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Sample records for terbium 136

  1. Lattice dynamics of terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Nicklow, R.M.

    1969-01-01

    Abstract only given substantially as follows. Neutron diffraction results are presented for the phonon dispersion relation of terbium......Abstract only given substantially as follows. Neutron diffraction results are presented for the phonon dispersion relation of terbium...

  2. Lattice dynamics of terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Nicklow, R.M.

    1970-01-01

    The frequency-wave-vector dispersion relation for the normal modes of vibration of terbium at room temperature has been measured by means of slow-neutron inelastic scattering techniques. The triple-axis spectrometer at the Oak Ridge high flux isotope reactor was used, mostly in the constant-Q mode...

  3. Elastic properties of terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spichkin, Y.I.; Bohr, Jakob; Tishin, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Young modulus along the crystallographic axes b and c (E(b) and E(c)), and the internal friction of a terbium single crystal have been measured. At 4.2 K, E(b) and E(c) are equal to 38 and 84.5 GPa, respectively. The lattice part of the Young modulus and the Debye...... temperature has been calculated. The origin of the Young modulus anomalies arising at the transition to the magnetically ordered state is discussed....

  4. Terbium oxide at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogra, Sugandha; Sharma, Nita Dilawar; Singh, Jasveer; Bandhyopadhyay, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we report the behaviour of terbium oxide at high pressures. The as received sample was characterized at ambient by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction showed the sample to be predominantly cubic Tb 4 O 7 , although a few peaks also match closely with Tb 2 O 3 . In fact in a recent study done on the same sample, the sample has been shown to be a mixture of Tb 4 O 7 and Tb 2 O 3 . The sample was subjected to high pressures using a Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell upto a pressure of about 42 GPa with ruby as pressure monitor

  5. Luminescent properties of terbium complex with phenylanthranilic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alakaeva, L.A.; Kalazhokova, I.A.; Naurzhanova, F.Kh.

    1990-01-01

    Existence of terbium luminescence reaction in complex with phenanthranilic acid (FAA) is ascertained. The optimal conditions of terbium complexing with FAA are found. The ratio of components in the complex is 1:1. The influence of foreign rare earth in terbium luminescence intensity in complex with FAA is studied

  6. Fine structure studies of terbium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhay Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Krishnanath; Niraj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Terbium (Z = 65) is a typical rare-earth element. Fine structure of spectural lines of terbium (Tb) are presented using the laser optogalvanic spectroscopic technique. Altogether eighty transitions in the 5686-6367 A range have been observed in the fine structure spectrum of 159 Tb. Wavelengths of all the observed transitions have been determined. Out of 80 transitions of Tb, a total of 59 transitions are being reported for the first time. Classifications of 39 new transitions have been provided using the known energy levels, Doppler-limited optogalvanic spectroscopic technique is employed to study the fine structure (fs) 159 Tb. (author)

  7. Semiconductor composition containing iron, dysprosium, and terbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooser, Raphael C.; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Malasi, Abhinav; Taz, Humaira; Farah, Annettee E.; Kalyanaraman, Ramakrishnan; Duscher, Gerd Josef Mansfred; Patel, Maulik K.

    2017-09-26

    An amorphous semiconductor composition includes 1 to 70 atomic percent iron, 15 to 65 atomic percent dysprosium, 15 to 35 atomic percent terbium, balance X, wherein X is at least one of an oxidizing element and a reducing element. The composition has an essentially amorphous microstructure, an optical transmittance of at least 50% in at least the visible spectrum and semiconductor electrical properties.

  8. Critical scattering of neutrons from terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Dietrich, O.W.; Marshall, W.

    1968-01-01

    The inelasticity of the critical scattering of neutrons in terbium has been measured above the Neél temperature at the (0, 0, 2−Q) satellite position. The results show that dynamic slowing down of the fluctuations does occur in a second‐order phase transition in agreement with the general theory...

  9. Magneto-elastic interactions in terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.

    1971-01-01

    . These calculations agree semi-quantitatively with the results of experimental measurements. The author has examined the extent to which this simple picture is applicable to explain the magnon-phonon interactions in terbium, which have been observed at finite wave vectors by inelastic neutron scattering...

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnetic terbium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, C.L.T.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic properties of terbium were studied by the method of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance at 1.5 to 4 and 85 to 160 0 K. Two unconventional experimental techniques have been employed: the swept frequency and the swept temperature technique. Near 4 0 K, triplet resonance line structures were found and interpreted in terms of the magnetic domain and wall structures of ferromagnetic terbium. In the higher temperature range, temperature dependence of the resonance frequency and the quadrupole splitting were measured. The former provides a measurement of the temperature dependence of the magnetization M, and it agrees with bulk M measurements as well as the latest spin wave theory of M(T) (Brooks 1968). The latter agrees well with a calculation using a very general single ion density matrix for collective excitations (Callen and Shtrikman 1965). In addition, the small temperature-independent contribution to the electric field gradient at the nucleus due to the lattice and conduction electrons was untangled from the P(T) data. Also an anomalous and unexplained relaxation phenomenon was also observed

  11. Production and separation of terbium-149 and terbium-152 for targeted cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.; Leigh, J.

    1997-01-01

    This work reports the production and separation of useful quantities of 149 , 152 Tb from natural neodymium ( nat Nd) and 141 Pr for in vitro studies by bombarding the targets with 12 C projectiles. The physical, chemical and nuclear properties of radionuclides determine their efficacy in therapy and diagnosis. Tb-149 is an alpha-emitter with a half-life of 4.1h and 152 Tb is a positron emitter with a half-life of 17.5 h. Both of the isotopes have suitable gamma emission with good branching ratio suggesting their application to diagnosis apart from therapy. Alpha-emitters are effective in controlling cancer because of their short range and high Relative Biological Effectiveness. Long-lived positron emitters are effective in studying physiological function in positron emission tomography other than therapy. The aim of this work is to optimise the production and carrier free separation of terbium. Because of the presence of other stable isotopes in nat Nd, a number of other lanthanides are produced by secondary reactions during the production of terbium. In order to remove the secondary products, α-hydroxyisobutyric acid of pH 5 was used as eluent. satisfactory separation of terbium was achieved and demonstrate that useful quantities of 144,152 Tb can be produced by Tandem accelerator from 141 Pr and nat Nd targets

  12. Improved terbium-doped, lithium-loaded glass scintillator fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spector, G.B.; McCollum, T.; Spowart, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved terbium-doped, 6 Li-loaded glass scintillator has been drawn into fibers. Tests indicate that the neutron detection response of the fibers is superior to the response with fibers drawn from the original terbium-doped glass. The new fibers offer less attenuation (1/e length of ∝40 cm) and improved gamma ray/neutron discrimination. The improved fibers will be incorporated in a scintillator fiber optic long counter for neutron detection. (orig.)

  13. Raman spectroscopy study of the doping effect of the encapsulated terbium halogenides on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharlamova, M.V.; Kramberger, C.; Mittelberger, A. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    In the present work, the doping effect of terbium chloride, terbium bromide, and terbium iodide on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was compared by Raman spectroscopy. A precise investigation of the doping-induced alterations of the Raman modes of the filled SWCNTs was conducted. The shifts of the components of the Raman modes and modification of their profiles allowed concluding that the inserted terbium halogenides have acceptor doping effect on the SWCNTs, and the doping efficiency increases in the line with terbium iodide, terbium bromide, and terbium chloride. (orig.)

  14. Magnetoresistance in terbium and holmium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.L.; Jericho, M.H.; Geldart, D.J.W.

    1976-01-01

    The longitudinal magnetoresistance of single crystals of terbium and holmium metals in their low-temperature ferromagnetic phase has been investigated in magnetic fields up to 80 kOe. Typical magnetoresistance isotherms exhibit a minimum which increases in depth and moves to higher fields as the temperature increases. The magnetoresistance around 1 0 K, where inelastic scattering is negligible, has been interpreted as the sum of a negative contribution due to changes in the domain structure and a positive contribution due to normal magnetoresistance. At higher temperatures, a phenomenological approach has been developed to extract the inelastic phonon and spin-wave components from the total measured magnetoresistance. In the temperature range 4--20 0 K (approximately), the phonon resistivity varies as T 3 . 7 for all samples. Approximate upper and lower bounds have been placed on the spin-wave resistivity which is also found to be described by a simple power law in this temperature range. The implications of this result for theoretical treatments of spin-wave resistivity due to s-f exchange interactions are considered. It is concluded that the role played by the magnon energy gap is far less transparent than previously suggested

  15. 132 - 136 Abdullahi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences, 4(2): 132 – 136. Received: October, 2011. Accepted: November, 2011 ... pharmaceutical properties, confirming that, the plant has medicinal value. Saxena (1990) reported the ... was passed through a Whatman filter paper No.1. (Whatman, UK) and concentrated in vacuo using ...

  16. Fabricating Bis(phthalocyaninato) Terbium SIM into Tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) Terbium SMM with Enhanced Performance through Sodium Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Liu, Chao; Ma, Fang; Qi, Dongdong; Liu, Qingyun; Sun, Hao-Ling; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2018-04-23

    The non-peripherally substituted 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octa(butoxy)-phthalocyanine-involved unsymmetrical heteroleptic bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium double-decker, Tb(Pc){H[Pc(α-OC 4 H 9 ) 8 ]} (Pc=unsubstituted phthalocyanine) (1), was revealed to exhibit typical single ion magnet (SIM) behavior with effective energy barrier, 180 K (125 cm -1 ), and blocking temperature, 2 K, due to the severe deviation of the terbium coordination polyhedron from square-antiprismatic geometry. Fabrication of this double-decker compound into the novel tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) terbium pseudo-quadruple-decker Na 2 {Tb(Pc)[Pc(α-OC 4 H 9 ) 8 ]} 2 (2) single molecule magnet (SMM) not only optimizes the coordination polyhedron of terbium ion towards the square-antiprismatic geometry and intensifies the coordination field strength, but more importantly significantly enhances the molecular magnetic anisotropy in the unsymmetrical bis(phthalocyaninato) double-decker unit, along with the change of the counter cation from H + of 1 to Na + of 2, leading to an significantly enhanced magnetic behavior with spin-reversal energy barrier, 528 K (367 cm -1 ), and blocking temperature, 25 K. The present result is surely helpful towards developing novel tetrapyrrole lanthanide SMMs through rational design and self-assembly from bis(tetrapyrrole) lanthanide single ion magnet (SIM) building block. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Infrared X-ray and thermal analysis of terbium soaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrotra, K.N.; Sharma, N.

    1996-01-01

    Terbium sops (laureate, myristate and palmitate) were synthesized by direct metathesis of corresponding potassium soap with an aqueous solution of terbium nitrate. The physico-chemical characteristics of soaps in solid state were investigated by IR spectra, X-ray diffraction patterns and TGA measurements. The IR results revealed that the fatty acids exist in dimeric state through hydrogen bonding while the soaps possess partial ionic character. The X-ray analysis showed that the soaps have double layer structure with molecular axes slightly inclined to the basal plane. The thermal analysis suggested that the decomposition of soaps occur in two steps. The energy of activation, order of reaction and various kinetic parameters (i.e. frequency factor, entropy of activation and free energy) for the thermal decomposition of soaps were evaluated. (author). 26 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  18. Terbium and dysprosium complexes luminescence at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkova, S B; Kravchenko, T B; Kononenko, L.I.; Poluehktov, N S [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Odessa. Fiziko-Khimicheskij Inst.

    1979-01-01

    The variation is studied of the luminescence intensity of terbium and dysprosium complexes used in the analysis as solutions are cooled down to the liquid nitrogen temperature. Three groups of methods have been studied: observation of fluorescence of aqueous solutions, precipitate and extract suspensions in organic solvents. The brightest luminescence and greatest increase in luminescence intensity are observed at freezing of complex solvents with 1,2-dioxybenzene-3,5-disulfonic acid (DBSA) and iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and DBSA+EDTA, as well as in the case of benzene extracting of complexes with phenanthroline and salicylic acid. Otherwise the intensity increases 2-14-fold and for the complex of terbium with acetoacetic ester 36-fold.

  19. Interaction of terbium group metal oxides with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodop'yanov, A.G.; Baranov, S.V.; Kozhevnikov, G.N.

    1990-01-01

    Mechanism of carbothermal reduction of terbium group metals from oxides is investigated using thermodynamic and kinetic analyses. Interaction of metal oxides with carbon covers dissociation of metal oxides and reduction by carbon monoxide, which contribution into general reduction depends on CO pressure. Temperatures of reaction beginning for batch initial components at P=1.3x10 -4 and P CO =0.1 MPa and of formation of oxycarbide melts are determined

  20. Highly n -doped graphene generated through intercalated terbium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukiya, L.; Nair, M. N.; Hajjar-Garreau, S.; Vonau, F.; Aubel, D.; Bubendorff, J. L.; Cranney, M.; Denys, E.; Florentin, A.; Reiter, G.; Simon, L.

    2018-01-01

    We obtained highly n -type doped graphene by intercalating terbium atoms between graphene and SiC(0001) through appropriate annealing in ultrahigh vacuum. After terbium intercalation angle-resolved-photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) showed a drastic change in the band structure around the K points of the Brillouin zone: the well-known conical dispersion band of a graphene monolayer was superposed by a second conical dispersion band of a graphene monolayer with an electron density reaching 1015cm-2 . In addition, we demonstrate that atom intercalation proceeds either below the buffer layer or between the buffer layer and the monolayer graphene. The intercalation of terbium below a pure buffer layer led to the formation of a highly n -doped graphene monolayer decoupled from the SiC substrate, as evidenced by ARPES and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The band structure of this highly n -doped monolayer graphene showed a kink (a deviation from the linear dispersion of the Dirac cone), which has been associated with an electron-phonon coupling constant one order of magnitude larger than those usually obtained for graphene with intercalated alkali metals.

  1. High-pressure liquid chromatography of trace elements: Determination of terbium in terbium doped gadolinium oxide sulphide phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzucotelli, A.; Dadone, A.; Frache, R.; Baffi, F.; Genoa Univ.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study of isocratic and gradient elution separations of lanthanides has been carried out. Analyses of industrially and scientifically interesting products such as luminescent phosphors have been carried out by gradient elution with DL-2-hydroxyisobutyric acid. The determination of small amounts of terbium in gadolinium oxide sulphide phosphors is described in which an HCl solution was eluted through a stainless steel column packed with microparticulate silica, with bonded cation-exchange groups. Complete separation of gadolinium and terbium is achieved. Detection is with a variable wavelength detector following post-column complex formation with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol monosodium salt. Results obtained on test solutions show good reproducilbity and sensitivtiy and the method may be considered sufficiently reliable to be used in routine quality control procedures. (orig.)

  2. Terbium nitrate luminescence quenching by eosin in he presence of lithium perchlorate in sulfolane solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostakhov, S.S.; Kolosnitsyn, V.S.; Krasnogorskaya, N.N.; Kazakov, V.P.

    2000-01-01

    Quenching of terbium nitrate luminescence by anionic dye, eosin, in the presence of lithium perchlorate in sulfolane solutions was studied. Temperature dependence of terbium nitrate luminescence in sulfolane solutions in the presence of perchlorate anions were considered. The values of energy required for water molecular substitution in Tb 3+ ion coordination sphere for solvent molecule in electrolyte solution were ascertained [ru

  3. Luminescent determination of trace amounts of terbium using diantipyrylmethane and salicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tishchenko, M A; Gerasimenko, G I; Poluehktov, N S [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Odessa. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii

    1978-01-01

    To elucidate the possibility of using pyrazolone-5-diantipyril-methane (DAM) derivative for determination of terbium microimpurities, the conditions have been studied of luminescent determination of terbium in complex compounds containing an ion of rare-earth element, diantipyrilmethane, and salicylic acid (Sal.). The ratio between the components in the complex REE-DAM-Sal is 1:1:3. La, Y, Gd do not affect the luminescence intensity of terbium complex. A luminescent method of determining terbium traces in highly pure oxides of lanthanum, gadolinium, lutetium, and yttrium has been developed in which suspensions of complex precipitation are used. The amount of terbium determined in oxide of lanthanum, gadolinium, and lutetium is (1-5)x10/sup -6/% and (2-3)x10/sup -5/% in yttrium oxide.

  4. Low-temperature thermal conductivity of terbium-gallium garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inyushkin, A. V.; Taldenkov, A. N.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of paramagnetic Tb 3 Ga 5 O 12 (TbGG) terbium-gallium garnet single crystals is investigated at temperatures from 0.4 to 300 K in magnetic fields up to 3.25 T. A minimum is observed in the temperature dependence κ(T) of thermal conductivity at T min = 0.52 K. This and other singularities on the κ(T) dependence are associated with scattering of phonons from terbium ions. The thermal conductivity at T = 5.1 K strongly depends on the magnetic field direction relative to the crystallographic axes of the crystal. Experimental data are considered using the Debye theory of thermal conductivity taking into account resonance scattering of phonons from Tb 3+ ions. Analysis of the temperature and field dependences of the thermal conductivity indicates the existence of a strong spin-phonon interaction in TbGG. The low-temperature behavior of the thermal conductivity (field and angular dependences) is mainly determined by resonance scattering of phonons at the first quasi-doublet of the electron spectrum of Tb 3+ ion.

