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Sample records for term x-ray spectral

  1. Long-term Spectral Variability of the Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Holmberg IX X–1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jithesh, V.; Misra, Ranjeev; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the long-term spectral variability in the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X–1. By analyzing the data from 8 Suzaku and 13 XMM-Newton observations conducted between 2001 and 2015, we perform a detailed spectral modeling for all spectra with simple models and complex physical models. We find that the spectra can be well explained by a disk-plus-thermal-Comptonization model. Applying this model, we unveil correlations between the X-ray luminosity ({L}{{X}}) and the spectral parameters. One particular correlation is the statistically significant positive correlation between {L}{{X}} and the photon index (Γ), while at the high luminosities of > 2× {10}40 {erg} {{{s}}}-1, the source becomes marginally hard, which results in a change in the slope of the {{Γ }}{--}{L}{{X}} correlation. Similar variability behavior is observed in the optical depth of the source around {L}{{X}}∼ 2× {10}40 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 as the source becomes more optically thick. We consider the scenario that a corona covers the inner part of the disk, and the correlations can be explained as being driven by the variability of seed photons from the disk input into the corona. On the basis of the disk-corona model, we discuss the physical processes that are possibly indicated by the variability of the spectral parameters. Our analysis reveals the complex variability behavior of Holmberg IX X–1 and the variability mechanism is likely related to the geometry of the X-ray-emitting regions.

  2. Comprehensive x-ray spectral code for high energy astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedahl, D A; Fournier, K B; Mauche, C W

    2000-08-18

    The aim of this project has been to develop a spectral analysis tool with a level of quality and completeness commensurate to that expected in data from the current generation of X-ray observatories. The code is called LXSS (Livermore X-Ray Spectral Synthesizer). X-ray-emitting astrophysical plasmas are rarely, if ever, in LTE, so they have adopted the detailed level accounting approach, in which rates for processes that populate or depopulate atomic energy levels are treated explicitly. This entails the generation of a large quantity of atomic data, most of which is calculated using ''in-house'' computer codes. Calculations are benchmarked against laboratory data, and spectral models have been used to provide first-time interpretations of astrophysical X-ray spectra. The design of a versatile graphical user interface that allows access to and manipulation of the atomic database comprises the second major part of the project.

  3. Long-term X-ray Variability of NGC 4945

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Amara; /UC, Davis /SLAC

    2007-08-29

    Though short-term X-ray variability has been studied for the active galaxy NGC 4945, long-term studies promise to contribute to our understanding of the processes involved in accretion onto supermassive black holes. In order to understand the relationship between black hole mass and breaks in the power spectral density (PSD), the long-term X-ray variability of NGC 4945 was studied over the energy range 8-30 keV. Observations occurred over the year 2006 using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. The data was reduced using the package FTOOLS, most notably the scripts Rex and faxbary. Light curves were produced and a PSD was obtained using a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. Preliminary studies of the light curve show greater X-ray variability at higher frequencies. This result complements previous studies of NGC 4945 by Martin Mueller. However, the PSD produced must go through further study before accurate results can be obtained. A way to account for the window function of the PSD must be found before the behavior at lower frequencies can be studied with accuracy and the relationship between black hole mass and the break in NGC 4945's PSD can be better understood. Further work includes exploration into ways to subtract the window function from the PSD, as well as a closer analysis of the PSD produced by averaging the data into logarithmic bins. The possibility of a better way to bin the data should be considered so that the window function would be minimized.

  4. An X-ray spectral study of 24 type-1 AGN

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, C. S.

    1996-01-01

    I present a study of the X-ray spectral properties of a sample containing 24 type-1 active galactic nuclei using the medium spectral resolution of ``ASCA''. The sample consists of 20 radio-quiet objects and 4 radio-loud objects. A simple power-law continuum absorbed by Galactic material provides a very poor description of the spectra of most objects. Deviations from the power-law form are interpreted in terms of X-ray reprocessing/absorption processes. In particular, at least half of the obje...

  5. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF X-RAY BINARIES IN CENTAURUS A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Mark J.; Raychaudhury, Somak [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Evans, Daniel A.; Jordan, Andres [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Maccarone, Thomas J.; Croston, Judith H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Brassington, Nicola J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Goodger, Joanna L. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Kainulainen, Jouni [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Woodley, Kristin A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Sivakoff, Gregory R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Gilfanov, Marat [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741, Garching (Germany); Sarazin, Craig L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Voss, Rasmus, E-mail: mburke@star.sr.bham.ac.uk [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud, University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); and others

    2013-04-01

    We present a spectral investigation of X-ray binaries (XBs) in NGC 5128 (Cen A), using six 100 ks Chandra observations taken over two months in 2007. We divide our sample into thermally and non-thermally dominated states based on the behavior of the fitted absorption column N{sub H}, and present the spectral parameters of sources with L{sub x} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}. The majority of sources are consistent with being neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS LMXBs) and we identify three transient black hole (BH) LMXB candidates coincident with the dust lane, which is the remnant of a small late-type galaxy. Our results also provide tentative support for the apparent 'gap' in the mass distribution of compact objects between {approx}2-5 M{sub Sun }. We propose that BH LMXBs are preferentially found in the dust lane, and suggest this is because of the younger stellar population. The majority ({approx}70%-80%) of potential Roche lobe filling donors in the Cen A halo are {approx}> 12 Gyr old, while BH LMXBs require donors {approx}> 1 M{sub Sun} to produce the observed peak luminosities. This requirement for more massive donors may also explain recent results that claim a steepening of the X-ray luminosity function with age at L{sub x} {>=} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} for the XB population of early-type galaxies; for older stellar populations, there are fewer stars {approx}> 1 M{sub Sun }, which are required to form the more luminous sources.

  6. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  7. Spectral feature variations in x-ray diffraction imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Scott D.; Greenberg, Joel A.

    2016-05-01

    Materials with different atomic or molecular structures give rise to unique scatter spectra when measured by X-ray diffraction. The details of these spectra, though, can vary based on both intrinsic (e.g., degree of crystallinity or doping) and extrinsic (e.g., pressure or temperature) conditions. While this sensitivity is useful for detailed characterizations of the material properties, these dependences make it difficult to perform more general classification tasks, such as explosives threat detection in aviation security. A number of challenges, therefore, currently exist for reliable substance detection including the similarity in spectral features among some categories of materials combined with spectral feature variations from materials processing and environmental factors. These factors complicate the creation of a material dictionary and the implementation of conventional classification and detection algorithms. Herein, we report on two prominent factors that lead to variations in spectral features: crystalline texture and temperature variations. Spectral feature comparisons between materials categories will be described for solid metallic sheet, aqueous liquids, polymer sheet, and metallic, organic, and inorganic powder specimens. While liquids are largely immune to texture effects, they are susceptible to temperature changes that can modify their density or produce phase changes. We will describe in situ temperature-dependent measurement of aqueous-based commercial goods in the temperature range of -20°C to 35°C.

  8. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J., E-mail: juanjose.vaquero@uc3m.es [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Desco, M. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid ES28029 (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  9. Long term hard X-ray variability of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1RXS J170849.0-400910 discovered with INTEGRAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, D.; Rea, N.; Israel, G.L.; Zane, S.; Esposito, P.; Gotthelf, E.V.; Mereghetti, S.; Tiengo, A.; Turolla, R.

    2007-01-01

    Aims.We report on a multi-band high-energy observing campaign aimed at studying the long term spectral variability of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 1RXS J170849.0-400910, one of the magnetar candidates. Methods: We observed 1RXS J170849.0-400910 in Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 simultaneously with

  10. Soft X-ray spectral variations in Scorpius X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, S. M.; Charles, P. A.; Bowyer, S.; Blissett, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Soft X-ray spectra of Scorpius X-1 obtained with the low-energy detectors of the A-2 experiment on HEAO 1 are presented. The raw count spectra are deconvolved using the Kahn and Blissett technique to reveal the presence of oxygen absorption in the range 0.5-0.7 keV. The strength of this feature is shown to vary on a time scale of order hours. These results are interpreted as evidence for variable X-ray photoionization of circumsource material in the system. An alternative model, involving variable Compton broadening of an oxygen edge, is also discussed.

  11. Relative calibration of energy thresholds on multi-bin spectral x-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjölin, M., E-mail: martin.sjolin@mi.physics.kth.se; Danielsson, M.

    2016-12-21

    Accurate and reliable energy calibration of spectral x-ray detectors used in medical imaging is essential for avoiding ring artifacts in the reconstructed images (computed tomography) and for performing accurate material basis decomposition. A simple and accurate method for relative calibration of the energy thresholds on a multi-bin spectral x-ray detector is presented. The method obtains the linear relations between all energy thresholds in a channel by scanning the thresholds with respect to each other during x-ray illumination. The method does not rely on a model of the detector's response function and does not require any identifiable features in the x-ray spectrum. Applying the same method, the offset between the thresholds can be determined also without external stimuli by utilizing the electronic noise as a source. The simplicity and accuracy of the method makes it suitable for implementation in clinical multi-bin spectral x-ray imaging systems.

  12. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma, produced by laser pulses of 45 fs duration, focussed up to an intensity of ∼1018 W cm-2, is carried out. The plasma conditions prevalent during the emission of X-ray spectrum were identified by comparing the experimental spectra with the ...

  13. Spectral brilliance of parametric X-rays at the FAST facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Seiss, Todd [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-22

    We discuss the generation of parametric X-rays in the new photoinjector at the FAST (Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology) facility in Fermilab. These experiments will be conducted in addition to channeling X-ray radiation experiments. The low emittance electron beam makes this facility a promising source for creating brilliant X-rays. We discuss the theoretical model and present detailed calculations of the intensity spectrum, energy and angular widths and spectral brilliance under different conditions. Furthermore, we report on expected results with parametric X-rays generated while under channeling conditions.

  14. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics - Phase 2 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcalorimeter x-ray instruments are non-dispersive, high spectral resolution, broad-band, high cadence imaging spectrometers. We have been developing these...

  15. Long term X-ray variability of Circinus X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo

    2003-03-19

    We present an analysis of long term X-ray monitoring observations of Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) made with four different instruments: Vela 5B, Ariel V ASM, Ginga ASM, and RXTE ASM, over the course of more than 30 years. We use Lomb-Scargle periodograms to search for the {approx}16.5 day orbital period of Cir X-1 in each of these data sets and from this derive a new orbital ephemeris based solely on X-ray measurements, which we compare to the previous ephemerides obtained from radio observations. We also use the Phase Dispersion Minimization (PDM) technique, as well as FFT analysis, to verify the periods obtained from periodograms. We obtain dynamic periodograms (both Lomb-Scargle and PDM) of Cir X-1 during the RXTE era, showing the period evolution of Cir X-1, and also displaying some unexplained discrete jumps in the location of the peak power.

  16. Spectral matching consideration in the design of a novel x-ray image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunyu; Chang, Benkang; Wei, Dianxiu

    2006-12-01

    In this article, a novel x-ray image intensifier is introduced. It is mainly composed of an x-ray intensifying screen and a low-light-level (L3) image intensifier. In order to obtain a bright enough image, the spectral compatibility among three different combinations of the x-ray intensifying screen and the photocathode is analyzed. The comparison indicates that a (Zn,Cd)S:Ag screen is superior to either a CaWO4 screen or a Gd2O2S :Tb screen when combined with the Super S25 photocathode and spectral compatibility analysis is a useful guide when designing an optoelectronic imaging device.

  17. A Monte Carlo simulation of scattering reduction in spectral x-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busi, Matteo; Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT), scattered radiation plays an important role in the accurate reconstruction of the inspected object, leading to a loss of contrast between the different materials in the reconstruction volume and cupping artifacts in the images. We present a Monte Carlo simulation...... photons, enabling spectral analysis of X-ray images. This technique is useful to extract efficiently more information on energy dependent quantities (e.g. mass attenuations coefficients) and study matter interactions (e.g. X-ray scattering, photoelectric absorption, etc...). Having a good knowledge...... of the spectral distribution of the scattered X-rays is fundamental to establish methods attempting to correct for it. The simulations are validated by real measurements using a CdTe spectral resolving detector (Multix ME-100). We observed the effect of the scattered radiation on the image reconstruction...

  18. Joint Spectral Analysis for Early Bright X-ray Flares of -Ray Bursts ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A joint spectral analysis for early bright X-ray flares that were simultaneously observed with Swift BAT and XRT are present. Both BAT and XRT lightcurves of these flares are correlated. Our joint spectral analysis shows that the radiations in the two energy bands are from the same spectral component, which can be well ...

  19. Toward a New Spectral Modeling Capability for Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, P. A.; Marcu, D.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wilms, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2013-04-01

    Spectral modeling of accreting X-ray pulsars can tell us a great deal about the physical conditions in and near the neutron star compact objects in high mass X-ray binary systems. In such systems the accreting plasma is initially channeled from an accretion disk by the strong neutron star magnetic field into a funneled supersonic flow onto the magnetic polar cap of the neutron star. Many of these accreting X-ray pulsars have X-ray spectra that consist of broadband Comptonized power-law X-ray continua with superposed cyclotron resonant scattering features indicating magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. We are undertaking a new program to develop a spectral analysis tool based on the analytical work of Becker & Wolff (2007) for accreting X-ray pulsar spectra inside the XSPEC spectral analysis framework. We will apply this new analysis tool to the large amount of data on numerous bright accreting X-ray pulsars currently residing in the HEASARC archive. In this presentation we discuss the physical processes that are likely to occur in such a flow and how one might self-consistently model the broadband pulsar X-ray spectrum. A previous attempt at developing such a modeling capability made significant contributions to the understanding of one source in particular, namely, 4U0115+634 (Ferrigno et al. 2010) and we expect to build on that success. Our models will incorporate bremsstrahlung emission, black body emission, and cyclotron emission, all in a strongly Comptonizing environment inside the shock-heated accreting plasma. We will discuss how we will include these physical processes in the calculations as well as the algorithm such a tool will use to converge to a solution. This program is both feasible and timely in light of the expected launch of the LOFT X-ray timing mission. This research is supported by the NASA Astrophysical Data Analysis Program and the Office of Naval Research.

  20. The color of X-rays: Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schioppa, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray

  1. The gravitational microlens influence on X-ray spectral line generated by an AGN accretion disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović L.Č.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of gravitational microlensing on the X-ray spectral line profiles originated from a relativistic accretion disc has been studied. Using a disc model, we show that microlensing can induce noticeable changes in the line shapes when the Einstein ring radius associated with the microlens is of a size comparable to that of the accretion disc. Taking into account the relatively small size of the X-ray accretion disc, we found that compact objects (of about a Solar mass which belong to the bulge of the host galaxy can produce significant changes in the X-ray line profile of AGN.

  2. A Monte Carlo simulation of scattering reduction in spectral x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Matteo; Olsen, Ulrik L.; Knudsen, Erik B.; Frisvad, Jeppe R.; Kehres, Jan; Christensen, Erik D.; Khalil, Mohamad; Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2017-08-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT), scattered radiation plays an important role in the accurate reconstruction of the inspected object, leading to a loss of contrast between the different materials in the reconstruction volume and cupping artifacts in the images. We present a Monte Carlo simulation tool for spectral X-ray CT to predict the scattered radiation generated by complex samples. An experimental setup is presented to isolate the energy distribution of scattered radiation. Spectral CT is a novel technique implementing photon-counting detectors able to discriminate the energy of incoming photons, enabling spectral analysis of X-ray images. This technique is useful to extract efficiently more information on energy dependent quantities (e.g. mass attenuations coefficients) and study matter interactions (e.g. X-ray scattering, photoelectric absorption, etc...). Having a good knowledge of the spectral distribution of the scattered X-rays is fundamental to establish methods attempting to correct for it. The simulations are validated by real measurements using a CdTe spectral resolving detector (Multix ME-100). We observed the effect of the scattered radiation on the image reconstruction, becoming relevant in the energy range where the Compton events are dominant (i.e. above 50keV).

  3. An X-ray spectral study of 24 type 1 active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, C. S.

    1997-04-01

    I present a study of the X-ray spectral properties of a sample containing 24 type 1 active galactic nuclei using the medium spectral resolution of ASCA. The sample consists of 20 radio-quiet objects (18 Seyfert 1 galaxies and two radio-quiet quasars) and four radio-loud objects (three broad-line radio galaxies and one radio-loud quasar). A simple power-law continuum absorbed by Galactic material provides a very poor description of the spectra of most objects. Deviations from the power-law form are interpreted in terms of X-ray reprocessing/absorption processes. In particular, at least half of the objects show K-shell absorption edges of warm oxygen (Ovii and Oviii) characteristic of optically thin, photoionized material along the line of sight to the central engine, the so-called warm absorber. The amount and presence of this absorption are found to depend on either the luminosity or radio properties of the objects: luminous and/or radio-loud objects are found to possess less ionized absorption. This ambiguity exists because the radio-loud objects are also amongst the most luminous of the sample. It is also found that objects with significant optical reddening display deep Ovii edges. The converse is true with two possible exceptions (NGC 3783 and NGC 3516). Coupled with other evidence resulting from detailed study of particular objects, this suggests the existence of dusty warm plasma. A radiatively driven outflow originating from the molecular torus is probably the source of this plasma. Rapid variability of the warm absorber also points to there being another component closer to the central source and probably situated within the broad-line region (BLR). Independent evidence for such an optically thin, highly ionized BLR component comes from detailed optical/UV studies. Spectral features at energies characteristic of cold iron Kalpha emission are common. Such emission is expected to arise from the fluorescence of cold iron in optically thick material when

  4. XSPEC: An x ray spectral fitting package. Version 2 of the user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, R. A.; Haberl, F.; Arnaud, K. A.; Tennant, A. F.; Barron, Chris (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The user guide for XSPEC, a command driven, interactive, X-ray spectral fitting program is presented. It is designed to be completely detector independent so it can be used for any X-ray spectral instrument. An overview of the program commands and a walk through of an XSPEC session is presented. Individual commands and descriptions of the spectral models are given. For the more experienced user details of some of the programs associated with XSPEC, the command parser, and the addition of models to XSPEC are included. The PLT plotting package used by XSPEC is described together with the maximum likelihood option for users possessing X-ray spectra with small numbers of counts per bin. Details on the various files used by XSPEC and on the general file structure are also given.

  5. Timing and Spectral Studies of the Peculiar X-ray Binary Circinus X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo M.

    2003-08-26

    studied by constructing both instrument-independent and model-independent color-color diagrams. Spectral fits are performed on all USA observations and physical parameters are derived. Cir X-1 periodically evolves from a high/soft state to a low/hard state within each orbital cycle. The spectral fits obtained indicate that a two-component model provides an appropriate description of the Cir X-1 spectrum with one component representing the emission from a multicolor blackbody accretion disk while the other component represents the higher energy Comptonized emission probably coming from a boundary layer on the surface of the neutron star. To study the long-term X-ray variability of Cir X-1 the author analyzes archival data from instruments going back to 1969 (Vela 5 satellite), up to more recent RXTE ASM data (for the last 6.5 years). The author uses various period finding techniques such as Lomb-Scargle periodograms and Phase Dispersion Minimization. Cir X-1 shows large variations in overall flux over the course of the last 30 years, with the brightest epoch corresponding to the recent RXTE/USA era. The author derives an X-ray ephemeris based on these long term observations showing that the period of Cir X-1 is rapidly decreasing (P/P < 3000 yrs), possibly implying a very young age for the system.

  6. The Impact of Accurate Extinction Measurements for X-Ray Spectral Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall K.; Valencic, Lynne A.; Corrales, Lia

    2016-02-01

    Interstellar extinction includes both absorption and scattering of photons from interstellar gas and dust grains, and it has the effect of altering a source's spectrum and its total observed intensity. However, while multiple absorption models exist, there are no useful scattering models in standard X-ray spectrum fitting tools, such as XSPEC. Nonetheless, X-ray halos, created by scattering from dust grains, are detected around even moderately absorbed sources, and the impact on an observed source spectrum can be significant, if modest, compared to direct absorption. By convolving the scattering cross section with dust models, we have created a spectral model as a function of energy, type of dust, and extraction region that can be used with models of direct absorption. This will ensure that the extinction model is consistent and enable direct connections to be made between a source's X-ray spectral fits and its UV/optical extinction.

  7. THE IMPACT OF ACCURATE EXTINCTION MEASUREMENTS FOR X-RAY SPECTRAL MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Randall K. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Valencic, Lynne A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Corrales, Lia, E-mail: lynne.a.valencic@nasa.gov [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 37-241, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Interstellar extinction includes both absorption and scattering of photons from interstellar gas and dust grains, and it has the effect of altering a source's spectrum and its total observed intensity. However, while multiple absorption models exist, there are no useful scattering models in standard X-ray spectrum fitting tools, such as XSPEC. Nonetheless, X-ray halos, created by scattering from dust grains, are detected around even moderately absorbed sources, and the impact on an observed source spectrum can be significant, if modest, compared to direct absorption. By convolving the scattering cross section with dust models, we have created a spectral model as a function of energy, type of dust, and extraction region that can be used with models of direct absorption. This will ensure that the extinction model is consistent and enable direct connections to be made between a source's X-ray spectral fits and its UV/optical extinction.

  8. A search for X-ray reprocessing echoes in the power spectral density functions of AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Papadakis, I. E.; Epitropakis, A.; Pecháček, T.; Dovčiak, M.; McHardy, I. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of a detailed study of the X-ray power spectral density (PSD) functions of 12 X-ray bright AGN, using almost all the archival XMM-Newton data. The total net exposure of the EPIC-pn light curves is larger than 350 ks in all cases (and exceeds 1 Ms in the case of 1H 0707-497). In a physical scenario in which X-ray reflection occurs in the inner part of the accretion disc of AGN, the X-ray reflection component should be a filtered echo of the X-ray continuum signal and should be equal to the convolution of the primary emission with the response function of the disc. Our primary objective is to search for these reflection features in the 5-7 keV (iron line) and 0.5-1 keV (soft) bands, where the X-ray reflection fraction is expected to be dominant. We fit to the observed periodograms two models: a simple bending power-law model (BPL) and a BPL model convolved with the transfer function of the accretion disc assuming the lamp-post geometry and X-ray reflection from a homogeneous disc. We do not find any significant features in the best-fitting BPL model residuals either in individual PSDs in the iron band, soft and full band (0.3-10 keV) or in the average PSD residuals of the brightest and more variable sources (with similar black hole mass estimates). The typical amplitude of the soft and full-band residuals is around 3-5 per cent. It is possible that the expected general relativistic effects are not detected because they are intrinsically lower than the uncertainty of the current PSDs, even in the strong relativistic case in which X-ray reflection occurs on a disc around a fast rotating black hole having an X-ray source very close above it. However, we could place strong constrains to the X-ray reflection geometry with the current data sets if we knew in advance the intrinsic shape of the X-ray PSDs, particularly its high-frequency slope.

  9. X-ray diffraction and spectral studies of biological native and modified tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazina, A.A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics of RAS, 142290 Pushchino Institutskaya st., 3, Moscow region (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: vazina@iteb.ru; Budantsev, A.Yu. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics of RAS, 142290 Pushchino Institutskaya st., 3, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Bras, W. [DUBBLE-CRG/ESRF, Grenoble (France)] [and others

    2005-05-01

    X-ray diffraction and spectral data obtained by studying different types of native and modified human and animal tissues are reported. It has been found that the proteoglycan structure undergoes transformation upon interaction with calcium cations. The role of the extracellular matrix in the structure of the native tissue is discussed.

  10. Spatial and spectral features of soft diffuse X ray background seen by the Einstein observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micela, G.; Harnden, F. R.; Rosner, R., Jr.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of the diffuse soft X-ray background as seen directly by the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) is presented. A source free region of the detector 1 by 1 degree field is used. The background in the 0.16 to 3.5 keV spectral region is viewed. The data covers roughly 5 percent of the sky, with some bias in coverage towards the galactic plane. The moderate energy resolution of the IPC enables the characterization and the production of maps of the background as a function of energy within the Einstein passband. The results are compared with previous observations of the diffuse X-ray background. The implications for galactic structure and for the soft component of the extragalactic X-ray background are discussed.

  11. Influence of X-ray tube spectral distribution on uncertainty of calculated fluorescent radiation intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitko, Rafal [Institute of Chemistry, Silesian University, 40-006 Katowice (Poland)], E-mail: rafal.sitko@us.edu.pl

    2007-08-15

    The relative radiation intensity (R{sub i}) defined as fluorescent radiation intensity of analyte in specimen to fluorescent radiation intensity of pure element or compound, e.g., oxide is used in calculation in both fundamental parameter methods and in theoretical influence coefficient algorithms. Accuracy of calculated R{sub i} is determined by uncertainties of atomic parameters, spectrometer geometry and also by X-ray tube spectral distribution. This paper presents the differences between R{sub i} calculated using experimental and theoretical X-ray tube spectra evaluated by three different algorithms proposed by Pella et al., Ebel, and Finkelshtein-Pavlova. The calculations are performed for the most common targets, i.e., Cr, Mo, Rh and W. In this study, R{sub i} is calculated for V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Mo in steels as an example. The differences between R{sub i} calculated using different X-ray tube spectrum algorithms are presented when pure element standard, multielement standard similar to the analyzed material and one pure element standard for all analytes is used in X-ray fluorescence analysis. The differences between R{sub i} for intermediate-thickness samples (and also for thin films) and for X-ray tube, which ran for many hours, are also evaluated.

  12. Spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray tubes using laplace inverse transform of the attenuation curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malezan, A.; Tomal, A.; Antoniassi, M.; Watanabe, P. C. A.; Albino, L. D.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a spectral reconstruction methodology for diagnostic X-ray, using Laplace inverse transform of the attenuation, was successfully applied to dental X-ray equipments. The attenuation curves of 8 commercially available dental X-ray equipment, from 3 different manufactures (Siemens, Gnatus and Dabi Atlante), were obtained by using an ionization chamber and high purity aluminium filters, while the kVp was obtained with a specific meter. A computational routine was implemented in order to adjust a model function, whose inverse Laplace transform is analytically known, to the attenuation curve. This methodology was validated by comparing the reconstructed and the measured (using semiconductor detector of cadmium telluride) spectra of a given dental X-ray unit. The spectral reconstruction showed the Dabi Atlante equipments generating similar shape spectra. This is a desirable feature from clinic standpoint because it produces similar levels of image quality and dose. We observed that equipments from Siemens and Gnatus generate significantly different spectra, suggesting that, for a given operating protocol, these units will present different levels of image quality and dose. This fact claims for the necessity of individualized operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose. The proposed methodology is suitable to perform a spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray equipments from the simple measurements of attenuation curve and kVp. The simplified experimental apparatus and the low level of technical difficulty make this methodology accessible to a broad range of users. The knowledge of the spectral distribution can help in the development of operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose.

  13. A HARD X-RAY POWER-LAW SPECTRAL CUTOFF IN CENTAURUS X-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Nowak, Michael A. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian W.; Fürst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona A.; Rana, Vikram [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Psaltis, Dimitrios [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier [Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [Division of Astrophysics, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ H3A 2T8 (Canada); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wik, Daniel R.; Zhang, William W. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wilms, Jörn, E-mail: deepto@mit.edu [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Cen X-4 is the brightest and closest (<1.2 kpc) quiescent neutron star transient. Previous 0.5-10 keV X-ray observations of Cen X-4 in quiescence identified two spectral components: soft thermal emission from the neutron star atmosphere and a hard power-law tail of unknown origin. We report here on a simultaneous observation of Cen X-4 with NuSTAR (3-79 keV) and XMM-Newton (0.3-10 keV) in 2013 January, providing the first sensitive hard X-ray spectrum of a quiescent neutron star transient. The 0.3-79 keV luminosity was 1.1×10{sup 33} D{sub kpc}{sup 2} erg s{sup –1}, with ≅60% in the thermal component. We clearly detect a cutoff of the hard spectral tail above 10 keV, the first time such a feature has been detected in this source class. We show that thermal Comptonization and synchrotron shock origins for the hard X-ray emission are ruled out on physical grounds. However, the hard X-ray spectrum is well fit by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT{sub e} = 18 keV, which can be understood as arising either in a hot layer above the neutron star atmosphere or in a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. The power-law cutoff energy may be set by the degree of Compton cooling of the bremsstrahlung electrons by thermal seed photons from the neutron star surface. Lower thermal luminosities should lead to higher (possibly undetectable) cutoff energies. We compare Cen X-4's behavior with PSR J1023+0038, IGR J18245–2452, and XSS J12270–4859, which have shown transitions between LMXB and radio pulsar modes at a similar X-ray luminosity.

  14. X-ray spectral components observed in the afterglow of GRB 130925A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Barrière, Nicolas M.; Bhalerao, Varun

    2014-01-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB 130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at >4σ significance, and its spectral shape varies between...... two observation epochs at 2 × 105 and 106 s after the burst. Several models can fit this additional component, each with very different physical implications. A broad, resolved Gaussian absorption feature of several keV width improves the fit, but it is poorly constrained in the second epoch....... An additive blackbody or second power-law component provide better fits. Both are challenging to interpret: the blackbody radius is near the scale of a compact remnant (108 cm), while the second power-law component requires an unobserved high-energy cutoff in order to be consistent with the non...

  15. Processing of spectral X-ray data with principal components analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, A P H; Cook, N J; Butzer, J; Schleich, N; Tlustos, L; Scott, N; Grasset, R; de Ruiter, N; Anderson, N G

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the work was to develop a general method for processing spectral x-ray image data. Principle component analysis (PCA) is a well understood technique for multivariate data analysis and so was investigated. To assess this method, spectral (multi-energy) computed tomography (CT) data was obtained using a Medipix2 detector in a MARS-CT (Medipix All Resolution System). PCA was able to separate bone (calcium) from two elements with k-edges in the X-ray spectrum used (iodine and barium) within a mouse. This has potential clinical application in dual-energy CT systems and future Medipix3 based spectral imaging where up to eight energies can be recorded simultaneously with excellent energy resolution. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Regularization of nonlinear decomposition of spectral x-ray projection images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducros, Nicolas; Abascal, Juan Felipe Perez-Juste; Sixou, Bruno; Rit, Simon; Peyrin, Françoise

    2017-09-01

    Exploiting the x-ray measurements obtained in different energy bins, spectral computed tomography (CT) has the ability to recover the 3-D description of a patient in a material basis. This may be achieved solving two subproblems, namely the material decomposition and the tomographic reconstruction problems. In this work, we address the material decomposition of spectral x-ray projection images, which is a nonlinear ill-posed problem. Our main contribution is to introduce a material-dependent spatial regularization in the projection domain. The decomposition problem is solved iteratively using a Gauss-Newton algorithm that can benefit from fast linear solvers. A Matlab implementation is available online. The proposed regularized weighted least squares Gauss-Newton algorithm (RWLS-GN) is validated on numerical simulations of a thorax phantom made of up to five materials (soft tissue, bone, lung, adipose tissue, and gadolinium), which is scanned with a 120 kV source and imaged by a 4-bin photon counting detector. To evaluate the method performance of our algorithm, different scenarios are created by varying the number of incident photons, the concentration of the marker and the configuration of the phantom. The RWLS-GN method is compared to the reference maximum likelihood Nelder-Mead algorithm (ML-NM). The convergence of the proposed method and its dependence on the regularization parameter are also studied. We show that material decomposition is feasible with the proposed method and that it converges in few iterations. Material decomposition with ML-NM was very sensitive to noise, leading to decomposed images highly affected by noise, and artifacts even for the best case scenario. The proposed method was less sensitive to noise and improved contrast-to-noise ratio of the gadolinium image. Results were superior to those provided by ML-NM in terms of image quality and decomposition was 70 times faster. For the assessed experiments, material decomposition was possible

  17. ON THE LATE-TIME SPECTRAL SOFTENING FOUND IN X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Liang, En-Wei; Lu, Zu-Jia [GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhao, Yinan [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Shao, Lang, E-mail: lshao@hebtu.edu.cn [Department of Space Sciences and Astronomy, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2016-02-20

    Strong spectral softening has been revealed in the late X-ray afterglows of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The scenario of X-ray scattering around the circumburst dusty medium has been supported by previous works due to its overall successful prediction of both the temporal and spectral evolution of some X-ray afterglows. To further investigate the observed feature of spectral softening we now systematically search the X-ray afterglows detected by the X-ray telescope aboard Swift and collect 12 GRBs with significant late-time spectral softening. We find that dust scattering could be the dominant radiative mechanism for these X-ray afterglows regarding their temporal and spectral features. For some well-observed bursts with high-quality data, the time-resolved spectra could be well-produced within the scattering scenario by taking into account the X-ray absorption from the circumburst medium. We also find that during spectral softening the power-law index in the high-energy end of the spectra does not vary much. The spectral softening is mainly manifested by the spectral peak energy continually moving to the soft end.

  18. X-Ray Spectral Study of the Photoionized Stellar Wind in Vela X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Shin; Sako, Masao; Ishida, Manabu; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kahn, Steven M.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Nagase, Fumiaki; Paerels, Frederik; Takahashi, Tadayuki; /JAXA,

    2006-07-10

    We present results from quantitative modeling and spectral analysis of the high mass X-ray binary system Vela X-1 obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. The observations cover three orbital phase ranges within a single binary orbit. The spectra exhibit emission lines from H-like and He-like ions driven by photoionization, as well as fluorescent emission lines from several elements in lower charge states. The properties of these X-ray lines are measured with the highest accuracy to date. In order to interpret and make full use of the high-quality data, we have developed a simulator, which calculates the ionization and thermal structure of a stellar wind photoionized by an X-ray source, and performs Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photons propagating through the wind. The emergent spectra are then computed as a function of the viewing angle accurately accounting for photon transport in three dimensions including dynamics. From comparisons of the observed spectra with results from the simulator, we are able to find the ionization structure and the geometrical distribution of material in the stellar wind of Vela X-1 that can reproduce the observed spectral line intensities and continuum shapes at different orbital phases remarkably well. We find that the stellar wind profile can be represented by a CAK-model with a star mass loss rate of (1.5-2.0) x 10{sup -6} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1}, assuming a terminal velocity of 1100 km s{sup -1}. It is found that a large fraction of X-ray emission lines from highly ionized ions are formed in the region between the neutron star and the companion star. We also find that the fluorescent X-ray lines must be produced in at least three distinct regions: (1) the extended stellar wind, (2) reflection off the stellar photosphere, and (3) in a distribution of dense material partially covering and possibly trailing the neutron star, which may be associated with an accretion wake. Finally, from

  19. X-ray spectral studies of the electronic structure of uranyl fluorite UO2F2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkin Igor O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work interpreted the fine X-ray photoelectron spectral structure of the low binding energy electrons (0-40 eV and X-ray O4,5(U emission spectral structure from UO2F2 taking into account the relativistic Xα discrete variation (RXα-DV calculation for the [(UO2F6]4–(D6h cluster reflecting an uranium close environment in UO2F2. The U5f electrons were shown to participate directly in the chemical bond formation. The U6p electrons were shown to participate not only information of the inner valence molecular orbitals, but also information of the outer valence molecular orbitals. The inner valence molecular orbitals sequence order in the binding energy range 12-40 eV was established. It is important for development of the technique of interatomic distance determination in the axial direction and equatorial plane of uranyl compounds on the X-ray photoelectron spectral basis.

  20. Assessment of the spectral performance of hybrid photon counting x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueb, Peter; Zambon, Pietro; Broennimann, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid Photon Counting (HPC) detectors profoundly improved x-ray diffraction experiments at third generation synchrotron facilities. Enabling the simultaneous measurement of x-ray intensities in multiple energy bins, they also have many potential applications in the field of medical imaging. A prerequisite for this is a clean spectral response. To quantify how efficiently HPC detectors are able to assign photons to the correct energy bin, a quantity called Spectral Efficiency (SE) is introduced. This figure of merit measures the number of x-rays with correctly assigned energy normalized to the number of incoming photons. A prototype HPC detector has been used to perform precision measurements of x-ray spectra at the BESSY synchrotron. The detector consists of a novel ASIC with pixels of 75 × 75 μm2 size and a 750 μm thick CdTe sensor. The experimental data are complemented by the results of a Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation, which not only includes the physical detection process but also pulse pile-up at high photon fluxes. The spectra and the measured photon flux are used to infer the Spectral Efficiency. In the energy range from 10 to 60 keV, both the Quantum Efficiency and the Spectral Efficiency were precisely measured and simulated. Good agreement between simulation and experiment has been achieved. For the small pixels of the prototype detector, a SE between 15% and 77% has been determined. The MC simulation is used to predict the SE for various pixel sizes at different photon fluxes. For a typical flux of 5∙107  photons/mm2 /s used in human Computed Tomography (CT), the highest SE is achieved for pixel sizes in the range between 150 × 150 μm2 and 300 × 300 μm2 . The Spectral Efficiency turns out to be a useful figure of merit to quantify the spectral performance of HPC detectors. It allows a quantitative comparison of detectors with different sensor and ASIC configurations over a broad range of x-ray energies and fluxes. The maximization of

  1. Spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray millisecond pulsar IGR J17498-2921

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falanga, M.; Kuiper, L.; Poutanen, J.; Galloway, D.K.; Bozzo, E.; Goldwurm, A.; Hermsen, W.; Stella, L.

    2012-01-01

    Context. IGR J17498-2921 is the third X-ray transient accreting millisecond pulsar discovered by INTEGRAL. It was in outburst for about 40 days beginning on August 08, 2011. Aims. We analyze the spectral and timing properties of the object and the characteristics of X-ray bursts to constrain the

  2. AGN spectral states from simultaneous UV and X-ray observations by XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, J.; Guainazzi, M.; Merloni, A.

    2017-07-01

    Context. It is generally believed that the supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) and stellar-mass black holes in X-ray binaries (XRBs) work in a similar way. Aims: While XRBs evolve rapidly and several sources have undergone a few complete cycles from quiescence to an outburst and back, most AGN remain in the same state over periods of years and decades, due to their longer characteristic timescale proportional to their size. However, the study of the AGN spectral states is still possible with a large sample of sources. Multi-wavelength observations are needed for this purpose since the AGN thermal disc emission dominates in the ultraviolet energy range, while the up-scattered hot-corona emission is detected in X-rays. Methods: We compared simultaneous UV and X-ray measurements of AGN obtained by the XMM-Newton satellite. The non-thermal power-law flux was constrained from the 2-12 keV X-ray luminosity, while the thermal disc component was estimated from the UV flux at ≈ 2900 Å. The hardness (defined as a ratio between the X-ray and UV plus X-ray luminosity) and the total luminosity were used to construct the AGN state diagrams. For sources with reliable mass measurements, the Eddington ratio was used instead of the total luminosity. Results: The state diagrams show that the radio-loud sources have on average higher hardness, due to the lack of the thermal disc emission in the UV band, and have flatter intrinsic X-ray spectra. In contrast, the sources with high luminosity and low hardness are radio-quiet AGN with the UV spectrum consistent with the multi-temperature thermal disc emission. The hardness-Eddington ratio diagram reveals that the average radio-loudness is stronger for low-accreting sources, while it decreases when the accretion rate is close to the Eddington limit. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the general properties of AGN accretion states are similar to those of XRBs. This suggests that the AGN radio dichotomy of radio

  3. Energy Calibration of the Pixels of Spectral X-ray Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have deve...

  4. SXP 15.6: X-ray spectral and temporal properties of a newly discovered pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilopoulos, G.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Haberl, F.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the X-ray spectral and temporal properties of the Be/X-ray binary system XMMU J004855.5-734946 located in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The system was monitored by Swift/XRT during a moderate outburst in 2016 July, while an unanticipated Chandra target of opportunity observation was triggered when the luminosity of the system was greater than 1036 erg s-1 allowing a detailed study of X-ray properties of the systems. Specifically, its X-ray spectrum, as observed during the outburst, is well modelled by an absorbed power law (Γ = 0.58). Timing analysis of the collected photon events revealed coherent X-ray pulsations with a period of ˜15.64 s, thus confirming XMMU J004855.5-734946 as a high-mass X-ray binary pulsar. By analysing archival XMM-Newton observations, we determined the long-term spin period evolution of the neutron star, showing that the compact star has spun-up by \\dot{P}˜ -0.0028 s yr^{-1}. By modelling the X-ray pulsed emission as detected by Chandra, we set constraints on the inclination of the magnetic and rotation axis of the neutron star, as well to its compactness (I.e. (M/M⊙)/(R/km) = 0.095 ± 0.007).

  5. ARE SPECTRAL AND TIMING CORRELATIONS SIMILAR IN DIFFERENT SPECTRAL STATES IN BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalamkar, M.; Klis, M. van der [Astronomical Institute, “Anton Pannekoek,” University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Altamirano, D., E-mail: maithili@oa-roma.inaf.it [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-20

    We study the outbursts of the black hole X-ray binaries MAXI J1659-152, SWIFT J1753.5-0127, and GX 339-4 with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The bandpass of the XRT has access to emission from both components of the accretion flow: the accretion disk and the corona/hot flow. This allows a correlated spectral and variability study, with variability from both components of the accretion flow. We present for the first time a combined study of the evolution of spectral parameters (disk temperature and radius) and timing parameters (frequency and strength) of all power spectral components in different spectral states. Comparison of the correlations in different spectral states shows that the frequency and strength of the power spectral components exhibit dependencies on the disk temperature that are different in the (low-)hard and the hard-intermediate states (HIMSs); most of these correlations that are clearly observed in the HIMS (in MAXI J1659-152 and GX 339-4) are not seen in the (low-)hard state (in GX 339-4 and SWIFT J1753.5-0127). Also, the responses of the individual frequency components to changes in the disk temperature are markedly different from one component to the next. Hence, the spectral-timing evolution cannot be explained by a single correlation that spans both these spectral states. We discuss our findings in the context of the existing models proposed to explain the origin of variability.

  6. An X-ray spectral model for clumpy tori in active galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo, E-mail: liuyuan@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: lixb@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918-3, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-05-20

    We construct an X-ray spectral model for the clumpy torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) using Geant4, which includes the physical processes of the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering, γ conversion, fluorescence line, and Auger process. Since the electrons in the torus are expected to be bounded instead of free, the deviation of the scattering cross section from the Klein-Nishina cross section has also been included, which changes the X-ray spectra by up to 25% below 10 keV. We have investigated the effect of the clumpiness parameters on the reflection spectra and the strength of the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The volume filling factor of the clouds in the clumpy torus only slightly influences the reflection spectra, however, the total column density and the number of clouds along the line of sight significantly change the shapes and amplitudes of the reflection spectra. The effect of column density is similar to the case of a smooth torus, while a small number of clouds along the line of sight will smooth out the anisotropy of the reflection spectra and the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The smoothing effect is mild in the low column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}), whereas it is much more evident in the high column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 25} cm{sup –2}). Our model provides a quantitative tool for the spectral analysis of the clumpy torus. We suggest that the joint fits of the broad band spectral energy distributions of AGNs (from X-ray to infrared) should better constrain the structure of the torus.

