique pattern of receptor preference, dependent upon subclass and antigenic epitope density. IC binding and IC-induced specific granule release was not mediated by the same receptor, or combination of receptors. High and low epitope density IgG3 IC binding and induction of specific granule release was mediated predominantly via CD16. Other IC subclasses bound differently, i.e. IgG1 IC used CD16 and CR3; IgG2 and IgG4 predominantly used complement receptors; but all three induced specific granule release via CD32. In vivo these results may translate into differential activation of neutrophils by soluble IC dependent upon their characteristics, leading to subtle nuances in the etiology, pathology and control of the immune response in IC-related diseases.

  8. Complex complementizers and the structural relation with weak T. New (morpho)syntactic data from a Pomeranian language island in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I discuss three properties of Brazilian Pomeranian, a Germanic language spoken in Espirito Santo, Brazil by descendents who emigrated in the 19th century. These three aspects of the verbal system are: 1. The relation between complex complementizers, a two-infinitive system, and split

  9. The terminal complement complex is generated in chronic leg ulcers in the absence of protectin (CD59)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, E; Thomsen, H K; Danielsen, L

    1999-01-01

    -accelerating factor (CD55) and protectin (CD59). Eleven frozen biopsies from ischaemic leg ulcers, 10 biopsies from venous hypertension leg ulcers, and 10 biopsies from normal skin were studied. In 9 of 11 ischaemic and in 5 of 10 venous hypertension leg ulcers, marked staining for TCC was found around....... Semiquantitative measurement of CD59 showed marked increased staining intensity in the endothelium in venous hypertension ulcers and diminished intensity in ischaemic ulcers compared to normal skin. No such difference could be observed for CD55. When TCC was positive in the capillary walls, weak or no staining...... for CD59 was found. A significantly higher ratio of TCC/CD59 was found in the ischaemic compared to venous ulcers (p = 0.018). This was due to a marked difference between the ulcer margins (p = 0.013). Localized areas in the venous ulcers had the same pattern as that seen in the ischaemic ulcers. Our...

  10. Reductive cleavage of nitrite to form terminal uranium mono-oxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew J; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2013-01-09

    Uranium terminal mono-oxo complexes are prepared with a unique activation of nitrite following reductive cleavage of an N-O bond with loss of nitric oxide. The thermodynamic driving force of U═O bond formation differentiates this reactivity from known mechanisms of nitrite reduction, which are typically mediated by proton transfer. Mechanistic details are explored by DFT supporting a simple homolytic cleavage pathway from a κ(1)-ONO bound intermediate. Complexes of the formula U(VI)OX[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) are formed providing a trigonal bipyramidal framework into which ligands trans to the U═O bond may be installed.

  11. Formation of a covalent complex between the terminal protein of pneumococcal bacteriophage Cp-1 and 5'-dAMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, P.; Hermoso, J.M.; Garcia, J.A.; Garcia, E.; Lopez, R.; Salas, M.

    1986-04-01

    Incubation of extracts of Cp-1-infected Streptococcus pneumoniae with (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)dATP produced a labeled protein with the electrophoretic mobility of the Cp-1 terminal protein. The reaction product was resistant to treatment with micrococcal nuclease and sensitive to treatment with proteinase K. Incubation of the /sup 32/P-labeled protein with 5 M piperidine for 4 h at 50/sup 0/C released 5'-dAMP, indicating that a covalent complex between the terminal protein and 5'-dAMP was formed in vitro. When the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates were included in the reaction mixture, a labeled complex of slower electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels than the terminal protein-dAMP complex was also found, indicating that the Cp-1 terminal protein-dAMP complex can be elongated and, therefore, that it is an initiation complex. Treatment of the /sup 32/P-labeled terminal protein-dAMP complex with 5.8 M HCl at 110/sup 0/C for 2 h yielded phosphothreonine. These results, together with the resistance of the terminal protein-DNA linkage to hydroxylamine, suggest that the Cp-1 terminal protein is covalently linked to the DNA through a phosphoester bond between L-threonine and 5'-dAMP, namely, a O-5'-deoxyadenylyl-L-threonine bond.

  12. Lutein supplementation leads to decreased soluble complement membrane attack complex sC5b-9 plasma levels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tian, Yuan; Kijlstra, A; Veen, van der, RLP; Makridaki, M; Murray, Ian J; Berendschot, TTJM Tos

    2015-01-01

    ... in drusen (Hageman et al. ). These findings were supported by studies showing an increase in the level of various complement activation products in the circulation of AMD patients (Donoso et al. ; Scholl et al. ; Reynolds et al. ; Hecker et al. ) and provided further evidence for a systemic inflammatory component to the disease pathogenesis...

  13. Eculizumab-C5 complexes express a C5a neoepitope in vivo: Consequences for interpretation of patient complement analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, P.H.; Thomas, A.M.; Bergseth, G.; Gustavsen, A.; Volokhina, E.B.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Barratt-Due, A.; Mollnes, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    The complement system has obtained renewed clinical focus due to increasing number of patients treated with eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody inhibiting cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b. The FDA approved indications are paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, but

  14. Immune complexes in chronic Chagas disease patients are formed by exovesicles from Trypanosoma cruzi carrying the conserved MASP N-terminal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Lozano, Isabel María; de Pablos, Luis Miguel; Longhi, Silvia Andrea; Zago, María Paola; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Osuna, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    The exovesicles (EVs) are involved in pathologic host-parasite immune associations and have been recently used as biomarkers for diagnosis of infectious diseases. The release of EVs by Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has recently been described, with different protein cargoes including the MASP multigene family of proteins MASPs are specific to this parasite and characterized by a conserved C-terminal (C-term) region and an N-terminal codifying for a signal peptide (SP). In this investigation, we identified immature MASP proteins containing the MASP SP in EVs secreted by the infective forms of the parasite. Those EVs are responsible for the formation of immune complexes (ICs) containing anti-MASP SP IgGs in patients with different (cardiac, digestive and asymptomatic) chronic Chagas disease manifestations. Moreover, purified EVs as well as the MASP SP inhibit the action of the complement system and also show a significant association with the humoral response in patients with digestive pathologies. These findings reveal a new route for the secretion of MASP proteins in T. cruzi, which uses EVs as vehicles for immature and misfolded proteins, forming circulating immune complexes. Such complexes could be used in the prognosis of digestive pathologies of clinical forms of Chagas disease.

  15. ELISA for evaluating the incorporation of plasma derived complement split-products C3b/iC3b into solid-phase immune complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann-Nielsen, E; Svehag, S E; Thorlacius-Ussing, O

    2001-01-01

    An ELISA that measures plasma derived complement (C) split-products C3b/iC3b deposited on solid-phase immune complexes during C activation is described. Plates are coated with BSA, anti-BSA and plasma is added. Deposited C3b/iC3b is then detected by biotinylated anti-C3c-antibodies, avidin...

  16. Impaired jun-NH2-terminal kinase activation by ultraviolet irradiation in fibroblasts of patients with Cockayne syndrome complementation group B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, V; Adler, V; Lehmann, A; Ronai, Z

    1996-06-01

    c-jun-NH2 kinases (JNK) are among the UV-activated protein kinases that play an important role in cellular stress response via the phosphorylation of c-jun, ATF2, and p53. Activation of JNK by UV irradiation requires cooperation between membrane and nuclear components, including DNA lesions per se. The role of DNA lesions in JNK activation led us to explore the inducibility of these kinases in cells of repair-deficient patients. Analyses of primary fibroblast cell lines from patients with Cockayne Syndrome of complementation group B (CS-B) revealed poor JNK activation after UV irradiation in four of five cases when compared with three repair-proficient, normal human fibroblast cell lines. Impaired ability to activate JNK persisted at various time points and with different doses of UV irradiation and coincided with failure of in vitro damaged DNA to activate these kinases. In contrast to UV irradiation, other forms of stress, such as H2O2 or heat shock were capable of inducing JNK activation in CS-B cells. Interestingly, when UV irradiation was administered after osmotic shock, it led to JNK activation in CS-B cells, indicating that alternate signal transduction pathways that are activated in response to other forms of stress can potentiate JNK activation by UV irradiation. Unlike CS-B cells, those of other repair-deficient cells, including xeroderma pigmentosum of different complementation groups, revealed proper activation of JNK by UV irradiation. Together, our findings point to deficiency of JNK activation by UV irradiation in CS-B cells, a phenomenon which may be associated with impaired CS-B, the mutant repair gene in these patients.

  17. Triamidoamine-uranium(IV)-stabilized terminal parent phosphide and phosphinidene complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Benedict M.; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J.; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Balazs, Gabor; Scheer, Manfred [Institut of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Regensburg (Germany); Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J.L. [School of Chemistry and Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-22

    Reaction of [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(THF)][BPh{sub 4}] (1; Tren{sup TIPS}=N{CH_2CH_2NSi(iPr)_3}{sub 3}) with NaPH{sub 2} afforded the novel f-block terminal parent phosphide complex [U(Tren {sup TIPS})(PH{sub 2})] (2; U-P=2.883(2) Aa). Treatment of 2 with one equivalent of KCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and two equivalents of benzo-15-crown-5 ether (B15C5) afforded the unprecedented metal-stabilized terminal parent phosphinidene complex [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(PH)][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (4; U=P=2.613(2) Aa). DFT calculations reveal a polarized-covalent U=P bond with a Mayer bond order of 1.92. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke Hansen

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing......, the presence of extrinsic CR1, on E, may serve to limit spontaneous MAC formation and thereby ensure cell survival in the circulation....

  19. Effect of Terminal Groups of Dendrimers in the Complexation with Antisense Oligonucleotides and Cell Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Peñaloza, Juan Pablo; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Reyes, Rodrigo; Vidaurre, Soledad; Romero, Valentina; Fuentes, Juan; Céric, Francisco; Velásquez, Luis; González-Nilo, Fernando D.; Otero, Carolina

    2016-02-01

    Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers are the most recognized class of dendrimer. Amino-terminated (PAMAM-NH2) and hydroxyl-terminated (PAMAM-OH) dendrimers of generation 4 are widely used, since they are commercially available. Both have different properties, mainly based on their different overall charges at physiological pH. Currently, an important function of dendrimers as carriers of short single-stranded DNA has been applied. These molecules, known as antisense oligonucleotides (asODNs), are able to inhibit the expression of a target mRNA. Whereas PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers have shown to be able to transfect plasmid DNA, PAMAM-OH dendrimers have not shown the same successful results. However, little is known about their interaction with shorter and more flexible molecules such as asODNs. Due to several initiatives, the use of these neutral dendrimers as a scaffold to introduce other functional groups has been proposed. Because of its low cytotoxicity, it is relevant to understand the molecular phenomena involving these types of dendrimers. In this work, we studied the behavior of an antisense oligonucleotide in presence of both types of dendrimers using molecular dynamics simulations, in order to elucidate if they are able to form stable complexes. In this manner, we demonstrated at atomic level that PAMAM-NH2, unlike PAMAM-OH, could form a well-compacted complex with asODN, albeit PAMAM-OH can also establish stable interactions with the oligonucleotide. The biological activity of asODN in complex with PAMAM-NH2 dendrimer was also shown. Finally, we revealed that in contact with PAMAM-OH, asODN remains outside the cells as TIRF microscopy results showed, due to its poor interaction with this dendrimer and cell membranes.

  20. Sulfate-bridged dimeric trinuclear copper(II–pyrazolate complex with three different terminal ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gellert Mezei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of CuSO4·5H2O, 4-chloropyrazole (4-Cl-pzH and triethylamine (Et3N in dimethylformamide (DMF produced crystals of diaquahexakis(μ-4-chloropyrazolato-κ2N:N′bis(N,N-dimethylformamidedi-μ3-hydroxido-bis(μ4-sulfato-κ4O:O′:O′′:O′′hexacopper(II N,N-dimethylformamide tetrasolvate dihydrate, [Cu3(OH(SO4(C3H2ClN23(C3H7NO(H2O]2·4C3H7NO·2H2O. The centrosymmetric dimeric molecule consists of two trinuclear copper–pyrazolate units bridged by two sulfate ions. The title compound provides the first example of a trinuclear copper–pyrazolate complex with three different terminal ligands on the Cu atoms, and also the first example of such complex with a strongly binding basal sulfate ion. Within each trinuclear unit, the CuII atoms are bridged by μ-pyrazolate groups and a central μ3-OH group, and are coordinated by terminal sulfate, H2O and DMF ligands, respectively. Moreover, the sulfate O atoms coordinate at the apical position to the Cu atoms of the symmetry-related unit, providing square–pyramidal coordination geometry around each copper cation. The metal complex and solvent molecules are involved in O—H...O hydrogen bonds, leading to a two-dimensional network parallel to (10-1.

  1. Changes in Cerebral Hemodynamics during Complex Motor Learning by Character Entry into Touch-Screen Terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Sagari

    Full Text Available Studies of cerebral hemodynamics during motor learning have mostly focused on neurorehabilitation interventions and their effectiveness. However, only a few imaging studies of motor learning and the underlying complex cognitive processes have been performed.We measured cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS in relation to acquisition patterns of motor skills in healthy subjects using character entry into a touch-screen terminal. Twenty healthy, right-handed subjects who had no previous experience with character entry using a touch-screen terminal participated in this study. They were asked to enter the characters of a randomly formed Japanese syllabary into the touch-screen terminal. All subjects performed the task with their right thumb for 15 s alternating with 25 s of rest for 30 repetitions. Performance was calculated by subtracting the number of incorrect answers from the number of correct answers, and gains in motor skills were evaluated according to the changes in performance across cycles. Behavioral and oxygenated hemoglobin concentration changes across task cycles were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlations.Performance correlated positively with task cycle, thus confirming motor learning. Hemodynamic activation over the left sensorimotor cortex (SMC showed a positive correlation with task cycle, whereas activations over the right prefrontal cortex (PFC and supplementary motor area (SMA showed negative correlations.We suggest that increases in finger momentum with motor learning are reflected in the activity of the left SMC. We further speculate that the right PFC and SMA were activated during the early phases of motor learning, and that this activity was attenuated with learning progress.

  2. Functional analysis of Ficolin-3 mediated complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Honoré, Christian; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2010-01-01

    assessed by C4, C3 and terminal complement complex (TCC) deposition. Serum Ficolin-3 bound to acBSA in a calcium dependent manner, while only minimal binding of Ficolin-2 and no binding of Ficolin-1 were observed. No binding to normal BSA was seen for any of the Ficolins. Serum C4, C3 and TCC deposition...... was applied to the samples that inhibited interference from the classical pathway due to the presence of anti-BSA antibodies in some sera. We describe a novel functional method for measuring complement activation mediated by Ficolin-3 in human serum up to the formation of TCC. The assay provides...

  3. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilbride Seán M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2 and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1 are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  4. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilbride, Sean M

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1) are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington\\'s disease and Alzheimer\\'s disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  5. Visualization of the Genomic Loci That Are Bound by Specific Multiprotein Complexes by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation Analysis on Drosophila Polytene Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huai; Kerppola, Tom K

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a procedure that enables visualization of the genomic loci that are bound by complexes formed by a specific combination of chromatin-binding proteins. This procedure is based on imaging bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) complexes on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. BiFC complexes are formed by the facilitated association of two fluorescent protein fragments that are fused to proteins that interact with, or are in close proximity to, each other. The intensity of BiFC complex fluorescence at individual genomic loci is greatly enhanced by the parallel alignment of hundreds of chromatids within the polytene chromosomes. The loci that are bound by the complexes are mapped by comparing the locations of BiFC complex fluorescence with the stereotypical banding patterns of the chromosomes. We describe strategies for the design, expression, and validation of fusion proteins for the analysis of BiFC complex binding on polytene chromosomes. We detail protocols for the preparation of polytene chromosome spreads that have been optimized for the purpose of BiFC complex visualization. Finally, we provide guidance for the interpretation of results from studies of BiFC complex binding on polytene chromosomes and for comparison of the genomic loci that are bound by BiFC complexes with those that are bound by subunits of the corresponding endogenous complexes. The visualization of BiFC complex binding on polytene chromosomes provides a unique method to visualize multiprotein complex binding at specific loci, throughout the genome, in individual cells. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide complements the GRACE risk score in predicting early and late mortality following acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sohail Q; Narayan, Hafid; Ng, Kelvin H; Dhillon, Onkar S; Kelly, Dominic; Quinn, Paulene; Squire, Iain B; Davies, Joan E; Ng, Leong L

    2009-06-02

    The GRACE (Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events) risk score has been shown to offer predictive power with regard to death and AMI (acute myocardial infarction) in patients with ACS (acute coronary syndromes). NT-proBNP (N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide) has also been found to be useful in predicting mortality following ACS. In the present study, we sought to investigate the use of the GRACE score and NT-proBNP levels at predicting risk of early and late deaths following ACS. We studied 1033 patients (740 men, mean age 66.5+/-12.7 years) with AMI. Blood was drawn once within 24 h following the onset of chest pain. The plasma concentration of NT-proBNP was determined using an in-house non-competitive immunoassay. Patients were GRACE risk scored. The 30-day mortality was 3.7% and the 6-month mortality was 7.8%, and all were related to higher GRACE risk scores (P=0.001 for trend). Higher NT-proBNP levels were also related to increased mortality (Pinformation to the GRACE risk score for predicting early and late mortality. The inclusion of the NT-proBNP blood test is useful in risk-stratifying patients after ACS.

  7. How well do you know your mutation? Complex effects of genetic background on expressivity, complementation, and ordering of allelic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher H Chandler

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available For a given gene, different mutations influence organismal phenotypes to varying degrees. However, the expressivity of these variants not only depends on the DNA lesion associated with the mutation, but also on factors including the genetic background and rearing environment. The degree to which these factors influence related alleles, genes, or pathways similarly, and whether similar developmental mechanisms underlie variation in the expressivity of a single allele across conditions and among alleles is poorly understood. Besides their fundamental biological significance, these questions have important implications for the interpretation of functional genetic analyses, for example, if these factors alter the ordering of allelic series or patterns of complementation. We examined the impact of genetic background and rearing environment for a series of mutations spanning the range of phenotypic effects for both the scalloped and vestigial genes, which influence wing development in Drosophila melanogaster. Genetic background and rearing environment influenced the phenotypic outcome of mutations, including intra-genic interactions, particularly for mutations of moderate expressivity. We examined whether cellular correlates (such as cell proliferation during development of these phenotypic effects matched the observed phenotypic outcome. While cell proliferation decreased with mutations of increasingly severe effects, surprisingly it did not co-vary strongly with the degree of background dependence. We discuss these findings and propose a phenomenological model to aid in understanding the biology of genes, and how this influences our interpretation of allelic effects in genetic analysis.

  8. How well do you know your mutation? Complex effects of genetic background on expressivity, complementation, and ordering of allelic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Christopher H; Chari, Sudarshan; Kowalski, Alycia; Choi, Lin; Tack, David; DeNieu, Michael; Pitchers, William; Sonnenschein, Anne; Marvin, Leslie; Hummel, Kristen; Marier, Christian; Victory, Andrew; Porter, Cody; Mammel, Anna; Holms, Julie; Sivaratnam, Gayatri; Dworkin, Ian

    2017-11-01

    For a given gene, different mutations influence organismal phenotypes to varying degrees. However, the expressivity of these variants not only depends on the DNA lesion associated with the mutation, but also on factors including the genetic background and rearing environment. The degree to which these factors influence related alleles, genes, or pathways similarly, and whether similar developmental mechanisms underlie variation in the expressivity of a single allele across conditions and among alleles is poorly understood. Besides their fundamental biological significance, these questions have important implications for the interpretation of functional genetic analyses, for example, if these factors alter the ordering of allelic series or patterns of complementation. We examined the impact of genetic background and rearing environment for a series of mutations spanning the range of phenotypic effects for both the scalloped and vestigial genes, which influence wing development in Drosophila melanogaster. Genetic background and rearing environment influenced the phenotypic outcome of mutations, including intra-genic interactions, particularly for mutations of moderate expressivity. We examined whether cellular correlates (such as cell proliferation during development) of these phenotypic effects matched the observed phenotypic outcome. While cell proliferation decreased with mutations of increasingly severe effects, surprisingly it did not co-vary strongly with the degree of background dependence. We discuss these findings and propose a phenomenological model to aid in understanding the biology of genes, and how this influences our interpretation of allelic effects in genetic analysis.

  9. Broad Coverage Identification of Multiple Proteolytic Cleavage Site Sequences in Complex High Molecular Weight Proteins Using Quantitative Proteomics as a Complement to Edman Sequencing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Alain; Overall, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Proteolytic processing modifies the pleiotropic functions of many large, complex, and modular proteins and can generate cleavage products with new biological activity. The identification of exact proteolytic cleavage sites in the extracellular matrix laminins, fibronectin, and other extracellular matrix proteins is not only important for understanding protein turnover but is needed for the identification of new bioactive cleavage products. Several such products have recently been recognized that are suggested to play important cellular regulatory roles in processes, including angiogenesis. However, identifying multiple cleavage sites in extracellular matrix proteins and other large proteins is challenging as N-terminal Edman sequencing of multiple and often closely spaced cleavage fragments on SDS-PAGE gels is difficult, thus limiting throughput and coverage. We developed a new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach we call amino-terminal oriented mass spectrometry of substrates (ATOMS) for the N-terminal identification of protein cleavage fragments in solution. ATOMS utilizes efficient and low cost dimethylation isotopic labeling of original N-terminal and proteolytically generated N termini of protein cleavage fragments followed by quantitative tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Being a peptide-centric approach, ATOMS is not dependent on the SDS-PAGE resolution limits for protein fragments of similar mass. We demonstrate that ATOMS reliably identifies multiple proteolytic sites per reaction in complex proteins. Fifty-five neutrophil elastase cleavage sites were identified in laminin-1 and fibronectin-1 with 34 more identified by matrix metalloproteinase cleavage. Hence, our degradomics approach offers a complimentary alternative to Edman sequencing with broad applicability in identifying N termini such as cleavage sites in complex high molecular weight extracellular matrix proteins after in vitro cleavage assays. ATOMS can therefore be useful in

  10. Complement factors C4 and C3 are down regulated in response to short term overfeeding in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghmar, Caroline; Brøns, Charlotte; Pilely, Katrine

    2017-01-01

    -days HFO by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-clamp. Circulating C4, C3, ficolins, mannose-binding-lectin, complement activation products C3bc, terminal complement complex (TCC) and complement activation capacity were determined using turbidimetry and ELISA. HFO induced peripheral insulin resistance in LBW...... individuals only, while both groups had the same degree of hepatic insulin resistance after HFO. Viewing all individuals circulating levels of C4, C3, C3bc, TCC and complement activation capacity decreased paradoxically along the development of insulin resistance after HFO (P = 0.0015, P

  11. Structural basis of HypK regulating N-terminal acetylation by the NatA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Felix Alexander; Gumiero, Andrea; Lapouge, Karine; Bange, Gert; Kopp, Jürgen; Sinning, Irmgard

    2017-06-06

    In eukaryotes, N-terminal acetylation is one of the most common protein modifications involved in a wide range of biological processes. Most N-acetyltransferase complexes (NATs) act co-translationally, with the heterodimeric NatA complex modifying the majority of substrate proteins. Here we show that the Huntingtin yeast two-hybrid protein K (HypK) binds tightly to the NatA complex comprising the auxiliary subunit Naa15 and the catalytic subunit Naa10. The crystal structures of NatA bound to HypK or to a N-terminal deletion variant of HypK were determined without or with a bi-substrate analogue, respectively. The HypK C-terminal region is responsible for high-affinity interaction with the C-terminal part of Naa15. In combination with acetylation assays, the HypK N-terminal region is identified as a negative regulator of the NatA acetylation activity. Our study provides mechanistic insights into the regulation of this pivotal protein modification.

  12. Complement the hemostatic system: an intimate relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Ilene Ceil

    2014-05-01

    The complement system is important part of our innate immune system and interacts directly with the hemostatic system. Disorders of complement activation or dysregulation resulting in excess complement generation, such as Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH), atypical Hemolytic uremic Syndrome (aHUS) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) have been associated with significant thrombophilia. Terminal Complement (C5b-9) deposition on endothelial and tumor cell membranes has also been reported in a variety of cancer. Recent developments in complement inhibition have given us new insights into the mechanism of thrombosis in these disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Two mechanisms coordinate replication termination by the Escherichia coli Tus–Ter complex

    KAUST Repository

    Pandey, Manjula

    2015-07-13

    The Escherichia coli replication terminator protein (Tus) binds to Ter sequences to block replication forks approaching from one direction. Here, we used single molecule and transient state kinetics to study responses of the heterologous phage T7 replisome to the Tus–Ter complex. The T7 replisome was arrested at the non-permissive end of Tus–Ter in a manner that is explained by a composite mousetrap and dynamic clamp model. An unpaired C(6) that forms a lock by binding into the cytosine binding pocket of Tus was most effective in arresting the replisome and mutation of C(6) removed the barrier. Isolated helicase was also blocked at the non-permissive end, but unexpectedly the isolated polymerase was not, unless C(6) was unpaired. Instead, the polymerase was blocked at the permissive end. This indicates that the Tus–Ter mechanism is sensitive to the translocation polarity of the DNA motor. The polymerase tracking along the template strand traps the C(6) to prevent lock formation; the helicase tracking along the other strand traps the complementary G(6) to aid lock formation. Our results are consistent with the model where strand separation by the helicase unpairs the GC(6) base pair and triggers lock formation immediately before the polymerase can sequester the C(6) base.

  14. Self-assemble nanoparticles based on polypeptides containing C-terminal luminescent Pt-cysteine complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlakh, E. G.; Grachova, E. V.; Zhukovsky, D. D.; Hubina, A. V.; Mikhailova, A. S.; Shakirova, J. R.; Sharoyko, V. V.; Tunik, S. P.; Tennikova, T. B.

    2017-02-01

    The growing attention to the luminescent nanocarriers is strongly stimulated by their potential application as drug delivery systems and by the necessity to monitor their distribution in cells and tissues. In this communication we report on the synthesis of amphiphilic polypeptides bearing C-terminal phosphorescent label together with preparation of nanoparticles using the polypeptides obtained. The approach suggested is based on a unique and highly technological process where the new phosphorescent Pt-cysteine complex serves as initiator of the ring-opening polymerization of α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides to obtain the polypeptides bearing intact the platinum chromophore covalently bound to the polymer chain. It was established that the luminescent label retains unchanged its emission characteristics not only in the polypeptides but also in more complicated nanoaggregates such as the polymer derived amphiphilic block-copolymers and self-assembled nanoparticles. The phosphorescent nanoparticles display no cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity in the tested range of concentrations and easily internalize into living cells that makes possible in vivo cell visualization, including prospective application in time resolved imaging and drug delivery monitoring.

  15. Complex suffering related to the terminal phase of illness, death and grieving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klikovac Tamara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to consider the issues related to the terminal phase of illness, death and loss in the family, the process of grieving and coping with the loss of the loved one, primarily from the psychological aspect. The main focus of the paper is the attempt to demystify the covered subject matter on the one hand, and on the other to clarify the psychological dimension of various problems that can be caused by a disease with inevitable death. The death of the youngest member of the family is a particularly difficult issue both for theoretical considerations and for practical work. The complex suffering of people who are faced with an incurable disease and particularly the suffering of children and adolescents are not talked about, written about or discussed in our environment, and consequently adequate models of psychological support and psychotherapeutic help which would be aimed both at the individual and the family are not developed in practice. .

  16. NMR assignments of SPOC domain of the human transcriptional corepressor SHARP in complex with a C-terminal SMRT peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Suzuka; Kanaba, Teppei; Ito, Yutaka; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-10-01

    The transcriptional corepressor SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein (SHARP) recruits histone deacetylases. Human SHARP protein is thought to function in processes involving steroid hormone responses and the Notch signaling pathway. SHARP consists of RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region and the spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain in the C-terminal region. It is known that the SPOC domain binds the LSD motif in the C-terminal tail of corepressors silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptor (SMRT)/nuclear receptor corepressor (NcoR). We are interested in delineating the mechanism by which the SPOC domain recognizes the LSD motif of the C-terminal tail of SMRT/NcoR. To this end, we are investigating the tertiary structure of the SPOC/SMRT peptide using NMR. Herein, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the SPOC domain in complex with a SMRT peptide, which contributes towards a structural understanding of the SPOC/SMRT peptide and its molecular recognition.

  17. Complement activation and inhibition: a delicate balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöberg, A P; Trouw, L A; Blom, A M

    2009-01-01

    proteins, pentraxins, amyloid deposits, prions and DNA, all bind the complement activator C1q, but also interact with complement inhibitors C4b-binding protein and factor H. This contrasts to the interaction between C1q and immune complexes, in which case no inhibitors bind, resulting in full complement...

  18. The renaissance of complement therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of clinical conditions that involve a pathological contribution from the complement system - many of which affect the kidneys - has spurred a regained interest in therapeutic options to modulate this host defence pathway. Molecular insight, technological advances, and the first decade of clinical experience with the complement-specific drug eculizumab, have contributed to a growing confidence in therapeutic complement inhibition. More than 20 candidate drugs that target various stages of the complement cascade are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, and additional agents are in preclinical development. Such diversity is clearly needed in view of the complex and distinct involvement of complement in a wide range of clinical conditions, including rare kidney disorders, transplant rejection and haemodialysis-induced inflammation. The existing drugs cannot be applied to all complement-driven diseases, and each indication has to be assessed individually. Alongside considerations concerning optimal points of intervention and economic factors, patient stratification will become essential to identify the best complement-specific therapy for each individual patient. This Review provides an overview of the therapeutic concepts, targets and candidate drugs, summarizes insights from clinical trials, and reflects on existing challenges for the development of complement therapeutics for kidney diseases and beyond.

  19. The renaissance of complement therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Reis, Edimara S.; Lambris, John D.

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of clinical conditions that involve a pathological contribution from the complement system — many of which affect the kidneys — has spurred a regained interest in therapeutic options to modulate this host defence pathway. Molecular insight, technological advances, and the first decade of clinical experience with the complement-specific drug eculizumab, have contributed to a growing confidence in therapeutic complement inhibition. More than 20 candidate drugs that target various stages of the complement cascade are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, and additional agents are in preclinical development. Such diversity is clearly needed in view of the complex and distinct involvement of complement in a wide range of clinical conditions, including rare kidney disorders, transplant rejection and haemodialysis-induced inflammation. The existing drugs cannot be applied to all complement-driven diseases, and each indication has to be assessed individually. Alongside considerations concerning optimal points of intervention and economic factors, patient stratification will become essential to identify the best complement-specific therapy for each individual patient. This Review provides an overview of the therapeutic concepts, targets and candidate drugs, summarizes insights from clinical trials, and reflects on existing challenges for the development of complement therapeutics for kidney diseases and beyond. PMID:29199277

  20. Solubilization of immune complexes in complement factor deficient sera and the influence of temperature, ionic strength and divalent cations on the solubilization reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, Ivan; Svehag, Svend-Erik

    1984-01-01

    The complement-mediated solubilization (CMS) of immune complexes (IC) and the initial kinetics (IKS) of this reaction in human sera depleted of or deficient in C2, C3, C8, factors B, P and I were investigated. Sera depleted of B or P and those lacking native C3 or factor I showed virtually no CMS...... whereas the IKS and CMS capacity of a C8-deficient serum were within the reference range. The IKS of a C2-deficient serum was markedly retarded while the CMS capacity was normal. Addition of C2 normalized the kinetics of the reaction. There was a good correlation between the kinetics of CMS determined...... by a radioassay and kinetic data for the binding of C3b to preformed immune complexes. The CMS capacity reached maximum at 39-41 degrees C and at an ionic strength of approximately 0.20 mu. Selective chelation of Mg2+ completely abolished the CMS of IC. Maximal CMS was observed at Mg2+ concentration of about 2m...

  1. Complement component 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain protein. This protein is part of the complement system. The complement system is a group of proteins that move freely ... a role in the development of inflammation. The complement system protects the body from infections, dead cells and ...

  2. Presence and Origin of Fluoride in the Complex Terminal Water of Ouargla Basin (Northern Sahara of Algeria)

    OpenAIRE

    Imed E. Nezli; Samia Achour; Mohamed Djidel; Saïd Attalah

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: The underground waters in the oriental regions of the Algerian Sahara, present real chemical quality problems. Their content in fluorides always exceeds the limit of the recommended levels. That is 0.8 mg L-1, according to the maximum temperature in the region. Combined to a high salinity, it affects the health of the population living around the region. The present work, deals with the presence of fluoride and the geochemical origin in the Complex Terminal aquifer of Ouarg...

  3. Mutation of an Arabidopsis NatB N-alpha-terminal acetylation complex component causes pleiotropic developmental defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Ferrández-Ayela

    Full Text Available N-α-terminal acetylation is one of the most common, but least understood modifications of eukaryotic proteins. Although a high degree of conservation exists between the N-α-terminal acetylomes of plants and animals, very little information is available on this modification in plants. In yeast and humans, N-α-acetyltransferase complexes include a single catalytic subunit and one or two auxiliary subunits. Here, we report the positional cloning of TRANSCURVATA2 (TCU2, which encodes the auxiliary subunit of the NatB N-α-acetyltransferase complex in Arabidopsis. The phenotypes of loss-of-function tcu2 alleles indicate that NatB complex activity is required for flowering time regulation and for leaf, inflorescence, flower, fruit and embryonic development. In double mutants, tcu2 alleles synergistically interact with alleles of ARGONAUTE10, which encodes a component of the microRNA machinery. In summary, NatB-mediated N-α-terminal acetylation of proteins is pleiotropically required for Arabidopsis development and seems to be functionally related to the microRNA pathway.

  4. Nicastrin interacts with gamma-secretase complex components via the N-terminal part of its transmembrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Anja; Kaether, Christoph; Edbauer, Dieter; Shirotani, Keiro; Merkl, Sabine; Steiner, Harald; Haass, Christian

    2003-12-26

    Two secretases are involved in the generation of amyloid beta-peptide, the principal component of amyloid plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. While beta-secretase is a classical aspartyl protease, gamma-secretase activity is associated with a high molecular weight complex. One of the complex components, which is critically required for gamma-secretase activity is nicastrin (NCT). Here we investigate the assembly of NCT into the gamma-secretase complex. NCT mutants either lacking the entire cytoplasmic tail, the cytoplasmic tail, and the transmembrane domain (TMD), or containing a set of heterologous TMDs were expressed in cells with strongly reduced levels of endogenous NCT. Maturation of exogenous NCT, gamma-secretase complex formation and proteolytic function was then investigated. This revealed that the cytoplasmic tail of NCT is dispensable for gamma-secretase complex assembly and function. In contrast, the authentic TMD of NCT is critically required for the interaction with gamma-secretase complex components and for formation of an active gamma-secretase complex. Neither soluble NCT lacking any membrane anchor nor NCT containing a heterologous TMD were inserted into the gamma-secretase complex. We identified the N-terminal region of the NCT TMD as a functionally important entity of NCT. These data thus demonstrate that NCT interacts with other gamma-secretase complex components via its TMD.

  5. Properties and modeling of GWAS when complex disease risk is due to non-complementing, deleterious mutations in genes of large effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Kevin R; Foran, Andrew J; Long, Anthony D

    2013-01-01

    Current genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have high power to detect intermediate frequency SNPs making modest contributions to complex disease, but they are underpowered to detect rare alleles of large effect (RALE). This has led to speculation that the bulk of variation for most complex diseases is due to RALE. One concern with existing models of RALE is that they do not make explicit assumptions about the evolution of a phenotype and its molecular basis. Rather, much of the existing literature relies on arbitrary mapping of phenotypes onto genotypes obtained either from standard population-genetic simulation tools or from non-genetic models. We introduce a novel simulation of a 100-kilobase gene region, based on the standard definition of a gene, in which mutations are unconditionally deleterious, are continuously arising, have partially recessive and non-complementing effects on phenotype (analogous to what is widely observed for most Mendelian disorders), and are interspersed with neutral markers that can be genotyped. Genes evolving according to this model exhibit a characteristic GWAS signature consisting of an excess of marginally significant markers. Existing tests for an excess burden of rare alleles in cases have low power while a simple new statistic has high power to identify disease genes evolving under our model. The structure of linkage disequilibrium between causative mutations and significantly associated markers under our model differs fundamentally from that seen when rare causative markers are assumed to be neutral. Rather than tagging single haplotypes bearing a large number of rare causative alleles, we find that significant SNPs in a GWAS tend to tag single causative mutations of small effect relative to other mutations in the same gene. Our results emphasize the importance of evaluating the power to detect associations under models that are genetically and evolutionarily motivated.

  6. Properties and modeling of GWAS when complex disease risk is due to non-complementing, deleterious mutations in genes of large effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Thornton

    Full Text Available Current genome-wide association studies (GWAS have high power to detect intermediate frequency SNPs making modest contributions to complex disease, but they are underpowered to detect rare alleles of large effect (RALE. This has led to speculation that the bulk of variation for most complex diseases is due to RALE. One concern with existing models of RALE is that they do not make explicit assumptions about the evolution of a phenotype and its molecular basis. Rather, much of the existing literature relies on arbitrary mapping of phenotypes onto genotypes obtained either from standard population-genetic simulation tools or from non-genetic models. We introduce a novel simulation of a 100-kilobase gene region, based on the standard definition of a gene, in which mutations are unconditionally deleterious, are continuously arising, have partially recessive and non-complementing effects on phenotype (analogous to what is widely observed for most Mendelian disorders, and are interspersed with neutral markers that can be genotyped. Genes evolving according to this model exhibit a characteristic GWAS signature consisting of an excess of marginally significant markers. Existing tests for an excess burden of rare alleles in cases have low power while a simple new statistic has high power to identify disease genes evolving under our model. The structure of linkage disequilibrium between causative mutations and significantly associated markers under our model differs fundamentally from that seen when rare causative markers are assumed to be neutral. Rather than tagging single haplotypes bearing a large number of rare causative alleles, we find that significant SNPs in a GWAS tend to tag single causative mutations of small effect relative to other mutations in the same gene. Our results emphasize the importance of evaluating the power to detect associations under models that are genetically and evolutionarily motivated.

  7. The Complement System

    OpenAIRE

    Sarma, J. Vidya; Ward, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    The complement system consists of a tightly regulated network of proteins that play an important role in host defense and inflammation. Complement activation results in opsonization of pathogens and their removal by phagocytes, as well as cell lysis. Inappropriate complement activation and complement deficiencies are the underlying cause of the pathophysiology of many diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and asthma. This review represents an overview of the complement system in an ef...