  5. Lifetime measurement in 136Pm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toney, D.; Zhong, Q.; De Angelis, G.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the electromagnetic transition probabilities in the doublet bands of 136 Pm. These two bands have been observed up to Iπ = (21 + ). Contrary to the case of 134 Pr, the B(M1)/B(E2) ratios take similar values within the error bars in 136 Pm. This is a strong indication that there is considerable difference between the two nuclei. However, a lifetime measurement in 136 Pm is needed to shed light on the scale and the origin of the difference

  6. Investigation of terbium scandate as an alternative gate dielectric in fully depleted transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Roeckerath, M.; Lopes, J. M. J.; Durgun Özben, E.; Urban, C.; Schubert, J.; Mantl, S.; Jia, Y.; Schlom, D.G.

    2010-01-01

    Terbium scandate thin films were deposited by e-gun evaporation on (100) silicon substrates. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray diffraction studies revealed homogeneous chemical compositions of the films. A dielectric constant of 26 and CV-curves with small hystereses were measured as well as low leakage current densities of < 1 nA/cm(2). Fully depleted n-type field-effect transistors on thin silicon-on-insulator substrates with terbium scandate gate dielectrics were fabricated ...

  7. Detection of Bacterial Endospores in Soil by Terbium Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brandes Ammann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spore formation is a survival mechanism of microorganisms when facing unfavorable environmental conditions resulting in “dormant” states. We investigated the occurrence of bacterial endospores in soils from various locations including grasslands (pasture, meadow, allotment gardens, and forests, as well as fluvial sediments. Bacterial spores are characterized by their high content of dipicolinic acid (DPA. In the presence of terbium, DPA forms a complex showing a distinctive photoluminescence spectrum. DPA was released from soil by microwaving or autoclaving. The addition of aluminium chloride reduced signal quenching by interfering compounds such as phosphate. The highest spore content (up to 109 spores per gram of dry soil was found in grassland soils. Spore content is related to soil type, to soil depth, and to soil carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Our study might provide a basis for the detection of “hot spots” of bacterial spores in soil.

  8. {alpha}-particle induced reactions on yttrium and terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, S.; Kumar, B.B. [School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain-456010 (India); Rashid, M.H. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Center, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Calcutta (India); Chintalapudi, S.N. [Inter-University Consortium for DAE Facilities, 3/LB, Bidhan Nagar, Calcutta (India)

    1997-05-01

    The stacked foil activation technique has been employed for the investigation of {alpha}-particle induced reactions on the target elements yttrium and terbium up to 50 MeV. Six excitation functions for the ({alpha},xn) type of reactions were studied using high-resolution HPGe {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. A comparison with Blann{close_quote}s geometric dependent hybrid model has been made using the initial exciton number n{sub 0}=4(4p0h) and n{sub 0}=5(5p0h). A broad general agreement is observed between the experimental results and theoretical predictions with an initial exciton number n{sub 0}=4(4p0h). {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. α-particle induced reactions on yttrium and terbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Kumar, B.B.; Rashid, M.H.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1997-01-01

    The stacked foil activation technique has been employed for the investigation of α-particle induced reactions on the target elements yttrium and terbium up to 50 MeV. Six excitation functions for the (α,xn) type of reactions were studied using high-resolution HPGe γ-ray spectroscopy. A comparison with Blann close-quote s geometric dependent hybrid model has been made using the initial exciton number n 0 =4(4p0h) and n 0 =5(5p0h). A broad general agreement is observed between the experimental results and theoretical predictions with an initial exciton number n 0 =4(4p0h). copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  10. Cerium(terbium, erbium)chloride-choline chloride aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajfutdinova, R.K.; Zhuravlev, E.F.; Bikbaeva, G.G.; Domrachev, V.N.; Vanskova, G.I.

    1985-01-01

    To clarify the effect of rare earth nature on mutual solubility of rare earth salts and amines the solubility of solid phases in the systems, consisting of choline chloride, water and cerium, terbium, erbium chlorides, has been studied. It is established, that solubility isotherms of all the systems, testify to the formation of new solid phases of the composition: Ce(Tb, Er)xCl 3 x2C 5 H 14 ONClx3H 2 O. Individuality of new solid phases is proved by DTA method, the composition is confirmed by chemical analysis and data of PMR spectra, for choline chloride and its complexes with rare earth chlorides of the given composition PMR and IR spectra are studied

  11. Spectrofluorimetric determination of cefixime using terbium-danofloxacin probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid L Manzoori

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Cefixime (Cfx, is a semi-synthetic third-generation oral cephalosporin antibiotic that is prescribed for the treatment of susceptible infections. There are some procedures for the determination of Cfx in pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples. Herein a spectrofluorimetric method was proposed for Cfx determination based on the fluorescence quenching of terbium-danofloxacin (Tb3+-Dano in the presence of Cfx. Materials and Methods: Cfx was detected based on fluorescence quenching of terbium-danofloxacin (Tb3+-Dano in the presence of Cfx with maximum excitation and emission wavelengths at 347 nm and 545 nm, respectively. The quenched fluorescence intensity of Tb3+- Dano system is proportional to the concentration of Cfx. The optimum conditions for the determination of Cfx were studied. Results: The maximum response was achieved under optimum conditions of [Tris buffer]= 0.008 mol/l (pH 6.5, [Tb3+]=1×10-4 mol/l  and [Dano]=1×10-4 mol/l. The developed method was evaluated in terms of accuracy, precision and limit of detection. The linear concentration ranges for quantification of Cfx were 8.8×10-8-8.8×10-7 mol/l and 1.1×10-7-8.8×10-7 mol/l in standard and human serum samples with the detection limits (S/N=3 of 2.8×10-8 mol/l and 3.9×10-8 mol/l, respectively. The Cfx was determined in pharmaceutical tablets and spiked serum samples and the results were satisfactory.   Conclusion: This method is simple, practical and relatively interference-free for determination of Cfx in pharmaceutical tablets and serum samples.

  12. (IS136) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agrobacterium strains harbour insertion sequences, which are known to transpose into genomes as well as into Ti plasmids. In this study we report the inactivation of a transgene due to transposition of the A. tumefaciens insertion sequence IS136. The transposition was discovered following transformation of plant tissues, ...

  13. Optical properties of phosphorescent nano-silicon electrochemically doped with terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelloz, Bernard [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Mentek, Romain; Koshida, Nobuyoshi [Tokyo University A and T, 2-24-16 Nakacho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Hybrid thin films consisting of oxidized nano-silicon doped with terbium have been fabricated. Nano-silicon was formed by electrochemical etching of silicon wafers. Terbium was incorporated into nano-silicon pores by electrochemical deposition. Different oxidizing thermal treatments were applied to the films. The samples treated by high-pressure water vapor annealing (HWA) exhibited strong blue emission with a phosphorescent component, as previously reported by our group. The low temperature (260 C) HWA also led to strong emission from Tb{sup 3+} ions, whereas typical high temperature (900 C) treatment generally used to activate Tb{sup 3+} ions in silicon-based materials led to less luminescent samples. Spectroscopic and dynamic analyses suggest that terbium was incorporated as a separate oxide phase in the pores of the porous nano-silicon. The PL of the terbium phase and nano-silicon phase exhibit different temperature and excitation power dependences suggesting little optical or electronic interaction between the two phases. The luminescence of terbium is better activated at low temperature (260 C) than at high temperature (900 C). The hybrid material may find some applications in photonics, for instance as a display material. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Monoxides of small terbium clusters: A density functional theory investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, G. L.; Yuan, H. K., E-mail: yhk10@swu.edu.cn; Chen, H.; Kuang, A. L.; Li, Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Chen, J. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2014-12-28

    To investigate the effect of oxygen atom on the geometrical structures, electronic, and magnetic properties of small terbium clusters, we carried out the first-principles calculations on Tb{sub n}O (n = 1-14) clusters. The capping of an oxygen atom on one trigonal-facet of Tb{sub n} structures is always favored energetically, which can significantly improve the structural stability. The far-infrared vibrational spectroscopies are found to be different from those of corresponding bare clusters, providing a distinct signal to detect the characteristic structures of Tb{sub n}O clusters. The primary effect of oxygen atom on magnetic properties is to change the magnetic orderings among Tb atoms and to reduce small of local magnetic moments of the O-coordinated Tb atoms, both of which serve as the key reasons for the experimental magnetic evolution of an oscillating behavior. These calculations are consistent with, and help to account for, the experimentally observed magnetic properties of monoxide Tb{sub n}O clusters [C. N. Van Dijk et al., J. Appl. Phys. 107, 09B526 (2010)].

  15. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production via Terbium Oxide Based Redox Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhosale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational thermodynamic modeling of the terbium oxide based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting (Tb-WS cycle is reported. The 1st step of the Tb-WS cycle involves thermal reduction of TbO2 into Tb and O2, whereas the 2nd step corresponds to the production of H2 through Tb oxidation by water splitting reaction. Equilibrium compositions associated with the thermal reduction and water splitting steps were determined via HSC simulations. Influence of oxygen partial pressure in the inert gas on thermal reduction of TbO2 and effect of water splitting temperature (TL on Gibbs free energy related to the H2 production step were examined in detail. The cycle (ηcycle and solar-to-fuel energy conversion (ηsolar-to-fuel efficiency of the Tb-WS cycle were determined by performing the second-law thermodynamic analysis. Results obtained indicate that ηcycle and ηsolar-to-fuel increase with the decrease in oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas and thermal reduction temperature (TH. It was also realized that the recuperation of the heat released by the water splitting reactor and quench unit further enhances the solar reactor efficiency. At TH=2280 K, by applying 60% heat recuperation, maximum ηcycle of 39.0% and ηsolar-to-fuel of 47.1% for the Tb-WS cycle can be attained.

  16. Autofluorescence-Free Live-Cell Imaging Using Terbium Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, M; Goetz, J; Bartenlian, H; Wong, K-L; Charbonnière, L J; Hildebrandt, N

    2018-04-18

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) have become irreplaceable tools for advanced cellular and subcellular imaging. While very bright NPs require excitation with UV or visible light, which can create strong autofluorescence of biological components, NIR-excitable NPs without autofluorescence issues exhibit much lower brightness. Here, we show the application of a new type of surface-photosensitized terbium NPs (Tb-NPs) for autofluorescence-free intracellular imaging in live HeLa cells. The combination of exceptionally high brightness, high photostability, and long photoluminecence (PL) lifetimes for highly efficient suppression of the short-lived autofluorescence allowed for time-gated PL imaging of intracellular vesicles over 72 h without toxicity and at extremely low Tb-NP concentrations down to 12 pM. Detection of highly resolved long-lifetime (ms) PL decay curves from small (∼10 μm 2 ) areas within single cells within a few seconds emphasized the unprecedented photophysical properties of Tb-NPs for live-cell imaging that extend well beyond currently available nanometric imaging agents.

  17. Folate Receptor Targeted Alpha-Therapy Using Terbium-149

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Cristina; Haller, Stephanie; Dorrer, Holger; Köster, Ulli; Johnston, Karl; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Terbium-149 is among the most interesting therapeutic nuclides for medical applications. It decays by emission of short-range α-particles (Eα = 3.967 MeV) with a half-life of 4.12 h. The goal of this study was to investigate the anticancer efficacy of a 149Tb-labeled DOTA-folate conjugate (cm09) using folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells in vitro and in tumor-bearing mice. 149Tb was produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Radiolabeling of cm09 with purified 149Tb resulted in a specific activity of ~1.2 MBq/nmol. In vitro assays performed with 149Tb-cm09 revealed a reduced KB cell viability in a FR-specific and activity concentration-dependent manner. Tumor-bearing mice were injected with saline only (group A) or with 149Tb-cm09 (group B: 2.2 MBq; group C: 3.0 MBq). A significant tumor growth delay was found in treated animals resulting in an increased average survival time of mice which received 149Tb-cm09 (B: 30.5 d; C: 43 d) compared to untreated controls (A: 21 d). Analysis of blood parameters rev...

  18. Characterization of antibody-chelator conjugates: Determination of chelator content by terbium fluorescence titration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, K.D.; Schnobrich, K.E.; Johnson, D.K. (Abbott Laboratories, Department 90M, Abbott Park, IL (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Fluorescence titrations were performed by adding varying mole ratios of terbium(III) to antibody conjugates formed by benzyl isothiocyanate derivatives of three different polyaminopolycarboxylate chelators (NTA, EDTA, and DTPA) and the results compared to values for average chelator content obtained by cobalt-57 binding assays. For two different murine monoclonal antibodies, the average chelator content obtained by terbium fluorescence titration correlated closely with that measured by the cobalt-57 binding assay. It is concluded that lanthanide fluorescence titrations provide a useful alternative to radiometal binding assays for the determination of chelator content in protein-chelator conjugates.

  19. Characterization of antibody-chelator conjugates: Determination of chelator content by terbium fluorescence titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, K.D.; Schnobrich, K.E.; Johnson, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    Fluorescence titrations were performed by adding varying mole ratios of terbium(III) to antibody conjugates formed by benzyl isothiocyanate derivatives of three different polyaminopolycarboxylate chelators (NTA, EDTA, and DTPA) and the results compared to values for average chelator content obtained by cobalt-57 binding assays. For two different murine monoclonal antibodies, the average chelator content obtained by terbium fluorescence titration correlated closely with that measured by the cobalt-57 binding assay. It is concluded that lanthanide fluorescence titrations provide a useful alternative to radiometal binding assays for the determination of chelator content in protein-chelator conjugates

  20. Systems of pyridine, piperidine, piperazine, morpholine hydrochlorides-terbium (dysprosium) chloride-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajfutdinova, R.K.; Sharafutdinova, A.A.; Murinov, Yu.I.

    1988-01-01

    The isothermal cross section method at 25 and 50 deg C is applied to study pyridine hydrochloride-terbium chloride-water (1) piperidine hydrochloride-dysprosium chloride-water (2), piperazine dihydrochloride-dysprosium chloride-water (3) and morpholine hydrochloride-terbium chloride (4) systems. Solubility isotherma prove the formation of incongruently soluble compound of the TbCl 3 x6C 5 H 5 NxHCl composition systems (1). The individuality of the new solid phase is proved by the chemical and DTA methods. Systems (2-4) are of a simple eutonic type

  1. Thermoluminescence of cerium and terbium -doped calcium pyrophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman L, J.; Cruz Z, E. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Lozano R, I. B.; Diaz G, J. A. I., E-mail: jesus.roman@nucleares.unam.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria No. 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this work is to report the thermoluminescence (Tl) response of Calcium Pyrophosphate phosphor doped with Cerium and Terbium impurities (Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+}). The phosphors were synthesized using the co-precipitation method and annealed at 900 degrees C by two hours for obtain the β phase. The intentional doping with Ce and Tb ions was 1 at.% and 0.1 at.%, whereas in the EDS results the concentration of impurities was 0.39 at.% and 0.05 at.%, respectively. The superficial morphology of phosphor is mainly composed by thin wafers of different size. All samples were exposed to gamma rays from {sup 60}Co in the Gammacell-200 irradiator. The Tl response of the phosphor was measured from Rt up to 350 degrees C and under nitrogen atmosphere in a Harshaw TLD 3500 reader. The glow curves of the Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+} powders showed a broad intense Tl peak centered at 165 degrees C and a shoulder at approximate 260 degrees C was observed. A linear Tl response in the range of absorbed dose of 0.2 to 10 Gy was obtained. Tl glow curves were analyzed using the initial rise (IR)and computerized glow curve deconvolution methods to evaluate the kinetics parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and kinetic order (b). (Author)

  2. 32 CFR 644.136 - Leasing guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Leasing guidelines. 644.136 Section 644.136 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Acquisition Acquisition by Leasing § 644.136 Leasing guidelines. Division and District...

  3. 42 CFR 136.116 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reports. 136.116 Section 136.116 Public Health... and Services § 136.116 Reports. In addition to the reporting and information requirements provided in... Federal financial assistance shall make such reports and information available to the Indian people served...

  4. 7 CFR 58.136 - Rejected milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rejected milk. 58.136 Section 58.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Milk § 58.136 Rejected milk. A plant shall reject specific milk from a producer if the milk fails to...

  5. 33 CFR 136.3 - Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information. 136.3 Section 136.3... SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT General § 136.3 Information. Anyone desiring to file a claim against the Fund may obtain general information on the procedure for filing a claim from the Director National...

  6. 42 CFR 136.110 - Facilities construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facilities construction. 136.110 Section 136.110..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Grants for Development, Construction, and Operation of Facilities and Services § 136.110 Facilities construction. In addition to other requirements of this subpart...