  7. An X-Ray Spectral Analysis of the Central Regions of NGC 4593

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneman, Laura W.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Wilms, Jörn; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth

    2007-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of XMM-Newton EPIC-pn data for the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4593. We discuss the X-ray spectral properties of this source, as well as its variations with time. The 0.5-10 keV spectrum shows significant complexity beyond a simple power-law form, with clear evidence existing for a ``soft excess,'' as well as absorption by highly ionized plasma (a warm absorber) within the central engine of this active galactic nucleus. We show that the soft excess is best described as originating from thermal Comptonization by plasma that is appreciably cooler than the primary X-ray-emitting plasma; we find that the form of the soft excess cannot be reproduced adequately by reflection from an ionized accretion disk. The only measurable deviation from the power-law continuum in the hard spectrum comes from the presence of cold and ionized fluorescent iron Kα emission lines at 6.4 and 6.97 keV, respectively. While constraints on the ionized iron line are weak, the cold line is found to be narrow at CCD resolution with a flux that does not track the temporal changes in the underlying continuum, implying an origin in the outer radii of the accretion disk or the putative molecular torus of Seyfert unification schemes. The X-ray continuum itself varies on all accessible timescales. We detect a ~230 s time lag between soft and hard EPIC-pn bands that, if interpreted as scattering timescales within a Comptonizing disk corona, can be used to constrain the physical size of the primary X-ray source to a characteristic length scale of ~2rg. Taken together, the small implied coronal size and the large implied iron-line emitting region indicate a departure from the current picture of a ``typical'' AGN geometry.

  8. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  9. Spectral Interferences Manganese (Mn) - Europium (Eu) Lines in X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanc, Beril; Kaya, Mustafa; Gumus, Lokman; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is widely used for quantitative and semi quantitative analysis of many major, minor and trace elements in geological samples. Some advantages of the XRF method are; non-destructive sample preparation, applicability for powder, solid, paste and liquid samples and simple spectrum that are independent from chemical state. On the other hand, there are some disadvantages of the XRF methods such as poor sensitivity for low atomic number elements, matrix effect (physical matrix effects, such as fine versus course grain materials, may impact XRF performance) and interference effect (the spectral lines of elements may overlap distorting results for one or more elements). Especially, spectral interferences are very significant factors for accurate results. In this study, semi-quantitative analyzed manganese (II) oxide (MnO, 99.99%) was examined. Samples were pelleted and analyzed with XRF spectrometry (Bruker S8 Tiger). Unexpected peaks were obtained at the side of the major Mn peaks. Although sample does not contain Eu element, in results 0,3% Eu2O3 was observed. These result can occur high concentration of MnO and proximity of Mn and Eu lines. It can be eliminated by using correction equation or Mn concentration can confirm with other methods (such as Atomic absorption spectroscopy). Keywords: Spectral Interferences; Manganese (Mn); Europium (Eu); X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry Spectrum.

  10. A curved crystal spectrometer for energy calibration and spectral characterization of mammographic x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, L T; Deslattes, R D; Henins, A; Chantler, C T; Kessler, E G; Schweppe, J E

    1996-10-01

    Clinical efficacy of diagnostic radiology for mammographic examinations is critically dependent on source characteristics, detection efficiency, image resolution and applied high voltage. In this report we focus on means for evaluation of source-dependent issues including noninvasive determination of the applied high voltage, and characterization of intrinsic spectral distributions which in turn reflect the effects of added filtration and target and window contamination. It is shown that a particular form of x-ray curved crystal spectrometry with electronic imaging can serve to determine all relevant parameters within the confines of a standard clinical exposure.

  11. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5–7.5 × 1013 cm−3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d–4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20–40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  12. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hayato; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sasaki, Akira; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; LHD Experiment Group

    2017-08-01

    The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA) emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5-7.5) × 1013 cm-3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d-4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20-40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  13. pyblocxs: Bayesian Low-Counts X-ray Spectral Analysis in Sherpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemiginowska, A.; Kashyap, V.; Refsdal, B.; van Dyk, D.; Connors, A.; Park, T.

    2011-07-01

    Typical X-ray spectra have low counts and should be modeled using the Poisson distribution. However, χ2 statistic is often applied as an alternative and the data are assumed to follow the Gaussian distribution. A variety of weights to the statistic or a binning of the data is performed to overcome the low counts issues. However, such modifications introduce biases or/and a loss of information. Standard modeling packages such as XSPEC and Sherpa provide the Poisson likelihood and allow computation of rudimentary MCMC chains, but so far do not allow for setting a full Bayesian model. We have implemented a sophisticated Bayesian MCMC-based algorithm to carry out spectral fitting of low counts sources in the Sherpa environment. The code is a Python extension to Sherpa and allows to fit a predefined Sherpa model to high-energy X-ray spectral data and other generic data. We present the algorithm and discuss several issues related to the implementation, including flexible definition of priors and allowing for variations in the calibration information.

  14. Observation of hohlraum-wall motion with spectrally selective x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, N., E-mail: izumi2@llnl.gov; Meezan, N. B.; Divol, L.; Hall, G. N.; Barrios, M. A.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Bailey, C. G.; Hardy, C. M.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Jaquez, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 9212 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The high fuel capsule compression required for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion requires careful control of the X-ray drive symmetry throughout the laser pulse. When the outer cone beams strike the hohlraum wall, the plasma ablated off the hohlraum wall expands into the hohlraum and can alter both the outer and inner cone beam propagations and hence the X-ray drive symmetry especially at the final stage of the drive pulse. To quantitatively understand the wall motion, we developed a new experimental technique which visualizes the expansion and stagnation of the hohlraum wall plasma. Details of the experiment and the technique of spectrally selective x-ray imaging are discussed.

  15. Spectral X-ray Radiography for Safeguards at Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facilities: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Smith, Leon E.

    2017-04-20

    The methods currently used by the International Atomic Energy Agency to account for nuclear materials at fuel fabrication facilities are time consuming and require in-field chemistry and operation by experts. Spectral X-ray radiography, along with advanced inverse algorithms, is an alternative inspection that could be completed noninvasively, without any in-field chemistry, with inspections of tens of seconds. The proposed inspection system and algorithms are presented here. The inverse algorithm uses total variation regularization and adaptive regularization parameter selection with the unbiased predictive risk estimator. Performance of the system is quantified with simulated X-ray inspection data and sensitivity of the output is tested against various inspection system instabilities. Material quantification from a fully-characterized inspection system is shown to be very accurate, with biases on nuclear material estimations of < 0.02%. It is shown that the results are sensitive to variations in the fuel powder sample density and detector pixel gain, which increase biases to 1%. Options to mitigate these inaccuracies are discussed.

  16. Spectral, DFT and X-ray diffraction studies on regioselective synthesis of thiazolo-quinazoline system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Deepika; Gautam, Poonam; Chaudhary, R. P.

    2017-10-01

    Unsymmetrical quinazoline-3-thione 2, obtained from one pot condensation of 2-tetralone, p-chlorobenzaldehyde and thiourea in acidic medium, on reaction with α-halo acids afforded thiazolo-quinazoline derivatives 3, 7 and not their regioisomers 4 and 8 respectively. The cyclised product obtained by the reaction of thione 2 with 1,2-dibromoethane has been assigned structure 5. Condensation of thione 2 with 3-chloropropionic acid and 1,3-dibromopropane furnished thiazino-quinazoline derivatives 10 and 12 instead of their regioisomers 11 and 13 respectively. The structure of the cyclised products has been established by means of spectral data (IR, NMR and Mass). X-ray diffraction studies of a representative compound supported our claim on structural assignments. DFT studies on regioisomers further validated the claim for assigned structures. The reaction of thione 2 with 3-chloropropionc acid in presence of acetic acid yielded thiazinan-4-one 10.

  17. X-RAY VARIABILITY AND HARDNESS OF ESO 243-49 HLX-1: CLEAR EVIDENCE FOR SPECTRAL STATE TRANSITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servillat, Mathieu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-67, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Farrell, Sean A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Lin Dacheng; Godet, Olivier; Barret, Didier; Webb, Natalie A., E-mail: mservillat@cfa.harvard.edu [Universite de Toulouse, Universite Paul Sabatier-Observatoire Midi-Pyrenees, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-10

    The ultraluminous X-ray (ULX) source ESO 243-49 HLX-1, which reaches a maximum luminosity of 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} (0.2-10 keV), currently provides the strongest evidence for the existence of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). To study the spectral variability of the source, we conduct an ongoing monitoring campaign with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT), which now spans more than two years. We found that HLX-1 showed two fast rise and exponential decay type outbursts in the Swift XRT light curve with increases in the count rate of a factor {approx}40 separated by 375 {+-} 13 days. We obtained new XMM-Newton and Chandra dedicated pointings that were triggered at the lowest and highest luminosities, respectively. From spectral fitting, the unabsorbed luminosities ranged from 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} to 1.25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. We confirm here the detection of spectral state transitions from HLX-1 reminiscent of Galactic black hole binaries (GBHBs): at high luminosities, the X-ray spectrum showed a thermal state dominated by a disk component with temperatures of 0.26 keV at most, and at low luminosities the spectrum is dominated by a hard power law with a photon index in the range 1.4-2.1, consistent with a hard state. The source was also observed in a state consistent with the steep power-law state, with a photon index of {approx}3.5. In the thermal state, the luminosity of the disk component appears to scale with the fourth power of the inner disk temperature, which supports the presence of an optically thick, geometrically thin accretion disk. The low fractional variability (rms of 9% {+-} 9%) in this state also suggests the presence of a dominant disk. The spectral changes and long-term variability of the source cannot be explained by variations of the beaming angle and are not consistent with the source being in a super-Eddington accretion state as is proposed for most ULX sources with lower luminosities. All this

  18. Discovery of Spatial and Spectral Structure in the X-Ray Emission from the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf; Hester; Tennant; Elsner; Schulz; Marshall; Karovska; Nichols; Swartz; Kolodziejczak; O'Dell

    2000-06-20

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory observed the Crab Nebula and pulsar during orbital calibration. Zeroth-order images with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) readout by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopy array (ACIS-S) show a striking richness of X-ray structure at a resolution comparable to that of the best ground-based visible-light observations. The HETG-ACIS-S images reveal, for the first time, an X-ray inner ring within the X-ray torus, the suggestion of a hollow-tube structure for the torus, and X-ray knots along the inner ring and (perhaps) along the inward extension of the X-ray jet. Although complicated by instrumental effects and the brightness of the Crab Nebula, the spectrometric analysis shows systematic variations of the X-ray spectrum throughout the nebula.

  19. High spectral resolution x-ray optics with highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legall, H; Stiel, H; Arkadiev, V; Bjeoumikhov, A A

    2006-05-15

    Thin films of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) give the opportunity to realize crystal optics with arbitrary geometry by mounting it on a mould of any shape. A specific feature of HOPG is its mosaicity accompanied by a high integral reflectivity, which is by an order of magnitude higher than that of all other known crystals in an energy range between 2 keV up to several 10 keV. These characteristics make it possible to realize highly efficient collecting optics, which could be also relevant for compact x-ray diagnostic tools and spectrometers. For these applications the achievable spectral resolution of the crystal optics is of interest. In this article measurements with a spectral resolution of E/DeltaE=2900 in the second order reflection and E/DeltaE=1800 in the first order reflection obtained with HOPG crystals are presented. These are by far the highest spectral resolutions reported for HOPG crystals. The integral reflectivity of these very thin films is still comparable with that of ideal Ge crystals. The trade-off between energy resolution and high integral reflectivity for HOPG is demonstrated by determining these parameters for HOPG films of different thickness.

  20. Charge and orbital ordered states studied by using x-ray anomalous scattering terms

    CERN Document Server

    Nakao, H

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the studies utilizing anomalous scattering term of atomic scattering factor near absorption edge, so called x-ray anomalous scattering and resonant x-ray scattering, have been rapidly developed. This technique has especially contributed to the determination of the charge-orbital ordered structure in strongly correlated electron system. In this paper, we present the typical examples - the charge ordering of V sup 4 sup + and V sup 5 sup + in NaV sub 2 O sub 5 and the antiferro-quadrupole ordering (orbital ordering) of Ge sup 3 sup + ions in CeB sub 6 (author)

  1. The nature of X-ray spectral variability in MCG-6-30-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, E. S.; Papadakis, I. E.

    2017-12-01

    The flux-flux plot (FFP) method can provide model-independent clues regarding the X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei. To use it properly, the bin size of the light curves should be as short as possible, provided the average counts in the light-curve bins are larger than ∼200. We apply the FFP method, performed in 2013, to the simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15, in the 0.3-40 keV range. The FFPs above ∼1.6 keV are well described by a straight line. This result rules out spectral slope variations and the hypothesis of absorption-driven variability. Our results are fully consistent with a power-law component varying in normalization only, with a spectral slope of ∼2, plus a variable, relativistic reflection arising from the inner accretion disc around a rotating black hole. We also detect spectral components that remain constant over ∼4.5 d (at least). At energies above ∼1.5 keV, the stable component is consistent with reflection from distant, neutral material. The constant component at low energies is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of kTBB ∼ 100 eV. The fluxes of these components are ∼10-20% of the average continuum flux (in the respective bands). They should always be included in the models that are used to fit the spectrum of the source. The FFPs below 1.6 keV are non-linear, which could be due to the variable warm absorber in this source.

  2. X-ray studies, spectral characterization and thermal behaviour of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP04)3]. H20, I, was synthesized by reacting Zn2+ ions with tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine phosphate [C6H21N4][P04].5H20. The compound was characterized by powder x-ray diffraction analysis, energy dispersive analysis by x-ray and infrared ...

  3. Spectral and timing properties of neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I analyzed the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries using data from several X-ray telescopes. I found that the relations of fluxes of different radiation components in 4U 1636-53 is more complicated than what the simple reflction model predicts. This may be due to either changes in

  4. Low-dose CT of the paranasal sinuses. Minimizing X-ray exposure with spectral shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, Wolfgang [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany); Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany); May, Matthias; Saake, Marc; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Shaping the energy spectrum of the X-ray beam has been shown to be beneficial in low-dose CT. This study's aim was to investigate dose and image quality of tin filtration at 100 kV for pre-operative planning in low-dose paranasal CT imaging in a large patient cohort. In a prospective trial, 129 patients were included. 64 patients were randomly assigned to the study protocol (100 kV with additional tin filtration, 150mAs, 192 x 0.6-mm slice collimation) and 65 patients to the standard low-dose protocol (100 kV, 50mAs, 128 x 0.6-mm slice collimation). To assess the image quality, subjective parameters were evaluated using a five-point scale. This scale was applied on overall image quality and contour delineation of critical anatomical structures. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Bony structures were of good diagnostic image quality in both groups, soft tissues were of sufficient diagnostic image quality in the study group because of a high level of noise. Radiation exposure was very low in both groups, but significantly lower in the study group (CTDI{sub vol} 1.2 mGy vs. 4.4 mGy, p < 0.001). Spectral optimization (tin filtration at 100 kV) allows for visualization of the paranasal sinus with sufficient image quality at a very low radiation exposure. (orig.)

  5. Note: Effect of photodiode aluminum cathode frame on spectral sensitivity in the soft x-ray energy band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarry, M. B., E-mail: mbmcgarry@wisc.edu; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; Johnson, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Franz, P. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA per la Fusione, Padova (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    Silicon photodiodes used for soft x-ray detection typically have a thin metal electrode partially covering the active area of the photodiode, which subtly alters the spectral sensitivity of the photodiode. As a specific example, AXUV4BST photodiodes from International Radiation Detectors have a 1.0 μm thick aluminum frame covering 19% of the active area of the photodiode, which attenuates the measured x-ray signal below ∼6 keV. This effect has a small systematic impact on the electron temperature calculated from measurements of soft x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from a high-temperature plasma. Although the systematic error introduced by the aluminum frame is only a few percent in typical experimental conditions on the Madison Symmetric Torus, it may be more significant for other instruments that use similar detectors.

  6. Note: Effect of photodiode aluminum cathode frame on spectral sensitivity in the soft x-ray energy band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, M B; Franz, P; Den Hartog, D J; Goetz, J A; Johnson, J

    2014-09-01

    Silicon photodiodes used for soft x-ray detection typically have a thin metal electrode partially covering the active area of the photodiode, which subtly alters the spectral sensitivity of the photodiode. As a specific example, AXUV4BST photodiodes from International Radiation Detectors have a 1.0 μm thick aluminum frame covering 19% of the active area of the photodiode, which attenuates the measured x-ray signal below ~6 keV. This effect has a small systematic impact on the electron temperature calculated from measurements of soft x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from a high-temperature plasma. Although the systematic error introduced by the aluminum frame is only a few percent in typical experimental conditions on the Madison Symmetric Torus, it may be more significant for other instruments that use similar detectors.

  7. Eliminating the non-Gaussian spectral response of X-ray absorbers for transition-edge sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divan, Ralu [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Gades, Lisa M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Kenesei, Peter [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Madden, Timothy J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Miceli, Antonino [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Park, Jun-Sang [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Patel, Umeshkumar M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Quaranta, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Northwestern Univeristy, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA; Sharma, Hemant [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Bennett, Douglas A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Doriese, William B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Fowler, Joseph W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Gard, Johnathon D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Hays-Wehle, James P. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Morgan, Kelsey M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Schmidt, Daniel R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Swetz, Daniel S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; Ullom, Joel N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA; University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA

    2017-11-06

    Transition-edge sensors (TESs) as microcalorimeters for high-energy-resolution X-ray spectroscopy are often fabricated with an absorber made of materials with high Z (for X-ray stopping power) and low heat capacity (for high resolving power). Bismuth represents one of the most compelling options. TESs with evaporated bismuth absorbers have shown spectra with undesirable and unexplained low-energy tails. We have developed TESs with electroplated bismuth absorbers over a gold layer that are not afflicted by this problem and that retain the other positive aspects of this material. To better understand these phenomena, we have studied a series of TESs with gold, gold/evaporated bismuth, and gold/electroplated bismuth absorbers, fabricated on the same die with identical thermal coupling. We show that the bismuth morphology is linked to the spectral response of X-ray TES microcalorimeters. Published by AIP Publishing.

  8. Spectral variability and reverberation time delays in the Suzaku X-ray spectrum of NGC 4051

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Reeves, J. N.; Lobban, A.; Kraemer, S. B.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    2010-03-01

    Long-exposure Suzaku X-ray observations of the nearby active galaxy NGC 4051 from 2005 and 2008 are analysed, in an attempt to reach a self-consistent understanding of both the spectral variability on long time-scales and the broad-band variability at high time resolution. The techniques of principal components analysis and a maximum likelihood method of power spectrum analysis are used. In common with other type I active galactic nuclei (AGN), the spectral variability is dominated by a varying-normalization power-law component together with a quasi-steady, hard-spectrum offset component that contains Fe K atomic features. NGC 4051 displays a strong excess over a power law at energies of above 20keV, some fraction of which also appears to vary with the power-law continuum. The fast time-scale power spectrum has a shape generally consistent with previous determinations, with the previously known dependence on broad-band photon energy, but in the new data significant differences are found between the low and high flux states of the source, demonstrating that the power spectrum is non-stationary. Frequency-dependent time lags between the hard and soft bands of up to 970 +/- 225s are measured. The existence of the observed time lags excludes the possibility that the hard spectral component originates as reflection from the inner accretion disc. We instead show that the time lags and their frequency and energy dependence may be explained simply by the effects of reverberation in the hard band, caused by reflection from a thick shell of material with maximum lags of about 10000s. If the reflecting material surrounds the AGN, it extends to a distance of about 1.5 × 1014cm, 600 gravitational radii, from the illuminating source and the global covering factor is Cg >~ 0.44, confirming previous suggestions that type I AGN have high covering factors of absorbing and reflecting material. Given the spectral and timing similarities with other type I AGN, we infer that this

  9. Low-Dose CT of the Paranasal Sinuses: Minimizing X-Ray Exposure with Spectral Shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Wolfgang; May, Matthias; Saake, Marc; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Shaping the energy spectrum of the X-ray beam has been shown to be beneficial in low-dose CT. This study's aim was to investigate dose and image quality of tin filtration at 100 kV for pre-operative planning in low-dose paranasal CT imaging in a large patient cohort. In a prospective trial, 129 patients were included. 64 patients were randomly assigned to the study protocol (100 kV with additional tin filtration, 150mAs, 192x0.6-mm slice collimation) and 65 patients to the standard low-dose protocol (100 kV, 50mAs, 128 × 0.6-mm slice collimation). To assess the image quality, subjective parameters were evaluated using a five-point scale. This scale was applied on overall image quality and contour delineation of critical anatomical structures. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Bony structures were of good diagnostic image quality in both groups, soft tissues were of sufficient diagnostic image quality in the study group because of a high level of noise. Radiation exposure was very low in both groups, but significantly lower in the study group (CTDIvol 1.2 mGy vs. 4.4 mGy, p image quality at a very low radiation exposure. • Spectral optimization (tin filtration) is beneficial to low-dose parasinus CT • Tin filtration at 100 kV yields sufficient image quality for pre-operative planning • Diagnostic parasinus CT can be performed with an effective dose <0.05 mSv.

  10. Prediction and Measurement of X-Ray Spectral and Intensity Distributions from Low Energy Electron Impact Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.

    1999-01-01

    In-vacuum electron beam welding is a technology that NASA considered as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. The interaction of energetic electrons with metal produces x-rays. The radiation exposure to astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding must be characterized and minimized to insure safe operating conditions. This investigation characterized the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the United States Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA, by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine, for ground based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests consisted of Thermoluminescence Dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) and exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x-rays of energy less than 10 KeV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by electron impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  11. The dependence of the soft X ray spectral slope with radio property, luminosity, and redshift, for a large sample of AGN from the Einstein IPC data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, H.; Worrall, D. M.; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Elvis, Martin

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of the soft X-ray spectral slope on radio, optical and X-ray properties, and on redshift are reported for a large sample of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The sample includes 317 optically and radio-selected AGN from a preliminary version of the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) quasar and AGN data base. The main results are: the difference in X-ray slope between radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN were confirmed for an independent and much larger sample of sources; a difference in X-ray slope between flat and steep radio spectrum AGN is observed only in high luminosity sub-sample; in flat radio spectrum AGNs there is an indication for a dependence of the X-ray spectral index on X-ray luminosity redshift and alpha sub 0x.

  12. Detection of X-ray spectral state transitions in mini-outbursts of black hole transient GRS 1739-278

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen; Yu, Wenfei

    2017-10-01

    We report the detection of the state transitions and hysteresis effect in the two mini-outbursts of the black hole (BH) transient GRS 1739-278 following its 2014 major outburst. The X-ray spectral evolutions in these two mini-outbursts are similar to the major outburst in spite of their peak luminosities and the outburst durations are one order of magnitude lower. We found L_hard{-to-soft} and Lpeak,soft of the mini-outbursts also follow the correlation previously found in other X-ray binaries. L_hard{-to-soft} of the mini-outbursts is still higher than that of the persistent BH binary Cyg X-1, which supports that there is a link between the maximum luminosity a source can reach in the hard state and the corresponding non-stationary accretion represented by substantial rate of change in the mass accretion rate during flares/outbursts. The detected luminosity range of these two mini-outbursts is roughly in 3.5 × 10-5 to 0.015 (D/7.5 kpc)2(M/8M⊙) LEdd. The X-ray spectra of other BH transients at such low luminosities are usually dominated by a power-law component, and an anti-correlation is observed between the photon index and the X-ray luminosity below 1 per cent LEdd. So, the detection of X-ray spectral state transitions indicates that the accretion flow evolution in these two mini-outbursts of GRS 1739-278 are different from other BH systems at such low-luminosity regime.

  13. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Aldcroft, Tom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Mossman, Amy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Silverman, John D. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Barkhouse, Wayne [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 (United States); Cameron, Robert A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Constantin, Anca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, James Madison University, PHCH, Harrisonburg, VA 22807 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1 (Canada); Foltz, Craig [Division of Astronomical Sciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Haggard, Daryl [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Jannuzi, Buell T. [NOAO, Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Marshall, Herman L. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Perez, Laura M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Romero-Colmenero, Encarni [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Ruiz, Angel [Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera-INAF, Milan (Italy); Smith, Malcolm G., E-mail: mtrichas@cfa.harvard.edu [Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2012-06-01

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z {approx} 5.5 and galaxies out to z {approx} 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While {approx}58% of X-ray Seyferts (10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} < L{sub 2-10keV} <10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L{sub 2-10keV} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO

  14. Are Spectral and Timing Correlations Similar in Different Spectral States in Black Hole X-Ray Binaries?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalamkar, M.; Reynolds, M.T.; van der Klis, M.; Altamirano, D.; Miller, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the outbursts of the black hole X-ray binaries MAXI J1659-152, SWIFT J1753.5-0127, and GX 339-4 with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The bandpass of the XRT has access to emission from both components of the accretion flow: the accretion disk and the corona/hot flow. This allows a

  15. Reducing Poisson noise and baseline drift in X-ray spectral images with bootstrap Poisson regression and robust nonparametric regression

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Feng; Feng, Weiyue; Wang, Huajian; Huang, Shaosen; Lv, Yisong; Chen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    X-ray spectral imaging provides quantitative imaging of trace elements in biological sample with high sensitivity. We propose a novel algorithm to promote the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of X-ray spectral images that have low photon counts. Firstly, we estimate the image data area that belongs to the homogeneous parts through confidence interval testing. Then, we apply the Poisson regression through its maximum likelihood estimation on this area to estimate the true photon counts from the Poisson noise corrupted data. Unlike other denoising methods based on regression analysis, we use the bootstrap resampling methods to ensure the accuracy of regression estimation. Finally, we use a robust local nonparametric regression method to estimate the baseline and subsequently subtract it from the X-ray spectral data to further improve the SNR of the data. Experiments on several real samples show that the proposed method performs better than some state-of-the-art approaches to ensure accuracy and precision for quantit...

  16. Spectral analysis of paramagnetic centers induced in human tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, I. I.

    2010-03-01

    Based on study of spectral and relaxation characteristics, we have established that paramagnetic centers induced in tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation are identical in nature. We show that for the same exposure dose, the intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal induced by x-radiation with effective energy 34 keV is about an order of magnitude higher than the amplitude of the signal induced by gamma radiation. We have identified a three-fold attenuation of the EPR signal along the path of the x-radiation from the buccal to the lingual side of a tooth, which is evidence that the individual had undergone diagnostic x-ray examination of the dentition or skull. We have shown that the x-ray exposure doses reconstructed from the EPR spectra are an order of magnitude higher than the applied doses, while the dose loads due to gamma radiation are equal to the applied doses. The data obtained indicate that for adequate reconstruction of individual absorbed doses from EPR spectra of tooth enamel in the population subjected to the combined effect of x-radiation and accidental external gamma radiation as a result of the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, we need to take into account the contribution to the dose load from diagnostic x-rays in examination of the teeth, jaw, or skull.

  17. All-Sky Hard X-Ray Spectral Line Survey with EXIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G. J.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.; Hartmann, D. H.; Vadawale, S.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST), under study to be the Black Hole Finder Probe in NASA's Beyond Einstein Program, would image the sky every 95 min in the energy range 10-600 keV. Although the main scientific objectives of EXIST are the systematic, all-sky survey of heavily obscured AGNs and gamma-ray bursts, there is a substantial capability of EXIST for the observation of transient and persistent hard X-ray lines from several astrophysical sources.

  18. An Outburst Scenario for the X-ray Spectral Variability in 3C 111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Reeves, J. N.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Garcia, J.; Lohfink, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a combined Suzaku and Swift BAT broad-band E=0.6-200 keV spectral analysis of three 3C 111 observations obtained in 2010. The data are well described with an absorbed power-law continuum and a weak (R approximately equal to 0.2) cold reflection component from distant material. We constrain the continuum cutoff at E(sub C) approximately equal to 150- 200 keV, which is in accordance with X-ray Comptonization corona models and supports claims that the jet emission is only dominant at much higher energies. Fe XXVI Ly alpha emission and absorption lines are also present in the first and second observations, respectively. The modelling and interpretation of the emission line is complex and we explore three possibilities. If originating from ionized disc reflection, this should be emitted at r(sub in) greater than or equal to 50 r(sub g) or, in the lamp-post configuration, the illuminating source should be at a height of h greater than or equal to 30 r(sub g) over the black hole. Alternatively, the line could be modeled with a hot collisionally ionized plasma with temperature kT = 22.0(sup +6.1)(sub -3.2) keV or a photo-ionized plasma with logXi=4.52(sup +0.10)(sub -0.16) erg per second cm, and column density N(sub H) greater than 3×10(sup 23) per square centimeter. However, the first and second scenarios are less favored on statistical and physical grounds, respectively. The blue-shifted absorption line in the second observation can be modelled as an ultra-fast outflow (UFO) with ionization parameter logXi=4.47(sup +0.76) (sub -0.04) erg per second cm, column density NH=(5.3(sup +1.8)(sub -1.3))×10(sup 22) per square centimeter and outflow velocity v(sub out) = 0.104+/-0.006c. Interestingly, the parameters of the photoionized emission model remarkably match those of the absorbing UFO, supporting the possibility that the same material could be responsible for both emission and absorption. We suggest an outburst scenario in which an accretion disc wind

  19. An outburst scenario for the X-ray spectral variability in 3C 111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Reeves, J. N.; Reynolds, C. S.; García, J.; Lohfink, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present a combined Suzaku and Swift BAT broad-band E = 0.6-200 keV spectral analysis of three 3C 111 observations obtained in 2010. The data are well described with an absorbed power-law continuum and a weak (R ≃ 0.2) cold reflection component from distant material. We constrain the continuum cutoff at EC ≃ 150-200 keV, which is in accordance with X-ray Comptonization corona models and supports claims that the jet emission is only dominant at much higher energies. Fe XXVI Lyα emission and absorption lines are also present in the first and second observations, respectively. The modelling and interpretation of the emission line is complex and we explore three possibilities. If originating from ionized-disc reflection, this should be emitted at rin ≥ 50 rg or, in the lamp-post configuration, the illuminating source should be at a height of h ≥ 30 rg above the black hole. Alternatively, the line could be modelled with a hot collisionally ionized plasma with temperature kT = 22.0^{+6.1}_{-3.2} keV or a photoionized plasma with log ξ = 4.52^{+0.10}_{-0.16} erg s-1 cm and column density NH > 3 × 1023 cm-2. However, the first and second scenarios are less favoured on statistical and physical grounds, respectively. The blueshifted absorption line in the second observation can be modelled as an ultrafast outflow (UFO) with ionization parameter log ξ = 4.47^{+0.76}_{-0.04} erg s-1 cm, column density N_H = (5.3^{+1.8}_{-1.3})× 10^{22} cm-2 and outflow velocity vout = 0.104 ± 0.006c. Interestingly, the parameters of the photoionized emission model remarkably match those of the absorbing UFO, supporting the possibility that the same material could be responsible for both emission and absorption. We suggest an outburst scenario in which an accretion disc wind, initially lying out of the line of sight and observed in emission, then crosses our view to the source and it is observed in absorption as a mildly relativistic UFO.

  20. A search for X-ray reprocessing echoes in the power spectral density functions of AGN

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Papadakis, I.E.; Epitropakis, A.; Pecháček, Tomáš; Dovčiak, Michal; McHardy, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 461, č. 2 (2016), s. 1642-1655 ISSN 0035-8711 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : black hole physics * galaxies * X-rays Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  1. PIXIE III: a very large area photon-counting CMOS pixel ASIC for sharp X-ray spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Spandre, G.; Minuti, M.; Pinchera, M.; Delogu, P.; de Ruvo, P. L.; Vincenzi, A.

    2015-01-01

    PIXIE III is the third generation of very large area (32 × 25 mm2) pixel ASICs developed by Pixirad Imaging Counters s.r.l. to be used in combination with suitable X-ray sensor materials (Silicon, CdTe, GaAs) in hybrid assemblies using flip-chip bonding. A Pixirad unit module based on PIXIE III shows several advances compared to what has been available up to now. It has a very broad energy range (from 2 to 100 keV before full pulse saturation), high speed (100 ns peaking time), high frame rate (larger than 500 fps), dead-time-free operation, good energy resolution (around 2 keV at 20 keV), high photo-peak fraction and sharp spectral separation between the color images. In this paper the results obtained with PIXIE III both in a test bench set-up as well in X-ray imaging applications are discussed.

  2. Numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation: X-ray spectral formation from cylindrical accretion onto a magnetized neutron star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinelli, R.; Ceccobello, C.; Romano, P.; Titarchuk, L.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Predicting the emerging X-ray spectra in several astrophysical objects is of great importance, in particular when the observational data are compared with theoretical models. This requires developing numerical routines for the solution of the radiative equation according to the expected physical conditions of the systems under study. Aims: We have developed an algorithm solving the radiative transfer equation in the Fokker-Planck approximation when both thermal and bulk Comptonization take place. The algorithm is essentially a relaxation method, where stable solutions are obtained when the system has reached its steady-state equilibrium. Methods: We obtained the solution of the radiative transfer equation in the two-dimensional domain defined by the photon energy E and optical depth of the system τ using finite-differences for the partial derivatives, and imposing specific boundary conditions for the solutions. We treated the case of cylindrical accretion onto a magnetized neutron star. Results: We considered a blackbody seed spectrum of photons with exponential distribution across the accretion column and for an accretion where the velocity reaches its maximum at the stellar surface and at the top of the accretion column, respectively. In both cases higher values of the electron temperature and of the optical depth τ produce flatter and harder spectra. Other parameters contributing to the spectral formation are the steepness of the vertical velocity profile, the albedo at the star surface, and the radius of the accretion column. The latter parameter modifies the emerging spectra in a specular way for the two assumed accretion profiles. Conclusions: The algorithm has been implemented in the xspec package for X-ray spectral fitting and is specifically dedicated to the physical framework of accretion at the polar cap of a neutron star with a high magnetic field (≳ 1012 G). This latter case is expected to be typical of accreting systems such as X-ray

  3. CSI 2264: Simultaneous optical and X-ray variability in pre-main sequence stars. I. Time resolved X-ray spectral analysis during optical dips and accretion bursts in stars with disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarcello, M. G.; Flaccomio, E.; Micela, G.; Argiroffi, C.; Sciortino, S.; Venuti, L.; Stauffer, J.; Rebull, L.; Cody, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Pre-main sequence stars are variable sources. The main mechanisms responsible for their variability are variable extinction, unsteady accretion, and rotational modulation of both hot and dark photospheric spots and X-ray-active regions. In stars with disks, this variability is related to the morphology of the inner circumstellar region (≤0.1 AU) and that of the photosphere and corona, all impossible to be spatially resolved with present-day techniques. This has been the main motivation for the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264, a set of simultaneous observations of NGC 2264 with 15 different telescopes. Aims: In this paper, we focus on the stars with disks. We analyze the X-ray spectral properties extracted during optical bursts and dips in order to unveil the nature of these phenomena. Stars without disks are studied in a companion paper. Methods: We analyze simultaneous CoRoT and Chandra/ACIS-I observations to search for coherent optical and X-ray flux variability in stars with disks. Then, stars are analyzed in two different samples. In stars with variable extinction, we look for a simultaneous increase of optical extinction and X-ray absorption during the optical dips; in stars with accretion bursts, we search for soft X-ray emission and increasing X-ray absorption during the bursts. Results: We find evidence for coherent optical and X-ray flux variability among the stars with variable extinction. In 9 of the 24 stars with optical dips, we observe a simultaneous increase of X-ray absorption and optical extinction. In seven dips, it is possible to calculate the NH/AV ratio in order to infer the composition of the obscuring material. In 5 of the 20 stars with optical accretion bursts, we observe increasing soft X-ray emission during the bursts that we associate to the emission of accreting gas. It is not surprising that these properties are not observed in all the stars with dips and bursts, since favorable geometric configurations are

  4. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Survey: Average Broadband X-Ray Spectral Properties of the NuSTAR-detected AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Moro, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Aird, J. A.; Bauer, F. E.; Civano, F.; Mullaney, J. R.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Brandt, W. N.; Comastri, A.; Gandhi, P.; Harrison, F. A.; Lansbury, G. B.; Lanz, L.; Luo, B.; Marchesi, S.; Puccetti, S.; Ricci, C.; Saez, C.; Stern, D.; Treister, E.; Zappacosta, L.

    2017-11-01

    We present a study of the average X-ray spectral properties of the sources detected by the NuSTAR extragalactic survey, comprising observations of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDFS), Extended Groth Strip (EGS), and the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS). The sample includes 182 NuSTAR sources (64 detected at 8–24 keV), with 3–24 keV fluxes ranging between {f}3{--24{keV}}≈ {10}-14 and 6 × 10‑13 erg cm‑2 s‑1 ({f}8{--24{keV}}≈ 3× {10}-14{--}3× {10}-13 erg cm‑2 s‑1) and redshifts in the range of z=0.04{--}3.21. We produce composite spectra from the Chandra + NuSTAR data (E≈ 2{--}40 {keV}, rest frame) for all the sources with redshift identifications (95%) and investigate the intrinsic, average spectra of the sources, divided into broad-line (BL) and narrow-line (NL) active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and also in different bins of X-ray column density and luminosity. The average power-law photon index for the whole sample is {{Γ }}={1.65}-0.03+0.03, flatter than the {{Γ }}≈ 1.8 typically found for AGNs. While the spectral slope of BL and X-ray unabsorbed AGNs is consistent with the typical values ({{Γ }}={1.79}-0.01+0.01), a significant flattening is seen in NL AGNs and heavily absorbed sources ({{Γ }}={1.60}-0.05+0.08 and {{Γ }}={1.38}-0.12+0.12, respectively), likely due to the effect of absorption and to the contribution from the Compton reflection component to the high-energy flux (E> 10 keV). We find that the typical reflection fraction in our spectra is R≈ 0.5 (for {{Γ }}=1.8), with a tentative indication of an increase of the reflection strength with X-ray column density. While there is no significant evidence for a dependence of the photon index on X-ray luminosity in our sample, we find that R decreases with luminosity, with relatively high levels of reflection (R≈ 1.2) for {L}10{--40{keV}} {10}44 erg s‑1 AGNs, assuming a fixed spectral slope of {{Γ }}=1.8.

  5. UV and x-ray spectral lines of FeXXIII ion for plasma diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Murakami, I; Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Takako

    1996-01-01

    We have calculated X-ray and UV spectra of Be-like Fe (FeXXIII) ion in collisional-radiative model including all fine-structure transitions among the 2s^2, 2s2p, 2p^2, 2snl, and 2pnl levels where n=3 and 4, adopting data for the collision strengths by Zhang & Sampson (1992) and by Sampson, Goett, & Clark (1984). Some line intensity ratios can be used for the temperature diagnostics. We show 5 ratios in UV region and 9 ratios in X-ray region as a function of electron temperature and density at 0.3keV < T_e < 10keV and n_e = 1 - 10^{25} cm^{-3}. The effect of cascade in these line ratios and in the level population densities are discussed.

  6. Spectral Variability in Hard X-rays and the Evidence for a 13.5 Years ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 23; Issue 3-4 ... This is in complete contrast to the reported data from OSSE and BeppoSAX which suggest the value of 1.3 to 1.6 for the power law index in the X-ray energy band, but is quite consistent with the value derived for the high energy gamma ray ...

  7. Joint Spectral Analysis for Early Bright X-ray Flares of γ-Ray Bursts ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007; Liang et al. 2008). Both temporal and spec- tral energy analysis for the flares are also done by some groups (e.g., Falcone et al. 2007; Chincarini et al. 2007; Margutti et al. 2011). It is generally believed that these. 1X-ray lightcurves of a small fraction of GRBs are a featureless single power-law (Liang et al. 2009). 423 ...

  8. A beam branching method for timing and spectral characterization of hard X-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Katayama

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a method for achieving advanced photon diagnostics of x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs under a quasi-noninvasive condition by using a beam-splitting scheme. Here, we used a transmission grating to generate multiple branches of x-ray beams. One of the two primary diffracted branches (+1st-order is utilized for spectral measurement in a dispersive scheme, while the other (−1st-order is dedicated for arrival timing diagnostics between the XFEL and the optical laser pulses. The transmitted x-ray beam (0th-order is guided to an experimental station. To confirm the validity of this timing-monitoring scheme, we measured the correlation between the arrival timings of the −1st and 0th branches. The observed error was as small as 7.0 fs in root-mean-square. Our result showed the applicability of the beam branching scheme to advanced photon diagnostics, which will further enhance experimental capabilities of XFEL.

  9. Numerical Solution of the Radiative Transfer Equation: X-Ray Spectral Formation from Cylindrical Accretion onto a Magnetized Neutron Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairnelli, R.; Ceccobello, C.; Romano, P.; Titarchuk, L.

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the emerging X-ray spectra in several astrophysical objects is of great importance, in particular when the observational data are compared with theoretical models. This requires developing numerical routines for the solution of the radiative transfer equation according to the expected physical conditions of the systems under study. Aims. We have developed an algorithm solving the radiative transfer equation in the Fokker-Planck approximation when both thermal and bulk Comptonization take place. The algorithm is essentially a relaxation method, where stable solutions are obtained when the system has reached its steady-state equilibrium. Methods. We obtained the solution of the radiative transfer equation in the two-dimensional domain defined by the photon energy E and optical depth of the system pi using finite-differences for the partial derivatives, and imposing specific boundary conditions for the solutions. We treated the case of cylindrical accretion onto a magnetized neutron star. Results. We considered a blackbody seed spectrum of photons with exponential distribution across the accretion column and for an accretion where the velocity reaches its maximum at the stellar surface and at the top of the accretion column, respectively. In both cases higher values of the electron temperature and of the optical depth pi produce flatter and harder spectra. Other parameters contributing to the spectral formation are the steepness of the vertical velocity profile, the albedo at the star surface, and the radius of the accretion column. The latter parameter modifies the emerging spectra in a specular way for the two assumed accretion profiles. Conclusions. The algorithm has been implemented in the XPEC package for X-ray fitting and is specifically dedicated to the physical framework of accretion at the polar cap of a neutron star with a high magnetic field (approx > 10(exp 12) G). This latter case is expected to be of typical accreting systems such as X-ray

  10. Temporal behavior of unresolved transition array emission in water window soft x-ray spectral region from multiply charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, Thanh-Hung, E-mail: dinh@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Li, Bowen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dunne, Padraig; O' Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Fujioka, Shinsuke [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Nishikino, Masaharu [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    We have characterized the spectral structure and the temporal history of the laser-produced high-Z multi-charged ion plasmas for the efficient water window soft x-ray sources. Strong unresolved transition array emission was observed due to 4d–4f and 4f–5g transitions from Au, Pb, and Bi plasmas in the 280–700 eV photon energy region. The temporal behavior of the emission was essentially similar of that of the laser pulse with a slight delay between different transitions. These results provide feedback for accurate modeling of the atomic processes with the radiative hydrodynamic simulations.