  8. Complement profile and activation mechanisms by different LDL apheresis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Anders; Hardersen, Randolf; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Enebakk, Terje; Christiansen, Dorte; Ludviksen, Judith Krey; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2012-07-01

    Extracorporeal removal of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by means of selective LDL apheresis is indicated in otherwise uncontrolled familial hypercholesterolemia. During blood-biomaterial interaction other constituents than the LDL particles are affected, including the complement system. We set up an ex vivo model in which human whole blood was passed through an LDL apheresis system with one of three different apheresis columns: whole blood adsorption, plasma adsorption and plasma filtration. The concentrations of complement activation products revealed distinctly different patterns of activation and adsorption by the different systems. Evaluated as the final common terminal complement complex (TCC) the whole blood system was inert, in contrast to the plasma systems, which generated substantial and equal amounts of TCC. Initial classical pathway activation was revealed equally for both plasma systems as increases in the C1rs-C1inh complex and C4d. Alternative pathway activation (Bb) was most pronounced for the plasma adsorption system. Although the anaphylatoxins (C3a and C5a) were equally generated by the two plasma separation systems, they were efficiently adsorbed to the plasma adsorption column before the "outlet", whereas they were left free in the plasma in the filtration system. Consequently, during blood-biomaterial interaction in LDL apheresis the complement system is modulated in different manners depending on the device composition. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. N-terminal arginines modulate plasma-membrane localization of Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenawit Girmatsion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks is important for cardiac action potential termination. The underlying channel is composed of Kv7.1 α-subunits and KCNE1 β-subunits. While most evidence suggests a role of KCNE1 transmembrane domain and C-terminus for the interaction, the N-terminal KCNE1 polymorphism 38G is associated with reduced I(Ks and atrial fibrillation (a human arrhythmia. Structure-function relationship of the KCNE1 N-terminus for I(Ks modulation is poorly understood and was subject of this study. METHODS: We studied N-terminal KCNE1 constructs disrupting structurally important positively charged amino-acids (arginines at positions 32, 33, 36 as well as KCNE1 constructs that modify position 38 including an N-terminal truncation mutation. Experimental procedures included molecular cloning, patch-clamp recording, protein biochemistry, real-time-PCR and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: All KCNE1 constructs physically interacted with Kv7.1. I(Ks resulting from co-expression of Kv7.1 with non-atrial fibrillation '38S' was greater than with any other construct. Ionic currents resulting from co-transfection of a KCNE1 mutant with arginine substitutions ('38G-3xA' were comparable to currents evoked from cells transfected with an N-terminally truncated KCNE1-construct ('Δ1-38'. Western-blots from plasma-membrane preparations and confocal images consistently showed a greater amount of Kv7.1 protein at the plasma-membrane in cells co-transfected with the non-atrial fibrillation KCNE1-38S than with any other construct. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study indicate that N-terminal arginines in positions 32, 33, 36 of KCNE1 are important for reconstitution of I(Ks. Furthermore, our results hint towards a role of these N-terminal amino-acids in membrane representation of the delayed rectifier channel complex.

  10. Plasma complement biomarkers distinguish multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Svetlana; Luppe, Sebastian; Evans, David Rs; Harding, Katharine; Loveless, Samantha; Robertson, Neil P; Morgan, B Paul

    2017-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) are autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. Although distinguished by clinicoradiological and demographic features, early manifestations can be similar complicating management. Antibodies against aquaporin-4 support the diagnosis of NMOSD but are negative in some patients. Therefore, there is unmet need for biomarkers that enable early diagnosis and disease-specific intervention. We investigated whether plasma complement proteins are altered in MS and NMOSD and provide biomarkers that distinguish these diseases. Plasma from 54 NMOSD, 40 MS and 69 control donors was tested in multiplex assays measuring complement activation products and proteins. Using logistic regression, we tested whether combinations of complement analytes distinguished NMOSD from controls and MS. All activation products were elevated in NMOSD compared to either control or MS. Four complement proteins (C1inh, C1s, C5 and FH) were higher in NMOSD compared to MS or controls. A model comprising C1inh and terminal complement complex (TCC) distinguished NMOSD from MS (area under the curve (AUC): 0.98), while C1inh and C5 distinguished NMOSD from controls (AUC: 0.94). NMOSD is distinguished from MS by plasma complement biomarkers. Selected complement analytes enable differential diagnosis. Findings support trials of anti-complement therapies in NMOSD.

  11. 42 CFR 421.505 - Termination and extension of non-random prepayment complex medical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... prepayment complex medical review. If the reduction in the error rate is attributed to a 25 percent or... error are no longer suspended for non-random prepayment complex medical review. (d) Periodic re... that appears to have resumed a high level of payment error on non-random prepayment complex medical...

  12. The role of complement system in adipose tissue-related inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaicu, Sonia I; Tatomir, Alexandru; Boodhoo, Dallas; Vesa, Stefan; Mircea, Petru A; Rus, Horea

    2016-06-01

    As the common factor linking adipose tissue to the metabolic context of obesity, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis are associated with a low-grade chronic inflammatory status, to which the complement system is an important contributor. Adipose tissue synthesizes complement proteins and is a target of complement activation. C3a-desArg/acylation-stimulating protein stimulates lipogenesis and affects lipid metabolism. The C3a receptor and C5aR are involved in the development of adipocytes' insulin resistance through macrophage infiltration and the activation of adipose tissue. The terminal complement pathway has been found to be instrumental in promoting hyperglycemia-associated tissue damage, which is characteristic of the major vascular complications of diabetes mellitus and diabetic ketoacidosis. As a mediator of the effects of the terminal complement complex C5b-9, RGC-32 has an impact on energy expenditure as well as lipid and glucose metabolic homeostasis. All of this evidence, taken together, indicates an important role for complement activation in metabolic diseases.

  13. Complement system in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shicui; Cui, Pengfei

    2014-09-01

    Zebrafish is recently emerging as a model species for the study of immunology and human diseases. Complement system is the humoral backbone of the innate immune defense, and our knowledge as such in zebrafish has dramatically increased in the recent years. This review summarizes the current research progress of zebrafish complement system. The global searching for complement components in genome database, together with published data, has unveiled the existence of all the orthologues of mammalian complement components identified thus far, including the complement regulatory proteins and complement receptors, in zebrafish. Interestingly, zebrafish complement components also display some distinctive features, such as prominent levels of extrahepatic expression and isotypic diversity of the complement components. Future studies should focus on the following issues that would be of special importance for understanding the physiological role of complement components in zebrafish: conclusive identification of complement genes, especially those with isotypic diversity; analysis and elucidation of function and mechanism of complement components; modulation of innate and adaptive immune response by complement system; and unconventional roles of complement-triggered pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional Analyses of Complement Convertases Using C3 and C5-Depleted Sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okroj, Marcin; Holmquist, Emelie; King, Ben C.; Blom, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    C3 and C5 convertases are central stages of the complement cascade since they converge the different initiation pathways, augment complement activation by an amplification loop and lead to a common terminal pathway resulting in the formation of the membrane attack complex. Several complement inhibitors attenuate convertase formation and/or accelerate dissociation of convertase complexes. Functional assays used to study these processes are often performed using purified complement components, from which enzymatic complexes are reconstituted on the surface of erythrocytes or artificial matrices. This strategy enables identification of individual interactions between convertase components and putative regulators but carries an inherent risk of detecting non-physiological interactions that would not occur in a milieu of whole serum. Here we describe a novel, alternative method based on C3 or C5-depleted sera, which support activation of the complement cascade up to the desired stages of convertases. This approach allows fast and simple assessment of the influence of putative regulators on convertase formation and stability. As an example of practical utility of the assay, we performed studies on thioredoxin-1 in order to clarify the mechanism of its influence on complement convertases. PMID:23071769

  15. Functional analyses of complement convertases using C3 and C5-depleted sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Okroj

    Full Text Available C3 and C5 convertases are central stages of the complement cascade since they converge the different initiation pathways, augment complement activation by an amplification loop and lead to a common terminal pathway resulting in the formation of the membrane attack complex. Several complement inhibitors attenuate convertase formation and/or accelerate dissociation of convertase complexes. Functional assays used to study these processes are often performed using purified complement components, from which enzymatic complexes are reconstituted on the surface of erythrocytes or artificial matrices. This strategy enables identification of individual interactions between convertase components and putative regulators but carries an inherent risk of detecting non-physiological interactions that would not occur in a milieu of whole serum. Here we describe a novel, alternative method based on C3 or C5-depleted sera, which support activation of the complement cascade up to the desired stages of convertases. This approach allows fast and simple assessment of the influence of putative regulators on convertase formation and stability. As an example of practical utility of the assay, we performed studies on thioredoxin-1 in order to clarify the mechanism of its influence on complement convertases.

  16. Trans-complex formation by proteolipid channels in the terminal phase of membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, C; Bayer, M J; Bühler, S

    2001-01-01

    -complex formation occurs downstream from trans-SNARE pairing, and depends on both the Rab-GTPase Ypt7 and calmodulin. The maintenance of existing complexes and completion of fusion are independent of trans-SNARE pairs. Reconstituted proteolipids form sealed channels, which can expand to form aqueous pores in a Ca2......+/calmodulin-dependent fashion. V0 trans-complexes may therefore form a continuous, proteolipid-lined channel at the fusion site. We propose that radial expansion of such a protein pore may be a mechanism for intracellular membrane fusion....

  17. Sonar sound groups and increased terminal buzz duration reflect task complexity in hunting bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgard, K.; Ratcliffe, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    More difficult tasks are generally regarded as such because they demand greater attention. Echolocators provide rare insight into this relationship because biosonar signals can be monitored. Here we show that bats produce longer terminal buzzes and more sonar sound groups during their approach...... to prey under presumably more difficult conditions. Specifically, we found Daubenton's bats, Myotis daubentonii, produced longer buzzes when aerial-hawking versus water-trawling prey, but that bats taking revolving air- and water-borne prey produced more sonar sound groups than did the bats when taking...... stationary prey. Buzz duration and sonar sound groups have been suggested to be independent means by which bats attend to would-be targets and other objects of interest. We suggest that for attacking bats both should be considered as indicators of task difficulty and that the buzz is, essentially...

  18. Terminal Iron Carbyne Complexes Derived from Arrested CO2 Reductive Disproportionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarzadeh, Charles C; Moore, Curtis E; Rheingold, Arnold L; Figueroa, Joshua S

    2017-08-28

    The encumbered tetraisocyanide dianion Na2 [Fe(CNArMes2 )4 ] reacts with two molecules of CO2 to effect reductive disproportionation to CO and carbonate ([CO3 ](2-) ). When the reaction is performed in the presence of silyl triflates, reductive disproportionation is arrested by silylative esterification of a mono-CO2 adduct. This results in the formation of four-coordinate terminal iron carbynes possessing an aryl carbamate substituent owing to the direct attachment of an C(O)OSiR3 group to an isocyanide nitrogen atom. Crystallographic, spectroscopic, and computational analyses of these iron-carbon multiply bonded species reveal electronic structure properties indicative of a conformationally locked iron carbyne unit. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of primed SNARE complexes in presynaptic terminals and β cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriko; Sawada, Wakako; Noguchi, Jun; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Yagishita, Sho; Ohno, Mitsuyo; Tokumaru, Hiroshi; Kasai, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear how readiness for Ca2+-dependent exocytosis depends on varying degrees of SNARE complex assembly. Here we directly investigate the SNARE assembly using two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between three pairs of neuronal SNAREs in presynaptic boutons and pancreatic β cells in the islets of Langerhans. These FRET probes functionally rescue their endogenous counterparts, supporting ultrafast exocytosis. We show that trans-SNARE complexes accumulated in the active zone, and estimate the number of complexes associated with each docked vesicle. In contrast, SNAREs were unassembled in resting state, and assembled only shortly prior to insulin exocytosis, which proceeds slowly. We thus demonstrate that distinct states of fusion readiness are associated with SNARE complex formation. Our FRET/FLIM approaches enable optical imaging of fusion readiness in both live and chemically fixed tissues.

  20. Quantitative Modeling of the Alternative Pathway of the Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewde, Nehemiah; Gorham, Ronald D; Dorado, Angel; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an integral part of innate immunity that detects and eliminates invading pathogens through a cascade of reactions. The destructive effects of the complement activation on host cells are inhibited through versatile regulators that are present in plasma and bound to membranes. Impairment in the capacity of these regulators to function in the proper manner results in autoimmune diseases. To better understand the delicate balance between complement activation and regulation, we have developed a comprehensive quantitative model of the alternative pathway. Our model incorporates a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the dynamics of the four steps of the alternative pathway under physiological conditions: (i) initiation (fluid phase), (ii) amplification (surfaces), (iii) termination (pathogen), and (iv) regulation (host cell and fluid phase). We have examined complement activation and regulation on different surfaces, using the cellular dimensions of a characteristic bacterium (E. coli) and host cell (human erythrocyte). In addition, we have incorporated neutrophil-secreted properdin into the model highlighting the cross talk of neutrophils with the alternative pathway in coordinating innate immunity. Our study yields a series of time-dependent response data for all alternative pathway proteins, fragments, and complexes. We demonstrate the robustness of alternative pathway on the surface of pathogens in which complement components were able to saturate the entire region in about 54 minutes, while occupying less than one percent on host cells at the same time period. Our model reveals that tight regulation of complement starts in fluid phase in which propagation of the alternative pathway was inhibited through the dismantlement of fluid phase convertases. Our model also depicts the intricate role that properdin released from neutrophils plays in initiating and propagating the alternative pathway during bacterial infection.

  1. Complementing approaches to demonstrate chlorinated solvent biodegradation in a complex pollution plume: Mass balance, PCR and compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbet, Christelle; Rivière, Agnès; Jeannottat, Simon; Rinaldi, Sandro; Hunkeler, Daniel; Bendjoudi, Hocine; de Marsily, Ghislain

    2011-11-01

    This work describes the use of different complementing methods (mass balance, polymerase chain reaction assays and compound-specific stable isotope analysis) to demonstrate the existence and effectiveness of biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in an alluvial aquifer. The solvent-contaminated site is an old chemical factory located in an alluvial plain in France. As most of the chlorinated contaminants currently found in the groundwater at this site were produced by local industries at various times in the past, it is not enough to analyze chlorinated solvent concentrations along a flow path to convincingly demonstrate biodegradation. Moreover, only a few data were initially available to characterize the geochemical conditions at this site, which were apparently complex at the source zone due to (i) the presence of a steady oxygen supply to the groundwater by irrigation canal losses and river infiltration and (ii) an alkaline pH higher than 10 due to former underground lime disposal. A demonstration of the existence of biodegradation processes was however required by the regulatory authority within a timeframe that did not allow a full geochemical characterization of such a complex site. Thus a combination of different fast methods was used to obtain a proof of the biodegradation occurrence. First, a mass balance analysis was performed which revealed the existence of a strong natural attenuation process (biodegradation, volatilization or dilution), despite the huge uncertainty on these calculations. Second, a good agreement was found between carbon isotopic measurements and PCR assays (based on 16S RNA gene sequences and functional genes), which clearly indicated reductive dechlorination of different hydrocarbons (Tetrachloroethene--PCE-, Trichloroethene--TCE-, 1,2-cisDichloroethene--cis-1,2-DCE-, 1,2-transDichloroethene-trans--1,2-DCE-, 1,1-Dichloroethene--1,1-DCE-, and Vinyl Chloride--VC) to ethene. According to these carbon isotope measurements, although TCE

  2. Direct observation of surface reconstruction and termination on a complex metal oxide catalyst by electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2012-03-19

    On the surface: The surface reconstruction of an MoVTeO complex metal oxide catalyst was observed directly by various electron microscopic techniques and the results explain the puzzling catalytic behavior. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Nucleophilicity and P-C bond formation reactions of a terminal phosphanido iridium complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrano, Á.L.; Casado, M.A.; Ciriano, M.A.; de Bruin, B.; López, J.A.; Tejel, C.

    2016-01-01

    The diiridium complex [{Ir(ABPN(2))(CO)}(2)(μ-CO)] (1; [ABPN(2)]- = [(allyl)B(Pz)(2)(CH(2)PPh(2))]-) reacts with diphenylphosphane affording [Ir(ABPN(2))(CO)(H) (PPh(2))] (2), the product of the oxidative addition of the P-H bond to the metal. DFT studies revealed a large contribution of the

  4. Synthesis and characterization of mono- and binuclear platinum complexes containing terminal and bridging diynyldiphenylphosphine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forniés, Juan; Garcia, Ana; Gil, Belén; Lalinde, Elena; Moreno, M Teresa

    2004-11-21

    A series of mononuclear platinum complexes containing diynyldiphenylphosphine ligands [cis-Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)(PPh(2)C[triple bond]CC(6)H(4)C[triple bond]CR)L](n)(n= 0, L = tht, R = Ph 2a, Bu(t)2b; L = PPh(2)C[triple bond]CC(6)H(4)C[triple bond]CR, 4a, 4b; n=-1, L = CN(-), 3a, 3b) has been synthesized and the X-ray crystal structures of 4a and 4b have been determined. In order to compare the eta2-bonding capability of the inner and outer alkyne units, the reactivity of towards [cis-Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)(thf)(2)] or [Pt(eta2)-C(2)H(4))(PPh(3))(2)] has been examined. Complexes coordinate the fragment "cis-Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)" using the inner alkynyl fragment and the sulfur of the tht ligand giving rise the binuclear derivatives [(C(6)F(5))(2)Pt(mu-tht)(mu-1kappaP:2eta2-C(alpha),C(beta)-PPh(2)C[triple bond]CC(6)H(4)C[triple bond]CR)Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)](R = Ph 5a, Bu(t)5b). The phenyldiynylphosphine complexes 2a, 3a and 4a react with [Pt(eta2)-C(2)H(4))(PPh(3))(2)] to give the mixed-valence Pt(II)-Pt(0) complexes [((C(6)F(5))(2)LPt(mu-1kappaP:2eta2)-C(5),C(6)-PPh(2)C[triple bond]CC(6)H(4)C[triple bond]CPh))Pt(PPh(3))(2)](n)(L = tht 6a, CN 8a and PPh(2)C[triple bond]CC(6)H(4)C[triple bond]CPh 9a) in which the Pt(0) fragment is eta2-complexed by the outer fragment. Complex 6a isomerizes in solution to a final complex [((C(6)F(5))(2)(tht)Pt(mu-1kappaP:2eta2)-C(alpha),C(beta)-PPh(2)C[triple bond]CC(6)H(4)C[triple bond]CPh))Pt(PPh(3))(2)]7a having the Pt(0) fragment coordinated to the inner alkyne function. In contrast, the tert-butyldiynylphosphine complexes 2b and 3b coordinate the Pt(0) unit through the phosphorus substituted inner acetylenic entity yielding 7b and 8b. By using 4a and 2 equiv. of [Pt(eta2)-C(2)H(4))(PPh(3))(2)] as precursors, the synthesis of the trinuclear complex [cis-((C(6)F(5))(2)Pt(mu-1kappaP:2eta2)-C(5),C(6)-PPh(2)C[triple bond]CC(6)H(4)C[triple bond]CPh)(2))(Pt(PPh(3))(2))(2)]10a, bearing two Pt(0)(PPh(3))(2)eta2)-coordinated to the outer alkyne functions is

  5. Eculizumab treatment during pregnancy does not affect the complement system activity of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallstensen, Randi Fykse; Bergseth, Grethe; Foss, Stian; Jæger, Steinar; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Holt, Jan; Christiansen, Dorte; Lau, Corinna; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Armstrong, Elina; Stefanovic, Vedran; Andersen, Jan Terje; Sandlie, Inger; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-04-01

    Eculizumab is a humanized IgG2/4 chimeric anti-complement C5 antibody used to treat patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) or atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not the complement activity in newborns from pregnant women who receive eculizumab is impaired. A novel eculizumab-C5 complex (E-C5) specific assay was developed and revealed that two newborns carried only 6-7% of the E-C5 detected in their eculizumab-treated PNH mothers. Serum from the pregnant women completely lacked terminal complement pathway activity, whereas the complement activity in the serum of the newborns was completely normal. Data from the pregnant women and their newborns were compared with that of healthy age-matched female controls and healthy newborns, as well as a non-treated pregnant woman with PNH and her newborn. These all showed normal complement activity without detectable E-C5 complexes. Furthermore, absence of eculizumab or E-C5 in the newborn could not be explained by lack of eculizumab binding to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), as eculizumab bound strongly to the receptor in vitro. In conclusion, despite binding to FcRn neither eculizumab nor E-C5 accumulates in fetal plasma, and eculizumab treatment during pregnancy does not impair the complement function in the newborn. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell culture model that mimics drusen formation and triggers complement activation associated with age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lincoln V.; Forest, David L.; Banna, Christopher D.; Radeke, Carolyn M.; Maloney, Michelle A.; Hu, Jane; Spencer, Christine N.; Walker, Aimee M.; Tsie, Marlene S.; Bok, Dean; Radeke, Monte J.; Anderson, Don H.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a human retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cell-culture model that mimics several key aspects of early stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These include accumulation of sub-RPE deposits that contain molecular constituents of human drusen, and activation of complement leading to formation of deposit-associated terminal complement complexes. Abundant sub-RPE deposits that are rich in apolipoprotein E (APOE), a prominent drusen constituent, are formed by RPE cells grown on porous supports. Exposure to human serum results in selective, deposit-associated accumulation of additional known drusen components, including vitronectin, clusterin, and serum amyloid P, thus suggesting that specific protein–protein interactions contribute to the accretion of plasma proteins during drusen formation. Serum exposure also leads to complement activation, as evidenced by the generation of C5b-9 immunoreactive terminal complement complexes in association with APOE-containing deposits. Ultrastructural analyses reveal two morphologically distinct forms of deposits: One consisting of membrane-bounded multivescicular material, and the other of nonmembrane-bounded particle conglomerates. Collectively, these results suggest that drusen formation involves the accumulation of sub-RPE material rich in APOE, a prominent biosynthetic product of the RPE, which interacts with a select group of drusen-associated plasma proteins. Activation of the complement cascade appears to be mediated via the classical pathway by the binding of C1q to ligands in APOE-rich deposits, triggering direct activation of complement by C1q, deposition of terminal complement complexes and inflammatory sequelae. This model system will facilitate the analysis of molecular and cellular aspects of AMD pathogenesis, and the testing of new therapeutic agents for its treatment. PMID:21969589

  7. Groundwater salinization survey of the Upper Cretaceous-Miocene Complexe terminal aquifer in the Sabaa Biar area of southwestern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhamdi, Abdelkader; Dhahri, Ferid; Gouasmia, Mouez; Moumni, Lahmadi; Mohamed, Soussi

    2015-12-01

    An integrated hydrogeological study involving the Schlumberger depth sounding method, geological data and wells data was conducted at the Sabaa Biar area of southern Tunisia to elucidate the problem of increasing groundwater salinity within The ;Complexe Terminal;. The ;Complexe Terminal; aquifer near Sabaa Biar region is a bi-layered aquifer comprised of fractured limestones of the Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) Berda Formation and sandstone of the Miocene Beglia Formation. The aquifer is affected by a main NW-trending fault, which is a chemical barrier that divides the study area into eastern and western blocks delivering freshwater and saline water, respectively. The salinization of groundwater within the limestone (Campanian-Maastrichtian Berda Formation) is linked mainly to the dissolution of outcropping Coniacian-Santonian gypsum along the core of the Jebel Sidi Bouhlel anticline to the east of the study area. Meteoric water dissolves salt from outcropping gypsum, flows through the fractures networks, and recharges the fractured limestone of the upper Berda Formation. The mobilization of salts stored in the salt-rich Quaternary sediment on hillslopes and inchannels contributes also to the salinization of groundwater within the sandstone (Miocene Beglia Formation) by lateral infiltration subsequent to water drainage during the wet season. The over exploitation of water from the Miocene sandstone causes an influx of saline-rich water from the underlying limestone of the Berda Formation into the sandstone of the Beglia Formation. Other sources of salinization of groundwater (such as ascension of hypersaline water from deep aquifer along faults, and the return flow of irrigation waters in the Djerid region) have been documented in this region, but are not discussed in this paper.

  8. Electroluminescent TCC, C3dg and fB/Bb epitope assays for profiling complement cascade activation in vitro using an activated complement serum calibration standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, B Jansen; Bergseth, G; Mollnes, T E; Shaw, A M

    2014-01-15

    Electroluminescent assays for epitopes on the complement components C3dg, terminal complement complex (TCC) and factor B/Bb (fB/Bb) have been developed with capture and detection antibodies to produce detection limits C3dg=91±9ng/mL, TCC=3±0.1ng/mL and fB=55.7±0.1ng/mL. The assay performance was assessed against a series of zymosan and heat aggregated IgG (HAIgG) in vitro activations of complement using a calibrated activated complement serum (ACS) as calibration standard. The ACS standard was stable within 20% accuracy over a 6-month period with freeze-thaw cycles as required. Differential activation of the complement cascade was observed for TCC showing a pseudo-first order formation half-life of 3.5h after activation with zymosan. The C3dg activation fragment indicates a 10% total activation for both activation agents. The kinetic-epitope analysis for fB indicates that the capture epitope is on the fB/Bb protein fragment which can then become covered by the formation of C3bBb or C3bBbP complexes during the time course of the cascade. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Generation of complement molecular complex C5b-9 (C5b-9) in response to poly-traumatic hemorrhagic shock and evaluation of C5 cleavage inhibitors in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, R Madelaine; Reyna, Sarah; Vernon, Philip; Tadaki, Douglas K; Dallelucca, Jurandir J; Sheppard, Forest

    2018-01-01

    Severe trauma initiates a systemic inflammatory cascade and that involves early activation of complement and cleavage of C5 into C5a (anaphylatoxin) and C5b (C5b-9 membrane attack complex). We examined activation of C5 in non-human primate (NHP) models of hemorrhagic shock. Blood plasma concentrations of C5b-9 were significantly increased in NHPs in response to hemorrhage alone and were further increased with the addition of tissue trauma. The onset of increased C5 cleavage was accelerated in NHPs that experienced decompensated poly-traumatic hemorrhagic shock. Next, to identify an effective inhibitor of NHP C5 cleavage in vitro, as a first step in the development of a potential therapy, three inhibitors of human C5 cleavage and hemolysis were tested in vitro. NHP C5 cleavage and complement-mediated hemolysis were successfully inhibited by pre-treatment of serum samples with a small, inhibitory peptide RA101348. Commercially-available C5 inhibitory antibodies were found to exhibit species-specific efficacy in vitro. Quidel's A217 antibody demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of C5 cleavage and hemolysis in NHP samples, whereas LGM-Eculizumab only inhibited complement-mediated hemolysis in human samples. This study shows that complement activation in NHPs following experimental poly-traumatic hemorrhagic shock is consistent with clinical reports, and that cleavage of C5 and complement-mediated hemolysis can be effectively inhibited in vitro using a small peptide inhibitor. Taken together, these findings offer a clinically-relevant vehicle and a potential strategy for treatment of hemorrhagic shock with poly-traumatic injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Complement genetics and host defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, P J

    1990-12-01

    There is a surprisingly high frequency of allelic variation in complement proteins. The best candidate for a true selective polymorphism is that of C3. For C4 and factor B within the MHC it is more difficult to identify the effects of individual alleles. No evidence suggests other alleles of C4 (and C2) than the null alleles (or the two isoproteins C4A and C4B) to have any functional differences with resistance. Thus, the major functions of complement, as shown by the effects of deficiency, are to resist infection against bacteria and particularly against Neisseria, and to prevent immune complex disease. There are also undoubtedly balancing contributions to the pathogenesis of some infections and to all immune complex disease. Data from studies of C4 polymorphism and from the presence of control proteins on micro-organisms suggest there may be in addition more subtle contributions to immunity against a variety of other infections.

  11. Cluster core controlled reactions of substitution of terminal bromide ligands by triphenylphosphine in octahedral rhenium chalcobromide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestopalov, Michael A; Mironov, Yuri V; Brylev, Konstantin A; Kozlova, Svetlana G; Fedorov, Vladimir E; Spies, Hartmut; Pietzsch, Hans-Jürgen; Stephan, Holger; Geipel, Gerhard; Bernhard, Gerd

    2007-03-28

    Reactions of rhenium chalcobromides Cs4[{Re6(mu3-S)8}Br6].2H2O, Cs3[{Re6(mu3-Se)8}Br6].2H2O, Cs3[{Re6(mu3-Q)7(mu3-Br)}Br6].H2O (Q = S, Se), and K2[{Re6(mu3-S)6(mu3-Br)2}Br6] with molten triphenylphosphine (PPh3) have resulted in a family of novel molecular hybrid inorganic-organic cluster compounds. Six octahedral rhenium cluster complexes containing PPh3 ligands with general formula [{Re6(mu3-Q)8-n(mu3-Br)n}(PPh3)4-nBrn+2] (Q = S, n = 0, 1, 2; Q = Se, n = 0, 1) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction and elemental analyses, 31P{1H} NMR, luminescent measurements, and quantum-chemical calculations. It was found that the number of terminal PPh3 ligands in the complexes is controlled by the composition and consequently by the charge of the cluster core {Re6Q8-nBrn}n+2. In crystal structures of the complexes with mixed chalcogen/bromine ligands in the cluster core all positions of a cube [Q8-nBrn] are ordered and occupied exclusively by Q or Br atoms. Luminescence characteristics of the compounds trans-[{Re6Q8}(PPh3)4Br2] and fac-[{Re6Se7Br}(PPh3)3Br3] (Q = S, Se) have been investigated in CH2Cl2 solution and the broad emission spectra in the range of 600-850 nm were observed.

  12. [Changes in the complement system in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurova, V A; Bobrova, L A; Kozlovskaya, N L; Korotchaeva, Yu V; Serova, A G; Kozlov, L V; Andina, S S; Demyanova, K A; Kuchieva, A M; Roshchupkina, S V

    To compare the clinical manifestations membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) in its idiopathic variant, lupus nephritis (LN), and C3 glomerulopathy (C3-GP), by comparing them with changes in the complement system. The clinic of nephrology followed up 42 patients with different types of MPGN in 2013 to 2015. The study included 35 patients divided into 3 groups: 1) 8 patients with C3-GP, 2) 13 with idiopathic MPGN; 3) 14 with Class IV LN. The investigators studied the blood and urine levels of components and markers for activation of the classical and alternative pathways (C3 and C4, С3а, C5a, CFH, CFB, and CFD) of the terminal complement complex (TCC). The detection rate of C3-GP was 19%. The patients with C3-GP were noted to have the lowest blood concentration of S3 and the highest urinary level of С3а, C5a, TCC, CFH, CFB, and CFD. C3 nephritic factor was detected in 2 patients from the C3-GP (dense deposit disease) group. Alternative complement pathway dysregulation caused by genetic or autoimmune factors plays a leading role in the pathogenesis of C3-GP.

  13. Value of Plasmatic Membrane Attack Complex as a Marker of Severity in Acute Kidney Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Eva; Riera, Marta; Barrios, Clara; Pascual, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if complement pathway is activated in AKI; for this purpose, we measured, through ELISA sandwich, the terminal lytic fraction of the complement system, called membrane attack complex (C5b-C9), in AKI patients compared with patients with similar clinical conditions but normal renal function. Our data showed that complement system is activated in AKI. Plasmatic MAC concentrations were significantly higher in AKI patients than in those with normal renal fun...

  14. Adaptor complex AP2/PICALM, through interaction with LC3, targets Alzheimer's APP-CTF for terminal degradation via autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuan; Chang, Jerry C; Fan, Emily Y; Flajolet, Marc; Greengard, Paul

    2013-10-15

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are the aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and tau protein. Autophagy is a major cellular pathway leading to the removal of aggregated proteins. We have reported recently that autophagy was responsible for amyloid precursor protein cleaved C-terminal fragment (APP-CTF) degradation and amyloid β clearance in an Atg5-dependent manner. Here we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which autophagy mediates the degradation of APP-CTF and the clearance of amyloid β. Through affinity purification followed by mass spectrum analysis, we identified adaptor protein (AP) 2 together with phosphatidylinositol clathrin assembly lymphoid-myeloid leukemia (PICALM) as binding proteins of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3). Further analysis showed that AP2 regulated the cellular levels of APP-CTF. Knockdown of AP2 reduced autophagy-mediated APP-CTF degradation. Immunoprecipitation and live imaging analysis demonstrated that AP2 and PICALM cross-link LC3 with APP-CTF. These data suggest that the AP-2/PICALM complex functions as an autophagic cargo receptor for the recognition and shipment of APP-CTF from the endocytic pathway to the LC3-marked autophagic degradation pathway. This molecular mechanism linking AP2/PICALM and AD is consistent with genetic evidence indicating a role for PICALM as a risk factor for AD.

  15. Cryoelectron Microscopic Structures of Eukaryotic Translation Termination Complexes Containing eRF1-eRF3 or eRF1-ABCE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Preis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Termination and ribosome recycling are essential processes in translation. In eukaryotes, a stop codon in the ribosomal A site is decoded by a ternary complex consisting of release factors eRF1 and guanosine triphosphate (GTP-bound eRF3. After GTP hydrolysis, eRF3 dissociates, and ABCE1 can bind to eRF1-loaded ribosomes to stimulate peptide release and ribosomal subunit dissociation. Here, we present cryoelectron microscopic (cryo-EM structures of a pretermination complex containing eRF1-eRF3 and a termination/prerecycling complex containing eRF1-ABCE1. eRF1 undergoes drastic conformational changes: its central domain harboring the catalytically important GGQ loop is either packed against eRF3 or swung toward the peptidyl transferase center when bound to ABCE1. Additionally, in complex with eRF3, the N-terminal domain of eRF1 positions the conserved NIKS motif proximal to the stop codon, supporting its suggested role in decoding, yet it appears to be delocalized in the presence of ABCE1. These results suggest that stop codon decoding and peptide release can be uncoupled during termination.

  16. Soluble Collectin-12 (CL-12) Is a Pattern Recognition Molecule Initiating Complement Activation via the Alternative Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Hein, Estrid; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2015-01-01

    -recognition molecule. Using recombinant CL-12 full length or CL-12 extracellular domain, we determined the occurrence of soluble CL-12 shed from in vitro cultured cells. Western blot showed that soluble recombinant CL-12 migrated with a band corresponding to ∼ 120 kDa under reducing conditions, whereas under...... of the terminal complement complex. These results demonstrate the existence of CL-12 in a soluble form and indicate a novel mechanism by which the alternative pathway of complement may be triggered directly by a soluble pattern-recognition molecule....

  17. Kinetics of the CRISPR-Cas9 effector complex assembly and the role of 3′-terminal segment of guide RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Semenova, Ekaterina; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 is widely applied for genome engineering in various organisms. The assembly of single guide RNA (sgRNA) with the Cas9 protein may limit the Cas9/sgRNA effector complex function. We developed a FRET-based assay for detection of CRISPR–Cas9 complex binding to its targets and used this assay to investigate the kinetics of Cas9 assembly with a set of structurally distinct sgRNAs. We find that Cas9 and isolated sgRNAs form the effector complex efficiently and rapidly. Yet, the assembly process is sensitive to the presence of moderate concentrations of non-specific RNA competitors, which considerably delay the Cas9/sgRNA complex formation, while not significantly affecting already formed complexes. This observation suggests that the rate of sgRNA loading into Cas9 in cells can be determined by competition between sgRNA and intracellular RNA molecules for the binding to Cas9. Non-specific RNAs exerted particularly large inhibitory effects on formation of Cas9 complexes with sgRNAs bearing shortened 3′-terminal segments. This result implies that the 3′-terminal segment confers sgRNA the ability to withstand competition from non-specific RNA and at least in part may explain the fact that use of sgRNAs truncated for the 3′-terminal stem loops leads to reduced activity during genomic editing. PMID:26945042

  18. Complement Recognition Pathways in Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauser, Christopher L; Farrar, Conrad A; Sacks, Steven H

    2017-09-01

    The complement system, consisting of soluble and cell membrane-bound components of the innate immune system, has defined roles in the pathophysiology of renal allograft rejection. Notably, the unavoidable ischemia-reperfusion injury inherent to transplantation is mediated through the terminal complement activation products C5a and C5b-9. Furthermore, biologically active fragments C3a and C5a, produced during complement activation, can modulate both antigen presentation and T cell priming, ultimately leading to allograft rejection. Earlier work identified renal tubule cell synthesis of C3, rather than hepatic synthesis of C3, as the primary source of C3 driving these effects. Recent efforts have focused on identifying the local triggers of complement activation. Collectin-11, a soluble C-type lectin expressed in renal tissue, has been implicated as an important trigger of complement activation in renal tissue. In particular, collectin-11 has been shown to engage L-fucose at sites of ischemic stress, activating the lectin complement pathway and directing the innate immune response to the distressed renal tubule. The interface between collectin-11 and L-fucose, in both the recipient and the allograft, is an attractive target for therapies intended to curtail renal inflammation in the acute phase. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Complement component 3 (C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain protein. This protein is part of the complement system. The complement system is a group of proteins that move freely ... a role in the development of inflammation. The complement system protects the body from infections, dead cells and ...

  20. Structural model of the TRPP2/PKD1 C-terminal coiled-coil complex produced by a combined computational and experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Yu, Yong; Ulbrich, Maximilian H; Li, Ming-hui; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Honig, Barry; Yang, Jian

    2011-06-21

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations in TRPP2 and PKD1, which form an ion channel/receptor complex containing three TRPP2 and one PKD1. A TRPP2 C-terminal coiled-coil trimer, critical for the assembly of this complex, associates with a single PKD1 C-terminal coiled-coil. Many ADPKD pathogenic mutations result in the abolishment of the TRPP2/PKD1 coiled-coil complex. To gain molecular and functional insights into this heterotetrameric complex, we computationally constructed a structural model by using a two-step docking strategy, based on a known crystal structure of the TRPP2 coiled-coil trimer. The model shows that this tetrameric complex has a novel di-trimer configuration: An upstream trimer made of three TRPP2 helices and a downstream trimer made of two TRPP2 helices and one PKD1 helix. Mutagenesis and biochemical analysis identified critical TRPP2/PKD1 interface contacts essential for the heteromeric coiled-coil complex. Mutation of these interface positions in the full-length proteins showed that these interactions were critical for the assembly of the full-length complex in cells. Our results provide a means to specifically weaken the TRPP2 and PKD1 association, thus facilitating future in vitro and in vivo studies on the functional importance of this association.