  7. Magneto-optical studies of valence instability in europium and terbium phosphors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodrigues, L.C.v.; Hölsä, J.; Brito, H.F.; Maryško, Miroslav; Matos, J.R.; Paturi, P.; Rodrigues, R.V.; Lastusaari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 170, Feb (2016), 701-706 ISSN 0022-2313 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : valence * europium * terbium * oxysulfide and -sulfate * phosphors * paramagnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.686, year: 2016

  8. A terbium(III)-organic framework for highly selective sensing of cytidine triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi Juan; He, Rong Xing; Li, Yuan Fang

    2012-11-21

    Highly selective sensing of cytidine triphosphate (CTP) against other triphosphate nucleosides including ATP, GTP and UTP is successfully achieved with a luminescent terbium(III)-organic framework (TbOF) of [Tb(2)(2,3-pzdc)(2)(ox)(H(2)O)(2)](n) (2,3-pzdc(2-) = 2,3-pyrazinedicarboxylate, ox(2-) = oxalate).

  9. Direct determination of graphene quantum dots based on terbium-sensitized luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorent-Martínez, Eulogio J.; Molina-García, Lucía; Durán, Gema M.; Ruiz-Medina, Antonio; Ríos, Ángel

    2018-06-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQD) were determined in water samples using terbium-sensitized luminescence (TSL). Terbium ions complex with GQD due to the carboxylic groups that are usually present in these nanomaterials, increasing the luminescence signal of terbium. In Tb(III)-GQD complexes, GQD absorb energy at their characteristic excitation wavelength and transfer it to terbium ion, which emits at its particular emission wavelength. The analytical signal, measured at λexc = 257 nm and λem = 545 nm, increases proportionally to GQD concentration between 50 and 500 μg L-1. Under optimum conditions, the proposed method presents a detection limit of 15 μg L-1 and is selective to GQD in the presence of other nanomaterials of similar size. As GQD are highly water-soluble, they are potential contaminants in environmental or drinking waters water samples, and hence the method was applied to the analysis of different drinking waters which were the target samples for the application of the developed method.

  10. Synthesis and novel fluorescence phenomenon of terbium(III) complex with N, N',N' -tris (2-benzimidazolmethyl) amine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Tianlin; Gao, Min; Yang, Jinhui; Qin, Wenwu

    2010-01-01

    A benzimidazole ligand with a tripodal structure, N, N', N' -tris (2-benzimidazolmethyl) amine, and its terbium (III) complex has been synthesized. The complex has been characterized by element analysis, IR spectra, mass spectra, thermal analysis and molar conductivity. The terbium ion is found to coordinate with the nitrogen atoms (= N-) of imidazole ring and the bridgehead nitrogen atom. The fluorescence properties of the complex in aqueous solutions have been studied. Under excitation of UV light, the complex exhibits characteristic fluorescence of terbium ion. The luminescence of terbium complex in aqueous solutions is strongly enhanced by H + concentration. This phenomenon makes the new complex favorable for use in fluorescence switches and sensors. The mechanism of the fluorescence enhancement by protonation of the nitrogen atoms (-NH-) of imidazole ring is due to the suppressed photoinduced electron transfer fluorescence quenching on addition of acid. (author)

  11. X-ray fluorescence analysis of terbium oxide for rare earth impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandola, L.C.; Machado, I.J.; Mohile, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    A method for the determination of Sm 2 O 3 , Eu 2 O 3 , Gd 2 O 3 , Dy 2 O 3 , Ho 2 O 3 and Y 2 O 3 in terbium oxide is described. The sample is converted to terbium oxalate, mixed with boric acid binder in the ratio 2:1, pelleted at a pressure of 20 tons over a boric acid backing pellet and irradiated with x-rays from a tungsten tube operated by Philips PW 1140 generator. The secondary x-rays thus generated are analysed by a LiF (200) crystal in Philips PW 1220 x-ray fluorescence spectrometer using suitable detectors. The minimum determination limit (MDL) is 0.01% for all rare earth oxides determined except for Y 2 O 3 for which it is 0.005%. (author)

  12. Investigation of terbium scandate as an alternative gate dielectric in fully depleted transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeckerath, M.; Lopes, J. M. J.; Özben, E. Durǧun; Urban, C.; Schubert, J.; Mantl, S.; Jia, Y.; Schlom, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Terbium scandate thin films were deposited by e-gun evaporation on (100) silicon substrates. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray diffraction studies revealed homogeneous chemical compositions of the films. A dielectric constant of 26 and CV-curves with small hystereses were measured as well as low leakage current densities of <1 nA/cm2. Fully depleted n-type field-effect transistors on thin silicon-on-insulator substrates with terbium scandate gate dielectrics were fabricated with a gate-last process. The devices show inverse subthreshold slopes of 80 mV/dec and a carrier mobility for electrons of 225 cm2/V•s was extracted.

  13. Automated spectrofluorimetric determinations of terbium and dysprosium in rare earth mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle, S.J.; Za' tar, N. (Kent Univ., Canterbury (UK))

    1983-12-01

    Several methods involving the use of water-soluble binary and ternary complexes have been proposed for the spectrofluorimetric determination based on terbium(III) emission at 545 nm. These are terbium(III) with (A) ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid), (B) o-hydroxyphenyliminodiacetic acid, (C) EDTA + 5-sulphosalicylic acid, (D) EDTA + 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-3,5-disulphonic acid disodium salt (Tiron), and (E) iminodiacetic acid (IDA) + Tiron. Two of the reagent mixtures (D and E) can also be used for the fluorimetric determination of dysprosium(III) at 582 nm. A comparison has been made of these methods in order to select the most satisfactory procedure with respect to selectivity, sensitivity and suitability for adaption to automatic operation. Results are given and discussed.

  14. Cross sections from 800 MeV proton irradiation of terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, J.W., E-mail: jwengle@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mashnik, S.G.; Bach, H.; Couture, A.; Jackman, K.; Gritzo, R.; Ballard, B.D.; Fassbender, M.; Smith, D.M.; Bitteker, L.J.; Ullmann, J.L.; Gulley, M.S.; Pillai, C.; John, K.D.; Birnbaum, E.R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Nortier, F.M., E-mail: meiring@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-11-02

    Terbium foils were irradiated with 800 MeV protons to ascertain the potential for production of lanthanide isotopes of interest in medical, astrophysical, and basic science research and to contribute to nuclear data repositories. Isotopes produced in the foil were quantified by gamma spectroscopy. Cross sections for 35 isotopes produced in the irradiation are reported and compared with predictions by the MCNP6 transport code using the CEM03.03, Bertini and INCL + ABLA event generators. Our results indicate the need to accurately consider fission and fragmentation of relatively light target nuclei like terbium in the modeling of nuclear reactions at 800 MeV. The predictive power of the code was found to be different for each event generator tested but was satisfactory for most of the product yields in the mass region where spallation reactions dominate. However, none of the event generators' results are in complete agreement with measured data.

  15. 33 CFR 136.309 - Advertisement determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advertisement determinations. 136... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Designation of Source and Advertisement § 136.309 Advertisement determinations. (a) The Director, NPFC, determines for each incident the type, geographic scope...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... protective footwear. (1) Protective footwear must comply with any of the following consensus standards: (i... in accordance with one of the above consensus standards will be deemed to be in compliance with the...

  17. 21 CFR 161.136 - Olympia oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Olympia oysters. 161.136 Section 161.136 Food and... oysters. Olympia oysters, raw Olympia oysters, shucked Olympia oysters, are of the species Ostrea lurida and conform to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for oysters in § 161.130. ...

  18. 33 CFR 136.5 - Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... offshore unit, Fund, guarantor, incident, National Contingency Plan, natural resources, navigable waters... means the Federal On-Scene Coordinator designated under the National Contingency Plan or that person's... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions 136.5 Section 136.5...

  19. 13 CFR 136.140 - Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employment. 136.140 Section 136....140 Employment. (a) No qualified individual with handicaps shall, on the basis of handicap, be subjected to discrimination in employment under any program, or activity conducted by the Agency. (b) The...

  20. 33 CFR 136.217 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.217 Compensation... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.217...

  1. 33 CFR 136.205 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.205 Compensation... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.205...

  2. 33 CFR 136.113 - Other compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT General Procedure § 136.113 Other compensation. A... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other compensation. 136.113...

  3. Raman spectra of terbium trichloride, phosphorus pentachloride and their molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Zakir'yanova, I.D.

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to study in situ the behavior of individual terbium trichloride and phosphorus pentachloride in different aggregative states as a function of temperature, and of solutions of PCl 5 vapors in molten TbCl 3 . A conclusion is drawn about their structure and the nature of phase transformations and chemical reactions in wide ranges of temperature and saturated vapor pressures [ru

  4. A thermoluminescence study of Z2-centres in terbium-doped NaCl crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, K.N.; Ahmed, I.M.; Pandaraiah, N.; Rao, U.V.S.; Babu, V.H.

    1983-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL), optical absorption are used to correlate thermal annealing of Z 2 -centres with TL peak occurring around 110 0 C in terbium-doped NaCl crystals. The TL glow peak occurring around 190 0 C is attributed to the thermal annealing of F-centres. The thermal activation parameters are calculated for both Z 2 - and F-centre peaks. (author)

  5. Terbium(III) ions as sensitizers of oxidation of indole and its derivatives in Fenton system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl; Staninski, Krzysztof

    2017-03-15

    Oxidation of indole and its derivatives in the Fenton system as a source of oxidising agents, in the presence of terbium(III) ions was studied by chemiluminescence methods to get the kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence. Terbium(III) ions acted as a sensitizer of the mixtures Tb(III)-Fe(II)/Fe(III)-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-indole or its derivative (tryptophan, tryptamine, indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetyl aspartic acid). For the above indolic compounds, linear dependencies of integrated intensity of chemiluminescence on concentration of indolic compound in water and in water-acetonitrile solution were obtained. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of the indolic compounds studied were found to be by one or two orders of magnitude lower in the system with terbium(III) ions than without them. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence emitted on oxidation of indolic compounds in Fenton system. • Tb (III) ions as sensitizers of indolic compounds oxidation in solutions. • Linear relations between CL intensity and indolic compound concentration.

  6. 21 CFR 136.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION BAKERY PRODUCTS General Provisions § 136.3 Definitions. For purposes of this part, the following definitions apply: (a) The word bread when used in the name of the food means the unit weighs one-half pound...

  7. 33 CFR 136.233 - Proof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.233 Proof. In addition to the... must be established. (d) Whether alternative employment or business was available and undertaken and...

  8. 33 CFR 136.223 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS... allowable under paragraph (a) of this section must be reduced by— (1) All compensation made available to the... under § 136.235. Government Revenues ...

  9. The symbiotic star H1-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Optical and infrared spectrophotometry is presented of the high-excitation emission-line star H1-36. The presence of a variable M giant is established: H1-36 may therefore be classified as a symbiotic star. The observations are interpreted in terms of the usual binary model for symbiotic stars, namely that an unseen star is heated by accretion of gas from its companion M giant. (author)

  10. Complex compounds of terbium(III) with some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teslyuk, O.I.; Egorova, A.V.; Yagodkin, B.N.; Bel'tyukova, S.V.

    2007-01-01

    Luminescence properties of the complexes of terbium(III) with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen and orthofen) were studied. It was demonstrated that in the presence of organic bases (2,2'-dipyridyl and 1,10-phenanthroline) mixed-ligand complexes are formed and the luminescence intensity of terbium(III) increases by a factor of up to 250. The optimum complexation conditions were determined. It was proposed to use these complexes as analytical forms for the luminescence determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen and orthofen) in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The detection limits are 2 and 0.05 μg/ml, respectively [ru

  11. Green light emission in aluminum oxide powders doped with different terbium concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariscal B, L; Falcony, C. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, 07360 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Carmona T, S.; Murrieta, H.; Sanchez A, M. A. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Vazquez A, R. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Computo, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia R, C. M., E-mail: mariscal2005@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-11-01

    Different emission intensities presented in aluminum oxide phosphors corresponding to different concentrations of doping performed with terbium are analyzed. The phosphors were synthesized by the evaporation technique and were characterized by photo and cathodoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and EDS techniques for different incorporation percentages of terbium as dopant; they show characteristic transitions in 494, 543, 587 and 622 nm, corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 6}, {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 5}, {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 4} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 3}, respectively when they are excited with λ{sub exc} = 380 nm wavelength at room temperature. The results of X-ray diffraction show the presence of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases with peaks located at 2θ = 25.78, 35.34, 37.96, 43.56, 45.8, 52.74, 57.7, 61.5, 66.74, 68.44, 77.12 and 80.94, and the δ-Al{sub 2}O-3 phase 2θ = 32.82, 45.8, 61.36 and 66.74. These compounds were heat treated for two hours at 1100 degrees Celsius. EDS analyzes indicate that these compounds have close to 60% oxygen around of 40% aluminum in the presence of terbium as dopant which indicates a stoichiometry close to the expected one for alumina. (Author)

  12. Synthesis and luminescence properties of europium and terbium complexes with pyridine- or bipyridine-linked oligothiophene ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping; Huang Mingsheng; Pan Wanzhang; Zhang Yamin; Hu Jianhua; Deng Wenji

    2006-01-01

    With an aim to develop novel luminescence materials, europium and terbium complexes of 2,5-(2-thiophene)-pyridine (TPY) and 5,5'-bis(5-(2,2'-bithiophene))-2,2'-bipyridine (B2TBPY) were synthesized, and their luminescence properties studied. The complexes exhibit ligand-sensitized emission, which is typical of Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions

  13. 33 CFR 136.211 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.211 Compensation... that amount required to accomplish the activities for which the claim was paid. Real or Personal...

  14. 33 CFR 136.231 - Authorized claimants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.231 Authorized... also involves a claim for injury to, or economic losses resulting from destruction of, real or personal...

  15. 33 CFR 136.215 - Proof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.215 Proof. (a) In addition to the... each claim for economic loss resulting from destruction of real or personal property, the claimant must...

  16. Pension kasvab vaid 136 krooni? / Olev Raju

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raju, Olev, 1948-

    2005-01-01

    Tartu Ülikooli majandusprofessori sõnul näitavad kõik arvud, et valitsus kavandabki vaid 136-kroonist pensionitõusu, kuigi peaminister Juhan Palts lubas mullu Riigikogule riigieelarvekava üle andes 250-kroonist pensionitõusu

  17. 42 CFR 136.401 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention § 136.401... types of crimes as mandated by section 408 of the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention... the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (ISDEA), Pub. L. 93-638, employ individuals...

  18. Electroanalytical performance of a terbium(III)-selective sensor based on a neutral ionophore in environmental and medicinal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V.K.; Singh, A.K.; Gupta, Barkha [Indian Institute of Technology-Roorkee, Department of Chemistry, Roorkee (India)

    2008-04-15

    A new highly selective terbium(III) electrode was prepared with a polymeric film doped using S-2-benzothiazolyl-2-amino-{alpha}-(methoxyimino)-4-thiazolethiol acetate as an electroactive material, benzyl acetate (BA) as a plasticizer, and potassium tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl) borate (KTpClPB) as an anionic site in the percentage ratio 3.17:1.58:63.4:31.7 (ionophore-KTpClPB-BA-PVC, w/w). The electrode exhibited a linear response with a near Nernstian slope of 19.5 mV/decade within the concentration range 1.5 x 10{sup -7}-1.0 x 10{sup -2} M terbium ions, with a working pH range from 2.0 to 8.0, and a fast response time of 10 s and presented satisfactory reproducibility. The limit of detection was 9.3 x 10{sup -8} M. The results show that this electrode can be used in ethanol media up to 30% (v/v) concentration without interference. It can be used for 3 months without any considerable divergence in the potentials. Selectivity coefficients for terbium(III) with respect to many cations were investigated. The electrode is highly selective for terbium(III) ions over a large number of monovalent, bivalent, and trivalent cations. This shows the valuable property of the proposed electrode. The stability constant of the ionophore towards Tb{sup 3+} ions was determined with the sandwich membrane method. It was successfully used as an indicator electrode in potentiometric determination of terbium(III) ions with EDTA and in direct determination in tap water and binary mixtures with quantitative results. The utility of the proposed electrode was also determined in the presence of ionic and nonionic surfactants and in the presence of fluoride ions in four pharmaceutical (mouthwash) preparations. (orig.)