  11. A BVMF-B algorithm for nonconvex nonlinear regularized decomposition of spectral x-ray projection images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Mai Quyen; Ducros, Nicolas; Nicolas, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Spectral computed tomography (CT) exploits the measurements obtained by a photon counting detector to reconstruct the chemical composition of an object. In particular, spectral CT has shown a very good ability to image K-edge contrast agent. Spectral CT is an inverse problem that can be addressed solving two subproblems, namely the basis material decomposition (BMD) problem and the tomographic reconstruction problem. In this work, we focus on the BMD problem, which is ill-posed and nonlinear. The BDM problem is classically either linearized, which enables reconstruction based on compressed sensing methods, or nonlinearly solved with no explicit regularization scheme. In a previous communication, we proposed a nonlinear regularized Gauss-Newton (GN) algorithm.1 However, this algorithm can only be applied to convex regularization functionals. In particular, the lp (p soft tissue, bone and gadolinium, which is scanned with a 90-kV x-ray tube and a 3-bin photon counting detector.

  12. The nature of X-ray spectral variability in MCG-6-30-15

    OpenAIRE

    Kammoun, E. S.; Papadakis, I. E.

    2017-01-01

    The flux-flux plot (FFP) method can provide model-independent clues regarding the X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei. To use it properly, the bin size of the light curves should be as short as possible, provided the average counts in the light curve bins are larger than $\\sim 200$. We apply the FFP method to the 2013, simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the Seyfert galaxy MCG$-$6-30-15, in the 0.3-40 keV range. The FFPs above $\\sim 1.6$ keV are well-d...

  13. A Hard X-Ray Power-Law Spectral Cutoff in Centaurus X-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Tomsick, John A.; Grefenstette, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The low-mass X-ray binary Cen X-4 is the brightest and closest (soft thermal emission from the neutron star atmosphere and a hard power-law tail of unknown...... inhibited by the magnetic propeller effect. The power-law cutoff energy is set by the degree of Compton cooling of the RIAF electrons by thermal seed photons from the neutron star atmosphere. Lower thermal luminosities should lead to higher (possibly undetectable) cutoff energies. We compare Cen~X-4's...

  14. A wide-acceptance Compton spectrometer for spectral characterization of a medical x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, Michelle A.; Gehring, A.; Belian, A.; Haines, T.; Hunter, J.; James, M.; Klasky, M.; Mendez, J.; Moir, D.; Sedillo, R.; Shurter, R.; Stearns, J.; Van Syoc, K.; Volegov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of the x-ray spectra used in medical treatment and radiography is important for dose calculations and material decomposition analysis. Indirect measurements via transmission through materials are possible. However, such spectra are challenging to measure directly due to the high photon fluxes. One method of direct measurement is via a Compton spectrometer (CS) method. In this approach, the x-rays are converted to a much lower flux of electrons via Compton scattering on a converter foil (typically beryllium or aluminum). The electrons are then momentum selected by bending in a magnetic field. With tight angular acceptance of electrons into the magnet of ~ 1 deg, there is a linear correlation between incident photon energy and electron position recorded on an image plate. Here we present measurements of Bremsstrahlung spectrum from a medical therapy machine, a Scanditronix M22 Microtron. Spectra with energy endpoints from 6 to 20 MeV are directly measured, using a CS with a wide energy range from 0.5 to 20 MeV. We discuss the sensitivity of the device and the effects of converter material and collimation on the accuracy of the reconstructed spectra. Approaches toward improving the sensitivity, including the use of coded apertures, and potential future applications to characterization of spectra are also discussed.

  15. Spectral-Timing Analysis of Kilohetrz Quasi-Periodic Osciallations in Neutron Star Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cackett, Edward; Troyer, Jon; Peille, Philippe; Barret, Didier

    2018-01-01

    Kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations or kHz QPOs are intensity variations that occur in the X-ray band observed in neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems. In such systems, matter is transferred from a secondary low-mass star to a neutron star via the process of accretion. kHz QPOs occur on the timescale of the inner accretion flow and may carry signatures of the physics of strong gravity (c2 ~ GM/R) and possibly clues to constraining the neutron star equation of state (EOS). Both the timing behavior of kHz QPOs and the time-averaged spectra of these systems have been studied extensively. No model derived from these techniques has been able to illuminate the origin of kHz QPOs. Spectral-timing is an analysis technique that can be used to derive information about the nature of physical processes occurring within the accretion flow on the timescale of the kHz QPO. To date, kHz QPOs of (4) neutron star LMXB systems have been studied with spectral-timing techniques. We present a comprehensive study of spectral-timing products of kHz QPOs from systems where data is available in the RXTE archive to demonstrate the promise of this technique to gain insights regarding the origin of kHz QPOs. Using data averaged over the entire RXTE archive, we show correlated time-lags as a function of QPO frequency and energy, as well as energy-dependent covariance spectra for the various LMXB systems where spectral-timing analysis is possible. We find similar trends in all average spectral-timing products for the objects studied. This suggests a common origin of kHz QPOs.

  16. Measuring warm dense matter properties with spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenzer, Siegfried; X-ray Thomson Scattering Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    We have developed powerful ultrafast pump-probe techniques to measure the structural transformations and the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions. We apply megabar pressures to our samples using high-power laser irradiation followed by X-ray laser pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source to take femtosecond measurements of the states that result. These experiments deliver data of unprecedented accuracy that allow critical experimental tests of theory in the challenging near-Fermi degenerate warm dense matter regime or in the non-ideal plasma state. We find good agreement with density functional theory simulations and provide predictions for new studies at the highest densities in laboratory plasmas that approach conditions of the interiors of brown dwarfs. This work is supported by DOE FES under FWP 100182.

  17. Spectral analysis of x-ray emission created by intense laser irradiation of copper materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntington, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P. [Atmospheric, Oceanic, Space Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States); Malamud, G. [Atmospheric, Oceanic, Space Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States); Department of Physics, Nuclear Research Center - Negev, 84190 Beer-Sheva (Israel); Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We have measured the x-ray emission, primarily from K{sub {alpha}},K{sub {beta}}, and He{sub {alpha}} lines, of elemental copper foil and 'foam' targets irradiated with a mid-10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse. The copper foam at 0.1 times solid density is observed to produce 50% greater He{sub {alpha}} line emission than copper foil, and the measured signal is well-fit by a sum of three synthetic spectra generated by the atomic physics code FLYCHK. Additionally, spectra from both targets reveal characteristic inner shell K{sub {alpha}} transitions from hot electron interaction with the bulk copper. However, only the larger-volume foam target produced significant K{sub {beta}} radiation, confirming a lower bulk temperature in the higher volume sample.

  18. Determining the nature of active region heating using high spatially and spectrally resolved x-ray observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrett, M. W.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Rarely have active regions on the Sun been studied at wavelengths less than 10 nm while simultaneously maintaining both high spatial and high spectral measurements. Marshall's Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS) will measure the soft X-ray solar spectrum within a wavelength range of 0.6 - 2.4 nm (0.5 - 2.0 keV) while maintaining a 5 arcsec spatial resolution. The wavelength range of 0.6 - 2.4 nm can provide insight into the heating roles of two of the likely coronal heating mechanisms: nanoflare and Alfven wave heating. The key difference in nanoflares and Alfven wave heating is the high temperature components of plasmas inside single magnetic strands. If the observed frequency of the heating event is low, it is determined to be a nanoflare. If the frequency of the heating event is high, it is Alfvenic in nature. To discriminate between these two distinct events requires that the components of the local high-temperature plasma be measured. MaGIXS is a proposed sounding rocket experiment. Currently in its prototype phase, MaGIXS is being aligned and characterized in hopes of a 2015 launch. To measure the attributes of high-temperature plasma, MaGIXS will employ the use of a matched pair of parabolic mirrors in conjunction with a planar varied-line-space silicon wafer grating. The two mirrors act as a collimator and re-focusing system, molding the beam to desired specifications and removing off-axis optical aberrations in the process. The grating has a HeNe alignment feature which allows the grating to be aligned at atmospheric pressure while focusing the HeNe laser beam near the center of MaGIXS wavelength range. This presentation will cover the alignment procedure of the mirrors, and the results of preliminary testing using both white light and X-ray sources.

  19. X-Ray Timing and Spectral Observations of Galactic Black Hole Candidate XTE J1550--564 During Outburst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Kaice T

    2002-12-11

    Soft X-ray transients (SXTs), a sub-class of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), provide a unique opportunity to test General Relativity and to probe fundamental physics under conditions terrestrially unattainable. SXT outbursts are of great interest because they allow the study of LMXBs under a wide range of accretion rates. The majority of known SXTs contain black holes, therefore SXT outbursts are key to understanding accretion physics around black holes and in active galactic nuclei, which are thought to contain supermassive, M {approx} 10{sup 6} - 10{sup 10} M{circle_dot}, where M{circle_dot} is one solar mass, central compact objects. These compact objects are most likely black holes, which exhibit, on a much larger scale, accretion physics similar to that around black holes in SXTs. In this work, the timing and spectral properties of the SXT and microquasar XTE J1550-564 during outburst are studied. Observations made by the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) Experiment on board the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS) are emphasized. USA data show a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) with a centroid frequency that tends to increase with increasing USA flux and a fractional rms amplitude which is correlated with the USA hardness ratio (4-16 keV/1-4 keV). Several high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) were detected by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), during periods where the LFQPO is seen to be weakening or not detectable at all. The evolution of the USA hardness ratio with time and source flux is examined. The hardness-intensity diagram shows counterclockwise cyclical evolution and possibly indicates the presence of two independent accretion flows: a geometrically thin, optically thick accretion disk and a hot sub-Keplerian flow.

  20. X-ray diffraction patterns and diffracted intensity of Kα spectral lines of He-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Arun; Khatri, Indu; Singh, A. K.; Sharma, Rinku; Mohan, Man

    2017-09-01

    In the present paper, we have calculated fine-structure energy levels related to the configurations 1s2s, 1s2p, 1s3s and 1s3p by employing GRASP2K code. We have also computed radiative data for transitions from 1s2p 1 P1o, 1s2p 3 P2o, 1s2p 3 P1o and 1s2s 3S1 to the ground state 1s2. We have made comparisons of our presented energy levels and transition wavelengths with available results compiled by NIST and good agreement is achieved. We have also provided X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of Kα spectral lines, namely w, x, y and z of Cu XXVIII, Kr XXXV and Mo with diffraction angle and maximum diffracted intensity which is not published elsewhere in the literature. We believe that our presented results may be beneficial in determination of the order parameter, X-ray crystallography, solid-state drug analysis, forensic science, geological and medical applications.

  1. A neural network-based method for spectral distortion correction in photon counting x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touch, Mengheng; Clark, Darin P.; Barber, William; Badea, Cristian T.

    2016-08-01

    Spectral CT using a photon counting x-ray detector (PCXD) shows great potential for measuring material composition based on energy dependent x-ray attenuation. Spectral CT is especially suited for imaging with K-edge contrast agents to address the otherwise limited contrast in soft tissues. We have developed a micro-CT system based on a PCXD. This system enables both 4 energy bins acquisition, as well as full-spectrum mode in which the energy thresholds of the PCXD are swept to sample the full energy spectrum for each detector element and projection angle. Measurements provided by the PCXD, however, are distorted due to undesirable physical effects in the detector and can be very noisy due to photon starvation in narrow energy bins. To address spectral distortions, we propose and demonstrate a novel artificial neural network (ANN)-based spectral distortion correction mechanism, which learns to undo the distortion in spectral CT, resulting in improved material decomposition accuracy. To address noise, post-reconstruction denoising based on bilateral filtration, which jointly enforces intensity gradient sparsity between spectral samples, is used to further improve the robustness of ANN training and material decomposition accuracy. Our ANN-based distortion correction method is calibrated using 3D-printed phantoms and a model of our spectral CT system. To enable realistic simulations and validation of our method, we first modeled the spectral distortions using experimental data acquired from 109Cd and 133Ba radioactive sources measured with our PCXD. Next, we trained an ANN to learn the relationship between the distorted spectral CT projections and the ideal, distortion-free projections in a calibration step. This required knowledge of the ground truth, distortion-free spectral CT projections, which were obtained by simulating a spectral CT scan of the digital version of a 3D-printed phantom. Once the training was completed, the trained ANN was used to perform

  2. Spectral Variability in Hard X-rays and the Evidence for a 13.5 Years ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    et al. 1990) and OSSE detector on-board Compton/GRO observatory (Johnson et al. 1995). It is seen from the figure that present values of spectral flux in various energy bins is consistent with the SIGMA and MIFRASO data. The two dotted lines in the figure represent the high state and the low state spectra from OSSE data.

  3. Development of an XSPEC-Based Spectral Analysis System for the Coded-Aperture Hard X-ray Balloon Payload EXITE2

    OpenAIRE

    Bloser, P.F.; Chou, Y.; Grindlay, J.E.; Narita, T.; Monnelly, G.

    2001-01-01

    We present the spectral analysis system for the second-generation Energetic X-ray Imaging Telescope Experiment (EXITE2) balloon payload. EXITE2 is an imaging hard X-ray telescope using a coded-aperture mask and a NaI/CsI phoswich detector operating in the energy range 20--600 keV. The instrument was flown on a high-altitude scientific balloon from Ft. Sumner, NM on 1997 May 7-8. We describe the details of the EXITE2 spectral analysis system, with emphasis on those aspects peculiar to coded-ap...

  4. Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. IV - The soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Powell, Forbes R.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Hoover, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    NASA's Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array uses various combinations of thin foil filters composed of Al, C, Te, Be, Mo, Rh, and phthalocyanine to achieve the requisite radiation-rejection characteristics. Such rejection is demanded by the presence of strong EUV radiation at longer wavelengths where the specular reflectivity of multilayer mirrors can cause 'contamination' of the image in the narrow band defined by the Bragg condition.

  5. A catalogue of optical to X-ray spectral energy distributions of z ≈ 2 quasars observed with Swift - I. First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawther, D.; Vestergaard, M.; Raimundo, S.; Grupe, D.

    2017-06-01

    We present the Swift optical to X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 44 quasars at redshifts z ≈ 2 observed by Swift, part of a larger program to establish and characterize the optical through X-ray SEDs of moderate-redshift quasars. Here, we outline our analysis approach and present preliminary analysis and results for the first third of the full quasar sample. Not all quasars in the sample are detected in X-rays; all of the X-ray-detected objects so far are radio loud. As expected for radio-loud objects, they are X-ray bright relative to radio-quiet quasars of comparable optical luminosities, with an average αox =1.39 ± 0.03 (where αox is the power-law slope connecting the monochromatic flux at 2500 Å and at 2 keV), and display hard X-ray spectra. We find integrated 3000 Å-25 keV accretion luminosities of between 0.7 × 1046 erg s-1 and 5.2 × 1047 erg s-1. Based on single-epoch spectroscopic virial black hole mass estimates, we find that these quasars are accreting at substantial Eddington fractions, 0.1 ≲ L/LEdd ≲ 1.

  6. High Spectral Resolution Observation of the Soft Diffuse X-ray Background in the Direction of the Galactic Anti-Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Dallas; Eckart, Mega E.; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Jaeckel, Felix; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; McCammon, Dan; Morgan, Kelsey M.; Porter, Frederick S.; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.

    2018-01-01

    High spectral resolution observations in the soft x-rays are necessary for understanding and modelling the hot component of the interstellar medium and its contribution to the Soft X-ray Background (SXRB). This extended source emission cannot be resolved with most wavelength dispersive spectrometers, making energy dispersive microcalorimeters the ideal choice for these observations. We present here the analysis of the most recent sounding rocket flight of the University of Wisconsin-Madison/Goddard Space Flight Center X-ray Quantum Calorimeter (XQC), a large area silicon thermistor microcalorimeter. This 111 second observation integrates a nearly 1 steradian field of view in the direction of the galactic anti-center (l, b = 165°, -5°) and features ~5 eV spectral resolution below 1 keV. Direct comparison will also be made to the previous, high-latitude observations.

  7. Evaluation of dental X-ray apparatus in terms of patient exposure to ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Olszewski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of X-ray in dental procedures causes exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation. This exposure depends primarily on the parameters used in tooth examination. The aim of the study was to determine the patients exposure and to assess the technical condition of X-ray tubes. Material and Methods: Seventeen hundred dental offices were covered by the questionnaire survey and 740 questionnaires were sent back. Direct measurements were performed in 100 units by using the thermoluminescent detectors and X-ray films. Results: The results showed that the most commonly used exposure time is 0.22±0.16 s. The average entrance dose for the parameters used most commonly by dentists is 1.7±1.4 mGy. The average efficiency of X-ray tube estimated on the basis of exposures is 46.5±23.7 μGy/mAs. Conclusions: The study results indicate that the vast majority of X-ray tubes meet the requirements specified in the binding regulations. Med Pr 2017;67(4:491–496

  8. [Evaluation of dental X-ray apparatus in terms of patient exposure to ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Jerzy; Wrzesień, Małgorzata

    2017-06-27

    The use of X-ray in dental procedures causes exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation. This exposure depends primarily on the parameters used in tooth examination. The aim of the study was to determine the patients exposure and to assess the technical condition of X-ray tubes. Seventeen hundred dental offices were covered by the questionnaire survey and 740 questionnaires were sent back. Direct measurements were performed in 100 units by using the thermoluminescent detectors and X-ray films. The results showed that the most commonly used exposure time is 0.22±0.16 s. The average entrance dose for the parameters used most commonly by dentists is 1.7±1.4 mGy. The average efficiency of X-ray tube estimated on the basis of exposures is 46.5±23.7 μGy/mAs. The study results indicate that the vast majority of X-ray tubes meet the requirements specified in the binding regulations. Med Pr 2017;67(4):491-496.

  9. Feedback at the Working Surface : A Joint X-ray and Low-Frequency Radio Spectral Study of the Cocoon Shock in Cygnus A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Michael W.; Rafferty, D. A.; McKean, J. P.

    We report on preliminary results from a joint spectral analysis of the cocoon shock region in Cygnus A using deep archival Chandra data and new low-frequency radio data from LOFAR. Being both bright in X-rays and the most powerful radio source in the local universe, the FRII radio galaxy Cygnus A

  10. A digital x-ray tomosynthesis coupled near infrared spectral tomography system for dual-modality breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Michaelsen, Kelly E; Pogue, Brian W; Poplack, Steven P; Shaw, Ian; Defrietas, Ken; Brooks, Ken; Paulsen, Keith D

    2012-08-13

    A Near Infrared Spectral Tomography (NIRST) system has been developed and integrated into a commercial Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner to allow structural and functional imaging of breast in vivo. The NIRST instrument uses an 8-wavelength continuous wave (CW) laser-based scanning source assembly and a 75-element silicon photodiode solid-state detector panel to produce dense spectral and spatial projection data from which spectrally constrained 3D tomographic images of tissue chromophores are produced. Integration of the optical imaging system into the DBT scanner allows direct co-registration of the optical and DBT images, while also facilitating the synergistic use of x-ray contrast as anatomical priors in optical image reconstruction. Currently, the total scan time for a combined NIRST-DBT exam is ~50s with data collection from 8 wavelengths in the optical scan requiring ~42s to complete. The system was tested in breast simulating phantoms constructed using intralipid and blood in an agarose matrix with a 3 cm x 2 cm cylindrical inclusion at 1 cm depth from the surface. Diffuse image reconstruction of total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration resulted in accurate recovery of the lateral size and position of the inclusion to within 6% and 8%, respectively. Use of DBT structural priors in the NIRST reconstruction process improved the quantitative accuracy of the HbT recovery, and led to linear changes in imaged versus actual contrast, underscoring the advantages of dual-modality optical imaging approaches. The quantitative accuracy of the system can be further improved with independent measurements of scattering properties through integration of frequency or time domain data.

  11. A soft X-ray spectral episode for the Clocked Burster, GS 1826-24 as measured by Swift and NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, J.; Galloway, D.K.; in ’t Zand, J.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Edd within the range of previous observations. However, the best-fit spectral model, adopting the double Comptonization used previously, exhibits significantly softer components. We detect seven type-I X-ray bursts, all significantly weaker (and with shorter rise and decay times) than observed previously......We report on NuSTAR and Swift observations of a soft state of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary GS 1826–24, commonly known as the "clocked" burster. The transition to the soft state was recorded in 2014 June through an increase of the 2–20 keV source intensity measured by MAXI, simultaneous...

  12. On the Nature of the mHz X-ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass.We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling.We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  13. Kilohertz QPOs, spectral state transitions and the distance to the neutron star X-ray transient IGR J17473-2721

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altamirano, D.; Galloway, D.; Chenevez, Jérôme

    2008-01-01

    -I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursts so far during this outburst. Two bursts observed on July 17 and 19 exhibited photospheric radius expansion, reaching identical peak (bolometric) fluxes of 9.5e-8 erg/cm2/s. The corresponding distance is likely between 4.9 kpc (using the theoretical Eddington limit for a pure He......We report on RXTE monitoring observations of the transient X-ray binary IGR J17473-2721 since the beginning of its latest outburst on March 26th, 2008 (see ATEL #1445, #1459, #1460, #1461 and #1468). IGR J17473-2721 reached a maximum unabsorbed flux of ~1.30E-8 ergs cm-2 s-1 (2-10 keV, assuming n......H=3.8e22cm-2, ATEL #1459) on June 22nd, and has been steadily decreasing since. The X-ray spectral state (based on the X-ray colors in the 2-16 keV band) has switched from hard to soft and back to hard. These state changes are also evident from the Swift/BAT Hard X-ray monitoring light curves. During...

  14. SU-F-I-75: Half-Value Layer Thicknesses and Homogeneity Coefficients for Fluoroscopic X-Ray Beam Spectra Incorporating Spectral Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderle, K [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Godley, A; Shen, Z; Dong, F [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rakowski, J [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to quantify various first half-value-layers (HVLs), second HVLs and homogeneity coefficients (HCs) for a state-of-the-art fluoroscope utilizing spectral (copper) filtration. Methods: A Radcal (Monrovia, Ca) AccuPro dosimeter with a 10×6-6 calibrated ionization chamber was used to measure air kerma for radiographic x-ray exposures made on a Siemens (Erlangen, Germany) Artis ZeeGo fluoroscope operated in the service mode. The ionization chamber was centered in the x-ray beam at 72 cm from the focal spot with a source-to-image-distance of 120 cm. The collimators were introduced to limit the x-ray field to approximately 5 cm × 5 cm at the ionization chamber plane. Type-1100 aluminum filters, in 0.5 mm increments, were used to determine the HVL. Two HVL calculation methods were used, log-linear interpolation and Lambert-W interpolation as described by Mathieu [Med Phys, 38(8), 4546 (2011)]. Multiple measurements were made at 60, 80, 100, 120 kVp at spectral filtration thicknesses of 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 mm. Results: First HVL, second HVL, and HCs are presented for the fluoroscopic x-ray beam spectra indicated above, with nearly identical results from the two interpolation methods. Accuracy of the set kVp was also determined and deviated less than 2%. First HVLs for fluoroscopic x-ray beam spectra without spectral filtration determined in our study were 7%–16% greater than previously published data by Fetterly et al. [Med Phys, 28, 205 (2001)]. However, the FDA minimum HVL requirements changed since that publication, requiring larger HVLs as of 2006. Additionally, x-ray tube and generator architecture have substantially changed over the last 15 years providing different beam spectra. Conclusion: X-ray beam quality characteristics for state-of-the-art fluoroscopes with spectral filtration have not been published. This study provides reference data which will be useful for defining beam qualities encountered on

  15. ESO 243-49 HLX-1: scaling of X-ray spectral properties and black hole mass determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Seifina, Elena

    2016-11-01

    We report the results of Swift/XRT observations (2008-2015) of a hyper-luminous X-ray source, ESO 243-49 HLX-1. We demonstrate a strong observational evidence that ESO 243-49 HLX-1 undergoes spectral transitions from the low/hard state to the high/soft state during these observations. The spectra of ESO 243-49 HLX-1 are well fitted by the so-called bulk motion Comptonization model for all spectral states. We have established the photon index (Γ) saturation level, Γsat = 3.0 ± 0.1, in the Γ versus mass accretion rate (Ṁ) correlation. This Γ-Ṁ correlation allows us to estimate black hole (BH) mass in ESO 243-49 HLX-1 to be MBH 7 × 104 M⊙ assuming the distance to ESO 243-49 of 95 Mpc. For the BH mass estimate we use the scaling method taking Galactic BHs XTE J1550-564, H 1743-322 and 4U 1630-472, and an extragalactic BH source, M101 ULX-1 as reference sources. The Γ versus Ṁ correlation revealed in ESO 243-49 HLX-1 is similar to those in a number of Galactic and extragalactic BHs and it clearly shows the correlation along with the strong Γ saturation at ≈3. This is a robust observational evidence for the presence of a BH in ESO 243-49 HLX-1. We also find that the seed (disk) photon temperatures are quite low, of order of 50-140 eV which are consistent with high BH mass in ESO 243-49 HLX-1.

  16. Revealing a hard X-ray spectral component that reverberates within one light hour of the central supermassive black hole in Ark 564

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustini, M.; Turner, T. J.; Reeves, J. N.; Miller, L.; Legg, E.; Kraemer, S. B.; George, I. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Arakelian 564 (Ark 564, z = 0.0247) is an X-ray-bright narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy. By using advanced X-ray timing techniques, an excess of "delayed" emission in the hard X-ray band (4-7.5 keV) following about 1000 s after "flaring" light in the soft X-ray band (0.4 - 1 keV) was recently detected. Aims: We report on the X-ray spectral analysis of eight XMM-Newton and one Suzaku observation of Ark 564. Our aim is to characterise the X-ray spectral properties of the source in the light of these recently reported results. Methods: High-resolution spectroscopy was performed with the RGS in the soft X-ray band, while broad-band spectroscopy was performed with the EPIC-pn and XIS/PIN instruments. We analysed time-averaged, flux-selected, and time-resolved spectra. Results: Despite the strong variability in flux during our observational campaign, the broad-band spectral shape of Ark 564 does not vary dramatically and can be reproduced either by a superposition of a power law and a blackbody emission or by a Comptonized power-law emission model. High-resolution spectroscopy revealed ionised gas along the line of sight at the systemic redshift of the source, with a low column density (NH ~ 1021 cm-2) and a range of ionisation states (-0.8 3.5. A reflection-dominated or an absorption-dominated model are similarly able to well reproduce the time-averaged data from a statistical point of view, in both cases requiring contrived geometries and/or unlikely physical parameters. Finally, through time-resolved analysis we spectroscopically identified the "delayed" emission as a spectral hardening above ~4 keV; the most likely interpretation for this component is a reprocessing of the "flaring" light by gas located at 10-100 rg from the central supermassive black hole that is so hot that it can Compton-upscatter the flaring intrinsic continuum emission.

  17. Long-term X-ray Observations of Galactic Superluminal Sources with GRANAT/WATCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sazonov, S.Y.; Sunyaev, R.; Lund, Niels

    1996-01-01

    The authors present X-ray time histories for the radio-jet sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40 observed by the GRANAT/WATCH all-sky monitor at 8-20 keV. GRS 1915+105 is extremely variable on the time scales of months to years. The analysis of a 3-year data set gives no evidence for periodicity ...

  18. A Technology Development Roadmap for a Near-Term Probe-Class X-ray Astrophysics Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daelemans, Gerard J.; Petre, Robert; Bookbinder, Jay; Ptak, Andrew; Smith, Randall

    2013-01-01

    funded through the NASA Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program; some through the end of FY13, others though FY14. These technology needs are those identified as critical for a near-term mission and briefly described in the 2012 NASA X-ray Mission Concepts Study. This Technology Development Roadmap (TDR) provides a more complete description of each, updates the status, and describes the steps to mature them. For each technology, a roadmap is presented for attaining TRL-6 by 2020 at the latest, and 2018 for most. The funding required for each technology to attain TRL-5 and TRL-6 is presented and justified through a description of the steps needing completion. The total funding required for these technologies to reach TRL-6 is relatively modest, and is consistent with the planned PCOS SAT funding over the next several years. The approximate annual cost through 2018 is $8M. The total cost for all technologies to be matured is $62M (including funding already awarded for FY13 and FY14). This can be contrasted to the $180M recommended by NWNH for technology development for IXO, primarily for the maturation of the mirror technology. The technology described in Section 3 of this document is exclusively that needed for a near-term Probe-class mission, to start in 2017, or for a mission that can be recommended by the next Decadal survey committee for an immediate start. It is important to note that there are other critical X-ray instrumentation technologies under development that are less mature than the ones discussed here, but are essential for a major X-ray mission that might start in the late 2020s. These technologies, described briefly in Section 4, are more appropriately funded through the Astronomy and Physics Research and Analysis (APRA) program.

  19. The Spectral Analysis of X-Ray Binaries from the XMM-Newton Space Craft Data using SAS Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, P.; Mito, C. O.

    2009-10-01

    A spectral data analysis on a luminous object of sky-coordinates 12h52m24.28s-29d115'02.3'12.6arcsec using Science Analysis Software (SAS) is presented. The analysis, based on data acquired by the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) camera aboard the XMM-Newton Space satellite, shows that the primary constituents of the X-ray source are Fe (Iron) and O (oxygen). This suggests that the source may be a magnetized plasma in a binary system and as this magnetic field accelerates the cooling of a star, one may speculate that this may be a compact star in its last stages of a thermonuclear fusion process. Nous présentons une analyse du spectre d'une source a rayons X située -- en coordonnées sidérales - à 12h52m24.28s - 29d115'02.312.6 arcsec. Science Analysis Software (SAS) est le programme informatique utilisé pour l'analyse des données. Cette analyse est basée sur les données provenant du spectromètre à haute résolution (RGS) à bord du satellite spatiale XMM-Newton. Nous montrons que ladite source est principalement constituée de Fer (Fe) et d'oxygene (O). Ce résultat suggère que la source pourrait être un plasma magnétisé au sein d'un système binaire. Et du fait que ce champ magnétique accélère le refroidissement de l'étoile, nous supposons que cette étoile pourrait ètre un objet compact en phase terminale d'un processus de fusion thermonucléaire.

  20. Long-term variability of low-mass X-ray binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippova E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider modulations of mass captured by the compact object from the companion star’s stellar wind in Low Mass X-ray Binaries with late type giants. Based on 3D simulations with two different hydrodynamic codes used Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches – the SPH code GADGET and the Eulerian code PLUTO, we conclude that a hydrodynamical interaction of the wind matter within a binary system even without eccentricity results in variability of the mass accretion rate with characteristic time-scales close to the orbital period. Observational appearances of this wind might be similar to that of an accretion disc corona/wind.

  1. Long term variability of Cygnus X-1. VI. Energy-resolved X-ray variability 1999-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, V.; Pottschmidt, K.; Böck, M.; Schmid, C.; Nowak, M. A.; Uttley, P.; Tomsick, J. A.; Rodriguez, J.; Hell, N.; Markowitz, A.; Bodaghee, A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Rothschild, R. E.; Wilms, J.

    2014-05-01

    We present the most extensive analysis of Fourier-based X-ray timing properties of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 to date, based on 12 years of bi-weekly monitoring with RXTE from 1999 to 2011. Our aim is a comprehensive study of timing behavior across all spectral states, including the elusive transitions and extreme hard and soft states. We discuss the dependence of the timing properties on spectral shape and photon energy, and study correlations between Fourier-frequency dependent coherence and time lags with features in the power spectra. Our main results follow. (a) The fractional rms in the 0.125-256 Hz range in different spectral states shows complex behavior that depends on the energy range considered. It reaches its maximum not in the hard state, but in the soft state in the Comptonized tail above 10 keV. (b) The shape of power spectra in hard and intermediate states and the normalization in the soft state are strongly energy-dependent in the 2.1-15 keV range. This emphasizes the need for an energy-dependent treatment of power spectra and a careful consideration of energy- and mass-scaling when comparing the variability of different source types, e.g., black hole binaries and AGN. PSDs during extremely hard and extremely soft states can be easily confused for energies above ~5 keV in the 0.125-256 Hz range. (c) The coherence between energy bands drops during transitions from the intermediate into the soft state but recovers in the soft state. (d) The time lag spectra in soft and intermediate states show distinct features at frequencies related to the frequencies of the main variability components seen in the power spectra and show the same shift to higher frequencies as the source softens. Our results constitute a template for other sources and for physical models for the origin of the X-ray variability. In particular, we discuss how the timing properties of Cyg X-1 can be used to assess the evolution of variability with spectral shape in other black

  2. HERMES: a soft X-ray beamline dedicated to X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkhou, Rachid; Stanescu, Stefan; Swaraj, Sufal; Besson, Adrien; Ledoux, Milena; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Dalle, Didier

    2015-07-01

    The HERMES beamline (High Efficiency and Resolution beamline dedicated to X-ray Microscopy and Electron Spectroscopy), built at Synchrotron SOLEIL (Saint-Auban, France), is dedicated to soft X-ray microscopy. The beamline combines two complementary microscopy methods: XPEEM (X-ray Photo Emitted Electron Microscopy) and STXM (Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy) with an aim to reach spatial resolution below 20 nm and to fully exploit the local spectroscopic capabilities of the two microscopes. The availability of the two methods within the same beamline enables the users to select the appropriate approach to study their specific case in terms of sample environment, spectroscopy methods, probing depth etc. In this paper a general description of the beamline and its design are presented. The performance and specifications of the beamline will be reviewed in detail. Moreover, the article is aiming to demonstrate how the beamline performances have been specifically optimized to fulfill the specific requirements of a soft X-ray microscopy beamline in terms of flux, resolution, beam size etc. Special attention has been dedicated to overcome some limiting and hindering problems that are usually encountered on soft X-ray beamlines such as carbon contamination, thermal stability and spectral purity.

  3. X-ray spectral measurements for tungsten-anode from 20 to 49 kVp on a digital breast tomosynthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents new spectral measurements of a tungsten-target digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system, including spectra of 43-49 kVp. Raw x-ray spectra of 20-49 kVp were directly measured from the tube port of a Selenia Dimensions DBT system using a CdTe based spectrometer. Two configurations of collimation were employed: one with two tungsten pinholes of 25 μm and 200 μm diameters, and the other with a single pinhole of 25 μm diameter, for acquiring spectra from the focal spot and from the focal spot as well as its vicinity. Stripping correction was applied to the measured spectra to compensate distortions due to escape events. The measured spectra were compared with the existing mammographic spectra of the TASMIP model in terms of photon fluence per exposure, spectral components, and half-value layer (HVL). HVLs were calculated from the spectra with a numerical filtration of 0.7 mm aluminum and were compared against actual measurements on the DBT system using W/Al (target-filter) combination, without paddle in the beam. The spectra from the double-pinhole configuration, in which the acceptance aperture pointed right at the focal spot, were harder than the single-pinhole spectra which include both primary and off-focus radiation. HVL calculated from the single-pinhole setup agreed with the measured HVL within 0.04 mm aluminum, while the HVL values from the double-pinhole setup were larger than the single-pinhole HVL by at most 0.1 mm aluminum. The spectra from single-pinhole setup agreed well with the TASMIP mammographic spectra, and are more relevant for clinical purpose. The spectra data would be useful for future research on DBT system with tungsten targets. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. X-ray CT Scanning Reveals Long-Term Copper Pollution Effects on Functional Soil Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Homstrup, Martin

    factors such as soil type, land use, and soil contamination. In this study, we quantified the soil structure using X-ray CT scanning and revealed the effect of a long history of Copper (Cu) pollution on it. A fallow field at Hygum Denmark provides this opportunity as it had a long history of Copper...... sulphate contamination in a gradient with Cu content varies from 21 mg kg-1 to 3837 mg kg-1. Total 20 intact soil columns (diameter of 10 cm and height of 8 cm) were sampled at five locations along the Cu-gradient from a depth of 5 to 15 cm below surface level. The soil columns were scanned at a voxel...... resolution of 0.21 mm x 0.21 mm x 0.21 mm. Images were analyzed using the Image-J software. Three-dimensional visualization of macropores showed that biopores (pores formed by organisms and plant roots) are present in abundance in this field at a Cu level of 21 mg kg-1 and decreased as the Cu content...

  5. X-ray timing and spectral analysis of the old gamma-ray pulsar J1836+5925

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugasamy, Prakash; Pavlov, George; Blake, Joseph

    PSR J1836+5925 is a bright gamma-ray source with a long observational history in various energy bands. Its radio-quietness, and non-detection of X-ray pulsations in previous observations have hindered a detailed analysis of this source. At the characteristic age of 1.83 Myr, it is one of the oldest non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars known, making it a useful object for understanding evolution of high-energy emission from rotation powered pulsars. In our 80 ks XMM-Newton observation of this pulsar, we detected unambiguous 5.77 Hz pulsations, consistent with its known gamma-ray ephemeris and assessed a low X-ray pulsed fraction of ˜ 0.34. In the 0.15 - 10 keV phase-integrated spectrum, non-thermal emission with the photon index Gamma ≈ 1.8 ± 0.2 dominates above 0.7 keV, whereas at lower energies, the spectrum requires a dominant kT = 63 ± 5 eV blackbody or, alternatively, a 24 ± 3 eV neutron star atmosphere model. We will also present the phase-resolved analysis of the pulsar spectrum and phase-matched X-ray and gamma-ray pulse profiles. Finally, we will discuss the implications of our results for thermal and magnetospheric emission of rotation powered pulsars.

  6. Joint x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  7. X-ray spectral and diffraction studies of germanides of iron-group metals in the amorphous and crystalline states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenchko, V. S.; Artym, V. T.; Andreiko, A. M.

    1986-01-01

    This article examines results of x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray diffractometry of amorphous and crystalline layers of certain germanides of iron-group transition metals. Combined analysis of the K- and L-bands of Me and Ge in Me2 (Fe, Co, Ni)Ge and data from model interpretation of radial distribution functions of atoms in amorphous layers are used to make conclusions on the character of the chemical bond and the structure of the short-range order in the materials studied. It was established that there is no significant change in the character of the chemical bond in germanides Me2(Fe, Co, Ni)Ge in the transition from the crystalline to the amorphous state. It was also found that short-range order in the investigated amorphous layers can be described by a complex “poly-structural” atom distribution, i.e. it is characterized by a complex, microscopically nonuniform model of the type Me2Ge+Me.

  8. X-Ray Properties of K-Selected Galaxies at 0.5 Less than z Less than 2.0: Investigating Trends with Stellar Mass, Redshift and Spectral Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Therese M.; Kriek, Mariska; vanDokkum, Peter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Greene, Jenny E.; Labbe, Ivo; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    We examine how the total X-ray luminosity correlates with stellar mass, stellar population, and redshift for a K-band limited sample of approximately 3500 galaxies at 0.5 types, based on similarities between the spectral energy distributions. For each galaxy type, we further divide the sample into bins of redshift and stellar mass, and perform an X-ray stacking analysis using the Chandra COSMOS data. We find that full band X-ray luminosity is primarily increasing with stellar mass, and at similar mass and spectral type is higher at larger redshifts. When comparing at the same stellar mass, we find that the X-ray luminosity is slightly higher for younger galaxies (i.e., weaker 4000 angstrom breaks), but the scatter in this relation is large. We compare the observed X-ray luminosities to those expected from low- and high-mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). For blue galaxies, XRBs can almost fully account for the observed emission, while for older galaxies with larger 4000 angstrom breaks, active galactic nuclei (AGN) or hot gas dominate the measured X-ray flux. After correcting for XRBs, the X-ray luminosity is still slightly higher in younger galaxies, although this correlation is not significant. AGN appear to be a larger component of galaxy X-ray luminosity at earlier times, as the hardness ratio increases with redshift. Together with the slight increase in X-ray luminosity this may indicate more obscured AGNs or higher accretion rates at earlier times.

  9. The weak neutral Fe fluorescence line and long-term X-ray evolution of the Compton-thick AGN in NGC 7674

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandhi, P.; Annuar, A.; Lansbury, G. B.

    2017-01-01

    .2 keV). We construct an X-ray light curve of NGC 7674 spanning 37 years and find that the observed 2-10 keV X-ray flux has remained constant for the past ≈ 20 years. Light travel time arguments constrain the minimum radius of the reflector to be ∼3.2pc under the switched-off AGN scenario, ≈30 times......We present NuSTAR X-ray observations of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in NGC 7674. The source shows a flat X-ray spectrum, suggesting that it is obscured by Compton-thick gas columns. Based upon long-term flux dimming, previous work suggested the alternate possibility that the source...... is a recently switched-off AGN with the observed X-rays being the lagged echo from the torus. Our high-quality data show the source to be reflection-dominated in hard X-rays, but with a relatively weak neutral Fe Kα emission line (equivalent width [EW] of ≈ 0.4 keV) and a strong Fe XXVI ionised line (EW ≈ 0...

  10. Estimation of Basis Line-Integrals in a Spectral Distortion-Modeled Photon Counting Detector Using Low-Order Polynomial Approximation of X-ray Transmittance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkyun Lee; Kappler, Steffen; Polster, Christoph; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2017-02-01

    Photon counting detector (PCD)-based computed tomography exploits spectral information from a transmitted x-ray spectrum to estimate basis line-integrals. The recorded spectrum, however, is distorted and deviates from the transmitted spectrum due to spectral response effect (SRE). Therefore, the SRE needs to be compensated for when estimating basis line-integrals. One approach is to incorporate the SRE model with an incident spectrum into the PCD measurement model and the other approach is to perform a calibration process that inherently includes both the SRE and the incident spectrum. A maximum likelihood estimator can be used to the former approach, which guarantees asymptotic optimality; however, a heavy computational burden is a concern. Calibration-based estimators are a form of the latter approach. They can be very efficient; however, a heuristic calibration process needs to be addressed. In this paper, we propose a computationally efficient three-step estimator for the former approach using a low-order polynomial approximation of x-ray transmittance. The low-order polynomial approximation can change the original non-linear estimation method to a two-step linearized approach followed by an iterative bias correction step. We show that the calibration process is required only for the bias correction step and prove that it converges to the unbiased solution under practical assumptions. Extensive simulation studies validate the proposed method and show that the estimation results are comparable to those of the ML estimator while the computational time is reduced substantially.

  11. Tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines: unfiltered x-ray spectra from 20 kV to 640 kV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Andrew M; Boone, John M

    2014-04-01

    Monte Carlo methods were used to generate lightly filtered high resolution x-ray spectra spanning from 20 kV to 640 kV. X-ray spectra were simulated for a conventional tungsten anode. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended radiation transport code (MCNPX 2.6.0) was used to produce 35 spectra over the tube potential range from 20 kV to 640 kV, and cubic spline interpolation procedures were used to create piecewise polynomials characterizing the photon fluence per energy bin as a function of x-ray tube potential. Using these basis spectra and the cubic spline interpolation, 621 spectra were generated at 1 kV intervals from 20 to 640 kV. The tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) produces minimally filtered (0.8 mm Be) x-ray spectra with 1 keV energy resolution. The TASMICS spectra were compared mathematically with other, previously reported spectra. Using pairedt-test analyses, no statistically significant difference (i.e., p > 0.05) was observed between compared spectra over energy bins above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence. For all energy bins, the correlation of determination (R(2)) demonstrated good correlation for all spectral comparisons. The mean overall difference (MOD) and mean absolute difference (MAD) were computed over energy bins (above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence) and over all the kV permutations compared. MOD and MAD comparisons with previously reported spectra were 2.7% and 9.7%, respectively (TASMIP), 0.1% and 12.0%, respectively [R. Birch and M. Marshall, "Computation of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra and comparison with spectra measured with a Ge(Li) detector," Phys. Med. Biol. 24, 505-517 (1979)], 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (Poludniowski), and 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (AAPM TG 195). The effective energy of TASMICS spectra with 2.5 mm of added Al filtration ranged from 17 keV (at 20 kV) to 138 keV (at 640 kV); with 0.2 mm of added Cu filtration the effective energy was 9 keV at 20 kV and 169 keV at 640 k

  12. X-ray Measurements of Black Hole X-ray Binary Source GRS 1915+ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    X-ray Measurements of Black Hole X-ray Binary Source GRS. 1915+105 and the Evolution of Hard X-ray Spectrum. R. K. Manchanda, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005, India,. Received 1999 December 28; accepted 2000 February 9. Abstract. We report the spectral measurement of GRS 1915+105 ...