  1. Complement Regulatory Protein Factor H Is a Soluble Prion Receptor That Potentiates Peripheral Prion Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Sarah J; Farley, Taylor K; Gordon, Elizabeth O; Estep, Joshua; Bender, Heather R; Moreno, Julie A; Bartz, Jason; Telling, Glenn C; Pickering, Matthew C; Zabel, Mark D

    2017-12-01

    Several complement proteins exacerbate prion disease, including C3, C1q, and CD21/35. These proteins of the complement cascade likely increase uptake, trafficking, and retention of prions in the lymphoreticular system, hallmark sites of early prion propagation. Complement regulatory protein factor H (fH) binds modified host proteins and lipids to prevent C3b deposition and, thus, autoimmune cell lysis. Previous reports show that fH binds various conformations of the cellular prion protein, leading us to question the role of fH in prion disease. In this article, we report that transgenic mice lacking Cfh alleles exhibit delayed peripheral prion accumulation, replication, and pathogenesis and onset of terminal disease in a gene-dose manner. We also report a biophysical interaction between purified fH and prion rods enriched from prion-diseased brain. fH also influences prion deposition in brains of infected mice. We conclude from these data and previous findings that the interplay between complement and prions likely involves a complex balance of prion sequestration and destruction via local tissue macrophages, prion trafficking by B and dendritic cells within the lymphoreticular system, intranodal prion replication by B and follicular dendritic cells, and potential prion strain selection by CD21/35 and fH. These findings reveal a novel role for complement-regulatory proteins in prion disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Symmetric Complementation. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    has efficient decision algorithms if the machine is both space and complementation bounded. Michael Sipser has also suggested an equivalent machine...Vassos Hadzilacos, Joe Halpern, Harry Lewis, A. Prasad, Michael Sipser , and Paul Spirakis for a careful reading and many useful comnents on

  3. Staphylococcus aureus SdrE captures complement factor H's C-terminus via a novel 'close, dock, lock and latch' mechanism for complement evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Wu, Minhao; Hang, Tianrong; Wang, Chengliang; Yang, Ye; Pan, Weimin; Zang, Jianye; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Xuan

    2017-05-04

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a soluble complement regulatory protein essential for the down-regulation of the alternative pathway on interaction with specific markers on the host cell surface. It recognizes the complement component 3b (C3b) and 3d (C3d) fragments in addition to self cell markers (i.e. glycosaminoglycans, sialic acid) to distinguish host cells that deserve protection from pathogens that should be eliminated. The Staphylococcus aureus surface protein serine-aspartate repeat protein E (SdrE) was previously reported to bind human CFH as an immune-evasion tactic. However, the molecular mechanism underlying SdrE-CFH-mediated immune evasion remains unknown. In the present study, we identified a novel region at CFH's C-terminus (CFH(1206-1226)), which binds SdrE N2 and N3 domains (SdrEN2N3) with high affinity, and determined the crystal structures of apo-SdrEN2N3 and the SdrEN2N3-CFH(1206-1226) complex. Comparison of the structure of the CFH-SdrE complex with other CFH structures reveals that CFH's C-terminal tail flips from the main body to insert into the ligand-binding groove of SdrE. In addition, SdrEN2N3 adopts a 'close' state in the absence of CFH, which undergoes a large conformational change on CFH binding, suggesting a novel 'close, dock, lock and latch' (CDLL) mechanism for SdrE to recognize its ligand. Our findings imply that SdrE functions as a 'clamp' to capture CFH's C-terminal tail via a unique CDLL mechanism and sequesters CFH on the surface of S. aureus for complement evasion. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Translation complex profile sequencing to study the in vivo dynamics of mRNA-ribosome interactions during translation initiation, elongation and termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Archer, Stuart K; Beilharz, Traude H; Powell, David; Preiss, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) translation is a tightly controlled process that is integral to gene expression. It features intricate and dynamic interactions of the small and large subunits of the ribosome with mRNAs, aided by multiple auxiliary factors during distinct initiation, elongation and termination phases. The recently developed ribosome profiling method can generate transcriptome-wide surveys of translation and its regulation. Ribosome profiling records the footprints of fully assembled ribosomes along mRNAs and thus primarily interrogates the elongation phase of translation. Importantly, it does not monitor multiple substeps of initiation and termination that involve complexes between the small ribosomal subunit (SSU) and mRNA. Here we describe a related method, termed 'translation complex profile sequencing' (TCP-seq), that is uniquely capable of recording positions of any type of ribosome-mRNA complex transcriptome-wide. It uses fast covalent fixation of translation complexes in live cells, followed by RNase footprinting of translation intermediates and their separation into complexes involving either the full ribosome or the SSU. The footprints derived from each type of complex are then deep-sequenced separately, generating native distribution profiles during the elongation, as well as the initiation and termination stages of translation. We provide the full TCP-seq protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae liquid suspension culture, including a data analysis pipeline. The protocol takes ∼3 weeks to complete by a researcher who is well acquainted with standard molecular biology techniques and who has some experience in ultracentrifugation and the preparation of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) libraries. Basic Bash and UNIX/Linux command skills are required to use the bioinformatics tools provided.

  5. The roles of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and type 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18) in the regulation of the immune complex-elicited respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in whole blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Antonsen, S; Matthiesen, S H

    1997-01-01

    The binding of immune complexes (IC) to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the consequent respiratory burst (RB) were investigated in whole blood cell preparations suspended in 75% human serum, using flow cytometry. Blockade of the complement receptor (CR)1 receptor sites for C3b on whole blood...... and inhibited the IC binding to PMN in a whole blood cell preparation, with or without mAb 3D9, by approximately 40% from 15-40 min while reducing their RB over 40 min to approximately one third. Blockade of CR1 on either erythrocytes (E) or leukocytes, before mixing the populations, revealed...... that the potentiation of the RB by mAb 3D9 was associated with abrogation of E-CR1 function, whereas blockade of leukocyte-CR1 had a diminishing effect. Exposure to IC at high concentrations induced release of both specific and azurophilic granule contents from PMN. The latter was CR3 dependent in that blockade...

  6. Structure and function of the C-terminal domain of MrpA in the Bacillus subtilis Mrp-antiporter complex--the evolutionary progenitor of the long horizontal helix in complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virzintiene, Egle; Moparthi, Vamsi K; Al-Eryani, Yusra; Shumbe, Leonard; Górecki, Kamil; Hägerhäll, Cecilia

    2013-10-11

    MrpA and MrpD are homologous to NuoL, NuoM and NuoN in complex I over the first 14 transmembrane helices. In this work, the C-terminal domain of MrpA, outside this conserved area, was investigated. The transmembrane orientation was found to correspond to that of NuoJ in complex I. We have previously demonstrated that the subunit NuoK is homologous to MrpC. The function of the MrpA C-terminus was tested by expression in a previously used Bacillus subtilis model system. At neutral pH, the truncated MrpA still worked, but at pH 8.4, where Mrp-complex formation is needed for function, the C-terminal domain of MrpA was absolutely required. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Scanning mutagenesis reveals roles for helix n of the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase thumb subdomain in transcription complex stability, pausing, and termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieba, L G; Gopal, V; Sousa, R

    2001-03-30

    Deletions within the thumb subdomain (residues 335-408) of T7 RNA polymerase decrease elongation complex stability and processivity, but the structure of a T7RNAP initial transcription complex containing a 3-nucleotide RNA reveals no interactions between the thumb and the RNA or DNA. Modeling of a longer RNA in this structure, using a T7DNAP-primer-template structure as a guide, suggests that the phosphate ribose backbone of the RNA contacts a stretch of mostly positively charged side chains between residues 385 and 395 of helix N of the thumb. Scanning mutagenesis of this region reveals that alanine substitutions of Arg(391), Ser(393), and Arg(394) destabilize elongation complexes and that substitutions at 393 and 394 increase termination of transcripts 5 or more bases in length. The alpha-carbons of all 3 of these residues lie on the side of helix N, which faces into the template-binding cleft of the RNA polymerase, and modeling suggests that they can contact the RNA 4-5 bases away from the 3'-end. Alanine substitutions of other residues within 385-395 do not have marked effects on transcription complex stability, but alanine substitutions of Asp(388) and Tyr(385) reduce pausing and termination at the T7 concatemer junction. Both of these side chains lie on the outer side of helix N, pointing away from the template binding cleft. The thumb subdomain of T7RNAP therefore has roles both in transcription complex stabilization and in pausing and termination at the T7 concatemer junction.

  8. 1,1'-Bis(di-tert-butylphosphino)ferrocene copper(I) complex catalyzed C-H activation and carboxylation of terminal alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Manoj; Singh, Gurmeet; Kumar, Abhinav; Rath, Nigam P

    2015-12-28

    Four copper(i) complexes, [CuBr(dtbpf)] (1), [CuI(dtbpf)] (2), [Cu4(μ2-I)2(μ3-I)2(μ-dtbpf)2] (3) and [Cu6(μ3-I)6(μ-dtbpf)2]·2CH3CN (4), were prepared using CuX (X = Br, I) and 1,1'-bis(di-tert-butylphosphino)ferrocene (dtbpf). These complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, IR, (1)H and (31)P NMR, ESI-MS and electronic absorption spectroscopy. Molecular structures of the complexes 2 and 4 were determined crystallographically. Complex 2 is the first monomeric isolated Cu(i) complex of dtbpf with the largest P-Cu-P bite angle (120.070(19)°) to date. Complex 4 shows a centrosymmetrical dimeric unit with two [Cu3(μ3-I)3] motifs bridged by two bidentate dtbpf ligands in the κ(1)-manner. Each [Cu3(μ3-I)3] motif unites to form a pyramid with one copper atom at the apex and one of the triangular faces capped by an iodine atom. All the complexes were found to be efficient catalysts for the conversion of terminal alkynes into propiolic acids with CO2. Owing to the excellent catalytic activity, the reactions proceeded at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature (25 °C). The catalytic products were obtained in moderate to good yields (80-96%) by using complex loading to 2 mol%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of an active ferrocenyl diphosphine Cu(i) catalyst for the carboxylation of terminal alkynes with CO2.

  9. CD54/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex II signaling induces B cells to express interleukin 2 receptors and complements help provided through CD40 ligation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    and MHC II in the presence of IL-5 induced expression of a functional IL-2R on small resting B cells. By contrast CD40 ligation, which induced B cell proliferation, did not induce IL-2 responsiveness. These data show that CD40 ligation is necessary but may not be sufficient for B cell differentiation......We have examined signaling roles for CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II as contact ligands during T help for B cell activation. We used a T helper 1 (Th1)-dependent helper system that was previously shown to be contact as well as interleukin 2 (IL-2......) dependent to demonstrate the relative roles of CD54, MHC II, and CD40 signaling in the events leading to the induction of B cell proliferation and responsiveness to IL-2. Paraformaldehyde-fixed activated Th1-induced expression of IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and B7, and upregulated MHC II and CD54 on B cells...

  10. Ficolin-3-mediated lectin complement pathway activation in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanier, Elisa R; Zangari, Rosalia; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the involvement of ficolin-3, the main initiator of the lectin complement pathway (LCP), in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) pathology and outcome. METHODS: In this preliminary exploratory study, plasma concentration of ficolin-3 and of ficolin-3-mediated functional LCP activity...... was measured, along with that of other LCP initiators (mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-2, and ficolin-1), C3 activation products, and soluble C5b-9 terminal complex, in a prospective cohort of 39 patients with SAH and 20 healthy controls. The following parameters were recorded: SAH severity, assessed using...

  11. Design and verification of halogen-bonding system at the complex interface of human fertilization-related MUP PDZ5 domain with CAMK's C-terminal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Guo, Yunjie; Zhang, Xue

    2017-11-21

    Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAMK) is physiologically activated in fertilized human oocytes and is involved in the Ca2+ response pathways that link the fertilization calmodulin signal to meiosis resumption and cortical granule exocytosis. The kinase has an unstructured C-terminal tail that can be recognized and bound by the PDZ5 domain of its cognate partner, the multi-PDZ domain protein (MUP). In the current study, we reported a rational biomolecular design of halogen-bonding system at the complex interface of CAMK's C-terminal peptide with MUP PDZ5 domain by using high-level computational approaches. Four organic halogens were employed as atom probes to explore the structural geometry and energetic property of designed halogen bonds in the PDZ5-peptide complex. It was found that the heavier halogen elements such as bromine Br and iodine I can confer stronger halogen bond but would cause bad atomic contacts and overlaps at the complex interface, while fluorine F cannot form effective halogen bond in the complex. In addition, the halogen substitution at different positions of peptide's aromatic ring would result in distinct effects on the halogen-bonding system. The computational findings were then verified by using fluorescence analysis; it is indicated that the halogen type and substitution position play critical role in the interaction strength of halogen bonds, and thus the PDZ5-peptide binding affinity can be improved considerably by optimizing their combination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The C-terminal polyproline-containing region of ELMO contributes to an increase in the life-time of the ELMO-DOCK complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sévajol, Marion; Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Chouquet, Anne; Pérard, Julien; Ayala, Isabel; Gans, Pierre; Kleman, Jean-Philippe; Housset, Dominique

    2012-03-01

    The eukaryotic Engulfment and CellMotility (ELMO) proteins form an evolutionary conserved family of key regulators which play a central role in Rho-dependent biological processes such as engulfment and cell motility/migration. ELMO proteins interact with a subset of Downstream of Crk (DOCK) family members, a new type of guanine exchange factors (GEF) for Rac and cdc42 GTPases. The physiological function of DOCK is to facilitate actin remodeling, a process which occurs only in presence of ELMO. Several studies have determined that the last 200 C-terminal residues of ELMO1 and the first 180 N-terminal residues of DOCK180 are responsible for the ELMO-DOCK interaction. However, the precise role of the different domains and motifs identified in these regions has remained elusive. Divergent functional, biochemical and structural data have been reported regarding the contribution of the C-terminal end of ELMO, comprising its polyproline motif, and of the DOCK SH3 domain. In the present study, we have investigated the contribution of the C-terminal end of ELMO1 to the interaction between ELMO1 and the SH3 domain of DOCK180 using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Our data presented here demonstrate the ability of the SH3 domain of DOCK180 to interact with ELMO1, regardless of the presence of the polyproline-containing C-terminal end. However, the presence of the polyproline region leads to a significant increase in the half-life of the ELMO1-DOCK180 complex, along with a moderate increase on the affinity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Penetration into Membrane of Amino-terminal Region of SecA when Associated with SecYEG in Active Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findik, Bahar T; Smith, Virginia F; Randall, Linda L

    2017-12-16

    The general secretory (Sec) system of Escherichia coli translocates both periplasmic and outer membrane proteins through the cytoplasmic membrane. The pathway through the membrane is provided by a highly conserved translocon, which in E. coli comprises two heterotrimeric integral membrane complexes, SecY, SecE and SecG (SecYEG), and SecD, SecF and YajC (SecDF/YajC). SecA is an associated ATPase that is essential to the function of the Sec system. SecA plays two roles, it targets precursors to the translocon with the help of SecB and it provides energy via hydrolysis of ATP. SecA exists both free in the cytoplasm and integrally membrane associated. Here we describe details of association of the amino-terminal region of SecA with membrane. We use site-directed spin labelling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to show that when SecA is co-assembled into lipids with SecYEG to yield highly active translocons, the N-terminal region of SecA penetrates the membrane and lies at the interface between the polar and the hydrophobic regions, parallel to the plane of the membrane at a depth of approximately 5 Å. When SecA is bound to SecYEG, preassembled into proteoliposomes, or nonspecifically bound to lipids in the absence of SecYEG, the N-terminal region penetrates more deeply (8 Å). Implications of partitioning of the SecA N-terminal region into lipids on the complex between SecB carrying a precursor and SecA are discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  14. Complement: A primer for the coming therapeutic revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnum, Scott R

    2017-04-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Originally characterized as a single serum component contributing to the killing of bacteria, we now know that there are close to sixty complement proteins, multiple activation pathways and a wide range of effector functions mediated by complement. The system plays a critical role in host defense against bacteria, viruses, fungi and other pathogens. However, inappropriate complement activation contributes to the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases and many inflammatory syndromes. Over the last several decades, therapeutic approaches to inhibit complement activation at various steps in the pathways have met with initial success, particularly at the level of the terminal pathway. This success, combined with insight from animal model studies, has lead to an unprecedented effort by biotech and pharmaceutical companies to begin developing complement inhibitors. As a result, complement has been brought for the first time to the attention of pharmacologists, toxicologists, project managers and others in the drug development industry, as well as those in the investment world. The purpose of this primer is to provide a broad overview of complement immunobiology to help those new to complement understand the rationale behind the current therapeutic directions and the investment potential of these new therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Material properties in complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, S. Moein; Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2011-01-01

    Uncontrolled complement activation can induce many inflammatory and life threatening conditions. Accordingly, the role of complement in initiation of adverse reactions to polymers and nanoparticulate drug carriers is receiving increasing attention and has prompted extensive ‘structure-immune perf......Uncontrolled complement activation can induce many inflammatory and life threatening conditions. Accordingly, the role of complement in initiation of adverse reactions to polymers and nanoparticulate drug carriers is receiving increasing attention and has prompted extensive ‘structure...

  16. Molecular envelope and atomic model of an anti-terminated glyQS T-box regulator in complex with tRNAGly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetnani, Bhaskar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A T-box regulator or riboswitch actively monitors the levels of charged/uncharged tRNA and participates in amino acid homeostasis by regulating genes involved in their utilization or biosynthesis. It has an aptamer domain for cognate tRNA recognition and an expression platform to sense the charge state and modulate gene expression. These two conserved domains are connected by a variable linker that harbors additional secondary structural elements, such as Stem III. The structural basis for specific tRNA binding is known, but the structural basis for charge sensing and the role of other elements remains elusive. To gain new structural insights on the T-box mechanism, a molecular envelope was calculated from small angle X-ray scattering data for the Bacillus subtilis glyQS T-box riboswitch in complex with an uncharged tRNAGly. A structural model of an anti-terminated glyQS T-box in complex with its cognate tRNAGly was derived based on the molecular envelope. It shows the location and relative orientation of various secondary structural elements. The model was validated by comparing the envelopes of the wild-type complex and two variants. The structural model suggests that in addition to a possible regulatory role, Stem III could aid in preferential stabilization of the T-box anti-terminated state allowing read-through of regulated genes. PMID:28531275

  17. The role of the complement system in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2017-03-01

    In addition to being a component of innate immunity and an ancient defense mechanism against invading pathogens, complement activation also participates in the adaptive immune response, inflammation, hemostasis, embryogenesis, and organ repair and development. Activation of the complement system via classical, lectin, or alternative pathways generates anaphylatoxins (C3a and C5a) and membrane attack complex (C5b-9) and opsonizes targeted cells. Complement activation end products and their receptors mediate cell-cell interactions that regulate several biological functions in the extravascular tissue. Signaling of anaphylatoxin receptors or assembly of membrane attack complex promotes cell dedifferentiation, proliferation, and migration in addition to reducing apoptosis. As a result, complement activation in the tumor microenvironment enhances tumor growth and increases metastasis. In this Review, I discuss immune and nonimmune functions of complement proteins and the tumor-promoting effect of complement activation.

  18. Complement propriety and conspiracy in nanomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is the first line of body's defense against intruders and it acts as a functional bridge between innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. This commentary examines the key roles of complement activation in response to nanomedicine administration, including nucleic acid...... complexes. These comprise beneficial (eg, adjuvanticity) as well as adverse effects (eg, infusion-related reactions). Pigs (and sheep) are often used as predictive models of nanomedicine-mediated infusion-related reactions in humans. The validity of these models in relation to human responses is questioned...

  19. Non-specific adsorption of complement proteins affects complement activation pathways of gold nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Quang Huy; Kah, James Chen Yong

    2017-04-01

    The complement system is a key humoral component of innate immunity, serving as the first line of defense against intruders, including foreign synthetic nanomaterials. Although gold nanomaterials (AuNMs) are widely used in nanomedicine, their immunological response is not well understood. Using AuNMs of three shapes commonly used in biomedical applications: spherical gold nanoparticles, gold nanostars and gold nanorods, we demonstrated that AuNMs activated whole complement system, leading to the formation of SC5b-9 complex. All three complement pathways were simultaneously activated by all the AuNMs. Recognition molecules of the complement system interacted with all AuNMs in vitro, except for l-ficolin, but the correlation between these interactions and corresponding complement pathway activation was only observed in the classical and alternative pathways. We also observed the mediating role of complement activation in cellular uptake of all AuNMs by human U937 promonocytic cells, which expresses complement receptors. Taken together, our results highlighted the potential immunological challenges for clinical applications of AuNMs that were often overlooked.

  20. The Complement System in Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, Daniel J; Hebert, Lee A

    2015-09-01

    The complement system is composed of a family of soluble and membrane-bound proteins that historically has been viewed as a key component of the innate immune system, with a primary role of providing a first-line defense against microorganisms. Although this role indeed is important, complement has many other physiological roles, including the following: (1) influencing appropriate immune responses, (2) disposing of waste in the circulation (immune complexes, cellular debris), and (3) contributing to damage of self-tissue through inflammatory pathways. These three roles are believed to be significant factors in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, particularly its renal manifestation (lupus nephritis), contributing both protective and damaging effects. In this review, we provide an overview of the human complement system and its functions, and discuss its intricate and seemingly contradictory roles in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Structural Basis for Recognition of the Pore-Forming Toxin Intermedilysin by Human Complement Receptor CD59

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Johnson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Pore-forming proteins containing the structurally conserved membrane attack complex/perforin fold play an important role in immunity and host-pathogen interactions. Intermedilysin (ILY is an archetypal member of a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin subclass that hijacks the complement receptor CD59 to make cytotoxic pores in human cells. ILY directly competes for the membrane attack complex binding site on CD59, rendering cells susceptible to complement lysis. To understand how these bacterial pores form in lipid bilayers and the role CD59 plays in complement regulation, we determined the crystal structure of human CD59 bound to ILY. Here, we show the ILY-CD59 complex at 3.5 Å resolution and identify two interfaces mediating this host-pathogen interaction. An ILY-derived peptide based on the binding site inhibits pore formation in a CD59-containing liposome model system. These data provide insight into how CD59 coordinates ILY monomers, nucleating an early prepore state, and suggest a potential mechanism of inhibition for the complement terminal pathway.

  2. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  3. Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex contains a C-terminal Ras-like domain that promotes association of Paf1 complex with chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amrich C. G.; Heroux A.; Davis, C. P.; Rogal, W. P.; Shirra, M. K.; Gardner, R. G.; Arndt, K. M.; VanDemark, A. P.

    2012-03-30

    The conserved Paf1 complex localizes to the coding regions of genes and facilitates multiple processes during transcription elongation, including the regulation of histone modifications. However, the mechanisms that govern Paf1 complex recruitment to active genes are undefined. Here we describe a previously unrecognized domain within the Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex, the Cdc73 C-domain, and demonstrate its importance for Paf1 complex occupancy on transcribed chromatin. Deletion of the C-domain causes phenotypes associated with elongation defects without an apparent loss of complex integrity. Simultaneous mutation of the C-domain and another subunit of the Paf1 complex, Rtf1, causes enhanced mutant phenotypes and loss of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation. The crystal structure of the C-domain reveals unexpected similarity to the Ras family of small GTPases. Instead of a deep nucleotide-binding pocket, the C-domain contains a large but comparatively flat surface of highly conserved residues, devoid of ligand. Deletion of the C-domain results in reduced chromatin association for multiple Paf1 complex subunits. We conclude that the Cdc73 C-domain probably constitutes a protein interaction surface that functions with Rtf1 in coupling the Paf1 complex to the RNA polymerase II elongation machinery.

  4. Formation of a covalent complex between the 80,000-dalton adenovirus terminal protein and 5'-dCMP in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichy, J H; Horwitz, M S; Hurwitz, J

    1981-05-01

    An in vitro adenovirus DNA replication system catalyzed the formation of a covalent complex between an 80,000-dalton protein and 5'-dCMP in the presence of [alpha-32P-dCTP, MgCl2, ATP, and adenovirus (Ad) DNA with a protein covalently bound to the 5' end of each strand (Ad DNA-prot). The requirement for Ad DNA-prot in this reaction was similar to that for in vitro DNA replication. When dATP, dTTP, and the 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside triphosphate (ddNTP) ddGTP were included in the reaction mixture, an elongated complex was detected, which consisted of an 80,000-dalton protein bound to a 26-base oligonucleotide. Formation of the elongated product, but not of the protein-dCMP complex, was inhibited by ddATP, ddCTP, or ddTTP. The requirements for formation of the protein-dCMP complex, the nature of the linkage between protein and dCMP, the size of the protein, and the existence of elongated forms indicated that the protein associated with the complex was identical to the 80,000-dalton Ad terminal protein found on replicating DNA molecules as described by Challberg et al. [Challberg, M. D., Desiderio, S. V. & Kelly, T. J., Jr. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 5105-5109].

  5. The hnRNP-like Nab3 termination factor can employ heterologous prion-like domains in place of its own essential low complexity domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J Loya

    Full Text Available Many RNA-binding proteins possess domains with a biased amino acid content. A common property of these low complexity domains (LCDs is that they assemble into an ordered amyloid form, juxtaposing RNA recognition motifs in a subcellular compartment in which RNA metabolism is focused. Yeast Nab3 is one such protein that contains RNA-binding domains and a low complexity, glutamine/proline-rich, prion-like domain that can self-assemble. Nab3 also contains a region of structural homology to human hnRNP-C that resembles a leucine zipper which can oligomerize. Here we show that the LCD and the human hnRNP-C homology domains of Nab3 were experimentally separable, as cells were viable with either segment, but not when both were missing. In exploiting the lethality of deleting these regions of Nab3, we were able to test if heterologous prion-like domains known to assemble into amyloid, could substitute for the native sequence. Those from the hnRNP-like protein Hrp1, the canonical prion Sup35, or the epsin-related protein Ent2, could rescue viability and enable the new Nab3 chimeric protein to support transcription termination. Other low complexity domains from RNA-binding, termination-related proteins or a yeast prion, could not. As well, an unbiased genetic selection revealed a new protein sequence that could rescue the loss of Nab3's essential domain via multimerization. This new sequence and Sup35's prion domain could also rescue the lethal loss of Hrp1's prion-like domain when substituted for it. This suggests there are different cross-functional classes of amyloid-forming LCDs and that appending merely any assembly-competent LCD to Nab3 does not restore function or rescue viability. The analysis has revealed the functional complexity of LCDs and provides a means by which the differing classes of LCD can be dissected and understood.

  6. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. The complement system in systemic lupus erythematosus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Jonatan; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2014-09-01

    The complement system plays a major role in the autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the role of complement in SLE is complex since it may both prevent and exacerbate the disease. In this review, we explore the latest findings in complement-focused research in SLE. C1q deficiency is the strongest genetic risk factor for SLE, although such deficiency is very rare. Various recently discovered genetic associations include mutations in the complement receptors 2 and 3 as well as complement inhibitors, the latter related to earlier onset of nephritis. Further, autoantibodies are a distinct feature of SLE that are produced as the result of an adaptive immune response and how complement can affect that response is also being reviewed. SLE generates numerous disease manifestations involving contributions from complement such as glomerulonephritis and the increased risk of thrombosis. Furthermore, since most of the complement system is present in plasma, complement is very accessible and may be suitable as biomarker for diagnosis or monitoring of disease activity. This review highlights the many roles of complement for SLE pathogenesis and how research has progressed during recent years. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Complement system in lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Pankita H; Wilkes, David S

    2014-10-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 8 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body's immune response known as the complement system . The complement system is a group of proteins that work together ... complement component 8 deficiency Merck Manual Consumer Version: Complement System Orphanet: Immunodeficiency due to a late component of ...

  10. Supraspinal connections and termination patterns of the parabrachial complex determined by the biocytin anterograde tract-tracing technique in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, R; Corsetti, G; Rodella, L; Tredici, G; Gioia, M

    1998-10-01

    We have re-evaluated, using the anterograde tracer biocytin, supraspinal efferent projections from the parabrachial complex (PBN) to gain new information about the nature of its connections and nerve terminal patterns. We selectively injected biocytin into the 3 main regions of the nucleus (lateral PBN, medial PBN and Kölliker-Fuse nucleus). We observed distinct groups of ascending and descending fibres of different calibre from the PBN running throughout the brain and reaching many brain areas involved in the regulation of autonomic function. Here we detected labelled bouton-like terminals and fibres with en-passage varicosities. The ascending efferents from the lateral PBN mainly reached the reticular, raphe and thalamic nuclei, the zona incerta (ZI), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and lateral area of the periaqueductal grey (PAG). Thin descending efferents reached the ventral region of the solitary tract nucleus (STN). The ascending efferents from the medial PBN were seen in the raphe nuclei, reticular nuclei, ventral and lateral areas of the PAG, thalamic nuclei, and in the medial and lateral nuclei of the amygdala. Descending efferents were seen in the STN and in some reticular nuclei. The ascending projections from the Kölliker-Fuse targeted the ventral area of PAG, CeA, ZI, lateral hypothalamic area, ventromedial thalamic nucleus and, with only a few terminals, the ipsi and contralateral reticular area. A large number of descending efferents reached STN, caudal and paragigantocellular reticular nuclei. The higher sensitivity of biocytin compared with other types of markers allowed us to determine more effectively the distribution, nature and extent of the supraspinal PBN connections. This suggested that in several nerve circuits the PBN probably plays a more important role than previously thought.

  11. Novel biological networks modulated by complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellos, Dimitrios; Andronis, Christos; Persidis, Andreas; Lambris, John D

    2005-06-01

    The almost complete deciphering of the human genome has paved the way for the application of new technology platforms in understanding the contribution of complex biological pathways to human pathophysiology and disease. In the post-genomic era, the concept of systems biology has gained significant momentum and biomedical research is now being conducted on an integrated and cross-disciplinary platform that pulls together its resources from diverse fields such as computational biology, bioinformatics, functional genomics, structural biology, and proteomics. In this perspective, the identity of established biologic systems is being re-examined in the light of novel findings that suggest novel associations between otherwise unrelated pathways and individual proteins. Complement exemplifies such a system that, transcending its innate immune identity, has forged functional associations with multiple pathways and networks in modulating basic biologic processes. In the present article, we provide a global overview of these unusual system associations of complement with the aid of a powerful and high-throughput bioinformatics platform. Using a novel approach called systems literature analysis that allows the rapid extraction of text-based associations between genes and pathways from the ever expanding scientific article database, we have selected a broad range of biologic processes modulated by complement proteins and have constructed an integrated map of complement-mediated networks that incorporates well over 85 diverse biologic pathways. Expanding the complement cascade beyond its approximately 35 designated components, we discuss protein-protein interactions involving novel ligands and associations with signaling cascades and cellular networks that affect both inflammatory and non-inflammatory processes. This integrated consideration of complement within a unified 'systems biology' framework underscores the concept that innate immunity goes well beyond the protection

  12. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus clinical isolates, their comparison with strain GG and their recognition by complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissilä, Eija; Douillard, François P; Ritari, Jarmo; Paulin, Lars; Järvinen, Hanna M; Rasinkangas, Pia; Haapasalo, Karita; Meri, Seppo; Jarva, Hanna; de Vos, Willem M

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains are ubiquitous in fermented foods, and in the human body where they are commensals naturally present in the normal microbiota composition of gut, vagina and skin. However, in some cases, Lactobacillus spp. have been implicated in bacteremia. The aim of the study was to examine the genomic and immunological properties of 16 clinical blood isolates of L. rhamnosus and to compare them to the well-studied L. rhamnosus probiotic strain GG. Blood cultures from bacteremic patients were collected at the Helsinki University Hospital laboratory in 2005-2011 and L. rhamnosus strains were isolated and characterized by genomic sequencing. The capacity of the L. rhamnosus strains to activate serum complement was studied using immunological assays for complement factor C3a and the terminal pathway complement complex (TCC). Binding of complement regulators factor H and C4bp was also determined using radioligand assays. Furthermore, the isolated strains were evaluated for their ability to aggregate platelets and to form biofilms in vitro. Genomic comparison between the clinical L. rhamnosus strains showed them to be clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG and to cluster in two distinct lineages. All L. rhamnosus strains activated complement in serum and none of them bound complement regulators. Four out of 16 clinical blood isolates induced platelet aggregation and/or formed more biofilms than L. rhamnosus GG, which did not display platelet aggregation activity nor showed strong biofilm formation. These findings suggest that clinical L. rhamnosus isolates show considerable heterogeneity but are clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG at the genomic level. All L. rhamnosus strains are still normally recognized by the human complement system.

  13. Structural characterization of the ternary complex that mediates termination of NF-κB signaling by IκBα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sulakshana P; Quintas, Pedro O; McNulty, Reginald; Komives, Elizabeth A; Dyson, H Jane

    2016-05-31

    The transcription factor NF-κB is used in many systems for the transduction of extracellular signals into the expression of signal-responsive genes. Published structural data explain the activation of NF-κB through degradation of its dedicated inhibitor IκBα, but the mechanism by which NF-κB-mediated signaling is turned off by its removal from the DNA in the presence of newly synthesized IκBα (termed stripping) is unknown. Previous kinetic studies showed that IκBα accelerates NF-κB dissociation from DNA, and a transient ternary complex between NF-κB, its cognate DNA sequence, and IκBα was observed. Here we structurally characterize the >100-kDa ternary complex by NMR and negative stain EM and show a modeled structure that is consistent with the measurements. These data provide a structural basis for previously unidentified insights into the molecular mechanism of stripping.

  14. The Mediator complex subunit MED25 is targeted by the N-terminal transactivation domain of the PEA3 group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Verreman, Kathye; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; de Launoit, Yvan; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2013-05-01

    PEA3, ERM and ER81 belong to the PEA3 subfamily of Ets transcription factors and play important roles in a number of tissue-specific processes. Transcriptional activation by PEA3 subfamily factors requires their characteristic amino-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD). However, the cellular targets of this domain remain largely unknown. Using ERM as a prototype, we show that the minimal N-terminal TAD activates transcription by contacting the activator interacting domain (ACID)/Prostate tumor overexpressed protein 1 (PTOV) domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. We further show that depletion of MED25 disrupts the association of ERM with the Mediator in vitro. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of MED25 as well as the overexpression of MED25-ACID and MED25-VWA domains efficiently inhibit the transcriptional activity of ERM. Moreover, mutations of amino acid residues that prevent binding of MED25 to ERM strongly reduce transactivation by ERM. Finally we show that siRNA depletion of MED25 diminishes PEA3-driven expression of MMP-1 and Mediator recruitment. In conclusion, this study identifies the PEA3 group members as the first human transcriptional factors that interact with the MED25 ACID/PTOV domain and establishes MED25 as a crucial transducer of their transactivation potential.

  15. Evolution of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian complement system constitutes a highly sophisticated body defense machinery comprising more than 30 components. Research into the evolutionary origin of the complement system has identified a primitive version composed of the central component C3 and two activation proteases Bf and MASP in cnidaria. This suggests that the complement system was established in the common ancestor of eumetazoa more than 500 million years ago. The original activation mechanism of the original complement system is believed to be close to the mammalian lectin and alternative activation pathways, and its main role seems to be opsonization and induction of inflammation. This primitive complement system has been retained by most deuterostomes without major change until the appearance of jawed vertebrates. At this stage, duplication of the C3, Bf and MASP genes as well as recruitment of membrane attack components added the classical and lytic pathways to the primitive complement system, converting it to the modern complement system. In contrast, the complement system was lost multiple times independently in the protostome lineage.

  16. DFT Mechanistic Study of the Selective Terminal C-H Activation of n-Pentane with a Tungsten Allyl Nitrosyl Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Richmond

    2017-01-17

    Mechanistic insights into the selective C-H terminal activation of n-pentane with tungsten allyl nitrosyl complex reported by Legzdins were gained by employing density functional theory with B3LYP hybrid functional. Using Bader’s atom in molecules (AIM) analysis on the elementary steps of the hydrogen transfer process, TS1 and TS2, it was observed that the calculated H-transfer models were closely similar to Hall’s metal-assisted σ-bond metathesis through bond critical point (BCP) comparisons. One distinguishable feature was the fact that the formal oxidation state of the W changed in the concerted H-transfer process. To better differentiate, we term these processes as ‘Formal Reductive Hydrogen Transfer’ (FRHT) for TS1 and ‘Formal Oxidative Hydrogen Transfer’ (FOHT) for TS2.

  17. DFT mechanistic study of the selective terminal C–H activation of n-pentane with a tungsten allyl nitrosyl complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richmond Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mechanistic insights into the selective C–H terminal activation of n-pentane with tungsten allyl nitrosyl complex reported by Legzdins were gained by employing density functional theory with B3LYP hybrid functional. Using Bader’s atom in molecules (AIM analysis on the elementary steps of the hydrogen transfer process, TS1 and TS2, it was observed that the calculated H-transfer models were closely similar to Hall’s metal-assisted σ-bond metathesis through bond critical point (BCP comparisons. One distinguishable feature was the fact that the formal oxidation state of the W changed in the concerted H-transfer process. To better differentiate, we term these processes as ‘Formal Reductive Hydrogen Transfer’ (FRHT for TS1 and ‘Formal Oxidative Hydrogen Transfer’ (FOHT for TS2.

  18. High-resolution structure of the N-terminal endonuclease domain of the Lassa virus L polymerase in complex with magnesium ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor D Wallat

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV causes deadly hemorrhagic fever disease for which there are no vaccines and limited treatments. LASV-encoded L polymerase is required for viral RNA replication and transcription. The functional domains of L-a large protein of 2218 amino acid residues-are largely undefined, except for the centrally located RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP motif. Recent structural and functional analyses of the N-terminal region of the L protein from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV, which is in the same Arenaviridae family as LASV, have identified an endonuclease domain that presumably cleaves the cap structures of host mRNAs in order to initiate viral transcription. Here we present a high-resolution crystal structure of the N-terminal 173-aa region of the LASV L protein (LASV L173 in complex with magnesium ions at 1.72 Å. The structure is highly homologous to other known viral endonucleases of arena- (LCMV NL1, orthomyxo- (influenza virus PA, and bunyaviruses (La Crosse virus NL1. Although the catalytic residues (D89, E102 and K122 are highly conserved among the known viral endonucleases, LASV L endonuclease structure shows some notable differences. Our data collected from in vitro endonuclease assays and a reporter-based LASV minigenome transcriptional assay in mammalian cells confirm structural prediction of LASV L173 as an active endonuclease. The high-resolution structure of the LASV L endonuclease domain in complex with magnesium ions should aid the development of antivirals against lethal Lassa hemorrhagic fever.

  19. New perspectives on mannan-binding lectin-mediated complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Søren Egedal; Thiel, Steffen; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune system, mediating several major effector functions and modulating adaptive immune responses. Three complement activation pathways exist: the classical pathway (CP), the alternative pathway (AP), and the lectin pathway (LP). The LP...... picture of the complement system is more that of a small "scale-free" network where C3 acts as the main hub, than that of three linear pathways converging in a common terminal pathway....

  20. Trapping unstable terminal M-O multiple bonds of monocyclopentadienyl niobium and tantalum complexes with Lewis acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Nieves, Javier; Frutos, Luis M; Royo, Pascual; Castaño, Obis; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Mosquera, Marta E G

    2010-11-15

    Hydrolysis of [NbCp'Cl(4)] (Cp' = η(5)-C(5)H(4)SiMe(3)) with the water adduct H(2)O·B(C(6)F(5))(3) afforded the oxo-borane compound [NbCp'Cl(2){O·B(C(6)F(5))(3)}] (2a). This compound reacted with [MgBz(2)(THF)(2)] giving [NbCp'Bz(2){O·B(C(6)F(5))(3)}] (2b), whereas [NbCp'Me(2){O·B(C(6)F(5))(3)}] (2c) was obtained from the reaction of [NbCp'Me(4)] with H(2)O·B(C(6)F(5))(3). Addition of Al(C(6)F(5))(3) to solutions containing the oxo-borane compounds [MCp(R)X(2){O·B(C(6)F(5))(3)}] (M = Ta, Cp(R) = η(5)-C(5)Me(5) (Cp*), X = Cl 1a, Bz 1b, Me 1c; M = Nb, Cp(R) = Cp', X = Cl 2a) afforded the oxo-alane complexes [MCp(R)X(2){O·Al(C(6)F(5))(3)}] (M = Ta, Cp(R) = Cp*, X = Cl 3a, Bz 3b, Me 3c; M = Nb, Cp(R) = Cp', X = Cl 4a), releasing B(C(6)F(5))(3). Compound 3a was also obtained by addition of Al(C(6)F(5))(3) to the dinuclear μ-oxo compound [TaCp*Cl(2)(μ-O)](2), meanwhile addition of the water adduct H(2)O·Al(C(6)F(5))(3) to [TaCp*Me(4)] gave complex 3c. The structure of 2a and 3a was obtained by X-ray diffraction studies. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to further understand these types of oxo compounds.

  1. Cysteine proteinase from Streptococcus pyogenes enables evasion of innate immunity via degradation of complement factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Ogawa, Taiji; Terao, Yutaka; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Ikebe, Kazunori; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-05-31

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis, sepsis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the function of a major cysteine protease from S. pyogenes that affects the amount of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) and other complement factors and aimed to elucidate the mechanism involved in occurrence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome from the aspect of the complement system. First, we revealed that culture supernatant of a given S. pyogenes strain and recombinant SpeB degraded the C1-INH. Then, we determined the N-terminal sequence of the C1-INH fragment degraded by recombinant SpeB. Interestingly, the region containing one of the identified cleavage sites is not present in patients with C1-INH deficiency. Scanning electron microscopy of the speB mutant incubated in human serum showed the abnormal superficial architecture and irregular oval structure. Furthermore, unlike the wild-type strain, that mutant strain showed lower survival capacity than normal as compared with heat-inactivated serum, whereas it had a significantly higher survival rate in serum without the C1-INH than in normal serum. Also, SpeB degraded multiple complement factors and the membrane attack complex. Flow cytometric analyses revealed deposition of C9, one of the components of membrane the attack complex, in greater amounts on the surface of the speB mutant, whereas lower amounts of C9 were bound to the wild-type strain surface. These results suggest that SpeB can interrupt the human complement system via degrading the C1-INH, thus enabling S. pyogenes to evade eradication in a hostile environment.