  19. Electroanalytical performance of a terbium(III)-selective sensor based on a neutral ionophore in environmental and medicinal samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, V.K.; Singh, A.K.; Gupta, Barkha

    2008-01-01

    A new highly selective terbium(III) electrode was prepared with a polymeric film doped using S-2-benzothiazolyl-2-amino-α-(methoxyimino)-4-thiazolethiol acetate as an electroactive material, benzyl acetate (BA) as a plasticizer, and potassium tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl) borate (KTpClPB) as an anionic site in the percentage ratio 3.17:1.58:63.4:31.7 (ionophore-KTpClPB-BA-PVC, w/w). The electrode exhibited a linear response with a near Nernstian slope of 19.5 mV/decade within the concentration range 1.5 x 10 -7 -1.0 x 10 -2 M terbium ions, with a working pH range from 2.0 to 8.0, and a fast response time of 10 s and presented satisfactory reproducibility. The limit of detection was 9.3 x 10 -8 M. The results show that this electrode can be used in ethanol media up to 30% (v/v) concentration without interference. It can be used for 3 months without any considerable divergence in the potentials. Selectivity coefficients for terbium(III) with respect to many cations were investigated. The electrode is highly selective for terbium(III) ions over a large number of monovalent, bivalent, and trivalent cations. This shows the valuable property of the proposed electrode. The stability constant of the ionophore towards Tb 3+ ions was determined with the sandwich membrane method. It was successfully used as an indicator electrode in potentiometric determination of terbium(III) ions with EDTA and in direct determination in tap water and binary mixtures with quantitative results. The utility of the proposed electrode was also determined in the presence of ionic and nonionic surfactants and in the presence of fluoride ions in four pharmaceutical (mouthwash) preparations. (orig.)

  20. ANSI laser standards, education (Z136.5), research, development or testing (Z136.8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barat, K.

    2014-07-01

    Several factors affect laser use in educational settings. First is the lower cost of lasers, in particular, diode have made lasers more accessible for laser classroom use (think of the hand held laser in red, green and blue). Second in the research and development, no technology has made the impact of the laser. Third the importance of introducing students to this technology. To the point no discipline is laser free. To address laser safety in the academic setting two American National Standard Institute Standards have been developed. The most recent Z136.8 Safe Use of Lasers in Research, Development and Testing Setting, published in 2012, Z136.5 Laser Safety in Education -2009 version was published. Z136.5 provides guidance for educators starting in public school and ranging into the college level. This includes classroom demonstrations and science fair demonstrations. Z136.8 is geared for the Graduate and Commercial research level. Z136.5 relies on the use of pre-approved safety lessons plans and appreciation of student maturity or lack of, Z136.8 relies heavily on cooperation between the user and the laser safety officer. The presentation will cover the contents of each and the different approaches taken.

  1. Symbiotic star H1-36

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D A

    1983-01-01

    It is suggested that H1-36 should be classified as a symbiotic star rather than a planetary nebula. Evidence of a cool giant now exists and the high-excitation emission-line spectrum resembles the spectra of many symbiotic stars. The optical spectrum, radio spectrum, high spectral index of +0.9 and computed mass-loss rate are among the features discussed.

  2. The symbiotic star H1-36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    It is suggested that H1-36 should be classified as a symbiotic star rather than a planetary nebula. Evidence of a cool giant now exists and the high-excitation emission-line spectrum resembles the spectra of many symbiotic stars. The optical spectrum, radio spectrum, high spectral index of +0.9 and computed mass-loss rate are among the features discussed

  3. Effects of time on the magnetic properties of terbium-doped LaMnO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weibin; Zhang Yingtang; Guan Wen; Kinsman, William; Yuan Xinqiang; Chen Ziyu

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic properties of the perovskite form of LaMnO 3 have been shown strong interest in recent years due to its high potential for use in magnetic devices. In this paper, the magnetic properties of a 30% terbium-doped LaMnO 3 (LMTO) perovskite manganite synthesized by a conventional solid-state reaction were investigated. Data on these properties was recorded periodically via SQUID and VSM to reveal it to be best described magnetically as a spin glass system. Thus, the time effect must be taken into consideration in instantaneously determining this material’s spin glass state as well as the overall magnetic properties in the absence of a magnetic field. The results of this paper point to a more in-depth understanding of the change in magnetic properties associated with doped LaMnO 3 .

  4. Electronic structure of surface-supported bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) single molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lucia; Fabris, Stefano; Conte, Adriano Mosca; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario; Baroni, Stefano; Kern, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of isolated bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) molecules, a novel single-molecular-magnet (SMM), supported on the Cu(111) surface has been characterized by density functional theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. These studies reveal that the interaction with the metal surface preserves both the molecular structure and the large spin magnetic moment of the metal center. The 4f electron states are not perturbed by the adsorption while a strong molecular/metal interaction can induce the suppression of the minor spin contribution delocalized over the molecular ligands. The calculations show that the inherent spin magnetic moment of the molecule is only weakly affected by the interaction with the surface and suggest that the SMM character might be preserved.

  5. Luminescent hybrid films obtained by covalent grafting of terbium complex to silica network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fengyi; Fu Lianshe; Wang Jun; Liu Ze; Li Huanrong; Zhang Hongjie

    2002-01-01

    Luminescent hybrid thin films consisting of terbium complex covalently bonded to a silica-based network have been obtained in situ via a sol-gel approach. A new monomer, N-(4-benzoic acid-yl), N'-(propyltriethoxysilyl)urea (PABI), has been synthesized by grafting isocyanatopropyltriethoxysilane (ICPTES) to p-aminobenzoic acid and characterized by 1 H NMR, IR and MS. The monomer acts as a ligand for Tb 3+ ion and as a sol-gel precursor. Band emission from Tb 3+ ion due to an efficient ligand-to-metal energy transfer was observed by UV excitation. The decay curves of Tb 3+ in the hybrid films were measured. The energy difference between the triplet state energy of PABI and the 5 D 4 level of Tb 3+ ion falls in the exciting range to sensitize Tb 3+ ion fluorescence

  6. Influence of crystallite size and temperature on the antiferromagnetic helices of terbium and holmium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, Jens-Peter; Michels, Andreas [Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); University of Luxembourg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Ferdinand, Adrian; Birringer, Rainer [Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Baller, Joerg; Sanctuary, Roland [University of Luxembourg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Philippi, Stefan [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Lott, Dieter [GKSS Research Center, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Balog, Sandor [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Rotenberg, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California 94720 (United States); Kaindl, Guenter [Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Doebrich, Kristian M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We report on the results of grain-size and temperature-dependent magnetization, specific-heat, neutron-scattering, and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments on the heavy rare-earth metals terbium and holmium, with particular emphasis on the temperature regions where the helical antiferromagnetic phases exist. In contrast to Ho, we find that the helical structure in Tb is relative strongly affected by microstructural disorder, specifically, it can no longer be detected for the smallest studied grain size of D=18 nm. Moreover, in coarse-grained Tb a helical structure persists even in the ferromagnetic regime, down to about T=215 K, in agreement with the ARPES data, which reveal a nesting feature of the Fermi surface at the L point of the Brillouin zone at T=210 K.

  7. Origin of gigantic magnetostriction and crystal field effects in terbium dititanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, I.V.; Lidskij, B.V.; Mamsurova, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature and magnetic field dependences of the magnetostriction and magnetization and the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and lattice parameter are investigated experimentally in a broad range of temperature and field strength for polycrystalline and single crystal Tb 2 Ti 2 O 7 . A conclusion is drawn regarding the structure of the energy levels of Tb 3+ in Tb 2 Ti 2 O 7 . A qualitative and quantitative explanation of all observed magnetic effects, and in particular of gigantic magnetostriction in Tb 2 Ti 2 O 7 , is presented which is based on the crystal field theory. It is shown that the huge magnitude of the magnetostriction in terbium dititanate is due to the specificity of the energy spectrum of Tb 3+ in Tb 2 Ti 2 O 7

  8. Hyperfine structure of the odd parity level system in the terbium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanska, D; Furmann, B

    2017-01-01

    Within this work new experimental results concerning the hyperfine structure ( hfs ) in the terbium atom are presented, concerning the odd parity levels system, hitherto only scarcely investigated (apart from the ground term). hfs constants A and B for 113 levels were determined for the first time, and for another 16 levels, which already occurred in our earlier works, supplementary results were obtained; additionally, our earlier results for 93 levels were compiled. The hfs of the odd parity levels was investigated using the method of laser induced fluorescence in a hollow cathode discharge. The hfs of 165 spectral lines, where the levels in question were involved as the upper levels, was recorded. Literature values of hfs constants of the even-parity lower levels (including our own earlier results) greatly facilitated the present data evaluation. (paper)

  9. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Yazbi, Amira F.; Loppnow, Glen R.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay for positive detection of DNA damage. •Recognition of undamaged DNA via hybridization to a hairpin probe. •Terbium(III) fluorescence reports the amount of damage by binding to ssDNA. •Tb/hairpin is a highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probe for DNA damage. -- Abstract: Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb 3+ ). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb 3+ emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb 3+ /hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb 3+ , producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb 3+ /hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb 3+ /hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36 ± 1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage

  10. 17 CFR 13.6 - Promulgation of rules; publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; publication. 13.6 Section 13.6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION PUBLIC RULEMAKING PROCEDURES § 13.6 Promulgation of rules; publication. After consideration of all relevant matters... also be made in the Federal Register if a proposal is subsequently withdrawn. The required publication...

  11. 45 CFR 96.136 - Independent peer review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... influence the quality of the services provided. (d) As part of the independent peer review, the reviewers... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Independent peer review. 96.136 Section 96.136... Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant § 96.136 Independent peer review. (a) The State shall for the...

  12. 6 CFR 13.6 - Prerequisites for issuing a Complaint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prerequisites for issuing a Complaint. 13.6 Section 13.6 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.6 Prerequisites for issuing a Complaint. (a) The Reviewing Official may issue a...

  13. 42 CFR 136a.15 - Health Service Delivery Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health Service Delivery Areas. 136a.15 Section 136a... Receive Care? § 136a.15 Health Service Delivery Areas. (a) The Indian Health Service will designate and... Federal Indian reservations and areas surrounding those reservations as Health Service Delivery Areas. (b...

  14. Temperature distributions in 136 superficial radiothermotherapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willich, N.; Duve, S.; Pfluger, T.; Bachmeier, K.

    1992-01-01

    Temperature distributions from 136 superficial radiothermotherapies in patients were analysed and three-dimensionally reconstructed. The calculation of mean values and standard deviations of the temperature measuring probes considering water bolus temperature, master probe temperature, site of the probes relatively to different applicator positions and site of the probes in the heated tissues yielded satisfactory temperature distributions for chest wall treatment in contrast to other regions of the body. Radiothermotherapy was statistically not superior to radiotherapy alone with respect to local tumor control. (authors)

  15. Determination of fluoxetine in pharmaceutical and biological samples based on the silver nanoparticle enhanced fluorescence of fluoxetine-terbium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Ali; Manzoori, Jamshid L

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a simple and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method is presented for the determination of fluoxetine based on the enhancing effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the terbium-fluoxetine fluorescence emission. The AgNPs were prepared by a simple reduction method and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was indicated that these AgNPs have a remarkable amplifying effect on the terbium-sensitized fluorescence of fluoxetine. The effects of various parameters such as AgNP and Tb 3+ concentration and the pH of the media were investigated. Under obtained optimal conditions, the fluorescence intensity of the terbium-fluoxetine-AgNP system was enhanced linearly by increasing the concentration of fluoxetine in the range of 0.008 to 19 mg/L. The limit of detection (b + 3s) was 8.3 × 10 -4 mg/L. The interference effects of common species found in real samples were also studied. The method had good linearity, recovery, reproducibility and sensitivity, and was satisfactorily applied for the determination of fluoxetine in tablet formulations, human urine and plasma samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Evaluating United States and world consumption of neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium in final products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Matthew

    This paper develops scenarios of future rare-earth-magnet metal (neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium) consumption in the permanent magnets used in wind turbines and hybrid electric vehicles. The scenarios start with naive base-case scenarios for growth in wind-turbine and hybrid-electric-vehicle sales over the period 2011 to 2020, using historical data for each good. These naive scenarios assume that future growth follows time trends in historical data and does not depend on any exogenous variable. Specifically, growth of each technological market follows historical time trends, and the amount of rare earths used per unit of technology remains fixed. The chosen reference year is 2010. Implied consumptions of the rare earth magnet metals are calculated from these scenarios. Assumptions are made for the material composition of permanent magnets, the market share of permanent-magnet wind turbines and vehicles, and magnet weight per unit of technology. Different scenarios estimate how changes in factors like the material composition of magnets, growth of the economy, and the price of a substitute could affect future consumption. Each scenario presents a different method for reducing rare earth consumption and could be interpreted as potential policy choices. In 2010, the consumption (metric tons, rare-earth-oxide equivalent) of each rare-earth-magnet metal was as follows. Total neodymium consumption in the world for both technologies was 995 tons; dysprosium consumption was 133 tons; terbium consumption was 50 tons; praseodymium consumption was zero tons. The base scenario for wind turbines shows there could be strong, exponential growth in the global wind turbine market. New U.S. sales of hybrid vehicles would decline (in line with the current economic recession) while non-U.S. sales increase through 2020. There would be an overall increase in the total amount of magnetic rare earths consumed in the world. Total consumption of each rare earth in the short

  17. Nanostructured Layered Terbium Hydroxide Containing NASIDs: In Vitro Physicochemical and Biological Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qing-Yang; Qiu, Xiao; Liu, Jing-Jing; Fu, Min; Chao, Jian-Ping; Ju, Rui-Jun; Li, Xue-Tao

    2018-08-01

    Diclofenac sodium (abrr. DS) and indomethacin (abrr. IMC) have been intercalated into the layered terbium hydroxide (LTbH) by anion exchange method. Chemical compositions, thermostability, morphology, luminescence property, release behaviors and cytotoxic effects have been investigated. The DS molecules may embed between layers with a bilayered arrangement and the IMC may correspond to a monolayered arrangement. The Tb3+ luminescence in DS-LTbH and IMC-LTbH composites were enhanced compared with LTbH precusor and the luminescence intensity increases with the deprotonation degree. Drug release was measured with HPLC, and LTbH showed sustained release behavior on both drugs. Further In Vitro evaluation were carried out on cancer cells. Cytotoxic effect of LTbH was observed with a sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay on a variety of cancer cell lines, which revealed that the LTbH showed little cytotoxic effect. Results indicate LTbH may offer a potential vehicle as an effective drug delivery system along with diagnostic integration.

  18. Sonochemical synthesis of terbium tungstate for developing high power supercapacitors with enhanced energy densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani-Nasab, Ali; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Naderi, Hamid Reza; Pourmohamadian, Vafa; Ahmadi, Farhad; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Ehrlich, Hermann

    2018-07-01

    Sonochemically prepared nanoparticles of terbium tungstate (TWNPs) were evaluated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis spectroscopy, and the optimal products were further characterized in terms of their electrochemical properties using conventional and continuous cyclic voltammetry (CV, and CCV), galvanostatic charge/discharge technique, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The CV studies indicated the TWNPs to have specific capacitance (SC) values of 336 and 205 F g -1 at 1 and 200 mV s -1 , and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests revealed the SC of the TWNP-based electrodes to be 300 F g -1 at 1 Ag -1 . Also continuous cyclic voltammetry evaluations proved the sample as having a capacitance retention value of 95.3% after applying 4000 potential cycles. In the light of the results TWNPs were concluded as favorable electrode materials for use in hybrid vehicle systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Terbium Sensitized Luminescence Method for the Assay of Flubiprofen in Pharmaceutical Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma M.Z. Al-Kindy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive time-resolved luminescence method for the determination of flubiprofen (FLP in methanol and in aqueous solution is described. The method is based on the luminescence sensitization of terbium (Tb3+ by the formation of a ternary complex with FLP in the presence of 4,7 diphenyl 1,10 phenanthroline (DPP as co-ligand, and Tween-20 as surfactant. The signal for Tb-FLP-DPP was monitored at λex  = 285 nm and λem  = 552 nm. Optimum conditions for the formation of the complex in an aqueous system were TRIS buffer, pH 8.0, DPP (2.5Å~10−7  M, Tween-20 (0.30% and 4Å~10-5  mol L-1  of Tb3+  which allowed the determination of 20–1000 ng mL-1  of FLP with a limit of detection (LOD of 10 ng mL-1 . The relative standard deviations of the method ranged between 0.6 and 1.4% indicating excellent reproducibility of the method. The proposed method was successfully applied for the assays of FLP in pharmaceutical formulations and spiked tap water samples with average recoveries of 87% – 95%.

  20. Preparation and luminescence properties of terbium-doped lanthanum oxide nanofibers by electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Lixin; Du Pingfan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology (Zhejiang Sci-Tech University), Ministry of Education, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Xiong Jie, E-mail: jxiong@zstu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology (Zhejiang Sci-Tech University), Ministry of Education, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Fan Xiaona; Jiao Yuxue [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology (Zhejiang Sci-Tech University), Ministry of Education, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Terbium-doped lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+}) nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning followed by calcination at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and photoluminescence (PL) were used to characterize the obtained fibers. The results reveal that the nanofibers have an average diameter of ca. 95{+-}25 nm and are composed of pure La{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase. Under the excitation of 274 nm light, the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+} nanofibers exhibit the characteristic emission resulting from the {sup 5}D{sub 4}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} (J=3, 4, 5, 6) transitions of Tb{sup 3+} ions. And the PL emission intensity is stronger than that of their nanoparticle counterparts. - Highlights: > Tb{sup 3+}-doped La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+}) fluorescent nanofibers were prepared via a simple electrospinning technique. > Luminescent properties and other characteristics of the nanofibers were investigated in details. > Potential applications of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+} nanofibers and electrospinning technique described in this paper are suggested.