  13. Black Hole Mass Determination In the X-Ray Binary 4U 1630-47: Scaling of Spectral and Variability Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive investigation on the evolution of spectral and timing properties of the Galactic black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its spectral transitions. In particular, we show how a scaling of the correlation of the photon index of the Comptonized spectral component gamma with low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), ?(sub L), and mass accretion rate, M, can be applied to the black hole mass and the inclination angle estimates.We analyze the transition episodes observed with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX satellites.We find that the broadband X-ray energy spectra of 4U 1630-47 during all spectral states can be modeled by a combination of a thermal component, a Comptonized component, and a red-skewed iron-line component. We also establish that gamma monotonically increases during transition from the low-hard state to the high-soft state and then saturates for high mass accretion rates. The index saturation levels vary for different transition episodes. Correlations of gamma versus ?(sub L) also show saturation at gamma (is) approximately 3. Gamma -M and gamma -?(sub L) correlations with their index saturation revealed in 4U 1630-47 are similar to those established in a number of other black hole candidates and can be considered as an observational evidence for the presence of a black hole in these sources. The scaling technique, which relies on XTE J1550-564, GRO 1655-40, and H1743-322 as reference sources, allows us to evaluate a black hole mass in 4U 1630-47 yielding M(sub BH) (is) approximately 10 +/- 0.1 solar masses and to constrain the inclination angle of i (is) approximately less than 70 deg.

  14. On the Nature of the mHz X-Ray QPOs from ULX M82 X-1: Evidence for Timing-Spectral (anti) Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its energy spectral power-law index. These quantities are known to correlate in stellar mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibiting Type-C QPOs (approx 0.2-15 Hz). The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of its mHz QPOs as Type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of Type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling and identify observations in which M82 X-1 was at least as bright as source 5. Using only those observations, we detect QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which the energy spectral power-law index varied from 1.7-2.2. Interestingly, we find evidence for an anti-correlation (Pearsons correlation coefficient = -0.95) between the power-law index and the QPO centroid frequency. While such an anti-correlation is observed in StMBHs at high Type-C QPO frequencies (approx 5-15 Hz), the frequency range over which it holds in StMBHs is significantly smaller (factor of approx 1.5-3) than the QPO range reported here from M82 X-1 (factor of 6). However, it remains possible that contamination from source 5 can bias our result. Joint Chandra/XMM-Newton observations in the future can resolve this problem and confirm the timing-spectral anti-correlation reported here.

  15. Modern x-ray spectral methods in the study of the electronic structure of actinide compounds: Uranium oxide UO2 as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fine X-ray photo electron spectral (XPS structure of uranium dioxide UO2 in the binding energy (BE range 0-~č40 eV was associated mostly with the electrons of the outer (OVMO (0-15 eV BE and inner (IVMO (15-40 eV BE valence molecular orbitals formed from the incompletely U5f,6d,7s and O2p and completely filled U6p and O2s shells of neighboring uranium and oxygen ions. It agrees with the relativistic calculation results of the electronic structure for the UO812–(Oh cluster reflecting uranium close environment in UO2, and was confirmed by the X-ray (conversion electron, non-resonance and resonance O4,5(U emission, near O4,5(U edge absorption, resonance photoelectron, Auger spectroscopy data. The fine OVMO and IVMO related XPS structure was established to yield conclusions on the degree of participation of the U6p,5f electrons in the chemical bond, uranium close environment structure and interatomic distances in oxides. Total contribution of the IVMO electrons to the covalent part of the chemical bond can be comparable with that of the OVMO electrons. It has to be noted that the IVMO formation can take place in compounds of any elements from the periodic table. It is a novel scientific fact in solid-state chemistry and physics.

  16. Versatile high-repetition-rate phase-locked chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectral region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plogmaker, Stefan; Linusson, Per; Eland, John H D; Baker, Neville; Johansson, Erik M J; Rensmo, Håkan; Feifel, Raimund; Siegbahn, Hans

    2012-01-01

    A novel light chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and x-ray spectral region has been developed. It can be phase-locked and synchronized with a synchrotron radiation storage ring, accommodating repetition rates in the range of ~8 to ~120 kHz by choosing different sets of apertures and subharmonics of the ring frequency (MHz range). Also the opening time of the system can be varied from some nanoseconds to several microseconds to meet the needs of a broad range of applications. Adjusting these parameters, the device can be used either for the generation of single light pulses or pulse packages from a microwave driven, continuous He gas discharge lamp or from storage rings which are otherwise often considered as quasi-continuous light sources. This chopper can be utilized for many different kinds of experiments enabling, for example, unambiguous time-of-flight (TOF) multi-electron coincidence studies of atoms and molecules excited by a single light pulse as well as time-resolved visible laser pump x-ray probe electron spectroscopy of condensed matter in the valence and core level region.

  17. Versatile high-repetition-rate phase-locked chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plogmaker, Stefan; Johansson, Erik M. J.; Rensmo, Haakan; Feifel, Raimund; Siegbahn, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Linusson, Per [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Eland, John H. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Baker, Neville [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    A novel light chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and x-ray spectral region has been developed. It can be phase-locked and synchronized with a synchrotron radiation storage ring, accommodating repetition rates in the range of {approx}8 to {approx}120 kHz by choosing different sets of apertures and subharmonics of the ring frequency (MHz range). Also the opening time of the system can be varied from some nanoseconds to several microseconds to meet the needs of a broad range of applications. Adjusting these parameters, the device can be used either for the generation of single light pulses or pulse packages from a microwave driven, continuous He gas discharge lamp or from storage rings which are otherwise often considered as quasi-continuous light sources. This chopper can be utilized for many different kinds of experiments enabling, for example, unambiguous time-of-flight (TOF) multi-electron coincidence studies of atoms and molecules excited by a single light pulse as well as time-resolved visible laser pump x-ray probe electron spectroscopy of condensed matter in the valence and core level region.

  18. Magnetically-coupled microcalorimeter arrays for x-ray astrophysics with sub-eV spectral resolution and large format capability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "We propose to develop a revolutionary x-ray camera for astrophysical imaging spectroscopy. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the...

  19. Heat Loss in a Laser-Driven, Magnetized, X-Ray Source with Thermoelectric Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Koning, J.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-10-01

    The efficiency of laser-driven K-shell radiation sources, i.e., pipes containing a gas or a metal foam, may be improved by using an axial magnetic field to thermally insulate the pipe wall from the hot interior. A planar, self-similar solution for the magnetic and thermal diffusion is developed to model the near wall physics that includes the thermoelectric Nernst and Ettingshausen effects. This solution extends previous work for the MagLIF concept to include the full dependence of the transport coefficients on the electron Hall parameter. The analytic solution assumes a constant pressure. This case is matched with a 1D MHD code, which is then applied to the case allowing for pressure gradients. These numerical solutions are found to evolve toward the self-similar ones. The variation of the time integrated heat loss with and without the thermoelectric terms will be examined. The present work provides a verification test for general MHD codes that use Braginskii's or Epperlein-Haines' transport model to account for thermoelectric effects. NRL supported by the DOE/NNSA. LLNL work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. A Unified Timing and Spectral Model for the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars XTE J1810-197 and CXOU J164710.2-455216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, A.; Turolla, R.; Israel, G. L.; Zane, S.; Nobili, L.; Stella, L.

    2010-10-01

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are two small classes of X-ray sources strongly suspected to host a magnetar, i.e., an ultra-magnetized neutron star with B ≈ 1014-1015 G. Many SGRs/AXPs are known to be variable, and recently the existence of genuinely "transient" magnetars was discovered. Here, we present a comprehensive study of the pulse profile and spectral evolution of the two transient AXPs (TAXPs) XTE J1810-197 and CXOU J164710.2-455216. Our analysis was carried out in the framework of the twisted magnetosphere model for magnetar emission. Starting from three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of the emerging spectrum, we produced a large database of synthetic pulse profiles which was fitted to observed light curves in different spectral bands and at different epochs. This allowed us to derive the physical parameters of the model and their evolution with time, together with the geometry of the two sources, i.e., the inclination of the line of sight and the magnetic axis with respect to the rotation axis. We then fitted the (phase-averaged) spectra of the two TAXPs at different epochs using a model similar to that used to calculate the pulse profiles (ntzang in XSPEC) freezing all parameters to the values obtained from the timing analysis and leaving only the normalization free to vary. This provided acceptable fits to XMM-Newton data in all the observations we analyzed. Our results support a picture in which a limited portion of the star surface close to one of the magnetic poles is heated at the outburst onset. The subsequent evolution is driven both by the cooling/varying size of the heated cap and by a progressive untwisting of the magnetosphere.

  1. Spectral-timing Analysis of the Lower kHz QPO in the Low-mass X-Ray Binary Aquila X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Jon S.; Cackett, Edward M.

    2017-01-01

    Spectral-timing products of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems, including energy- and frequency-dependent lags, have been analyzed previously in 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-53, and 4U 1728-34. Here, we study the spectral-timing properties of the lower kHz QPO of the neutron star LMXB Aquila X-1 for the first time. We compute broadband energy lags as well as energy-dependent lags and the covariance spectrum using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find characteristics similar to those of previously studied systems, including soft lags of ˜30 μs between the 3.0-8.0 keV and 8.0-20.0 keV energy bands at the average QPO frequency. We also find lags that show a nearly monotonic trend with energy, with the highest-energy photons arriving first. The covariance spectrum of the lower kHz QPO is well fit by a thermal Comptonization model, though we find a seed photon temperature higher than that of the mean spectrum, which was also seen in Peille et al. and indicates the possibility of a composite boundary layer emitting region. Lastly, we see in one set of observations an Fe K component in the covariance spectrum at 2.4-σ confidence, which may raise questions about the role of reverberation in the production of lags.

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to ... to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit ...

  3. SIXE: An X-ray experiment for a minisatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isern, Jordi; Bravo, Eduardo; Gómez-Gomar, Jordi; Hernanz, Margarida; García-Berro, Enrique; Giovannelli, Franco; La Padula, Cesare D.; Sabau, Lola; Gutiérrez, Jordi; José, Jordi; García-Senz, Domingo; Bausells, Joan; Cabestany, Joan; Madrenas, Jordi; Angulo, Manuel; Fernández-Valbuena, Manuel; Herrera, Erardo; Reina, Manuel; Talavera, Antonio

    1999-12-01

    SIXE (Spanish Italian X-ray Experiment) is an X-ray detector with geometric area of 2300 cm2, formed by four identical gas-filled Multicell Proportional Counters, and devoted to study the long term spectroscopy of selected X-ray sources in the energy range 3-50 keV. The main characteristics of SIXE are: time accuracy of 1 microsecond, spectral resolution of 5% for E>35 keV and 46/E% for ESpanish MINISAT-02 satellite, in a 3 years long mission starting about 2002-2004. The main scientific goal is the study of the short and long term variability of a selected set of X-ray sources, such as quasars, Seyfert galaxies, high and low mass X-ray binaries, etc. The philosophy of the mission will provide the unique opportunity for the study of X-ray sources with a temporal accuracy of 1 microsecond all through the time range 10-5:107 s.

  4. Hard X-ray/IR spectral-imaging of GRBs from the high-z Universe to EXIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    The re-configured Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST ) mission is optimized for study of GRBs as probes of the high-z Universe. The primary High Energy Telescope (HET) on EXIST maintains its high sensitivity (> 4 - 10X that of Swift) and bandwidth (5-600 keV) but has improved its angular resolution ( 5σ survey threshold) while fitting into a lower cost launch vehicle with greatly reduced mission mass and cost by reducing (by 2X) its instantaneous FoV (to ˜1.5sr, fully coded). This allows full-sky coverage every 2 orbits of survey and, most importantly, the addition of a co-aligned 1.1m IR telescope (IRT) with objective prism (R ˜10) and slit spectroscopy (R ˜1500) simultaneously (with dichroic) in the optical (0.3-1µ) and IR (0.9-2.5µ) bands. Rapid (˜100sec) slews onto GRBs allow determination onboard of GRB optical/IR counterparts and immediate spectra and redshifts. With radiative cooling (-30C) of the primary and secondary mirrors of the IRT, the low backgrounds permit IRT discovery objective prism spectra (R ˜10) on all objects in a 5 x 5arcmin field down to magnitude AB(H) ˜24 within ˜600sec. This will enable rapid measurements of redshifts and followup R ˜1500 longer exposure narrow slit spectra for studies of cosmic re-ionization. EXIST will detect ˜700 GRBs per year, with >70 per year likely to be at z > 6. This will enable comprehensive measures of cosmic structure, along many lines of sight, and constrain the growth of galaxies as well as possibly Pop III stars at redshifts as high as z ˜20. EXIST was selected under the Advanced Mission Concept Study (AMCS) program and is under a 1y study for science and mission optimization for presentation to the upcoming Decadal Survey. Its technical readiness would allow a launch as a Medium Class mission as early as ˜2015, particularly if international partnership(s) could enable an equatorial non- NASA launch. The overall mission science and concept will be presented.

  5. Early Soft X-Ray to UV Emission from Double Neutron Star Mergers: Implications from the Long-term Observations of GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Yu; Huang, Zhi-Qiu

    2018-01-01

    Recent long-term radio follow-up observations of GW170817 reveal a simple power-law rising light curve, with a slope of {t}0.78, up to 93 days after the merger. The latest X-ray detection at 109 days is also consistent with such a temporal slope. Such a shallow rise behavior requires a mildly relativistic outflow with a steep velocity gradient profile, so that slower material with larger energy catches up with the decelerating ejecta and re-energizes it. It has been suggested that this mildly relativistic outflow may represent a cocoon of material. We suggest that the velocity gradient profile may form during the stage that the cocoon is breaking out of the merger ejecta, resulting from shock propagation down a density gradient. The cooling of the hot relativistic cocoon material immediately after it breaks out should have produced soft X-ray to UV radiation at tens of seconds to hours after the merger. The soft X-ray emission has a luminosity of {L}{{X}}∼ {10}45 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 over a period of tens of seconds for a merger event like GW170817. The UV emission shows a rise initially and peaks at about a few hours with a luminosity of {L}{UV}∼ {10}42 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. The soft X-ray transients could be detected by future wide-angle X-ray detectors, such as the Chinese mission Einstein Probe. This soft X-ray/UV emission would serve as one of the earliest electromagnetic counterparts of gravitation waves from double neutron star mergers and could provide the earliest localization of the sources.

  6. Hand x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  7. X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... show up on chest X-rays. Breast cancer. Mammography is a special type of X-ray test used to examine breast tissue. Enlarged heart. This sign of congestive heart failure shows up clearly on X-rays. Blocked blood vessels. Injecting a contrast material that contains iodine can help highlight sections ...

  8. A Soft X-Ray Spectral Episode for the Clocked Burster, GS 1826-24 as Measured by Swift and NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenvez, J.; Galloway, D. K.; Zand, J. J. M. In 'T; Tomsick, J. A.; Barret, D.; Chakrabarty, D.; Fuerst, F.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report on NuSTAR and Swift observations of a soft state of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary GS 1826-24, commonly known as the "clocked" burster. The transition to the soft state was recorded in 2014 June through an increase of the 2-20 keV source intensity measured by MAXI, simultaneous with a decrease of the 15-50 keV intensity measured by Swift/BAT. The episode lasted approximately two months, after which the source returned to its usual hard state. We analyze the broadband spectrum measured by Swift/XRT and NuSTAR and estimate the accretion rate during the soft episode to be approximately equal to 13% m(sub Edd), within the range of previous observations. However, the best-fit spectral model, adopting the double Comptonization used previously, exhibits significantly softer components. We detect seven type-I X-ray bursts, all significantly weaker (and with shorter rise and decay times) than observed previously. The burst profiles and recurrence times vary significantly, ruling out the regular bursts that are typical for this source. One burst exhibited photospheric radius expansion?and we estimate the source distance as (5.7 +/- 0.2) xi(sub b)(exp -1/2) kpc, where xi(sub b) parameterizes the possible anisotropy of the burst emission. The observed soft state may most likely be interpreted as a change in accretion geometry at about similar bolometric luminosity as in the hard state. The different burst behavior can therefore be attributed to this change in accretion flow geometry, but the fundamental cause and process for this effect remain unclear.

  9. A Multi-Epoch Timing and Spectral Study of the Ultraluminous X-Ray NGC 5408 X-1 with XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheeraj, Pasham; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2012-01-01

    We present results of new XMM-Newton observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1, one of the few ULXs to show quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). We detect QPOs in each of four new (approximately equal to 100 ks) pointings, expanding the range of frequencies observed from 10 to 40 mHz. We compare our results with the timing and spectral correlations seen in stellar-mass black hole systems, and find that the qualitative nature of the timing and spectral behavior of NGC 5408 X-1 is similar to systems in the steep power-law state exhibiting Type-C QPOs. However, in order for this analogy to quantitatively hold we must only be seeing the so-called saturated portion of the QPO frequency-photon index (or disk flux) relation. Assuming this to be the case, we place a lower limit on the mass of NGC 5408 X-1 of greater than or equal to 800 solar mass. Alternatively, the QPO frequency is largely independent of the spectral parameters, in which case a close analogy with the Type-C QPOs in stellar system is problematic. Measurement of the source's timing properties over a wider range of energy spectral index is needed to definitively resolve this ambiguity. We searched all the available data for both a broad Fe emission line as well as high-frequency QPO analogs (0.1- 1 Hz), but detected neither. We place upper limits on the equivalent width of any Fe emission feature in the 6-7 keV band and of the amplitude (rms) of a high-frequency QPO analog of approximately equal to 10 eV and approximately equal to 4%, respectively.

  10. The weak Fe fluorescence line and long-term X-ray evolution of the Compton-thick active galactic nucleus in NGC 7674

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, P.; Annuar, A.; Lansbury, G. B.; Stern, D.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Bianchi, S.; Boggs, S. E.; Boorman, P. G.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Del Moro, A.; Elvis, M.; Guainazzi, M.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M.; Lamperti, I.; Malaguti, G.; Masini, A.; Matt, G.; Puccetti, S.; Ricci, C.; Rivers, E.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2017-06-01

    We present NuSTAR X-ray observations of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in NGC 7674. The source shows a flat X-ray spectrum, suggesting that it is obscured by Compton-thick gas columns. Based upon long-term flux dimming, previous work suggested the alternate possibility that the source is a recently switched-off AGN with the observed X-rays being the lagged echo from the torus. Our high-quality data show the source to be reflection-dominated in hard X-rays, but with a relatively weak neutral Fe Kα emission line (equivalent width [EW] of ≈ 0.4 keV) and a strong Fe xxvi ionized line (EW ≈ 0.2 keV). We construct an updated long-term X-ray light curve of NGC 7674 and find that the observed 2-10 keV flux has remained constant for the past ≈ 20 yr, following a high-flux state probed by Ginga. Light travel time arguments constrain the minimum radius of the reflector to be ˜ 3.2 pc under the switched-off AGN scenario, ≈ 30 times larger than the expected dust sublimation radius, rendering this possibility unlikely. A patchy Compton-thick AGN (CTAGN) solution is plausible, requiring a minimum line-of-sight column density (NH) of 3 × 1024 cm-2 at present, and yields an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of (3-5) × 1043 erg s-1. Realistic uncertainties span the range of ≈ (1-13) × 1043 erg s-1. The source has one of the weakest fluorescence lines amongst bona fide CTAGN, and is potentially a local analogue of bolometrically luminous systems showing complex neutral and ionized Fe emission. It exemplifies the difficulty of identification and proper characterization of distant CTAGN based on the strength of the neutral Fe Kα line.

  11. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  12. Spectral filter for splitting a beam with electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or soft X-Ray (Soft X) and the infrared (IR) wavelength range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, F.A.; Bijkerk, Frederik; van den Boogaard, Toine; van den Boogaard, A.J.R.; van der Meer, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral filter for splitting the primary radiation from a generated beam with primary electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation) or soft X-ray (soft X) wavelength range and parasitic radiation having a wavelength in the infrared wavelength range (IR

  13. X-Ray Spectral Analyses of AGNs from the 7Ms Chandra Deep Field-South Survey: The Distribution, Variability, and Evolutions of AGN Obscuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teng; Tozzi, Paolo; Wang, Jun-Xian; Brandt, William N.; Vignali, Cristian; Xue, Yongquan; Schneider, Donald P.; Comastri, Andrea; Yang, Guang; Bauer, Franz E.; Paolillo, Maurizio; Luo, Bin; Gilli, Roberto; Wang, Q. Daniel; Giavalisco, Mauro; Ji, Zhiyuan; Alexander, David M.; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Shemmer, Ohad; Koekemoer, Anton; Risaliti, Guido

    2017-09-01

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the brightest active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in the 7Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey over a time span of 16 years. Using a model of an intrinsically absorbed power-law plus reflection, with possible soft excess and narrow Fe Kα line, we perform a systematic X-ray spectral analysis, both on the total 7Ms exposure and in four different periods with lengths of 2-21 months. With this approach, we not only present the power-law slopes, column densities {N}{{H}}, observed fluxes, and absorption-corrected 2-10 keV luminosities L X for our sample of AGNs, but also identify significant spectral variabilities among them on timescales of years. We find that the {N}{{H}} variabilities can be ascribed to two different types of mechanisms, either flux-driven or flux-independent. We also find that the correlation between the narrow Fe line EW and {N}{{H}} can be well explained by the continuum suppression with increasing {N}{{H}}. Accounting for the sample incompleteness and bias, we measure the intrinsic distribution of {N}{{H}} for the CDF-S AGN population and present reselected subsamples that are complete with respect to {N}{{H}}. The {N}{{H}}-complete subsamples enable us to decouple the dependences of {N}{{H}} on L X and on redshift. Combining our data with those from C-COSMOS, we confirm the anticorrelation between the average {N}{{H}} and L X of AGN, and find a significant increase of the AGN-obscured fraction with redshift at any luminosity. The obscured fraction can be described as {f}{obscured}≈ 0.42 {(1+z)}0.60.

  14. Quantum optics with X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2017-11-01

    The demonstration of strong coupling between two nuclear polariton modes in the X-ray spectral region using two coupled cavities each containing a thin layer of iron brings new opportunities for exploring quantum science.

  15. Long-term TeV and X-ray observations of the gamma-ray binary HESS J0632+057

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Behera, B.; Chen, X. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Berger, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bird, R. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J., E-mail: gernot.maier@desy.de, E-mail: afalcone@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: pol.bordas@uni-tuebingen.de [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; H.E.S.S. Collaboration; and others

    2014-01-10

    HESS J0632+057 is the only gamma-ray binary known so far whose position in the sky allows observations with ground-based observatories in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Here we report on long-term observations of HESS J0632+057 conducted with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System and High Energy Stereoscopic System Cherenkov telescopes and the X-ray satellite Swift, spanning a time range from 2004 to 2012 and covering most of the system's orbit. The very-high-energy (VHE) emission is found to be variable and is correlated with that at X-ray energies. An orbital period of 315{sub −4}{sup +6} days is derived from the X-ray data set, which is compatible with previous results, P = (321 ± 5) days. The VHE light curve shows a distinct maximum at orbital phases close to 0.3, or about 100 days after periastron passage, which coincides with the periodic enhancement of the X-ray emission. Furthermore, the analysis of the TeV data shows for the first time a statistically significant (>6.5σ) detection at orbital phases 0.6-0.9. The obtained gamma-ray and X-ray light curves and the correlation of the source emission at these two energy bands are discussed in the context of the recent ephemeris obtained for the system. Our results are compared to those reported for other gamma-ray binaries.

  16. Evidence For Quasi-Periodic X-ray Dips From An Ultraluminous X-ray Source: Implications for the Binary Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    We report results from long-term (approx.1240 days) X-ray (0.3-8.0 keV) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Here we expand on earlier work by Strohmayer (2009) who used only a part of the present data set. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of sharp, quasi-periodic, energy-independent dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 +/- 4 days, the amplitude of which weakens during the second half of the light curve, and (3) spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data. We interpret the X-ray modulations within the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination accreting X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 +/- 23 days, in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported by Strohmayer (2009). We discuss the overall X-ray modulation within the framework of accretion via Roche-lobe overflow of the donor star. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk, this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination > or approx.70deg. We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.

  17. X-Ray Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band ...

  18. AN X-RAY SPECTRAL MODEL OF REPROCESSING BY SMOOTH AND CLUMPY MOLECULAR TORI IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH THE MONACO FRAMEWORK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furui, Shun’ya; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ohno, Masanori; Hayashi, Kazuma [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Odaka, Hirokazu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Kawaguchi, Toshihiro, E-mail: fukazawa@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Sapporo Medical University, S1W17, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan)

    2016-02-20

    We construct an X-ray spectral model of reprocessing by a torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with the Monte Carlo simulation framework MONACO. Two torus geometries of smooth and clumpy cases are considered and compared. In order to reproduce a Compton shoulder accurately, MONACO includes not only free electron scattering but also bound electron scattering. Raman and Rayleigh scattering are also treated, and scattering cross sections dependent on chemical states of hydrogen and helium are included. Doppler broadening by turbulence velocity can be implemented. Our model gives results consistent with other available models, such as MYTorus, except for differences due to different physical parameters and assumptions. We studied the dependence on torus parameters for a Compton shoulder, and found that a intensity ratio of a Compton shoulder to the line core mainly depends on column density, inclination angle, and metal abundance. For instance, an increase of metal abundance makes a Compton shoulder relatively weak. Also, the shape of a Compton shoulder depends on the column density. Furthermore, these dependences become different between smooth and clumpy cases. Then, we discuss the possibility of ASTRO-H/SXS spectroscopy of Compton shoulders in AGN reflection spectra.

  19. Provenance of Holocene sediment on the Chukchi-Alaskan margin based on combined diffuse spectral reflectance and quantitative X-Ray Diffraction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, J.D.; Polyak, L.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Darby, D.; Eberl, D.D.; Naidu, S.; Nof, D.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment clay and silt mineral assemblages provide an excellent means of assessing the provenance of fine-grained Arctic sediment especially when a unique mineral assemblage can be tied to specific source areas. The diffuse spectral reflectance (DSR) first derivative measurements and quantitative X-Ray Diffraction (qXRD) on a high-resolution sediment core from the continental slope north of Alaska constrain the sediment mineralogy. DSR results are augmented by measurements on several adjacent cores and compared to surface sediment samples from the northern Alaskan shelf and slope. Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we infer that the three leading DSR modes relate to mixtures of smectite + dolomite, illite + goethite, and chlorite + muscovite. This interpretation is consistent with the down core qXRD results. While the smectite + dolomite, and illite + goethite factors show increased variability down core, the chlorite + muscovite factor had highest positive loadings in the middle Holocene, between ca. 6.0 and 3.6??ka. Because the most likely source of the chlorite + muscovite suite in this vicinity lies in the North Pacific, we argue that the oscillations in chlorite + muscovite values likely reflect an increase in the inflow of Pacific water to the Arctic through the Bering Strait. The time interval of this event is associated in other parts of the globe with a non-linear response of the climate system to the decrease in insolation, which may be related to changes in water exchange between the Pacific and Arctic Ocean. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  1. Diverse Long-Term Variability of Five Candidate High-Mass X-Ray Binaries from Swift Burst Alert Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, Robin H. D.; Coley, Joel B.; Krimm, Hans A.

    2017-01-01

    We present an investigation of long-term modulation in the X-ray light curves of five little-studied candidate high-mass X-ray binaries using the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (SWIFT-BAT). IGR J14488-5942 and AX J1700.2-4220 show strong modulation at periods of 49.6 and 44 days, respectively, which are interpreted as orbital periods of Be star systems. For IGR J14488-5942, observations with the Swift X-ray Telescope show a hint of pulsations at 33.4 seconds. For AX J1700.2-4220, 54 second-pulsations were previously found with XMM-Newton. Swift J1816.7-1613 exhibits complicated behavior. The strongest peak in the power spectrum is at a period near 150 days, but this conflicts with a determination of a period of 118.5 days by La Parola et al. AX J1820.5-1434 has been proposed to exhibit modulation near 54 days, but the extended BAT observations suggest modulation at slightly longer than double this at approximately 111 days. There appears to be a long-term change in the shape of the modulation near 111 days, which may explain the apparent discrepancy. The X-ray pulsar XTE J1906+090,which was previously proposed to be a Be star system with an orbital period of approximately 30 days from pulse timing, shows peaks in the power spectrum at 81 and 173 days. The origins of these periods are unclear, although theymight be the orbital period and a superorbital period respectively. For all five sources, the long-term variability, together with the combination of orbital and proposed pulse periods, suggests that the sources contain Be starmass donors.

  2. First Hard X-Ray Detection of the Non-Thermal Emission Around the Arches Cluster: Morphology and Spectral Studies With NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe K(alpha) line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity of the possible illuminating hard X-ray source. The properties of the observed emission are also in broad agreement with the low-energy cosmic-ray proton excitation scenario. Key words: cosmic rays - Galaxy: center - ISM: general - X-rays: individual (Arches cluster)

  3. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ...

  5. Reabsorption of soft x-ray emission at high x-ray free-electron laser fluences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; Sellberg, Jonas A; McQueen, Trevor; Laksmono, Hartawan; Kennedy, Brian; Eckert, Sebastian; Schlesinger, Daniel; Nordlund, Dennis; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Sierra, Raymond G; Segtnan, Vegard H; Kubicek, Katharina; Schlotter, William F; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan P; Bergmann, Uwe; Techert, Simone; Pettersson, Lars G M; Wernet, Philippe; Bogan, Michael J; Harada, Yoshihisa; Nilsson, Anders; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2014-10-10

    We report on oxygen K-edge soft x-ray emission spectroscopy from a liquid water jet at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We observe significant changes in the spectral content when tuning over a wide range of incident x-ray fluences. In addition the total emission yield decreases at high fluences. These modifications result from reabsorption of x-ray emission by valence-excited molecules generated by the Auger cascade. Our observations have major implications for future x-ray emission studies at intense x-ray sources. We highlight the importance of the x-ray pulse length with respect to the core-hole lifetime.

  6. First hard X-ray detection of the non-thermal emission around the Arches cluster: morphology and spectral studies with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.

    2014-01-01

    The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe Ku line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is n......The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe Ku line emission at 6.4 keV from material...... that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology...... and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity...

  7. Imaging Grating Spectrometer (I-GRASP) for Solar Soft X-Ray Spectral Measurements in Critically Under-Observed 0.5 - 7 nm Spectral Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didkovsky, L. V.; Wieman, S. R.; Chao, W.; Woods, T. N.; Jones, A. R.; Thiemann, E.; Mason, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    We discuss science and technology advantages of the Imaging Grating Spectrometer (I-GRASP) based on a novel transmission diffracting grating (TDG) made possible by technology for fabricating Fresnel zone plates (ZPs) developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Older version TDGs with 200 nm period available in the 1990s became a proven technology for providing 21 years of regular measurements of solar EUV irradiance. I-GRASP incorporates an advanced TDG with a grating period of 50 nm providing four times better diffraction dispersion than the 200 nm period gratings used in the SOHO/CELIAS/SEM, the SDO/EVE/ESP flight spectrophotometers, and the EVE/SAM sounding rocket channel. Such new technology for the TDG combined with a back-illuminated 2000 x 1504 CMOS image sensor with 7 micron pixels, will provide spatially-and-spectrally resolved images and spectra from individual Active Regions (ARs) and solar flares with high (0.15 nm) spectral resolution. Such measurements are not available in the spectral band from about 2 to 6 nm from existing or planned spectrographs and will be significantly important to study ARs and solar flare temperatures and dynamics, to improve existing spectral models, e.g. CHIANTI, and to better understand processes in the Earth's atmosphere processes. To test this novel technology, we have proposed to the NASA LCAS program an I-GRASP version for a sounding rocket flight to increase the TDG TRL to a level appropriate for future CubeSat projects.

  8. X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenster, A. [Univ. of Western Ontario, J.P. Robarts Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Yaffe, M.J. [Univ. of Toronto, Depts. of Medical Biophysics and Medical Imaging, North York, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-09-01

    In this article, we briefly review the principles of x-ray imaging, consider some of its applications in medicine and describe some of the developments in this area which have taken place in Canada. X rays were first used for diagnosis and therapy in medicine almost immediately after the report of their discovery by Roentgen in 1895. X-ray imaging has remained the primary tool for the investigation of structures within the body up to the present time (Johns and Cunningham 1983). Medical x rays are produced in a vacuum tube by the electron bombardment of a metallic target. Electrons emitted from a heated cathode are accelerated through an electric field to energies of 20-150 keV (wavelength 6.2-0.83 nm) and strike a target anode. X rays appear in a spectrum of bremsstrahlung radiation with energies ranging from 0 to a value that is numerically equal to the peak voltage applied between the cathode and anode of the x-ray tube (Figure 1). In addition, where the energy of the impinging electrons exceeds the binding energy of inner atomic orbitals of the target material, electrons may be ejected from those shells. Filling of these shells by more loosely-bound electrons gives rise to x rays whose energies are equal to the difference of the binding energies of the donor and acceptor shells. The energies of these characteristic x rays are unique to the target material. Less than 1% of the energy of the incident electrons is converted to that of x rays, while the remainder is dissipated as heat in the target. For this reason, a tremendous amount of engineering has gone into the design of x-ray tubes that can yield a large fluence rate of quanta from a small effective source size, while withstanding the enormous applied heat loading (e.g. 10 kJ per exposure). Tungsten is by far the most common material used for targets in tubes for diagnostic radiology, because of its high melting point and its high atomic number; the efficiency of x-ray production is proportional to Z of the

  9. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  10. The Weak Fe Fluorescence Line and Long-Term X-Ray Evolution of the Compton-Thick Active Galactic Nucleus in NGC7674

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandi, P.; Annuar, A.; Lansbury, G. B.; Stern, D.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Bianchi, S.; Boggs, S. E.; Boorman, P. G.; Brandt, W. N.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present NuSTAR X-ray observations of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in NGC7674.The source shows a flat X-ray spectrum, suggesting that it is obscured by Compton-thick gas columns. Based upon long-term flux dimming, previous work suggested the alternate possibility that the source is a recently switched-off AGN with the observed X-rays being the lagged echo from the torus. Our high-quality data show the source to be reflection-dominated in hard X-rays, but with a relatively weak neutral Fe K(alpha) emission line (equivalent width [EW] of approximately 0.4 keV) and a strong Fe XXVI ionized line (EW approximately 0.2 keV).We construct an updated long-term X-ray light curve of NGC7674 and find that the observed 2-10 keV flux has remained constant for the past approximately 20 yr, following a high-flux state probed by Ginga. Light travel time arguments constrain the minimum radius of the reflector to be approximately 3.2 pc under the switched-off AGN scenario, approximately 30 times larger than the expected dust sublimation radius, rendering this possibility unlikely. A patchy Compton-thick AGN (CTAGN) solution is plausible, requiring a minimum line-of-sight column density (N(sub H)) of 3 x 10(exp 24) cm(exp -2) at present, and yields an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of (3-5) x 10(exp 43) erg s(exp -1). Realistic uncertainties span the range of approximately (1-13) x 10(exp 43) erg s1. The source has one of the weakest fluorescence lines amongst bona fide CTAGN, and is potentially a local analogue of bolometrically luminous systems showing complex neutral and ionized Fe emission. It exemplifies the difficulty of identification and proper characterization of distant CTAGN based on the strength of the neutral Fe K line

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  13. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very small ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  14. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  15. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight February is American Heart Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  19. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  20. Sinus x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an infection and inflammation of the sinuses called sinusitis . A sinus x-ray is ordered when you have any of the following: Symptoms of sinusitis Other sinus disorders, such as a deviated septum ( ...

  1. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight November is National Lung Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  4. X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-ray References Geleijns J, Tack D. Medical physics: radiation risks. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard ... Updated by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  6. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. ... University in Durham, North Carolina. I’d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known ...

  7. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  8. Parametric X-rays at FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the generation of parametric X-rays (PXR) in the photoinjector at the new FAST facility at Fermilab. Detailed calculations of the intensity spectrum, energy and angular widths and spectral brilliance with a diamond crystal are presented. We also report on expected results with PXR generated while the beam is channeling. The low emittance electron beam makes this facility a promising source for creating brilliant X-rays.

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. ... x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations to ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. ... Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken ... of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  16. An X-ray view of the very faint black hole X-ray transient Swift J1357.2-0933 during its 2011 outburst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Méndez, M.; Miller, J. M.; Degenaar, N.

    We report on the X-ray spectral (using XMM-Newton data) and timing behaviour [using XMM-Newton and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data] of the very faint X-ray transient and black hole system Swift J1357.2-0933 during its 2011 outburst. The XMM-Newton X-ray spectrum of this source can be

  17. An X-ray view of the very faint black hole X-ray transient Swift J1357.2-0933 during its 2011 outburst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Méndez, M.; Miller, J.M.; Degenaar, N.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the X-ray spectral (using XMM-Newton data) and timing behaviour [using XMM-Newton and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data] of the very faint X-ray transient and black hole system Swift J1357.2-0933 during its 2011 outburst. The XMM-Newton X-ray spectrum of this source can be

  18. Close-packed Arrays of Transition-edge X-ray Microcalorimeters with High Spectral Resolution at 5.9 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal metal-features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition, and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  19. Development of online quasimonochromatic X-ray backlighter for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gold plasma produces continuous X-ray spectrum (M band) in this range. The spectral, spatial and temporal resolutions of the system measured are 30 mÅ, 50 μm and 1.5 ns respectively. The spectral width of the X-ray pulse is 2 Å ( E = 0.39 keV). Keywords. X-ray backlighter; quasimonochromatic; crystal spectrometer.

  20. X-Ray Absorption with Transmission X-Ray Microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X

    2016-01-01

    In this section we focus on the use of transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) to measure the XAS spectra. In the last decade a range of soft X-ray and hard X-ray TXM microscopes have been developed, allowing the measurement of XAS spectra with 10–100 nm resolution. In the hard X-ray range the TXM

  1. Hard x-ray Morphological and Spectral Studies of the Galactic Center Molecular Cloud SGR B2: Constraining Past SGR A* Flaring Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, NuSTAR observed the Sgr B2 region and for the first time resolved its hard X-ray emission on subarcminute scales. Two prominent features are detected above 10 keV:. a newly emerging cloud, G0.66-0.13, and the central 90 '' radius region containing two compact cores, Sgr B2(M) and Sgr B2(N......), surrounded by diffuse emission. It is inconclusive whether the remaining level of Sgr. B2 emission is still decreasing or has reached a constant background level. A decreasing X-ray emission can be best explained by the X-ray reflection nebula scenario, where the cloud reprocesses a past giant outburst from...... Sgr A*. In the X-ray reflection nebula (XRN) scenario, the 3-79 keV Sgr. B2 spectrum allows us to self-consistently test the XRN model using both the Fe K alpha line and the continuum emission. The peak luminosity of the past Sgr A* outburst is constrained to L3-79keV∼5 x 1038 ergs s-1. A newly...

  2. A long-term study of AGN X-ray variability . Structure function analysis on a ROSAT-XMM quasar sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middei, R.; Vagnetti, F.; Bianchi, S.; La Franca, F.; Paolillo, M.; Ursini, F.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Variability in the X-rays is a key ingredient in understanding and unveiling active galactic nuclei (AGN) properties. In this band, flux variations occur on short timescales (hours) as well as on larger timescales. While short timescale variability is often investigated in single source studies, only a few works are able to explore flux variation on very long timescales. Aims: This work aims to provide a statistical analysis of the AGN long term X-ray variability. We study variability on the largest time interval ever investigated for the 0.2-2 keV band, up to approximately 20 yr rest-frame for a sample of 220 sources. Moreover, we study variability for 2700 quasars up to approximatley eight years rest-frame in the same (soft) band. Methods: We built our source sample using the 3XMM serendipitous source catalogue data release 5, and data from ROSAT All Sky Survey Bright and Faint source catalogues. To ensure that we selected AGN only, we used the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogues data releases 7 and 12. Combining ROSAT and XMM-Newton observations, we investigated variability using the structure function analysis which describes the amount of variability as a function of the lag between the observations. Results: Our work shows an increase of the structure function up to 20 yr. We find no evidence of a plateau in the structure function on these long timescales. Conclusions: The increase of the structure function at long time lags suggests that variability in the soft X-rays can be influenced by flux variations originated in the accretion disk or that they take place in a region large enough to justify variation on such long timescales.

  3. Long term mortality after a single treatment course with X-rays in patients treated for ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darby, S.C.; Doll, R.; Gill, S.K.; Smith, P.G.

    1987-02-01

    Mortality to 1 January 1983 was studied in 14,106 ankylosing spondylitis patients after a single course of X-rays (1935-1954). For neoplasms other than leukaemia or colon cancer, mortality was 28% greater than the general population of England and Wales, proportional increase reaching a maximum 71% between 10.0 and 12.4 years post-irradiation. There was 7% mortality increase more than 25.0 years post-irradiation and only for oesophageal cancer was the relative risk significantly raised. Neither the relative risk, nor its post-irradiation temporal pattern, were greatly influenced by the patient's age. There was a threefold increase in leukaemia mortality, the relative risk highest between 2.5 and 4.9 years post-treatment, but not disappearing being nearly twice that of the general population more than 25 years post-treatment. There was evidence that acute myeloid, acute lymphatic and chronic myeloid leukaemia risks were increased, but no evidence of increase in chronic lymphatic leukaemia. The relative risk appeared greatest for acute myeloid leukaemia. Colon cancer mortality increased by 30%. Non-neoplastic conditions showed a 51% mortality increase, likely to be associated with the disease itself, and not confined to diseases associated with spondylitis.

  4. Bone densitometry by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA in preterm newborns compared with full-term peers in the first six months of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia S. Quintal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To longitudinally assess bone mineral content (BMC, bone mineral density (BMD, and whole-body lean mass obtained through bone densitometry by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA in preterm newborns (PTNs and compare them with full-term newborns (FTNs from birth to 6 months of corrected postnatal age. METHODS: A total of 28 adequate for gestational age (AGA newborns were studied: 14 preterm and 14 full-term newborns. DXA was used to determine BMC, BMD, and lean mass in three moments: 40 weeks corrected post-conceptual age, as well as 3 and 6 months of corrected postnatal age. PTNs had gestational age ≤ 32 weeks at birth and were fed their mother's own milk or milk from the human milk bank. RESULTS: All infants had an increase in BMC, BMD, and lean body mass values during the study. PTNs had lower BMC, BMD, and lean mass at 40 weeks of corrected post-conceptual age in relation to FTNs (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.047, respectively. However, there was an acceleration in the mineralization process of PTNs, which was sufficient to achieve the normal values of FTNs at 6 months of corrected age. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that bone densitometry by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is a good method for the assessment of body composition parameters at baseline, and at the follow-up of these PTNs.