  2. NMR resonance assignments for the N-terminal domain of the δ subunit of the E. coli γ clamp loader complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, Esmael M; Rizzo, Alessandro A; Beuning, Penny J; Korzhnev, Dmitry M

    2017-10-01

    The β-clamp protein and the γ clamp loader complex are essential components of bacterial DNA replication machinery. The β-clamp is a ring-shaped homodimer that encircles DNA and increases the efficiency of replication by providing a binding platform for DNA polymerases and other replication-related proteins. The β-clamp is loaded onto DNA by the five-subunit γ clamp loader complex in a multi-step ATP-dependent process. The initial steps of this process involve the cooperative binding of the β-clamp by the five subunits of ATP-bound clamp loader, which induces or traps an open conformation of the clamp. Remarkably, the δ subunit of the E. coli clamp loader, or even its 140 residue N-terminal domain (called mini-δ), alone can shift conformational equilibrium of the β-clamp towards the open state. Here we report nearly complete backbone and side-chain 1H, 13C and 15N NMR resonance assignments of mini-δ that will facilitate NMR studies of the mechanisms of β-clamp opening and its loading on DNA by the clamp loader.

  3. Structure and function of complement protein C1q and its role in the development of autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Smykał-Jankowiak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Complement plays an important role in the immune system. Three different pathways of complement activation are known: the classical, alternative, and lectin dependent. They involve more than 30 serum peptides. C1q is the first subcomponent of the classical pathway of complement activation. It is composed of three types of chains, A, B, and C, which form a molecule containing 18 peptides. Each of the chains has a short amino-terminal region followed by a collagen-like region (playing a role in the activation of C1r2C1s2 and a carboxy-terminal head, which binds to immune complexes. Recent studies have shown a great number of ligands for C1q, including aggregated IgG, IgM, human T-cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I, gp21 peptide, human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 gp21 peptide, β-amyloid, fragments of bacterial walls, apoptotic cells, and many others. However, the role of C1q is not only associated with complement activation. It also helps in the removal of immune complexes and necrotic cells, stimulates the production of some cytokines, and modulates the function of lymphocytes. Complete C1q deficiency is a rare genetic disorder. The C1q gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 1. So far, only a few mutations in C1q gene have been reported. The presence of these mutations is strongly associated with recurrent bacterial infections and the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Recent clinical studies point to the significance of anti-C1q antibodies in the diagnosis and assessment of lupus nephritis activity.

  4. DR1769, a protein with N-terminal beta propeller repeats and a low-complexity hydrophilic tail, plays a role in desiccation tolerance of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S; Misra, Hari S

    2013-09-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes five putative quinoproteins. Among these, the Δdr2518 and Δdr1769 mutants became sensitive to gamma radiation. DR2518 with beta propeller repeats in the C-terminal domain was characterized as a radiation-responsive serine/threonine protein kinase in this bacterium. DR1769 contains beta propeller repeats at the N terminus, while its C-terminal domain is a proline-rich disordered structure and constitutes a low-complexity hydrophilic region with aliphatic-proline dipeptide motifs. The Δdr1769 mutant showed nearly a 3-log cycle sensitivity to desiccation at 5% humidity compared to that of the wild type. Interestingly, the gamma radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) resistance in mutant cells also dropped by ∼1-log cycle at 10 kGy and ∼1.5-fold, respectively, compared to those in wild-type cells. But there was no effect of UV (254 nm) exposure up to 800 J · m(-2). These cells showed defective DNA double-strand break repair, and the average size of the nucleoid in desiccated wild-type and Δdr1769 cells was reduced by approximately 2-fold compared to that of respective controls. However, the nucleoid in wild-type cells returned to a size almost similar to that of the untreated control, which did not happen in mutant cells, at least up to 24 h postdesiccation. These results suggest that DR1769 plays an important role in desiccation and radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, possibly by protecting genome integrity under extreme conditions.

  5. Complement susceptibility in glutamine deprived breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boackle Robert J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRPs inhibit complement-mediated killing of human cells by human complement, a property that confers protection from complement to malignant breast cancer cells and that thwarts some immunotherapies. Metabolic mechanisms may come into play in protecting cancer cells from the complement system subsequent to relatively low levels of complement deposition. Results In differentiating these mechanisms, two types of human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 (adenocarcinoma and Bcap37 (medullary carcinoma were cell-cycle synchronized using glutamine-deprivation followed by restoration. These cells were examined for the expression of two mCRPs (CD59 and CD55, and for subsequent susceptibility to antibody-mediated complement-induced membrane damage. After glutamine restoration, MCF7 and Bcap37 cells were synchronized into the G2/M phase and an average increased expression of CD59 and CD55 occurred with a corresponding resistance to complement-mediated damage. Blocking CD59 inhibitory function with monoclonal antibody revealed that CD59 played a key role in protecting unsynchronized Bcap37 and MCF7 cancer cells from the complement membrane attack complex. Interestingly, glutamine-deprivation did not significantly affect the expression of proteins e.g., the surface level of CD59 or CD55, but did increase the susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. One possible explanation is that glutamine-deprivation may have slowed the turnover rate of mCRPs, preventing the cells from replacing pre-existing mCRPs, as they became neutralized by covalent C4b and C3b depositions. Conclusion Taken together the findings are consistent with the conclusion that future immunotherapies should aim to achieve a highly specific and profound activation and deposition of complement as well as to disrupt the synthesis and expression of CD59 and CD55 by the cancer cells.

  6. [Pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)--the central role of complement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trendelenburg, M

    2005-05-01

    The traditional view of the pathogenesis of SLE is that immune complexes containing autoantigens and autoantibodies activate complement, and that this causes inflammatory injury to tissues. Although this model is biologically plausible, it cannot account for all of the clinical observations that link the complement system and SLE. In particular, the observation that complement deficiency causes lupus is hard to reconcile with the concept that complement activation products are the major cause of inflammatory injury in the disease. More recent data suggests that the role of complement in SLE is rather protective. Bindung of complement might prevent an autoimmune response by supporting the clearance of immuncomplexes and apoptotic cell debrid.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 2 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body's immune response known as the complement system . The complement system is a group of proteins that work together ... in the pathway that turns on (activates) the complement system when foreign invaders, such as bacteria, are detected. ...

  8. The role of the complement system in diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    -threatening disease. An increasing body of evidence points toward a role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. For example, circulating levels of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition molecule of the innate immune system, have emerged as a robust biomarker...... for the development and progression of this disease, and evidence suggests that MBL, H-ficolin, complement component C3 and the membrane attack complex might contribute to renal injury in the hyperglycaemic mileu. New approaches to modulate the complement system might lead to the development of new agents to prevent...

  9. Terminating supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levendosky, Alytia A; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this paper is on the termination of clinical supervision. Although clinical supervision is considered the backbone of most mental health training programs, it gets relatively little theoretical or empirical attention. The termination of supervision has received even less attention. In this paper, we describe an approach to terminating supervision in our treatment team, which integrates intensive assessment with a relational perspective in a clinical science training program (Levendosky & Hopwood, 2016). We describe our established conceptual framework, review empirical evidence, and provide verbatim examples from final supervision meetings on our team to elaborate the importance of conceptualizing individual differences across trainees and parallels between supervision and psychotherapy dynamics. We conclude by emphasizing the need for research on supervision in general and supervision termination in particular. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Dysregulated Complement Activation as a Common Pathway of Injury in Preeclampsia and Other Pregnancy Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Anne M.; Salmon, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    The complement system protects the host against invading organisms, initiates inflammation and dispose of immune complexes and the products of inflammatory injury. The complement system provides an important link between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Experimental observations suggest that increased complement activation causes and/or perpetuates inflammation during pregnancy. Recent studies suggest a link between complement activation and preeclampsia. Excessive activation or insuff...

  11. The role of complement in ocular pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Bora, Nalini S.; Jha, Purushottam; Bora, Puran S.

    2008-01-01

    Functionally active complement system and complement regulatory proteins are present in the normal human and rodent eye. Complement activation and its regulation by ocular complement regulatory proteins contribute to the pathology of various ocular diseases including keratitis, uveitis and age-related macular degeneration. Furthermore, a strong relationship between age-related macular degeneration and polymorphism in the genes of certain complement components/complement regulatory proteins is...

  12. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    , IR was an independent predictor of sMAC in the CHF group beta = 0.37 (p complement system and thus......Objectives. Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have an exaggerated immune response, endothelial damage/dysfunction, and increased risk of diabetes mellitus (DM). The inter-relationship(s) between indices of complement activation (soluble membrane attack complex, sMAC), inflammation (hs...

  13. Characterization of human cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12) and CDK13 complexes in C-terminal domain phosphorylation, gene transcription, and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Gao, Xin; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Smith, Edwin; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and CDK12 have each been demonstrated to phosphorylate the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) at serine 2 of the heptad repeat, both in vitro and in vivo. CDK9, as part of P-TEFb and the super elongation complex (SEC), is by far the best characterized of CDK9, CDK12, and CDK13. We employed both in vitro and in vivo assays to further investigate the molecular properties of CDK12 and its paralog CDK13. We isolated Flag-tagged CDK12 and CDK13 and found that they associate with numerous RNA processing factors. Although knockdown of CDK12, CDK13, or their cyclin partner CCNK did not affect the bulk CTD phosphorylation levels in HCT116 cells, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis revealed that CDK12 and CDK13 losses in HCT116 cells preferentially affect expression of DNA damage response and snoRNA genes, respectively. CDK12 and CDK13 depletion also leads to a loss of expression of RNA processing factors and to defects in RNA processing. These findings suggest that in addition to implementing CTD phosphorylation, CDK12 and CDK13 may affect RNA processing through direct physical interactions with RNA processing factors and by regulating their expression. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) represses terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation downstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Bruno; Zakaria, Chadi; Jia, J J

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis. The best studied targets of mTORC1 in translation are the eukaryotic initiation factor-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). In this study, we identify the La......-related protein 1 (LARP1) as a key novel target of mTORC1 with a fundamental role in terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation. Recent genome-wide studies indicate that TOP and TOP-like mRNAs compose a large portion of the mTORC1 translatome, but the mechanism by which mTORC1 controls TOP mRNA translation...... is incompletely understood. Here, we report that LARP1 functions as a key repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. Our data show the following: (i) LARP1 associates with mTORC1 via RAPTOR; (ii) LARP1 interacts with TOP mRNAs in an mTORC1-dependent manner; (iii) LARP1 binds the 5′TOP motif...

  15. Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Woźny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation The concepts of motion and force are both extensively discussed in cognitive linguistics literature. But they are discussed separately. The first usually in the context of ‘motion situations’ (Talmy, Slobin, Zlatev, the other as part of the Force Dynamics framework, which was developed by Talmy. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to argue that the concepts of force and motion should not be isolated but considered as two inseparable parts of force-motion events. The second goal is to prove that the modified Force Dynamics (force-motion framework can be used for precise characterization of the verb complementation patterns. To this end, a random sample of 50 sentences containing the verb ‘went’ is analyzed, demonstrating the differences between the categories of intensive and intransitive complementation with respect to the linguistically coded parameters of force and motion.

  16. How Escherichia coli Circumvent Complement-Mediated Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela S. Barbosa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Complement is a crucial arm of the innate immune response against invading bacterial pathogens, and one of its main functions is to recognize and destroy target cells. Similar to other pathogens, Escherichia coli has evolved mechanisms to overcome complement activation. It is well known that capsular polysaccharide may confer resistance to complement-mediated killing and phagocytosis, being one of the strategies adopted by this bacterium to survive in serum. In addition, proteases produced by E. coli have been shown to downregulate the complement system. Pic, an autotransporter secreted by different pathogens in the Enterobacteriaceae family, is able to cleave C2, C3/C3b, and C4/C4b and works synergistically with human Factor I and Factor H (FH, thereby promoting inactivation of C3b. Extracellular serine protease P, a serine protease of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC, downregulates complement activation by cleaving C3/C3b and C5. StcE, a metalloprotease secreted by EHEC, inhibits the classical complement-mediated cell lysis by potentiating the action of C1 inhibitor, and the periplasmic protease Prc contributes to E. coli complement evasion by interfering with the classical pathway activation and by preventing membrane attack complex deposition. Finally, it has been described that E. coli proteins interact with negative complement regulators to modulate complement activation. The functional consequences resulting from the interaction of outer membrane protein A, new lipoprotein I, outer membrane protein W, and Stx2 with proteins of the FH family and C4b-binding protein (C4BP are discussed in detail. In brief, in this review, we focused on the different mechanisms used by pathogenic E. coli to circumvent complement attack, allowing these bacteria to promote a successful infection.

  17. Inhibition of complement activation by IgG4 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zee, J S; van Swieten, P; Aalberse, R C

    1986-05-01

    Prolonged exposure to antigens may result in high IgG4 antibody titres as was shown in a previous paper (Aalberse et al., 1983b). In novice bee keepers, a shift in the IgG1/IgG4 ratio of the response against phospholipase-A (PLA; a major component of bee venom) occurred. This resulted in an IgG4-dominated response after approximately 2 years of bee-keeping experience. Subject of the present study was the influence of relatively high concentrations of IgG4 antibodies on the biological activity of immune complexes. In the PLA antigen model, it was demonstrated that IgG4-containing immune complexes do not activate complement and that IgG4 antibodies effectively inhibit immune precipitation and complement activation by IgG1 antibodies. Evidence is provided that IgG4 antibodies inhibit binding of C1q to IgG1 in mixed, IgG1- and IgG4-containing complexes. It is proposed that IgG4 antibodies protect against the biological effects of the complement-fixing IgG subclasses. For this reason, determination of the total IgG response or just determination of antibody activity in the complement-fixing isotypes is insufficient in immune-complex diseases. The modulating effect of the non-complement-fixing isotypes should be taken into account to predict the biological activity of the immune complexes.

  18. Making Wireless Terminals Simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Skovgaard; Popovski, Petar; De Carvalho, Elisabeth

    2005-01-01

    The exponential growth of user demands and the limitations of 3G systems have brought researchers and industry to propose solutions for the next generation. Among the requirements are higher bit rates and cheaper deployment. In this paper we focus on a terminal complexity problem related to channel...

  19. Sialic acid on the neuronal glycocalyx prevents complement C1 binding and complement receptor-3-mediated removal by microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnartz, Bettina; Kopatz, Jens; Tenner, Andrea J; Neumann, Harald

    2012-01-18

    Microglial cells are professional phagocytes of the CNS responsible for clearance of unwanted structures. Neuronal processes are marked by complement C1 before they are removed in development or during disease processes. Target molecules involved in C1 binding and mechanisms of clearance are still unclear. Here we show that the terminal sugar residue sialic acid of the mouse neuronal glycocalyx determines complement C1 binding and microglial-mediated clearance function. Several early components of the classical complement cascade including C1q, C1r, C1s, and C3 were produced by cultured mouse microglia. The opsonin C1q was binding to neurites after enzymatic removal of sialic acid residues from the neuronal glycocalyx. Desialylated neurites, but not neurites with intact sialic acid caps, were cleared and taken up by cocultured microglial cells. The removal of the desialylated neurites was mediated via the complement receptor-3 (CR3; CD11b/CD18). Data demonstrate that mouse microglial cells via CR3 recognize and remove neuronal structures with an altered neuronal glycocalyx lacking terminal sialic acid.

  20. Crystal structure of the vaccinia virus DNA polymerase holoenzyme subunit D4 in complex with the A20 N-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Contesto-Richefeu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus polymerase holoenzyme is composed of the DNA polymerase E9, the uracil-DNA glycosylase D4 and A20, a protein with no known enzymatic activity. The D4/A20 heterodimer is the DNA polymerase co-factor whose function is essential for processive DNA synthesis. Genetic and biochemical data have established that residues located in the N-terminus of A20 are critical for binding to D4. However, no information regarding the residues of D4 involved in A20 binding is yet available. We expressed and purified the complex formed by D4 and the first 50 amino acids of A20 (D4/A20₁₋₅₀. We showed that whereas D4 forms homodimers in solution when expressed alone, D4/A20₁₋₅₀ clearly behaves as a heterodimer. The crystal structure of D4/A20₁₋₅₀ solved at 1.85 Å resolution reveals that the D4/A20 interface (including residues 167 to 180 and 191 to 206 of D4 partially overlaps the previously described D4/D4 dimer interface. A20₁₋₅₀ binding to D4 is mediated by an α-helical domain with important leucine residues located at the very N-terminal end of A20 and a second stretch of residues containing Trp43 involved in stacking interactions with Arg167 and Pro173 of D4. Point mutations of the latter residues disturb D4/A20₁₋₅₀ formation and reduce significantly thermal stability of the complex. Interestingly, small molecule docking with anti-poxvirus inhibitors selected to interfere with D4/A20 binding could reproduce several key features of the D4/A20₁₋₅₀ interaction. Finally, we propose a model of D4/A20₁₋₅₀ in complex with DNA and discuss a number of mutants described in the literature, which affect DNA synthesis. Overall, our data give new insights into the assembly of the poxvirus DNA polymerase cofactor and may be useful for the design and rational improvement of antivirals targeting the D4/A20 interface.

  1. THE FORMALIZATION PROCESS OF CARGO TERMINAL OPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Shramenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical formalization of operation process for a terminal complex is proposed and a model taking into account characteristics of a freight terminal and all the possible states of a system is developed.

  2. Complement: Alive and Kicking Nanomedicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Hashemi, S.H.; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2009-01-01

    Administration of liposome- and polymer-based clinical nanomedicines, as well as many other proposed multifunctional nanoparticles, often triggers hypersensitivity reactions without the involvement of IgE. These anaphylactic reactions are believed to be secondary to activation of the complement...

  3. The lectin pathway of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe Cecilie Diederich; Haugaard, Anna Karen; Garred, P

    2014-01-01

    The pattern recognition molecules of the lectin complement pathway are important components of the innate immune system with known functions in host-virus interactions. This paper summarizes current knowledge of how these intriguing molecules, including mannose-binding lectin (MBL), Ficolin-1, -2...

  4. Role of complement in in vitro and in vivo lung inflammatory reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B; Bless, N M

    1998-01-01

    Complement is one of the integral buttresses of the inflammatory response. In addition to host defense activities, proinflammatory properties of several complement components are described. This overview elucidates the role of complement in inflammatory reactions in vitro and in vivo, focusing...... on the complement activation products, C5a, and the membrane attack complex, C5b-9. Using several approaches, the impact of these complement components in mechanisms relevant to neutrophil recruitment is emphasized. In addition, the participation of complement in endothelial superoxide generation and its essential...... requirement for full expression of lung injury is demonstrated, as are the involved intracellular signal transduction pathways. Understanding the mechanisms of complement-induced proinflammatory effects may provide a basis for future therapeutic blockade of complement and/or its activation products....

  5. La-related Protein 1 (LARP1) Represses Terminal Oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA Translation Downstream of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Bruno D.; Zakaria, Chadi; Jia, Jian-Jun; Graber, Tyson E.; Svitkin, Yuri; Tahmasebi, Soroush; Healy, Danielle; Hoang, Huy-Dung; Jensen, Jacob M.; Diao, Ilo T.; Lussier, Alexandre; Dajadian, Christopher; Padmanabhan, Niranjan; Wang, Walter; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Hearnden, Jaclyn; Smith, Ewan M.; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Yanagiya, Akiko; Morita, Masahiro; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; González, Jose L.; Hernández, Greco; Alain, Tommy; Damgaard, Christian K.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis. The best studied targets of mTORC1 in translation are the eukaryotic initiation factor-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). In this study, we identify the La-related protein 1 (LARP1) as a key novel target of mTORC1 with a fundamental role in terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation. Recent genome-wide studies indicate that TOP and TOP-like mRNAs compose a large portion of the mTORC1 translatome, but the mechanism by which mTORC1 controls TOP mRNA translation is incompletely understood. Here, we report that LARP1 functions as a key repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. Our data show the following: (i) LARP1 associates with mTORC1 via RAPTOR; (ii) LARP1 interacts with TOP mRNAs in an mTORC1-dependent manner; (iii) LARP1 binds the 5′TOP motif to repress TOP mRNA translation; and (iv) LARP1 competes with the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G for TOP mRNA binding. Importantly, from a drug resistance standpoint, our data also show that reducing LARP1 protein levels by RNA interference attenuates the inhibitory effect of rapamycin, Torin1, and amino acid deprivation on TOP mRNA translation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that LARP1 functions as an important repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. PMID:25940091

  6. La-related Protein 1 (LARP1) Represses Terminal Oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA Translation Downstream of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Bruno D; Zakaria, Chadi; Jia, Jian-Jun; Graber, Tyson E; Svitkin, Yuri; Tahmasebi, Soroush; Healy, Danielle; Hoang, Huy-Dung; Jensen, Jacob M; Diao, Ilo T; Lussier, Alexandre; Dajadian, Christopher; Padmanabhan, Niranjan; Wang, Walter; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Hearnden, Jaclyn; Smith, Ewan M; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Yanagiya, Akiko; Morita, Masahiro; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; González, Jose L; Hernández, Greco; Alain, Tommy; Damgaard, Christian K

    2015-06-26

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis. The best studied targets of mTORC1 in translation are the eukaryotic initiation factor-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). In this study, we identify the La-related protein 1 (LARP1) as a key novel target of mTORC1 with a fundamental role in terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation. Recent genome-wide studies indicate that TOP and TOP-like mRNAs compose a large portion of the mTORC1 translatome, but the mechanism by which mTORC1 controls TOP mRNA translation is incompletely understood. Here, we report that LARP1 functions as a key repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. Our data show the following: (i) LARP1 associates with mTORC1 via RAPTOR; (ii) LARP1 interacts with TOP mRNAs in an mTORC1-dependent manner; (iii) LARP1 binds the 5'TOP motif to repress TOP mRNA translation; and (iv) LARP1 competes with the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G for TOP mRNA binding. Importantly, from a drug resistance standpoint, our data also show that reducing LARP1 protein levels by RNA interference attenuates the inhibitory effect of rapamycin, Torin1, and amino acid deprivation on TOP mRNA translation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that LARP1 functions as an important repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Windows Terminal Servers Orchestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowiec, Sebastian; Gaspar, Ricardo; Smith, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Windows Terminal Servers provide application gateways for various parts of the CERN accelerator complex, used by hundreds of CERN users every day. The combination of new tools such as Puppet, HAProxy and Microsoft System Center suite enable automation of provisioning workflows to provide a terminal server infrastructure that can scale up and down in an automated manner. The orchestration does not only reduce the time and effort necessary to deploy new instances, but also facilitates operations such as patching, analysis and recreation of compromised nodes as well as catering for workload peaks.

  8. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    a subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes...... in significant reduction of both C3-fragment deposition (22.0+/-14.5%) and MAC formation (47.4+/-13.8%). Both the lack of CR2 influence on MAC formation and the promotion of C3-fragment deposition by CR1 are in striking contrast to the situation where only the AP is operational. The presence of erythrocytes (E...

  9. The Complement System and Ocular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jha, Purushottam; Bora, Puran S.; Bora, Nalini S.

    2007-01-01

    In the normal eye, the complement system is continuously activated at low levels and both membrane-bound and soluble intraocular complement regulatory proteins tightly regulate this spontaneous complement activation. This allows protection against pathogens without causing any damage to self-tissue and vision loss. The complement system and complement regulatory proteins control the intraocular inflammation in autoimmune uveitis and play an important role in the development of corneal inflamm...

  10. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Potempa

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  11. Structural and functional characterization of human complement factor P

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dennis

    The complement system is of great importance for the innate immune response, which can lead to opsonization and removal of invading pathogens, as well as immune complexes and damaged self-cells. Factor P (FP), also known as properdin, acts as a positive regulator of the alternative pathway...... of complement by stabilizing the C3 convertase complex (C3bBb). FP has also been suggested to serve as a pattern recognition molecule for the initiation of the alternative pathway. However, the molecular mechanisms of FP remain unclear due to its oligomeric nature and hence the atomic structure of FP has...

  12. Terminal Ballistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the important issues of terminal ballistics in a comprehensive way combining experimental data, numerical simulations and analytical modeling. The first chapter reviews the experimental equipment which are used for ballistic tests and the diagnostics for material characterization under impulsive loading conditions. The second chapter covers essential features of the codes which are used for terminal ballistics such as the Euler vs. Lagrange schemes and meshing techniques, as well as the most popular material models. The third chapter, devoted to the penetration mechanics of rigid penetrators, brings the update of modeling in this field. The fourth chapter deals with plate perforation and the fifth chapter deals with the penetration mechanics of shaped charge jets and eroding long rods. The last two chapters discuss several techniques for the disruption and defeating of the main threats in armor design. Throughout the book the authors demonstrate the advantages of numerical simulations in unde...

  13. The complement system as a potential therapeutic target in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouw, Leendert A; Pickering, Matthew C; Blom, Anna M

    2017-09-01

    Complement activation is associated with common rheumatic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic vasculitis. Evidence linking complement activation to these diseases includes the presence of complement deposition in affected tissues, decreased levels of complement proteins and high levels of complement activation fragments in the blood and/or synovial fluid of patients with these diseases, as well as data from experimental models. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits the complement component C5, is now approved for the treatment of rare conditions involving complement hyperactivation, and the success of this therapy has renewed interest in understanding the utility of complement inhibition in rheumatological practice, particularly for SLE. For example, inhibiting C5 is a potential means of reducing glomerular inflammation in lupus nephritis or treating thrombotic microangiopathy in SLE. The complement system is one of multiple mediators of tissue injury in complex diseases such as SLE, and identifying the disease context in which complement activation has a predominant role is a challenge. An added difficulty in RA is identifying a role for therapeutic complement inhibition within the diverse treatment modalities already available. In this Review, evidence for the therapeutic potential of complement manipulation in rheumatology practice is evaluated.

  14. Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits selectively deplete the pattern recognition molecule ficolin-2 of the lectin complement pathway in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Munthe-Fog, L; Thiara, A S

    2015-01-01

    of infections. Thus, we investigated the biocompatibility of the recognition molecules of the lectin pathway in two different types of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. Bloods were drawn at five time-points before, during and postoperatively from 30 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Patients were......The complement system can be activated via the lectin pathway by the recognition molecules mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and the ficolins. Ficolin-2 exhibits binding against a broad range of ligands, including biomaterials in vitro, and low ficolin-2 levels are associated with increased risk...... randomized into two groups using different coatings of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits, Phisio® (phosphorylcholine polymer coating) and Bioline® (albumin-heparin coating). Concentrations of MBL, ficolin-1, -2 and -3 and soluble C3a and terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma samples were measured...

  15. The complement system and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regal, Jean F; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Burwick, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the fetal allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Depletion of complement system immunity in patients with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenwen; Che, Lin; Jiang, Jinfa; Yang, Fan; Duan, Qianglin; Song, Haoming; Liu, Xiaohong; Shen, Yuqin; Wang, Lemin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate differences in the expression of complement system genes, and serum levels of CH50, C3 and C4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with myocardial infarction (AMI), stable angina pectoris (SA) and controls. A total of 100 patients with AMI, 100 with SA and 100 clinical controls were recruited in the present study. In each group, 20 randomly selected individuals were examined using whole human genome microarray analysis to detect the expression of genes of the complement system. The serum levels of CH50, C3 and C4 were measured in all 300 subjects. In the patients with AMI, the expression levels of genes encoding C1qα, C1qβ, C1qγ, C1r, Factor P, C5a (complement component), CR1, integrin αM, integrin αX, integrin β2, C5aR, CRIg (complement receptors) and CD46, CD55 and CD59 (complement regulators) were significantly higher, compared with the respective genes in the SA patients and controls (Pcomplement components or regulators between the SA and control groups. The serum levels of CH50, C3 and C4 were significantly increased in the AMI and SA groups, compared with the controls. In the AMI and SA groups, the complement system was activated. However, the differential mRNA expression of complement components, receptors and regulators in the AMI group suggested the dysfunction of the C5b-9 complex. The depression of complement system immunity in the patients with AMI may be associated with the pathogenesis of AMI.

  17. Direct, Indirect and Inferred Causation: Finite and Infinitive Complements of Deixar and Fazer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Vesterinen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article examines the variation between finite and infinitive complements of the two Portuguese causation verbs deixar and fazer from a cognitive perspective. It is argued that the difference between these complements is mainly semantic and that it can be explained by the notion of linguistic iconicity, i.e. the semantic differences can be seen in the formal differences. Accordingly, a minor formal distance between the main verb and the complement verb in the infinitive complements signals a prototypically direct causation. On the other hand, a greater distance in the finite complements implies an indirect causation. Further, it is claimed that the indirect causation is often of an inferential and more complex character, thus giving rise to a higher degree of subjectification in the finite complements than in the infinitive complements.

  18. Overview of Laboratory Testing and Clinical Presentations of Complement Deficiencies and Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer-Abel, A; Sepiashvili, L; Mbughuni, M M; Willrich, M A V

    Historically, complement disorders have been attributed to immunodeficiency associated with severe or frequent infection. More recently, however, complement has been recognized for its role in inflammation, autoimmune disorders, and vision loss. This paradigm shift requires a fundamental change in how complement testing is performed and interpreted. Here, we provide an overview of the complement pathways and summarize recent literature related to hereditary and acquired angioedema, infectious diseases, autoimmunity, and age-related macular degeneration. The impact of complement dysregulation in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and C3 glomerulopathies is also described. The advent of therapeutics such as eculizumab and other complement inhibitors has driven the need to more fully understand complement to facilitate diagnosis and monitoring. In this report, we review analytical methods and discuss challenges for the clinical laboratory in measuring this complex biochemical system. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A serine protease isolated from the bristles of the Amazonic caterpillar, Premolis semirufa, is a potent complement system activator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora Maria Villas Boas

    Full Text Available The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa, commonly named pararama, is found in the Brazilian Amazon region. Accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles causes an intense itching sensation, followed by symptoms of an acute inflammation, which last for three to seven days after the first incident. After multiple accidents a chronic inflammatory reaction, called "Pararamose", characterized by articular synovial membrane thickening with joint deformities common to chronic synovitis, frequently occurs. Although complement mediated inflammation may aid the host defense, inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system and generation of anaphylatoxins can lead to inflammatory disorder and pathologies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, whether the Premolis semirufa's bristles extract could interfere with the human complement system.The bristles extract was able to inhibit the haemolytic activity of the alternative pathway, as well as the activation of the lectin pathway, but had no effect on the classical pathway, and this inhibition seemed to be caused by activation and consumption of complement components. The extract induced the production of significant amounts of all three anaphylatoxins, C3a, C4a and C5a, promoted direct cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and induced a significant generation of terminal complement complexes in normal human serum. By using molecular exclusion chromatography, a serine protease of 82 kDa, which activates complement, was isolated from P. semirufa bristles extract. The protease, named here as Ps82, reduced the haemolytic activity of the alternative and classical pathways and inhibited the lectin pathway. In addition, Ps82 induced the cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and the generation of C3a and C4a in normal human serum and it was capable to cleave human purified C5 and generate C5a. The use of Phenanthroline, metalloprotease inhibitor, in the reactions did not significantly interfere

  20. Structure of the DNA-bound BRCA1 C-terminal region from human replication factor C p140 and model of the protein-DNA complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, M.; AB, E.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; Siegal, G.

    2010-01-01

    BRCA1 C-terminal domain (BRCT)-containing proteins are found widely throughout the animal and bacteria kingdoms where they are exclusively involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA metabolism. Whereas most BRCT domains are involved in protein-protein interactions, a small subset has bona fide DNA

  1. HIV Coinfection Enhances Complement Activation During Sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, Michaëla A. M.; Wouters, Diana; van Mierlo, Gerard; Grobusch, Martin P.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced complement activation may play a role in chronic immune activation in patients with HIV infection and influence the complement system during acute illness. We determined the impact of HIV infection on the complement system in patients with asymptomatic HIV

  2. Terminal ballistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    This book comprehensively discusses essential aspects of terminal ballistics, combining experimental data, numerical simulations and analytical modeling. Employing a unique approach to numerical simulations as a measure of sensitivity for the major physical parameters, the new edition also includes the following features: new figures to better illustrate the problems discussed; improved explanations for the equation of state of a solid and for the cavity expansion process; new data concerning the Kolsky bar test; and a discussion of analytical modeling for the hole diameter in a thin metallic plate impacted by a shaped charge jet. The section on thick concrete targets penetrated by rigid projectiles has now been expanded to include the latest findings, and two new sections have been added: one on a novel approach to the perforation of thin concrete slabs, and one on testing the failure of thin metallic plates using a hydrodynamic ram.

  3. Sonogashira Reaction of Aryl and Heteroaryl Halides with Terminal Alkynes Catalyzed by a Highly Efficient and Recyclable Nanosized MCM-41 Anchored Palladium Bipyridyl Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yuan Mou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A heterogeneous catalyst, nanosized MCM-41-Pd, was used to catalyze the Sonogashira coupling of aryl and heteroaryl halides with terminal alkynes in the presence of CuI and triphenylphosphine. The coupling products were obtained in high yields using low Pd loadings to 0.01 mol%, and the nanosized MCM-41-Pd catalyst was recovered by centrifugation of the reaction solution and re-used in further runs without significant loss of reactivity.

  4. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  5. Complement System Part I – Molecular Mechanisms of Activation and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Church, Sarah Elizabeth; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here, we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical, and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins, and the membrane-attack-complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure–function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly, we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors. PMID:26082779

  6. Complement-Mediated Regulation of Apolipoprotein E in Cultured Human RPE Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Skiba, Nikolai P; Tewkesbury, Grace M; Treboschi, Victoria M; Baciu, Peter; Jaffe, Glenn J

    2017-06-01

    Complement activation is implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and complement activation products such as membrane attack complex (MAC) are present in eyes of individuals with AMD. Herein, we investigated the effect of complement activation on induction of ApoE accumulation in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Cultured human RPE cells were primed with a complement-fixing antibody followed by treatment with C1q-depleted (C1q-Dep) human serum to elicit alternative pathway complement activation. Controls included anti-C5 antibody-treated serum and heat-inactivated C1q-Dep. Total protein was determined on RPE cell extracts, conditioned media, and extracellular matrix (ECM) by Western blot. ApoE and MAC colocalization was assessed on cultured RPE cells and human eyes by immunofluorescent stain. ApoE mRNA expression was evaluated by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Complement challenge upregulated cell-associated ApoE, but not apolipoprotein A1. ApoE accumulation was blocked by anti-C5 antibody and enhanced by repetitive complement challenge. ApoE mRNA levels were not affected by complement challenge. ApoE was frequently colocalized with MAC in complement-treated cells and drusen from human eyes. ApoE was released into complement-treated conditioned media after a single complement challenge and accumulated on ECM after repetitive complement challenge. Complement challenge induces time-dependent ApoE accumulation in RPE cells. An understanding of the mechanisms by which complement affects RPE ApoE accumulation may help to better explain drusen composition, and provide insights into potential therapeutic targets.

  7. The Role of Complement in Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, Ruben; Corrales, Leticia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a central part of the immune system that has developed as a first defense against non-self cells. Neoplastic transformation is accompanied by an increased capacity of the malignant cells to activate complement. In fact, clinical data demonstrate complement activation in cancer patients. On the basis of the use of protective mechanisms by malignant cells, complement activation has traditionally been considered part of the body's immunosurveillance against cancer. Inhibitory mechanisms of complement activation allow cancer cells to escape from complement-mediated elimination and hamper the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody–based cancer immunotherapies. To overcome this limitation, many strategies have been developed with the goal of improving complement-mediated effector mechanisms. However, significant work in recent years has identified new and surprising roles for complement activation within the tumor microenvironment. Recent reports suggest that complement elements can promote tumor growth in the context of chronic inflammation. This chapter reviews the data describing the role of complement activation in cancer immunity, which offers insights that may aid the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to control cancer. PMID:24272362

  8. An assay for the mannan-binding lectin pathway of complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steen Vang; Thiel, S; Jensen, L

    2001-01-01

    The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation has been established as the third pathway of complement activation. MBL is a carbohydrate-binding serum protein, which circulates in complex with serine proteases known as mannan-binding lectin associated serine proteases (MASPs...

  9. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Nobuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. Results The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low μM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Conclusion Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure

  10. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  11. Complement Diagnostics: Concepts, Indications, and Practical Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Nilsson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrations in the complement system have been shown to be direct or indirect pathophysiological mechanisms in a number of diseases and pathological conditions such as autoimmune disease, infections, cancer, allogeneic and xenogeneic transplantation, and inflammation. Complement analyses have been performed on these conditions in both prospective and retrospective studies and significant differences have been found between groups of patients, but in many diseases, it has not been possible to make predictions for individual patients because of the lack of sensitivity and specificity of many of the assays used. The basic indications for serological diagnostic complement analysis today may be divided into three major categories: (a acquired and inherited complement deficiencies; (b disorders with complement activation; (c inherited and acquired C1INH deficiencies. Here, we summarize indications, techniques, and interpretations for basic complement analyses and present an algorithm, which we follow in our routine laboratory.

  12. Complement defects in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Lange, Bibi; Kjeldsen, Anette D

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of our immune system, and complement defects lead generally to increased susceptibility to infections and autoimmune diseases. We have studied the role of complement activity in relation with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and more specifically studied...... was significantly higher among CRS patients than among healthy control subjects. A majority of Mannan-binding lectin deficient CRS patients was observed. The presence of complement defects had no influence on the severity of subjective symptoms. Our studies show that defects in the complement system collectively...... whether complement defects collectively predispose individuals for CRS or affect CRS severity. The participants comprised 87 CRS patients randomly selected from the general population, and a control group of 150 healthy blood donors. The CRS patients were diagnosed according to the European Position Paper...

  13. Complement pathways and meningococcal disease : diagnostic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, A G; Truedsson, L; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2001-01-01

    Complement is an immunological effector system that bridges innate and acquired immunity in several ways. There is a striking association between susceptibility to meningococcal disease and various forms of complement deficiency (1,2). In defense against bacterial infection, the most important...... function of complement is probably to serve as a mediator of antibody-dependent immunity. Specific antibodies can trigger activation of the classical and the alternative pathways of complement activation (3-5). It is well known that antibody-independent mechanisms interfere with alternative pathway...... activation on the bacterial surface (6,7). The newly discovered mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation appears to be protective against many types of infection (8) and adds previously unsuspected aspects of innate immunity to complement-mediated defense. Interestingly, immune responses...

  14. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  15. Interactions of the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 with the complement system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doni, Andrea; Garlanda, Cecilia; Bottazzi, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system comprises a cellular and a humoral arm. The long pentraxin PTX3 is a fluid phase pattern recognition molecule, which acts as an essential component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PTX3 has antibody-like properties including interactions with complement components...... and factor H, the principal regulators of the classical, lectin and alternative complement pathways, show that PTX3 also may have a major influence on the regulation of the complement system. The complex interaction of PTX3 with the complement system at different levels has broad implications for host....... PTX3 interacts with C1q, ficolin-1 and ficolin-2 as well as mannose-binding lectin, recognition molecules in the classical and lectin complement pathways. The formation of these heterocomplexes results in cooperative pathogen recognition and complement activation. Interactions with C4b binding protein...

  16. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Biocompatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Garred, Peter

    2015-01-01

    activation, the coagulation system and the complement system. The complement system is an important part of the initial immune response and consists of fluid phase molecules in the blood stream. Three different activation pathways can initiate the complement system, the lectin, the classical...... been broadly documented. However, the specific role of lectin pathway and the pattern recognition molecules initiating the pathway has only been transiently investigated. Here we review the current data on the field....

  17. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Sigbj?rn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorder...