  1. Sensitization effects of supramolecular assemblies on the luminescence of terbium-ion prulifloxacin complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hong; Yi Chongyue; Li Xue; Fang Fang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang Yajiang, E-mail: yjyang@mail.hust.edu.c [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Luminescence enhancement of terbium-ion prulifloxacin complexes (Tb(III)-PUFX) in supramolecular hydrogels formed by assembly of 1,3:2,4-di-O-benzylidene-D-sorbitol (DBS) was investigated by steady-state fluorescence, varying temperature fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence. The luminescence images show that Tb(III)-PUFX were dispersed in the DBS gels. The luminescence intensity of Tb(III)-PUFX in the DBS gels was significantly increased in comparison with that in corresponding aqueous solutions. The varying temperature fluorescent spectra show that the luminescence intensity of Tb(III)-PUFX decreased with an increase in the temperature. This implies that the luminescence enhancement of Tb(III)-PUFX is related to the dissociation and the formation of the DBS assemblies. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show slower rotational motion in DBS gels in comparison with that in the corresponding aqueous solutions. This may be ascribed to a unique microstructure of three-dimensional network formed by DBC aggregates, resulting in deactivation of the nonradiative relaxation. The images of field emission scanning electron microscopy and polarized optical microscopy indicate that the morphology of the DBS assemblies was not influenced upon addition of Tb(III)-PUFX to the DBS gels.

  2. Sensitive luminescent determination of DNA using the terbium(III)-difloxacin complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yegorova, Alla V.; Scripinets, Yulia V.; Duerkop, Axel; Karasyov, Alexander A.; Antonovich, Valery P.; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the terbium-difloxacin complex (Tb-DFX) with DNA has been examined by using UV-vis absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. The Tb-DFX complex shows an up to 85-fold enhancement of luminescence intensity upon titration with DNA. The long decay times allow additional detection schemes like time-resolved measurements in microplate readers to enhance sensitivity by off-gating short-lived background luminescence. Optimal conditions are found at equimolar concentrations of Tb 3+ and DFX (0.1 or 1 μM) at pH 7.4. Under these conditions, the luminescence intensity is linearly dependent on the concentration of ds-DNAs and ss-DNA between 1-1500 ng mL -1 and 4.5-270 ng mL -1 , respectively. The detection limit is 0.5 ng mL -1 for ds-DNAs and 2 ng mL -1 for ss-DNA. The mechanism for the luminescence enhancement was also studied

  3. Efficient green luminescence of terbium oxalate crystals: A case study with Judd-Ofelt theory and single crystal structure analysis and the effect of dehydration on luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dinu; Joy, Monu; Thomas, Kukku; Sisira, S.; Biju, P. R.; Unnikrishnan, N. V.; Sudarsanakumar, C.; Ittyachen, M. A.; Joseph, Cyriac

    2018-06-01

    Design and synthesis of Lanthanide based metal organic framework is a frontier area of research owing to their structural diversity enabling specific applications. The luminescence properties of rare earths, tuned by the structural features of Ln-MOFs are investigated extensively. Rare earth oxalates which can be synthesized in a facile method, ensuring the structural features of MOFs with excellent photoluminescence characteristics deserves much attention. This work is the first time report on the single crystal structure and Judd-Ofelt (JO) theoretical analysis - their correlation with the intense and sharp green luminescence of Terbium oxalate crystals. The intense green luminescence observed for Terbium oxalate crystals for a wide range of excitation from DUV to visible region despite the luminescence limiting factors are discussed. The absence of concentration quenching and lifting up of forbidden nature of f-f transitions, allowing direct excitation of Terbium ions is analysed with the help of JO theory and single crystal structure analysis. The JO analysis predicted the asymmetry of Terbium sites, allowing the electric dipole transitions and from the JO intensity parameters, promising spectroscopic parameters - emission cross section, branching ratio, gain band width and gain coefficient of the material were calculated. The single crystal structure analysis revealed the asymmetry of Tb sites and structure of Terbium oxalate is formed by the hydrogen bonded stacking of overlapped six Terbium membered rings connected by the oxalate ligands. The molecularly thick layers thus formed on the crystal surface are imaged by the atomic force microscopy. The presence of water channels in the structure and the effect of lattice water molecules on the luminescence intensity are also investigated.

  4. 136 Xe enrichment through cryogenic distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Henning O.; Bottenus, Daniel R.; Clayton, Christopher K.; Stephenson, David E.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2017-09-01

    The next generation of 136Xe neutrinoless double beta decay experiments will require on the order of 5 tons of enriched 136Xe. By estimating the relative volatilities of the xenon isotopes and using standard chemical engineering techniques we explore the feasibility of using cryogenic distillation to produce 5 tons of 80% enriched 136Xe in 5-6 years. With current state-of-the-art distillation column packing materials we can estimate the total height of a traditional cryogenic distillation column. We also, report on how Micro Channel Distillation may reduce the overall size of a distillation system for 136Xe production.

  5. Project for detecting the double beta decay of 136Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, M.; Sasaki, S.; Tawara, H.

    1992-01-01

    For detecting the nuclear double beta decay of 136 Xe, a liquid-xenon positive-ion collector and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer are under development for detecting the decay product 136 Ba. Two sets of lasers are used with the mass spectrometer. An Nd-YAG laser is used for sampling 136 Ba from the surface of the positive-ion collector electrode, and a dye laser pumped by an Nd-YAG laser is used for the selective ionization of 136 Ba. The principle of measurements as well as the experimental apparatus and procedures are described in detail, together with our future plans. (orig.)

  6. New nuclear structure data beyond 136Sn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozeva Radomira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Exotic nuclei beyond the 132Sn double shell-closure are influenced by both the Sn superfluity and the evolving collectivity only few nucleons away. Toward even more neutron-rich nuclei, especially at intermediate mass number, the interplay between single-particle and collective particle-hole excitations competes. In some cases with the extreme addition of neutrons also other effects as the formation of neutron skin, stabilization as sub-shell gaps or orbital crossings may be expected. The knowledge of nuclear ingredients is especially interesting beyond 132Sn and little is known on how the excitation modes develop with the addition of both protons and neutrons and for example systematic prompt and decay studies can be such very sensitive probe. Recently, we have approached this region of nuclei in several experimental measurements following 238U projectile fission on 9Be and n-induced fission on 241Pu and 235U. Consistent data analysis allows to access various spins and excitation energies and provide new input to theory. Examples from these studies on several nuclei in the A~140 region were presented during the conference together with the possible interpretation of the new data. Here, we will illustrate one example on 136I using two complementary data sets.

  7. New nuclear structure data beyond 136Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeva, Radomira

    2018-05-01

    Exotic nuclei beyond the 132Sn double shell-closure are influenced by both the Sn superfluity and the evolving collectivity only few nucleons away. Toward even more neutron-rich nuclei, especially at intermediate mass number, the interplay between single-particle and collective particle-hole excitations competes. In some cases with the extreme addition of neutrons also other effects as the formation of neutron skin, stabilization as sub-shell gaps or orbital crossings may be expected. The knowledge of nuclear ingredients is especially interesting beyond 132Sn and little is known on how the excitation modes develop with the addition of both protons and neutrons and for example systematic prompt and decay studies can be such very sensitive probe. Recently, we have approached this region of nuclei in several experimental measurements following 238U projectile fission on 9Be and n-induced fission on 241Pu and 235U. Consistent data analysis allows to access various spins and excitation energies and provide new input to theory. Examples from these studies on several nuclei in the A 140 region were presented during the conference together with the possible interpretation of the new data. Here, we will illustrate one example on 136I using two complementary data sets.

  8. Construction of the energy matrix for complex atoms. Part VIII: Hyperfine structure HPC calculations for terbium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elantkowska, Magdalena; Ruczkowski, Jarosław; Sikorski, Andrzej; Dembczyński, Jerzy

    2017-11-01

    A parametric analysis of the hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even parity configurations of atomic terbium (Tb I) is presented in this work. We introduce the complete set of 4fN-core states in our high-performance computing (HPC) calculations. For calculations of the huge hyperfine structure matrix, requiring approximately 5000 hours when run on a single CPU, we propose the methods utilizing a personal computer cluster or, alternatively a cluster of Microsoft Azure virtual machines (VM). These methods give a factor 12 performance boost, enabling the calculations to complete in an acceptable time.

  9. Solid-phase synthesis of compounds of europium and terbium with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds under mechanical activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinovskaya, I.V.; Karasev, V.E.

    2000-01-01

    Effect of solvents and parameters of mechanical treatment on basic regularities of synthesis of rare earth compounds with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds is studied. It is shown that interaction on europium (3) and terbium (3) nitrates with nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds leads to formation of compounds of Ln(NO 3 )·2D composition, where Ln=Eu, Tb; D=2,2-dipyridyl, 1,10-phenanthroline, diphenylguanidine. Effect of conditions of mechanical treatment and different additions on process and yield of products is studied. Compounds prepared are characterized by the methods of chemical element analysis, IR spectroscopy and luminescent spectroscopy [ru

  10. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... TOURS AND NATIONAL PARKS AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT National Air Tour Safety Standards § 136.11 Helicopter floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline must...

  11. 14 CFR 136.5 - Additional requirements for Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional requirements for Hawaii. 136.5 Section 136.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... requirements for Hawaii. No person may conduct a commercial air tour in the State of Hawaii unless they comply...

  12. 33 CFR 136.311 - Types of advertisement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Types of advertisement. 136.311... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Designation of Source and Advertisement § 136.311 Types of advertisement. Advertisement required by the Director, NPFC, will normally include one or more of...

  13. 33 CFR 136.313 - Content of advertisement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Content of advertisement. 136.313... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Designation of Source and Advertisement § 136.313 Content of advertisement. Each advertisement required by this subpart may be required to contain the...

  14. 21 CFR 136.130 - Milk bread, rolls, and buns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Milk bread, rolls, and buns. 136.130 Section 136.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....130 Milk bread, rolls, and buns. (a) Each of the foods milk bread, milk rolls, and milk buns conforms...

  15. Structural, elastic, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of Terbium oxide: First-principles investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samah Al-Qaisi

    Full Text Available First-principles investigations of the Terbium oxide TbO are performed on structural, elastic, mechanical and thermodynamic properties. The investigations are accomplished by employing full potential augmented plane wave FP-LAPW method framed within density functional theory DFT as implemented in the WIEN2k package. The exchange-correlation energy functional, a part of the total energy functional, is treated through Perdew Burke Ernzerhof scheme of the Generalized Gradient Approximation PBEGGA. The calculations of the ground state structural parameters, like lattice constants a0, bulk moduli B and their pressure derivative B′ values, are done for the rock-salt RS, zinc-blende ZB, cesium chloride CsCl, wurtzite WZ and nickel arsenide NiAs polymorphs of the TbO compound. The elastic constants (C11, C12, C13, C33, and C44 and mechanical properties (Young’s modulus Y, Shear modulus S, Poisson’s ratio σ, Anisotropic ratio A and compressibility β, were also calculated to comprehend its potential for valuable applications. From our calculations, the RS phase of TbO compound was found strongest one mechanically amongst the studied cubic structures whereas from hexagonal phases, the NiAs type structure was found stronger than WZ phase of the TbO. To analyze the ductility of the different structures of the TbO, Pugh’s rule (B/SH and Cauchy pressure (C12–C44 approaches are used. It was found that ZB, CsCl and WZ type structures of the TbO were of ductile nature with the obvious dominance of the ionic bonding while RS and NiAs structures exhibited brittle nature with the covalent bonding dominance. Moreover, Debye temperature was calculated for both cubic and hexagonal structures of TbO in question by averaging the computed sound velocities. Keywords: DFT, TbO, Elastic properties, Thermodynamic properties

  16. Resonance energy transfer from quinolinone modified polystyrene-block-poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) copolymer to terbium(III) metal ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Výprachtický, Drahomír; Mikeš, F.; Lokaj, Jan; Pokorná, Veronika; Cimrová, Věra

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 160, April (2015), s. 27-34 ISSN 0022-2313 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/12/0827; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-26542S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : energy transfer * terbium luminescence * quinolinone donor Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.693, year: 2015

  17. Determination of sertraline in pharmaceutical and biological samples using 1, 10-phenanthroline-terbium probe and silver nanoparticles enhanced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotfi, Ali, E-mail: alilotfi67@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Tabriz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Manzoori, Jamshid L. [Department of Chemistry, Tabriz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohagheghi, Arash [Clinical Psychiatry Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Sertraline is an antidepressant widely prescribed for major depressive disorders. In this contribution we report a novel, rapid and sensitive spectrofluorimetric technique, developed and validated for the determination of sertraline in pharmaceutical, human urine and human plasma samples, based on the fluorescence enhancement of the sertraline by 1, 10-phenanthroline-terbium probe with Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs). The effect of pH, buffer concentration, the order of addition of reagents, terbium and 1, 10-phenanthroline concentrations, and concentration of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) as well as reaction time on the fluorescence intensity were investigated and the optimum conditions were determined. The linear range for determination of sertraline was obtained as 0.001–3 mg L{sup −1}. The limit of detection (b+3s) and the limit of quantification was calculated as 2.9×10{sup −4} mg L{sup −1} and 9.8×10{sup −4} mg L{sup −1}, respectively. The interference effects of common excipients found in pharmaceutical preparations were studied. The presented technique was used to determine the sertraline in pharmaceutical samples, human urine and plasma as real samples. The presented method was indicated a comparable results with the standard analytical techniques for sertraline. Good linearity, reproducibility, recovery and limit of detection have made this method suitable for determination of sertraline in various types of samples.

  18. Determination of sertraline in pharmaceutical and biological samples using 1, 10-phenanthroline-terbium probe and silver nanoparticles enhanced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfi, Ali; Manzoori, Jamshid L.; Mohagheghi, Arash

    2017-01-01

    Sertraline is an antidepressant widely prescribed for major depressive disorders. In this contribution we report a novel, rapid and sensitive spectrofluorimetric technique, developed and validated for the determination of sertraline in pharmaceutical, human urine and human plasma samples, based on the fluorescence enhancement of the sertraline by 1, 10-phenanthroline-terbium probe with Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs). The effect of pH, buffer concentration, the order of addition of reagents, terbium and 1, 10-phenanthroline concentrations, and concentration of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) as well as reaction time on the fluorescence intensity were investigated and the optimum conditions were determined. The linear range for determination of sertraline was obtained as 0.001–3 mg L −1 . The limit of detection (b+3s) and the limit of quantification was calculated as 2.9×10 −4 mg L −1 and 9.8×10 −4 mg L −1 , respectively. The interference effects of common excipients found in pharmaceutical preparations were studied. The presented technique was used to determine the sertraline in pharmaceutical samples, human urine and plasma as real samples. The presented method was indicated a comparable results with the standard analytical techniques for sertraline. Good linearity, reproducibility, recovery and limit of detection have made this method suitable for determination of sertraline in various types of samples.

  19. Preparation and photoluminescence enhancement in terbium(III ternary complexes with β-diketone and monodentate auxiliary ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Singh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of new solid ternary complexes of terbium(III ion based on β-diketone ligand acetylacetone (acac and monodentate auxiliary ligands (aqua/urea/triphenylphosphineoxide/pyridine-N-oxide had been prepared. The structural characterizations of synthesized ternary compounds were studied by means of elemental analysis, infrared (IR, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectral techniques. The optical characteristics were investigated with absorption as well as photoluminescence spectroscopy. Thermal behavior of compounds was examined by TGA/DTA analysis and all metal complexes were found to have good thermal stability. The luminescence decay time of complexes were also calculated by monitoring at emission wavelength corresponding to 5D4 → 7F5 transition. A comparative inspection of the luminescent behavior of prepared ternary compounds was performed in order to determine the function of auxiliary ligands in the enhancement of luminescence intensity produced by central terbium(III ion. The color coordinates values suggested that compounds showed bright green emission in visible region in electromagnetic spectrum. Complexes producing green light could play a significant role in the fabrication of efficient light conversion molecular devices for display purposes and lightning systems.