  5. Bone densitometry by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in preterm newborns compared with full-term peers in the first six months of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintal, Virginia S; Diniz, Edna M A; Caparbo, Valeria de F; Pereira, Rosa M R

    2014-01-01

    To longitudinally assess bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD), and whole-body lean mass obtained through bone densitometry by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in preterm newborns (PTNs) and compare them with full-term newborns (FTNs) from birth to 6 months of corrected postnatal age. A total of 28 adequate for gestational age (AGA) newborns were studied: 14 preterm and 14 full-term newborns. DXA was used to determine BMC, BMD, and lean mass in three moments: 40 weeks corrected post-conceptual age, as well as 3 and 6 months of corrected postnatal age. PTNs had gestational age ≤ 32 weeks at birth and were fed their mother's own milk or milk from the human milk bank. All infants had an increase in BMC, BMD, and lean body mass values during the study. PTNs had lower BMC, BMD, and lean mass at 40 weeks of corrected post-conceptual age in relation to FTNs (psufficient to achieve the normal values of FTNs at 6 months of corrected age. This study suggests that bone densitometry by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is a good method for the assessment of body composition parameters at baseline, and at the follow-up of these PTNs. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. X-Ray Micro-Calorimeter Based on Si Thermistors for X-Ray Astronomy: Design and First Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliane, A.; de Moro, F.; Pigot, C.; Agnese, P.; de La Broïse, X.; Gasse, A.; Navick, X.-F.; Karolak, M.; Ribot, H.; Sauvageot, J.-L.; Szeflinski, V.; Gobil, Y.; Renaud, D.; Rivallin, P.; Geoffray, H.

    2008-04-01

    X-ray Astronomy provides a unique window on a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. The currently operating X-ray space observatories perform X-ray spectral imaging with the use of CCDs. When available, cryogenic X-ray microcalorimeter arrays will far outperform CCDs in terms of spectral resolution, energy bandwidth and count rate. Experience has been gained with Infra-Red bolometer arrays at CEA-LETI (Grenoble) in collaboration with the CEA-SAp (Saclay); taking advantage of this background, we are now developing an X-ray spectro-imaging camera for the next generation space astronomy missions, using silicon technology (implanted and high temperature diffused thermistors). Each pixel of this array detector is made of a tantalum absorber bound, by indium bump hybridization, to a silicon thermistor. The absorber array is bound to the thermistor array in a single automatic step. The thermo-mechanical link, provided by hybridization, is being improved in terms of thermal capacitance. Finally, our main effort is in developing arrays of silicon thermistors with negligible excess 1/ f noise. The thermistor has been simulated with the 2D simulator ATHENA (SILVACO International). We studied the effects of the implants and their thermal treatment on both vertical and lateral dopant distributions at the edges of the thermistor. Prototypes have been created following the procedure optimized by the ATHENA simulation. We present the status of the development and results of measurements performed on these four main building blocks required to create a detector array up to 32×32 pixels in size.

  7. Subluminous X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the first X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, by Giacconi et al. (1962), marked the birth of X-ray astronomy. Following that discovery, many additional X-ray sources where found with the first generation of X-ray rockets and observatories (e.g., UHURU and Einstein). The short-timescale

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is used ...

  9. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... be placed over the lower part of your spine. You will be asked to hold your breath ... x-ray. The most common reason for lumbosacral spine x-ray is to look for the cause ...

  10. High Resolution X-ray Views of Solar System Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella

    2011-05-01

    Over the last decade Chandra, and XMM-Newton, have revealed the beauty and multiplicity of X-ray emissions in our solar system: high resolution data, in both spectral and spatial domains, have been crucial in disentangling the physical processes at work. The talk will review the main findings in this area at the boundary between astrophysics and planetary science, and will show how the solar system offers `next door’ examples of widespread astrophysical phenomena. Jupiter shows bright X-ray aurorae, arising from the interactions of local and/or solar wind ions, and electrons, with its powerful magnetic environment: the ions undergo charge exchange with atmospheric neutrals and generate soft X-ray line emission, and the electrons give rise to bremsstrahlung X-rays. Chandra's unparalleled spatial resolution has shown how the X-ray footprints of the electrons in the aurorae coincide with the bright FUV auroral oval, indicating that the same electron population is likely to be at the origin of both emissions. Moreover, Jupiter's disk scatters solar X-rays, displaying a spectrum that closely resembles that of solar flares. Saturn has not revealed X-ray aurorae (yet), but its disk X-ray brightness, like Jupiter's, is strictly correlated with the Sun's X-ray output. A bright X-ray spot has also been resolved by Chandra on the eastern ansa of Saturn's rings, and its spectrum suggests an origin in the fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays on the rings icy particles. Both Mars and Venus have X-ray emitting disks and exospheres, which can be clearly resolved at high spectral and spatial resolution. And the Earth has bright X-ray aurorae that have been targets of Chandra observations. Finally, comets, with their extended neutral comae and extremely line-rich X-ray spectra, are spectacular X-ray sources, and ideal probes of the conditions of the solar wind in the Sun's proximity.

  11. X-Ray Point-source Populations Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Yoshida, Tessei; Ebisawa, Ken

    2013-03-01

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above ≈10-14 erg cm-2 s-1, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe Kα emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight November is National Lung Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions ... Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey Rubin, ...

  14. Pelvis x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    The x-ray is used to look for: Fractures Tumors Degenerative conditions of bones in the hips, pelvis, and upper legs ... Abnormal results may suggest: Pelvic fractures Arthritis of the hip joint ... spondylitis (abnormal stiffness of the spine and joint) ...

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound November 8 is ...

  16. Global Properties of X-Ray Flashes and X-Ray-Rich GRBs Observed by Swift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Cummings, J.; Krimm, H.; Parsons, A.; Hullinger, D.; Barbier, L.; Fenimore, E.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We describe and discuss the spectral and temporal characteristics of the prompt emission and X-ray afterglow emission of X-ray flashes (XRFs) detected and observed by Swift between December 2005 and September 2006. We compare these characteristics to a sample of X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRRs) and conventional classical gamma-ray bursts (C-GRBs)observed during the same period. We confirm the correlation between Epeak and fluence noted by others and find further evidence that XRFs and C-GRBs form a continuum. We also confirmed that our known redshift samples are consistent with the correlation between the peak energy (Epeak) and the isotropic radiated energy (Eiso), so called the Epeak-Eiso relation. The spectral properties of X-ray afterglows are similar to those of gamma-ray burst afterglows, but the temporal properties of the two classes are quite different. We found that the light curves of C-GRBs afterglow show a break to steeper indices (shallow-to-steep break) at much earlier times than do XRF afterglows. Moreover, the overall luminosity of X-ray afterglows of XRFs are systematically smaller by a factor of two or more compared with that of C-GRBs. These distinct differences in the X-ray afterglow between XRFs and C-GRBs are key to understanding not only a mysterious shallow-to-steep phase in the X-ray afterglow but also the unique nature of XRFs.

  17. X-Ray Optics: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, William W.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray astronomy started with a small collimated proportional counter atop a rocket in the early 1960s. It was immediately recognized that focusing X-ray optics would drastically improve both source location accuracy and source detection sensitivity. In the past 5 decades, X-ray astronomy has made significant strides in achieving better angular resolution, large photon collection area, and better spectral and timing resolutions, culminating in the three currently operating X-ray observatories: Chandra, XMM/Newton, and Suzaku. In this talk I will give a brief history of X-ray optics, concentrating on the characteristics of the optics of these three observatories. Then I will discuss current X-ray mirror technologies being developed in several institutions. I will end with a discussion of the optics for the International X-ray Observatory that I have been developing at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  18. Estimation of Basis Line-Integrals in a Spectral Distortion-Modeled Photon Counting Detector Using Low-Rank Approximation-Based X-Ray Transmittance Modeling: K-Edge Imaging Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okkyun; Kappler, Steffen; Polster, Christoph; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2017-11-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) provide multiple energy-dependent measurements for estimating basis line-integrals. However, the measured spectrum is distorted from the spectral response effect (SRE) via charge sharing, K-fluorescence emission, and so on. Thus, in order to avoid bias and artifacts in images, the SRE needs to be compensated. For this purpose, we recently developed a computationally efficient three-step algorithm for PCD-CT without contrast agents by approximating smooth X-ray transmittance using low-order polynomial bases. It compensated the SRE by incorporating the SRE model in a linearized estimation process and achieved nearly the minimum variance and unbiased (MVU) estimator. In this paper, we extend the three-step algorithm to K-edge imaging applications by designing optimal bases using a low-rank approximation to model X-ray transmittances with arbitrary shapes (i.e., smooth without the K-edge or discontinuous with the K-edge). The bases can be used to approximate the X-ray transmittance and to linearize the PCD measurement modeling and then the three-step estimator can be derived as in the previous approach: estimating the x-ray transmittance in the first step, estimating basis line-integrals including that of the contrast agent in the second step, and correcting for a bias in the third step. We demonstrate that the proposed method is more accurate and stable than the low-order polynomial-based approaches with extensive simulation studies using gadolinium for the K-edge imaging application. We also demonstrate that the proposed method achieves nearly MVU estimator, and is more stable than the conventional maximum likelihood estimator in high attenuation cases with fewer photon counts.

  19. Calculation of characteristics of X-ray devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orobinskyi A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Actuality of this work is related to human radiation safety during tuning and regulation of X-ray devices in the process of their development and production. The more precise the calculations for the device are, the less time is required for its tuning and regulation, and thus people are less exposed to radiation. When developing an X-ray device, it is necessary to choose an X-ray tube and filters taking into account the application domain of the device. In order to do this, one should know anode voltage, X-ray tube anode current, material and thickness of filters, i.e. to calculate these characteristics at the set quality of X-ray radiation. The known published studies do not give any solution to this problem. The scientific novelty of this work is that it establishes the interdependence between main characteristics of the X-ray device: the function of the device defines the quality of X-ray radiation (mean photon energy and air kerma power; mean photon energy depends on the X-ray anode tube voltage and spectral resolution; air kerma power depends on anode tube voltage, current of X-ray tube anode, spectral resolution, thicknesses of the filters and their materials; spectral resolution depends on thicknesses of filters and their materials; thickness of filters depends on the material of the filter (the linear coefficient of weakening of X-ray radiation. Knowledge of interdependence of basic characteristics of the X-ray devices allowes developing simple algorithm for their calculation at the values of homogeneity coefficient from 0,8 to 1, which makes it possible to choose an X-ray tube and filters with the purpose of obtaining X-ray radiation of the set quality.

  20. X-ray filter for x-ray powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinsheimer, John Jay; Conley, Raymond P.; Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Dooryhee, Eric; Ghose, Sanjit

    2018-01-23

    Technologies are described for apparatus, methods and systems effective for filtering. The filters may comprise a first plate. The first plate may include an x-ray absorbing material and walls defining first slits. The first slits may include arc shaped openings through the first plate. The walls of the first plate may be configured to absorb at least some of first x-rays when the first x-rays are incident on the x-ray absorbing material, and to output second x-rays. The filters may comprise a second plate spaced from the first plate. The second plate may include the x-ray absorbing material and walls defining second slits. The second slits may include arc shaped openings through the second plate. The walls of the second plate may be configured to absorb at least some of second x-rays and to output third x-rays.

  1. X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cominsky, L

    2004-03-23

    This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

  2. Effect of spectral shape in the relative efficiency of LiF: Mg,Ti exposed to 20 keV effective energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ixquiac-Cabrera, J.M., E-mail: mixquiac@nucleares.unam.m [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 DF (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala, Edificio T-1 Facultad de Ingenieria (Guatemala); Brandan, M.E.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Ruiz-Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico); Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 DF (Mexico)

    2011-04-15

    This work is aimed at studying the possible dependence of the thermoluminescent response of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) on the X-ray beam spectrum. TLD-100 chips were irradiated with 20 keV effective energy filtered tungsten X-ray spectra, generated by a tube operated at 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 kV, and the response was measured relative to the response to {sup 60}Co gammas. TLDs were exposed in air at air kerma values between 50 and 300 mGy. Glow curve deconvolution into 8 peaks (3, 4, 5, 6a, 6b, 7, 8 and 9) was performed in order to evaluate the response of individual peaks and regions of interest in the glow curve. Results show that all peaks display a linear response, at least up to 200 mGy, for all X-ray beam qualities. The relative response of the total glow curve area, the dosimetric region (peaks 3 + 4 + 5) and peaks 5 to 9 is statistically constant for beams generated by voltages from 30 to 70 kV; for 80 kV, the values are lower by about 20% for peaks 8 and 9 and 9% for the rest. The relative efficiency for the glow curve area, the dosimetric region and peaks 5 (1.15, 1.10 and 1.13), peaks 8 and 9 (2.05 and 1.55) do not depend on the beam spectrum between 30 and 70 kV, while for 80 kV the efficiency is lower. For peaks 6a, 6b and 7, relative efficiencies (1.91, 2.94 and 2.60) are voltage independent.

  3. PREPARATION, SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES AND X-RAY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These complexes have been characterized by analysis, molar conductance, magnetic measurements, infrared spectral studies and X-ray diffraction. The analytical data showed 1:3 (metal:ligand) stoichiometry. Molar conductance measurements in dmf indicate 1:3 electrolytes in all cases. Magnetic moment values are close ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations ... patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is ... care is taken during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on large film ... assist you in finding the most comfortable position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ... body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray ...

  8. Coherent x-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Paganin, David M

    2006-01-01

    'Coherent X-Ray Optics' gives a thorough treatment of the rapidly expanding field of coherent x-ray optics, which has recently experienced something of a renaissance with the availability of third-generation synchrotron sources.

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues around or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require ... is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... and Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray ( ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ... and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used ... placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page ... the patient standing upright, as in cases of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is used to: ... and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  2. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; hide

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be taken to minimize radiation exposure to the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of an x-ray tube suspended over a table on which the patient ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  5. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recorded on a computer or special X-ray film. This image shows the soft tissues and bones of the forearm. The X-ray image is black and white. Dense structures that block the passage of the X-ray beam through the body, such as the bones, appear white on the ...

  6. Neutron Stars in X-ray Binaries and their Environments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Paul

    2017-09-07

    Sep 7, 2017 ... Abstract. Neutron stars in X-ray binary systems are fascinating objects that display a wide range of timing and spectral phenomena in the X-rays. Not only parameters of the neutron stars, like magnetic field strength and spin period evolve in their active binary phase, the neutron stars also affect the binary ...

  7. Synthesis, spectral and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of novel O-(Carboalkoxy)methyl oxime ethers of 3-alkyl and 3,5-dialkyl-1-methyl-2,6-diphenylpiperidin-4-ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayutham Pillai, M.; Rajeswari, K.; Vidhyasagar, T.

    2014-11-01

    A series of novel O-(Carboalkoxy)methyl oxime ether derivatives of 3-alkyl and 3,5-dialkyl-1-methyl-2,6-diphenylpiperidin-4-ones were synthesized and characterized through FT-IR, Mass, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1Hsbnd 1H COSY, 1Hsbnd 13C COSY and NOESY spectral techniques. The stereocontrolled formation of E-isomer exclusively in all the cases was confirmed by NMR spectral analysis. A1,3 strain induced epimerization of C5 carbon in the case of compounds 18 and 23 was also observed. The preferred conformation of compounds 16, 17, 20, 21, 22 and 25 was found to be chair and for compounds 19 &24 it was boat while compounds 18 and 23 adopt a twist boat conformation as observed by 1H NMR and NOESY spectra. The solid state geometry of compound 16 was established by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis.

  8. A combined optical and X-ray study of unobscured type 1 active galactic nuclei - I. Optical spectra and spectral energy distribution modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chichuan; Ward, Martin; Done, Chris; Gelbord, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    We present modelling and interpretation of the continuum and emission lines for a sample of 51 unobscured type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). All of these AGNs have high-quality spectra from both XMM-Newton and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We extend the wavelength coverage where possible by adding simultaneous ultraviolet data from the OM onboard XMM-Newton. Our sample is selected based on low reddening in the optical and low gas columns implied by their X-ray spectra, except for one case, the broad absorption line quasar PG 1004+130. They also lack clear signatures for the presence of a warm absorber. Therefore, the observed characteristics of this sample are likely to be directly related to the intrinsic properties of the central engine.

  9. The universe in X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Hasinger, Günther

    2008-01-01

    In the last 45 years, X-ray astronomy has become an integral part of modern astrophysics and cosmology. There is a wide range of astrophysical objects and phenomena, where X-rays provide crucial diagnostics. In particular they are well suited to study hot plasmas and matter under extreme physical conditions in compact objects. This book summarizes the present status of X-ray astronomy in terms of observational results and their astrophysical interpretation. It is written for students, astrophysicists as well a growing community of physicists interested in the field. An introduction including historical material is followed by chapters on X-ray astronomical instrumentation. The next two parts summarize in 17 chapters the present knowledge on various classes of X-ray sources in the galactic and extragalactic realm. While the X-ray astronomical highlights discussed in this book are mainly based on results from ROSAT, ASCA, RXTE, BeppoSAX, Chandra and XMM-Newton, a final chapter provides an outlook on observation...

  10. Jovian X-ray emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H.; Lewis, W. S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Brandt, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    The Einstein and Rosat observations of X-ray emissions from Jupiter are summarized. Jupiter's soft X-ray emission is observed to originate from the planet's auroral zones, and specifically, from its equatorial region. The processes responsible for these emissions are not established. The brightness distribution of the Jovian X-rays is characterized by the dependence on central meridian longitude and by north-south and morning-afternoon asymmetries. The X-rays observed during the impact of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 are believed to be impact-induced brightenings of the X-ray aurora.

  11. Fluor'X: a near monochromatic x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfeld, Jan; van Dorssen, Gert E.; Niestadt, Marcel

    2001-12-01

    More than 100 years after the discovery of X-rays by Roentgen the basic design of X-ray tubes remains nearly unchanged. A polychromatic spectrum of X-rays is generated by deceleration of electrons in a heavy (metal) target, superimposed by the characteristic fluorescence lines of that material. Nowadays, in many applications the need for near monochromatic radiation is beneficial or even mandatory. In this paper an X-ray tube is described which emits a spectrum consisting only of characteristic fluorescence radiation. Measurements of the yield and spectral distribution are presented, as well as possible applications.

  12. Depth of interaction and bias voltage depenence of the spectral response in a pixellated CdTe detector operating in time-over-threshold mode subjected to monochromatic X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröjdh, E.; Fröjdh, C.; Gimenez, E. N.; Maneuski, D.; Marchal, J.; Norlin, B.; O'Shea, V.; Stewart, G.; Wilhelm, H.; Modh Zain, R.; Thungström, G.

    2012-03-01

    High stopping power is one of the most important figures of merit for X-ray detectors. CdTe is a promising material but suffers from: material defects, non-ideal charge transport and long range X-ray fluorescence. Those factors reduce the image quality and deteriorate spectral information. In this project we used a monochromatic pencil beam collimated through a 20μm pinhole to measure the detector spectral response in dependance on the depth of interaction. The sensor was a 1mm thick CdTe detector with a pixel pitch of 110μm, bump bonded to a Timepix readout chip operating in Time-Over-Threshold mode. The measurements were carried out at the Extreme Conditions beamline I15 of the Diamond Light Source. The beam was entering the sensor at an angle of \\texttildelow20 degrees to the surface and then passed through \\texttildelow25 pixels before leaving through the bottom of the sensor. The photon energy was tuned to 77keV giving a variation in the beam intensity of about three orders of magnitude along the beam path. Spectra in Time-over-Threshold (ToT) mode were recorded showing each individual interaction. The bias voltage was varied between -30V and -300V to investigate how the electric field affected the spectral information. For this setup it is worth noticing the large impact of fluorescence. At -300V the photo peak and escape peak are of similar height. For high bias voltages the spectra remains clear throughout the whole depth but for lower voltages as -50V, only the bottom part of the sensor carries spectral information. This is an effect of the low hole mobility and the longer range the electrons have to travel in a low field.

  13. X-ray optics of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letfullin, Renat R; Rice, Colin E W; George, Thomas F

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been investigated as contrast agents for traditional x-ray medical procedures, utilizing the strong absorption characteristics of the nanoparticles to enhance the contrast of the detected x-ray image. Here we use the Kramers-Kronig relation for complex atomic scattering factors to find the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction for the medium composed of single-element materials or compounds in the x-ray range of the spectrum. These complex index of refraction values are then plugged into a Lorenz-Mie theory to calculate the absorption efficiency of various size gold nanoparticles for photon energies in the 1-100 keV range. Since the output from most medical diagnostic x-ray devices follows a wide and filtered spectrum of photon energies, we introduce and compute the effective intensity-absorption-efficiency values for gold nanoparticles of radii varying from 5 to 50 nm, where we use the TASMIP model to integrate over all spectral energies generated by typical tungsten anode x-ray tubes with kilovolt potentials ranging from 50 to 150 kVp.

  14. The super-orbital modulation of supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Lobel, A.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2017-10-01

    The long-term X-ray light curves of classical supergiant X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients show relatively similar super-orbital modulations, which are still lacking a sound interpretation. We propose that these modulations are related to the presence of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) known to thread the winds of OB supergiants. To test this hypothesis, we couple the outcomes of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic models for the formation of CIRs in stellar winds with a simplified recipe for the accretion onto a neutron star. The results show that the synthetic X-ray light curves are indeed modulated by the presence of the CIRs. The exact period and amplitude of these modulations depend on a number of parameters governing the hydrodynamic wind models and on the binary orbital configuration. To compare our model predictions with the observations, we apply the 3D wind structure previously shown to well explain the appearance of discrete absorption components in the UV time series of a prototypical B0.5I-type supergiant. Using the orbital parameters of IGRJ 16493-4348, which has the same B0.5I donor spectral type, the period and modulations in the simulated X-ray light curve are similar to the observed ones, thus providing support to our scenario. We propose that the presence of CIRs in donor star winds should be considered in future theoretical and simulation efforts of wind-fed X-ray binaries.

  15. Diagnosing the accretion flow in ultraluminous X-ray sources using soft X-ray atomic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, M.J.; Walton, D.J.; Fabian, A.; Roberts, T.P.; Heil, L.; Pinto, C.; Anderson, G.; Sutton, A.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of unambiguous detections of atomic features in the X-ray spectra of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) has proven a hindrance in diagnosing the nature of the accretion flow. The possible association of spectral residuals at soft energies with atomic features seen in absorption and/or

  16. Characterization of a triboelectric x-ray spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya-Sanchez, E. Ulises; Romo-Espejel, J. A.; Aceves-Aldrete, F. J. [Departamento de Fisica, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Low-energy X-ray imaging system has been useful in medical diagnostic in order to obtain high contrast in soft tissue. Recently, Camara et al. and most recently Hird et al. have produced low-energy X-rays using a triboelectric effect. The main aim of this work is to characterize the penetration (beam quality) of a triboelectric X-ray source in terms of the computed Half Value Layer (HVL). Additionally, the computed HVL of the triboelectric X-ray source has been compared with the HVL of X-ray tube Mo-anode (Apogee 5000). According to our computations the triboelectric X-ray source has a similar penetration such as a X-ray tube source.

  17. X-rays absorption study on medieval corrosion layers for the understanding of very long-term indoor atmospheric iron corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monnier, J. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); UMR 7182 CNRS and UPEC, Universite Paris-Est, Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est (ICMPE), Thiais (France); Reguer, S.; Vantelon, D. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dillmann, P. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); IRAMAT UMR 5060 CNRS, Gif sur Yvette (France); Neff, D. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); Guillot, I. [UMR 7182 CNRS and UPEC, Universite Paris-Est, Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est (ICMPE), Thiais (France)

    2010-05-15

    The study and prediction of very long-term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ferrous alloys is of great importance in different fields. First the conservation of metallic artefacts in museum and the corrosion diagnosis on ferrous reinforcement used in ancient monuments since medieval times needs reliable data to understand the mechanisms. Second, in the frame of the interim storage of nuclear waste in France, it is necessary to model the long-term corrosion of low alloy steel overcontainer. The nature of phases and elements constituting the corrosion layers can greatly influence the corrosion mechanisms. On the one hand, it is crucial to precisely determine the nature of microscopic phases that can be highly reactive. On the other hand, some elements as P and S could modify this reactivity. To clarify this point and complementary to other studies using Raman micro spectroscopy technique, X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) under synchrotron radiation plays a crucial role. It allows one to precisely identify the reactive phases in the corrosion layers. Micro-XAS was required in order to refine the spatial variation, at micrometer scale, of the predominant Fe oxidation state and to characterise the corresponding corrosion products. Moreover, the role of minor elements on phase's stability and the chemical form of these elements in the rust layer, especially phosphorus and sulphur, was investigated. (orig.)

  18. The behavior of subluminous X-ray transients near the Galactic center as observed using the X-ray telescope aboard Swift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report on the spectral analysis of seven X-ray transients, which were found to be active during a monitoring campaign of the Galactic center carried out in 2006 and 2007 using the X-ray telescope aboard the Swift satellite. This campaign detected new outbursts of five known X-ray

  19. XMM-Newton Spectroscopy of the X-ray Detected Broad Absorption Line QSO CSO 755

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Niel

    2005-01-01

    We present the results from XMM-Newton observations of the highly optically polarized broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) CSO 755. By analyzing its X-ray spectrum with a total of approximately 3000 photons we find that this source has an X-ray continuum of "typical" radio-quiet quasars, with a photon index of Gamma=1.83, and a rather flat (X-ray bright) intrinsic optical-to-X-ray spectral slope of alpha_ox=- 1.51. The source shows evidence for intrinsic absorption, and fitting the spectrum with a neutral-absorption model gives a column density of N_H approximately 1.2x10^22 cm^{-2}; this is among the lowest X-ray columns measured for BALQSOs. We do not detect, with high significance, any other absorption features in the X-ray spectrum. Upper limits we place on the rest-frame equivalent width of a neutral (ionized) Fe K-alpha line, less than =180 eV (less than =120 eV), and on the Compton-reflection component parameter, R less than =0.2, suggest that most of the X-rays from the source are directly observed rather than being scattered or reflected; this is also supported by the relatively flat intrinsic alpha ox we measure. The possibility that most of the X-ray flux is scattered due to the high level of UV-optical polarization is ruled out. Considering data for 46 BALQSOs from the literature, including CSO 755, we have found that the UV-optical continuum polarization level of BALQSOs is not correlated with any of their X-ray properties. A lack of significant short-term and long-term X-ray flux variations in the source may be attributed to a large black-hole mass in CSO 755. We note that another luminous BALQSO, PG 2112+059, has both similar shallow C IV BALs and moderate X-ray absorption.

  20. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  1. Phase-space evolution of x-ray coherence in phase-sensitive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2008-08-01

    X-ray coherence evolution in the imaging process plays a key role for x-ray phase-sensitive imaging. In this work we present a phase-space formulation for the phase-sensitive imaging. The theory is reformulated in terms of the cross-spectral density and associated Wigner distribution. The phase-space formulation enables an explicit and quantitative account of partial coherence effects on phase-sensitive imaging. The presented formulas for x-ray spectral density at the detector can be used for performing accurate phase retrieval and optimizing the phase-contrast visibility. The concept of phase-space shearing length derived from this phase-space formulation clarifies the spatial coherence requirement for phase-sensitive imaging with incoherent sources. The theory has been applied to x-ray Talbot interferometric imaging as well. The peak coherence condition derived reveals new insights into three-grating-based Talbot-interferometric imaging and gratings-based x-ray dark-field imaging.

  2. Structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts from Si(100)-c[4x2] surface: A spectral x-ray photoelectron diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X.; Tonner, B.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Denlinger, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)][Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors have performed angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) from a Si(100)-c(4x2) surface to study the structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts. In the experiment, the highly resolved surface Si-2p core-level spectra were measured as a fine grid of hemisphere and photon energies, using the SpectroMicroscopy Facility {open_quotes}ultraESCA{close_quotes} instrument. By carefully decomposing the spectra into several surface peaks, the authors are able to obtain surface-atom resolved XPD patterns. Using a multiple scattering analysis, they derived a detailed atomic model for the Si(100)-c(4x2) surface. In this model, the asymmetric dimers were found tilted by 11.5 plus/minus 2.0 degrees with bond length of 2.32 plus/minus 0.05{angstrom}. By matching model XPD patterns to experiment, the authors can identify which atoms in the reconstructed surface are responsible for specific photoemission lines in the 2p spectrum.

  3. Optical spectroscopy of the Be/X-ray binary V850 Centauri/GX 304-1 during faint X-ray periodical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacaria, C.; Kollatschny, W.; Whelan, E.; Santangelo, A.; Klochkov, D.; McBride, V.; Ducci, L.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Be/X-ray binaries (BeXRBs) are the most populous class of high-mass X-ray binaries. Their X-ray duty cycle is tightly related to the optical companion wind activity, which in turn can be studied through dedicated optical spectroscopic observations. Aims: We study optical spectral features of the Be circumstellar disk to test their long-term variability and their relation with the X-ray activity. Special attention has been given to the Hα emission line, one of the best tracers of the disk conditions. Methods: We obtained optical broadband medium resolution spectra from a dedicated campaign with the Anglo-Australian Telescope and the Southern African Large Telescope in 2014-2015. Data span over one entire binary orbit, and cover both X-ray quiescent and moderately active periods. We used Balmer emission lines to follow the evolution of the circumstellar disk. Results: We observe prominent spectral features, like double-peaked Hα and Hβ emission lines. The HαV/R ratio significantly changes over a timescale of about one year. Our observations are consistent with a system observed at a large inclination angle (I ≳ 60°). The derived circumstellar disk size shows that the disk evolves from a configuration that prevents accretion onto the neutron star, to one that allows only moderate accretion. This is in agreement with the contemporary observed X-ray activity. Our results are interpreted within the context of inefficient tidal truncation of the circumstellar disk, as expected for this source's binary configuration. We derived the Hβ-emitting region size, which is equal to about half of the corresponding Hα-emitting disk, and constrain the luminosity class of V850 Cen as III-V, consistent with the previously proposed class.

  4. X-Ray Lasers 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, Sergei; Daido, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-01

    These proceedings comprise a selection of invited and contributed papers presented at the 15th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers (ICXRL 2016), held at the Nara Kasugano International Forum, Japan, from May 22 to 27, 2016. This conference was part of an ongoing series dedicated to recent developments in the science and technology of x-ray lasers and other coherent x-ray sources with additional focus on supporting technologies, instrumentation and applications.   The book showcases recent advances in the generation of intense, coherent x-rays, the development of practical devices and their applications across a wide variety of fields. It also discusses emerging topics such as plasma-based x-ray lasers, 4th generation accelerator-based sources and higher harmonic generations, as well as other x-ray generation schemes.

  5. X-ray optics of tapered capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaic, D X; Nugent, K A

    1995-11-01

    The optics of x-ray concentration by tapered glass capillaries is analyzed in terms of a phase-space construction describing their transmission efficiency. The parameters defining the intensity gain are given in terms of parameters describing the x-ray source used, the capillary taper profile, and glass characteristics. We introduce some key concepts in understanding these devices: the extreme ray and a phase-space description of sources and optics. They are used to develop an analytical formulation for the optimum gain characteristics of generalized tapers for use with synchrotrons and other low-divergence sources. This general solution is solved further for the case of conical taper profile. The predictions of this theory are compared with the results of three-dimensional, ray-tracing simulations of x-ray concentration efficiency for conical and paraboloidal tapers.

  6. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, M V; Zheludeva, S I; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O P; Arutynyan, E H; Kheiker, D M; Kreines, A Y; Lider, V V; Pashaev, E M; Shilina, N Y; Shishkov, V A

    2000-01-01

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  7. Soft X-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, Eberhard A

    1993-01-01

    This text describes optics mainly in the 10 to 500 angstrom wavelength region. These wavelengths are 50 to 100 times shorter than those for visible light and 50 to 100 times longer than the wavelengths of medical x rays or x-ray diffraction from natural crystals. There have been substantial advances during the last 20 years, which one can see as an extension of optical technology to shorter wavelengths or as an extension of x-ray diffraction to longer wavelengths. Artificial diffracting structures like zone plates and multilayer mirrors are replacing the natural crystals of x-ray diffraction.

  8. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  9. Diagnostic X-ray sources-present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Rolf; Grüner, Florian

    2018-01-01

    This paper compares very different physical principles of X-ray production to spur ideation. Since more than 120 years, bremsstrahlung from X-ray tubes has been the workhorse of medical diagnostics. Generated by X-ray segments comprised of X-ray tubes and high-voltage generators in the various medical systems, X-ray photons in the spectral range between about 16 keV and 150 keV deliver information about anatomy and function of human patients and in pre-clinical animal studies. Despite of strides to employ the wave nature of X-rays as phase sensitive means, commercial diagnostic X-ray systems available until the time of writing still rely exclusively on measuring the attenuation and scattering of X-rays by matter. Significant activities in research aim at building highly brilliant short pulse X-ray sources, based on e.g. synchrotron radiation, free electron lasers and/or laser wake-field acceleration of electrons followed by wiggling with magnetic structures or Thomson scattering in bunches of light. While both approaches, non-brilliant and brilliant sources, have different scope of application, we speculate that a combination may expand the efficacy in medical application. At this point, however, severe technical and commercial difficulties hinder closing this gap. This article may inspire further development and spark innovation in this important field.

  10. A zinc(II) quinolinone complex (Et3NH)[Zn(qui)Cl2]: Synthesis, X-ray structure, spectral properties and in vitro cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchtík, Roman; Nemec, Ivan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2014-02-01

    A new zinc(II) complex with 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone (Hqui) of the composition (Et3NH)[Zn(qui)Cl2] was prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, FT IR, 1D and 2D NMR, and fluorescence spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray analysis. The molecular structure is composed of the triethylammonium (Et3NH+) cations and tetrahedral [ZnII(qui)Cl2]- complex anions, in which the Zn(II) atoms are bidentate coordinated by one qui ligand through keto (OK) and phenolate (OP) oxygen atoms and by two chlorido ligands, thus forming the {O2Cl2} donor set, with Zn-OK = 1.9860(14) Å, Zn-OP 1.9961(14) Å and Zn-Cl = 2.2509(6) Å and 2.2266(6) Å. The complex cations are aligned into 1D supramolecular chains through the NH⋯Cl hydrogen bonding between the amine group of the quinolinone ligand and the chlorido ligand of the adjacent complex anion. The amine group from the Et3NH+ cations provides the NH⋯OP hydrogen bond with the phenolate oxygen atoms from the complex anion. Screening of in vitro cytotoxicity of the compound was studied on human osteosarcoma (HOS) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) cell lines, with IC50 > 50 μM. The fluorescence study showed that the complex exhibits a relatively high integral intensity (29%) as compared to the standard quinine sulfate, and 1.6-fold enhancement of emission with respect to free Hqui.

  11. X-ray studies of coeval star samples. II - The Pleiades cluster as observed with the Einstein Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1990-01-01

    Coronal X-ray emission of the Pleiades stars is investigated, and maximum likelihood, integral X-ray luminosity functions are computed for Pleiades members in selected color-index ranges. A detailed search is conducted for long-term variability in the X-ray emission of those stars observed more than once. An overall comparison of the survey results with those of previous surveys confirms the ubiquity of X-ray emission in the Pleiades cluster stars and its higher rate of emission with respect to older stars. It is found that the X-ray emission from dA and early dF stars cannot be proven to be dissimilar to that of Hyades and field stars of the same spectral type. The Pleiades cluster members show a real rise of the X-ray luminosity from dA stars to early dF stars. X-ray emission for the young, solarlike Pleiades stars is about two orders of magnitude more intense than for the nearby solarlike stars.

  12. Globular cluster X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, D.

    We know from observations that globular clusters are very efficient catalysts in forming unusual binary systems, such as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs), with formation rates per unit mass exceeding those in the Galactic disk by orders of magnitude. The high stellar densities in globular clusters trigger various dynamical interactions: exchange encounters, direct collisions, destruction of binaries, and tidal capture. This binary population is, in turn, critical to the stabilization of globular clusters against gravitational collapse; the long-term stability of a cluster is thought to depend on tapping into the gravitational binding energy of such close binaries. I will present an overview of the current state of globular cluster X-ray observations, as well as our work on deep Chandra observations of M4, where we reach some of the lowest X-ray luminosities in any globular cluster (comparable to the deep observations of 47 Tuc and NGC 6397). One of M4 X-ray sources previously classified as a white dwarf binary is likely a neutron star binary, and another X-ray source is a sub-subgiant, the nature of which is still unclear. skip=3pt

  13. Two-channel X-ray reflectometer

    CERN Document Server

    Touryanski, A G; Pirshin, I V

    2000-01-01

    The two-channel X-ray reflectometer is proposed providing an increase in accuracy and sensitivity especially to nanoscale oxide layers. The reflectometer has two independent measuring channels controlled by a processor and the beam-splitting and spectral selection device based on a row of semitransparent plates of pyrolitic graphite. Results of reflection curve measurements in a relative mode are presented for an Ni film and GaAs monocrystal.

  14. Tantalum/Copper X-Ray Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, William J.; Edmonds, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed unique solution to subsidiary problem of fabrication of x-ray target. Plasma spraying enabled fabrication of lightweight, high-performance targets. Power settings, atmosphere-control settings, rate of deposition, and other spraying parameters developed. Thin coats of tantalum successfully deposited on copper targets. Targets performed successfully in tests and satisfied all criteria expressed in terms of critical parameters. Significantly reduces projected costs of fabrication of targets and contributes to development of improved, long-lived, lightweight x-ray system.

  15. X-ray optics high-energy-resolution applications

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd’ko, Yuri

    2004-01-01

    The generation of radiation with well-defined frequency and wavelength, and the ability to precisely determine these quantities, are of fundamental importance in physics and other natural sciences Monochromatic radiation enables both very accurate structure determinations and studies of the dynamics of living and non-living matter It is crucial for the realization of standards of time and length, for the determination of fundamental constants, and for many other aspects of basic research Bragg backscattering from perfect crystals is a tool for creating, manipulating, and analyzing x-rays with highest spectral purity It has the unique feature of selecting x-rays with narrow spectral bandwidth This book describes the theoretical foundations and principles of x-ray crystal optics with high spectral resolution Various experimental studies and applications are presented and the author also addresses the development of instrumentation, such as high-resolution x-ray monochromators, analyzers, wavelength meters, reso...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x-rays to pass through them. As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnosis and treatment. No radiation remains in a patient's body after an x-ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... widely available in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes and other locations, making it convenient for both patients and physicians. Because x-ray imaging is fast and easy, it is ... Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations to use ...

  20. Chandra's X-ray Vision

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1999-07-23

    Jul 23, 1999 ... GENERAL I ARTICLE. Chandra's X-ray Vision. K P Singh. Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) is a scientific satellite (moon/ chandra), named after the Indian-born Nobel laureate. Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar - one of the foremost astro- physicists of the twentieth century and popularly known as. Chandra.

  1. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation through the ankle, and black and white images of the bones and soft tissues are recorded on a computer or special X-ray film. Dense structures that block the passage of the X-ray beam through the body, such as bones, appear white. Softer body tissues, ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ...

  3. The difference of bone mineral density of lumbar spine and wrist in the preterm and full-term infants: using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Min Jung; Kim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Young Seok; Chang, Young Pyo; Park, Jin Young [Dankook University Hospital, College of Medicine, Dankook University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    To assess the differences in bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar spine and wrist between preterm infants of postconceptional age 40 weeks and normal full-term infants.Sixty-eight preterm infants born at conceptional age 26-36 weeks and 31 normal full-term infants born at 38-42 weeks were investigated. Bone mineral densities of the lumbar spine (from the second to the fourth segment) and wrist were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. In preterm infants, the corrected age of 0 month was defined as postconceptional 40 weeks. Full-term infants were compared. In the preterm group, birth weight and conceptional age were correlated with lumbar spinal and wrist bone mineral densities. Data were analyzed by student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient, and a p value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. In preterm infants, the values of bone mineral densities of the lumbar spine and wrist were 0.137 {+-} 0.018 g/cm{sup 2} (0.061-0.202 g/cm{sup 2}) and 0.089 {+-} 0.013 g/cm{sup 2} (0.065-0.123 g/cm{sup 2}), respectively, while the respective values for full-term infants were 0.214 {+-} 0.030 g/cm{sup 2} (0.160-0.296 g/cm{sup 2}) and 0.118 {+-} 0.014 g/cm{sup 2} (0.096-0.162 g/cm{sup 2}). In the preterm group, lumbar spinal BMD correlated significantly with conceptional age (r=3D0.384, p less than 0.05) and birth weight (r=3D0.438, p less than 0.05). While wrist BMD correlated significantly with birth weight (r=3D0.281, p less than 0.05), its correlation with conceptional age was not significant (r=3D0.223, p greater than 0.05). The lumbar spinal and wrist BMDs of preterm infants at corrected age 0 were lower than those of normal full-term infants. In the preterm group, BMD values for the lumbar spine were lower in infants of lower conceptional age and birth weight. (author)

  4. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  5. Application of X-ray Optics to Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy; McMillan

    1998-11-01

    : X-ray optics have been used in X-ray analytical instruments for several years. Applications of X-ray optics have been reported in X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. X-ray optics have been used to increase the X-ray flux incident on the sample or to direct and focus emitted X-rays from a sample. We report here the use of a grazing incidence optic (GIO) as a flux-enhancing collimator for use with an energy-dispersive (ED) detector used to perform electron beam microanalysis. We found that the GIO in combination with an ED spectrometer (EDS) provides substantial intensity gain for X-ray lines with energy below 1 keV. The GIO is also found to provide a modest focus effect, and introduces minimal spectral artifacts.

  6. Suzaku observation of the eclipsing high mass X-ray binary pulsar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jincy Devasia

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... The correlated variations in the spectral parameters indicate towards the presence of clumps in the stellar wind of the companion star accounting for the absorption of low energy X-rays in some time segments. Keywords. X-ray: neutron stars—X-ray binaries: individual (XTE J1855-026). 1. Introduction.

  7. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  8. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  9. BXA: Bayesian X-ray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    BXA connects the nested sampling algorithm MultiNest (ascl:1109.006) to the X-ray spectral analysis environments Xspec/Sherpa for Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison. It provides parameter estimation in arbitrary dimensions and plotting of spectral model vs. the data for best fit, posterior samples, or each component. BXA allows for model selection; it computes the evidence for the considered model, ready for use in computing Bayes factors and is not limited to nested models. It also visualizes deviations between model and data with Quantile-Quantile (QQ) plots, which do not require binning and are more comprehensive than residuals.