  18. A Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation Tool for Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotić, Ana; Swinnen, Erwin; Demuyser, Liesbeth; De Keersmaecker, Herlinde; Mizuno, Hideaki; Tournu, Hélène; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2017-10-05

    Investigation of protein-protein interactions (PPI) in Candida albicans is essential for understanding the regulation of the signal transduction network that triggers its pathogenic lifestyle. Unique features of C. albicans, such as its alternative codon usage and incomplete meiosis, have enforced the optimization of standard genetic methods as well as development of novel approaches. Since the existing methods for detection of PPI are limited for direct visualization of the interacting complex in vivo, we have established a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay in C. albicans, a powerful technique for studying PPI. We have developed an optimized set of plasmids that allows for N- and C-terminal tagging of proteins with split yeast-enhanced monomeric Venus fragments, so that all eight combinations of fusion orientations can be analyzed. With the use of our BiFC assay we demonstrate three interaction complexes in vivo, which were also confirmed by two-hybrid analysis. Our Candida-optimized BiFC assay represents a useful molecular tool for PPI studies and shows great promise in expanding our knowledge of molecular mechanisms of protein functions. Copyright © 2017 Subotic et al.

  19. Antibody production in mice deficient for complement receptors 1 and 2 can be induced by IgG/Ag and IgE/Ag, but not IgM/Ag complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applequist, S E; Dahlström, J; Jiang, N; Molina, H; Heyman, B

    2000-09-01

    Deficiencies in C factors C2, C3, or C4 as well as lack of C receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) lead to impaired Ab production. Classical pathway activation plays a major role, as mice deficient in factor B, a key factor in the alternative pathway, have normal Ab production. Abs in complex with their specific Ag are known to feedback regulate the Ab response, and enhanced responses are initiated by IgM, IgE, and IgG. IgM acts via the C system, whereas IgE and IgG can operate independently of C via Fc receptors. Here we have investigated whether these isotypes are able to enhance Ab responses in mice lacking CR1/2. SRBC-specific IgM, administered with SRBC, does not enhance Ab responses in these animals. In contrast, 2,4, 6-trinitrophenyl-specific IgE and IgG2a, administered with BSA-2,4, 6-trinitrophenyl, induce potent Ab responses in CR1/2-deficient mice. Additionally, BSA administered with CFA or alum induced strong Ab responses in the absence of CR1/2. These results indicate that CR1/2 is needed to promote IgM-mediated induction of primary Ab responses. The data also show that the need for CR1/2 can be circumvented by Abs typical of a secondary immune response forming complexes with Ag or by conventional adjuvants, presumably mimicking physiological inflammatory reactions.

  20. Stimuli of sensory-motor nerves terminate arterial contractile effects of endothelin-1 by CGRP and dissociation of ET-1/ET(A)-receptor complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meens, Merlijn J P M T; Compeer, Matthijs G; Hackeng, Tilman M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a long-acting paracrine mediator, is implicated in cardiovascular diseases but clinical trials with ET-receptor antagonists were not successful in some areas. We tested whether the quasi-irreversible receptor-binding of ET-1 (i) limits reversing effects of the ant...... at an antagonist-insensitive site of the receptor and (ii) are selectively terminated by endogenously released CGRP. Hence, natural stimuli of sensory-motor nerves that stimulate release of endogenous CGRP can be considered for therapy of diseases involving ET-1.......BACKGROUND: Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a long-acting paracrine mediator, is implicated in cardiovascular diseases but clinical trials with ET-receptor antagonists were not successful in some areas. We tested whether the quasi-irreversible receptor-binding of ET-1 (i) limits reversing effects...

  1. Ad E1A 243R oncoprotein promotes association of proto-oncogene product MYC with the NuA4/Tip60 complex via the E1A N-terminal repression domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M; Green, Maurice

    2016-12-01

    The adenovirus E1A 243R oncoprotein targets TRRAP, a scaffold protein that assembles histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, such as the NuA4/Tip60 complex which mediates transcriptional activity of the proto-oncogene MYC and helps determine the cancer cell phenotype. How E1A transforms cells through TRRAP remains obscure. We performed proteomic analysis with the N-terminal transcriptional repression domain of E1A 243R (E1A 1-80) and showed that E1A 1-80 interacts with TRRAP, p400, and three other members of the NuA4 complex - DMAP1, RUVBL1 and RUVBL2 - not previously shown to associate with E1A 243R. E1A 1-80 interacts with these NuA4 components and MYC through the E1A TRRAP-targeting domain. E1A 243R association with the NuA4 complex was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and analysis with DMAP1, Tip60, and MYC. Significantly, E1A 243R promotes association of MYC/MAX with the NuA4/Tip60 complex, implicating the importance of the MYC/NuA4 pathway in cellular transformation by both MYC and E1A. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Review on complement analysis method and the roles of glycosaminoglycans in the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lian, Qianqian; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-12-10

    Complement system is composed of over 30 proteins and it plays important roles in self-defence and inflammation. There are three activation pathways, including classical pathway, alternative pathway and lectin pathway, in complement system, and they are associated with many diseases such as osteoarthritis and age-related macular degeneration. Modulation of the complement system may be a promising strategy in the treatment of related diseases. Glycosaminoglycans are anionic linear polysaccharides without branches. They are one kind of multi-functional macromolecules which have great potential in regulating complement system. This review is organized around two aspects between the introduction of complement system and the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with complement system. Three complement activation pathways and the biological significance were introduced first. Then functional analysis methods were compared to provide a strategy for potential glycosaminoglycans screen. Finally, the roles of glycosaminoglycans played in the complement system were summed up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Viral mimicry of the complement system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    et al 2002), hepatitis C virus (Ishii et al 2001) and HIV. (Ezekowitz et al 1989; Saifuddin et al 2000). Activation of the complement system in the absence of proper regulation can lead to virus neutralization. The various mechanisms which are known to inactivate viruses are: (i) neutralization by complement dependant ...

  4. Viral mimicry of the complement system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The complement system is a potent innate immune mechanism consisting of cascades of proteins which are designed to fight against and annul intrusion of all the foreign pathogens. Although viruses are smaller in size and have relatively simple structure, they are not immune to complement attack. Thus, activation of the ...

  5. Complement Clause Formation In Leteh | Ansah | Contemporary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the complementation phenomenon in Leteh. The discussion is done within the framework of Basic Linguistic Theory (Dixon 1997), and further appeals to the theory of grammaticalization to explain the multiple functions of Leteh complementizers. Leteh is a South Guan (Kwa, Niger-Congo) language ...

  6. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via

  7. [Alternation of retinal complement system in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide- induced uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xueying; Zheng, Shijie; Lei, Bo

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the activation of the complement system in the retina in a mouse model of endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). Balb/c mice were randomly divided into control group and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced EIU group. Twenty-four hours after modeling, the expressions of the major complement components of the classical pathway (CP), mannose-binding lectin (MBL) pathway, alternative pathway (AP), and terminal pathway in the retina were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Western blotting was employed to examine the protein expressions of the key components of the complement system involved in the CP and AP pathways in the retina. s Normal mouse retina expressed a variety of complement components that were involved mainly in the CP and AP pathways. The expressions of the complement components involved in the CP and AP pathways were up-regulated in the retina of mice with EIU. Although MASP1 and MASP2 were detected in the retina in both the EIU and control groups, their expressions were weak and showed no significant difference between the two groups. The AP and CP but not the MBL pathways of the complement system are activated in the retina of mice with EIU, suggesting a role of the activated complement system in the pathological process of EIU.

  8. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidani, Kárita C. F.; Bavia, Lorena; Ambrosio, Altair R.; de Messias-Reason, Iara J.

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD), a neglected sickness that affects around 6–8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP), lectin (LP), and alternative (AP). The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion of plasma

  9. Dynamic control of the complement system by modulated expression of regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Joshua M; Renner, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    The complement system serves many biological functions, including the eradication of invasive pathogens and the removal of damaged cells and immune-complexes. Uncontrolled complement activation causes injury to host cells, however, so adequate regulation of the system is essential. Control of the complement system is maintained by a group of cell surface and circulating proteins referred to as complement regulatory proteins. The expression of the cell surface complement regulatory proteins varies from tissue to tissue. Furthermore, specific cell types can upregulate or downregulate the expression of these proteins in response to a variety of signals or insults. Altered regulation of the complement regulatory proteins can have important effects on local complement activation. In some circumstances this can be beneficial, such as in the setting of certain infections. In other circumstances, however, this can be a cause of complement-mediated injury of the tissue. A full understanding of the mechanisms by which the complement system is modulated at the local level can have important implications for how we diagnose and treat a wide range of inflammatory diseases.

  10. The 33 carboxyl-terminal residues of Spa40 orchestrate the multi-step assembly process of the type III secretion needle complex in Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botteaux, Anne; Kayath, Christian A; Page, Anne-Laure; Jouihri, Nouredine; Sani, Musa; Boekema, Egbert; Biskri, Latéfa; Parsot, Claude; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm

    2010-09-01

    The type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) is a central virulence factor of many Gram-negative bacteria. Its overall morphology consists of a cytoplasmic region, inner- and outer-membrane sections and an extracellular needle. In Shigella, the length of the needle is regulated by Spa32. To understand better the role of Spa32 we searched for its interacting partners using a two-hybrid screen in yeast. We found that Spa32 interacts with the 33 C-terminal residues (CC*) of Spa40, a member of the conserved FlhB/YscU family. Using a GST pull-down assay we confirmed this interaction and identified additional interactions between Spa40 and the type III secretion components Spa33, Spa47, MxiK, MxiN and MxiA. Inactivation of spa40 abolished protein secretion and led to needleless structures. Genetic and functional analyses were used to investigate the roles of residues L310 and V320, located within the CC* domain of Spa40, in the assembly of the T3SA. Spa40 cleavage, at the conserved NPTH motif, is required for assembly of the T3SA and for its interaction with Spa32, Spa33 and Spa47. In contrast, unprocessed forms of Spa40 interacted only with MxiA, MxiK and MxiN. Our data suggest that the conformation of the cytoplasmic domain of Spa40 defines the multi-step assembly process of the T3SA.

  11. Interallelic complementation of mutations in propionic acidemia by microinjection of mutant cDNAs into fibroblasts of affected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyer, M.; Leclerc, D.; Gravel, R.A. [McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Propionic acidemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from defects of the {alpha} or {beta} subunit of biotin-dependent propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). Mutations are assigned to defects of the PCCA ({alpha} subunit) or PCCB ({beta} subunit) gene through complementation studies after somatic fusion of patient cell lines. About two-thirds of patients with {beta} subunit defects (complementation group pccBC) show interallelic complementation in cell fusion experiments (subgroups pccB and pccC), monitored by the PCC-dependent metabolisms of {sup 14}C-propionate. Most patient cell lines are heteroallelic for two different mutations, leaving ambiguous the identity of the mutation participating in interallelic complementation. To identify the complementing mutations, we have expressed {beta}-subunit cDNAs containing individual mutations by microinjection of the cDNAs in recipient cells from patients with {beta} subunit defects. Correction of the PCC defect was monitored by autoradiography of {sup 14}C-propionate incorporation. In some experiments, cDNAs were co-injected with a plasmid expressing the E. coli lacZ gene as a positive control for successful injection. Two mutations from the pccB subgroup showed complementation when injected into pccC cells; dupKICK140-143 and Pro228Leu. Similarly, two mutations from the pccC subgroup complemented after injection into pccB cells; {Delta}Ile408 and Arg410Trp. No mutation complemented with mutation of the pccBC group which are classified as non-complementing in cell fusion experiments. The results show that the complementing pccB mutations are found in the N-terminal half of the {beta} subunit, while the complementing pccC mutations cluxter at a site in the C-terminal half. The latter site is a candidate for the propionyl-CoA binding site based on sequence identity with a region of transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii.

  12. Imaging complement by phase-plate cryo-electron tomography from initiation to pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Thomas H; Faas, Frank G A; Koster, Abraham J; Gros, Piet

    2017-02-01

    Phase plates in cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) improve contrast, increasing the ability to discern separate molecules and molecular complexes in dense biomolecular environments. Here, we applied this new technology to the activation of the human complement system. Binding of C1 to antigen-antibody complexes initiates a cascade of proteolytic events that deposits molecules onto adjacent surfaces and terminates with the formation of membrane-attack-complex (MAC) pores in the targeted membranes. We imaged steps in this process using a Volta phase plate mounted on a Titan Krios equipped with a Falcon-II direct electron detector. The data show patches of single-layer antibodies on the surface and C1 bound to antibody platforms, with ca. ∼4% of instances where C1r and C1s proteases have dissociated from C1, and potentially instances of C1 transiently interacting with its substrate C4 or product C4b. Next, extensive deposition of C4b and C3b molecules is apparent, although individual molecules cannot always be properly distinguished with the current methods. Observations of MAC pores include formation of both single and composite pores, and instances of potential soluble-MAC dissociation upon failure of membrane insertion. Overall, application of the Volta phase plate cryoET markedly improved the contrast in the tomograms, which allowed for individual components to be more readily interpreted. However, variability in the phase shift induced by the phase-plate during the course of an experiment, together with incomplete sampling during tomogram acquisition, limited the interpretability of the resulting tomograms. Our studies exemplify the potential in studying molecular processes with complex spatial topologies by phase-plate cryoET. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. GLUCOCORTICOSTEROIDS' EFFECT UPON THE COMPLEMENT LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voja Pavlovic

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high doses of cortisol upon the level of the overall complements'hemolytic activity and particular complements' components is studies. The experimentsinvolved guinea pigs of male sex of the body mass from 300 to 400 g, namelythose that have not been treated by anything so far. The doses of hydrocortisone(Hemofarm DD were also used for the experiment. The overall complements'activity was determined by testing the capabilities of a series of various solutions ofthe guinea pigs' serum to separate sheep erythrocytes that were made sensitive byrabbit anti-erythrocyte antibodies. The determination of the C1, C2, C3 and C4complements' components was done by the method of the quantitative diffusion ofthe radial type by using the Partigen blocks Behringwerke AG. The series comprised25 guinea pigs of male sex. The low cortisol level rapidly increase the overallhemolytic activity of the complements of the C1 est erase concentration. Along withthe cortisol dose increase the overall hemolytic complements' activity is dropping aswell as that of the C1, C2, C3 and C4 complements' components.

  14. Complement receptors in myeloid cell adhesion and phagocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dustin, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells make extensive use of the complement system in the context of recruitment, phagocytosis and other effector functions. There are several types of complement receptors on myeloid cells including G-proteins coupled receptors for localizing the source of complement activation, and three sets of type I transmembrane proteins that link complement to phagocytosis-complement receptor 1, a single chain type I membrane protein with tandem complement regulatory repeats, complement receptor...

  15. Structural characterisation of human galectin-4 N-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain in complex with glycerol, lactose, 3′-sulfo-lactose, and 2′-fucosyllactose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bum-Erdene, Khuchtumur; Leffler, Hakon; Nilsson, Ulf J.; Blanchard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-4 is a tandem-repeat galectin with two distinct carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD). Galectin-4 is expressed mainly in the alimentary tract and is proposed to function as a lipid raft and adherens junction stabilizer by its glycan cross-linking capacity. Galectin-4 plays divergent roles in cancer and inflammatory conditions, either promoting or inhibiting each disease progression, depending on the specific pathological condition. The study of galectin-4’s ligand-binding profile may help decipher its roles under specific conditions. Here we present the X-ray structures of human galectin-4 N-terminal CRD (galectin-4N) bound to different saccharide ligands. Galectin-4’s overall fold and its core interactions to lactose are similar to other galectin CRDs. Galectin-4N recognises the sulfate cap of 3′-sulfated glycans by a weak interaction through Arg45 and two water-mediated hydrogen bonds via Trp84 and Asn49. When galectin-4N interacts with the H-antigen mimic, 2′-fucosyllactose, an interaction is formed between the ring oxygen of fucose and Arg45. The extended binding site of galectin-4N may not be well suited to the A/B-antigen determinants, α-GalNAc/α-Gal, specifically due to clashes with residue Phe47. Overall, galectin-4N favours sulfated glycans whilst galectin-4C prefers blood group determinants. However, the two CRDs of galectin-4 can, to a less extent, recognise each other’s ligands. PMID:26828567

  16. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry To Study Inflammatory Cartilage Degradation and Resulting Interactions with the Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin Fürst, Camilla; Åhrman, Emma; Bratteby, Klas; Waldemarson, Sofia; Malmström, Johan; Blom, Anna M

    2016-10-15

    Joint diseases are often characterized by inflammatory processes that result in pathological changes in joint tissues, including cartilage degradation and release of components into the synovial fluid. The complement system plays a central role in promoting the inflammation. Because several cartilage proteins are known to interact with complement, causing either activation or inhibition of the system, we aimed to investigate these interactions comprehensively. Bovine cartilage explants were cultured with IL-1α to induce cartilage degradation, followed by incubation with human serum. Label-free selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry was used to specifically quantify complement proteins interacting with the cartilage explant. In parallel, the time-dependent degradation of cartilage was detected using mass spectrometry analysis (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry). Complement proteins resulting from activation of the classical, alternative, and terminal pathways were detected on IL-1α-stimulated cartilage at time points when clear alterations in extracellular matrix composition had occurred. Increased levels of the complement activation product C4d, as detected by ELISA in serum after incubation with IL-1α-stimulated cartilage, confirmed the selected reaction monitoring results indicating complement activation. Further, typical activated (cleaved) C3 fragments were detected by Western blotting in extracts of IL-1α-stimulated cartilage. No complement activation was triggered by cartilage cultured in the absence of IL-1α. Components released from IL-1α-stimulated cartilage during culture had an inhibitory effect on complement activation. These were released after a longer incubation period with IL-1α and may represent a feedback reaction to cartilage-triggered complement activation observed after a shorter incubation period. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Soluble Collectin-12 (CL-12) Is a Pattern Recognition Molecule Initiating Complement Activation via the Alternative Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Hein, Estrid; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Bayarri-Olmos, Rafael; Romani, Luigina; Garred, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Soluble defense collagens including the collectins play important roles in innate immunity. Recently, a new member of the collectin family named collectin-12 (CL-12 or CL-P1) has been identified. CL-12 is highly expressed in umbilical cord vascular endothelial cells as a transmembrane receptor and may recognize certain bacteria and fungi, leading to opsonophagocytosis. However, based on its structural and functional similarities with soluble collectins, we hypothesized the existence of a fluid-phase analog of CL-12 released from cells, which may function as a soluble pattern-recognition molecule. Using recombinant CL-12 full length or CL-12 extracellular domain, we determined the occurrence of soluble CL-12 shed from in vitro cultured cells. Western blot showed that soluble recombinant CL-12 migrated with a band corresponding to ∼ 120 kDa under reducing conditions, whereas under nonreducing conditions it presented multimeric assembly forms. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of human umbilical cord plasma enabled identification of a natural soluble form of CL-12 having an electrophoretic mobility pattern close to that of shed soluble recombinant CL-12. Soluble CL-12 could recognize Aspergillus fumigatus partially through the carbohydrate-recognition domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This led to activation of the alternative pathway of complement exclusively via association with properdin on A. fumigatus as validated by detection of C3b deposition and formation of the terminal complement complex. These results demonstrate the existence of CL-12 in a soluble form and indicate a novel mechanism by which the alternative pathway of complement may be triggered directly by a soluble pattern-recognition molecule. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Transnationalism and integration : complements or Substitutes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, B.; Siegel, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between transnational practices and integration by testing whether they are substitutes or complements. For this purpose, we use a multidimensional transnationalism index. The index includes three dimensions of transnational practices, including migrants'

  19. Autocrine Effects of Tumor-Derived Complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soon Cho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications.

  20. Formation of a covalent complex between the 80,000-dalton adenovirus terminal protein and 5'-dCMP in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Lichy, J H; Horwitz, M. S.; Hurwitz, J

    1981-01-01

    An in vitro adenovirus DNA replication system catalyzed the formation of a covalent complex between an 80,000-dalton protein and 5'-dCMP in the presence of [alpha-32P-dCTP, MgCl2, ATP, and adenovirus (Ad) DNA with a protein covalently bound to the 5' end of each strand (Ad DNA-prot). The requirement for Ad DNA-prot in this reaction was similar to that for in vitro DNA replication. When dATP, dTTP, and the 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside triphosphate (ddNTP) ddGTP were included in the reaction mixture...

  1. IL-17A deficiency mitigates bleomycin-induced complement activation during lung fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Ellyse; Fisher, Amanda J; Gu, Hongmei; Mickler, Elizabeth A; Agarwal, Manisha; Wilke, Carol A; Kim, Kevin K; Moore, Bethany B; Vittal, Ragini

    2017-12-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and complement (C') activation have each been implicated in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We have reported that IL-17A induces epithelial injury via TGF-β in murine bronchiolitis obliterans; that TGF-β and the C' cascade present signaling interactions in mediating epithelial injury; and that the blockade of C' receptors mitigates lung fibrosis. In the present study, we investigated the role of IL-17A in regulating C' in lung fibrosis. Microarray analyses of mRNA isolated from primary normal human small airway epithelial cells indicated that IL-17A (100 ng/ml; 24 h; n = 5 donor lungs) induces C' components (C' factor B, C3 , and GPCR kinase isoform 5), cytokines ( IL8 , -6 , and -1B ), and cytokine ligands ( CXCL1 , -2 , -3 , -5 , -6 , and -16 ). IL-17A induces protein and mRNA regulation of C' components and the synthesis of active C' 3a (C3a) in normal primary human alveolar type II epithelial cells (AECs). Wild-type mice subjected to IL-17A neutralization and IL-17A knockout ( il17a -/- ) mice were protected against bleomycin (BLEO)-induced fibrosis and collagen deposition. Further, BLEO-injured il17a -/- mice had diminished levels of circulating Krebs Von Den Lungen 6 (alveolar epithelial injury marker), local caspase-3/7, and local endoplasmic reticular stress-related genes. BLEO-induced local C' activation [C3a, C5a, and terminal C' complex (C5b-9)] was attenuated in il17a -/- mice, and IL-17A neutralization prevented the loss of epithelial C' inhibitors (C' receptor-1 related isoform Y and decay accelerating factor), and an increase in local TUNEL levels. RNAi-mediated gene silencing of il17a in fibrotic mice arrested the progression of lung fibrosis, attenuated cellular apoptosis (caspase-3/7) and lung deposition of collagen and C' (C5b-9). Compared to normals, plasma from IPF patients showed significantly higher hemolytic activity. Our findings demonstrate that limiting complement activation by

  2. Complement and Immunoregulation in Tissue Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    transplantation, cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases . The complement system is an important mediator of IR injury in various organs including...on epithelial cells. Because of its ability to mobilize neutrophils, IL-17A is important in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases , and in chronic...intestine, kidney , liver, lungs and heart. In mesenteric IR complement activation and deposition have been recognized as key components for the initiation

  3. Complements and the Wound Healing Cascade: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Sinno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex pathway of regulated reactions and cellular infiltrates. The mechanisms at play have been thoroughly studied but there is much still to learn. The health care system in the USA alone spends on average 9 billion dollars annually on treating of wounds. To help reduce patient morbidity and mortality related to abnormal or prolonged skin healing, an updated review and understanding of wound healing is essential. Recent works have helped shape the multistep process in wound healing and introduced various growth factors that can augment this process. The complement cascade has been shown to have a role in inflammation and has only recently been shown to augment wound healing. In this review, we have outlined the biology of wound healing and discussed the use of growth factors and the role of complements in this intricate pathway.

  4. Surviving mousepox infection requires the complement system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Moulton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Poxviruses subvert the host immune response by producing immunomodulatory proteins, including a complement regulatory protein. Ectromelia virus provides a mouse model for smallpox where the virus and the host's immune response have co-evolved. Using this model, our study investigated the role of the complement system during a poxvirus infection. By multiple inoculation routes, ectromelia virus caused increased mortality by 7 to 10 days post-infection in C57BL/6 mice that lack C3, the central component of the complement cascade. In C3(-/- mice, ectromelia virus disseminated earlier to target organs and generated higher peak titers compared to the congenic controls. Also, increased hepatic inflammation and necrosis correlated with these higher tissue titers and likely contributed to the morbidity in the C3(-/- mice. In vitro, the complement system in naïve C57BL/6 mouse sera neutralized ectromelia virus, primarily through the recognition of the virion by natural antibody and activation of the classical and alternative pathways. Sera deficient in classical or alternative pathway components or antibody had reduced ability to neutralize viral particles, which likely contributed to increased viral dissemination and disease severity in vivo. The increased mortality of C4(-/- or Factor B(-/- mice also indicates that these two pathways of complement activation are required for survival. In summary, the complement system acts in the first few minutes, hours, and days to control this poxviral infection until the adaptive immune response can react, and loss of this system results in lethal infection.

  5. Serological and Genetic Evidence for Altered Complement System Functionality in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Findings of the GAPAID Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Prechl

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with multifactorial ethiopathogenesis. The complement system is involved in both the early and late stages of disease development and organ damage. To better understand autoantibody mediated complement consumption we examined ex vivo immune complex formation on autoantigen arrays. We recruited patients with SLE (n = 211, with other systemic autoimmune diseases (n = 65 and non-autoimmune control subjects (n = 149. Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected and serum complement levels were determined. The genotype of SNP rs1143679 in the ITGAM gene was also determined. Ex vivo formation of immune complexes, with respect to IgM, IgG, complement C4 and C3 binding, was examined using a functional immunoassay on autoantigen microarray comprising nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Complement consumption of nucleic acids increased upon binding of IgM and IgG even when serum complement levels were decreased due to consumption in SLE patients. A negative correlation between serum complement levels and ex vivo complement deposition on nucleic acid autoantigens is demonstrated. On the contrary, complement deposition on tested protein and lipid autoantigens showed positive correlation with C4 levels. Genetic analysis revealed that the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 in complement receptor type 3 is associated with an increased production of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies. Notwithstanding, homozygous carriers of the previously reported susceptible allele (AA had lower levels of dsDNA specific IgM among SLE patients. Both the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 and the high ratio of nucleic acid specific IgG/IgM were associated with multiple organ involvement. In summary, secondary complement deficiency in SLE does not impair opsonization of nucleic-acid-containing autoantigens but does affect other antigens and potentially other complement dependent processes. Dysfunction of the receptor

  6. Serological and Genetic Evidence for Altered Complement System Functionality in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Findings of the GAPAID Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József; Papp, Krisztián; Hérincs, Zoltán; Péterfy, Hajna; Lóránd, Veronika; Szittner, Zoltán; Estonba, Andone; Rovero, Paolo; Paolini, Ilaria; Del Amo, Jokin; Uribarri, Maria; Alcaro, Maria Claudia; Ruiz-Larrañaga, Otsanda; Migliorini, Paola; Czirják, László

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with multifactorial ethiopathogenesis. The complement system is involved in both the early and late stages of disease development and organ damage. To better understand autoantibody mediated complement consumption we examined ex vivo immune complex formation on autoantigen arrays. We recruited patients with SLE (n = 211), with other systemic autoimmune diseases (n = 65) and non-autoimmune control subjects (n = 149). Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected and serum complement levels were determined. The genotype of SNP rs1143679 in the ITGAM gene was also determined. Ex vivo formation of immune complexes, with respect to IgM, IgG, complement C4 and C3 binding, was examined using a functional immunoassay on autoantigen microarray comprising nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Complement consumption of nucleic acids increased upon binding of IgM and IgG even when serum complement levels were decreased due to consumption in SLE patients. A negative correlation between serum complement levels and ex vivo complement deposition on nucleic acid autoantigens is demonstrated. On the contrary, complement deposition on tested protein and lipid autoantigens showed positive correlation with C4 levels. Genetic analysis revealed that the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 in complement receptor type 3 is associated with an increased production of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies. Notwithstanding, homozygous carriers of the previously reported susceptible allele (AA) had lower levels of dsDNA specific IgM among SLE patients. Both the non-synonymous variant rs1143679 and the high ratio of nucleic acid specific IgG/IgM were associated with multiple organ involvement. In summary, secondary complement deficiency in SLE does not impair opsonization of nucleic-acid-containing autoantigens but does affect other antigens and potentially other complement dependent processes. Dysfunction of the receptor recognizing complement

  7. Platinum complexes having redox-active PPh2C[triple bond]CFc and/or C[triple bond]CFc as terminal or bridging ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Alvaro; Lalinde, Elena; Teresa Moreno, M; Sánchez, Sergio

    2009-05-14

    A series of heteronuclear-Pt(ii) complexes containing ferrocenylethynyl units linked directly (Pt-C[triple bond]CFc) or through a phosphorous atom (Pt-PPh(2)C[triple bond]CFc) to the platinum center is reported. The reaction of derivative [cis-Pt(R(F))(2)(PPh(2)C[triple bond]CFc)(2)] (R(F) = C(6)F(5)) with the solvate complex [cis-Pt(R(F))(2)(thf)(2)] leads to the formation of an asymmetrical heteronuclear diplatinum complex [{Pt(R(F))(2)(mu-1kappaP:2eta(2)-PPh(2)C[triple bond]CFc)(2)}Pt(R(F))(2)] having the "cis-Pt(R(F))(2)" fragment coordinated to the triple bonds of both ferrocenylethynylphosphine units, while treatment of [cis-Pt(C[triple bond]CFc)(2)(PPh(2)C[triple bond]CR)(2)] (R = Fc , Ph , tBu ) with the same solvate [cis-Pt(R(F))(2)(thf)(2)], affords double ferrocenylacetylide-bridged diplatinum systems [{Pt(PPh(2)C[triple bond]CR)(2)(mu-eta(1):eta(2)-C[triple bond]CFc)(2)}Pt(R(F))(2)] . The solid-state structures of [cis/trans-Pt(R(F))(2)(PPh(2)C[triple bond]CFc)(2)] /, [cis-Pt(R(F))(2)(PPh(2)C[triple bond]CFc)(tht)] (tht = tetrahydrothiophene), [{Pt(R(F))(2)(mu-1kappaP:2eta(2)-PPh(2)C[triple bond]CFc)(2)}Pt(R(F))(2)] and [{Pt(PPh(2)C[triple bond]CtBu)(2)(mu-eta(1):eta(2)-C[triple bond]CFc)(2)}Pt(R(F))(2)] have been determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The electronic spectra and the electrochemical behaviour of all monoplatinum derivatives are discussed, showing a different extent of interaction between the remote ferrocenyl groups when they belong to PPh(2)C[triple bond]CFc or C[triple bond]CFc ligands. For the diplatinum systems and , containing bridging (kappaP:eta(2)-PPh(2)C[triple bond]CFc ) or (eta(1):eta(2)-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CFc ) ligands, their electrochemical properties were also compared with the parent precursors.

  8. Intermodal freight terminals : terminal business planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, Peter; Wiegmans, Bart W.

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for existing- and newly proposedinter-modal freight terminals in their business planning process. This framework is importantfor constructing- and improving the central terminal service portfolio of handling (loading,discharging, and

  9. The lectin complement pathway serine proteases (MASPs) represent a possible crossroad between the coagulation and complement systems in thromboinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozarcanin, H; Lood, C; Fog, Lea Munthe

    2016-01-01

    both in vitro and in vivo. These findings may represent a crossroad between the complement and the coagulation systems. SUMMARY: BACKGROUND: The activated forms of the complement lectin pathway (LP) proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2 are able to cleave the coagulation factors prothrombin, fibrinogen, factor...... by AT during clotting without the assistance of heparin. In all other cases the MASPs were, as previously reported, inactivated by C1-INH. In systemic lupus erythematosus patients with thrombotic disease and in polytrauma patients, the levels of activated MASP-1 and MASP-2 in complex with both AT and C1-INH...... were associated with markers of thrombotic disease and contact/coagulation system activation. CONCLUSIONS: MASP-1 and MASP-2 are activated during blood clotting. This activation is triggered by activated platelets and by the generation of fibrin during thrombotic reactions in vitro and in vivo, and may...

  10. Molecules Great and Small: The Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathern, Douglas R; Heeger, Peter S

    2015-09-04

    The complement cascade, traditionally considered an effector arm of innate immunity required for host defense against pathogens, is now recognized as a crucial pathogenic mediator of various kidney diseases. Complement components produced by the liver and circulating in the plasma undergo activation through the classical and/or mannose-binding lectin pathways to mediate anti-HLA antibody-initiated kidney transplant rejection and autoantibody-initiated GN, the latter including membranous glomerulopathy, antiglomerular basement membrane disease, and lupus nephritis. Inherited and/or acquired abnormalities of complement regulators, which requisitely limit restraint on alternative pathway complement activation, contribute to the pathogenesis of the C3 nephropathies and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Increasing evidence links complement produced by endothelial cells and/or tubular cells to the pathogenesis of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and progressive kidney fibrosis. Data emerging since the mid-2000s additionally show that immune cells, including T cells and antigen-presenting cells, produce alternative pathway complement components during cognate interactions. The subsequent local complement activation yields production of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, which bind to their respective receptors (C3aR and C5aR) on both partners to augment effector T-cell proliferation and survival, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T-cell induction and function. This immune cell-derived complement enhances pathogenic alloreactive T-cell immunity that results in transplant rejection and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of other T cell-mediated kidney diseases. C5a/C5aR ligations on neutrophils have additionally been shown to contribute to vascular inflammation in models of ANCA-mediated renal vasculitis. New translational immunology efforts along with the development of pharmacologic agents that block human complement components and receptors now permit

  11. Rodent complementation group 8 (ERCC8) corresponds to Cockayne syndrome complementation group A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, T; Shiomi, T; Shiomi, N; Harada, Y; Wakasugi, M; Matsunaga, T; Nikaido, O; Friedberg, E C; Yamaizumi, M

    1996-02-15

    US31 is a UV-sensitive mutant cell line (rodent complementation group 8) derived from a mouse T cell line L5178Y. We analyzed removal kinetics for UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts in US31 cells using monoclonal antibodies against these photoproducts. While nearly all (6-4) photoproducts were repaired within 6 h after UV-irradiation, more than 70% of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers remained unrepaired even 24 h after UV-irradiation. These kinetics resembled those of Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells. Since US31 cells had a low efficiency of cell fusion and transfection, which hampered both complementation tests and gene cloning, we constructed fibroblastic complementation group 8 cell line 6L1030 by fusion of US31 cells with X-irradiated normal mouse fibroblastic LTA cells. Complementation tests by cell fusion and transfection using 6L1030 cells revealed that rodent complementation group 8 corresponded to CS complementation group A.

  12. AKT and GSK-3 are necessary for direct ezrin binding to NHE3 as part of a C-terminal stimulatory complex: role of a novel Ser-rich NHE3 C-terminal motif in NHE3 activity and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varsha; Lin, Rong; Yang, Jianbo; Cha, Boyoung; Sarker, Rafiquel; Tse, Chung Ming; Donowitz, Mark

    2014-02-28

    Basal activity of the BB Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE3 requires multiprotein complexes that form on its C terminus. One complex stimulates basal NHE3 activity and contains ezrin and phosphoinositides as major components; how it stimulates NHE3 activity is not known. This study tested the hypothesis that ezrin dynamically associates with this complex, which sets ezrin binding. NHE3 activity was reduced by an Akti. This effect was eliminated if ezrin binding to NHE3 was inhibited by a point mutant. Recombinant AKT phosphorylated NHE3 C terminus in the domain ezrin directly binds. This domain (amino acids 475-589) is predicted to be α-helical and contains a conserved cluster of three serines (Ser(515), Ser(522), and Ser(526)). Point mutations of two of these (S515A, S515D, or S526A) reduced basal NHE3 activity and surface expression and had no Akti inhibition. S526D had NHE3 activity equal to wild type with normal Akti inhibition. Ezrin binding to NHE3 was regulated by Akt, being eliminated by Akti. NHE3-S515A and -S526D did not bind ezrin; NHE3-S515D had reduced ezrin binding; NHE3-S526D bound ezrin normally. NHE3-Ser(526) is predicted to be a GSK-3 kinase phosphorylation site. A GSK-3 inhibitor reduced basal NHE3 activity as well as ezrin-NHE3 binding, and this effect was eliminated in NHE3-S526A and -S526D mutants. The conclusions were: 1) NHE3 basal activity is regulated by a signaling complex that is controlled by sequential effects of two kinases, Akt and GSK-3, which act on a Ser cluster in the same NHE3 C-terminal domain that binds ezrin; and 2) these kinases regulate the dynamic association of ezrin with NHE3 to affect basal NHE3 activity.

  13. Assembly and activation of alternative complement components on endothelial cell-anchored ultra-large von Willebrand factor links complement and hemostasis-thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Turner

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cells (ECs express and release protein components of the complement pathways, as well as secreting and anchoring ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF multimers in long string-like structures that initiate platelet adhesion during hemostasis and thrombosis. The alternative complement pathway (AP is an important non-antibody-requiring host defense system. Thrombotic microangiopathies can be associated with defective regulation of the AP (atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome or with inadequate cleavage by ADAMTS-13 of ULVWF multimeric strings secreted by/anchored to ECs (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Our goal was to determine if EC-anchored ULVWF strings caused the assembly and activation of AP components, thereby linking two essential defense mechanisms.We quantified gene expression of these complement components in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs by real-time PCR: C3 and C5; complement factor (CF B, CFD, CFP, CFH and CFI of the AP; and C4 of the classical and lectin (but not alternative complement pathways. We used fluorescent microscopy, monospecific antibodies against complement components, fluorescent secondary antibodies, and the analysis of >150 images to quantify the attachment of HUVEC-released complement proteins to ULVWF strings secreted by, and anchored to, the HUVECs (under conditions of ADAMTS-13 inhibition. We found that HUVEC-released C4 did not attach to ULVWF strings, ruling out activation of the classical and lectin pathways by the strings. In contrast, C3, FB, FD, FP and C5, FH and FI attached to ULVWF strings in quantitative patterns consistent with assembly of the AP components into active complexes. This was verified when non-functional FB blocked the formation of AP C3 convertase complexes (C3bBb on ULVWF strings.AP components are assembled and activated on EC-secreted/anchored ULVWF multimeric strings. Our findings provide one possible molecular mechanism for clinical

  14. Structural insight into proteolytic activation and regulation of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Janus A; Pedersen, Dennis V; Andersen, Gregers R

    2016-11-01

    The complement system is a highly complex and carefully regulated proteolytic cascade activated through three different pathways depending on the activator recognized. The structural knowledge regarding the intricate proteolytic enzymes that activate and control complement has increased dramatically over the last decade. This development has been pivotal for understanding how mutations within complement proteins might contribute to pathogenesis and has spurred new strategies for development of complement therapeutics. Here we describe and discuss the complement system from a structural perspective and integrate the most recent findings obtained by crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy. In particular, we focus on the proteolytic enzymes governing activation and their products carrying the biological effector functions. Additionally, we present the structural basis for some of the best known complement inhibitors. The large number of accumulated molecular structures enables us to visualize the relative size, position, and overall orientation of many of the most interesting complement proteins and assembled complexes on activator surfaces and in membranes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Complement in therapy and disease: Regulating the complement system with antibody-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Joost P M; Strumane, Kristin; Ruuls, Sigrid R; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2015-10-01

    Complement is recognized as a key player in a wide range of normal as well as disease-related immune, developmental and homeostatic processes. Knowledge of complement components, structures, interactions, and cross-talk with other biological systems continues to grow and this leads to novel treatments for cancer, infectious, autoimmune- or age-related diseases as well as for preventing transplantation rejection. Antibodies are superbly suited to be developed into therapeutics with appropriate complement stimulatory or inhibitory activity. Here we review the design, development and future of antibody-based drugs that enhance or dampen the complement system. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Kallikrein Cleaves C3 and Activates Complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmscher, Sarah; Döring, Nadia; Halder, Luke D; Jo, Emeraldo A H; Kopka, Isabell; Dunker, Christine; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Luo, Shanshan; Slevogt, Hortense; Lorkowski, Stefan; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine

    2017-12-14

    The human plasma contact system is an immune surveillance system activated by the negatively charged surfaces of bacteria and fungi and includes the kallikrein-kinin, the coagulation, and the fibrinolytic systems. Previous work shows that the contact system also activates complement, and that plasma enzymes like kallikrein, plasmin, thrombin, and FXII are involved in the activation process. Here, we show for the first time that kallikrein cleaves the central complement component C3 directly to yield active components C3b and C3a. The cleavage site within C3 is identical to that recognized by the C3 convertase. Also, kallikrein-generated C3b forms C3 convertases, which trigger the C3 amplification loop. Since kallikrein also cleaves factor B to yield Bb and Ba, kallikrein alone can trigger complement activation. Kallikrein-generated C3 convertases are inhibited by factor H; thus, the kallikrein activation pathway merges with the amplification loop of the alternative pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that activation of the contact system locally enhances complement activation on cell surfaces. The human pathogenic microbe Candida albicans activates the contact system in normal human serum. However, C. albicans immediately recruits factor H to the surface, thereby evading the alternative and likely kallikrein-mediated complement pathways. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Platelets and the complement cascade in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Johannes; Verschoor, Admar; Langer, Harald F

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its late sequels are still the number one cause of death in western societies. Platelets are a driving force not only during the genesis of atherosclerosis, but especially in its late stages, as evidenced by complications such as arterial thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and ischemic stroke. Atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory disease, influenced by various immune mechanisms. The complement system is part of our innate immune system, and its diverse roles in atherosclerosis have become evident over the past years. In this review we identify points of intersection between platelets and the complement system and discuss their relevance for atherosclerosis. Specifically, we will focus on roles for platelets in the onset as well as progression of the disease, a possible dual role for complement in the genesis and development of atherosclerosis, and review emerging literature revealing previously unrecognized cross-talk between platelets and the complement system and discuss its possible impact for atherosclerosis. Finally, we identify limitations of current research approaches and discuss perspectives of complement modulation in the control of the disease.