  20. An ICP AES method for determination of dysprosium and terbium in high purity yttrium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2011-01-01

    High purity yttrium finds interesting application in astronavigation, luminescence, nuclear energy and metallurgical industries. Most of these applications require yttrium oxide of highest purity. Consequently there is a need for production of high purity yttrium oxide. Separation and purification of yttrium from other rare earths is a challenging task due to their close chemical properties. Liquid-liquid extraction and ion exchange have been widely used in the production of yttrium oxide of highest purity. Determination of impurities, especially other rare earths, in ppm level is required for process development and chemical characterization of the high purity Y 2 O 3 . Many methods have been described in literature. However since the advent of ICP AES much work in this area has been carried out by this technique. This paper describes the work done for determination of dysprosium (Dy) and terbium (Tb) in yttrium oxide using a high resolution sequential ICP AES. Emission spectra of rare earth elements are very complex and due to this complexity it is important to select spectral interference free analyte lines for determination of rare earths in rare earth matrix. For the determination of Dy and Tb in Y 2 O 3 , sensitive lines of Dy and Tb are selected from the instrument wavelength table and spectral interference free emission lines for the determination is selected by scanning around the selected wavelengths using 5 g/L Y solution and 5 mg/L standard solutions of Dy and Tb prepared in 4% nitric acid. It is found 353.170 nm line of Dy and 350.917 nm line Tb is suitable for quantitative determination. The signal to background ratio increases with increase in matrix concentration, i.e. from 1 to 5 mg/L. The optimum forward power is determined and it is found to be 1100W for Dy and 1000W for Tb. The instrument is calibrated using matrix matched standards containing 5g/L of Y matrix. Samples are dissolved in nitric acid and Y concentration is maintained at 5g/L. Two

  1. Complete Stokes polarimetry of magneto-optical Faraday effect in a terbium gallium garnet crystal at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Shaheen, Amrozia; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh

    2013-10-21

    We report the complete determination of the polarization changes caused in linearly polarized incident light due to propagation in a magneto-optically active terbium gallium garnet (TGG) single crystal, at temperatures ranging from 6.3 to 300 K. A 28-fold increase in the Verdet constant of the TGG crystal is seen as its temperature decreases to 6.3 K. In contrast with polarimetry of light emerging from a Faraday material at room temperature, polarimetry at cryogenic temperatures cannot be carried out using the conventional fixed polarizer-analyzer technique because the assumption that ellipticity is negligible becomes increasingly invalid as temperature is lowered. It is shown that complete determination of light polarization in such a case requires the determination of its Stokes parameters, otherwise inaccurate measurements will result with negative implications for practical devices.

  2. A search for long-lived radionuclides produced by fast-neutron irradiations of copper, silver, europium, terbium, and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.

    1990-01-01

    Identical sample packets, each containing samples of elemental copper, silver, europium, terbium, and hafnium, as well as titanium, iron and nickel as dosimeters, have been irradiated in three distinct accelerator neutron fields (at Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory in the U.S.A., and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Japan) as part of an interlaboratory research collaboration to search for the production of long-lived radionuclides for fusion waste disposal applications. This paper is a progress report on this project. To date, we have detected the following activities, and have obtained preliminary experimental cross section values for several of these: Ag-106m,108m,110m; Eu-150m,152g,154; Tb-158,160; and Hf-175,178m2,179m2,181. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  3. Effects of time on the magnetic properties of terbium-doped LaMnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Weibin [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang Yingtang, E-mail: zhangyingtang76@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Institute of Functional Material, Shaanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong 723003 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment and MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Guan Wen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment and MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Kinsman, William [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Yuan Xinqiang [School of Material Science and Engineering, Institute of Functional Material, Shaanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong 723003 (China); Chen Ziyu [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2012-09-01

    The magnetic properties of the perovskite form of LaMnO{sub 3} have been shown strong interest in recent years due to its high potential for use in magnetic devices. In this paper, the magnetic properties of a 30% terbium-doped LaMnO{sub 3} (LMTO) perovskite manganite synthesized by a conventional solid-state reaction were investigated. Data on these properties was recorded periodically via SQUID and VSM to reveal it to be best described magnetically as a spin glass system. Thus, the time effect must be taken into consideration in instantaneously determining this material's spin glass state as well as the overall magnetic properties in the absence of a magnetic field. The results of this paper point to a more in-depth understanding of the change in magnetic properties associated with doped LaMnO{sub 3}.

  4. Self-assembly of Terbium(III)-based metal-organic complexes with two-photon absorbing active

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Shao, Nanqi; Sun, Xianshun; Zhang, Guocui; Li, Shengli; Zhou, Hongping; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2014-12-01

    Hybrid complexes based on D-π-A type dyes p-aminostyryl-pyridinum and Terbium(III) complex anion (1, 2) have been synthesized by ionic exchange reaction. Meanwhile two different alkyl-substituted amino groups were used as electron donors in organic dyes cations. The synthesized complexes were characterized by element analysis. In addition, the structural features of them were systematic studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Their linear properties have been systematically investigated by absorption spectra and fluorescence, the results show that the energy transfer takes place from the trans-4-[4‧-(N,N-diethylamino)styryl]-N-methyl pyridinium (2‧) cation to Tb(III). In addition, complex 2 exhibit a large two-photon absorption coefficient β: 0.044 cm/GW at 710 nm.

  5. Commercializing potassium terbium fluoride, KTF (KTb3F10) faraday crystals for high laser power optical isolator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Wolfgang; Stevens, Kevin; Foundos, Greg; Payne, Alexis

    2017-10-01

    Many scientific lasers and increasingly industrial laser systems operate in manufacture. However, for high-power laser applications TGG is limited by its absorption at 1064nm and its thermo-optic coefficient, dn/dT. Specifically, thermal lensing and depolarization effects become a limiting factor at high laser powers. While TGG absorption has improved significantly over the past few years, there is an intrinsic limit. Now, SYNOPTICS is commercializing the enhanced new crystal Potassium Terbium Fluoride KTF (KTb3F10) that exhibits much smaller nonlinear refractive index and thermo-optic coefficients, and still exhibits a Verdet constant near that of TGG. This cubic crystal has relatively low absorption and thermo-optic coefficients. It is now fully characterized and available for select production orders. At OPTIFAB in October 2017 we present recent results comparing the performance of KTF to TGG in optical isolators and show SYNOPTICS advances in large volume crystal growth and the production ramp up.

  6. Sensitivity improvement of Cerenkov luminescence endoscope with terbium doped Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xin; Chen, Xueli, E-mail: xlchen@xidian.edu.cn, E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn; Cao, Xu; Zhan, Yonghua; Liang, Jimin, E-mail: xlchen@xidian.edu.cn, E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Molecular and Neuro Imaging of the Ministry of Education and School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710071 (China); Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Wu, Kaichun [Department of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)

    2015-05-25

    Our previous study showed a great attenuation for the Cerenkov luminescence endoscope (CLE), resulting in relatively low detection sensitivity of radiotracers. Here, a kind of radioluminescence nanoparticles (RLNPs), terbium doped Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S was mixed with the radionuclide {sup 68}Ga to enhance the intensity of emitted luminescence, which finally improved the detection sensitivity of the CLE by using the radioluminescence imaging technique. With the in vitro and in vivo pseudotumor experiments, we showed that the use of RLNPs mixed with the radionuclide {sup 68}Ga enabled superior sensitivity compared with the radionuclide {sup 68}Ga only, with 50-fold improvement on detection sensitivity, which guaranteed meeting the demands of the clinical diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract tumors.

  7. 2$^{+}$ anomaly and configurational isospin polarization of $^{136}$Te

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to perform a Coulomb excitation experiment on beams of radioactive ions of $^{136}$Te delivered by HIE-ISOLDE impinging on a $^{58}$Ni target. Scattered particles will be detected by a DSSSD detector and $\\gamma$-rays will be detected by the MINIBALL array. The proposed Configurational Isospin Polarization (CIP) of the two lowest 2$^+$ states will be determined by measuring the E2 excitation yield distribution to them. The expected proton-dominated one-phonon character of the second excited 2$^+$ state of $^{136}$Te will be tested on the basis of absolute electromagnetic matrix elements from the observed Coulomb excitation cross sections. Complementary lifetime information on this predominant 2$^+_{1,ms}$ state will be extracted using the differential DSAM technique. The experiment will clarify to what extent CIP is responsible for the 2$^+$ anomaly in $^{136}$Te.

  8. A hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of terbium from fluorescent lamps: Experimental design, optimization of acid leaching process and process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenzi, Valentina; Ippolito, Nicolò Maria; De Michelis, Ida; Medici, Franco; Vegliò, Francesco

    2016-12-15

    Terbium and rare earths recovery from fluorescent powders of exhausted lamps by acid leaching with hydrochloric acid was the objective of this study. In order to investigate the factors affecting leaching a series of experiments was performed in according to a full factorial plan with four variables and two levels (4 2 ). The factors studied were temperature, concentration of acid, pulp density and leaching time. Experimental conditions of terbium dissolution were optimized by statistical analysis. The results showed that temperature and pulp density were significant with a positive and negative effect, respectively. The empirical mathematical model deducted by experimental data demonstrated that terbium content was completely dissolved under the following conditions: 90 °C, 2 M hydrochloric acid and 5% of pulp density; while when the pulp density was 15% an extraction of 83% could be obtained at 90 °C and 5 M hydrochloric acid. Finally a flow sheet for the recovery of rare earth elements was proposed. The process was tested and simulated by commercial software for the chemical processes. The mass balance of the process was calculated: from 1 ton of initial powder it was possible to obtain around 160 kg of a concentrate of rare earths having a purity of 99%. The main rare earths elements in the final product was yttrium oxide (86.43%) following by cerium oxide (4.11%), lanthanum oxide (3.18%), europium oxide (3.08%) and terbium oxide (2.20%). The estimated total recovery of the rare earths elements was around 70% for yttrium and europium and 80% for the other rare earths. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Raman spectra of terbium trichloride, phosphorus pentachloride and their molten mixtures; Spektry kombinatsionnogo rasseyaniya sveta trikhlorida terbiya, pentakhlorida fosfora i ikh rasplavlennykh smesej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A B; Zakir' yanova, I D [UrO RAN, Inst. Vysokotemperaturnoj Ehlektrokhimii, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2008-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy was used to study in situ the behavior of individual terbium trichloride and phosphorus pentachloride in different aggregative states as a function of temperature, and of solutions of PCl{sub 5} vapors in molten TbCl{sub 3}. A conclusion is drawn about their structure and the nature of phase transformations and chemical reactions in wide ranges of temperature and saturated vapor pressures.

  10. Determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by microchip capillary electrophoresis along with time-resolved sensitized luminescence of their terbium(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra-Rodero, Marina; Fernández -Romero, Juan Manuel; Gómez -Hens, Agustina

    2014-01-01

    We report on the time-resolved detection of the three fluoroquinolone (FQs) antibiotics ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR) and flumequine (FLU). On addition of terbium(III) ions, the terbium(III)-FQs chelates are formed in-situ in an on-capillary derivatization reaction of a microfluidic system. The laser-induced terbium(III)-sensitized luminescence of the chelates is measured at excitation/emission wavelengths of 337/545 nm. The analytes can be separated and quantified within less than 4 min. A solid phase extraction step for analyte preconcentration can be included prior to chelation and microchip capillary electrophoresis. The analytical ranges of the calibration graphs for CIP, ENR and FLU are from 10.6 to 60.0, 10.3 to 51.0, and 11.5 to 58.8 ng mL −1 , respectively, and the detection limits are 3.2, 3.1 and 3.6 ng mL −1 , respectively. The precision was established at two concentration levels of each analyte and revealed relative standard deviations in the range from 3.0 to 10.2 %. The method was applied to the analysis of FQ-spiked water samples. (author)

  11. Determination of trace amounts of rare earth elements in samarium, terbium and disprosium oxides by graphite furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, E.S.K.

    1990-01-01

    A graphite furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry method for the determination of neodymium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium at trace level in samarium oxide; of samarium, europium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium and yttrium in terbium oxide and of europium, terbium, holmium, erbium and yttrium in dysprosium oxide was established. The best pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were determined for each lanthanide considered. Calibration curves were obtained for the pure elements, for binary mixtures formed by the matrix and each of the lanthanides studied and, finally, for the complex mixtures constituted by the matrix and all the other lanthanide of the group under scrutiny. This study has been carried out to examine the interference of the presence of one lanthanide on the behaviour of the other, since a lack of linearity on the calibration curves has been observed in some cases. Detection and determination limits have been determined as well. The detection limits encountered were within the range 0.002 to 0.3% for different elements. The precision of the method expressed as the relative standard deviation was calculated for each element present in each of the matrices studied. The conclusion arrived at is that the method can be applied for determining the above mentioned lanthanides present in the matrices studied with purity up to 99.50%. (author)

  12. Investigation of the luminescent properties of terbium-anthranilate complexes and application to the determination of anthranilic acid derivatives in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, N.; Georges, J

    2003-01-10

    The luminescent properties of terbium complexes with furosemide (FR), flufenamic (FF) acid, tolfenamic (TF) acid and mefenamic (MF) acid have been investigated in aqueous solutions. For all four compounds, complexation occurs when the carboxylic acid of the aminobenzoic group is dissociated and is greatly favoured in the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide as co-ligand and Triton X-100 as surfactant. Under optimum conditions, luminescence of the lanthanide ion is efficiently sensitised and the lifetime of the {sup 5}D{sub 4} resonance level of terbium in the complex is ranging between 1 and 1.9 ms, against 0.4 ms for the aqua ion. The sensitivity of the method for the determination of anthranilic acid derivatives is improved by one to two orders of magnitude with respect to that achieved using native fluorescence or terbium-sensitised luminescence in methanol. The limits of detection are 2x10{sup -10}, 5x10{sup -10} and 2x10{sup -9} mol l{sup -1} for flufenamic acid, furosemide and tolfenamic acid, and mefenamic acid, respectively, with within-run RSD values of less than 1%. The method has been applied to the determination of flufenamic acid in spiked calf sera with and without sample pretreatment. Depending on the method and the analyte concentration, the recovery was ranging between 83 and 113% and the lowest concentration attainable in serum samples was close to 1x10{sup -7} mol l{sup -1}.

  13. 21 CFR 136.160 - Raisin bread, rolls, and buns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Water extract of raisins may be used, but not to replace raisins. (3) The baked units may bear icing or... other dairy products does not apply. (5) The total solids are determined by the method prescribed in § 136.110(d), except that section 14.091(b) of “Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of...

  14. 14 CFR 136.39 - Air tour management plans (ATMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air tour management plans (ATMP). 136.39... management plans (ATMP). (a) Establishment. The Administrator, in cooperation with the Director, shall... of decision. (d) Procedure. In establishing an ATMP for a national park or tribal lands, the...

  15. 42 CFR 136.350 - Contracts with Urban Indian organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 136.350 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act Programs...) of this section; (7) Identify gaps between unmet health needs of urban Indians and the resources...

  16. 14 CFR 136.41 - Interim operating authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND NATIONAL PARKS AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT National Parks Air Tour Management § 136.41 Interim operating... terminate 180 days after the date on which an air tour management plan is established for the park and tribal lands; (6) Shall promote protection of national park resources, visitor experiences, and tribal...

  17. 17 CFR 256.136 - Temporary cash investments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary cash investments... UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935 3. Current and Accrued Assets § 256.136 Temporary cash investments. This account shall include the cost of investments, such as demand and time loans, bankers' acceptances...

  18. A Massive Star Census of the Starburst Cluster R136

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Paul

    2012-10-01

    We propose to carry out a comprehensive census of the most massive stars in the central parsec {4"} of the starburst cluster, R136, which powers the Tarantula Nebula in the LMC. R136 is both sufficiently massive that the upper mass function is richly populated and young enough that its most massive stars have yet to explode as supernovae. The identification of very massive stars in R136, up to 300 solar masses, raises general questions of star formation, binarity and feedback in young massive clusters. The proposed STIS spectral survey of 36 stars more massive than 50 solar masses within R136 is ground-breaking, of legacy value, and is specifically tailored to a} yield physical properties; b} detect the majority of binaries by splitting observations between Cycles 19 and 20; c} measure rotational velocities, relevant for predictions of rotational mixing; d} quantify mass-loss properties for very massive stars; e} determine surface compositions; f} measure radial velocities, relevant for runaway stars and cluster dynamics; g} quantify radiative and mechanical feedback. This census will enable the mass function of very massive stars to be measured for the first time, as a result of incomplete and inadequate spectroscopy to date. It will also perfectly complement our Tarantula Survey, a ground-based VLT Large Programme, by including the most massive stars that are inaccessible to ground-based visual spectroscopy due to severe crowding. These surveys, together with existing integrated UV and optical studies will enable 30 Doradus to serve as a bona-fide template for unresolved extragalactic starburst regions.

  19. A new luminescent terbium 4-methylsalicylate complex as a novel sensor for detecting the purity of methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng-Hui; Yang, Yang-Yi; Zhu, Yi-Min; Wang, Hong-Ming; Chu, Tian-Shu; Ng, Seik Weng

    2012-01-01

    A new dinuclear terbium complex [Tb(2)(4-msal)(6)(H(2)O)(4)]·6H(2)O (1) (4-msal = 4-methylsalcylate) was synthesized. Its structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, and the complex was characterized by PXRD, FT-IR, fluorescence, TGA and DTA. Complex 1 exists as discrete molecules that are linked by extensive O-H … O hydrogen bonds into a 3D network. The luminescence lifetimes of 3 μM methanol solution and solid sample of 1 are 1.321 and 1.009 ms, respectively. The quantum yield of solid sample is 6.0%. The luminescence quenched more than 50% when 3% (vol/vol) different impurities (acetone, acetonitrile, chloroform, dichloromethane, dioxane, DMF, DMSO, ethanol, ether, ethyl acetate, glycol, H(2)O, hexane, TEA, THF and toluene or their mixture) were added. The inverse linear relationship between the Lg value of fluorescence intensity and the volume ratio of the minor component (to a maximum of 20%) is interpreted in terms of LgI = a-bX (I: luminescence intensity; X: volume ratio of impurities in methanol; a, b are constants). So 1 is a potential luminescent sensor for analyzing the purity of methanol. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  20. Study of the role of complete fusion in the reaction of 48Ca and 56Fe with cerium and terbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, D.J.