  10. Characteristic evaluation of a novel CdTe photon counting detector for X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Kim, Hee-Joung; Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Choi, Yu-Na

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of a novel cadmium-telluride (CdTe) photon counting detector optimized for X-ray imaging applications. CdTe was studied as a potential detector material for hard X-ray and gamma-ray detection. In this study, we used a CdTe photon counting detector manufactured by AJAT Ltd. (PID 350, Finland) for the purposes of both X-ray and gamma-ray detection. However, it is noted that X-ray detection can be limited by the characteristics of gamma-ray detectors. For the investigation of the characteristics of a detector for X-ray imaging, the detector has been studied in terms of detector calibration, count rate, and pixel sensitivity variation by using a poly-energetic X-ray. The detector calibration was evaluated to determine the effects of offset, gain, and energy. An optimal calibration increases the accuracy of the output energy spectrum. The pixel sensitivity variation was evaluated using profiles of various rows and columns from white (with X-ray) and dark (without X-ray) images. The specific trend of each image was observed around the edges of the hybrids. These pixel variations of the CdTe sensor were corrected. The image quality was improved by using the optimal correction method based on an understanding of the pixel sensitivity variation. The maximum recorded count rate of the detector was measured in all pixels. The count rate was measured by setting the energy windows from just above the noise level to the maximum energy. The average count rate was fairly linear up to 1.6 × 106 cps/8 modules and saturated at about 2.2 × 106 cps/8 modules. In this paper, we present several characteristics of the detector and demonstrate the improved spectrum and image obtained after calibration and correction. These results show that the novel CdTe photon counting detector can be used in conventional X-ray imaging, but exhibits limitations when applied to spectral X-ray imaging.

  11. Spectral and raw quasi in-situ energy dispersive X-ray data captured via a TEM analysis of an ODS austenitic stainless steel sample under 1 MeV Kr2+ high temperature irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Adam J; Yao, Zhongwen

    2017-10-01

    The data presented in this article is related to the research experiment, titled: 'Quasi in-situ energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy observation of matrix and solute interactions on Y-Ti-O oxide particles in an austenitic stainless steel under 1 MeV Kr2+ high temperature irradiation' (Brooks et al., 2017) [1]. Quasi in-situ analysis during 1 MeV Kr2+ 520 °C irradiation allowed the same microstructural area to be observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM), on an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) austenitic stainless steel sample. The data presented contains two sets of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) data collected before and after irradiation to 1.5 displacements-per-atom (~1.25×10-3 dpa/s with 7.5×1014 ions cm-2). The vendor software used to process and output the data is the Bruker Esprit v1.9 suite. The data includes the spectral (counts vs. keV energy) of the quasi in-situ scanned region (512×512 pixels at 56k magnification), along with the EDX scanning parameters. The.raw files from the Bruker Esprit v1.9 output are additionally included along with the.rpl data information files. Furthermore included are the two quasi in-situ HAADF images for visual comparison of the regions before and after irradiation. This in-situ experiment is deemed 'quasi' due to the thin foil irradiation taking place at an external TEM facility. We present this data for critical and/or extended analysis from the scientific community, with applications applying to: experimental data correlation, confirmation of results, and as computer based modeling inputs.

  12. Advancing the technology of monolithic CMOS detectors for use as x-ray imaging spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Amato, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff has been engaged in a multi year effort to advance the technology of monolithic back-thinned CMOS detectors for use as X-ray imaging spectrometers. The long term goal of this campaign is to produce X-ray Active Pixel Sensor (APS) detectors with Fano limited performance over the 0.1-10keV band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Such devices would be ideal for candidate post 2020 decadal missions such as LYNX and for smaller more immediate applications such as CubeX. Devices from a recent fabrication have been back-thinned, packaged and tested for soft X-ray response. These devices have 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels with ˜135μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel signal chain. These new detectors are fabricated on 10μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. We present details of our camera design and device performance with particular emphasis on those aspects of interest to single photon counting X-ray astronomy. These features include read noise, X-ray spectral response and quantum efficiency.

  13. STROBE-X: X-ray timing and spectroscopy on dynamical timescales from microseconds to years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen A. Wilson-Hodge

    Full Text Available The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X probes strong gravity for stellar mass to supermassive black holes and ultradense matter with unprecedented effective area, high time-resolution, and good spectral resolution, while providing a powerful time-domain X-ray observatory. Keywords: Missions, X-ray timing, X-ray spectroscopy, Compact objects

  14. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  15. X-ray emission from Of stars and OB supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinelli, J. P.; Waldron, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    The result of a survey of X-ray emission from luminous early-type stars is reported in which observations were made using the imaging proportional counter on the Einstein Observatory. The survey suggests that all Of stars and OB supergiants earlier than B1 I are X-ray sources with luminosities not less than 10 to the 32nd ergs/s and that some later B supergiants have X-ray luminosities not less than 10 to the 31st ergs/s. The X-ray luminosities are roughly 10 to the -7.2nd of the bolometric luminosities for supergiants earlier than B1 and perhaps a factor of 3 less for later B supergiants. Spectral analysis of the X-rays in conjunction with information on anomalous ionization in the wind from four of the strongest sources implies that the data are not consistent with a model in which the X-rays originate in a thin slab coronal zone at the base of the wind. Constraints on the source of X-rays from B supergiants are derived by combining the X-ray flux information with that on ultraviolet line anomalies.

  16. X-ray imaging physics for nuclear medicine technologists. Part 1: Basic principles of x-ray production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2004-09-01

    The purpose is to review in a 4-part series: (i) the basic principles of x-ray production, (ii) x-ray interactions and data capture/conversion, (iii) acquisition/creation of the CT image, and (iv) operational details of a modern multislice CT scanner integrated with a PET scanner. Advances in PET technology have lead to widespread applications in diagnostic imaging and oncologic staging of disease. Combined PET/CT scanners provide the high-resolution anatomic imaging capability of CT with the metabolic and physiologic information by PET, to offer a significant increase in information content useful for the diagnostician and radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, or other physician needing both anatomic detail and knowledge of disease extent. Nuclear medicine technologists at the forefront of PET should therefore have a good understanding of x-ray imaging physics and basic CT scanner operation, as covered by this 4-part series. After reading the first article on x-ray production, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with (a) the physical characteristics of x-rays relative to other electromagnetic radiations, including gamma-rays in terms of energy, wavelength, and frequency; (b) methods of x-ray production and the characteristics of the output x-ray spectrum; (c) components necessary to produce x-rays, including the x-ray tube/x-ray generator and the parameters that control x-ray quality (energy) and quantity; (d) x-ray production limitations caused by heating and the impact on image acquisition and clinical throughput; and (e) a glossary of terms to assist in the understanding of this information.

  17. X-Ray Optics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-20

    OF FUNDING NUMBERS Building 410 PORM POET TS OKUI Bolig FBDC2032648ELEMENT NO. NO. NO ACCESiON NO 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) X - Ray Optics Research...by block number) This report describes work conducted during the period I October 1987 through 30 April 1990, under Contract AFOSR-88-00l0, " X - Ray Optics Research...growth and structure of multilayer interfaces. This capability is central to the development of future materials for multilayer x - ray optics , because

  18. Graded X-ray Optics for Synchrotron Radiation Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erko, A; Veldkamp, M; Gudat, W; Abrosimov, N V; Rossolenko, S N; Shekhtman, V; Khasanov, S; Alex, V; Groth, S; Schröder, W; Vidal, B; Yakshin, A

    1998-05-01

    Using X-ray diffractometry and spectral measurements, the structure and properties of graded X-ray optical elements have been examined. Experimental and theoretical data on X-ray supermirrors, which were prepared by the magnetron sputtering technique using precise thickness control, are reported. Measurements on graded aperiodic Si(1-x)Ge(x) single crystals, which were grown by the Czochralski technique, are also presented. The lattice parameter of such a crystal changes almost linearly with increasing Ge concentration. The measurements indicate that Si(1-x)Ge(x) crystals with concentrations up to 7 at.% Ge can be grown with a quality comparable to that of pure Si crystals.

  19. Characterizing Complexity of Containerized Cargo X-ray Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guangxing [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, Harry [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glenn, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Divin, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Birrer, Nat [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    X-ray imaging can be used to inspect cargos imported into the United States. In order to better understand the performance of X-ray inspection systems, the X-ray characteristics (density, complexity) of cargo need to be quantified. In this project, an image complexity measure called integrated power spectral density (IPSD) was studied using both DNDO engineered cargos and stream-of-commerce (SOC) cargos. A joint distribution of cargo density and complexity was obtained. A support vector machine was used to classify the SOC cargos into four categories to estimate the relative fractions.

  20. How to Distinguish Neutron Star and Black Hole X-ray Binaries? Spectral Index and Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nickolai

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed strong correlations between 1-10 Hz frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources when seen in the low/hard state, the steep power-law (soft) state, and in transition between these states. In the soft state these index-QPO frequency correlations show a saturation of the photon index GAMMA approximately equal to 2.7 at high values of the low frequency nu(sub L). This saturation effect was previously identified as a black hole signature. In this paper we argue that this saturation does not occur, at least for one neutron star (NS) source 4U 1728-34, for which the index GAMMA monotonically increases with nu(sub L) to the values of 6 and higher. We base this conclusion on our analysis of approximately 1.5 Msec of RXTE archival data for 4U 1728-34. We reveal the spectral evolution of the Comptonized blackbody spectra when the source transitions from the hard to soft states. The hard state spectrum is a typical thermal Comptonization spectrum of the soft photons which originate in the disk and the NS outer photospheric layers. The hard state photon index is GAMMA approximately 2. The soft state spectrum consists of two blackbody components which are only slightly Comptonized. Thus we can claim (as expected from theory) that in NS sources thermal equilibrium is established for the soft state. To the contrary in BH sources, the equilibrium is never established due to the presence of the BH horizon. The emergent BH spectrum, even in the high/soft state, has a power law component. We also identify the low QPO frequency nu(sub L) as a fundamental frequency of the quasi-spherical component of the transition layer (presumably related to the corona and the NS and disk magnetic closed field lines). The lower frequency nu(sub SL) is identified as the frequency of oscillations of a quasi-cylindrical configuration of the TL (presumably related to the NS and disk magnetic

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... code: Phone no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  2. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation ... x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone ...

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    Full Text Available ... in evaluating the hips of children with congenital problems. top of page This page was reviewed on ... Exams Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety How to Read Your Radiology Report ...

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... procedure varies. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their ...

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    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... taking our brief survey: Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... may also be asked to remove jewelry, removable dental appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and ...

  2. X-ray crystallographic and 2D HETCOR NMR studies of 2-acetylthiophene- o-aminobenzoylhydrazone: synthesis and spectral studies of its transition metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudasi, Kalagouda B.; Shenoy, Rashmi V.; Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Patil, Siddappa A.; Nethaji, Munirathinam

    2006-05-01

    The coordination chemistry of the ligand 2-acetylthiophene- o-aminobenzoylhydrazone (ATABZ) with oxovanadium(IV), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and cadmium(II) has been studied wherein the complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moments, conductivity measurements, spectral (IR, 1D and 2D HETCOR NMR, EPR and UV-VIS) and thermal studies. The ligand ATABZ crystallizes in the orthorhombic system, space group Pca21 with lattice parameters a=8.5279(17) Å, b=5.8101(11) Å, c=25.720(5) Å, V=1274.3(4) Å 3 and Z=4. All the complexes are neutral in nature and possess four-coordinate geometry around the metal ion except oxovanadium(IV) complex, which is five-coordinate. The X-band EPR spectra of the copper(II) and oxovanadium(IV) complexes at both room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature have been recorded and their salient features are reported. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the ligand and complexes have been carried out.

  3. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  4. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  5. Why Do I Need X-Rays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects The History of ... Sets the Record Straight on Dental X-Rays Types of X-Rays X-Rays Help Predict Permanent ...

  6. Nanometer x-ray lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Khan Malek, Chantal G.

    1999-10-01

    New developments for x-ray nanomachining include pattern transfer onto non-planar surfaces coated with electrodeposited resists using synchrotron radiation x-rays through extremely high-resolution mask made by chemically assisted focused ion beam lithography. Standard UV photolithographic processes cannot maintain sub-micron definitions over large variation in feature topography. The ability of x-ray printing to pattern thin or thick layers of photoresist with high resolution on non-planar surfaces of large and complex topographies with limited diffraction and scattering effects and no substrate reflection is known and can be exploited for patterning microsystems with non-planar 3D geometries as well as multisided and multilayered substrates. Thin conformal coatings of electro-deposited positive and negative tone photoresist have been shown to be x-ray sensitive and accommodate sub-micro pattern transfer over surface of extreme topographical variations. Chemically assisted focused ion beam selective anisotropic erosion was used to fabricate x-ray masks directly. Masks with feature sizes less than 20 nm through 7 microns of gold were made on bulk silicon substrates and x-ray mask membranes. The technique is also applicable to other high density materials. Such masks enable the primary and secondary patterning and/or 3D machining of Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems over large depths or complex relief and the patterning of large surface areas with sub-optically dimensioned features.

  7. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  8. Adjustment of a goniometer for X-rays optics calibration in the spectral range 1.5-20 KeV; Mise au point d`un goniometre pour l`etalonnage d`optiques X dans le domaine d`energie 1.5-20 KeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legistre, S.

    1992-10-01

    The aim of this memoir is the adjustment of a ({theta}, 2{theta}) goniometer coupled to X-rays source to calibrate mirrors (single layers like C, Ni, Au, etc... and multilayers like C/W, Si/W, etc...) in the spectral range 1.5 - 20 keV. For each kind of tested optics the adjustment of the goniometer include the procedure alignment of the different components (X-ray source, collimation slits, optics, detectors) and the first reflectivity measurements. Those measurements are compared those realized at LURE, using synchrotron radiation provided by SUPER ACO storage ring, and to a theoretical simulation.

  9. The X-ray properties of z 6 luminous quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, R.; Vignali, C.; Gilli, R.; Moretti, A.; Brandt, W. N.

    2017-07-01

    We present a systematic analysis of X-ray archival data of all the 29 quasars (QSOs) at z> 5.5 observed so far with Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift-XRT, including the most-distant quasar ever discovered, ULAS J1120+0641 (z = 7.08). This study allows us to place constraints on the mean spectral properties of the primordial population of luminous Type 1 (unobscured) quasars. Eighteen quasars are detected in the X-ray band, and we provide spectral-fitting results for their X-ray properties, while for the others we provide upper limits to their soft (0.5-2.0 keV) X-ray flux. We measured the power-law photon index and derived an upper limit to the column density for the five quasars (J1306+0356, J0100+2802, J1030+0524, J1148+5251, J1120+0641) with the best spectra (>30 net counts in the 0.5-7.0 keV energy range) and find that they are consistent with values from the literature and lower-redshift quasars. By stacking the spectra of ten quasars detected by Chandra in the redshift range 5.7 ≤ z ≤ 6.1 we find a mean X-ray power-law photon index of Γ = 1.92-0.27+0.28 and a neutral intrinsic absorption column density of NH ≤ 1023 cm-2. These results suggest that the X-ray spectral properties of luminous quasars have not evolved up to z ≈ 6. We also derived the optical-X-ray spectral slopes (αox) of our sample and combined them with those of previous works, confirming that αox strongly correlates with UV monochromatic luminosity at 2500 Å. These results strengthen the non-evolutionary scenario for the spectral properties of luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  10. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, Gabriella [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Denes, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gruener, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lessner, Elianne [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2012-08-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) X-ray and neutron user facilities attract more than 12,000 researchers each year to perform cutting-edge science at these state-of-the-art sources. While impressive breakthroughs in X-ray and neutron sources give us the powerful illumination needed to peer into the nano- to mesoscale world, a stumbling block continues to be the distinct lag in detector development, which is slowing progress toward data collection and analysis. Urgently needed detector improvements would reveal chemical composition and bonding in 3-D and in real time, allow researchers to watch “movies” of essential life processes as they happen, and make much more efficient use of every X-ray and neutron produced by the source The immense scientific potential that will come from better detectors has triggered worldwide activity in this area. Europe in particular has made impressive strides, outpacing the United States on several fronts. Maintaining a vital U.S. leadership in this key research endeavor will require targeted investments in detector R&D and infrastructure. To clarify the gap between detector development and source advances, and to identify opportunities to maximize the scientific impact of BES user facilities, a workshop on Neutron and X-ray Detectors was held August 1-3, 2012, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Participants from universities, national laboratories, and commercial organizations from the United States and around the globe participated in plenary sessions, breakout groups, and joint open-discussion summary sessions. Sources have become immensely more powerful and are now brighter (more particles focused onto the sample per second) and more precise (higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution). To fully utilize these source advances, detectors must become faster, more efficient, and more discriminating. In supporting the mission of today’s cutting-edge neutron and X-ray sources, the workshop identified six detector research challenges

  11. Uhuru observations of 4U 1608-52 - The 'steady' X-ray source associated with the X-ray burst source in Norma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H.; Chaisson, L. J.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Matilsky, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented for the X-ray source 4U 1608-52, summarizing its light curve, location, and spectral parameters. Evidence is presented showing that this source is the 'steady' X-ray counterpart of the X-ray burst source in Norma. The spectrum of the 'steady' source is compared with the spectrum observed during two bursts, and it is noted that there is substantially more low-energy absorption during the bursts. The 'steady' source spectral data are used to examine the optical data, and it is concluded that if the X-ray spectrum is thermal, then a globular-cluster counterpart probably would have been detected (whereas none has been). Further X-ray and optical observations are suggested for this source, since an optical identification may be central in determining whether all X-ray bursts have a common origin and if this origin requires a globular-cluster environment.

  12. High precision x ray lithographic masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, R. F.; Browning, R.

    1992-09-01

    This contract period was first concerned with winding up the projects on the embedded X-ray Mask structure and on the 'quantum lithography' idea. As a result of developments elsewhere it became clear that among the most critical issues in achieving high precision X-ray masks were those associated with achieving high precision in both feature size and feature placement in electron beam lithography. Most of the effort in this reporting period was aimed at achieving precision in feature size; notably an attack on the problem of proximity effects. There were two approaches: (1) A short term approach aimed at correcting effects in existing electron beam pattern generators (notably the ETEC MEBES 3 and 4) for feature sizes down 500 nm; and (2) A long term approach aimed at avoiding proximity effects by employing low energy electron exposure for feature size below 500 nm.

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. ( ...

  14. Extreme UV and X-ray scattering measurements from a rough LiF crystal surface characterized by electron micrography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alehyane; Arbaoui; Barchewitz

    1989-01-01

    XUV and X-ray scattering by a LiF crystal is measured. The angular distribution of the scattered radiation (ADSR) reveals characteristic features, side peaks or asymmetry. The surface of the sample is statistically characterized by a microdensitometer analysis of electron micrographs resolving...... of the ADSR features in terms of the modulation of the surface power spectral density function associated with the microroughness by an optical factor. The possibility of obtaining short scale roughness characterization from XUV or X-ray measurements is discussed...

  15. High Angular Resolution and Lightweight X-Ray Optics for Astronomical Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Blake, P. N.; Chan, K. W.; Evans, T. C.; Hong, M.; Jones, W. D.; Jones, W. D.; Kolos, L. D.; Mazzarella, J. M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    X-ray optics with both high angular resolution and lightweight is essential for further progress in x-ray astronomy. High angular resolution is important in avoiding source confusion and reducing background to enable the observation of the most distant objects of the early Universe. It is also important in enabling the use of gratings to achieve high spectral resolution to study, among other things, the myriad plasmas that exist in planetary, stellar, galactic environments, as well as interplanetary, inter-stellar, and inter-galactic media. Lightweight is important for further increase in effective photon collection area, because x-ray observations must take place on space platforms and the amount of mass that can be launched into space has always been very limited and is expected to continue to be very limited. This paper describes an x-ray optics development program and reports on its status that meets these two requirements. The objective of this program is to enable Explorer type missions in the near term and to enable flagship missions in the long term.

  16. Quantum effets in nonresonant X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowik, Jan Malte

    2015-11-15

    Due to their versatile properties, X rays are a unique tool to investigate the structure and dynamics of matter. X-ray scattering is the fundamental principle of many imaging techniques. Examples are X-ray crystallography, which recently celebrated one hundred years and is currently the leading method in structure determination of proteins, as well as X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI), which is an imaging technique with countless applications in biology, medicine, etc. The technological development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) has brought X-ray imaging at the edge of a new scientific revolution. XFELs offer ultrashort X-ray pulses with unprecedented high X-ray fluence and excellent spatial coherence properties. These properties make them an outstanding radiation source for X-ray scattering experiments, providing ultrafast temporal resolution as well as atomic spatial resolution. However, the radiation-matter interaction in XFEL experiments also advances into a novel regime. This demands a sound theoretical fundament to describe and explore the new experimental possibilities. This dissertation is dedicated to the theoretical study of nonresonant X-ray scattering. As the first topic, I consider the near-field imaging by propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI). I devise a novel theory of PCI, in which radiation and matter are quantized. Remarkably, the crucial interference term automatically excludes contributions from inelastic scattering. This explains the success of the classical description thus far. The second topic of the thesis is the X-ray imaging of coherent electronic motion, where quantum effects become particularly apparent. The electron density of coherent electronic wave packets - important in charge transfer and bond breaking - varies in time, typically on femto- or attosecond time scales. In the near future, XFELs are envisaged to provide attosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility for time-resolved ultrafast X-ray scattering

  17. Soft x-ray excitonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulet, A.; Bertrand, J. B.; Klostermann, T.; Guggenmos, A.; Karpowicz, N.; Goulielmakis, E.

    2017-09-01

    The dynamic response of excitons in solids is central to modern condensed-phase physics, material sciences, and photonic technologies. However, study and control have hitherto been limited to photon energies lower than the fundamental band gap. Here we report application of attosecond soft x-ray and attosecond optical pulses to study the dynamics of core-excitons at the L2,3 edge of Si in silicon dioxide (SiO2). This attosecond x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (AXANES) technique enables direct probing of the excitons’ quasiparticle character, tracking of their subfemtosecond relaxation, the measurement of excitonic polarizability, and observation of dark core-excitonic states. Direct measurement and control of core-excitons in solids lay the foundation of x-ray excitonics.

  18. X-ray tensor tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  19. X-ray-selected broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M. J.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M.; Corral, A.; Ebrero, J.; Esquej, P.; Krumpe, M.; Mateos, S.; Rosen, S.; Schwope, A.; Streblyanska, A.; Symeonidis, M.; Tedds, J. A.; Watson, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray-selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index α = 0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, αOX, of the X-ray-selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of = 1.69 ± 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray-selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of a similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically selected BALQSOs typically have much larger αOX and so are characterized as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray spectra are absorbed by a similar degree to that seen in optically selected BALQSO samples; X-ray absorption appears to be ubiquitous in BALQSOs, but X-ray weakness is not. We argue that BALQSOs sit at one end of a spectrum of X-ray absorption properties in QSOs related to the degree of ultraviolet absorption in C IV 1550 Å.

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dislocations. In elderly or patients with osteoporosis, a hip fracture may be clearly seen on a CT scan, while it may be barely seen, if at all, on a hip x-ray. For suspected spine injury or other ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ... This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation ... x-ray images are among the clearest, most detailed views of ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... may be placed over your pelvic area or breasts when feasible to protect from ... chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

  5. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest way for your doctor ... shin), ankle or foot. top of page What are some common uses of the ... bones or joint dislocation. demonstrate proper alignment and stabilization of bony ...

  7. X-rays and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ... Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Sponsored by ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluated). MRI can also detect subtle or occult fractures or bone bruises (also called bone contusions or microfractures) not visible on x-ray images. CT is being used widely to assess trauma patients in ... fractures, subtle fractures or dislocations. In elderly or patients ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pelvis and an image is recorded on special film or a computer. This image shows the bones of the pelvis, which include the two hip bones, plus the sacrum and the coccyx (tailbone). The X-ray image is black and white. Dense body parts that block the passage of the X- ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing ... imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... way for your doctor to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little ... way for a physician to view and assess bone injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a physician to view and assess bone injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes and other locations, making it ...

  15. Intense picosecond x-rays from structured targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulcsar, Gabor

    Laser plasmas from a new type of nanostructured surface are studied. This nanowire surface is especially useful as a very high absorption target for high power (1 TW) subpicosecond laser-matter interaction. The ensemble of oriented 10-200 nm metallic fibers of this material have linear absorption of 1 m m light greater than 95%. When irradiated by 1 ps pulses at intensities up to 1017 W/cm-2, these targets produce a pulse of x-rays (average energy > 1.5 keV) 30 times more efficiently than do uniform solid targets, while preserving several-picosecond emission times. X-ray conversion efficiencies from the nanowire target and from previously investigated grating and `smoke' targets are compared to those of flat targets for various angles of incidence and polarizations. Streak camera results show that a bright picosecond measure x-ray pulse is emitted from the near-solid density plasma created from the nanowire target. The measured x-ray pulse length is resolution-limited ( glass system is based on a feedback-controlled mode-locked oscillator capable of providing high contrast 1 ps pulses at a wavelength of 1.054 m m, with energies up to 5 m J/pulse. The characteristics of the CPA system are described. A new detector was developed to measure absolute x-ray yield, in various spectral ranges, radiated from the solid-density plasma. A calibrated silicon PIN photodiode connected to a charge-sensitive amplifier circuit allows x-ray yield measurements from picosecond pulses. If properly filtered the detector can measure the amount of x-rays radiated in a narrow spectral range. The electrical and spectral characteristics of the PIN photodiode detectors are given.

  16. Understanding the Nature of X-ray Weak Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, William

    Eddington ratio. Specifically, we will measure if/how the fraction of X-ray weak quasars declines when considering quasar samples with increasing C IV emission-line equivalent width. X-ray spectral measurements will also be used to search for heavy X-ray absorption and Compton-reflection signatures occurring when our line of sight intercepts the thick inner disk. These measurements will clarify if inner-disk shielding plays a broader role in setting the high-ionization emission-line strengths of quasars. Furthermore, our new sample of X-ray weak quasars will let us identify reliably the UV emission-line, UV continuum, and spectral energy distribution properties that trace X-ray weakness, so that physical modeling of identified connections can proceed with confidence. There is mounting evidence that some X-ray weak quasars, including a significant fraction of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, simply lack the means to produce a typical level of X-ray emission. We will utilize both individual spectroscopic and X-ray stacking analyses to determine the frequency of BAL quasars with intrinsically weak Xray emission, thereby clarifying the overall importance of intrinsic X-ray weakness for the launching of quasar winds. Utilizing quasars with multiple X-ray observations, we will also assess how often extreme X-ray variability causes transient X-ray weakness. Finally, given our past results, we expect our greatly improved sample to reveal new unexpected X-ray weak quasars that can provide fresh insights. The proposed program will probe the nature of black holes, explore the extreme physical conditions of the Universe, and investigate outstanding issues in the development of galaxies over cosmic time. It thereby directly addresses NASA's strategic objective to discover how the Universe works, and how it began and evolved (Objective 1.6 of the 2014 NASA Strategic Plan).

  17. RADIATION LOAD IN THE PROCESS OF X-RAY DIAGNOSTICS WITH THE USE OF MICROFOCUS METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    N. N. Potrakhov; A. Ju. Griaznov; A. N. Barkovsky

    2008-01-01

    The article regards the perspectives of microfocus X-ray equipment implementation in the medical X-ray diagnostics. It demonstrates the advantages of suggested equipment in comparison with traditional X-ray diagnostic machines with the big focus in the terms of dental X-ray diagnostics. The article shows the significant patient's exposure doses reduction with improving of diagnostic quality of the obtained images. It emphasizes the need of the regulatory basis of the enhancement for microfocu...

  18. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  19. Determination of diagnostic X ray spectra scattered by a phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehrenbacher, G.; Panzer, W.; Regulla, D. [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. of Radiation Protection; Tesfu, K. [Addis Ababa Univ. (Ethiopia)

    1997-12-01

    Photon spectra are reported that result from the scatter of diagnostic X rays at an appropriate water phantom that represents a patient. The tube voltages considered are between 52 kV and 110 kV, the scatter angles from 10{sup o} to 142{sup o} to the normal radiation incidence direction. All spectral measurements were performed with a high-purity germanium detector. Spectral photon fluences are computed from the measured pulse height distribution by using an unfolding procedure. The required response functions of the detection system were obtained by using Monte Carlo methods. Reference is made to a catalogue compiling 35 spectra of scattered X rays in diagnostics resulting from a human substitute, together with information on relevant primary field parameters as well as air kerma for the scattered X rays. (Author).

  20. A simple X-ray emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroaki; Ono, Ryoichi; Hirai, Atsuhiko; Hosokawa, Yoshinori; Kawai, Jun

    2005-07-01

    A compact X-ray emission instrument is made, and the X-ray spectra are measured by changing the applied electric potential. Strong soft X-rays are observed when evacuating roughly and applying a high voltage to an insulator settled in this device. The X-ray intensity is higher as the applied voltage is increased. A light-emitting phenomenon is observed when this device emits X-rays. The present X-ray emitter is made of a small cylinder with a radius of 20 mm and a height of 50 mm. This X-ray generator has a potential to be used as an X-ray source in an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

  1. Understanding X-ray Reflection as a Probe of Accreting Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are some of the most luminous objects we see in the Universe, powered by the accretion of matter onto a supermassive black hole in the centre of a galaxy, yet many of the physical processes by which the energy is released and injected into the surroundings remain a mystery. X-rays are emitted from a ‘corona’ of energetic particles surrounding the black hole and as well as being observed directly, they are seen to be reflected from the accreting disc, producing a number of spectral features including emission lines that are broadened by relativistic effects in the proximity of the black hole. In my thesis, I develop methods through which detailed measurement of the reflected X-rays from the accretion disc can be used to probe the innermost regions of accretion flow and corona, right down to the innermost stable orbit and the event horizon. Novel spectral analysis techniques allow us to reconstruct, from the observed relativistic X-ray reflection spectrum the spatially resolved illumination pattern of the accretion disc and will discuss how comparing this to the results of systematic general relativistic ray tracing simulations I have developed, we are able to constrain the location and geometry of the X-ray emitting corona and understand the dramatic change of the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0707-495 into an extremely low flux state in terms of a collapse in the corona. I will discuss how measurements of the X-ray variability, specifically the reverberation time lags that are observed between variability in the directly observed X-rays from the corona and those reflected from the accretion disc add a further dimension to the study of accreting black holes, letting us not only build up a three dimensional image of the immediate vicinity of the black hole but also to probe mechanisms by which the energy is released from the accretion flow; techniques that will let us exploit not just current instrumentation but future proposed X-ray

  2. Effective X-ray beam size measurements of an X-ray tube and polycapillary X-ray lens system using a scanning X-ray fluorescence method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gherase, Mihai R., E-mail: mgherase@csufresno.edu; Vargas, Andres Felipe

    2017-03-15

    Size measurements of an X-ray beam produced by an integrated polycapillary X-ray lens (PXL) and X-ray tube system were performed by means of a scanning X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) method using three different metallic wires. The beam size was obtained by fitting the SXRF data with the analytical convolution between a Gaussian and a constant functions. For each chemical element in the wire an effective energy was calculated based on the incident X-ray spectrum and its photoelectric cross section. The proposed method can be used to measure the effective X-ray beam size in XRF microscopy studies.

  3. X-ray luminescence of ZnSCdS:Au,Cu phosphor using X-ray beams for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandarakis, I.; Cavouras, D.; Nomicos, C. D.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the X-ray luminescence and imaging performance of phosphor screens prepared from ZnSCdS:Au,Cu. Absolute efficiency, X-ray luminescence efficiency, detector optical gain, and gain transfer function were experimentally determined. Theoretical models were also employed to fit experimental data and to determine optical properties of the phosphor material. Additionally, the emission spectrum of ZnSCdS:Au,Cu was measured and its compatibility with the spectral sensitivity of radiographic optical detectors (films, photodiodes) was determined. Results showed that ZnSCdS:Au,Cu is an efficient phosphor exhibiting high intrinsic X-ray to light conversion efficiency (0.17) and an excellent spectral compatibility (0.9) with amorphous silicon photodiodes, used in optical detectors of modern digital radiography systems.

  4. Comprehensive study of hexarhenium cluster complex Na4[{Re6Te8}(CN)6] - In terms of a new promising luminescent and X-ray contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikova, Anna A; Solovieva, Anastasiya O; Ivanov, Anton A; Trifonova, Kristina E; Pozmogova, Tatiana N; Tsygankova, Alphiya R; Smolentsev, Anton I; Kretov, Evgeniy I; Sergeevichev, David S; Shestopalov, Michael A; Mironov, Yuri V; Shestopalov, Alexander M; Poveshchenko, Alexander F; Shestopalova, Lidiya V

    2017-02-01

    Octahedral rhenium cluster complexes may have considerable potential as therapeutic and diagnostic drugs due to their luminescent and X-ray contrast properties, as well as their ability to generate singlet oxygen upon photoirradiation. However, their potential biological effects and toxicity in vitro and in vivo are rather far from being understood. Thus, the aim of our research was to study cytotoxicity, intracellular localization and cellular uptake/elimination kinetics in vitro, biodistribution and acute intravenous toxicity in vivo of a complex Na 4 [{Re 6 Te 8 }(CN) 6 ] as the promising compound for biomedical application. The results have demonstrated that the complex penetrates through cell membranes with the maximum accumulation in cells in 24h of incubation and have low toxic effects in vitro and in vivo. The median lethal dose (LD 50 ) of intravenously administrated Na 4 [{Re 6 Te 8 }(CN) 6 ] is equal to 1082±83mg/kg. These findings will be useful for future development of cluster-based agents for different biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diffractive X-ray Telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted space- time in the immediate vicinity of the super...

  6. The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feroci, M.; Herder, J. W. den; Bozzo, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) was studied within ESA M3 Cosmic Vision framework and participated in the final down-selection for a launch slot in 2022-2024. Thanks to the unprecedented combination of effective area and spectral resolution of its main instrument, LOFT will study...

  7. The Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feroci, M.; Stella, L.; van der Klis, M.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Hernanz, M.; Hudec, R.; Santangelo, A.; Walton, D.; Zdziarski, A.; Barret, D.; Belloni, T.; Braga, J.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Campana, S.; den Herder, J.W.; Huovelin, J.; Israel, G.L.; Pohl, M.; Ray, P.; Vacchi, A.; Zane, S.; Argan, A.; Attinà, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bozzo, E.; Campana, R.; Chakrabarty, D.; Costa, E.; De Rosa, A.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cosimo, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Haas, D.; Jonker, P.; Korpela, S.; Labanti, C.; Malcovati, P.; Mignani, R.; Muleri, F.; Rapisarda, M.; Rashevsky, A.; Rea, N.; Rubini, A.; Tenzer, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winter, B.; Wood, K.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Abramowicz, M.A.; Alpar, M.A.; Altamirano, D.; Alvarez, J.M.; Amati, L.; Amoros, C.; Antonelli, L.A.; Artigue, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bachetti, M.; Baldazzi, G.; Barbera, M.; Barbieri, C.; Basa, S.; Baykal, A.; Belmont, R.; Boirin, L.; Bonvicini, V.; Burderi, L.; Bursa, M.; Cabanac, C.; Cackett, E.; Caliandro, G.A.; Casella, P.; Chaty, S.; Chenevez, J.; Coe, M.J.; Collura, A.; Corongiu, A.; Covino, S.; Cusumano, G.; D'Amico, F.; Dall'Osso, S.; De Martino, D.; De Paris, G.; Di Persio, G.; Di Salvo, T.; Done, C.; Dovčiak, M.; Drago, A.; Ertan, U.; Fabiani, S.; Falanga, M.; Fender, R.; Ferrando, P.; Della Monica Ferreira, D.; Fraser, G.; Frontera, F.; Fuschino, F.; Galvez, J.L.; Gandhi, P.; Giommi, P.; Godet, O.; Göǧüş, E.; Goldwurm, A.; Götz, D.; Grassi, M.; Guttridge, P.; Hakala, P.; Henri, G.; Hermsen, W.; Horak, J.; Hornstrup, A.; in 't Zand, J.J.M.; Isern, J.; Kalemci, E.; Kanbach, G.; Karas, V.; Kataria, D.; Kennedy, T.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kokkotas, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Krolik, J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuvvetli, I.; Kylafis, N.; Lattimer, J.M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Leahy, D.; Lebrun, F.; Lin, D.; Lund, N.; Maccarone, T.; Malzac, J.; Marisaldi, M.; Martindale, A.; Mastropietro, M.; McClintock, J.; McHardy, I.; Mendez, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Miller, M.C.; Mineo, T.; Morelli, E.; Morsink, S.; Motch, C.; Motta, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Naletto, G.; Neustroev, V.; Nevalainen, J.; Olive, J.F.; Orio, M.; Orlandini, M.; Orleanski, P.; Ozel, F.; Pacciani, L.; Paltani, S.; Papadakis, I.E.; Papitto, A.; Patruno, A.; Pellizzoni, A.; Petráček, V.; Petri, J.; Petrucci, P.O.; Phlips, B.; Picolli, L.; Possenti, A.; Psaltis, D.; Rambaud, D.; Reig, P.; Remillard, R.; Rodriguez, J.; Romano, P.; Romanova, M.; Schanz, T.; Schmid, C.; Segreto, A.; Shearer, A.; Smith, A.; Smith, P.J.; Soffitta, P.; Stergioulas, N.; Stolarski, M.; Stuchlik, Z.; Tiengo, A.; Torres, D.; Török, G.; Turolla, R.; Uttley, P.; Vaughan, S.; Vercellone, S.; Waters, R.; Watts, A.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Webb, N.; Wilms, J.; Zampieri, L.; Zezas, A.; Ziolkowski, J.

    2012-01-01

    High-time-resolution X-ray observations of compact objects provide direct access to strong-field gravity, to the equation of state of ultradense matter and to black hole masses and spins. A 10 m2-class instrument in combination with good spectral resolution is required to exploit the relevant

  8. The Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feroci, M.; Stella, L.; van der Klis, M.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Hudec, R.; Santangelo, A.; Walton, D.; Zdziarski, A.; Barret, D.; Belloni, T.; Braga, J.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Campana, S.; den Herder, J.-W.; Huovelin, J.; Israel, G. L.; Pohl, M.; Ray, P.; Vacchi, A.; Zane, S.; Argan, A.; Attinà, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bozzo, E.; Campana, R.; Chakrabarty, D.; Costa, E.; De Rosa, A.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cosimo, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Haas, D.; Jonker, P.; Korpela, S.; Labanti, C.; Malcovati, P.; Mignani, R.; Muleri, F.; Rapisarda, M.; Rashevsky, A.; Rea, N.; Rubini, A.; Tenzer, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winter, B.; Wood, K.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Abramowicz, M. A.; Alpar, M. A.; Altamirano, D.; Alvarez, J. M.; Amati, L.; Amoros, C.; Antonelli, L. A.; Artigue, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bachetti, M.; Baldazzi, G.; Barbera, M.; Barbieri, C.; Basa, S.; Baykal, A.; Belmont, R.; Boirin, L.; Bonvicini, V.; Burderi, L.; Bursa, M.; Cabanac, C.; Cackett, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Casella, P.; Chaty, S.; Chenevez, J.; Coe, M. J.; Collura, A.; Corongiu, A.; Covino, S.; Cusumano, G.; D'Amico, F.; Dall'Osso, S.; De Martino, D.; De Paris, G.; Di Persio, G.; Di Salvo, T.; Done, C.; Dovčiak, M.; Drago, A.; Ertan, U.; Fabiani, S.; Falanga, M.; Fender, R.; Ferrando, P.; Della Monica Ferreira, D.; Fraser, G.; Frontera, F.; Fuschino, F.; Galvez, J. L.; Gandhi, P.; Giommi, P.; Godet, O.; Göǧüş, E.; Goldwurm, A.; Götz, D.; Grassi, M.; Guttridge, P.; Hakala, P.; Henri, G.; Hermsen, W.; Horak, J.; Hornstrup, A.; in't Zand, J. J. M.; Isern, J.; Kalemci, E.; Kanbach, G.; Karas, V.; Kataria, D.; Kennedy, T.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kokkotas, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Krolik, J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuvvetli, I.; Kylafis, N.; Lattimer, J. M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Leahy, D.; Lebrun, F.; Lin, D.; Lund, N.; Maccarone, T.; Malzac, J.; Marisaldi, M.; Martindale, A.; Mastropietro, M.; McClintock, J.; McHardy, I.; Mendez, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Miller, M. C.; Mineo, T.; Morelli, E.; Morsink, S.; Motch, C.; Motta, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Naletto, G.; Neustroev, V.; Nevalainen, J.; Olive, J. F.; Orio, M.; Orlandini, M.; Orleanski, P.; Ozel, F.; Pacciani, L.; Paltani, S.; Papadakis, I.; Papitto, A.; Patruno, A.; Pellizzoni, A.; Petráček, V.; Petri, J.; Petrucci, P. O.; Phlips, B.; Picolli, L.; Possenti, A.; Psaltis, D.; Rambaud, D.; Reig, P.; Remillard, R.; Rodriguez, J.; Romano, P.; Romanova, M.; Schanz, T.; Schmid, C.; Segreto, A.; Shearer, A.; Smith, A.; Smith, P. J.; Soffitta, P.; Stergioulas, N.; Stolarski, M.; Stuchlik, Z.; Tiengo, A.; Torres, D.; Török, G.; Turolla, R.; Uttley, P.; Vaughan, S.; Vercellone, S.; Waters, R.; Watts, A.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Webb, N.; Wilms, J.; Zampieri, L.; Zezas, A.; Ziolkowski, J.

    2012-01-01

    High-time-resolution X-ray observations of compact objects provide direct access to strong-field gravity, to the equation of state of ultradense matter and to black hole masses and spins. A 10 m(2)-class instrument in combination with good spectral resolution is required to exploit the relevant

  9. A Comprehensive X-Ray Absorption Model for Atomic Oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorzyca, T.W.; Bautista, M.A.; Hasoglu, M.F.; García, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J.S.; Kallman, T.R.; Manson, S.T.; Mendoza, C.; Raassen, A.J.J.; de Vries, C.P.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-01-01

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of O I for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects,

  10. X-ray interferometry development at the Advanced Photon Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.-K.

    1999-11-22

    In this paper, we report initial test results of a four-bounce Bragg reflection X-ray interferometer at 7.46 keV and, for the first time to our knowledge, at the higher energy of 14.91 keV where the spectral acceptance is much smaller.

  11. Crab Nebula Variations in Hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The Crab Nebula was surprisingly variable from 2001-2010, with less variability before 2001 and since mid-2010. We presented evidence for spectral softening from RXTE, Swift/BAT, and Fermi GBM during the mid-2008-2010 flux decline. We see no clear connections between the hard X-ray variations and the GeV flares

  12. The impact of an ICME on the Jovian X-ray aurora

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, William R.; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Elsner, Ronald F.; Vogt, Marissa F.; Lamy, Laurent; Ford, Peter G.; Coates, Andrew J.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Jackman, Caitriona M.; Nichols, Jonathan D.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Varsani, Ali; Kimura, Tomoki; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Jasinski, Jamie M.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We report the first Jupiter X-ray observations planned to coincide with an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME). At the predicted ICME arrival time, we observed a factor of ∼8 enhancement in Jupiter's X-ray aurora. Within 1.5 h of this enhancement, intense bursts of non-Io decametric radio emission occurred. Spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics also varied between ICME arrival and another X-ray observation two days later. Gladstone et al. (2002) disco...