  18. pawg Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  19. kgfk Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  20. kcll Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  1. kden Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  2. kmgm Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  3. kswf Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  4. katy Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  5. krdg Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  6. khot Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  7. kpih Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  8. krdd Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  9. kabq Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  10. klax Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  11. krut Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  12. kpvu Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  13. pagy Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  14. koaj Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  15. khya Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  16. phog Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  17. kpeq Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  18. keko Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  19. Terminated Multifamily Mortgages Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Includes all terminated HUD Multifamily insured mortgages. It includes the Holder and Servicer at the time the mortgage was terminated. The data is good as of...

  20. pail Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  1. kelp Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  2. kdab Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  3. keld Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  4. kewr Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  5. paom Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  6. ksan Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  7. ktix Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  8. kpln Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  9. kgag Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  10. kbuf Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  11. ptkk Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  12. klyh Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  13. kslc Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  14. kabe Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  15. pahn Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  16. kbvo Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  17. kfoe Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  18. kbff Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  19. kprc Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  20. kmdt Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  1. kals Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  2. kgrb Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  3. khdn Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  4. kgso Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  5. khlg Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  6. kjan Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  7. kbce Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  8. ktys Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  9. kcha Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  10. kdug Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  11. Terminated Multifamily Mortgages Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This Excel 2010 file includes all terminated HUD Multifamily insured mortgages. It includes the Holder and Servicer at the time the mortgage was terminated. The data...

  12. kpub Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  13. ksrq Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  14. kaeg Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  15. pata Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  16. klgu Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  17. pamc Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  18. kmsl Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  19. kbrl Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  20. ksfb Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  1. kpsc Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  2. kely Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  3. ksyr Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  4. katw Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  5. kama Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  6. kpae Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  7. kmli Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  8. kokc Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  9. kjst Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  10. kgup Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  11. padl Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  12. klit Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  13. kalb Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  14. kact Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  15. kink Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  16. kshv Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  17. pajn Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  18. kpna Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  19. ktph Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  20. ksux Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  1. kcon Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  2. khio Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  3. konp Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  4. kpnc Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  5. kmlu Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  6. kgsp Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  7. kgpt Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  8. kflo Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  9. keri Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  10. kcid Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  11. ksaf Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  12. kcvg Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  13. ptya Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  14. katl Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  15. kmth Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TAF (terminal aerodrome forecast or terminal area forecast) is a format for reporting weather forecast information, particularly as it relates to aviation. TAFs are...

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray data collection of the N-terminal domain of the 26S proteasome regulatory subunit p27 and its complex with the ATPase domain of Rpt5 from Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Wentao; Yang, Xue; Zhou, Hao

    2014-05-01

    The protein 26S proteasome regulatory subunit p27 is one of the four chaperones that help in the assembly of the 19S regulatory particle (RP) of the 26S proteasome. In the present work, the N-terminus of p27 (residues 1-128) from Mus musculus was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized alone and in complex with the C-terminal ATPase domain of Rpt5 (residues 173-442). The crystals of p27((1-128)) diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 26.79, b = 30.39, c = 145.06 Å. Resolution-dependent Matthews coefficient probability analysis suggested the presence of only one molecule per asymmetric unit, with 40.5% solvent content and a VM value of 2.02 Å(3) Da(-1). The crystal of the p27((1-128))-Rpt5((173-442)) complex diffracted to 4 Å resolution and belonged to space group P222, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.93, b = 76.08, c = 336.85 Å. The presence of four heterodimers in the asymmetric unit with 53.2% solvent content and a VM value of 2.63 Å(3) Da(-1) or five heterodimers in the asymmetric unit with 41.5% solvent content and a VM value of 2.10 Å(3) Da(-1) is assumed.

  17. The role of the complement system in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2017-05-01

    The development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus has a substantial negative impact on morbidity and mortality and is responsible for substantial individual and socioeconomic costs worldwide. One of the most serious consequences of diabetes mellitus is the development of diabetic angiopathy, which manifests clinically as microvascular and macrovascular complications. One microvascular complication, diabetic nephropathy, is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in developed countries. Although several available therapeutic interventions can delay the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy, morbidity associated with this disease remains high and new therapeutic approaches are needed. In addition, not all patients with diabetes mellitus will develop diabetic nephropathy and thus new biomarkers are needed to identify individuals who will develop this life-threatening disease. An increasing body of evidence points toward a role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. For example, circulating levels of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition molecule of the innate immune system, have emerged as a robust biomarker for the development and progression of this disease, and evidence suggests that MBL, H-ficolin, complement component C3 and the membrane attack complex might contribute to renal injury in the hyperglycaemic mileu. New approaches to modulate the complement system might lead to the development of new agents to prevent or slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  18. Three complementation groups in Cockayne syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, A.R. (Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK). M.R.C. Cell Mutation Unit)

    1982-12-01

    After 16 Jm/sup -2/ of UV-irradiation non-dividing normal cells recover normal rates of RNA synthesis within 24 h, whereas in cells from donors with Cockayne syndrome (CS) the rate of RNA synthesis gradually declines. Cultures of a mixed population from 2 CS donors were fused with polyethylene glycol: subsequently they were UV-irradiated and RNA synthesis was measured autoradiographically in mono-, bi-, and multinuclear cells. Genetic complementation was indicated by high levels of RNA synthesis in bi- and multinuclear cells when compared with mononuclear cells. Using this assay, 11 CS strains have been assigned to three complementation groups: 2 into group A, 8 into group B and 1 into group C. The strain in group C is derived from an individual who also had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and was the sole known representative of XP-complementation group B.

  19. Intermodal freight terminals : terminal business planning

    OpenAIRE

    Nijkamp, Peter; Bart W Wiegmans

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for existing- and newly proposedinter-modal freight terminals in their business planning process. This framework is importantfor constructing- and improving the central terminal service portfolio of handling (loading,discharging, and transhipping) and storage of containerised cargo. Supportive activities (e.g. administration, customs) are taken into account as well.In particular, its aim is to investigate whether business planning offer...

  20. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Is a Regulator of Epidermal Complement Component Expression and Complement Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Humaidan, Anas H A; Ananthoju, Nageshwar; Mohanty, Tirthankar

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is activated in response to tissue injury. During wound healing, complement activation seems beneficial in acute wounds but may be detrimental in chronic wounds. We found that the epidermal expression of many complement components was only increased to a minor extent in skin...... components in keratinocytes and epidermis following stimulation with proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, EGFR inhibition of cultured keratinocytes either alone or in combination with proinflammatory stimulus promoted activation of the complement system after incubation with serum. In keratinocytes...... wounds in vivo and in cultured keratinocytes after exposure to supernatant from stimulated mononuclear cells. In contrast, the epidermal expression of complement components was downregulated in ex vivo injured skin lacking the stimulation from infiltrating inflammatory cells but with intact injury...

  1. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  2. Mesenchymal stromal cells engage complement and complement receptor bearing innate effector cells to modulate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Moll

    Full Text Available Infusion of human third-party mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs appears to be a promising therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD. To date, little is known about how MSCs interact with the body's innate immune system after clinical infusion. This study shows, that exposure of MSCs to blood type ABO-matched human blood activates the complement system, which triggers complement-mediated lymphoid and myeloid effector cell activation in blood. We found deposition of complement component C3-derived fragments iC3b and C3dg on MSCs and fluid-phase generation of the chemotactic anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. MSCs bound low amounts of immunoglobulins and lacked expression of complement regulatory proteins MCP (CD46 and DAF (CD55, but were protected from complement lysis via expression of protectin (CD59. Cell-surface-opsonization and anaphylatoxin-formation triggered complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18-mediated effector cell activation in blood. The complement-activating properties of individual MSCs were furthermore correlated with their potency to inhibit PBMC-proliferation in vitro, and both effector cell activation and the immunosuppressive effect could be blocked either by using complement inhibitor Compstatin or by depletion of CD14/CD11b-high myeloid effector cells from mixed lymphocyte reactions. Our study demonstrates for the first time a major role of the complement system in governing the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs and elucidates how complement activation mediates the interaction with other immune cells.

  3. Fourier transform infrared characterization of a CuB-nitrosyl complex in cytochrome ba3 from Thermus thermophilus: relevance to NO reductase activity in heme-copper terminal oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Lin, I-Jin; Chen, Ying; Fee, James A; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre

    2007-12-05

    The two heme-copper terminal oxidases of Thermus thermophilus have been shown to catalyze the two-electron reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N2O) [Giuffre, A.; Stubauer, G.; Sarti, P.; Brunori, M.; Zumft, W. G.; Buse, G.; Soulimane, T. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1999, 96, 14718-14723]. While it is well-established that NO binds to the reduced heme a3 to form a low-spin heme {FeNO}7 species, the role CuB plays in the binding of the second NO remains unclear. Here we present low-temperature FTIR photolysis experiments carried out on the NO complex formed by addition of NO to fully reduced cytochrome ba3. Low-temperature UV-vis, EPR, and RR spectroscopies confirm the binding of NO to the heme a3 and the efficiency of the photolysis at 30 K. The nu(NO) modes from the light-induced FTIR difference spectra are isolated from other perturbed vibrations using 15NO and 15N18O. The nu(N-O)a3 is observed at 1622 cm-1, and upon photolysis, it is replaced by a new nu(N-O) at 1589 cm-1 assigned to a CuB-nitrosyl complex. This N-O stretching frequency is more than 100 cm-1 lower than those reported for Cu-NO models with three N-ligands and for CuB+-NO in bovine aa3. Because the UV-vis and RR data do not support a bridging configuration between CuB and heme a3 for the photolyzed NO, we assign the exceptionally low nu(NO) to an O-bound (eta1-O) or a side-on (eta2-NO) CuB-nitrosyl complex. From this study, we propose that, after binding of a first NO molecule to the heme a3 of fully reduced Tt ba3, the formation of an N-bound {CuNO}11 is prevented, and the addition of a second NO produces an O-bond CuB-hyponitrite species bridging CuB and Fea3. In contrast, bovine cytochrome c oxidase is believed to form an N-bound CuB-NO species; the [{FeNO}7{CuNO}11] complex is suggested here to be an inhibitory complex.

  4. Graphs whose complement and square are isomorphic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milanic, M.; Pedersen, Anders Sune; Pellicer, D.

    2014-01-01

    We study square-complementary graphs, that is, graphs whose complement and square are isomorphic. We prove several necessary conditions for a graph to be square-complementary, describe ways of building new square-complementary graphs from existing ones, construct infinite families of square-compl...

  5. Synapse remodeling, compliments of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourgeaud, Lawrence; Boulanger, Lisa M

    2007-12-14

    A growing body of evidence indicates that some proteins known for their immune functions also have distinct nonimmune functions in the normal uninjured central nervous system. In this issue, Stevens et al. (2007) demonstrate an unexpected requirement for molecules of the complement cascade in the remodeling of synaptic connections in the developing visual system.

  6. Complement activation and regulation in preeclamptic placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Inkeri eLokki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is a common disorder of pregnancy originating in the placenta. We examined whether excessive activation or poor regulation of the complement system at the maternal-fetal interface could contribute to the development of PE. Location and occurrence of complement components and regulators in placentae were analyzed. Cryostat sections of placentae were processed from 7 early-onset PE (diagnosis <34 weeks of gestation, 5 late-onset PE and 10 control pregnancies and immunostained for 6 complement activators and 6 inhibitors. Fluorescence was quantified and compared between PE and control placentae. Gene copy numbers of complement components C4A and C4B were assessed by a quantitative PCR method. Maternal C4 deficiencies (≥1 missing or non-functional C4 were most common in the early-onset PE group (71%, and more frequent in late-onset PE compared to healthy controls (60% vs. 38%. Complement C1q deposition differed significantly between control and patient groups: controls and early-onset PE patients had more C1q than late-onset PE patients (mean p=0.01 and p=0.005, respectively. C3 activation was analyzed by staining for C3b/iC3b and C3d. C3d was mostly specific to the basal syncytium and C3b/iC3b diffuse in other structures, but there were no clear differences between the study groups. Activated C4 and membrane-bound regulators CD55, CD46 and CD59 were observed abundantly in the syncytiotrophoblast. Syncytial knots, structures enriched in PE, stained specifically for the classical pathway inhibitor C4bp, whereas the key regulator alternative pathway, Factor H showed a wider distribution in the placenta. Differences in C1q deposition between late- and early-onset PE groups may be indicative of the different aetiology of PE symptoms in these patients. Irregular distribution of the complement regulators C4bp and FH in the PE placenta and a higher frequency of C4A deficiencies suggest a disturbed balance between complement activation

  7. 29 CFR 4043.24 - Termination or partial termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Termination or partial termination. 4043.24 Section 4043.24....24 Termination or partial termination. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the Secretary of the Treasury determines that there has been a termination or partial termination of a plan...

  8. Human pentraxin 3 binds to the complement regulator c4b-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Braunschweig

    Full Text Available The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is a soluble recognition molecule with multiple functions including innate immune defense against certain microbes and the clearance of apoptotic cells. PTX3 interacts with recognition molecules of the classical and lectin complement pathways and thus initiates complement activation. In addition, binding of PTX3 to the alternative complement pathway regulator factor H was shown. Here, we show that PTX3 binds to the classical and lectin pathway regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP. A PTX3-binding site was identified within short consensus repeats 1-3 of the C4BP α-chain. PTX3 did not interfere with the cofactor activity of C4BP in the fluid phase and C4BP maintained its complement regulatory activity when bound to PTX3 on surfaces. While C4BP and factor H did not compete for PTX3 binding, the interaction of C4BP with PTX3 was inhibited by C1q and by L-ficolin. PTX3 bound to human fibroblast- and endothelial cell-derived extracellular matrices and recruited functionally active C4BP to these surfaces. Whereas PTX3 enhanced the activation of the classical/lectin pathway and caused enhanced C3 deposition on extracellular matrix, deposition of terminal pathway components and the generation of the inflammatory mediator C5a were not increased. Furthermore, PTX3 enhanced the binding of C4BP to late apoptotic cells, which resulted in an increased rate of inactivation of cell surface bound C4b and a reduction in the deposition of C5b-9. Thus, in addition to complement activators, PTX3 interacts with complement inhibitors including C4BP. This balanced interaction on extracellular matrix and on apoptotic cells may prevent excessive local complement activation that would otherwise lead to inflammation and host tissue damage.

  9. Synergy between ficolin-2 and pentraxin 3 boosts innate immune recognition and complement deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Doni, Andrea; Hummelshøj, Tina

    2009-01-01

    The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a multifunctional soluble pattern recognition molecule that is crucial in innate immune protection against opportunistic fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus fumigatus. The mechanisms that mediate downstream effects of PTX3 are largely unknown. However, PTX3 interac...... innate immune system, which activate different complement pathways, cooperate and amplify microbial recognition and effector functions....... with C1q from the classical pathway of the complement. The ficolins are recognition molecules of the lectin complement pathway sharing structural and functional characteristics with C1q. Thus, we investigated whether the ficolins (Ficolin-1, -2, and -3) interact with PTX3 and whether the complexes...... are able to modulate complement activation on A. fumigatus. Ficolin-2 could be affinity-isolated from human plasma on immobilized PTX3. In binding studies, Ficolin-1 and particularly Ficolin-2 interacted with PTX3 in a calcium-independent manner. Ficolin-2, but not Ficolin-1 and Ficolin-3, bound A...

  10. The Stigma Experienced by Terminally Ill Patients: Evidence From a Portuguese Ethnographic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hilário, Ana Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to offer an understanding of the ways in which terminally ill patients may face discrimination due to their visibly altered body. An ethnographic approach was adopted and fieldwork was conducted over 10 months in 2 inpatient hospice units in Portugal. Participant observation was complemented by 50 in-depth interviews with terminally ill patients, family members, and hospice staff. The stigma experienced by terminally ill patients derived mostly from the behavior of p...

  11. Preparation and Characterization of a Homoleptic Vanadium(III) Amide Complex and Its Transformation into Terminal Chalcogenide Derivatives [(3,5-Me(2)Ph)AdN](3)V=E (E = S, Se; Ad = Adamantyl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppa, Kamalesh B. P.; Desmangles, Nathalie; Gambarotta, Sandro; Yap, Glenn; Rheingold, Arnold L.

    1997-03-12

    Reaction of VCl(3)(THF)(3) with (3,5-Me(2)Ph)AdNLi.Et(2)O (Ad = adamantyl) yields the homoleptic vanadium complex [(3,5-Me(2)Ph)AdN](3)V (1), which reacts with chalcogens E (E = S, Se) to yield diamagnetic terminal chalcogenide derivatives [(3,5-Me(2)Ph)AdN](3)V=E [E = S (3a), Se (3b)] Crystal data for 1 and 3a are as follows. 1: C(54)H(72)N(3)V, fw 814.09, triclinic P&onemacr;, a = 10.441(1) Å, b = 11.648(4) Å, c = 19.321(2) Å, alpha = 83.69(2) degrees, beta = 83.89(1) degrees, gamma = 82.42(2) degrees, Z = 2. 3a: C(54)H(72)N(3)VS.(1)/(2)Et(2)O, fw 883.25, monoclinic C2/c, a = 43.400(9) Å, b = 11.744(3) Å, c = 20.705(4) Å, beta = 113.05(1) degrees, Z = 8.

  12. The Bordetella pertussis Bps Polysaccharide Enhances Lung Colonization by Conferring Protection from Complement-mediated Killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Tridib; Johnson, John B.; Kock, Nancy D.; Parks, Griffith D.; Deora, Rajendar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bordetella pertussis is a human-restricted Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes whooping cough or pertussis. Pertussis is the leading vaccine preventable disease that is resurging in the USA and other parts of the developed world. There is an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which B. pertussis evades killing and clearance by the complement system, a first line of host innate immune defense. The present study examined the role of the Bps polysaccharide to resist complement activity in vitro and in the mouse respiratory tract. The isogenic bps mutant strain containing a large non polar in-frame deletion of the bpsA-D locus was more sensitive to serum and complement mediated killing than the WT strain. As determined by western blotting, flow cytometry and electron microscopic studies, the heightened sensitivity of the mutant strain was due to enhanced deposition of complement proteins and the formation of membrane attack complex, the end product of complement activation. Bps was sufficient to confer complement resistance as evidenced by a Bps-expressing E. coli being protected by serum killing. Additionally, western blotting and flow cytometry assays revealed that Bps inhibited the deposition of complement proteins independent of other B. pertussis factors. The bps mutant strain colonized the lungs of complement-deficient mice at higher levels than that observed in C57Bl/6 mice. These results reveal a previously unknown interaction between Bps and the complement system in controlling B. pertussis colonization of the respiratory tract. These findings also make Bps a potential target for the prevention and therapy of whooping cough. PMID:24438122

  13. Identification of C3b-Binding Small-Molecule Complement Inhibitors Using Cheminformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Brandon L; Skaff, D Andrew; Chatterjee, Arindam; Hanning, Anders; Walker, John K; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2017-05-01

    The complement system is an elegantly regulated biochemical cascade formed by the collective molecular recognition properties and proteolytic activities of more than two dozen membrane-bound or serum proteins. Complement plays diverse roles in human physiology, such as acting as a sentry against invading microorganisms, priming of the adaptive immune response, and removal of immune complexes. However, dysregulation of complement can serve as a trigger for a wide range of human diseases, which include autoimmune, inflammatory, and degenerative conditions. Despite several potential advantages of modulating complement with small-molecule inhibitors, small-molecule drugs are highly underrepresented in the current complement-directed therapeutics pipeline. In this study, we have employed a cheminformatics drug discovery approach based on the extensive structural and functional knowledge available for the central proteolytic fragment of the cascade, C3b. Using parallel in silico screening methodologies, we identified 45 small molecules that putatively bind C3b near ligand-guided functional hot spots. Surface plasmon resonance experiments resulted in the validation of seven dose-dependent C3b-binding compounds. Competition-based biochemical assays demonstrated the ability of several C3b-binding compounds to interfere with binding of the original C3b ligand that guided their discovery. In vitro assays of complement function identified a single complement inhibitory compound, termed cmp-5, and mechanistic studies of the cmp-5 inhibitory mode revealed it acts at the level of C5 activation. This study has led to the identification of a promising new class of C3b-binding small-molecule complement inhibitors and, to our knowledge, provides the first demonstration of cheminformatics-based, complement-directed drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Structural basis for therapeutic inhibition of complement C5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jore, Matthijs M; Johnson, Steven; Sheppard, Devon; Barber, Natalie M; Li, Yang I; Nunn, Miles A; Elmlund, Hans; Lea, Susan M

    2016-05-01

    Activation of complement C5 generates the potent anaphylatoxin C5a and leads to pathogen lysis, inflammation and cell damage. The therapeutic potential of C5 inhibition has been demonstrated by eculizumab, one of the world's most expensive drugs. However, the mechanism of C5 activation by C5 convertases remains elusive, thus limiting development of therapeutics. Here we identify and characterize a new protein family of tick-derived C5 inhibitors. Structures of C5 in complex with the new inhibitors, the phase I and phase II inhibitor OmCI, or an eculizumab Fab reveal three distinct binding sites on C5 that all prevent activation of C5. The positions of the inhibitor-binding sites and the ability of all three C5-inhibitor complexes to competitively inhibit the C5 convertase conflict with earlier steric-inhibition models, thus suggesting that a priming event is needed for activation.

  15. CONTAINER TERMINALS IN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart W. WIEGMANS

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to address the linkage between logistics (in particular, the management of marketing channel flows and transport markets, while also the interaction between these two markets and intermodal container terminals is analysed. The marketing channel theory is used to describe all relevant actors and flows that run through marketing channels, starting with customer needs and ending with customer satisfaction. Porter's theory of competitive advantages is used to review competitive forces in both markets. Finally, a competitor analysis is performed for the logistics and transport market. These theories are applied so as to be able to determine the competitive position of intermodal container terminals with a view to the management of marketing channel flows and the physical transport of freight flows. Hence, the central question of this paper is: Which markets are served by intermodal container terminals and with whom are they competing? At present, neither the maritime container terminals nor the continental container terminals appear to have a significant influence in the logistics service market; they concentrate mainly on the physical movement of containers (transshipment. Furthermore, maritime container terminals and continental container terminals are not dominant players in the transport service market. Our conclusion is that continental terminals are predominantly competing with unimodal road transport, with neighbouring continental terminals and with barge transport companies.

  16. Incomplete inhibition by eculizumab: mechanistic evidence for residual C5 activity during strong complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Markus J; Kuhn, Nadine; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Höchsmann, Britta; von Zabern, Inge; Weinstock, Christof; Simmet, Thomas; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Skerra, Arne; Anliker, Markus; Schmidt, Christoph Q

    2017-02-23

    Eculizumab inhibits the terminal, lytic pathway of complement by blocking the activation of the complement protein C5 and shows remarkable clinical benefits in certain complement-mediated diseases. However, several reports suggest that activation of C5 is not always completely suppressed in patients even under excess of eculizumab over C5, indicating that residual C5 activity may derogate the drug's therapeutic benefit under certain conditions. By using eculizumab and the tick-derived C5 inhibitor coversin, we determined conditions ex vivo in which C5 inhibition is incomplete. The degree of such residual lytic activity depended on the strength of the complement activator and the resulting surface density of the complement activation product C3b, which autoamplifies via the alternative pathway (AP) amplification loop. We show that at high C3b densities required for binding and activation of C5, both inhibitors reduce but do not abolish this interaction. The decrease of C5 binding to C3b clusters in the presence of C5 inhibitors correlated with the levels of residual hemolysis. However, by employing different C5 inhibitors simultaneously, residual hemolytic activity could be abolished. The importance of AP-produced C3b clusters for C5 activation in the presence of eculizumab was corroborated by the finding that residual hemolysis after forceful activation of the classical pathway could be reduced by blocking the AP. By providing insights into C5 activation and inhibition, our study delivers the rationale for the clinically observed phenomenon of residual terminal pathway activity under eculizumab treatment with important implications for anti-C5 therapy in general. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Terminal Satisfiability in GSTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized symbolic trajectory evaluation (GSTE is an extension of symbolic trajectory evaluation (STE and a method of model checking. GSTE specifications are given as assertion graphs. There are four efficient methods to verify whether a circuit model obeys an assertion graph in GSTE, Model Checking Strong Satisfiability (SMC, Model Checking Normal Satisfiability (NMC, Model Checking Fair Satisfiability (FMC, and Model Checking Terminal Satisfiability (TMC. SMC, NMC, and FMC have been proved and applied in industry, but TMC has not. This paper gives a six-tuple definition and presents a new algorithm for TMC. Based on these, we prove that our algorithm is sound and complete. It solves the SMC’s limitation (resulting in false negative without extending from finite specification to infinite specification. At last, a case of using TMC to verify a realistic hardware circuit round-robin arbiter is achieved. Avoiding verifying the undesired paths which are not related to the specifications, TMC makes it possible to reduce the computational complexity, and the experimental results suggest that the time cost by SMC is 3.14× with TMC in the case.

  18. Tanker avionics and aircrew complement evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, R W; Barbato, G J

    1982-11-01

    This paper describes an effort to determine control and display criteria for operating SAC's KC-135 tanker with a reduced crew complement. The Tanker Avionics and Aircrew Complement Evaluation (TAACE) Program was a four-phase effort addressing the control and display design issues associated with operating the tanker without the navigator position. Discussed are: the mission analysis phase, during which the tanker's operational responsibilities were defined and documented; the design phase, during which alternative crew station design concepts were developed; the mockup evaluation phase, which accomplished initial SAC crew member assessment of cockpit designs; and the simulation phase, which validated the useability of the crew system redesign. The paper also describes a recommended crew station configuration and discusses some of the philosophy underlying the selection of cockpit hardware and systems.

  19. Complementing the sugar code: role of GAGs and sialic acid in complement regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eLangford-Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugar molecules play a vital role on both microbial and mammalian cells, where they are involved in cellular communication, govern microbial virulence and modulate host immunity and inflammatory responses. The complement cascade, as part of a host’s innate immune system, is a potent weapon against invading bacteria but has to be tightly regulated to prevent inappropriate attack and damage to host tissues. A number of complement regulators, such as factor H and properdin, interact with sugar molecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and sialic acid, on host and pathogen membranes and direct the appropriate complement response by either promoting the binding of complement activators or inhibitors. The binding of these complement regulators to sugar molecules can vary from location to location, due to their different specificities and because distinct structural and functional subpopulations of sugars are found in different human organs, such as the brain, kidney and eye. This review will cover recent studies that have provided important new insights into the role of glycosaminoglycans and sialic acid in complement regulation and how sugar recognition may be compromised in disease

  20. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Sun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host's immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated.The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration.Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9.

  1. Complement and Immunoregulation in Tissue Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    components of the immune response. To date there is no specific therapy that has yet gained widespread clinical use for the prevention and treatment of...lymphocyte depletion and inhibition of complement activation. Despite significant advances in this field, no agent or 9 therapy has yet gained widespread...relative to ß actin expression. 11 Figure 3: Proposed schema illustrates the protective role of R-spondin3 in endothelial cells under hypoxic stress

  2. Spontaneous complement activation on human B cells results in localized membrane depolarization and the clustering of complement receptor type 2 and C3 fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løbner, Morten; Leslie, Robert G Q; Prodinger, Wolfgang M

    2009-01-01

    While our previous studies have demonstrated that complement activation induced by complement receptors type 2 (CR2/CD21) and 1 (CR1/CD35) results in C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation in human B cells, the consequences of these events for B-cell functions remain...... requires activation of complement via the alternative pathway, as indicated by total inhibition upon neutralization of factor D, and is abrogated by combined blockade of CR1 and CR2, but not of either receptor alone. The membrane depolarization is not associated with the apoptosis of B cells, as examined...... by co-staining with APO-2.7 or by the TdT-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay. Confocal microscopy revealed that depolarization and C3 deposition, unlike MAC deposition, are limited to restricted areas on the B-cell surface. Double staining revealed a close association between the C3...

  3. Organizational Relationship Termination Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas; Geersbro, Jens

    2011-01-01

    that a firm's percentage of unwanted customers decreases significantly as acceptance of termination increases, if the firm's definition of unwanted customers is well understood, and if a firm has clear termination routines. In addition, general focus on profitability and external constraints on relationship...

  4. Design and synthesis of a dinucleating ligand system with varying terminal donor functions that provides no bridging donor and its application to the synthesis of a series of Fe(III)-μ-O-Fe(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strautmann, Julia Bernhardette Hildegard; Dammers, Susanne; Limpke, Thomas; Parthier, Janine; Zimmermann, Thomas Philipp; Walleck, Stephan; Heinze-Brückner, Gabriele; Stammler, Anja; Bögge, Hartmut; Glaser, Thorsten

    2016-02-28

    Based on a rational ligand design for stabilizing high-valent {Fe(μ-O)2Fe} cores, a new family of dinucleating bis(tetradentate) ligands with varying terminal donor functions has been developed: redox-inert biomimetic carboxylates in H4julia, pyridines in susan, and phenolates in H4hilde(Me2). Based on a retrosynthetic analysis, the ligands were synthesized and used for the preparation of their diferric complexes [(julia){Fe(OH2)(μ-O)Fe(OH2)}]·6H2O, [(julia){Fe(OH2)(μ-O)Fe(OH2)}]·7H2O, [(julia){Fe(DMSO)(μ-O)Fe(DMSO)}]·3DMSO, [(hilde(Me2)){Fe(μ-O)Fe}]·CH2Cl2, [(hilde(Me2)){FeCl}2]·2CH2Cl2, [(susan){FeCl(μ-O)FeCl}]Cl2·2H2O, [(susan){FeCl(μ-O)FeCl0.75(OCH3)0.25}](ClO4)2·0.5MeOH, and [(susan){FeCl(μ-O)FeCl}](ClO4)2·0.5EtOH, which were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-Vis-NIR, Mössbauer, magnetic, and electrochemical measurements. The strongly electron-donating phenolates afford five-coordination, while the carboxylates and pyridines lead to six-coordination. The analysis of the ligand conformations demonstrates a strong flexibility of the ligand backbone in the complexes. The different hydrogen-bonding in the secondary coordination sphere of [(julia){Fe(OH2)(μ-O)Fe(OH2)}] influences the C-O, C[double bond, length as m-dash]O, and Fe-O bond lengths and is reflected in the FTIR spectra. The physical properties of the central {Fe(μ-O)Fe} core (d-d, μ-oxo → Fe(III) CT, νas(Fe-O-Fe), J) are governed by the differences in terminal ligands - Fe(III) bonds: strongly covalent π-donation with phenolates, less covalent π-donation with carboxylates, and π-acceptation with pyridines. Thus, [(susan){FeCl(μ-O)FeCl}](2+) is oxidized at 1.48 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc, which is shifted to 1.14 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc by methanolate substitution, while [(julia){Fe(OH2)(μ-O)Fe(OH2)}] is oxidized ≤1 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc. [(hilde(Me2)){Fe(μ-O)Fe}] is oxidized at 0.36 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc to a phenoxyl radical. The catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane with TONs up to

  5. The relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi resists complement-mediated killing by human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegler, Axel; Herzberger, Pia; Margos, Gabriele; Fingerle, Volker; Kraiczy, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi, a relapsing fever spirochete transmitted by ixodid ticks, is able to cause infections associated with systemic complaints, including malaise and fever, as well as meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. In order to elucidate immune evasion of previously difficult to cultivate B. miyamotoi, we have examined the ability of this newly emerging human pathogen to escape the complement system. Growth inhibition assays revealed that B. miyamotoi is strongly resistant to complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Investigating complement activation, we found that B. miyamotoi showed reduced deposition of components C3, C5, C7, C8, C9 as well as the membrane attack complex (MAC) on the borrelial surface. In addition, no aberrations in cell morphology were observed after incubation of B. miyamotoi in active human serum, confirming the findings of the growth inhibition assay. The data presented here provide strong evidence that B. miyamotoi overcome human complement by affecting the central complement component C3, thereby inhibiting formation of the C3 convertase and downstream activation of the complement cascade. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Scabies mite inactive serine proteases are potent inhibitors of the human complement lectin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone L Reynolds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei and has been classified as one of the six most prevalent epidermal parasitic skin diseases infecting populations living in poverty by the World Health Organisation. The role of the complement system, a pivotal component of human innate immunity, as an important defence against invading pathogens has been well documented and many parasites have an arsenal of anti-complement defences. We previously reported on a family of scabies mite proteolytically inactive serine protease paralogues (SMIPP-Ss thought to be implicated in host defence evasion. We have since shown that two family members, SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have the ability to bind the human complement components C1q, mannose binding lectin (MBL and properdin and are capable of inhibiting all three human complement pathways. This investigation focused on inhibition of the lectin pathway of complement activation as it is likely to be the primary pathway affecting scabies mites. Activation of the lectin pathway relies on the activation of MBL, and as SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have previously been shown to bind MBL, the nature of this interaction was examined using binding and mutagenesis studies. SMIPP-S D1 bound MBL in complex with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs and released the MASP-2 enzyme from the complex. SMIPP-S I1 was also able to bind MBL in complex with MASPs, but MASP-1 and MASP-2 remained in the complex. Despite these differences in mechanism, both molecules inhibited activation of complement components downstream of MBL. Mutagenesis studies revealed that both SMIPP-Ss used an alternative site of the molecule from the residual active site region to inhibit the lectin pathway. We propose that SMIPP-Ss are potent lectin pathway inhibitors and that this mechanism represents an important tool in the immune evasion repertoire of the parasitic mite and a potential target for therapeutics.

  7. Excretions/secretions from medicinal larvae (Lucilia sericata) inhibit complement activation by two mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Tetsuro; Cazander, Gwendolyn; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Trouw, Leendert A; Nibbering, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Larvae of the blowfly Lucilia sericata facilitate wound healing by removing dead tissue and biofilms from non-healing and necrotic wounds. Another beneficial action of larvae and their excretions/secretions (ES) is down-regulation of excessive inflammation. As prolonged complement activation is key to excessive inflammation, the aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the anti-complement activities of ES. Results revealed that heat sensitive serine proteases in ES degrade multiple complement proteins in all steps of the three complement activation pathways. Importantly, C3a and C5a-major activators of inflammation-were also degraded by ES and pretreatment of these factors with ES completely blocked their ability to induce activation of human neutrophils. Pre-exposure of the neutrophils to ES did not affect their responsiveness to C3a/C5a and fMLP, indicating that the receptors for these activators on neutrophils were not affected by ES. Surprisingly, heat and serine protease inhibitor pretreatment did not affect the ability of ES to inhibit C5b-9 complex formation despite degrading complement proteins, indicating a second complement-inhibiting molecule in ES. Heated ES was as effective as intact ES in inhibiting C3 deposition upon activation of the alternative pathway, but was significantly less effective in wells with a classical or lectin pathway-specific coating. Unfortunately, the molecules affecting the complement system could not be identified due to an insufficient database for L. sericata. Together, larval ES inhibit complement activation by two different mechanisms and down-regulate the C3a/C5a-mediated neutrophil activation. This attenuates the inflammatory process, which may facilitate wound healing. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  8. Susceptibility to advanced age-related macular degeneration and alleles of complement factor H, complement factor B, complement component 2, complement component 3, and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 genes in a Mexican population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Gabriela; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Pompa-Mera, Ericka N.; Graue-Wiechers, Federico; Bekker-Méndez, Carolina; Ayala-Ramirez, Raul; Quezada, Carlos; Rodríguez-Loaiza, Jose L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)–high risk alleles of the complement factor H (CFH), complement factor B (CFB), complement component 2 (C2), complement component 3 (C3), and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) genes in a Mexican population for the first time. Methods Genotyping was performed for the Y402H variant of CFH, for the L9H, R32Q, and K565E variants of CFB, the E318D variant of C2, the A69S variant of ARMS2, and the R102G variant of C3 in 159 Mexican mestizo patients at advanced stages of AMD, i.e., CARMS (Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging System) grade 4 or 5. The frequency of these variants was also investigated in a group of 152 control subjects without AMD. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood leukocytes, and genotyping was performed using PCR followed by direct sequencing. Allele-specific restriction enzyme digestion was used to detect the R102G polymorphism in C3. Results There were significant differences in the allelic distribution between the two groups for CFH Y402H (p=1×10−5), ARMS A69S (p=4×10−7), and CFB R32Q (p=0.01). The odds ratios (95% confidence interval) obtained for the risk alleles of these three variants were 3.8 (2.4–5.9), 3.04 (2.2–4.3), and 2.5 (1.1–5.7), respectively. Haplotype analysis including the two most significantly associated alleles (CFH Y402H and ARMS A69S) indicated that the C-T combination conferred an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 6.9 (3.2–14.8). The exposed attributable risk for this particular haplotype was 85.5%. Conclusions This is the first case-control investigation of AMD–high risk alleles in a Latino population. Our results support that CFH, ARMS2, and CFB AMD-risk alleles are consistently associated with the disease, even in ethnic groups with a complex admixture of ancestral populations such as Mexican mestizos. PMID:23112567

  9. Susceptibility to advanced age-related macular degeneration and alleles of complement factor H, complement factor B, complement component 2, complement component 3, and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 genes in a Mexican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Gabriela; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Pompa-Mera, Ericka N; Graue-Wiechers, Federico; Bekker-Méndez, Carolina; Ayala-Ramirez, Raul; Quezada, Carlos; Rodríguez-Loaiza, Jose L; Zenteno, Juan C

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the association of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)-high risk alleles of the complement factor H (CFH), complement factor B (CFB), complement component 2 (C2), complement component 3 (C3), and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) genes in a Mexican population for the first time. Genotyping was performed for the Y402H variant of CFH, for the L9H, R32Q, and K565E variants of CFB, the E318D variant of C2, the A69S variant of ARMS2, and the R102G variant of C3 in 159 Mexican mestizo patients at advanced stages of AMD, i.e., CARMS (Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging System) grade 4 or 5. The frequency of these variants was also investigated in a group of 152 control subjects without AMD. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood leukocytes, and genotyping was performed using PCR followed by direct sequencing. Allele-specific restriction enzyme digestion was used to detect the R102G polymorphism in C3. There were significant differences in the allelic distribution between the two groups for CFH Y402H (p=1×10(-5)), ARMS A69S (p=4×10(-7)), and CFB R32Q (p=0.01). The odds ratios (95% confidence interval) obtained for the risk alleles of these three variants were 3.8 (2.4-5.9), 3.04 (2.2-4.3), and 2.5 (1.1-5.7), respectively. Haplotype analysis including the two most significantly associated alleles (CFH Y402H and ARMS A69S) indicated that the C-T combination conferred an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 6.9 (3.2-14.8). The exposed attributable risk for this particular haplotype was 85.5%. This is the first case-control investigation of AMD-high risk alleles in a Latino population. Our results support that CFH, ARMS2, and CFB AMD-risk alleles are consistently associated with the disease, even in ethnic groups with a complex admixture of ancestral populations such as Mexican mestizos.