    1978-05-01

    48 Ca and 56 Fe beams from the Super HILAC accelerator were used to irradiate thick metal foils of cerium and terbium. Product gamma ray activities were detected offline and individual products were identified by half-life, gamma ray energy and gamma ray abundances. The production cross sections were iteratively fit to charge and mass dispersions to allow correction for parent decay and calculation of mass yields. From the mass yield curves contributions from quasielastic transfer, deep inelastic transfer and complete fusion reaction mechanisms were interred. Complete fusion was made up on contributions from both evaporation residue and fusion-fission products for the 48 Ca induced reactions. However, only fusion-fission products were detected in the 56 Fe induced reactions. Critical angular momenta for fusion were found to be 82 +- 8 h for 48 Ca + 159 Tb and 34 +- 5 h for 56 Fe + 140 Ce, which can be compared with 53 +- 8 h for 12 C + 197 Au (Natowitz, 1970) and 86 +- 5 h for 40 Ar + 165 Ho (Hanappe, 1973). All of these reactions lead to essentially the same compound nucleus and seem to show the dramatic decline in complete fusion for heavy ions larger than 40 Ar. The prediction of this decline was found to be beyond the model calculations of Bass and the critical distance approach of Glas and Mosel

  1. Terbium to Quantum Dot FRET Bioconjugates for Clinical Diagnostics: Influence of Human Plasma on Optical and Assembly Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Hildebrandt

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET from luminescent terbium complexes (LTC as donors to semiconductor quantum dots (QDs as acceptors allows extraordinary large FRET efficiencies due to the long Förster distances afforded. Moreover, time-gated detection permits an efficient suppression of autofluorescent background leading to sub-picomolar detection limits even within multiplexed detection formats. These characteristics make FRET-systems with LTC and QDs excellent candidates for clinical diagnostics. So far, such proofs of principle for highly sensitive multiplexed biosensing have only been performed under optimized buffer conditions and interactions between real-life clinical media such as human serum or plasma and LTC-QD-FRET-systems have not yet been taken into account. Here we present an extensive spectroscopic analysis of absorption, excitation and emission spectra along with the luminescence decay times of both the single components as well as the assembled FRET-systems in TRIS-buffer, TRIS-buffer with 2% bovine serum albumin, and fresh human plasma. Moreover, we evaluated homogeneous LTC-QD FRET assays in QD conjugates assembled with either the well-known, specific biotin-streptavidin biological interaction or, alternatively, the metal-affinity coordination of histidine to zinc. In the case of conjugates assembled with biotin-streptavidin no significant interference with the optical and binding properties occurs whereas the histidine-zinc system appears to be affected by human plasma.

  2. Fluorometric determination of proteins using the terbium (III)-2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate-protein system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Zhen [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Chemistry, Dezhou University, Dezhou 253023 (China); Yang Jinghe [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)]. E-mail: yjh@sdu.edu.cn; Wu Xia [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang Fei [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Guo Changying [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu Shufang [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2006-12-15

    It is found that in hexamethylene tetramine (HMTA)-HCl buffer of pH=8.00, proteins can enhance the fluorescence of terbium (III) (Tb{sup 3+})-2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA)-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) system. Based on this, a sensitive method for the determination of proteins is proposed. The experiments indicate that under the optimum conditions, the enhanced fluorescence intensity is in proportion to the concentration of proteins in the range of 4.0x10{sup -9}-7.5x10{sup -6}g/mL for bovine serum albumin (BSA), 5.0x10{sup -9}-1.5x10{sup -5}g/mL for human serum albumin (HSA), 1.0x10{sup -8}-7.5x10{sup -6}g/mL for egg albumin (EA). Their detection limits (S/N=3) are 0.5, 0.8 and 2.0ng/mL, respectively. The interaction mechanism is also studied.

  3. Sparkle/PM3 for the modeling of europium(III), gadolinium(III), and terbium(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2009-01-01

    The Sparkle/PM3 model is extended to europium(III), gadolinium(III), and terbium(III) complexes. The validation procedure was carried out using only high quality crystallographic structures, for a total of ninety-six Eu(III) complexes, seventy Gd(III) complexes, and forty-two Tb(III) complexes. The Sparkle/PM3 unsigned mean error, for all interatomic distances between the trivalent lanthanide ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is: 0.080 A for Eu(III); 0.063 A for Gd(III); and 0.070 A for Tb(III). These figures are similar to the Sparkle/AM1 ones of 0.082 A, 0.061 A, and 0.068 A respectively, indicating they are all comparable parameterizations. Moreover, their accuracy is similar to what can be obtained by present-day ab initio effective core potential full geometry optimization calculations on such lanthanide complexes. Finally, we report a preliminary attempt to show that Sparkle/PM3 geometry predictions are reliable. For one of the Eu(III) complexes, BAFZEO, we created hundreds of different input geometries by randomly varying the distances and angles of the ligands to the central Eu(III) ion, which were all subsequently fully optimized. A significant trend was unveiled, indicating that more accurate local minima geometries cluster at lower total energies, thus reinforcing the validity of sparkle model calculations. (author)

  4. Study of quantum dot based on tin/yttrium mixed oxide doped with terbium to be used as biomarker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, Paula P.; Felinto, Maria Claudia F.C.; Kodaira, Claudia A.; Brito, Hermi F.; Nunes, Luiz Antonio O.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots (semiconductors nanocrystals) have brought a promising field to develop a new generation of luminescent biomarkers. The use of lanthanides ions as luminescent markers has many advantages, for example a security method, low cost, high specificity and also the luminescence can be promptly measured with high sensibility and accuracy. These luminescent dots are functionalized with biomolecules. For the luminophore particle to be connect with biologicals molecules (for example covalent antibody) is necessary a previous chemical treatment to modify luminophore particle surface and this process is called functionalization. A prior chemical treatment with changes on the surface luminophore particle is necessary to couple the luminophore to biological molecules. This process can be used as coating which can protect these particles from being dissolved by acid as well as provide functional groups for biological conjugation. This work presents a photoluminescence study of nanoparticles based on tin/yttrium mixed oxides doped with terbium (SnO 2 /Y 2 O 3 :Tb 3+ ), synthesized by coprecipitation method. The nanoparticles were submitted to thermal treatment and characterized by X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) that showed cassiterite phase formation and the influence of thermal treatment on nanoparticles structures. These nanoparticles going to be functionalized with a natural polysaccharide (chitosan) in order to form microspheres. These microspheres going to be irradiated with gamma radiation to sterilization and it can be evaluated if the nanoparticles are resistant to irradiation and they do not lose functionality with this process. (author)

  5. Development and Validation of A Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Calf Thymus DNA Using a Terbium-Danofloxacin Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Soltani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Analysis of biomolecules is required in many biomedical research areas. A spectrofluorimetric method is proposed for determination of calf thymus DNA (ctDNA based on the fluorescence enhancement of terbium-danofloxacin (Tb3+-Dano in the presence of ctDNA. Methods: A probe with maximum excitation and emission wavelengths of 347 nm and 545 nm, respectively, was developed. The enhanced fluorescence intensity of Tb3+-Dano system was proportional to the concentration of ctDNA. The effective factors and the optimum conditions for the determination of ctDNA were studied. Under the optimum conditions of [Tris buffer]= 0.01 mol L-1 (pH 7.8, [ Tb3+]= 1×10-5 mol L-1 and [Dano]= 5×10-5 mol L-1, the maximum response was achieved. The developed method was evaluated in terms of accuracy, precision and limit of detection. Results: The linear concentration range for quantification of ctDNA was 36-3289 ng mL-1 and the detection limit (S/N=3 was 8 ng mL-1. The concentration of DNA extracted from Escherichia coli as an extracted sample was also determined using the developed probe. The concentration of DNA in extracted sample was determined using UV assay and developed method, the results were satisfactory. Conclusion: The proposed method is a simple, practical and relatively interference free method to follow up the concentrations of ctDNA.

  6. Evidence of mass exchange between inside and outside of sonoluminescing bubble in aqueous solution of terbium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jinfu, E-mail: liang.shi2007@163.com [School of Physics and Electronic Science, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang 550001 (China); Chen, Weizhong, E-mail: wzchen@nju.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institution of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang, Xun; Yang, Jing; Chen, Zhan [The Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institution of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-12-16

    Highlights: • Time-resolved spectra of SBSL were obtained for Tb{sup 3+} ions emission lines. • Mass exchange between inside and outside of SL bubble was probed via Tb{sup 3+} ions lines. • The argon rectification hypothesis was tested by time-resolved spectra of SBSL. • The rate of mass exchange inside an SBSL bubble increases with increasing sound pressure. - Abstract: Spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) were obtained for Tb{sup 3+} ions emission lines from bubbles in an aqueous solution of terbium chloride (TbCl{sub 3}). The spectra provide experimental evidence to prove that an air bubble driven by strong ultrasound will not eventually become a rectified pure argon bubble, which is not as predicted by the argon rectification hypothesis. The time-resolved spectra of SBSL show a mass exchange of material such as Tb{sup 3+} ions between the inside and outside of the bubble. With increasing sound pressure, the rate of mass exchange and the SBSL intensity increases.

  7. Spectrofluorimetric determination of trace amount of coenzyme II using ciprofloxacin-terbium complex as a fluorescent probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian Weiwei; Wang Yusheng; Zhu Xiaojing; Jiang Chongqiu

    2006-01-01

    A new spectrofluorimetric method was developed for the determination of trace amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Using terbium ion (Tb 3+ )-ciprofloxacin (CIP) complex as a fluorescent probe, in the buffer solution of pH=9.00, NADP can remarkably enhance the fluorescence intensity of the Tb 3+ -CIP complex at λ=545nm and the enhanced fluorescence intensity of Tb 3+ ion is in proportion to the concentration of NADP. Optimum conditions for the determination of NADP were also investigated. The dynamic range for the determination of NADP is 4.9x10 -7 -3.7x10 -6 molL -1 with detection limit of 1.3x10 -7 molL -1 . This method is simple, practical and relatively free interference from coexisting substances and can be successfully applied to determination of NADP in synthetic water samples. Moreover, the enhancement mechanisms of the fluorescence intensity in the Tb 3+ -CIP system and the Tb 3+ -CIP-NADP system have been also discussed

  8. Studies of binary cerium(IV)-praseodymium(IV) and cerium(IV)-terbium(IV) oxides as pigments for ceramic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado, L.M.L.

    1991-01-01

    It was investigated a series of pigments of general composition Ce 1-x Pr x O 2 , and Ce x Tb y O 2 , exhibiting radish and brown colors, respectively, and high temperature stability. The pigments were obtained by dissolving appropriate amounts of the pure lanthanide oxides in acids and precipitating the rare earths as mixed oxalates, which were isolated and calcined under air, at 1000 0 C. X-Ray powder diffractograms were consistent with a cubic structure for the pigments. Magnetic susceptibility measurements, using Gouy method, indicated the presence of Pr(IV) ions in the Ce 1-x Pr x O 2 pigments and of Terbium predominantly as Tb(III) ions in the Ce-tb mixed oxides. A new method, based on suspension of solid samples in PVA-STB gels (STB = sodium tetradecaborate), was employed for the measurements of the electronic spectra of the pigments. The thermal behaviour the pigments was investigated by the calcination of the oxalates in the temperature range of 500 to 1200 O C, from 10 to 60 minutes. (author)

  9. Effect of solvents on relation of intensities of bands of luminescence spectra of terbium and dysprosium ions in solutions of their complexes with acetoacetic ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononenko, L.I.; Bel'tyukova, S.V.; Meshkova, S.B.; Kravchenko, T.B.; Poluehktov, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation is made of the effect of different solvents on the ratio of the intensity of luminescence spectrum bands of terbium and dysprosium ions, corresponding and not corresponding to ''supersensitive'' transitions in complex compounds with acetoacetic ether. A dependence is established between these values and the dielectric constant of the solvent, and also parallels in their changes, which indicate the similar manifestation of the effect of solvents in both elements. A correlation is observed between ratios of the intensity of luminescence spectrum bands and values of forces of neodymium complex absorption band oscillators in different solvents

  10. Actinide production in 136Xe bombardments of 249Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregorich, K.E.

    1985-08-01

    The production cross sections for the actinide products from 136 Xe bombardments of 249 Cf at energies 1.02, 1.09, and 1.16 times the Coulomb barrier were determined. Fractions of the individual actinide elements were chemically separated from recoil catcher foils. The production cross sections of the actinide products were determined by measuring the radiations emitted from the nuclides within the chemical fractions. The chemical separation techniques used in this work are described in detail, and a description of the data analysis procedure is included. The actinide production cross section distributions from these 136 Xe + 249 Cf bombardments are compared with the production cross section distributions from other heavy ion bombardments of actinide targets, with emphasis on the comparison with the 136 Xe + 248 Cm reaction. A technique for modeling the final actinide cross section distributions has been developed and is presented. In this model, the initial (before deexcitation) cross section distribution with respect to the separation energy of a dinuclear complex and with respect to the Z of the target-like fragment is given by an empirical procedure. It is then assumed that the N/Z equilibration in the dinuclear complex occurs by the transfer of neutrons between the two participants in the dinuclear complex. The neutrons and the excitation energy are statistically distributed between the two fragments using a simple Fermi gas level density formalism. The resulting target-like fragment initial cross section distribution with respect to Z, N, and excitation energy is then allowed to deexcite by emission of neutrons in competition with fission. The result is a final cross section distribution with respect to Z and N for the actinide products. 68 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs

  11. 33 CFR 162.136 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; anchorage grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; anchorage grounds. 162.136 Section 162.136 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.136 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; anchorage grounds. (a) In the Detroit...

  12. 24 CFR 17.136 - Procedures for salary offset: methods of collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for salary offset: methods of collection. 17.136 Section 17.136 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary... the Government Salary Offset Provisions § 17.136 Procedures for salary offset: methods of collection...

  13. 42 CFR 460.136 - Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities. 460.136 Section 460.136 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES....136 Internal quality assessment and performance improvement activities. (a) Quality assessment and...

  14. High-j neutron excitations outside 136Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, R.; Kay, B. P.; Mitchell, A. J.; Adachi, S.; Entwisle, J. P.; Fujita, Y.; Gey, G.; Noji, S.; Ong, H. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Tamii, A.

    2017-08-01

    The ν 0 h9 /2 and ν 0 i13 /2 strength at 137Xe, a single neutron outside the N =82 shell closure, has been determined using the 136Xe(α ,3He)137Xe reaction carried out at 100 MeV. We confirm the recent observation of the second 13 /2+ state and reassess previous data on the 9 /2- states, obtaining spectroscopic factors. These new data provide additional constraints on predictions of the same single-neutron excitations at 133Sn.

  15. Compact all-fiber optical Faraday components using 65-wt%-terbium-doped fiber with a record Verdet constant of -32 rad/(Tm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Jiang, S; Marciante, J R

    2010-06-07

    A compact all-fiber Faraday isolator and a Faraday mirror are demonstrated. At the core of each of these components is an all-fiber Faraday rotator made of a 4-cm-long, 65-wt%-terbium-doped silicate fiber. The effective Verdet constant of the terbium-doped fiber is measured to be -32 rad/(Tm), which is 27 x larger than that of silica fiber. This effective Verdet constant is the largest value measured to date in any fiber and is 83% of the Verdet constant of commercially available crystal used in bulk optics-based isolators. Combining the all-fiber Faraday rotator with fiber polarizers results in a fully fusion spliced all-fiber isolator whose isolation is measured to be 19 dB. Combining the all-fiber Faraday rotator with a fiber Bragg grating results in an all-fiber Faraday mirror that rotates the polarization state of the reflected light by 88 +/- 4 degrees .

  16. Electromagnetic excitation of 136Xe in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.D.

    1991-11-01

    In the framework of the experimental program at the accelerator facilities SIS/ESR at the Society for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt a detector system for relativistic neutrons was developed, constructed, and applied in first experiments. An essential research aim is the study of collective states after electromagnetic excitation in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In peripheral collisions high-energy virtual photons are exchanged. This leads to the excitation of giant resonances, especially of the giant dipole and quadrupole resonance. An essential decay channel of giant resonances in heavy nuclei is the emission of neutrons, followed by the emission of γ radiation below the particle threshold. These decay channels were studied with the detector system developed by the LAND collaboration. A first experiment on the electromagnetic excitation was performed with a 136 Xe beam at an energy of 700 MeV/u and Pb respectively C targets. (orig./HSI) [de

  17. Pediatric morphea (localized scleroderma): review of 136 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen-Zaech, Stéphanie; Hakim, Miriam D; Afsar, F Sule; Paller, Amy S

    2008-09-01

    Morphea is an autoimmune inflammatory sclerosing disorder that may cause permanent functional disability and disfigurement. We sought to determine the clinical features of morphea in a large pediatric cohort. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 136 pediatric patients with morphea from one center, 1989 to 2006. Most children showed linear morphea, with a disproportionately high number of Caucasian and female patients. Two patients with rapidly progressing generalized or extensive linear morphea and arthralgias developed restrictive pulmonary disease. Initial oral corticosteroid treatment and long-term methotrexate administration stabilized and/or led to disease improvement in most patients with aggressive disease. Retrospective analysis, relatively small sample size, and risk of a selected referral population to the single site are limitations. These data suggest an increased prevalence of morphea in Caucasian girls, and support methotrexate as treatment for problematic forms. Visceral manifestations rarely occur; the presence of progressive problematic cutaneous disease and arthralgias should trigger closer patient monitoring.