  13. Coherent methods in X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorobtsov, Oleg

    2017-05-15

    X-ray radiation has been used to study structural properties of materials for more than a hundred years. Construction of extremely coherent and bright X-ray radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) and latest generationstorage rings led to rapid development of experimental methods relying on high radiation coherence. These methods allow to perform revolutionary studies in a wide range of fields from solid state physics to biology. In this thesis I focus on several important problems connected with the coherent methods. The first part considers applications of dynamical diffraction theory on crystals to studies with coherent X-ray radiation. It presents the design of a high-resolution spectrometer for free electron lasers that should allow to resolve spectral structure of individual FEL pulses. The spectrometer is based on the principle of dynamical diffraction focusing. The knowledge of individual FEL pulse spectra is necessary for understanding FEL longitudinal coherence. In the same part I present quasi-kinematical approximation to dynamical theory which allows to treat analytically phase effects observed in X-ray coherent imaging on nanocrystals. These effects may play a big role when methods such as ptychography are used to study crystalline samples. The second part deals with measurements of FEL coherence properties using intensity - intensity interferometry. Results of several experiments performed at FELs FLASH and LCLS are revealed in this section. I have developed models and theories to explain the behavior observed in experiments on FLASH. These models allowed to extract information about external positional jitter of FEL pulses and secondary beams present in FEL radiation. In the LCLS experiment the Hanbury Brown and Twiss type interferometry was performed on Bragg peaks from colloidal crystal. This did not require additional measurements without the sample and information was extracted directly from diffraction patterns. Therefore intensity

  14. Analyzing the Spectra of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Michael

    This proposal seeks funding for the analysis of accretion-powered X-ray pulsar spectra from NASA/ HEASARC archived X-ray data. Spectral modeling of accreting X-ray pulsars can tell us a great deal about the physical conditions in and near high mass X-ray binary systems. Such systems have accretion flows where plasma is initially channeled from an accretion disk by the strong neutron star magnetic field, eventually falling onto the magnetic polar cap of the neutron star compact object. Many of these accreting X-ray pulsars have X-ray spectra that consist of broad power-law continua with superposed cyclotron resonant scattering features indicating magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. The energies of these cyclotron line features have recently been shown to vary with X-ray luminosity in a number of sources such as Her X-1 and V 0332+53, a phenomenon not well understood. Another recent development is the relatively new analytic model for the spectral continuum formation in accretion-powered pulsar systems developed by Becker & Wolff. In their formalism the accretion flows are assumed to go through radiation- dominated radiative shocks and settle onto the neutron star surface. The radiation field consists of strongly Comptonized bremsstrahlung emission from the entire plasma, Comptonized cyclotron emission from the de-excitations of Landau-excited electrons in the neutron star magnetic field, and Comptonized black-body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface. We seek to develop the data analysis tools to apply this model framework to the X-ray data from a wide set of sources to make progress characterizing the basic accretion properties (e.g., magnetic field strength, plasma temperatures, polar cap size, accretion rate per unit area, dominance of bulk vs. thermal Comptonization) as well as understanding the variations of the cyclotron line energies with X-ray luminosity. The three major goals of our proposed work are as follows: In the first year

  15. The very soft X-ray emission of X-ray-faint early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, S.; Fabbiano, G.

    1994-01-01

    surface brightness distribution. The present data may suggest that the X-ray surface brightness is more extended than the optical profile. In this case, a straightforward explanation in terms of stellar sources could not be satisfactory. The available data can be better explained with three different contributions: a very soft component of stellar origin, a hard component from X-ray binaries, and an approximately 0.6 keV hot ISM. The latter can explain the extended X-ray surface brightness profile, if the galaxy has a dark-to-luminous mass ratio of 9, with the dark matter very broadly distributed, and a SN Ia explosive rate of approximately 0.6 the Tammann rate.

  16. The X-Ray Integral Field Unit and the Athena mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Luigi; Barret, Didier; Den herder, Jan-willem

    The Athena+ mission concept is designed to implement the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme submitted to the European Space Agency in response to the call for White Papers for the definition of the L2 and L3 missions of its science program. The Athena+ science payload consists of a large aperture high angular resolution X-ray optics and twelve meters away, two interchangeable focal plane instruments: the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) and the Wide Field Imager (WFI). The X-IFU is a cryogenic X-ray spectrometer, based on a large array of Transition Edge Sensors (TES), offering 2.5 eV spectral resolution, with ˜ 5’’ pixels, over a field of view of 5 arc minutes in diameter. In this talk, we briefly describe the Athena+ mission concept and the X-IFU performance being driven by science requirements. We then present the X-IFU detector and readout electronics principles, the current design of the focal plane assembly, the cooling chain and review the global architecture design. Finally, we describe the current performance estimates, in terms of effective area, particle background rejection, count rate capability and velocity measurements. Finally, we emphasize on the latest technology developments concerning TES array fabrication, spectral resolution and readout performance achieved to show that significant progresses are being accomplished towards the demanding X-IFU requirements.

  17. The X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) for Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Laurent; Barret, Didier; Willem den Herder, Jan; Piro, Luigi; Cledassou, Rodolphe; Pointecouteau, Etienne; Peille, Philippe; Pajot, Francois; Arnaud, Monique; Pigot, Claude; hide

    2014-01-01

    Athena is designed to implement the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme selected by the European Space Agency for the second large mission of its Cosmic Vision program. The Athena science payload consists of a large aperture high angular resolution X-ray optics (2 m2 at 1 keV) and twelve meters away, two interchangeable focal plane instruments: the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) and the Wide Field Imager. The X-IFU is a cryogenic X-ray spectrometer, based on a large array of Transition Edge Sensors (TES), oering 2.5 eV spectral resolution, with approximately 5" pixels, over a field of view of 5' in diameter. In this paper, we present the X-IFU detector and readout electronics principles, some elements of the current design for the focal plane assembly and the cooling chain. We describe the current performance estimates, in terms of spectral resolution, effective area, particle background rejection and count rate capability. Finally, we emphasize on the technology developments necessary to meet the demanding requirements of the X-IFU, both for the sensor, readout electronics and cooling chain.

  18. X-ray morphology after vagotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeger, R.; Vogel, H.

    1983-12-01

    Vagotomy is often followed by changes in the shape and motoric function of the stomach which usually return to normal in the course of a few months. The morphological changes which are typical for the different surgical techniques are described on the basis of references and the authors' own findings. X-ray examination contributes towards distinguishing regular postoperative changes from complications. The necessary long-term follow-ups to discover any possible recurrence of ulcers should be supplemented by gastroscopy.

  19. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, F; Kemp, G E; Regan, S P; Barrios, M A; Pino, J; Scott, H; Ayers, S; Chen, H; Emig, J; Colvin, J D; Bedzyk, M; Shoup, M J; Agliata, A; Yaakobi, B; Marshall, F J; Hamilton, R A; Jaquez, J; Farrell, M; Nikroo, A; Fournier, K B

    2014-11-01

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the Omega laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2-18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  20. Warm, Dense Plasma Characterization by X-ray Thomson Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Cauble, R C; Lee, R W; Edwards, J E; Degroot, J S

    2000-07-18

    We describe how the powerful technique of spectrally resolved Thomson scattering can be extended to the x-ray regime, for direct measurements of the ionization state, density, temperature, and the microscopic behavior of dense cool plasmas. Such a direct measurement of microscopic parameters of solid density plasmas could eventually be used to properly interpret laboratory measurements of material properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity, EUS and opacity. In addition, x-ray Thomson scattering will provide new information on the characteristics of rarely and hitherto difficult to diagnose Fermi degenerate and strongly coupled plasmas.

  1. The Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feroci, M.; Stella, L.; van der Klis, M.

    2012-01-01

    High-time-resolution X-ray observations of compact objects provide direct access to strong-field gravity, to the equation of state of ultradense matter and to black hole masses and spins. A 10 m²-class instrument in combination with good spectral resolution is required to exploit the relevant......? The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT), selected by ESA as one of the four Cosmic Vision M3 candidate missions to undergo an assessment phase, will revolutionise the study of collapsed objects in our galaxy and of the brightest supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. Thanks...

  2. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  3. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source.

  4. X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is A scoliosis X-ray is a relatively safe and painless ...

  5. Techniques in X-ray Astronomy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ray telescopes in space, leading to a veritable revolution. Stich telescopes require distortion free focusing of X-rays and the use of position sensitive X- ray detectors. In this article I shall describe the importance of X-ray imaging, the optical ...

  6. RADIATION LOAD IN THE PROCESS OF X-RAY DIAGNOSTICS WITH THE USE OF MICROFOCUS METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Potrakhov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article regards the perspectives of microfocus X-ray equipment implementation in the medical X-ray diagnostics. It demonstrates the advantages of suggested equipment in comparison with traditional X-ray diagnostic machines with the big focus in the terms of dental X-ray diagnostics. The article shows the significant patient's exposure doses reduction with improving of diagnostic quality of the obtained images. It emphasizes the need of the regulatory basis of the enhancement for microfocus machines application in X-ray diagnostics.

  7. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation.

  8. The Athena X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, Didier; Lam Trong, Thien; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Piro, Luigi; Barcons, Xavier; Huovelin, Juhani; Kelley, Richard; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Paltani, Stéphane; Rauw, Gregor; RoŻanska, Agata; Wilms, Joern; Barbera, Marco; Bozzo, Enrico; Ceballos, Maria Teresa; Charles, Ivan; Decourchelle, Anne; den Hartog, Roland; Duval, Jean-Marc; Fiore, Fabrizio; Gatti, Flavio; Goldwurm, Andrea; Jackson, Brian; Jonker, Peter; Kilbourne, Caroline; Macculi, Claudio; Mendez, Mariano; Molendi, Silvano; Orleanski, Piotr; Pajot, François; Pointecouteau, Etienne; Porter, Frederick; Pratt, Gabriel W.; Prêle, Damien; Ravera, Laurent; Renotte, Etienne; Schaye, Joop; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Valenziano, Luca; Vink, Jacco; Webb, Natalie; Yamasaki, Noriko; Delcelier-Douchin, Françoise; Le Du, Michel; Mesnager, Jean-Michel; Pradines, Alice; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Dadina, Mauro; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Miller, Jon; Nazé, Yaël; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Sciortino, Salvatore; Torrejon, Jose Miguel; Geoffray, Hervé; Hernandez, Isabelle; Luno, Laure; Peille, Philippe; André, Jérôme; Daniel, Christophe; Etcheverry, Christophe; Gloaguen, Emilie; Hassin, Jérémie; Hervet, Gilles; Maussang, Irwin; Moueza, Jérôme; Paillet, Alexis; Vella, Bruno; Campos Garrido, Gonzalo; Damery, Jean-Charles; Panem, Chantal; Panh, Johan; Bandler, Simon; Biffi, Jean-Marc; Boyce, Kevin; Clénet, Antoine; DiPirro, Michael; Jamotton, Pierre; Lotti, Simone; Schwander, Denis; Smith, Stephen; van Leeuwen, Bert-Joost; van Weers, Henk; Brand, Thorsten; Cobo, Beatriz; Dauser, Thomas; de Plaa, Jelle; Cucchetti, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board the Advanced Telescope for High-ENergy Astrophysics (Athena) will provide spatially resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy from 0.2 to 12 keV, with 5" pixels over a field of view of 5 arc minute equivalent diameter and a spectral resolution of 2.5

  9. STROBE-X: X-ray timing and spectroscopy on dynamical timescales from microseconds to years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, Paul S.; Gendreau, Keith; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Brandt, Soren; Hernanz, Margarita; Hui, C. Michelle; Jenke, Peter A.; Maccarone, Thomas; Remillard, Ron; Wood, Kent; Zane, Silvia; Strobe-X Collaboration

    The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) probes strong gravity for stellar mass to supermassive black holes and ultradense matter with unprecedented effective area, high time-resolution, and good spectral resolution, while providing a powerful time-domain X-ray observatory.

  10. Luminosity Dependent Study of the High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1997-02-10

    Feb 10, 1997 ... these spectral characteristics as observed with ASCA with those of other satellites. We also compare ... periodicity has been observed in the X-ray light curves of 4U 0114 + 65 from the analysis of archival ... The X-ray spectrum emanating from the pulsar is nicely fitted with a generic model applicable in the ...

  11. X-ray Observations of Eight Young Open Star Clusters: I ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The probable cluster memberships of the X-ray sources have been established on the basis of multi-wavelength archival data, and samples of 152 pre-main sequence (PMS) low mass ( 10⊙) stars have been generated. X-ray spectral analyses ...

  12. Soft X-Ray Observations of a Complete Sample of X-Ray--selected BL Lacertae Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Morris, Simon L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT PSPC observations of the X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects (XBLs) in the complete Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EM MS) sample. None of the objects is resolved in their respective PSPC images, but all are easily detected. All BL Lac objects in this sample are well-fitted by single power laws. Their X-ray spectra exhibit a variety of spectral slopes, with best-fit energy power-law spectral indices between α = 0.5-2.3. The PSPC spectra of this sample are slightly steeper than those typical of flat ratio-spectrum quasars. Because almost all of the individual PSPC spectral indices are equal to or slightly steeper than the overall optical to X-ray spectral indices for these same objects, we infer that BL Lac soft X-ray continua are dominated by steep-spectrum synchrotron radiation from a broad X-ray jet, rather than flat-spectrum inverse Compton radiation linked to the narrower radio/millimeter jet. The softness of the X-ray spectra of these XBLs revives the possibility proposed by Guilbert, Fabian, & McCray (1983) that BL Lac objects are lineless because the circumnuclear gas cannot be heated sufficiently to permit two stable gas phases, the cooler of which would comprise the broad emission-line clouds. Because unified schemes predict that hard self-Compton radiation is beamed only into a small solid angle in BL Lac objects, the steep-spectrum synchrotron tail controls the temperature of the circumnuclear gas at r ≤ 1018 cm and prevents broad-line cloud formation. We use these new ROSAT data to recalculate the X-ray luminosity function and cosmological evolution of the complete EMSS sample by determining accurate K-corrections for the sample and estimating the effects of variability and the possibility of incompleteness in the sample. Our analysis confirms that XBLs are evolving "negatively," opposite in sense to quasars, with Ve/Va = 0.331±0.060. The statistically significant difference between the values for X-ray

  13. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2IFRS, but if confirmed, the increased AGN numbers at these redshifts will account for the unresolved part of the X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  14. 11th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Ciaran L. S; X-Ray Lasers 2008

    2009-01-01

    This book provides a thorough account of the current status of achievements made in the area of soft X-ray laser source development and of the increasingly diverse applications being demonstrated using such radiation sources. There is significant effort worldwide to develop very bright, short duration radiation sources in the X-ray spectral region – driven by the multitude of potential applications in all branches of science. This book contains updates on several different approaches for comparative purposes but concentrates on developments in the area of laser-produced plasmas, whereby transient population inversion and gain between ion states is pumped by optical lasers interacting with pre-formed plasmas. The most significant development here is the demonstrated increasing feasibility to produce useful soft X-ray laser beams with high repetition rates in a typical, small, university-class laboratory – as opposed to the requirement of access to a national facility some 20 years ago. Experimental progres...

  15. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  16. Ginga observations of dipping low mass X ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Alan P.; Mukai, Koji; Williams, O. Rees; Jones, Mark H.; Parmar, Arvind N.; Corbet, Robin H. D.

    1989-01-01

    Ginga observations of several low mass X ray binaries displaying pronounced dips of variable depth and duration in their X ray light curves are analyzed. The periodic occultation of the central X ray source by azimuthal accretion disk structure is considered. A series of spectra selected by intensity from the dip data from XB1916-053, are presented. The effects of a rapidly changing column density upon the spectral fitting results are modeled. EXO0748-676 was observed in March 1989 for three days. The source was found to be in a bright state with a 1 to 20 keV flux of 8.8 x 10 (exp -10) erg/sqcms. The data include two eclipses, observed with high time resolution.

  17. X-raying a nearby gamma-ray millisecond pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, George

    2013-10-01

    We propose an exploratory EPIC observation of a nearby recycled gamma-ray pulsar recently detected in the radio. The radio pulsations were found in a follow-up search at the location of a bright Fermi source. There are few millisecond pulsars whose spectral properties have been studied both in X-rays and gamma-rays. Those for which a multiwavelength analysis has been done show an intriguing connection between the gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. In a modest exposure we will collect enough counts to test the putative link between the the gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. The results will advance our understanding of the inner workings of the pulsar magnetospheres, including pair cascades, particle acceleration, magnetospheric current distribution, and radiation processes in superstrong magnetic fields.

  18. Jovian X-Ray Aurora and Energetic Oxygen Ion Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weihong; Schultz, D. R.

    1999-11-20

    The X-ray line spectra of highly charged oxygen ions excited by charge transfer interaction with the molecular hydrogen in the auroral atmosphere of Jupiter are calculated. The calculations utilize our calculated cross sections of state-selective charge transfer and the available cross-section data of ionization and stripping. Comparison of these spectra with high-resolution spectral observations may provide a sensitive probe of the characteristics of the heavy ions precipitating into the Jovian auroral atmosphere. On the basis of the much higher X-ray efficiency of heavy ions than of electrons, it is concluded that the Jovian aurora may be accounted for by a combination of energetic heavy-ion precipitation and energetic electron precipitation, which produces the auroral X-ray and ultraviolet emissions, respectively. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society.

  19. Origin of X-rays in the low state of the FSRQ 3C 273: evidence of inverse Compton emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Nibedita; Gupta, Alok C.; Wiita, Paul J.; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Duorah, Kalpana

    2017-08-01

    We analyse the 2.5-10 keV X-ray spectra of the luminous quasar 3C 273 and simultaneous observations in UV wavelengths from XMM-Newton between 2000 and 2015. The lowest flux level ever was observed in 2015. The continuum emission from 3C 273 is generally best described by an absorbed power-law but during extremely low states the addition of fluorescence from the K-shell iron line improves the fit. We study the spectral evolution of the source during its extended quiescent state and also examine connections between the X-ray and ultraviolet emissions, which have been seen in some, but not all, previous work. We detect a possible anticorrelation between these two bands during the low state that characterized 3C 273 for most of this period; however, this was not present during a flaring state. A harder-when-brighter trend for the X-ray spectrum was observed in these long-term observations of 3C 273 for the first time. We suggest that the X-ray emission in 3C 273 is the result of inverse Compton scattering of soft UV seed photons (emitted from the local environment of the AGN), most likely in a thermal corona. We can explain the significant temporal variation of the spectral continuum as an outcome of changing optical depth of the Comptonizing medium, along the lines of the wind-shock model proposed by Courvoisier and Camenzind.

  20. Method for spatially modulating X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2015-03-10

    A method and apparatus are provided for spatially modulating X-rays or X-ray pulses using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based X-ray optics. A torsionally-oscillating MEMS micromirror and a method of leveraging the grazing-angle reflection property are provided to modulate X-ray pulses with a high-degree of controllability.

  1. NIKOLA TESLA AND THE X-RAY

    OpenAIRE

    Rade R. Babic

    2005-01-01

    After professor Wilhelm Konrad Röntgen published his study of an x-ray discovery (Academy Bulletin, Berlin, 08. 11. 1895.), Nikola Tesla published his first study of an x-ray on the 11th of March in 1896. (X-ray, Electrical Review). Until the 11th of August in 1897 he had published ten studies on this subject. All Tesla,s x-ray studies were experimental, which is specific to his work. Studying the nature of the x-ray, he established a new medical branch-radiology. He wrote:” There’s no doubt...

  2. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.R.; /SLAC; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  3. ZnTe :O phosphor development for x-ray imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Z. T.; Summers, C. J.; Menkara, H.; Wagner, B. K.; Durst, R.; Diawara, Y.; Mednikova, G.; Thorson, T.

    2006-03-01

    An efficient ZnTe :O x-ray powder phosphor was prepared by a dry synthesis process using gaseous doping and etching medias. The x-ray luminescent properties were evaluated and compared to standard commercial phosphors exhibited an x-ray luminescent efficiency equivalent to 76% of Gd2O2S:Tb and an equal resolution of 2.5lines/mm. In addition, the fast decay time, low afterglow, and superior spectral match to conventional charge-coupled devices-indicate that ZnTe :O is a very promising phosphor candidate for x-ray imaging applications.

  4. AN OSCILLATOR CONFIGURATION FOR FULL REALIZATION OF HARD X-RAY FREE ELECTRON LASER*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.-J.; Kolodziej, T.; Lindberg, R. R.; Shu, D.; Shvyd' ko, Y.; Stoupin, S.; Maxwell, T.J.; Ding, Y.; Fawley, W. M.; Hastings, J.; Huang, Z; Krzywinski, J.; Marcus, G.; Qin, Weilun; Medvedev, N.; Zemella, J.; Blank, V.; Terentyev, S.

    2017-06-01

    An x-ray free electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is feasible by employing an X-ray cavity with Bragg mirrors such as diamond crystals. An XFELO at the 5th harmonic frequency may be implemented at the LCLS II using its 4 GeV superconducting linac, producing stable, fully coherent, high-spectral-purity hard x-rays. In addition, its output can be a coherent seed to the LCLS amplifier for stable, high-power, femto-second x-ray pulses. We summarize the recent progress in various R&D efforts addressing critical issues for realizing an XFELO at LCLS II.

  5. X-ray reverberation around accreting black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttley, P.; Cackett, E. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Wilkins, D. R.

    2014-08-01

    Luminous accreting stellar mass and supermassive black holes produce power-law continuum X-ray emission from a compact central corona. Reverberation time lags occur due to light travel time delays between changes in the direct coronal emission and corresponding variations in its reflection from the accretion flow. Reverberation is detectable using light curves made in different X-ray energy bands, since the direct and reflected components have different spectral shapes. Larger, lower frequency, lags are also seen and are identified with propagation of fluctuations through the accretion flow and associated corona. We review the evidence for X-ray reverberation in active galactic nuclei and black hole X-ray binaries, showing how it can be best measured and how it may be modelled. The timescales and energy dependence of the high-frequency reverberation lags show that much of the signal is originating from very close to the black hole in some objects, within a few gravitational radii of the event horizon. We consider how these signals can be studied in the future to carry out X-ray reverberation mapping of the regions closest to black holes.

  6. The Bragg solar x-ray spectrometer SolpeX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ścisłowski, D.; Sylwester, J.; Steślicki, M.; Płocieniak, S.; Bąkała, J.; Szaforz, Ż.; Kowaliński, M.; Podgórski, P.; Trzebiński, W.; Hernandez, J.; Barylak, J.; Barylak, A.; Kuzin, Sergey

    2015-09-01

    Detection of polarization and spectra measurement of X-ray solar flare emission are indispensable in improving our understanding of the processes releasing energy of these most energetic phenomena in the solar system. We shall present some details of the construction of SolpeX - an innovative Bragg soft X-ray flare polarimeter and spectrometer. The instrument is a part of KORTES - Russian instrument complex to be mounted aboard the science module to be attached to the International Space Station (2017/2018). The SolpeX will be composed of three individual measuring units: the soft X-ray polarimeter with 1-2% linear polarization detection threshold, a fast-rotating flat crystal X-ray spectrometer with a very high time resolution (0.1 s) and a simple pinhole soft X-ray imager-spectrometer with a moderate spatial (~20 arcsec), spectral (0.5 keV) and high time resolution (0.1 s). Having a fast rotating unit to be served with power, telemetry and "intelligence" poses a challenge for the designer. Some of the solutions to this will be provided and described.

  7. Performance evaluation of a digital intraoral imaging device based on the CMOS photosensor array coupled with an integrated X-ray conversion fiber-optic faceplate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyosung [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, 234 Maeji Heungup, Wonju 220 710 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hscho1@yonsei.ac.kr; Choi, Sungil [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, 234 Maeji Heungup, Wonju 220 710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongguk [Department of Physics, Myongji University, 38-2 Namdong Cheuingu, Yongin 449 728 (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Yangseo; Kim, Taewoo; Ro, Changjoon [Radiation Technology Laboratory, Vatech Co., Ltd., 75-11 Seogu Dongtan, Hwaseong 445 811 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bongsoo [School of Biomedical Engineering, Konkuk University, 322 Danweul, Chungju 380 701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sin [Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, Cheju National University, 66 Chejudaehakro, Cheju 690 756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hokyung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeun Geumjung, Pusan 609 735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-21

    As a continuation of our digital X-ray imaging sensor R and D, we have developed a cost-effective, intraoral imaging device based on the complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) photosensor array coupled with an integrated X-ray conversion fiber-optic faceplate. It consists of a commercially available CMOS photosensor of a 35x35 {mu}m{sup 2} pixel size and a 688x910 pixel array dimension, and a high-efficiency columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator of a 90 {mu}m thickness directly deposited on a fiber-optic faceplate of a 6 {mu}m core size and an 1.46 mm thickness with 85/15 core-cladding ratio (NA{approx}1.0 in air). The fiber-optic faceplate is a highly X-ray attenuating material that minimizes X-ray absorption on the end CMOS photosensor array, thus, minimizing X-ray induced noise at the photosensor array. It uses a high light-output columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator with a peak spectral emission at 545 nm, giving better spatial resolution, but attenuates some of this light due to interfacial and optical attenuation factors. In this paper, we presented the performance analysis of the intraoral imaging device with experimental measurements and acquired X-ray images in terms of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE)

  8. Comparative evaluation of single crystal scintillators under x-ray imaging conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valais, I G; David, S; Michail, C [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, 265 00 Patras (Greece); Nomicos, C D [Department of Electronics, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos, Egaleo, 122 10 Athens (Greece); Panayiotakis, G S; Kandarakis, I S [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos, Egaleo, 122 10 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: kandarakis@teiath.gr

    2009-06-15

    The present study is a comparative investigation of the luminescence properties of (Lu,Y){sub 2}SiO{sub 5}: Ce (LYSO: Ce), YAlO{sub 3}: Ce (YAP: Ce), Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}: Ce (GSO: Ce) and (Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}) BGO single crystal scintillators under x-ray excitation. Results will be of value in designing dual modality tomographic systems (PET/CT, SPECT/CT) based on a common scintillator crystal. All scintillating crystals have dimensions of 10 x 10 x 10 cm{sup 3} are non-hygroscopic exhibiting high radiation absorption efficiency in the energy range used in medical imaging applications. The comparative investigation was performed by determining the x-ray luminescence efficiency (emitted light flux over incident x-ray energy flux) in the range of x-ray energies employed in: (i) general x-ray imaging (40-140 kV, using a W/Al x-ray spectrum) and (ii) x-ray mammography imaging (22-49 kV, using a Mo/Mo x-ray spectrum). Additionally, light emission spectra of crystals at various x-ray energies were measured, in order to determine the intrinsic conversion efficiency and the spectral compatibility to optical photon detectors incorporated in medical imaging systems. The light emission performance of LYSO:Ce scintillator studied was found very high for x-ray imaging.

  9. Toward active x-ray telescopes II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Lillie, Charles F.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2012-10-01

    In the half century since the initial discovery of an astronomical (non-solar) x-ray source, the observation time required to achieve a given sensitivity has decreased by eight orders of magnitude. Largely responsible for this dramatic progress has been the refinement of the (grazing-incidence) focusing x-ray telescope, culminating with the exquisite subarcsecond imaging performance of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The future of x-ray astronomy relies upon the development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (technologically challenging—requiring precision fabrication, alignment, and assembly of large areas (x-ray optics. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes current progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  10. On stellar X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Golub, L.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Stellar X-ray astronomy represents an entirely new astronomical discipline which has emerged during the past five years. It lies at the crossroads of solar physics, stellar physics, and general astrophysics. The present review is concerned with the main physical problems which arise in connection with a study of the stellar X-ray data. A central issue is the extent to which the extrapolation from solar physics is justified and the definition (if possible) of the limits to such extrapolation. The observational properties of X-ray emission from stars are considered along with the solar analogy and the modeling of X-ray emission from late-type stars, the modeling of X-ray emission from early-type stars, the physics of stellar X-ray emission, stellar X-ray emission in the more general astrophysical context, and future prospects.

  11. The Secret X-ray Lives of Cepheids: Presenting the First Unambiguous X-ray Detections of Classical Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, E.; Evans, N.; DePasquale, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chromospheric and transition region emissions have been found in certain Classical Cepheids by previous IUE studies and through our own much more recent FUSE study. However, X-ray emission has long been considered nonexistent in these cool supergiants. Here we report on the surprising discovery of X-ray emissions in three bright, nearby Classical Cepheids recently observed with the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites - representing the first true detections of this class of variable star at X-ray wavelengths. Polaris (V = +1.98; F7 Ib-II; P = 3.97-d; d 130-pc), β Dor (V = +3.77; F6 Ia; P = 9.84-d; d 318-pc) and δ Cep (V = +4.07; F5 Iab; P = 5.37-d; d 273-pc) are currently the only three Cepheids to have been observed with modern X-ray satellites. However, only Polaris and β Dor have been observed with the FUSE satellite, and β Dor (which has multiple spectra) displays variability in the FUV emission strengths which appears to be correlated to its pulsation period. Unexpectedly, our early analyses of the X-ray data show that these Cepheids, despite their differences in spectral type and pulsation properties, all have log Lx values of 28.8-29 and similarly soft energy distributions. The initial results of our recent X-ray studies are presented along with our FUSE results to bring the high energy activity into better focus. Further FUV/X-ray observations have been proposed with HST/XMM to unambiguously determine the origin and nature of the observed high energy emissions from the targets, possibly arising from warm winds, shocks, or pulsationally induced magnetic activity. We gratefully acknowledge support for this project from NASA grants Chandra-GO6-7011A, 06-FUSE8-099 & XMM-AO7-55241 and NSF grant AST05-07542.

  12. CdZnTe detector in diagnostic x-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Satoshi; Imagawa, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Masao

    2002-07-01

    A method to utilize CdZnTe (CZT) detectors in diagnostic x-ray spectroscopy is described in this article. Spectral distortion due to transmission of primary x rays, the escape of cadmium- and tellurium-K fluorescent x rays, and tailing was severe in measured x-ray spectra. Therefore, correction for the distortion was performed with the stripping method using response functions. The response functions were calculated with the Monte Carlo method. The Hecht equation was employed to approximate the effects of carrier trapping in the calculations. The parameters in the Hecht equation, the mean-free path (lambda) of electrons and holes, were determined such that the tailing in calculated response functions fit that in measured gamma-ray spectra. Corrected x-ray spectra agreed well with the reference spectra measured with an HPGe detector. The results indicate that CZT detectors are suitable for diagnostic x-ray spectroscopy with appropriate corrections.

  13. X-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry with a portable CdTe device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbene, Leonardo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy)]. E-mail: abbene@difter.unipa.it; La Manna, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Fauci, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Gerardi, Gaetano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Stumbo, Simone [Struttura Dipartimentale di Matematica e Fisica dell' Universita degli studi di Sassari, Sassari (Italy); INFN Sezione di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Raso, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2007-02-01

    X-ray spectra and dosimetry information are very important for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) in medical diagnostic X-ray systems. An accurate knowledge of the diagnostic X-ray spectra would improve the patient dose optimization, without compromising image information. In this work, we performed direct diagnostic X-ray spectra measurements with a portable device, based on a CdTe solid-state detector. The portable device is able to directly measure X-ray spectra at high photon fluence rates, as typical of clinical radiography. We investigated on the spectral performances of the system in the mammographic energy range (up to {approx}40 keV). Good system response to monoenergetic photons was measured (energy resolution of 5% FWHM at 22.1 keV). We measured the molybdenum X-ray spectra produced by a mammographic X-ray unit (GE Senographe DMR) at 28 kV and 30 kV under clinical conditions. The results showed the good reproducibility of the system and low pile-up distortions. Preliminary dosimetric measurements have been regarded as exposure and half value layer (HVL) values obtained from direct measurements and from measured X-ray spectral data, and a good agreement between exposure attenuation curves and the HVL values was obtained. The results indicated that the portable device is suitable for mammographic X-ray spectroscopy under clinical conditions.

  14. An edge-on charge-transfer design for energy-resolved x-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zaifeng; Yang, Haoyu; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2016-06-01

    As an x-ray beam goes through the human body, it will collect important information via interaction with tissues. Since this interaction is energy-sensitive, the state-of-the-art spectral CT technologies provide higher quality images of biological tissues with x-ray energy information (or spectral information). With existing energy-integrating technologies, a large fraction of energy information is ignored in the x-ray detection process. Although the recently proposed photon-counting technology promises to achieve higher image quality at a lower radiation dose, it suffers from limitations in counting rate, performance uniformity, and fabrication cost. In this paper, we focus on an alternative approach to resolve the energy distribution of transmitted x-ray photons. First, we analyze the x-ray attenuation in a silicon substrate and describe a linear approximation model for x-ray detection. Then, we design an edge-on architecture based on the proposed energy-resolving model. In our design, the x-ray-photon-induced charges are transferred sequentially resembling the working process of a CCD camera. Finally, we numerically evaluate the linear approximation of x-ray attenuation and derive the energy distribution of x-ray photons. Our simulation results show that the proposed energy-sensing approach is feasible and has the potential to complement the photon-counting technology.

  15. Moving-Article X-Ray Imaging System and Method for 3-D Image Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray imaging system and method for a moving article are provided for an article moved along a linear direction of travel while the article is exposed to non-overlapping x-ray beams. A plurality of parallel linear sensor arrays are disposed in the x-ray beams after they pass through the article. More specifically, a first half of the plurality are disposed in a first of the x-ray beams while a second half of the plurality are disposed in a second of the x-ray beams. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays is oriented perpendicular to the linear direction of travel. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the first half is matched to a corresponding one of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the second half in terms of an angular position in the first of the x-ray beams and the second of the x-ray beams, respectively.

  16. Perspectives of the lobster-eye telescope: The promising types of cosmic X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimon, V.

    2017-07-01

    We show the astrophysical aspects of observing the X-ray sky with the planned lobster-eye telescope. This instrument is important because it is able to provide wide-field X-ray imaging. For the testing observations, we propose to include also X-ray binaries in which matter transfers onto the compact object (mostly the neutron star). We show the typical features of the long-term X-ray activity of such objects. Observing in the soft X-ray band is the most promising because their X-ray intensity is the highest in this band. Since these X-ray sources tend to concentrate toward the center of our Galaxy, several of them can be present in the field of view of the tested instrument.

  17. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Tianxi; MacDonald, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  18. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianxi; Macdonald, C A

    2013-02-07

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  19. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Dennis [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Padmore, Howard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lessner, Eliane [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2013-03-27

    nanolithographic techniques for improved spatial resolution and efficiency of zone plates. Development of large, perfect single crystals of materials other than silicon for use as beam splitters, seeding monochromators, and high-resolution analyzers. Development of improved thin-film deposition methods for fabrication of multilayer Laue lenses and high-spectral-resolution multilayer gratings. Development of supports, actuator technologies, algorithms, and controls to provide fully integrated and robust adaptive X-ray optic systems. Development of fabrication processes for refractive lenses in materials other than silicon. The workshop participants also addressed two important nontechnical areas: our relationship with industry and organization of optics within the light source facilities. Optimization of activities within these two areas could have an important effect on the effectiveness and efficiency of our overall endeavor. These are crosscutting managerial issues that we identified as areas that needed further in-depth study, but they need to be coordinated above the individual facilities. Finally, an issue that cuts across many of the optics improvements listed above is routine access to beamlines that ideally are fully dedicated to optics research and/or development. The success of the BES X-ray user facilities in serving a rapidly increasing user community has led to a squeezing of beam time for vital instrumentation activities. Dedicated development beamlines could be shared with other R&D activities, such as detector programs and novel instrument development. In summary, to meet the challenges of providing the highest-quality X-ray beams for users and to fully utilize the high-brightness sources of today and those that are on the horizon, it will be critical to make strategic investments in X-ray optics R&D. This report can provide guidance and direction for effective use of investments in the field of X-ray optics and potential approaches to develop a better

  20. First peek of ASTRO-H Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) in-orbit performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Takashi; Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos, Peter; Mori, Hideyuki; Olsen, Larry; Robinson, David; Koenecke, Richard; Chang, Bill; Hahne, Devin; Iizuka, Ryo; Ishida, Manabu; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Sato, Toshiki; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Kurashima, Sho; Nakaniwa, Nozomi; Hayashi, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Miyazawa, Takuya; Tachibana, Kenji; Tamura, Keisuke; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Tawara, Yuzuru; Sugita, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    ASTRO-H (Hitomi) is a Japanese X-ray astrophysics satellite just launched in February, 2016, from Tanegashima, Japan by a JAXA's H-IIA launch vehicle. It has two Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXTs), among other instruments, that were developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in collaboration with ISAS/JAXA and Nagoya University. One is for an X-ray micro-calorimeter instrument (Soft X-ray Spectrometer, SXS) and the other for an X-ray CCD camera (Soft X-ray Imager, SXI), both covering the X-ray energy band up to 15 keV. The two SXTs were fully characterized at the 30-m X-ray beamline at ISAS/JAXA. The combined SXT+SXS system effective area is about 250 and 300 cm2 at 1 and 6 keV, respectively, although observations were performed with the gate valve at the dewar entrance closed, which blocks most of low energy X-rays and some of high energy ones. The angular resolution for SXS is 1.2 arcmin (Half Power Diameter, HPD). The combined SXT+SXI system effective area is about 370 and 350 cm2 at 1 and 6 keV, respectively. The angular resolution for SXI is 1.3 arcmin (HPD). The both SXTs have a field of view of about 16 arcmin (FWHM of their vignetting functions). The SXT+SXS field of view is limited to 3 x 3 arcmin by the SXS array size. In-flight data available to the SXT team was limited at the time of this conference and a point-like source data is not available for the SXT+SXS. Although due to lack of attitude information we were unable to reconstruct a point spread function of SXT+SXI, according to RXJ1856.5-3754 data, the SXT seems to be working as expected in terms of imaging capability. As for the overall effective area response for both SXT+SXS and SXT+SXI, consistent spectral model fitting parameters with the previous measurements were obtained for Crab and G21.5-0.9 data. On the other hand, their 2-10 keV fluxes differ by about 20% at this point. Calibration work is still under progress. The SXT is the latest version of the aluminum foil X-ray mirror, which is

  1. First Peek of ASTRO-H Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) In-Orbit Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Takashi; Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Mori, Hideyuki; Olsen, Lawrence; Robinson, David; Koenecke, Richard; Chang, William; Hahne, David; Iisuka, Ryo; hide

    2016-01-01

    ASTRO-H (Hitomi) is a Japanese X-ray astrophysics satellite just launched in February, 2016, from Tanegashima, Japan by a JAXA's H-IIA launch vehicle. It has two Soft X-ray Telescopes (SXTs), among other instruments, that were developed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in collaboration with ISAS/JAXA and Nagoya University. One is for an X-ray micro-calorimeter instrument (Soft X-ray Spectrometer, SXS) and the other for an X-ray CCD camera (Soft X-ray Imager, SXI), both covering the X-ray energy band up to 15 keV. The two SXTs were fully characterized at the 30-m X-ray beam line at ISAS/JAXA. The combined SXT+SXS system effective area is about 250 and 300 cm(exp 2) at 1 and 6 keV, respectively, although observations were performed with the gate valve at the dewar entrance closed, which blocks most of low energy X-rays and some of high energy ones. The angular resolution for SXS is 1.2 arcmin (Half Power Diameter, HPD). The combined SXT+SXI system effective area is about 370 and 350 cm (exp 2) at 1 and 6 keV, respectively. The angular resolution for SXI is 1.3 arcmin (HPD). The both SXTs have a field of view of about 16 arcmin (FWHM of their vignetting functions).The SXT+SXS field of view is limited to 3 x 3 arcmin by the SXS array size. In-flight data available to the SXT team was limited at the time of this conference and a point-like source data is not available for the SXT+SXS. Although due to lack of attitude information we were unable to reconstruct a point spread function of SXT+SXI, according to RXJ1856.5-3754 data, the SXT seems to be working as expected in terms of imaging capability. As for the overall effective area response for both SXT+SXS and SXT+SXI, consistent spectral model fitting parameters with the previous measurements were obtained for Crab and G21.5-0.9 data. On the other hand, their 2-10 keV fluxes differ by about 20% at this point. Calibration work is still under progress. The SXT is the latest version of the aluminum foil X-ray

  2. Understanding X-ray reflection emissivity profiles in AGN: locating the X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.

    2012-08-01

    The illumination pattern (or emissivity profile) of the accretion disc due to the reflection of X-rays in active galactic nucleus can be understood in terms of relativistic effects on the rays propagating from a source in a corona surrounding the central black hole, both on their trajectories and on the accretion disc itself. Theoretical emissivity profiles due to isotropic point sources as well as simple extended geometries are computed in general relativistic ray-tracing simulations performed on graphics processing units (GPUs). Such simulations assuming only general relativity naturally explain the accretion disc emissivity profiles determined from relativistically broadened emission lines which fall off steeply (with power-law indices of between 6 and 8) over the inner regions of the disc, then flattening off to almost a constant before tending to a constant power law of index 3 over the outer disc. Simulations for a variety of source locations, extents and geometries show how the emissivity profiles depend on these properties, and when combined with reverberation time lags allow the location and extent of the primary X-ray source to be constrained. Comparing the emissivity profile determined from the broadened iron K emission line in spectra of 1H 0707-495 obtained in 2008 January to theoretical emissivity profiles and applying constraints from reverberation lags suggest that there exists an extended region of primary X-ray emission located as low as 2rg above the accretion disc, extending outwards to a radius of around 30rg.

  3. Advantages of intermediate X-ray energies in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Hong, Youli; Ge, Xin; Wang, Dajiang; Pan, Zhiyun; Zhu, Peiping; Yun, Wenbing; Jacobsen, Chris; Wu, Ziyu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the hierarchical organizations of molecules and organelles within the interior of large eukaryotic cells is a challenge of fundamental interest in cell biology. Light microscopy is a powerful tool for observations of the dynamics of live cells, its resolution attainable is limited and insufficient. While electron microscopy can produce images with astonishing resolution and clarity of ultra-thin (microscopy offers superior imaging resolution compared to light microscopy, and unique capability of nondestructive three-dimensional imaging of hydrated unstained biological cells, complementary to existing light and electron microscopy. Until now, X-ray microscopes operating in the "water window" energy range between carbon and oxygen k-shell absorption edges have produced outstanding 3D images of cryo-preserved cells. The relatively low X-ray energy (phase contrast can overcome the above limitations and reduces radiation dose to the specimen. Using a hydrated model cell with an average chemical composition reported in literature, we calculated the image contrast and the radiation dose for absorption and Zernike phase contrast, respectively. The results show that an X-ray microscope operating at ~2.5 keV using Zernike phase contrast offers substantial advantages in terms of specimen size, radiation dose and depth-of-focus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Diffuse Soft X-ray Background: Trials and Tribulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Melville P.