  10. Isolating the Epstein-Barr virus gp350/220 binding site on complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kendra A; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2007-12-14

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) is essential for the attachment of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to the surface of B-lymphocytes in an interaction mediated by the viral envelope glycoprotein gp350. The heavily glycosylated structure of EBV gp350 has recently been elucidated by x-ray crystallography, and the CR2 binding site on this protein has been characterized. To identify the corresponding gp350 binding site on CR2, we have undertaken a site-directed mutagenesis study targeting regions of CR2 that have previously been implicated in the binding of CR2 to the C3d/C3dg fragments of complement component C3. Wild-type or mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on K562 cells, and the ability of these CR2-expressing cells to bind gp350 was measured using flow cytometry. Mutations directed toward the two N-terminal extracellular domains of CR2 (SCR1-2) reveal that a large contiguous surface of CR2 SCR1-2 is involved in gp350 binding, including a number of positively charged residues (Arg-13, (Arg-28, (Arg-36, Lys-41, Lys-57, Lys-67, and Arg-83). These data appear to complement the CR2 binding site on gp350, which is characterized by a preponderance of negative charge. In addition to identifying the importance of charge in the formation of a CR2-gp350 complex, we also provide evidence that both SCR1 and SCR2 make contact with gp350. Specifically, two anti-CR2 monoclonal antibodies, designated as monoclonal antibodies 171 and 1048 whose primary epitopes are located within SCR2, inhibit binding of wild-type CR2 to EBV gp350; with regard to SCR1, both K562 cells expressing an S15P mutation and recombinant S15P CR2 proteins exhibit diminished gp350 binding.

  11. Microbe-specific C3b deposition in the horseshoe crab complement system in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Tagawa

    Full Text Available Complement C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens in the mammalian complement system, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. To understand the molecular mechanism of C3b deposition on microbes, we characterized two types of C2/factor B homologs (designated TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 identified from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Although the domain architectures of TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were identical to those of mammalian homologs, they contained five-repeated and seven-repeated complement control protein domains at their N-terminal regions, respectively. TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were synthesized and glycosylated in hemocytes and secreted to hemolymph plasma, which existed in a complex with C3 (TtC3, and their activation by microbes was absolutely Mg(2+-dependent. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TtC3b deposition was Mg(2+-dependent on Gram-positive bacteria or fungi, but not on Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this analysis demonstrated that Ca(2+-dependent lectins (C-reactive protein-1 and tachylectin-5A were required for TtC3b deposition on Gram-positive bacteria, and that a Ca(2+-independent lectin (Tachypleus plasma lectin-1 was definitely indispensable for TtC3b deposition on fungi. In contrast, a horseshoe crab lipopolysaccharide-sensitive protease factor C was necessary and sufficient to deposit TtC3b on Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that plasma lectins and factor C play key roles in microbe-specific TtC3b deposition in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

  12. N(pro) fusion technology: On-column complementation to improve efficiency in biopharmaceutical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, S; Missbichler, B; Walther, C; Sponring, M; Cserjan-Puschmann, M; Auer, B; Schneider, R; Dürauer, A

    2016-04-01

    N(pro) fusion technology, a highly efficient system for overexpression of proteins and peptides in Escherichia coli, was further developed by splitting the autoprotease N(pro) into two fragments to generate a functional complementation system. The size of the expression tag is thus reduced from 168 to 58 amino acids, so by 66%. Upon complementation of the fragments auto-proteolytic activity is restored. This process has been shown for three model proteins of different size, a short 16 aa-peptide, MCP-1, and lysozyme. Moreover, the complementation was still functional after immobilization of the N-terminal fragment to a solid support which enables recycling of the immobilized fragment. This strategy enhances overall productivity of N(pro) Fusion Technology and thus allows more efficient production of recombinant proteins with reduced costs and in higher yields. Overall, the N(pro) complementation system has, depending on the size of the target molecule, potential to increase the productivity up to 4 fold for batch refolding and even more for on-column refolding strategies by the proven possibility of regeneration of the immobilized fragment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic, molecular and functional analyses of complement factor I deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, S.C.; Trouw, L.A.; Renault, N.

    2009-01-01

    Complete deficiency of complement inhibitor factor I (FI) results in secondary complement deficiency due to uncontrolled spontaneous alternative pathway activation leading to susceptibility to infections. Current genetic examination of two patients with near complete FI deficiency and three patie...

  14. Role of complement in graft rejection after organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Ineke G. A.; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.; Hack, C. Erik

    2002-01-01

    Activation of the complement system may significantly contribute to the inflammatory reaction after solid organ transplantation. In allotransplantation, the complement system may be activated by ischemia/reperfusion and, possibly, by antibodies directed against the graft. In xenotransplantation from

  15. Complement Inhibitory Proteins and Their Role in Tumorigenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomlinson, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Complement is a major effector mechanism of the immune system. Membrane complement inhibitors on the surface of breast tumor cells, may play a crucial role in determining tumorigenesis and the outcome of antibody-mediated immunotherapy...

  16. On Wiener index of graph complements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaisankar Senbagamalar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Let $G$ be an $(n,m$-graph. We say that $G$ has property $(ast$ if for every pair of its adjacent vertices $x$ and $y$, there exists a vertex $z$, such that $z$ is not adjacent to either $x$ or $y$. If the graph $G$ has property $(ast$, then its complement $overline G$ is connected, has diameter 2, and its Wiener index is equal to $binom{n}{2}+m$, i.e., the Wiener index is insensitive of any other structural details of the graph $G$. We characterize numerous classes of graphs possessing property $(ast$, among which are trees, regular, and unicyclic graphs.

  17. Begin and start: aspect and complement choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tünde Nagy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers a semantic analysis of begin and start and their non-finite complementation: the to-infinitive and –ing constructions. The core idea of the paper is that the aspectual constructions ‘begin+ to infinitive’, ‘begin + ing’, ‘start+ to infinitive’, and ‘start+ ing’ have both a schematic and a prototypical meaning, and that the subtle differences between them are motivated by several factors, like viewing (perfectivity vs. imperfectivity, temporality (future orientation vs. ongoing reading dynamicity (graduality vs. abruptness, agentivity, etc.

  18. Comsat's TDMA traffic terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, M. C.; Bogaert, W. M.

    1985-06-01

    Comsat has installed two traffic terminals in the Etam earth-station and is currently installing a third in the new Roaring Creek earth-station to access the Intelsat TDMA network. This paper describes the Comsat TDMA traffic terminal equipment from the supergroup interface to the antenna. Comsat's 1: N redundancy approach for terrestrial interface equipment and DSI unit back-up is described as well as electrical path length, amplitude and group delay equalization techniques, special on-line RF monitoring and failure reporting facilities and the operation and maintenance center which can operate and perform diagnostic testing on up to four traffic terminals from a central location.

  19. Human factor H-related protein 2 (CFHR2 regulates complement activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes U Eberhardt

    Full Text Available Mutations and deletions within the human CFHR gene cluster on chromosome 1 are associated with diseases, such as dense deposit disease, CFHR nephropathy or age-related macular degeneration. Resulting mutant CFHR proteins can affect complement regulation. Here we identify human CFHR2 as a novel alternative pathway complement regulator that inhibits the C3 alternative pathway convertase and terminal pathway assembly. CFHR2 is composed of four short consensus repeat domains (SCRs. Two CFHR2 molecules form a dimer through their N-terminal SCRs, and each of the two C-terminal ends can bind C3b. C3b bound CFHR2 still allows C3 convertase formation but the CFHR2 bound convertases do not cleave the substrate C3. Interestingly CFHR2 hardly competes off factor H from C3b. Thus CFHR2 likely acts in concert with factor H, as CFHR2 inhibits convertases while simultaneously allowing factor H assisted degradation by factor I.

  20. Molecular insights into the surface-specific arrangement of complement C5 convertase enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, E.T.M.; Gorham R.D., Jr.; Ruyken, M.; Soppe, J.A.; Orhan, H.; Aerts, P.C.; de Haas, C.J.C.; Gros, P.; Rooijakkers, S.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Complement is a large protein network in plasma that is crucial for human immune defenses and a major cause of aberrant inflammatory reactions. The C5 convertase is a multi-molecular protease complex that catalyses the cleavage of native C5 into its biologically important products. So

  1. Relative roles of general and complementation language in theory-of-mind development: evidence from Cantonese and English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Him; Hsuan-Chih, Chen; Creed, Nikki; Ng, Lisa; Ping Wang, Sui; Mo, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Complex complements are clausal objects containing tensed verbs (e.g., that she cried) or infinitives (e.g., to cry), following main verbs of communication or mental activities (e.g., say, want). This research examined whether English- and Cantonese-speaking 4-year-olds' complement understanding uniquely predicts their representation of other minds (i.e., theory of mind). Results showed that neither meaning of main verbs (communication vs. desire) nor complement structure (tensed vs. infinitival) affected the correlation between complement understanding and theory of mind. More important, the correlation became insignificant after controlling for general language comprehension. These findings led to the conclusion that the syntax of complement per se does not contribute uniquely to theory-of-mind development; general language comprehension is a more important factor to consider. Copyright 2004 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  2. Imaging of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and septin 9 interaction by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in live cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Maya; Mabjeesh, Nicola J

    2017-05-09

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a major mediator of the hypoxic response involved in tumor progression. We had earlier described the interaction between septin 9 isoform 1 (SEPT9_i1) protein and the oxygen-regulated subunit, HIF-1α. SEPT9_i1 is a member of the conserved family of GTP-binding cytoskeleton septins. SEPT9_i1 stabilizes HIF-1α and facilitates its cytoplasmic-nuclear translocation. We utilized split yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) methodology to monitor the interaction between HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 in live cells. N-terminal (YN) and C-terminal (YC) split YFP chimeras with HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 on both their amino and carboxyl termini were generated. HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 chimeras were expressed in cancer cells and screened for functional complementation. SEPT9_i1-YN and YC-HIF-1α formed a long-lived highly stable complex upon interaction. The BiFC signal was increased in the presence of hypoxia-mimicking agents. In contrast, YC-ΔHLH-HIF-1α chimera, which lacked the helix-loop-helix domain that is essential for the interaction with SEPT9_i1 as well as the expression of SEPT9_i1 252-379 amino acids fragment required for the interaction with HIF-1α, significantly reduced the BiFC signal. The signal was also reduced when cells were treated with 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, an HSP90 inhibitor that inhibits HIF-1α. It was increased with fourchlorfenuron, a small molecule that increases the interaction between HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1. These results reconfirmed the interaction between HIF-1α and SEPT9_i1 that was imaged in live cells. This BiFC system represents a novel approach for studying the real-time interaction between these two proteins and will allow high-throughput drug screening to identity compounds that disrupt this interaction.

  3. The Production of Complement Clauses in Children with Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Gillian; Rose, Miranda; Eadie, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to provide a comprehensive description of complement-clause production in children with language impairment. Complement clauses were examined with respect to types of complement structure produced, verb use, and both semantic and syntactic accuracy. Method: A group of 17 children with language impairment…

  4. The Complement System in Dialysis : A Forgotten Story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppelaars, Felix; Faria, Bernardo; da Costa, Mariana Gaya; Franssen, Casper F. M.; van Son, Willem J.; Berger, Stefan P.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Seelen, Marc A.

    2018-01-01

    Significant advances have lead to a greater understanding of the role of the complement system within nephrology. The success of the first clinically approved complement inhibitor has created renewed appreciation of complement-targeting therapeutics. Several clinical trials are currently underway to

  5. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5240 Complement components immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement components...

  6. The Ancient Complement System: Role in Physiology and Defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Saskia

    2003-01-01

    The Ancient Complement System: Role in Microbial Clearance, Lipid Transport and Prevention of Autoimmunity This study concentrates on the complement system, which is part of the nonspecific or ‘innate’ immune system. The complement system may be considered a primordial enzyme system that was,

  7. Pathogenic role of complement in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Pieter van der

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was to study the role of complement in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) and to delineate the contribution of the different complement pathways involved. So far, in human renal IRI, the activation pathways of complement by ischemic proximal

  8. Terminated Multifamily Mortgages Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This dataset includes all terminated HUD Multifamily mortgages except those from the Hospital Mortgage Insurance Program. It includes the Holder and Servicer at the...

  9. Early Neoplastic Progression Is Complement Independent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin E. de Visser

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Infiltration of leukocytes into premalignant tissue is a common feature of many epithelial neoplasms and is thought to contribute to cancer development. However, the molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms underlying activation of innate host responses to enhanced neoplastic cell proliferation are largely unknown. Considering the importance of the complement system in regulating inflammation during acute pathologic tissue remodeling, we examined the functional significance of complement component 3 (C3 as a regulator of inflammatory cell infiltration and activation during malignant progression by using a transgenic mouse model of multistage epithelial carcinogenesis, e.g., HPV16 mice. Whereas abundant deposition of C3 is a characteristic feature of premalignant hyperplasias and dysplasias coincident with leukocyte infiltration in neoplastic tissue, genetic elimination of C3 neither affects inflammatory cell recruitment toward neoplastic skin nor impacts responding pathways downstream of inflammatory cell activation, e.g., keratinocyte hyperproliferation or angiogenesis. Taken together, these data suggest that complementindependent pathways are critical for leukocyte recruitment into neoplastic tissue and leukocytemediated potentiation of tumorigenesis.

  10. Participial Perception Verb Complements in Old English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowrey Brian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I shall examine the complements of perception verbs in Old English involving a noun phrase and a present participle. What kind of perception is described by these structures? Do they evoke the perception of an event, or that of an entity? It will be shown here that there are good reasons to believe that an NP + present participle sequence could function as the equivalent of the traditional “AcI” construction when used with perception verbs. I shall also attempt to determine to what extent the syntax of this construction matches the semantics: is the internal argument of the perception verb the NP alone, or some kind of combination of the NP and the participle? This question is particularly interesting in the light of Declerck’s (1982 remarks on participle perception verb complements in modern English. Finally, I shall take a look at morphological parametres: sometimes the participle inflects to agree with the NP, whereas on other occasions it does not. What might the implications of this kind of variation be?

  11. Antecedents of Customer Relationship Termination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geersbro, Jens; Ritter, Thomas

    relationships as a managerial task. This paper contributes by (1) developing a conceptualization of relationship termination competence and (2) analyzing its antecedents. The empirical results identify termination acceptance, definition non-customers, organizational relationship termination routines...

  12. Primary complement C5 deficiencies – Molecular characterization and clinical review of two families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, Lone; Fadnes, Dag; Permin, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Inherited deficiency states of the terminal complement component C5 are rare and often associated with increased risk of recurrent Neisseria infections. More than 50 cases with primary C5 deficiency have been reported. In spite of this, the molecular basis has only been documented in a few cases...... not reveal any differences between C5 deficient and sufficient individuals with regard to clinical presentation, apart from the susceptibility to Neisseria infections. Of note, one of the patients described here, and several C5 deficient patients from the literature had Neisseria meningitidis serotype B...

  13. Doc of prophage P1 is inhibited by its antitoxin partner Phd through fold complementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Pino, Abel; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Wyns, Lode

    2008-01-01

    Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin modules are involved in major physiological events set in motion under stress conditions. The toxin Doc (death on curing) from the phd/doc module on phage P1 hosts the C-terminal domain of its antitoxin partner Phd (prevents host death) through fold complementation...... evolutionary origin for the phd/doc operon. Doc induces growth arrest of Escherichia coli cells in a reversible manner, by targeting the protein synthesis machinery. Moreover, Doc activates the endogenous E. coli RelE mRNA interferase but does not require this or any other known chromosomal toxin...

  14. Theoretical implications of complement structure acquisition in Korean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y J

    1989-10-01

    The acquisition of complement phrasal constructions in Korean is examined in spontaneous speech data from two children, who were observed from one and a half to three years of age. In spite of typological differences between English and Korean, both syntactic and semantic characteristics are found to be shared by children acquiring complement constructions in the two languages. However, certain language-specific features of Korean complement structures make it possible to address theoretical points concerning the structure of infinitival complements which cannot be resolved with the acquisition data on English. The error pattern in the acquisition of certain 'subject-equi' verbs in Korean poses problems both for LFG and GB accounts of the constituent structure of infinitival complements and the acquisition of those constructions. On the basis of the Korean data, I propose that base-generated VP complements are acquired first, with semantically motivated reanalysis of previously acquired infinitival complement structures occurring at a later stage.

  15. The Complement System and Antibody-Mediated Transplant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Erik; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Thurman, Joshua M

    2015-12-15

    Complement activation is an important cause of tissue injury in patients with Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of transplanted organs. Complement activation triggers a strong inflammatory response, and it also generates tissue-bound and soluble fragments that are clinically useful markers of inflammation. The detection of complement proteins deposited within transplanted tissues has become an indispensible biomarker of AMR, and several assays have recently been developed to measure complement activation by Abs reactive to specific donor HLA expressed within the transplant. Complement inhibitors have entered clinical use and have shown efficacy for the treatment of AMR. New methods of detecting complement activation within transplanted organs will improve our ability to diagnose and monitor AMR, and they will also help guide the use of complement inhibitory drugs. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. A vital role for complement in heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement......Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors......, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial...

  17. Masturbation and Partnered Sex: Substitutes or Complements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnerus, Mark; Price, Joseph; Gordon, David

    2017-10-01

    Drawing upon a large, recent probability sample of American adults ages 18-60 (7648 men and 8090 women), we explored the association between sexual frequency and masturbation, evaluating the evidence for whether masturbation compensates for unavailable sex, complements (or augments) existing paired sexual activity, or bears little association with it. We found evidence supporting a compensatory relationship between masturbation and sexual frequency for men, and a complementary one among women, but each association was both modest and contingent on how content participants were with their self-reported frequency of sex. Among men and women, both partnered status and their sexual contentment were more obvious predictors of masturbation than was recent frequency of sex. We conclude that both hypotheses as commonly evaluated suffer from failing to account for the pivotal role of subjective sexual contentment in predicting masturbation.

  18. Genetic complementation groups in cockayne syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, K.; Kawai, K.; Kumahara, Y.; Ikenaga, M.; Okada, Y.

    1981-07-01

    Skin fibroblasts from patients with cockayne syndrome (CS cell) exhibited marked ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity as measured by colony-forming ability. Further, recovery of semiconservative DNA synthesis following UV irradiation was absent in CS cells, as it is in xeroderma pigmentosum cells. We found that the rate of semiconservative DNA synthesis measured at 12 h after 12 J/m2 of UV irradiation had recovered to nearly normal levels in binuclear cells obtained by the fusion of CS strains CS3BE (GM 1856) and CS7SE (GM1428) and of CS3BE (GM1856) and CS1BE (GM1629), but not of C57SE (GM1428) and CS1BE (GM1629). These results indicate that there are at least two genetic complementation groups in CS.

  19. Lectin Complement Pathway Proteins in Healthy Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Anne; Hansen, Annette Gudmann; Hansen, Søren W K

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the lectin pathway of complement activation, numerous clinical cohorts have been examined for one or more of the proteins, with the intention of uncovering the functions of the proteins or with the aim of discovering new biomarkers or diagnostic tools. To unveil the abnormal......, it is pivotal to know the normal. Our aim was to describe the concentrations of the eleven known proteins of the lectin pathway in serum and plasma and to uncover possible gender differences, age and diurnal variations, which must be taken into account for investigations in different cohorts. We examined...... the concentrations of all lectin pathway proteins (mannan-binding lectin (MBL), H-ficolin, L-ficolin, M-ficolin, collectin-K1, collectin-L1, MBL-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2), MASP-3, MBL associated protein of 44 kDa (MAp44) and MAp19 in 300 Danish blood donors in serum and EDTA plasma in established assays...

  20. Acidosis activates complement system in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Emeis

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the in vitro effect of different form s of acidosis (pH 7.0 on the formation of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Metabolic acidosis due to addition of hydrochloric acid (10 μ mol/ml blood or lactic acid (5.5 μ mol/ml to heparin blood (N=12 caused significant activation of C3a and C5a compared to control (both p=0.002. Respiratory acidosis activated C3a (p=0.007 and C5a (p=0.003 compared to normocapnic controls. Making blood samples with lactic acidosis hypocapnic resulted in a median pH of 7.37. In this respiratory compensated metabolic acidosis, C3a and C5a were not increased. These experiments show that acidosis itself and not lactate trigger for activation of complement components C3 and C5.

  1. The structure of bovine complement component 3 reveals the basis for thioester function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Folmer; Jenner, Lasse Bohl; Husted, Lise Bjerre

    2006-01-01

    The third component of complement (C3) is a 190 kDa glycoprotein essential for eliciting the complement response. The protein consists of two polypeptide chains (α and β) held together with a single disulfide bridge. The β-chain is made up of six MG domains of which one of which is shared...... but not in C5) is cleaved during complement activation. This mediates covalent attachment of the activated C3b to immune complexes and invading microorganisms hereby opsonising the target. We present the structure of bovine C3 determined at 3 Å resolution. The structure shows that the ester is deeply buried......-chain of C3, which appears essential for conformational changes in C3....

  2. Properdin Regulation of Complement Activation Affects Colitis in Interleukin 10 Gene-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Umang; Midgen, Craig A; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Stover, Cordula M; Stadnyk, Andrew W

    2015-07-01

    Interleukin 10-deficient mice (IL-10(-/-)) are a popular model used to dissect the mechanisms underlying inflammatory bowel diseases. The role of complement, a host defense mechanism that bridges the innate and adaptive immune systems, has not been described in this model. We therefore studied the effect of deficiency of properdin, a positive regulator of complement, on colitis in mice with the IL-10(-/-) background. For acute colitis, IL-10(-/-) and IL-10/properdin double knockout (DKO) or radiation bone marrow-reconstituted chimeric mice, had piroxicam added to their powdered chow for 14 days. For chronic colitis, 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate was added to the animals' water for 4 days then the mice were killed 8 weeks later. Colons were assessed for inflammation, cell infiltration, and cytokine and complement measurements. Bacterial translocation was measured by cultivating bacteria from organs on Luria broth agar plates. C3a and C5a levels and C9 deposition were all increased in piroxicam-fed IL-10(-/-) mice compared with mice not fed piroxicam. Piroxicam-fed DKO mice lacked increased C5a and C9 deposition combined with exacerbated colitis, reduced numbers of infiltrating neutrophils, and markedly higher local and systemic bacterial numbers compared with IL-10(-/-) mice. Bone marrow cells from IL-10(-/-) mice were sufficient to restore protection against the heightened colitis in piroxicam-fed DKO mice. Complement is activated in the IL-10(-/-) mouse mucosa in a properdin-dependent manner. In the absence of terminal complement activation, the inflammation is heightened, likely due to a lack of neutrophil control over microbes escaping from the intestines.

  3. Limited proteolysis of beta 2-microglobulin at Lys-58 by complement component C1s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Roepstorff, P; Thim, L

    1990-01-01

    a modified form of beta 2-microglobulin with a two-chain structure. The C-terminal Lys-58 in the A chain is highly susceptible to removal by a carboxypeptidase-B-like activity causing the formation of des-Lys58-beta 2-microglobulin. This is the first demonstration of a noncomplement protein substrate......We have now demonstrated that activated complement component C1s cleaves beta 2-microglobulin at the position identical to that at which beta 2-microglobulin is cleaved in serum of patients suffering from lung cancer. The main cleavage is in the disulphide loop C-terminal to Lys-58, generating...... for the proteolytic activity of C1s. The C1s-induced cleavage of beta 2-microglobulin can be inhibited in the presence of C1 esterase inhibitor, demonstrating a regulatory function of C1 esterase inhibitor in the C1s-induced cleavage of beta 2-microglobulin....

  4. Fcγ and Complement Receptors and Complement Proteins in Neutrophil Activation in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Contribution to Pathogenesis and Progression and Modulation by Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Balbina Paoliello-Paschoalato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a highly disabling disease that affects all structures of the joint and significantly impacts on morbidity and mortality in RA patients. RA is characterized by persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane lining the joint associated with infiltration of immune cells. Eighty to 90% of the leukocytes infiltrating the synovia are neutrophils. The specific role that neutrophils play in the onset of RA is not clear, but recent studies have evidenced that they have an important participation in joint damage and disease progression through the release of proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS, cytokines, and neutrophil extracellular traps, in particular during frustrated phagocytosis of immune complexes (ICs. In addition, the local and systemic activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of RA and other IC-mediated diseases. This review discusses (i the participation of Fcγ and complement receptors in mediating the effector functions of neutrophils in RA; (ii the contribution of the complement system and ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms to joint damage in RA; and (iii the use of plant extracts, dietary compounds, and isolated natural compounds in the treatment of RA, focusing on modulation of the effector functions of neutrophils and the complement system activity and/or activation.

  5. Complement System in Pathogenesis of AMD: Dual Player in Degeneration and Protection of Retinal Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosz P. Kawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of blindness among the elderly, especially in Western countries. Although the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical course of the disease are well described, its pathogenesis is not entirely elucidated. AMD is associated with a variety of biochemical abnormalities, including complement components deposition in the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch’s membrane-choriocapillaris complex. Although the complement system (CS is increasingly recognized as mediating important roles in retinal biology, its particular role in AMD pathogenesis has not been precisely defined. Unrestricted activation of the CS following injury may directly damage retinal tissue and recruit immune cells to the vicinity of active complement cascades, therefore detrimentally causing bystander damage to surrounding cells and tissues. On the other hand, recent evidence supports the notion that an active complement pathway is a necessity for the normal maintenance of the neurosensory retina. In this scenario, complement activation appears to have beneficial effect as it promotes cell survival and tissue remodeling by facilitating the rapid removal of dying cells and resulting cellular debris, thus demonstrating anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this review, we discuss both the beneficial and detrimental roles of CS in degenerative retina, focusing on the diverse aspects of CS functions that may promote or inhibit macular disease.

  6. DYNAMICS OF ACTIVITY OF SOME COMPONENTS OF COMPLEMENT IN TREATMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Andina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes immunoassay methods of determining the functional activity of the components C3 and C9 and C1 inhibitor for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in the treatment of patients. The activity of these components, as well as the activity and the amount of C1 inhibitor in the blood serum of children aged 6 months to 18 years suffering from atopic dermatitis have been analyzed before and after treatment to determine the involvement of the complement system in the pathogenesis of this disease. The developed methods of enzyme immunoassay for determination of the functional components of the complement system have shown high sensitivity and reliability. The activity of C9 component involved in the membrane attack of the complement was significantly below normal in children with atopic dermatitis. That indicates the involvement of membrane attack complex components in the skin necrotic processes. Component C3 activity is also reduced. C3 is the key component of the activation cascade involved in the inflammatory processes. Specific activity of C1 inhibitor increased before and during the treatment, indicating an increased biosynthesis of this acute phase protein. Positive tendency towards the normalization of the status of complement after treatment has been observed. Data obtained in this study indicate the involvement of complement system in the pathological process of atopic dermatitis in children.

  7. New insights into the reaction of Schistosoma mansoni cercaria to the human complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da'dara, Akram A; Krautz-Peterson, Greice

    2014-10-01

    Schistosomes are parasitic worms that have a complex life cycle. The larval stage cercaria, infectious to mammals, is described as highly susceptible to the complement system, largely due to the glycocalyx that covers the cercarial membrane. In an attempt to have a more complete understanding of cercaria reaction to the complement system, three different approaches were used. Live cercariae exposed to normal human serum (NHS) as source of complement factors were assessed for (i) membrane attack complex (MAC) deposition on the parasite surface, (ii) cercaria survival rate by Hoechst staining of parasite DNA, and (iii) transformation into schistosomula by detection of the glucose transporter protein 4 (SGTP4), a marker for new tegument formation. We found that 82-95% of cercariae directly exposed to NHS for 18 h were viable and retained their ability to shed the glycocalyx, suggesting minimal tegument damage. In contrast, inhibition of glycocalyx shedding using eserine caused significant MAC binding and parasite death. Culturing complement-exposed cercariae to measure long-term survival showed that more parasites died over time, reaching a survival rate of 18-31% by day 6 in culture. The reason for this slow death is unknown, but the surviving parasites were able to form a new tegument as shown by detection of SGTP4 on the parasite surface. Furthermore, we found that complement activation significantly damaged the acetabular gland ducts and lysed secretory vesicles released by transforming cercariae. These findings should contribute for future in vivo studies of the effects of the complement system in skin migrating cercariae.

  8. The visibility complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pocchiola, M; Vegter, G

    We introduce the visibility complex (rr 2-dimensional regular cell complex) of a collection of n pairwise disjoint convex obstacles in the plane. It can be considered as a subdivision of the set of free rays (i.e., rays whose origins lie in free space, the complement of the obstacles). Its cells

  9. Complement regulation and kidney diseases: recent knowledge of the double-edged roles of complement activation in nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Masashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2017-03-24

    The complement activation system plays important roles to maintain homeostasis in the host and to fight foreign invaders to protect the host. Therefore, the complement system is considered a core part of innate immunity which also cross-talks to acquired immunity. In the history of nephrology, the complement system is familiar to us, because complement protein or fragment deposition, including C3, C4, C1q, and/or C4d, is routinely estimated by immunohistochemistry to diagnose renal pathologies. The relationships between pathological mechanisms and complement activation have been investigated for renal diseases such as post-infectious glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis, and primary membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, which are usually accompanied by hypocomplementemia. However, unregulated complement activation in local areas might be associated with progression of various renal injuries even in the normocomplementemic patient. Recently, attention has focused on dysfunction of complement regulation in various diseases including renal diseases such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathy. Some mechanisms associated with complement activation in these diseases were clarified. In addition, lots of anti-complement agents were developed and some of the agents have become clinically available. Now, anti-complement therapies represent a realistic choice of therapeutic approaches for complement-related diseases. Research on roles of complement activation is proceeding into new stages in the field of nephrology and in other fields involving both basic and clinical research. We herein summarize relationships between the complement activation and regulation systems, their physiological effects and roles in maintenance of homeostasis in the host, and how dysregulation of the complement system triggers disease, especially renal disease.

  10. Smoke Exposure Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Lipid Accumulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium through Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:24711457

  11. A vital role for complement in heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena; Espevik, Terje; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne; Mollnes, Tom E; Hovland, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement system is crucial for the protozoa-host interaction. Thus, complement activation appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of a diverse range of cardiac conditions. Determination of the exact role of complement in the various heart diseases will hopefully help to identify patients that might benefit from therapeutic complement intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HOX gene complement and expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko W. Currie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater planarians are well known for their regenerative abilities. Less well known is how planarians maintain spatial patterning in long-lived adult animals or how they re-pattern tissues during regeneration. HOX genes are good candidates to regulate planarian spatial patterning, yet the full complement or genomic clustering of planarian HOX genes has not yet been described, primarily because only a few have been detectable by in situ hybridization, and none have given morphological phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi. Results Because the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (S. mediterranea is unsegmented, appendage less, and morphologically simple, it has been proposed that it may have a simplified HOX gene complement. Here, we argue against this hypothesis and show that S. mediterranea has a total of 13 HOX genes, which represent homologs to all major axial categories, and can be detected by whole-mount in situ hybridization using a highly sensitive method. In addition, we show that planarian HOX genes do not cluster in the genome, yet 5/13 have retained aspects of axially restricted expression. Finally, we confirm HOX gene axial expression by RNA deep-sequencing 6 anterior–posterior “zones” of the animal, which we provide as a dataset to the community to discover other axially restricted transcripts. Conclusions Freshwater planarians have an unappreciated HOX gene complexity, with all major axial categories represented. However, we conclude based on adult expression patterns that planarians have a derived body plan and their asexual lifestyle may have allowed for large changes in HOX expression from the last common ancestor between arthropods, flatworms, and vertebrates. Using our in situ method and axial zone RNAseq data, it should be possible to further understand the pathways that pattern the anterior–posterior axis of adult planarians.

  13. HOX gene complement and expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Ko W; Brown, David D R; Zhu, Shujun; Xu, ChangJiang; Voisin, Veronique; Bader, Gary D; Pearson, Bret J

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater planarians are well known for their regenerative abilities. Less well known is how planarians maintain spatial patterning in long-lived adult animals or how they re-pattern tissues during regeneration. HOX genes are good candidates to regulate planarian spatial patterning, yet the full complement or genomic clustering of planarian HOX genes has not yet been described, primarily because only a few have been detectable by in situ hybridization, and none have given morphological phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi. Because the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (S. mediterranea) is unsegmented, appendage less, and morphologically simple, it has been proposed that it may have a simplified HOX gene complement. Here, we argue against this hypothesis and show that S. mediterranea has a total of 13 HOX genes, which represent homologs to all major axial categories, and can be detected by whole-mount in situ hybridization using a highly sensitive method. In addition, we show that planarian HOX genes do not cluster in the genome, yet 5/13 have retained aspects of axially restricted expression. Finally, we confirm HOX gene axial expression by RNA deep-sequencing 6 anterior-posterior "zones" of the animal, which we provide as a dataset to the community to discover other axially restricted transcripts. Freshwater planarians have an unappreciated HOX gene complexity, with all major axial categories represented. However, we conclude based on adult expression patterns that planarians have a derived body plan and their asexual lifestyle may have allowed for large changes in HOX expression from the last common ancestor between arthropods, flatworms, and vertebrates. Using our in situ method and axial zone RNAseq data, it should be possible to further understand the pathways that pattern the anterior-posterior axis of adult planarians.

  14. Coal terminal guide 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    IBJ`s third edition of its annual guide to the world`s multi-user coal terminals includes comprehensive details of terminals in 44 countries. The guide sets out information for rapid and easy reference comprising contact, full address and communication details as well as berth dimensions and constraints, loading equipment and daily loading rate, annual loading capacity, daily discharge rate, annual discharge capacity, annual throughput capacity, storage facilities, stockyard capacity and equipment, processing facilities and so on. All information has been compiled from specific questionnaires and is presented alphabetically in country order.

  15. EXTREME AND TERMINAL STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.F. Litvitsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Author brings modern conception of extreme and terminal states, their types, likenesses and differences, etiology, key common chains of pathogenesis, principles and methods of their treatment. Pathophysiological data on one of extreme states — collapse — is described in details. Next publications will present the data on shock and coma.Key words: extreme and terminal states, vicious circle of pathogenesis, extreme regulation, principles of treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(3:74-80

  16. Electrical termination techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakey, W. E.; Schleicher, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    A technical review of high reliability electrical terminations for electronic equipment was made. Seven techniques were selected from this review for further investigation, experimental work, and preliminary testing. From the preliminary test results, four techniques were selected for final testing and evaluation. These four were: (1) induction soldering, (2) wire wrap, (3) percussive arc welding, and (4) resistance welding. Of these four, induction soldering was selected as the best technique in terms of minimizing operator errors, controlling temperature and time, minimizing joint contamination, and ultimately producing a reliable, uniform, and reusable electrical termination.

  17. Terminal oxidases of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S E; Schlarb-Ridley, B G; Bendall, D S; Howe, C J

    2005-08-01

    The respiratory chain of cyanobacteria appears to be branched rather than linear; furthermore, respiratory and photosynthetic electron-transfer chains co-exist in the thylakoid membrane and even share components. This review will focus on the three types of terminal respiratory oxidases identified so far on a genetic level in cyanobacteria: aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase, cytochrome bd-quinol oxidase and the alternative respiratory terminal oxidase. We summarize here their genetic, biochemical and biophysical characterization to date and discuss their interactions with electron donors as well as their physiological roles.

  18. Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome associated with a hybrid complement gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian P Venables

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sequence analysis of the regulators of complement activation (RCA cluster of genes at chromosome position 1q32 shows evidence of several large genomic duplications. These duplications have resulted in a high degree of sequence identity between the gene for factor H (CFH and the genes for the five factor H-related proteins (CFHL1-5; aliases CFHR1-5. CFH mutations have been described in association with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS. The majority of the mutations are missense changes that cluster in the C-terminal region and impair the ability of factor H to regulate surface-bound C3b. Some have arisen as a result of gene conversion between CFH and CFHL1. In this study we tested the hypothesis that nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats in the RCA cluster could result in the formation of a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene that predisposes to the development of aHUS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a family with many cases of aHUS that segregate with the RCA cluster we used cDNA analysis, gene sequencing, and Southern blotting to show that affected individuals carry a heterozygous CFH/CFHL1 hybrid gene in which exons 1-21 are derived from CFH and exons 22/23 from CFHL1. This hybrid encodes a protein product identical to a functionally significant CFH mutant (c.3572C>T, S1191L and c.3590T>C, V1197A that has been previously described in association with aHUS. CONCLUSIONS: CFH mutation screening is recommended in all aHUS patients prior to renal transplantation because of the high risk of disease recurrence post-transplant in those known to have a CFH mutation. Because of our finding it will be necessary to implement additional screening strategies that will detect a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene.

  19. Natural variation of the amino-terminal glutamine-rich domain in Drosophila argonaute2 is not associated with developmental defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hain

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila argonaute2 (ago2 gene plays a major role in siRNA mediated RNA silencing pathways. Unlike mammalian Argonaute proteins, the Drosophila protein has an unusual amino-terminal domain made up largely of multiple copies of glutamine-rich repeats (GRRs. We report here that the ago2 locus produces an alternative transcript that encodes a putative short isoform without this amino-terminal domain. Several ago2 mutations previously reported to be null alleles only abolish expression of the long, GRR-containing isoform. Analysis of drop out (dop mutations had previously suggested that variations in GRR copy number result in defects in RNAi and embryonic development. However, we find that dop mutations genetically complement transcript-null alleles of ago2 and that ago2 alleles with variant GRR copy numbers support normal development. In addition, we show that the assembly of the central RNAi machinery, the RISC (RNA induced silencing complex, is unimpaired in embryos when GRR copy number is altered. In fact, we find that GRR copy number is highly variable in natural D. melanogaster populations as well as in laboratory strains. Finally, while many other insects share an extensive, glutamine-rich Ago2 amino-terminal domain, its primary sequence varies drastically between species. Our data indicate that GRR variation does not modulate an essential function of Ago2 and that the amino-terminal domain of Ago2 is subject to rapid evolution.

  20. Settings for Terminal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corless, Inge B.

    1988-01-01

    Examines topics related to delivery of terminal care services: ability of various hospice programs to survive financially, contributions of various models of hospice care, impact of Medicare legislation on hospice movement, demonstration of unique hospice intervention, integration of spiritual care into hospice, and role of hospice in care of…

  1. Termination of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuite, M F; Stansfield, I

    1994-05-01

    One of three mRNA codons--UAA, UAG and UGA--is used to signal to the elongating ribosome that translation should be terminated at this point. Upon the arrival of the stop codon at the ribosomal acceptor(A)-site, a protein release factor (RF) binds to the ribosome resulting in the peptidyl transferase centre of the ribosome switching to a hydrolytic function to remove the completed polypeptide chain from the peptidyl-tRNA bound at the adjacent ribosomal peptidyl(P)-site. In this review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism of termination in the bacterium Escherichia coli will be summarised, paying particular attention to the roles of 16S ribosomal RNA and the release factors RF-1, RF-2 and RF-3 in stop codon recognition. Our understanding of the translation termination process in eukaryotes is much more rudimentary with the identity of the single eukaryotic release factor (eRF) still remaining elusive. Finally, several examples of how the termination mechanism can be subverted either to expand the genetic code (e.g. selenocysteine insertion at UGA codons) or to regulate the expression of mammalian retroviral or plant viral genomes will be discussed.

  2. Porcine complement regulators protect aortic smooth muscle cells poorly against human complement-induced lysis and proliferation: consequences for xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capey, Steven; van den Berg, Carmen W

    2005-05-01

    Accelerated atherosclerosis after transplantation has been observed and is characterized by smooth muscle cell proliferation in the graft. Porcine cells are frequently used in models of atherosclerosis and porcine organs are considered for use in transplantation. Complement (C) activation is known to play a major role in rejection of xenografts and is also considered to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and function of membrane bound regulators of complement (CReg) on porcine aortic smooth muscle cells (PASMC). The PASMC were assessed for expression of CReg and susceptibility to lysis by human C by flow-cytometry. The effect of various cytokines on CReg expression and C-susceptibility was investigated. The ability of human C to induce cell proliferation was assessed using the Alamar blue assay. The PASMC only express the CReg membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and CD59 on their cell surface. MCP expression was increased by interleukin (IL)-4. In contrast to porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC), PASMC were found to be surprisingly sensitive to C-mediated lysis, mainly due to a low level of expression of CD59. Human C-induced proliferation of PASMC, which was dependent on complete membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. Endogenously expressed CReg on PASMC poorly protect these cells to human C. Human C can induce proliferation of PASMC. In order to prevent accelerated atherosclerosis in porcine xenografts, increased levels of CReg not only have to be obtained on the endothelial cells but also on the smooth muscle cells.

  3. Complement selectively elicits glutamate release from nerve endings in different regions of mammal central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merega, Elisa; Di Prisco, Silvia; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Severi, Paolo; Pittaluga, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Our study was aimed at investigating whether complement, a complex of soluble and membrane-associated serum proteins, could, in addition to its well-documented post-synaptic activity, also pre-synaptically affect the release of classic neurotransmitters in central nervous system (CNS). Complement (dilution 1 : 10 to 1 : 10000) elicited the release of preloaded [(3) H]-d-aspartate ([(3) H]d-ASP) and endogenous glutamate from mouse cortical synaptosomes in a dilution-dependent manner. It also evoked [(3) H]d-ASP release from mouse hippocampal, cerebellar, and spinal cord synaptosomes, as well as from rat and human cortical nerve endings, but left unaltered the release of GABA, [(3) H]noradrenaline or [(3) H]acetylcholine. Lowering external Na(+) (from 140 to 40 mM) or Ca(2+) (from 1.2 to 0.1 mM) ions prevented the 1 : 300 complement-evoked [(3) H]d-ASP release from mouse cortical synaptosomes. Complement-induced releasing effect was unaltered in synaptosomes entrapped with the Ca(2+) ions chelator 1,2-bis-(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N', tetra-acetic acid or with pertussis toxin. Nifedipine,/ω-conotoxin GVIA/ω-conotoxin MVIIC mixture as well as the vesicular ATPase blocker bafilomycin A1 were also inefficacious. The excitatory amino acid transporter blocker DL-threo-ß-benzyloxyaspartic acid, on the contrary, reduced the complement-evoked releasing effect in a concentration-dependent manner. We concluded that complement-induced releasing activity is restricted to glutamatergic nerve endings, where it was accounted for by carrier-mediated release. Our observations afford new insights into the molecular events accounting for immune and CNS crosstalk. We investigated whether complement, a complex of soluble and membrane-associated serum proteins, could pre-synaptically affect the release of classic neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS). Our data provide evidence that complement-induced releasing activity is restricted to glutamatergic nerve endings

  4. Genetic complementation studies of multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, A L

    1979-12-01

    Cultured fibroblasts from two individuals with multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) were found to have decreased activities of arylsulfatases (aryl-sulfate sulfohydrolase, EC 3.1.6.1) A, B, and C as well as iduronate-sulfate sulfatase, sulfamidase, and N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase. The activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase was decreased in one line but not in the other. Mixtures of MSD cell extracts with extracts from normal cells did not result in inhibition of normal sulfatase activities. Mixtures of MSD cell extracts with extracts of fibroblasts from patients with Hunter or Sanfilippo A syndrome did not activate iduronate-sulfate sulfatase or sulfamidase activity. Heterokaryons formed by fusion of MSD cells with Sanfilippo A fibroblasts demonstrated a partial correction of the enzyme deficiency. In similar manner, MSD-Hunter heterokaryons showed a significant increase in iduronate-sulfate-sulfatase activity. Genetic complementation in heterokaryons of MSD fibroblasts and cells of either Sanfilippo A or Hunter syndrome implies a genetic defect in MSD different from that causing specific sulfatase deficiencies.

  5. Quantification of complement system activation by measuring C5b-9 cell surface deposition using a cell-ELISA technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyungtaek; Lee, Ji-Su; Yoo, Seungmin; Lee, Myung-Shin

    2014-12-15

    The complement system is an important aspect of immune defense against microbial invasion. Eukaryotic cells express various complement regulatory proteins to protect them from uncontrolled complement activation. However, some eukaryotic cells possess constitutive complement system activation that does not require specific triggering factors, which is known to have unexpected effects on cell proliferation and survival. This area of research is still preliminary and a standard method to measure complement system activation in eukaryotic cells has yet to be identified. Here, we present a quantitative in vitro method to measure complement system activation in eukaryotic cells by detecting C5b-9, the membrane attack complex, on cell surfaces. The results obtained using this assay correlated with C3b deposition measured using flow cytometry and C5b-9 deposition detected using an immunofluorescence assay. Furthermore, we showed that various cancer cell lines displayed different levels of complement system activation by using this assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A split luciferase complementation assay for studying in vivo protein-protein interactions in filamentous ascomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Cho, Eun Ji; Jo, Seong mi; Sung, Bo Reum; Lee, Seunghoon; Yun, Sung-Hwan

    2012-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions play important roles in controlling many cellular events. To date, several techniques have been developed for detection of protein-protein interactions in living cells, among which split luciferase complementation has been applied in animal and plant cells. Here, we examined whether the split luciferase assay could be used in filamentous ascomycetes, such as Gibberella zeae and Cochliobolus heterostrophus. The coding sequences of two strongly interacting proteins (the F-box protein, FBP1, and its partner SKP1) in G. zeae, under the control of the cryparin promoter from Cryphonectria parasitica, were translationally fused to the C- and N-terminal fragments of firefly luciferase (luc), respectively. Each fusion product inserted into a fungal transforming vector carrying the gene for resistance to either geneticin or hygromycin B, was transformed into both fungi. We detected complementation of split luciferase proteins driven by interaction of the two fungal proteins with a high luminescence intensity-to-background ratio only in the fungal transformants expressing both N-luc and C-luc fusion constructs. Using this system, we also confirmed a novel protein interaction between transcription factors, GzMCM1 and FST12 in G. zeae, which could hardly be proven by the yeast two-hybrid method. This is the first study demonstrating that monitoring of split luciferase complementation is a sensitive and efficient method of studying in vivo protein-protein interactions in filamentous ascomycetes.

  7. Saliva of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) inhibits classical and alternative complement pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Naylene C S; Vale, Vladimir F; Franco, Paula F; Gontijo, Nelder F; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Pereira, Marcos H; Sant'Anna, Mauricio R V; Rodrigues, Daniel S; Lima, Walter S; Fux, Blima; Araujo, Ricardo N

    2016-08-11

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is the main ectoparasite affecting livestock worldwide. For a successful parasitism, ticks need to evade several immune responses of their hosts, including the activation of the complement system. In spite of the importance of R. microplus, previous work only identified one salivary molecule that blocks the complement system. The current study describes complement inhibitory activities induced by R. microplus salivary components and mechanisms elicited by putative salivary proteins on both classical and alternative complement pathways. We found that R. microplus saliva from fully- and partially engorged females was able to inhibit both pathways. Saliva acts strongly at the initial steps of both complement activation pathways. In the classical pathway, the saliva blocked C4 cleavage, and hence, deposition of C4b on the activation surface, suggesting that the inhibition occurs at some point between C1q and C4. In the alternative pathway, saliva acts by binding to initial components of the cascade (C3b and properdin) thereby preventing the C3 convertase formation and reducing C3b production and deposition as well as cleavage of factor B. Saliva has no effect on formation or decay of the C6 to C8 components of the membrane attack complex. The saliva of R. microplus is able to inhibit the early steps of classical and alternative pathways of the complement system. Saliva acts by blocking C4 cleavage and deposition of C4b on the classical pathway activation surface and, in the alternative pathway, saliva bind to initial components of the cascade (C3b and properdin) thereby preventing the C3 convertase formation and the production and deposition of additional C3b.

  8. Genetic evidence for involvement of classical complement pathway in induction of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Erdem; Scott, Benjamin G; Goluszko, Elzbieta; Higgs, Stephen; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2003-10-01

    Abs to acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and complement are the major constituents of pathogenic events causing neuromuscular junction destruction in both myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG). To analyze the differential roles of the classical vs alternative complement pathways in EAMG induction, we immunized C3(-/-), C4(-/-), C3(+/-), and C4(+/-) mice and their control littermates (C3(+/+) and C4(+/+) mice) with AChR in CFA. C3(-/-) and C4(-/-) mice were resistant to disease, whereas mice heterozygous for C3 or C4 displayed intermediate susceptibility. Although C3(-/-) and C4(-/-) mice had anti-AChR Abs in their sera, anti-AChR IgG production by C3(-/-) mice was significantly suppressed. Both C3(-/-) and C4(-/-) mice had reduced levels of B cells and increased expression of apoptotis inducers (Fas ligand, CD69) and apoptotic cells in lymph nodes. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the neuromuscular junction of C3(-/-) and C4(-/-) mice lacked C3 or membrane attack complex deposits, despite having IgG deposits, thus providing in vivo evidence for the incapacity of anti-AChR IgGs to induce full-blown EAMG without the aid of complements. The data provide the first direct genetic evidence for the classical complement pathway in the induction of EAMG induced by AChR immunization. Accordingly, severe MG and other Ab- and complement-mediated diseases could be effectively treated by inhibiting C4, thus leaving the alternative complement pathway intact.

  9. Lectin complement pathway proteins in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troldborg, A; Hansen, A; Hansen, S W K; Jensenius, J C; Stengaard-Pedersen, K; Thiel, S

    2017-04-01

    Since the discovery of the lectin pathway of complement activation, numerous clinical cohorts have been examined for one or more proteins, with the intention of uncovering the functions of the proteins or with the aim of discovering new biomarkers or diagnostic tools. To unveil the abnormal, it is pivotal to know the normal. Our aim was to describe the concentrations of the 11 known proteins of the lectin pathway in serum and plasma and to uncover possible gender differences, age and diurnal variations, which must be taken into account for investigation in different cohorts. We examined the concentrations of all lectin pathway proteins mannan-binding lectin (MBL), H-ficolin, L-ficolin, M-ficolin, collectin-K1, collectin-L1, MBL-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2), MASP-3, MBL-associated protein of 44 kDa (MAp44) and MAp19 in 300 Danish blood donors in serum and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) plasma in established assays, and we further developed a new assay to measure MASP-1 in the same samples. We found significant differences in concentrations between serum and plasma for all proteins except for MBL and MASP-3. H-ficolin, M-ficolin and MAp19 displayed convincing diurnal variation. H-ficolin, in particular, halved from morning to the middle of the night. There were gender differences for most proteins, whereas age did not seem to influence concentration. The present study underlines the necessity of considering which material to use, correct matching and a trial design that takes the nature of the protein into account in order for the outcome of cohort studies to have significant relevance. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  10. Complement-coagulation cross-talk: a potential mediator of the physiological activation of complement by low pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Ibrahim Kenawy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is a major constituent of the innate immune system. It not only bridges innate and adaptive arms of the immune system but also links the immune system with the coagulation system. Current understanding of the role of complement has extended far beyond fighting of infections, and now encompasses maintenance of homeostasis, tissue regeneration and pathophysiology of multiple diseases. It has been known for many years that complement activation is strongly pH sensitive, but only relatively recently has the physiological significance of this been appreciated. Most complement assays are carried out at the physiological pH 7.4. However, pH in some extracellular compartments, for example renal tubular fluid in parts of the tubule, and extracellular fluid at inflammation loci, is sufficiently acidic to activate complement. The exact molecular mechanism of this activation is still unclear, but possible cross talk between the contact system and complement may exist at low pH with subsequent complement activation. The current article reviews the published data on the effect of pH on the contact system and complement activity, the nature of the pH sensor molecules, and the clinical implications of these effects. Of particular interest is chronic kidney disease (CKD accompanied by metabolic acidosis, in which therapeutic alkalinisation of urine has been shown significantly to reduce tubular complement activation products, an effect which may have important implications for slowing progression of CKD.

  11. The Bordetella pertussis Bps polysaccharide enhances lung colonization by conferring protection from complement-mediated killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Tridib; Johnson, John B; Kock, Nancy D; Parks, Griffith D; Deora, Rajendar

    2014-07-01

    Bordetella pertussis is a human-restricted Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes whooping cough or pertussis. Pertussis is the leading vaccine preventable disease that is resurging in the USA and other parts of the developed world. There is an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which B. pertussis evades killing and clearance by the complement system, a first line of host innate immune defence. The present study examined the role of the Bps polysaccharide to resist complement activity in vitro and in the mouse respiratory tract. The isogenic bps mutant strain containing a large non-polar in-frame deletion of the bpsA-D locus was more sensitive to serum and complement mediated killing than the WT strain. As determined by Western blotting, flow cytometry and electron microscopic studies, the heightened sensitivity of the mutant strain was due to enhanced deposition of complement proteins and the formation of membrane attack complex, the end-product of complement activation. Bps was sufficient to confer complement resistance as evidenced by a Bps-expressing Escherichia coli being protected by serum killing. Additionally, Western blotting and flow cytometry assays revealed that Bps inhibited the deposition of complement proteins independent of other B. pertussis factors. The bps mutant strain colonized the lungs of complement-deficient mice at higher levels than that observed in C57Bl/6 mice. These results reveal a previously unknown interaction between Bps and the complement system in controlling B. pertussis colonization of the respiratory tract. These findings also make Bps a potential target for the prevention and therapy of whooping cough. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Exploitation of the complement system by oncogenic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus for cell survival and persistent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Shin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During evolution, herpesviruses have developed numerous, and often very ingenious, strategies to counteract efficient host immunity. Specifically, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV eludes host immunity by undergoing a dormant stage, called latency wherein it expresses a minimal number of viral proteins to evade host immune activation. Here, we show that during latency, KSHV hijacks the complement pathway to promote cell survival. We detected strong deposition of complement membrane attack complex C5b-9 and the complement component C3 activated product C3b on Kaposi's sarcoma spindle tumor cells, and on human endothelial cells latently infected by KSHV, TIME-KSHV and TIVE-LTC, but not on their respective uninfected control cells, TIME and TIVE. We further showed that complement activation in latently KSHV-infected cells was mediated by the alternative complement pathway through down-regulation of cell surface complement regulatory proteins CD55 and CD59. Interestingly, complement activation caused minimal cell death but promoted the survival of latently KSHV-infected cells grown in medium depleted of growth factors. We found that complement activation increased STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation (Y705 of KSHV-infected cells, which was required for the enhanced cell survival. Furthermore, overexpression of either CD55 or CD59 in latently KSHV-infected cells was sufficient to inhibit complement activation, prevent STAT3 Y705 phosphorylation and abolish the enhanced survival of cells cultured in growth factor-depleted condition. Together, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus subverts and exploits the host innate immune system to promote viral persistent infection.

  13. Ice age terminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R Lawrence; Broecker, Wallace S; Denton, George H; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Yongjin; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xianfeng

    2009-10-09

    230Th-dated oxygen isotope records of stalagmites from Sanbao Cave, China, characterize Asian Monsoon (AM) precipitation through the ends of the third- and fourthmost recent ice ages. As a result, AM records for the past four glacial terminations can now be precisely correlated with those from ice cores and marine sediments, establishing the timing and sequence of major events. In all four cases, observations are consistent with a classic Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity trigger for an initial retreat of northern ice sheets. Meltwater and icebergs entering the North Atlantic alter oceanic and atmospheric circulation and associated fluxes of heat and carbon, causing increases in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperatures that drive the termination in the Southern Hemisphere. Increasing CO2 and summer insolation drive recession of northern ice sheets, with probable positive feedbacks between sea level and CO2.

  14. Equilibrium and Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Oury

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a reduction of the termination problem for a Turing machine (in the simplified form of the Post correspondence problem to the problem of determining whether a continuous-time Markov chain presented as a set of Kappa graph-rewriting rules has an equilibrium. It follows that the problem of whether a computable CTMC is dissipative (ie does not have an equilibrium is undecidable.

  15. Coal terminal project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-03-01

    Malaysia is building the necessary infrastructure to cope with an increasing demand for electricity. Its restructured energy policy has led to construction of the 2,100 MW Manjung coal-fired power plant in the state of Perak, for which coal has to be imported via the new Lekiv Bulk Terminal (LBT) adjacent to the plant. Contracts for the LBC and the TNBJ coal stockyard were awarded to the Koch Consortium. The article describes equipment for handling and storing coal. 4 photos.

  16. Terminal Satisfiability in GSTE

    OpenAIRE

    Yongsheng Xu; Guowu Yang; Zhengwei Chang; Desheng Zheng; Wensheng Guo

    2014-01-01

    Generalized symbolic trajectory evaluation (GSTE) is an extension of symbolic trajectory evaluation (STE) and a method of model checking. GSTE specifications are given as assertion graphs. There are four efficient methods to verify whether a circuit model obeys an assertion graph in GSTE, Model Checking Strong Satisfiability (SMC), Model Checking Normal Satisfiability (NMC), Model Checking Fair Satisfiability (FMC), and Model Checking Terminal Satisfiability (TMC). SMC, NMC, and FMC have been...

  17. Demand Heterogeneity and the Adoption of Platform Complements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Rietveld (Joost); J.P. Eggers

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper offers a demand-based theory of how platform maturity affects the adoption of platform complements. We argue that differences between early and late adopters of the platform include willingness to pay for the platform-and-complement bundle, risk preferences, preference for

  18. The role of complement activation in thrombosis and hemolytic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, John; Terry, Hunter S; Kleinert, Dorothy; Laurence, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe complement activation in hemostatic and pathologic states of coagulation and in the acquired and congenital hemolytic anemias. We review published and emerging data on the involvement of the classic, alternative and lectin-based complement pathways in coagulation and the hemolytic anemias. The alternative pathway in particular is always "on," at low levels, and is particularly sensitive to hyper-activation in a variety of physiologic and pathologic states including infection, autoimmune disorders, thrombosis and pregnancy, requiring tight control predicated on a variety of soluble and membrane bound regulatory proteins. In acquired hemolytic anemias such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and cold agglutinin disease (CAD), the complement system directly induces red blood cell injury, resulting in intravascular and extravascular hemolysis. In congenital hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, the complement system may also contribute to thrombosis and vascular disease. Complement activation may also lead to a storage lesion in red blood cells prior to transfusion. Complement pathways are activated in hemolytic anemias and are closely linked with thrombosis. In acquired disorders such as PNH and possibly CAD, inhibition of the alternative complement pathway improves clinical outcomes and reduces thrombosis risk. Whether complement inhibition has a similar role in congenital hemolytic anemias apart from the atypical hemolytic-uremic (aHUS)-type thrombotic microangiopathies remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Complement Attack against Aspergillus and Corresponding Evasion Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Speth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis shows a high mortality rate particularly in immunocompromised patients. Perpetually increasing numbers of affected patients highlight the importance of a clearer understanding of interactions between innate immunity and fungi. Innate immunity is considered to be the most significant host defence against invasive fungal infections. Complement represents a crucial part of this first line defence and comprises direct effects against invading pathogens as well as bridging functions to other parts of the immune network. However, despite the potency of complement to attack foreign pathogens, the prevalence of invasive fungal infections is increasing. Two possible reasons may explain that phenomenon: First, complement activation might be insufficient for an effective antifungal defence in risk patients (due to, e.g., low complement levels, poor recognition of fungal surface, or missing interplay with other immune elements in immunocompromised patients. On the other hand, fungi may have developed evasion strategies to avoid recognition and/or eradication by complement. In this review, we summarize the most important interactions between Aspergillus and the complement system. We describe the various ways of complement activation by Aspergillus and the antifungal effects of the system, and also show proven and probable mechanisms of Aspergillus for complement evasion.

  20. Complement evasion by Borrelia burgdorferi: it takes three to tango

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Taeye, Steven W.; Kreuk, Lieselotte; van Dam, Alje P.; Hovius, Joppe W.; Schuijt, Tim J.

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is one of the major innate defense mechanisms Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato has to overcome to establish an infection of mammalian hosts and to cause Lyme borreliosis in humans. Borrelia prevents complement-mediated killing during host colonization through (i) recruitment of

  1. Inactivation of complement by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, H M; Finke, J H; Elgert, K D; Cambell, B J; Barrett, J T

    1979-07-01

    Zymosan depletion of serum complement in guinea pigs rendered them highly resistant to lesion by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom. Guinea pigs deficient in C4 of the complement system are as sensitive to the venom as normal guinea pigs. The injection of 35 micrograms of whole recluse venom intradermally into guinea pigs lowered their complement level by 35.7%. Brown recluse spider venom in concentrations as slight as 0.02 micrograms protein/ml can totally inactivate one CH50 of guinea pig complement in vitro. Bee, scorpion, and other spider venoms had no influence on the hemolytic titer of complement. Fractionation of recluse spider venom by Sephadex G-200 filtration separated the complement-inactivating property of the venom into three major regions which could be distinguished on the basis of heat stability as well as size. None was neutralized by antivenom. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of venom resolved the complement inactivators into five fractions. Complement inactivated by whole venom or the Sephadex fractions could be restored to hemolytic activity by supplements of fresh serum but not by heat-inactivated serum, pure C3, pure C5, or C3 and C5 in combination.

  2. Production of complement components by cells of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, R; van Essen, M F; van Kooten, C; Trouw, L A

    2017-05-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune defence. It contributes not only to local inflammation, removal and killing of pathogens, but it also assists in shaping of the adaptive immune response. Besides a role in inflammation, complement is also involved in physiological processes such as waste disposal and developmental programmes. The complement system comprises several soluble and membrane-bound proteins. The bulk of the soluble proteins is produced mainly by the liver. While several complement proteins are produced by a wide variety of cell types, other complement proteins are produced by only a few related cell types. As these data suggest that local production by specific cell types may have specific functions, more detailed studies have been employed recently analysing the local and even intracellular role of these complement proteins. Here we review the current knowledge about extrahepatic production and/or secretion of complement components. More specifically, we address what is known about complement synthesis by cells of the human immune system. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  3. Rat C-reactive protein activates the autologous complement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz Padilla, Niubel; Bleeker, Wim K.; Lubbers, Yvonne; Rigter, Gemma M. M.; van Mierlo, Gerard J.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Hack, C. Erik

    2003-01-01

    Activation of complement is a biological function of human C-reactive protein (hCRP), whereas rat CRP (rCRP) has been claimed to be unable to activate complement. As important biological functions of proteins are probably conserved among species, we re-evaluated, using various ligands, the

  4. Complement Attack against Aspergillus and Corresponding Evasion Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis shows a high mortality rate particularly in immunocompromised patients. Perpetually increasing numbers of affected patients highlight the importance of a clearer understanding of interactions between innate immunity and fungi. Innate immunity is considered to be the most significant host defence against invasive fungal infections. Complement represents a crucial part of this first line defence and comprises direct effects against invading pathogens as well as bridging functions to other parts of the immune network. However, despite the potency of complement to attack foreign pathogens, the prevalence of invasive fungal infections is increasing. Two possible reasons may explain that phenomenon: First, complement activation might be insufficient for an effective antifungal defence in risk patients (due to, e.g., low complement levels, poor recognition of fungal surface, or missing interplay with other immune elements in immunocompromised patients). On the other hand, fungi may have developed evasion strategies to avoid recognition and/or eradication by complement. In this review, we summarize the most important interactions between Aspergillus and the complement system. We describe the various ways of complement activation by Aspergillus and the antifungal effects of the system, and also show proven and probable mechanisms of Aspergillus for complement evasion. PMID:22927844

  5. Schur complements of matrices with acyclic bipartite graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Thomas Johann; Olesky, D.D.; van den Driessche, P.

    2005-01-01

    Bipartite graphs are used to describe the generalized Schur complements of real matrices having nos quare submatrix with two or more nonzero diagonals. For any matrix A with this property, including any nearly reducible matrix, the sign pattern of each generalized Schur complement is shown...

  6. Terminating DNA Tile Assembly with Nanostructured Caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Jiang, Ruoyu; Reinhart, Seth; Mohammed, Abdul M; Jorgenson, Tyler D; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-10-24

    Precise control over the nucleation, growth, and termination of self-assembly processes is a fundamental tool for controlling product yield and assembly dynamics. Mechanisms for altering these processes programmatically could allow the use of simple components to self-assemble complex final products or to design processes allowing for dynamic assembly or reconfiguration. Here we use DNA tile self-assembly to develop general design principles for building complexes that can bind to a growing biomolecular assembly and terminate its growth by systematically characterizing how different DNA origami nanostructures interact with the growing ends of DNA tile nanotubes. We find that nanostructures that present binding interfaces for all of the binding sites on a growing facet can bind selectively to growing ends and stop growth when these interfaces are presented on either a rigid or floppy scaffold. In contrast, nucleation of nanotubes requires the presentation of binding sites in an arrangement that matches the shape of the structure's facet. As a result, it is possible to build nanostructures that can terminate the growth of existing nanotubes but cannot nucleate a new structure. The resulting design principles for constructing structures that direct nucleation and termination of the growth of one-dimensional nanostructures can also serve as a starting point for programmatically directing two- and three-dimensional crystallization processes using nanostructure design.

  7. Physicochemical signatures of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Tardiff, Mark F.; Xu, Zhixiang; Hourcade, Dennis E.; Pham, Christine T. N.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Weinberger, Kilian Q.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles are potentially powerful therapeutic tools that have the capacity to target drug payloads and imaging agents. However, some nanoparticles can activate complement, a branch of the innate immune system, and cause adverse side-effects. Recently, we employed an in vitro hemolysis assay to measure the serum complement activity of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles that differed by size, surface charge, and surface chemistry, quantifying the nanoparticle-dependent complement activity using a metric called Residual Hemolytic Activity (RHA). In the present work, we have used a decision tree learning algorithm to derive the rules for estimating nanoparticle-dependent complement response based on the data generated from the hemolytic assay studies. Our results indicate that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, namely, size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and mole percentage of the active surface ligand of a nanoparticle, can serve as good descriptors for prediction of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation in the decision tree modeling framework.

  8. [The complement system: a double edge sword in tumor progression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugan, Marie; Noe, Remi; Herman Fridman, Wolf; Sautes-Fridman, Catherine; Roumenina, Lubka T

    2017-10-01

    The complement system is a key component of the innate immunity, playing a role in pathogen elimination and in host homeostasis. The complement system has been considered for long time as an anti-tumoral element. However, recent studies showed a pro-tumoral effect of complement and particularly of the anaphylatoxines C3a and C5a in a large variety of tumor types. Complement proteins act on different levels of tumor progression, affecting the tumor cells, the angiogenesis and the immune microenvironment. The impact of the complement system on tumor progression seems to be cancer type-dependent and this has to be taken into account in the establishment of potential biomarkers and development of therapeutic strategies. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  9. Complement monitoring of Pluronic 127 gel and micelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamad, Islam; Hunter, A Christy; Moghimi, Seyed Moien

    2013-01-01

    vascular occlusion. We show that poloxamer gel can trigger the complement system, which is an integral part of innate immunity and its inadvertent activation can induce clinically significant anaphylaxis. Complement activation by the poloxamer gel is through the alternative pathway, but material...... transformations from gel to the solution state further incite complement through calcium-sensitive pathways, where a role for C1q and antibodies has been eliminated. Poloxamer addition to plasma/serum (at levels above its critical micelle concentration, cmc) induced formation of large and diffused structures......, which may have been responsible for triggering complement. Since poloxamer 407 administration has been reported to cause significant changes in plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels we further examined the role of lipoproteins in poloxamer-mediated complement activation. Our results show...

  10. Image reconstruction of fluorescent molecular tomography based on the tree structured Schur complement decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jiajun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inverse problem of fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT often involves complex large-scale matrix operations, which may lead to unacceptable computational errors and complexity. In this research, a tree structured Schur complement decomposition strategy is proposed to accelerate the reconstruction process and reduce the computational complexity. Additionally, an adaptive regularization scheme is developed to improve the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Methods The global system is decomposed level by level with the Schur complement system along two paths in the tree structure. The resultant subsystems are solved in combination with the biconjugate gradient method. The mesh for the inverse problem is generated incorporating the prior information. During the reconstruction, the regularization parameters are adaptive not only to the spatial variations but also to the variations of the objective function to tackle the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Results Simulation results demonstrate that the strategy of the tree structured Schur complement decomposition obviously outperforms the previous methods, such as the conventional Conjugate-Gradient (CG and the Schur CG methods, in both reconstruction accuracy and speed. As compared with the Tikhonov regularization method, the adaptive regularization scheme can significantly improve ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Conclusions The methods proposed in this paper can significantly improve the reconstructed image quality of FMT and accelerate the reconstruction process.

  11. The Ethics of Terminal Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agich, George J.

    1978-01-01

    Need for a critical and analytical approach to ethics of terminal care is suggested by considering a series of unexamined questions regarding justification of terminal care. If terminal care is a moral and ethical enterprise, such considerations must be given a more prominent place in discussions of the hospice movement. (Author)

  12. Functional analysis of archaeal MBF1 by complementation studies in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebers Bettina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiprotein-bridging factor 1 (MBF1 is a transcriptional co-activator that bridges a sequence-specific activator (basic-leucine zipper (bZIP like proteins (e.g. Gcn4 in yeast or steroid/nuclear-hormone receptor family (e.g. FTZ-F1 in insect and the TATA-box binding protein (TBP in Eukaryotes. MBF1 is absent in Bacteria, but is well- conserved in Eukaryotes and Archaea and harbors a C-terminal Cro-like Helix Turn Helix (HTH domain, which is the only highly conserved, classical HTH domain that is vertically inherited in all Eukaryotes and Archaea. The main structural difference between archaeal MBF1 (aMBF1 and eukaryotic MBF1 is the presence of a Zn ribbon motif in aMBF1. In addition MBF1 interacting activators are absent in the archaeal domain. To study the function and therefore the evolutionary conservation of MBF1 and its single domains complementation studies in yeast (mbf1Δ as well as domain swap experiments between aMBF1 and yMbf1 were performed. Results In contrast to previous reports for eukaryotic MBF1 (i.e. Arabidopsis thaliana, insect and human the two archaeal MBF1 orthologs, TMBF1 from the hyperthermophile Thermoproteus tenax and MMBF1 from the mesophile Methanosarcina mazei were not functional for complementation of an Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking Mbf1 (mbf1Δ. Of twelve chimeric proteins representing different combinations of the N-terminal, core domain, and the C-terminal extension from yeast and aMBF1, only the chimeric MBF1 comprising the yeast N-terminal and core domain fused to the archaeal C-terminal part was able to restore full wild-type activity of MBF1. However, as reported previously for Bombyx mori, the C-terminal part of yeast Mbf1 was shown to be not essential for function. In addition phylogenetic analyses revealed a common distribution of MBF1 in all Archaea with available genome sequence, except of two of the three Thaumarchaeota; Cenarchaeum symbiosum A and Nitrosopumilus maritimus

  13. Hemolytic plate assay for quantification of active human complement component C3 using methylamine-treated plasma as complement source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, M; Jessen, T E; Welinder, K. G.

    1985-01-01

    A hemolytic plate assay specific for active human complement component C3 is described. The method is well suited for tracing active C3 during preparative purification or for screening of plasma samples. The assay is based on activation of the alternative pathway of complement by unmodified rabbi...

  14. Information Technology and Transportation: Substitutes or Complements?

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, Atara Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The increased availability and prevalence of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) provides opportunities to use such products as substitutes for transportation. Common examples of this substitution are telecommuting, video conferences, and online classes. However, despite the intuitive appeal of a substitution relationship existing between ICT and transportation, prior research has indicated that the relationship between ICT and transportation is quite complex; at times ICT substit...

  15. Loss and terminal illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, J Q

    1985-06-01

    The experience of terminal illness can best be viewed as a situation of multiple losses involving the dying person, family members and friends, and the health care providers engaged in offering services to them. It is a major transition during which the central participants must cope with the personal meanings of the forthcoming death as well as other losses brought about by the disease process, medical treatments, and the need to provide care for the dying person. How families adapt to the stresses and changes imposed by the experience of living with dying depends on their previous experiences with death, their established patterns of communication about serious matters, and their decision-making practices. Some individuals and families are at greater risk than others for developing maladaptive responses and behaviors during and after the experience of terminal illness. Risk factors to be considered in making hypotheses about the potential for maladaptive reactions include the strength of the attachment to the dying person, uncontrollable and distressing symptoms, and coping limitations associated with age and other factors contributing to increased vulnerability to the demands of continuous change. Working effectively with different kinds of families during the transition of terminal illness can best be accomplished within a conceptual framework built upon knowledge about people undergoing change. The concept of safe conduct can serve as an overall guide for the creation of nursing services designed to offer personalized care and accessibility of professional help at times of maximum need by the family. Assisting dying patients and their families toward the achievement of their personal goals is fundamental to the idea of safe conduct. The delivery of nursing care in terminal illness requires an orientation to assessment as an ongoing process that makes use of knowledge about disease processes, medical treatments, individual and group adaptations to loss, risk

  16. Complement in Non-Antibody-Mediated Kidney Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Angeletti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is part of the innate immune response that plays important roles in protecting the host from foreign pathogens. The complement components and relative fragment deposition have long been recognized to be strongly involved also in the pathogenesis of autoantibody-related kidney glomerulopathies, leading to direct glomerular injury and recruitment of infiltrating inflammation pathways. More recently, unregulated complement activation has been shown to be associated with progression of non-antibody-mediated kidney diseases, including focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, C3 glomerular disease, thrombotic microangiopathies, or general fibrosis generation in progressive chronic kidney diseases. Some of the specific mechanisms associated with complement activation in these diseases were recently clarified, showing a dominant role of alternative activation pathway. Over the last decade, a growing number of anticomplement agents have been developed, and some of them are being approved for clinical use or already in use. Therefore, anticomplement therapies represent a realistic choice of therapeutic approaches for complement-related diseases. Herein, we review the complement system activation, regulatory mechanisms, their involvement in non-antibody-mediated glomerular diseases, and the recent advances in complement-targeting agents as potential therapeutic strategies.

  17. Cyclosporine Induces Endothelial Cell Release of Complement-Activating Microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Brandon; Klawitter, Jelena; Goldberg, Ryan; McCullough, James W.; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Cooper, James E.; Christians, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Defective control of the alternative pathway of complement is an important risk factor for several renal diseases, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Infections, drugs, pregnancy, and hemodynamic insults can trigger episodes of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in susceptible patients. Although the mechanisms linking these clinical events with disease flares are unknown, recent work has revealed that each of these clinical conditions causes cells to release microparticles. We hypothesized that microparticles released from injured endothelial cells promote intrarenal complement activation. Calcineurin inhibitors cause vascular and renal injury and can trigger hemolytic uremic syndrome. Here, we show that endothelial cells exposed to cyclosporine in vitro and in vivo release microparticles that activate the alternative pathway of complement. Cyclosporine-induced microparticles caused injury to bystander endothelial cells and are associated with complement-mediated injury of the kidneys and vasculature in cyclosporine-treated mice. Cyclosporine-induced microparticles did not bind factor H, an alternative pathway regulatory protein present in plasma, explaining their complement-activating phenotype. Finally, we found that in renal transplant patients, the number of endothelial microparticles in plasma increases 2 weeks after starting tacrolimus, and treatment with tacrolimus associated with increased C3 deposition on endothelial microparticles in the plasma of some patients. These results suggest that injury-associated release of endothelial microparticles is an important mechanism by which systemic insults trigger intravascular complement activation and complement-dependent renal diseases. PMID:24092930

  18. Complement in disease: a defence system turning offensive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2016-07-01

    Although the complement system is primarily perceived as a host defence system, a more versatile, yet potentially more harmful side of this innate immune pathway as an inflammatory mediator also exists. The activities that define the ability of the complement system to control microbial threats and eliminate cellular debris - such as sensing molecular danger patterns, generating immediate effectors, and extensively coordinating with other defence pathways - can quickly turn complement from a defence system to an aggressor that drives immune and inflammatory diseases. These host-offensive actions become more pronounced with age and are exacerbated by a variety of genetic factors and autoimmune responses. Complement can also be activated inappropriately, for example in response to biomaterials or transplants. A wealth of research over the past two decades has led to an increasingly finely tuned understanding of complement activation, identified tipping points between physiological and pathological behaviour, and revealed avenues for therapeutic intervention. This Review summarizes our current view of the key activating, regulatory, and effector mechanisms of the complement system, highlighting important crosstalk connections, and, with an emphasis on kidney disease and transplantation, discusses the involvement of complement in clinical conditions and promising therapeutic approaches.

  19. Intracellular complement - the complosome - in immune cell regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbore, Giuseppina; Kemper, Claudia; Kolev, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The complement system was defined over a century ago based on its ability to "complement" the antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immune responses against pathogens. Today our understanding of this ancient part of innate immunity has changed substantially and we know now that complement plays an undisputed pivotal role in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity. The complement system consists of over 50 blood-circulating, cell-surface expressed and intracellular proteins. It is key in the recognition and elimination of invading pathogens, also in the removal of self-derived danger such as apoptotic cells, and it supports innate immune responses and the initiation of the general inflammatory reactions. The long prevailing classic view of complement was that of a serum-operative danger sensor and first line of defence system, however, recent experimental and clinical evidences have demonstrated that "local" tissue and surprisingly intracellular complement (the complosome) activation impacts on normal cell physiology. This review will focus on novel aspects of intracellular complement activation and its unexpected roles in basic cell processes such as metabolism. We also discuss what the existence of the complosome potentially means for how the host handles intracellular pathogens such as viruses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. New high-cloning-efficiency vectors for complementation studies and recombinant protein overproduction in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDrisse, C M; Escalante-Semerena, J C

    2016-07-01

    Galloway et al. recently described a method to alter vectors to include Type IIS restriction enzymes for high efficiency cloning. Utilizing this method, the multiple cloning sites of complementation and overexpression vectors commonly used in our laboratory were altered to contain recognition sequences of the Type IIS restriction enzyme, BspQI. Use of this enzyme increased the rate of cloning success to >97% efficiency. L(+)-Arabinose-inducible complementation vectors and overexpression vectors encoding N-terminal recombinant tobacco etch virus protease (rTEV)-cleavable H6-tags were altered to contain BspQI sites that allowed for cloning into all vectors using identical primer overhangs. Additionally, a vector used for directing the synthesis of proteins with a C-terminal, rTEV-cleavable H6-tag was engineered to contain BspQI sites, albeit with different overhangs from that of the previously mentioned vectors. Here we apply a method used to engineer cloning vectors to contain BspQI sites and the use of each vector in either in vivo complementation studies or in vitro protein purifications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.