    2013-01-01

    I joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison sounding rocket group at its inception. It was an exciting time, as nobody knew what the X-ray sky looked like. Our group focused on the soft X-ray background, and built proportional counters with super thin (2 micron thick) windows. As the inter gas pressure of the counters was about 1 atmosphere, it was no mean feat to get payload to launch without the window bursting. On top of that we built all our own software from space solutions to unfolding the spectral data. For we did it then as now: Our computer code modeled the detector response and then folded various spectral shapes through the response and compared the results with the raw data. As far as interpretation goes, here are examples of how one can get things wrong: The Berkeley group published a paper of the soft X-ray background that disagreed with ours. Why? It turned out they had **assumed** the galactic plane was completely opaque to soft X-ray and hence corrected for detector background that way. It turns out that the ISM emits in soft X-rays! Another example was the faux pas of the Calgary group. They didn’t properly shield their detector from the sounding rocket telemetry. Thus they got an enormous signal, which to our amusement some (ambulance chaser) theoreticians tried to explain! So back then as now, mistakes were made, but at least we all knew how our X-ray systems worked from soup (the detectors) to nuts (the data analysis code) where as toady “anybody” with a good idea but only a vague inkling of how detectors, mirrors and software work, can be an X-ray astronomer. On the one hand, this has made the field accessible to all, and on the other, errors in interpretation can be made as the X-ray telescope user can fall prey to running black box software. Furthermore with so much funding going into supporting observers, there is little left to make the necessary technology advances or keep the core expertise in place to even to stay even with

  5. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  6. Semi-analytic off-axis X-ray source model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshad, M.; Anjomrouz, M.; Smithies, D. J.; Largeau, A.; Lu, G.; Atharifard, A.; Vanden Broeke, L.; Aamir, R.; Panta, R. K.; Walsh, M. F.; Goulter, B. P.; Healy, J. L.; Bheesette, S.; Bell, S. T.; Bateman, C. J.; Butler, A. P. H.; Butler, P. H.

    2017-10-01

    Spectral computed tomography (CT) systems are employed with energy-resolving photon counting detectors. Incorporation of a spectrally accurate x-ray beam model in image reconstruction helps to improve material identification and quantification by these systems. Using an inaccurate x-ray model in spectral reconstruction can lead to severe image artifacts, one of the extreme cases of this is the well-known beam-hardening artifacts. An often overlooked spectral feature of x-ray beams in spectral reconstruction models is the angular dependence of the spectrum with reference to the central beam axis. To address these factors, we have developed a parameterized semi-analytical x-ray source model in the diagnostic imaging range (30-120 kVp) by applying regression techniques to data obtained from Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc). This x-ray beam model is generalized to describe the off-axis spectral information within ±17o along θ (vertical direction), ±5o along phi (horizontal direction) of the central axis, and can be parameterized for specific x-ray tube models. Comparisons of our model with those generated by SpekCalc, TOPAS, and IPEM78 at central axis show good agreement (within 2 %). We have evaluated the model with experimental data collected with a small animal spectral scanner.

  7. Next Generation Astronomical X-ray Optics: High Angular Resolution, Light Weight, and Low Production Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang. W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Blake, P. N.; Chan, K. W.; Gaskin, J. A.; Hong, M. L.; Jones, W. D.; Kolos, L. D.; Mazzarella, J. R.; McClelland, R. S.; hide

    2012-01-01

    X-ray astronomy depends on the availability of telescopes with high resolution and large photon collecting areas. Since x-ray observation can only be carried out above the atmosphere, these telescopes must be necessarily lightweight. Compounding the lightweight requirement is that an x-ray telescope consists of many nested concentric shells, which further require that x-ray mirrors must also be geometrically thin to achieve high packing efficiency. This double lightweight and geometrically thin requirement poses significant technical challenges in fabricating the mirrors and in integrating them into mirror assemblies. This paper reports on the approach, strategy and status of our x-ray optics development program whose objective is to meet these technical challenges at modest cost to enable future x-ray missions, including small Explorer missions in the near term, probe class missions in the medium term, and large flagship missions in the long term.

  8. Reverberation Mapping Quasars: X-ray and broadband SED properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merloni, A.; Simm, T.; Nandra, K.; Green, P.

    2017-10-01

    An ongoing SDSS reverberation mapping (RM) program (Shen et al. 2015) provides significantly improved black hole mass estimates for a large sample of QSOs out to redshift ˜3 in a single 7 square degree field. A recently approved large XMM-Newton program will complete the X-ray coverage of the field, contributing to a unique legacy sample of hundreds of QSOs with accurately measured bolometric luminosity, spectral energy distributions, Eddington ratios and variability properties. As illustration, we present here the X-ray spectral properties of the RM-QSOs derived from the analysis of all existing XMM-Newton and deep Chandra (AEGIS field) observations of the field. Taking advantage of the unprecedented multi-band, multi-epoch imaging and spectroscopy provided by the SDSS-RM campaign, the Pan-STARRS1 medium deep survey and the GALEX time domain survey we study in detail their instantaneous broadband spectral energy distributions to obtain accurate measures of the bolometric luminosity and to test accretion disk models. This data set allows us to dissect correlations between optical/X-ray spectral properties with black hole mass and Eddington ratio, as well as to constrain evolution of the radiative efficiency providing a first handle on black hole spin evolution in a large, statistical sample of AGN.

  9. The X-ray corona of Procyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.; Peres, G.; Serio, S.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray emission from the nearby system Procyon A/B (F5 IV + DF) was detected, using the IPC (Imaging Proportional Counter) on board the Einstein Observatory. Analysis of the X-ray pulse height spectrum suggests that the observed X-ray emission originates in Procyon A rather than in the white dwarf companion Procyon B, since the derived X-ray temperature, log T = 6.2, agrees well with temperatures found for quiescent solar X-ray emission. Modeling Procyon's corona with loops characterized by some apex temperature Tmax and emission length scale L, it is found that Tmax is well constrained, but L, and consequently the filling factor of the X-ray emitting gas, are essentially unconstrained even when EUV emission from the transition region is included in the analysis.

  10. Handbook of X-Ray Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornack, Günter

    2007-01-01

    This sourcebook is intended as an X-ray data reference for scientists and engineers working in the field of energy or wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry and related fields of basic and applied research, technology, or process and quality controlling. In a concise and informative manner, the most important data connected with the emission of characteristic X-ray lines are tabulated for all elements up to Z = 95 (Americium). This includes X-ray energies, emission rates and widths as well as level characteristics such as binding energies, fluorescence yields, level widths and absorption edges. The tabulated data are characterized and, in most cases, evaluated. Furthermore, all important processes and phenomena connected with the production, emission and detection of characteristic X-rays are discussed. This reference book addresses all researchers and practitioners working with X-ray radiation and fills a gap in the available literature.

  11. X-ray microdiffraction of biominerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2013-01-01

    Biominerals have complex and heterogeneous architectures, hence diffraction experiments with spatial resolutions between 500 nm and 10 μm are extremely useful to characterize them. X-ray beams in this size range are now routinely produced at many synchrotrons. This chapter provides a review of the different hard X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques, used in conjunction with efficient, state-of-the-art X-ray focusing optics. These include monochromatic X-ray microdiffraction, polychromatic (Laue) X-ray microdiffraction, and microbeam small-angle X-ray scattering. We present some of the most relevant discoveries made in the field of biomineralization using these approaches. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation safety in X-ray facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    The guide specifies the radiation safety requirements for structural shielding and other safety arrangements used in X-ray facilities in medical and veterinary X-ray activities and in industry, research and education. The guide is also applicable to premises in which X-ray equipment intended for radiation therapy and operating at a voltage of less than 25 kV is used. The guide applies to new X-ray facilities in which X-ray equipment that has been used elsewhere is transferred. The radiation safety requirements for radiation therapy X-ray devices operating at a voltage exceeding 25 kV, and for the premices in which such devices are used, are set out in Guide ST 2.2.

  13. Stacked, filtered multi-channel X-ray diode array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacNeil, Lawrence [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Dutra, Eric [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Raphaelian, Mark [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Compton, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jacoby, Barry [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    There are many types of X-ray diodes used for X-ray flux or spectroscopic measurements and for estimating the spectral shape of the VUV to soft X-ray spectrum. However, a need exists for a low-cost, robust X-ray diode to use for experiments in hostile environments on multiple platforms, and for experiments that utilize forces that may destroy the diode(s). Since the typical proposed use required a small size with a minimal single line-of-sight, a parallel array could not be used. So, a stacked, filtered multi-channel X-ray diode array was developed, called the MiniXRD. To achieve significant cost savings while maintaining robustness and ease of field setup, repair, and replacement, we designed the system to be modular. The filters were manufactured in-house and cover the range from 450 eV to 5000 eV. To achieve the line-of-sight accuracy needed, we developed mounts and laser alignment techniques. We modeled and tested elements of the diode design at NSTec Livermore Operations (NSTec / LO) to determine temporal response and dynamic range, leading to diode shape and circuitry changes to optimize impedance and charge storage. The authors fielded individual and stacked systems at several national facilities as ancillary "ride-along" diagnostics to test and improve the design usability. This paper presents the MiniXRD system performance, which supports consideration as a viable low-costalternative for multiple-channel low-energy X-ray measurements. This diode array is currently at Technical Readiness Level (TRL) 6.

  14. RENEWED ACTIVITY FROM THE X-RAY TRANSIENT SAXJ 1810.8-2609 WITH INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiocchi, M.; Natalucci, L.; Chenevez, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    (36) erg s(-1) in the 20-100 keV energy range. This low outburst luminosity and the long-term time-average accretion rate of similar to 5 x 10(-12) M-circle dot yr(-1) suggest that SAX J1810.8-2609 is a faint soft X-ray transient. During the flux increase, spectra are consistent with a thermal...... Comptonization model with a temperature plasma of kT(e) similar to 23-30 keV and an optical depth of tau similar to 1.2-1.5, independent of the luminosity of the system. This is a typical low hard spectral state for which the X-ray emission is attributed to the upscattering of soft seed photons by a hot......, optically thin electron plasma. During the decay, spectra have a different shape, the high energy tail being compatible with a single power law. This confirm similar behavior observed by BeppoSAX during the previous outburst, with the absence of visible cutoff in the hard X-ray spectrum. INTEGRAL...

  15. Wide band focusing x-ray spectrograph with spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuz, S A; Douglass, J D; Shelkovenko, T A; Sinars, D B; Hammer, D A

    2008-01-01

    A new, wide spectral bandwidth x-ray spectrograph, the wide-bandwidth focusing spectrograph with spatial resolution (WB-FSSR), based on spherically bent mica crystals, is described. The wide bandwidth is achieved by combining three crystals to form a large aperture dispersive element. Since the WB-FSSR covers a wide spectral band, it is very convenient for application as a routine diagnostic tool in experiments in which the desired spectral coverage is different from one test to the next. The WB-FSSR has been tested in imploding wire-array experiments on a 1 MA pulsed power machine, and x-ray spectra were recorded in the 1-20 A spectral band using different orders of mica crystal reflection. Using a two mirror-symmetrically placed WB-FSSR configuration, it was also possible to distinguish between a real spectral shift and a shift of recorded spectral lines caused by the spatial distribution of the radiating plasma. A spectral resolution of about 2000 was demonstrated and a spatial resolution of approximately 100 microm was achieved in the spectral band of 5-10 A in second order of mica reflection. A simple method of numerical analysis of spectrograph capability is proposed.

  16. Handbook of X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Keith; Smith, Randall; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Ellis, Richard; Huchra, John; Kahn, Steve; Rieke, George; Stetson, Peter B.

    2011-11-01

    Practical guide to X-ray astronomy for graduate students, professional astronomers and researchers. Presenting X-ray optics, basic detector physics and data analysis. It introduces the reduction and calibration of X-ray data, scientific analysis, archives, statistical issues and the particular problems of highly extended sources. The appendices provide reference material often required during data analysis. The handbook web page contains figures and tables: http://xrayastronomyhandbook.com/

  17. Sandia Mark II X-Ray System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, L.W.

    1979-11-01

    The Sandia Mark II X-Ray System was designed and developed to provide an intense source of mononergetic, ultra-soft x rays with energies between 0.282 and 1.486 keV. The x-ray tube design is similar to one developed by B.L. Henke and incorporates modifications made by Tom Ellsberry. An operations manual section is incorporated to help the experimenter/operator.

  18. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  19. Study on high quality spectral materials for emitted soft X-ray. Special study on inorganic materials between FY 1991 and FY 1995; Hoshako nan X sen`yo bunko zairyo no kohinshitsuka ni kansuru kenkyu. 1991 nendo - 1995 nendo muki zaishitsu tokubetsu kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-28

    This is No.93 report of National Institute for Research in Inorganic Materials. Single crystal growth of YB66 was investigated to develop the single crystal of YB66 as a spectral material for synchrotron emitted soft X-ray. The emitted light is white light including from visible radiation to hard X-ray. Usually, it is used as homogeneous light through spectra. There are K-absorption edges of Mg and Si in the region ranging from 1 to 2 keV, which is significant for material science. There has been no proper spectral elemental device for application of the emitted spectra. The YB66 is the most suitable for this purpose. For the single crystal growth of high crystalline YB66, high frequency indirect heating floating method has been developed. For the growth furnace, a mechanism has been developed, by which pressurized gas atmosphere can be sealed with magnetic fluid. At the same time, the growth axis can be driven in high accuracy. From evaluation of the elemental device, energy resolution of 0.5{times}10{sup -3} was obtained as expected. By using this spectral device, accurate measurements of XAFS and EXAFS can be conducted with excellent operability for K-absorption edges of Mg and Si. 15 refs., 54 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Solar X-rays from Axions: Rest-Mass Dependent Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Zioutas, Konstantin; Semertzidis, Yannis; Papaevangelou, Thomas; Gardikiotis, Antonios; Dafni, Theopisti; Anastassopoulos, Vassilis

    2010-01-01

    The spectral shape of solar X-rays is a power law. The more active the Sun is, the less steep the distribution. This behaviour can be explained by axion regeneration to X-rays occurring ~400km deep into the photosphere. Their down-comptonization reproduces the measured spectral shape, pointing at axions with rest mass m_a~17 meV/c2, without contradicting astrophysical-laboratory limits. Directly measured soft X-ray spectra from the extremely quiet Sun during 2009 (SphinX mission), though hitherto overlooked, fitt the axion scenario.

  1. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90° Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ~ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 Å) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been demonstrated as a

  2. X-ray Observations at Gaisberg Tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasan Hettiarachchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the occurrence of X-rays at ground level due to cloud-to-ground flashes of upward-initiated lightning from Gaisberg Tower, in Austria, which is located at an altitude of 1300 m. This is the first observation of X-ray emissions from upward lightning from a tower top located at high altitude. Measurements were carried out using scintillation detectors installed close to the tower top in two phases from 2011 to 2015. X-rays were recorded in three subsequent strokes of three flashes out of the total of 108 flashes recorded in the system during both phases. In contrast to the observations from downward natural or triggered lightning, X-rays were observed only within 10 µs before the subsequent return stroke. This shows that X-rays were emitted when the dart leader was in the vicinity of the tower top, hence during the most intense phase of the dart leader. Both the detected energy and the fluence of X-rays are far lower compared to X-rays from downward natural or rocket-triggered lightning. In addition to the above 108 flashes, an interesting observation of X-rays produced by a nearby downward flash is also presented. The shorter length of dart-leader channels in Gaisberg is suggested as a possible cause of this apparently weaker X-ray production.

  3. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  4. Detector development for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, M. A.; Herr, D. A.; Brewer, K. J.; Ojason, N.; Tarpine, H. A.

    2010-02-01

    X-ray imaging requires unique optical detector system configuration for optimization of image quality, resolution, and contrast ratio. A system is described whereby x-ray photons from multiple anode sources create a series of repetitive images on fast-decay scintillator screens, from which an intensified image is transferred to a fast phosphor on a GEN II image intensifier and collected as a cineradiographic video with high speed digital imagery. The work addresses scintillator material formulation, flash x-ray implementation, image intensification, and high speed video processing and display. Novel determination of optimal scintillator absorption, x-ray energy and dose relationships, contrast ratio determination, and test results are presented.

  5. X-ray Observations of "Recycled" Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2014-11-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory has been instrumental in establishing the X-ray properties of the Galactic population of rotation-powered ("recycled") millisecond pulsars. In this talk I will provide a summary of deep X-ray studies of globular cluster millisecond pulsars, as well as several nearby field millisecond pulsars. These include thermally-emitting recycled pulsars that may provide stringent constraints on the elusive neutron star equation of state, and so-called "redback" binary pulsars, which seem to sporadically revert to an X-ray binary-like state.

  6. X-ray spectrometry using polycapillary X-ray optics and position sensitive detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, X; Xie, J; He, Y; Pan, Q; Yan, Y

    2000-10-02

    Polycapillary X-ray optics (capillary X-ray lens) are now popular in X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. Such an X-ray lens can collect X-rays emitted from an X-ray source in a large solid angle and form a very intense X-ray microbeam which is very convenient for microbeam X-ray fluorescence (MXRF) analysis giving low minimum detection limits (MDLs) in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). A new method called position sensitive X-ray spectrometry (PSXS) which combines an X-ray lens used to form an intense XRF source and a position sensitive detector (PSD) used for wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS) measurement was developed recently in the X-ray Optics Laboratory of Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics (ILENP) at Beijing Normal University. Such a method can give high energy and spacial resolution and high detection efficiency simultaneously. A short view of development of both the EDXRF using a capillary X-ray lens and the new PSXS is given in this paper.

  7. X-Ray Probes of Cosmic Star Formation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pranab; White, Nicholas E.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the imprints left by a cosmological evolution of the star formation rate (SFR) on the evolution of X-ray luminosities Lx of normal galaxies, using the scheme earlier proposed by us, wherein the evolution of LX of a galaxy is driven by the evolution of its X-ray binary population. As indicated in our earlier work, the profile of Lx with redshift can both serve as a diagnostic probe of the SFR profile and constrain evolutionary models for X-ray binaries. We report here the first calculation of the expected evolution of X-ray luminosities of galaxies, updating our work by using a suite of more recently developed SFR profiles that span the currently plausible range. The first Chandra deep imaging results on Lx evolution are beginning to probe the SFR profile of bright spiral galaxies; the early results are consistent with predictions based on current SFR models. Using these new SFR profiles, the resolution of the "birthrate problem" of low-mass X-ray binaries and recycled, millisecond pulsars in terms of an evolving global SFR is more complete. We discuss the possible impact of the variations in the SFR profile of individual galaxies and galaxy types.

  8. X-ray absorption and soft x-ray fluorescence analysis of KDP optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; van Buuren, T; Miller, E; Land, T A; Bostedt, C; Franco, N; Whitman, P K; Baisden, P A; Terminello, L J; Callcott, T A

    2000-08-09

    Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) is a non-linear optical material used for laser frequency conversion and optical switches. Unfortunately, when KDP crystals are coated with a porous silica anti-reflection coating [1] and then exposed to ambient humidity, they develop dissolution pits [2,3]. Previous investigations [2] have shown that thermal annealing renders KDP optics less susceptible to pitting suggesting that a modification of surface chemistry has occurred. X-ray absorption and fluorescence were used to characterize changes in the composition and structure of KDP optics as a function of process parameters. KDP native crystals were also analyzed to provide a standard basis for interpretation. Surface sensitive total electron yield and bulk sensitive fluorescence yield from the K 2p, P 2p (L{sub 2,3}-edge) and O 1s (K-edge) absorption edges were measured at each process step. Soft X-ray fluorescence was also used to observe changes associated with spectral differences noted in the absorption measurements. Results indicate that annealing at 160 C dehydrates the surface of KDP resulting in a metaphosphate surface composition with K:P:O = 1:1:3.

  9. Space Optic Manufacturing - X-ray Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century - including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. To reduce the cost of mirror fabrication, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed replication techniques, the machinery and materials to replicate electro-formed nickel mirrors. The process allows fabricating precisely shaped mandrels to be used and reused as masters for replicating high-quality mirrors. This image shows a lightweight replicated x-ray mirror with gold coatings applied.

  10. Polishing X-ray Mirror Mandrel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century - including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. To reduce the cost of mirror fabrication, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed replication techniques, the machinery, and materials to replicate electro-formed nickel mirrors. The process allows fabricating precisely shaped mandrels to be used and reused as masters for replicating high-quality mirrors. MSFC's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC) has grinding and polishing equipment ranging from conventional spindles to custom-designed polishers. These capabilities allow us to grind precisely and polish a variety of optical devices, including x-ray mirror mandrels. This image shows Charlie Griffith polishing the half-meter mandrel at SOMTC.

  11. Optical, x-ray and microwave diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudisco, S.; Mascali, D.; Altana, C.; Anzalone, A.; Gammino, S.; Musumarra, A.; Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. P. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); IBAM-CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95100 Catania (Italy); Tramontana, A. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    Laser-driven ion acceleration is a new approach for the particles acceleration, which allows obtaining ion beams with unique properties, such as short burst duration, large particle number, small size source size, low transverse emittance. Currently, two main acceleration mechanisms have been identified and investigated: target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) and radiation pressure acceleration (RPA). Electrons dynamics and energies are strongly coupled to these acceleration mechanisms and they can be investigated with optical and X-ray techniques. The main aim of these studies are the identification of few physical observables that can be directly correlated to the proton emission obtained (in terms of reproducibility and intensity) in operations with different target material and structure and laser-target interaction parameters.

  12. Study of exploding type pumping x-ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashiro, Hidehiko; Tomie, Toshihisa [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We are proposing a new x-ray pumping scheme named 'Exploding type pumping scheme'. A plasma is produced from a very thin membrane which is irradiated by a short pulse laser. Effective heating and ionization of a plasma from membrane is evaluated from Si spectral lines and theoretically hydrodynamic simulation. Effect of ASE from KrF amplifiers is experimentally evaluated as a negligible level when a short pulse laser is well-synchronized. (author)

  13. X-Ray variability in LINERs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-García, L.; González-Martín, O.; Masegosa, J.; Márquez, I.

    2013-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are powered by energetic phenomena which cannot be attributed to stars. Among AGN, several objects can be described by the unified model (Antonucci 1993; Urry & Padovani 1995). However, several subclasses of objects that cannot be accommodated into this scheme, as is the case of LINERs (low ionisation narrow emission line regions). Variability across the whole electromagnetic spectrum is one of the properties that characterized AGNs. Therefore, searching for variability in LINERs could unequivocally demonstrate the presence of a non-thermal source. Also, X-rays is one of the best ways to search for AGN signature. In this work (which is part of a larger study) we add more evidence about the X-ray variability in LINERs and investigate its origin. We study two LINER nuclei; NGC 1052 (type 2) and NGC 4278 (type 1). The data consist on different observations in different epochs (timescale of years), taken from XMM-Newton and Chandra archives, respectively. To search for variability we try to fit all the spectra with the same model using XSPEC; if we can fit all the spectra with the same parameters, it is supposed that the object is non-variable, whereas if we cannot fit them properly, it will be variable. In the last case we need to let one or more parameters to vary in the model, so it may provide clues to understand the nature of this variability. For NGC 1052 we fit a model containing a thermal component plus two power laws. This results in a variability due to changes in the column density and the slope of the power law, both at hard energies. This scenario is consistent with the variability understood as variations in the clouds intersecting the line of sight of the observer (see Rissalitti et al. (2007, 2010)), and is also compatible with the framework of the clumpy torus model (Elitzur 2006). For NGC 4278 the model contains a thermal component plus a single power law. The spectral fitting results in variations of the slope and

  14. The X-ray emission of the γ Cassiopeiae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Myron A.; Lopes de Oliveira, R.; Motch, C.

    2016-09-01

    Long considered as the ;odd man out; among X-ray emitting Be stars, γ Cas (B0.5e IV) is now recognized as the prototype of a class of stars that emit hard thermal X-rays. Our classification differs from the historical use of the term ; γ Cas stars; defined from optical properties alone. The luminosity output of this class contributes significantly to the hard X-ray production of massive stars in the Galaxy. The γ Cas stars have light curves showing variability on a few broadly-defined timescales and spectra indicative of an optically thin plasma consisting of one or more hot thermal components. By now 9-13 Galactic ≈ B0-1.5e main sequence stars are judged to be members or candidate members of the γ Cas class. Conservative criteria for this designation are for a ≈ B0-1.5e III-V star to have an X-ray luminosity of 1032-1033 ergs s-1, a hot thermal spectrum containing the short wavelength Lyα Fe XXV and Fe XXVI lines and the fluorescence FeK feature all in emission. If thermality cannot be demonstrated, for example from either the presence of these Lyα lines or curvature of the hard continuum of the spectrum of an X-ray active Be star, we call them γ Cas candidates. We discuss the history of the discovery of the complicated characteristics of the variability in the optical, UV, and X-ray domains, leading to suggestions for the physical cause of the production of hard X-rays. These include scenarios in which matter from the Be star accretes onto a degenerate secondary star and interactions between magnetic fields on the Be star and its decretion disk. The greatest aid to the choice of the causal mechanism is the temporal correlations of X-ray light curves and spectra with diagnostics in the optical and UV wavebands. We show why the magnetic star-disk interaction scenario is the most tenable explanation for the creation of hard X-rays on these stars.

  15. Optical Design for a Survey X-Ray Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Timo T.; Zhang, William W.; McClelland, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    Optical design trades are underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to define a telescope for an x-ray survey mission. Top-level science objectives of the mission include the study of x-ray transients, surveying and long-term monitoring of compact objects in nearby galaxies, as well as both deep and wide-field x-ray surveys. In this paper we consider Wolter, Wolter-Schwarzschild, and modified Wolter-Schwarzschild telescope designs as basic building blocks for the tightly nested survey telescope. Design principles and dominating aberrations of individual telescopes and nested telescopes are discussed and we compare the off-axis optical performance at 1.0 KeV and 4.0 KeV across a 1.0-degree full field-of-view.

  16. A hard X-ray laboratory for monochromator characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamelin, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Since their installation at ILL during the 1970`s the ILL {gamma}-ray diffractometers have been intensively used in the development of neutron monochromators. However, the ageing of the sources and new developments in hard X-ray diffractometry lead to a decision at the end of 1995 to replace the existing {gamma}-ray laboratory with a hard X-ray laboratory, based on a 420 keV generator, making available in the long term several beam-lines for rapid characterisation of monochromator crystals. The facility is now installed and its characteristics and advantages are outlined. (author). 2 refs.

  17. X-ray optics simulation using Gaussian superposition technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idir, Mourad; Cywiak, Moisés; Morales, Arquímedes; Modi, Mohammed H

    2011-09-26

    We present an efficient method to perform x-ray optics simulation with high or partially coherent x-ray sources using Gaussian superposition technique. In a previous paper, we have demonstrated that full characterization of optical systems, diffractive and geometric, is possible by using the Fresnel Gaussian Shape Invariant (FGSI) previously reported in the literature. The complex amplitude distribution in the object plane is represented by a linear superposition of complex Gaussians wavelets and then propagated through the optical system by means of the referred Gaussian invariant. This allows ray tracing through the optical system and at the same time allows calculating with high precision the complex wave-amplitude distribution at any plane of observation. This technique can be applied in a wide spectral range where the Fresnel diffraction integral applies including visible, x-rays, acoustic waves, etc. We describe the technique and include some computer simulations as illustrative examples for x-ray optical component. We show also that this method can be used to study partial or total coherence illumination problem. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. X-RAY SOURCES IN THE DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY DRACO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonbas, E. [University of Adiyaman, Department of Physics, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I., E-mail: edasonbas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with L{sub X} > 3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup −1} in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  19. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  20. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M. [Plasma Physics Department, Applied Physics Division, Soreq NRC, Yavne (Israel); Strum, G. [Solid State Department, Applied Physics Division, Soreq NRC, Yavne (Israel)

    2012-08-15

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  1. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    images from the modelled data. The simulated images show good agreement with the experimental images both in terms of the temporal and spatial response of the backscattered X-rays. The computer model has also been used to simulate scanning over an area to generate a 3D image of the test objects scanned. Range gating was applied to the simulated 3D data to show how significant signal-to-noise ratio enhancements could be achieved to resulting 2D images when compared to conventional backscatter X-ray images. Further predictions have been made using the computer simulation including the energy distribution of the backscatter X-rays, as well as multi-path and scatter effects not measured in the experiment. Multi-path effects were shown to be the primary contributor to undesirable image artefacts observed in the simulated images. The computer simulation allowed the sources of these artefacts to be identified and highlighted the importance of mitigating these effects in the experiment. These predicted effects could be explored and verified through future experiments. Additionally the model has provided insight into potential performance limitations of the X-ray RADAR concept and informed on possible solutions. Further model developments will include simulating a more realistic electron beam energy distribution and incorporating representative detector characteristics.

  2. Einstein X-ray survey of the Pleiades - The dependence of X-ray emission on stellar age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Bookbinder, J.; Golub, L.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1985-01-01

    The data obtained with two pointed observations of 1 deg by 1 deg fields of the Pleiades region have been analyzed, and the results are presented. The maximum-likelihood X-ray luminosity functions for the Pleiades G and K stars in the cluster are derived, and it is shown that, for the G stars, the Pleiades X-ray luminosity function is significantly brighter than the corresponding function for Hyades G dwarf stars. This finding indicates a dependence of X-ray luminosity on stellar age, which is confirmed by comparison of the same data with median X-ray luminosities of pre-main sequence and local disk population dwarf G stars. It is suggested that the significantly larger number of bright X-ray sources associated with G stars than with K stars, the lack of detection of M stars, and the relatively rapid rotation of the Pleiades K stars can be explained in terms of the onset of internal differential rotation near the convective envelope-radidative core interface after the spin-up phase during evolution to the main sequence.

  3. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors ...

  4. Low Energy X-Ray Diagnostics - 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    ray Analysis, 18, 26 (1975). practicA !ity of thermal recording of intense x-rays. 2. R.P. Godwin, Adv. in X-rays Analysis, 19, 533 Many optical...the 15. T. W. Barbee Jr., in "National Science Foundation behavior of LSM dispersion elements. - Twenty Sixth Annual Report for Fiscal Year Extension

  5. Instrumental technique in X-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed review of the development of instruments for X-ray astronomy is given with major emphasis on nonfocusing high-sensitivity counter techniques used to detect cosmic photons in the energy range between 0.20 and 300 keV. The present status of X-ray astronomy is summarized together with significant results of the Uhuru observations, and photon interactions of importance for the detection of X-rays in space are noted. The three principal devices used in X-ray astronomy (proportional, scintillation, and solid-state counters) are described in detail, data-processing systems for these devices are briefly discussed, and the statistics of nuclear counting as applied to X-ray astronomy is outlined analytically. Effects of the near-earth X-ray environment and atmospheric gamma-ray production on X-ray detection by low-orbit satellites are considered. Several contemporary instruments are described (proportional-counter systems, scintillation-counter telescopes, modulation collimators), and X-ray astronomical satellite missions are tabulated.

  6. X-ray Galaxy Clusters & Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettori, Stefano

    2011-09-01

    I present a summary of the four lectures given on these topics: (i) Galaxy Clusters in a cosmological context: an introduction; (ii) Galaxy Clusters in X-ray: how and what we observe, limits and prospects; (iii) X-ray Galaxy Clusters and Cosmology: total mass, gas mass & systematics; (iv) Properties of the ICM: scaling laws and metallicity.

  7. The Beginnings of X-ray Crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Those were the days when Science was hovering around the wave–particle duality. William. Henry Bragg was toying with the idea that X-rays are particles and the observation made by Max von Laue that X-rays are diffracted by crystals could indeed lead to the understanding of crystal structures. On the other hand, his son, ...

  8. Tissue Equivalent Phantom Design for Characterization of a Coherent Scatter X-ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Kathryn Elizabeth

    Scatter in medical imaging is typically cast off as image-related noise that detracts from meaningful diagnosis. It is therefore typically rejected or removed from medical images. However, it has been found that every material, including cancerous tissue, has a unique X-ray coherent scatter signature that can be used to identify the material or tissue. Such scatter-based tissue-identification provides the advantage of locating and identifying particular materials over conventional anatomical imaging through X-ray radiography. A coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter spectral imaging system has been developed in our group to classify different tissue types based on their unique scatter signatures. Previous experiments using our prototype have demonstrated that the depth-resolved coherent scatter spectral imaging system (CACSSI) can discriminate healthy and cancerous tissue present in the path of a non-destructive x-ray beam. A key to the successful optimization of CACSSI as a clinical imaging method is to obtain anatomically accurate phantoms of the human body. This thesis describes the development and fabrication of 3D printed anatomical scatter phantoms of the breast and lung. The purpose of this work is to accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Tissue-equivalent anatomical phantoms were designed to assess the capability of the CACSSI system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, malignant). These phantoms were 3D printed based on DICOM data obtained from CT scans of prone breasts. The phantoms were tested through comparison of measured scatter signatures with those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Tumors in the phantom were modeled using a variety of biological tissue including actual surgically excised benign and malignant tissue specimens. Lung based phantoms have also been printed for future

  9. Long term changes in EUV and X-ray emissions from the solar corona and chromosphere as measured by the response of the Earth’s ionosphere during total solar eclipses from 1932 to 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Davis

    Full Text Available Measurements of the ionospheric E region during total solar eclipses in the period 1932–1999 have been used to investigate the fraction of Extreme Ultra Violet and soft X-ray radiation, 8, that is emitted from the limb corona and chromosphere. The relative apparent sizes of the Moon and the Sun are different for each eclipse, and techniques are presented which correct the measurements and, therefore, allow direct comparisons between different eclipses. The results show that the fraction of ionising radiation emitted by the limb corona has a clear solar cycle variation and that the underlying trend shows this fraction has been increasing since 1932. Data from the SOHO spacecraft are used to study the effects of short-term variability and it is shown that the observed long-term rise in 8 has a negligible probability of being a chance occurrence.

    Key words. Ionosphere (solar radiation and cosmic ray effects – Solar physics, astrophysics, and astronomy (corona and transition region

  10. The X-ray imager on AXO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    2001-01-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma-ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as the so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated....... Modular design and the low-power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: the X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X-ray...... Observatory (AXO), which is a mission proposed to the Danish Small Satellite Program and is dedicated to observations of X-ray generating processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Of special interest will be simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of sprites that are flashes appearing directly above an active...

  11. Hybrid scintillators for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Clifford; Rairden, Richard L.; Betz, Robert A.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to improve x-ray absorption and light production while maintaining high spatial resolution in x-ray imaging phosphor screens. Our current target is to improve screen absorption efficiency and screen brightness by factors of 2 or greater over existing screens that have 10-1p/mm resolution. In this program, commercial phosphor screens are combined with highly absorbing, high-resolution scintillating fiber-optic (SFO) face plates to provide a hybrid sensor that exhibits superior spatial resolution, x-ray absorption, and brightness values over the phosphor material alone. These characteristics of hybrid scintillators can be adjusted to meet specific x-ray imaging requirements over a wide range of x-ray energy. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, and testing of a new series of hybrid scintillators.

  12. X-ray modeling for SMILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T.; Wang, C.; Wei, F.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zheng, J.; Yu, X. Z.; Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2016-12-01

    SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer) is a novel mission to explore the coupling of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system via providing global images of the magnetosphere and aurora. As the X-ray imaging is a brand new technique applied to study the large scale magnetopause, modeling of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emissions in the magnetosheath and cusps is vital in various aspects: it helps the design of the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) on SMILE, selection of satellite orbits, as well as the analysis of expected scientific outcomes. Based on the PPMLR-MHD code, we present the simulation results of the X-ray emissions in geospace during storm time. Both the polar orbit and the Molniya orbit are used. From the X-ray images of the magnetosheath and cusps, the magnetospheric responses to an interplanetary shock and IMF southward turning are analyzed.

  13. A magnitude limited stellar X-ray survey and the F star X-ray luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topka, K.; Golub, L.; Gorenstein, P.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Vaiana, G. S.; Avni, Y.; Rosner, R.

    1982-01-01

    An X-ray survey has been conducted of stars brighter than visual magnitude 8.5 that have serendipitously fallen into the fields of view of the Imaging Proportional Counter of the Einstein Observatory. The survey includes 227 separate 1 x 1 deg fields, containing 274 stars with a visual magnitude of no more than 8.5 and covering a wide range of spectral types and luminosity classes. X-ray emission was detected from 33 stars, and upper limits have been determined for the remainder of the sample. F type stars dominate the detected sample, and most of these are shown to be dwarfs. An X-ray luminosity function for dF stars has been deduced, and reveals that the average 0.2-4.0 keV luminosity of these stars is around 10 to the 29th erg/sec. Constraints have been placed on the high luminosity tails and medians of the X-ray luminosity functions for other types of stars.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy using a self-seeded soft X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Thomas; Kern, Jan; Kubin, Markus; Ratner, Daniel; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin D; Löchel, Heike; Krzywinski, Jacek; Lutman, Alberto; Ding, Yuantao; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan; Turner, Joshua J; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nordlund, Dennis L; Rehanek, Jens; Weniger, Christian; Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hill, Ethan; Borovik, Andrew; Erko, Alexei; Föhlisch, Alexander; Mitzner, Rolf; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko; Wernet, Philippe; Bergmann, Uwe

    2016-10-03

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable unprecedented new ways to study the electronic structure and dynamics of transition metal systems. L-edge absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for such studies and the feasibility of this method at XFELs for solutions and solids has been demonstrated. However, the required x-ray bandwidth is an order of magnitude narrower than that of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), and additional monochromatization is needed. Here we compare L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of a prototypical transition metal system based on monochromatizing the SASE radiation of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) with a new technique based on self-seeding of LCLS. We demonstrate how L-edge XAS can be performed using the self-seeding scheme without the need of an additional beam line monochromator. We show how the spectral shape and pulse energy depend on the undulator setup and how this affects the x-ray spectroscopy measurements.

  15. X-ray source development for EXAFS measurements on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, F.; Thorn, D. B.; Kemp, G. E.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Ping, Y.; Eggert, J. H.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-08-01

    Extended X-ray absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements require a bright, spectrally smooth, and broad-band x-ray source. In a laser facility, such an x-ray source can be generated by a laser-driven capsule implosion. In order to optimize the x-ray emission, different capsule types and laser irradiations have been tested at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A crystal spectrometer is used to disperse the x-rays and high efficiency image plate detectors are used to measure the absorption spectra in transmission geometry. EXAFS measurements at the K-edge of iron at ambient conditions have been obtained for the first time on the NIF laser, and the requirements for optimization have been established.

  16. Characterization of Polycrystalline Materials Using Synchrotron X-ray Imaging and Diffraction Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, Wolfgang; King, A.; Herbig, M.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of synchrotron radiation x-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offers new possibilities for in-situ observation of deformation and damage mechanisms in the bulk of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (i.e., cracks, porosities) can be detected using...... propagation based phase contrast imaging, a 3-D imaging mode exploiting the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. Furthermore, for some classes of polycrystalline materials, one may use a 3-D variant of x-ray diffraction imaging, termed x-ray diffraction contrast tomography. X-ray...

  17. Current status and future perspectives of accelerator-based x-ray light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    State-of-the-art x-ray light sources are nowadays based on large-scale electron accelerators, because the synchrotron radiation (SR) and x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) radiation generated by high-energy electron beams have many advantages over other alternatives in terms of the wavelength tunability, high brightness and flux, high coherence, flexible polarization states, and so on. This is the reason why SR and XFEL light sources have largely contributed to the evolution of x-ray science. This paper reviews the current status of such accelerator-based x-ray light source facilities and discusses their future perspectives.

  18. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological samples using a betatron x-ray source generated in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaulagain, U.; Bohacek, K.; Kozlova, M.; Nejdl, J.; Krus, M.; Horny, V.; Mahieu, B.; Ta-Phuoc, K.

    2017-05-01

    In a plasma wakefield accelerator, an intense laser pulse propagates in an under-dense plasma that drives a relativistic plasma wave in which electrons can be injected and accelerated to relativistic energies within a short distance. These accelerated electrons undergo betatron oscillation and emit a collimated X-ray beam along the direction of electron velocity. This X-ray source is characterised with a source size of the order of a micrometer, a pulse duration of the order of femtosecond, and with a high spectral brightness. This novel X-ray source provides an excellent imaging tool to achieve unprecedented high-resolution image through phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast technique has the potential to reveal structures which are invisible with the conventional absorption imaging. In the X-ray phase contrast imaging, the image contrast is obtained thanks to phase shifts induced on the X-rays passing through the sample. It involves the real part of refractive index of the object. Here we present high-resolution phase contrast X-ray images of two biological samples using laser-driven Betatron X-ray source.

  19. X-rays from protostellar jets: emission from continuous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Favata, F.; Rosner, R.

    2007-02-01

    Context: Recently X-ray emission from protostellar jets has been detected with both XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, but the physical mechanism which can give rise to this emission is still unclear. Aims: We performed an extensive exploration of the parameter space for the main parameters influencing the jet/ambient medium interaction. Aims include: 1) to constrain the jet/ambient medium interaction regimes leading to the X-ray emission observed in Herbig-Haro objects in terms of the emission by a shock forming at the interaction front between a continuous supersonic jet and the surrounding medium; 2) to derive detailed predictions to be compared with optical and X-ray observations of protostellar jets; 3) to get insight into the protostellar jet's physical conditions. Methods: We performed a set of two-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations, in cylindrical coordinates, modeling supersonic jets ramming into a uniform ambient medium. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely thermal conduction and radiative losses. Results: Our model explains the observed X-ray emission from protostellar jets in a natural way. In particular, we find that a protostellar jet that is less dense than the ambient medium well reproduces the observations of the nearest Herbig-Haro object, HH 154, and allows us to make detailed predictions of a possible X-ray source proper motion (v_sh ≈500 km s-1) detectable with Chandra. Furthermore, our results suggest that the simulated protostellar jets which best reproduce the X-rays observations cannot drive molecular outflows.

  20. X-Ray Production by V1647 Ori During Optical Outbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teets, William; Weintraub, David; Grosso, Nicolas; Principe, David; Kastner, Joel; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Richmond, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The pre-main-sequence (PMS) star V1647 Ori has recently undergone two optical/near-infrared (OIR) outbursts that are associated with dramatic enhancements in the stellar accretion rate. Our intensive X-ray monitoring of this object affords the opportunity to investigate whether and how the intense X-ray emission is related to PMS accretion activity. Our analysis of all 14 Chandra X-Ray Observatory observations of V1647 Ori demonstrates that variations in the X-ray luminosity of V1647 Ori are correlated with similar changes in the OIR brightness of this source during both (2003-2005 and 2008) eruptions, strongly supporting the hypothesis that accretion is the primary generation mechanism for the X-ray outbursts. Furthermore, the Chandra monitoring demonstrates that the X-ray spectral properties of the second eruption were strikingly similar to those of the 2003 eruption. We find that X-ray spectra obtained immediately following the second outburstduring which V1647 Ori exhibited high X-ray luminosities, high hardness ratios, and strong X-ray variabilityare well modeled as a heavily absorbed (N H 4 1022cm2), single-component plasma with characteristic temperatures (kT X 2-6keV) that are consistently too high to be generated via accretion shocks but are in the range expected for plasma heated by magnetic reconnection events. We also find that the X-ray absorbing column has not changed significantly throughout the observing campaign. Since the OIR and X-ray changes are correlated, we hypothesize that these reconnection events either occur in the accretion stream connecting the circumstellar disk to the star or in accretion-enhanced protostellar coronal activity.