  18. Physico-chemical characterization of terbium-161-chloride (161TbCl3) radioisotope from irradiated natural gadolinium oxide target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmairit Aziz; Nana Suherman

    2015-01-01

    Currently cancer patients are increasing every year in Indonesia and become the third leading cause of death after heart disease and high blood pressure. Terbium-161 ( 161 Tb) is a low β- emitter (E β - = 0.155 MeV, T 1/2 = 6.9 d) and very similar to 177 Lu in terms of half-life, E β - energy and chemical properties.However, 161 Tb also ejects internal conversion electrons and Auger electrons which can provide a greater therapeutic effect than 177 Lu. Radioisotope of 161 Tb can be produced as a carrier-free for use in labeling of biomolecules as a targeted radiopharmaceutical for cancer therapy. 161 Tb was obtained through 160 Gd(n,γ) 161 Tb nuclear reaction by thermal neutron bombardment on 100 mg of natural gadolinium oxide target in RSG-G.A. Siwabessy at a thermal neutron flux of ~10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and followed by radiochemical separation of 161 Tb from Gd isotopes using extraction chromatography method. The physico-chemical characterization of 161 TbCl 3 solution was studied by determination of its radionuclide purity by means of a γ-rays spectrometry with HP-Ge detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer (MCA). Radiochemical purity was determined using paper chromatography and paper electrophoresis methods. The results showed that 161 TbCl 3 radioisotope has a pH of 2, radiochemical purity of 99.64 ± 0.34%, radionuclide purity of 99.69 ± 0.20%, specific activity and radioactive concentration at the end of irradiation (EOI) of 2.26 – 5.31 Ci/mg and 3.84 – 9.03 mCi/mL, respectively. 161 TbCl 3 solution stable for 3 weeks at room temperature with a radiochemical purity of 98.41 ± 0.42%. 161 TbCl 3 solution from irradiated natural gadolinium oxide target has the physico-chemical characteristic that meets the requirements for use as a precursor in preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  19. Crystal structures of two mononuclear complexes of terbium(III nitrate with the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethylpropane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaiane Gregório

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Two new mononuclear cationic complexes in which the TbIII ion is bis-chelated by the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethylpropane (H3LEt, C6H14O3 were prepared from Tb(NO33·5H2O and had their crystal and molecular structures solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis after data collection at 100 K. Both products were isolated in reasonable yields from the same reaction mixture by using different crystallization conditions. The higher-symmetry complex dinitratobis[1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethylpropane]terbium(III nitrate dimethoxyethane hemisolvate, [Tb(NO32(H3LEt2]NO3·0.5C4H10O2, 1, in which the lanthanide ion is 10-coordinate and adopts an s-bicapped square-antiprismatic coordination geometry, contains two bidentate nitrate ions bound to the metal atom; another nitrate ion functions as a counter-ion and a half-molecule of dimethoxyethane (completed by a crystallographic twofold rotation axis is also present. In product aquanitratobis[1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethylpropane]terbium(III dinitrate, [Tb(NO3(H3LEt2(H2O](NO32, 2, one bidentate nitrate ion and one water molecule are bound to the nine-coordinate terbium(III centre, while two free nitrate ions contribute to charge balance outside the tricapped trigonal-prismatic coordination polyhedron. No free water molecule was found in either of the crystal structures and, only in the case of 1, dimethoxyethane acts as a crystallizing solvent. In both molecular structures, the two tripodal ligands are bent to one side of the coordination sphere, leaving room for the anionic and water ligands. In complex 2, the methyl group of one of the H3LEt ligands is disordered over two alternative orientations. Strong hydrogen bonds, both intra- and intermolecular, are found in the crystal structures due to the number of different donor and acceptor groups present.

  20. Study of high-j neutron excitations outside 136Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, R.; Kay, B. P.; Mitchell, A. J.; Adachi, S.; Entwisle, J. P.; Fujita, Y.; Gey, G.; Noji, S.; Ong, H. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Tamii, A.

    2017-09-01

    The character of single-neutron excitations outside of N = 82 has been studied using nucleon transfer reactions in terms of the energy centroid of their strength as well as the fragmentation of this strength among the actual states of the nucleus. However, extending the systematic study of the N = 83 isotones to 137Xe has been challenging due to xenon being a gas at room temperature. Though several attempts have been made, a quantitative determination of the spectroscopic factors for the neutron 9/2- and 13/2+ excitations in 137Xe is still lacking. In the present work, we report on a study of the 136Xe(α,3He)137Xe reaction carried out at 100 MeV to probe the l = 5 , 9/2- and l = 6 , 13/2+ single-neutron excitations. The experimental technique and results will be presented discussing them in context of the evolution of these single-neutron excitations and the influence of the tensor interaction on the neutron single-particle states as the proton orbits are filling. This work has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357, the Australian Research Council Discovery Project 120104176, and the UK Science and Technology Facilities.

  1. The Gotthard experiment on 136Xe ββ decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, F.; Busto, J.; Farine, J.; Gabathuler, K.; Gervasio, G.; Henrikson, H.; Joergens, V.; Lou, K.; Luescher, R.; Paic, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Gotthard experiment measuring the double beta decay of 136 Xe is now running with an improved version of the TPC. The whole charge readout system has been redesigned in order to reduce the radioactive background. Signal-to-noise ratio is further enhanced by the tracking capability that allows to select events with two electron tracks emerging from the same point, and reject with high efficiency those background components such as internal β and α radioactivity, Compton electrons, and cosmic rays. After the first 2200 hours of data taking, a reduction of the count rate has been observed. The most recent 90% C.L. half life limits for the different ββ modes are: 4 x 10 23 yr, corresponding to a Majorana mass of 1.9-2.5 eV, for the neutrinoless channel; 1.1 x 10 22 yr for the majoron, and 4.6 x 10 20 yr for the 2ν channel. (K.A.)

  2. Study for the determination of samarium, europium,terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in gadolinium oxide matrix by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caires, A.C.F.

    1985-01-01

    A study for determination of samarium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in a gadolinium oxide matrix by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace is presented. The best charrring and atomization conditions were estabilished for each element, the most convenient ressonance lines being selected as well. The study was carried out for the mentioned lanthanides both when pure and when in binary mixtures with gadolinium, besides those where all for them were together with gadolinium. The determination limits for pure lanthanides were found to be between 1.3 and 9.6 ng assuming a 20% relative standard deviation as acceptable. The detection limits were in the range 0.51 and 7.5 ng, assuming as positive any answer higher than twofold the standard deviation. (author) [pt

  3. Synthesis and characterization of bright green terbium coordination complex derived from 1,4-bis(carbonylmethyl)terephthalate: Structure and luminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mengjiao; Li, Congcong; Shu, Dengkun; Wang, Chaohua; Xi, Peng

    2018-02-01

    A photoluminescent terbium (Tb) complex involving a novel benzoic-acid compound with a unique coordinated structure, namely 1,4-bis(carbonylmethyl)terephthalate (BCMT), has been designed and synthesized. The new coordinate structure and energy-transfer mechanism between the ligand and Tb(III) ions were investigated in detail. The results demonstrated that the BCMT-Tb(III) complex shows strong fluorescence intensity (4 × 106 a.u.) and long fluorescence lifetime (1.302 ms), owing to the favorable degree of energy matching between the triplet excited level of the ligand and the resonant level of Tb(III) ions. Based on the analysis of three-dimensional luminescence spectra, the as-prepared Tb(III) complex can be effectively excited in the range of 250-310 nm, and it shows high color purity, with a bright green appearance.

  4. High power single-frequency and frequency-doubled laser with active compensation for the thermal lens effect of terbium gallium garnet crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiwei; Lu, Huadong; Su, Jing; Peng, Kunchi

    2016-05-01

    The thermal lens effect of terbium gallium garnet (TGG) crystal in a high power single-frequency laser severely limits the output power and the beam quality of the laser. By inserting a potassium dideuterium phosphate (DKDP) slice with negative thermo-optical coefficient into the laser resonator, the harmful influence of the thermal lens effect of the TGG crystal can be effectively mitigated. Using this method, the stable range of the laser is broadened, the bistability phenomenon of the laser during the process of changing the pump power is completely eliminated, the highest output power of an all-solid-state continuous-wave intracavity-frequency-doubling single-frequency laser at 532 nm is enhanced to 30.2 W, and the beam quality of the laser is significantly improved.

  5. Study of the nucleotide binding site of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe plasma membrane H+-ATPase using formycin triphosphate-terbium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronjat, M.; Lacapere, J.J.; Dufour, J.P.; Dupont, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The plasma membrane of yeasts contains an H+-ATPase similar to the other cation transport ATPases of eukaryotic organisms. This enzyme has been purified and shows H+ transport in reconstituted vesicles. In the presence of Mg2+, formycin triphosphate (FTP) is hydrolyzed by the H+-ATPase and supports H+ transport. When combined with terbium ion, FTP (Tb-FTP) and ATP (Tb-ATP) are no longer hydrolyzed. Competition between Mg-ATP and Tb-FTP for ATP hydrolysis indicates that terbium-associated nucleotides bind to the catalytic site of the H+-ATPase. The fluorescent properties of the Tb-FTP complex were used to study the active site of the H+-ATPase. Fluorescence of Tb-FTP is greatly enhanced upon binding into the nucleotide site of H+-ATPase with a dissociation constant of 1 microM. Tb-ATP, Tb-ADP, and Tb-ITP are competitive inhibitors of Tb-FTP binding with Ki = 4.5, 5.0, and 6.0 microM, respectively. Binding of Tb-FTP is observed only in the presence of an excess of Tb3+ with an activation constant Ka = 25 microM for Tb3+. Analysis of the data reveals that the sites for Tb-FTP and Tb3+ binding are independent entities. In standard conditions these sites would be occupied by Mg-ATP and Mg2+, respectively. These findings suggest an important regulatory role of divalent cations on the activity of H+-ATPase. Replacement of H 2 O by D 2 O in the medium suggests the existence of two types of nucleotide binding sites differing by the hydration state of the Tb3+ ion in the bound Tb-FTP complex

  6. Terbium(III)/gold nanocluster conjugates: the development of a novel ratiometric fluorescent probe for mercury(II) and a paper-based visual sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Min; Zhu, Anwei; Shi, Guoyue

    2015-08-21

    In this work, a novel ratiometric fluorescent probe was developed for rapid, highly accurate, sensitive and selective detection of mercury(II) (Hg(2+)) based on terbium(III)/gold nanocluster conjugates (Tb(3+)/BSA-AuNCs), in which bovine serum albumin capped gold nanoclusters (BSA-AuNCs) acted as the signal indicator and terbium(III) (Tb(3+)) was used as the build-in reference. Our proposed ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited unique specificity toward Hg(2+) against other common environmentally and biologically important metal ions, and had high accuracy and sensitivity with a low detection limit of 1 nM. In addition, our proposed probe was effectively employed to detect Hg(2+) in the biological samples from the artificial Hg(2+)-infected rats. More significantly, an appealing paper-based visual sensor for Hg(2+) was designed by using filter paper embedded with Tb(3+)/BSA-AuNC conjugates, and we have further demonstrated its feasibility for facile fluorescent sensing of Hg(2+) in a visual format, in which only a handheld UV lamp is used. In the presence of Hg(2+), the paper-based visual sensor, illuminated by a handheld UV lamp, would undergo a distinct fluorescence color change from red to green, which can be readily observed with naked eyes even in trace Hg(2+) concentrations. The Tb(3+)/BSA-AuNC-derived paper-based visual sensor is cost-effective, portable, disposable and easy-to-use. This work unveiled a facile approach for accurate, sensitive and selective measuring of Hg(2+) with self-calibration.

  7. 27 CFR 17.136 - Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements. 17.136 Section 17.136 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL... Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements. A product is not a medicine, medicinal preparation...

  8. 42 CFR 136.416 - When should the IHS deny employment or dismiss an employee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Child... over Indian children, and it has been adjudicated, pursuant to § 136.414 and § 136.415, that the... violence; sexual assault, molestation, exploitation, contact, or prostitution; crimes against persons; or...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.136 - Internal combustion engines, other than ship's equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Internal combustion engines, other than ship's equipment. 1915.136 Section 1915.136 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Tools and Related Equipment §...

  10. 25 CFR 39.136 - What is the WSU for Language Development programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the WSU for Language Development programs? 39.136... EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Language Development Programs § 39.136 What is the WSU for Language Development programs? Language Development programs are funded at 0.13 WSUs per student. ...

  11. 42 CFR 136a.55 - Drugs and devices and termination of ectopic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and devices and termination of ectopic pregnancies. Federal funds are available for drugs or devices... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drugs and devices and termination of ectopic pregnancies. 136a.55 Section 136a.55 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  12. 42 CFR 136.55 - Drugs and devices and termination of ectopic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... devices and termination of ectopic pregnancies. Federal funds are available for drugs or devices to... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drugs and devices and termination of ectopic pregnancies. 136.55 Section 136.55 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  13. 40 CFR 52.136 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. 52.136 Section 52.136 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the State of Arizona...

  14. Clinical Study on 136 Children with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Jiao; Wang, Da-Yong; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wang, Li; Yang, Feng-Bo; Lan, Lan; Guan, Jing; Yin, Zi-Fang; Rosenhall, Ulf; Yu, Lan; Hellstrom, Sten; Xue, Xi-Jun; Duan, Mao-Li; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2016-04-20

    The prevalence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in children (CSSNHL) is consistently increasing. However, the pathology and prognosis of CSSNHL are still poorly understood. This retrospective study evaluated clinical characteristics and possible associated factors of CSSNHL. One hundred and thirty-six CSSNHL patients treated in Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Institute of Otolaryngology at Chinese PLA General Hospital between July 2008 and August 2015 were included in this study. These patients were analyzed for clinical characteristics, audiological characteristics, laboratory examinations, and prognostic factors. Among the 136 patients (151 ears), 121 patients (121 ears, 80.1%) were diagnosed with unilaterally CSSNHL, and 15 patients (30 ears, 19.9%) with bilateral CSSNHL. The complete recovery rate of CSSNHL was 9.3%, and the overall recovery rate was 37.7%. We found that initial degree of hearing loss, onset of treatment, tinnitus, the ascending type audiogram, gender, side of hearing loss, the recorded auditory brainstem response (ABR), and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) had prognostic significance. Age, ear fullness, and vertigo had no significant correlation with recovery. Furthermore, the relevant blood tests showed 30.8% of the children had abnormal white blood cell (WBC) counts, 22.1% had elevated homocysteine levels, 65.8% had high alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 33.8% had high IgE antibody levels, and 86.1% had positive cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG antibodies. CSSNHL commonly occurs unilaterally and results in severe hearing loss. Initial severe hearing loss and bilateral hearing loss are negative prognostic factors for hearing recovery, while positive prognostic factors include tinnitus, gender, the ascending type audiogram, early treatment, identifiable ABR waves, and DPOAEs. Age, vertigo, and ear fullness are not correlated with the recovery. Some serologic indicators, including the level of WBC, platelet

  15. Magnon Interactions in Terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Mackintosh, Allan

    1970-01-01

    Magnon energies and lifetimes have been studied in Tb and Tb-10% Ho single crystals by inelastic neutron scattering. The lifetimes of magnons propagating in the c-direction have been measured in the ferromagnetic phase of Tb, and are found to decrease with increasing temperature and wave......-vector, probably principally due to magnon-magnon interactions. The interaction of magnons with phonons has also been observed and the effect of Ho impurities on this interaction studied. In addition, excitations which are ascribed to local modes associated with the Ho ions have been observed. The dependence...... of the indirect exchange interaction on temperature in the alloy gives information on the mechanisms responsible for the transition from the helical to ferromagnetic structures. The dependence of the magnon energies on magnetic field at low temperatures gives detailed information on the role of magnetoelastic...

  16. Spin Waves in Terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Bjerrum Møller, Hans

    1975-01-01

    with the symmetry, we deduce the dispersion relation for the spin waves in a basal-plane ferromagnet. This phenomenological spin-wave theory accounts for the observed behavior of the magnon energies in Tb. The two q⃗-dependent Bogoliubov components of the magnon energies are derived from the experimental results......, which are corrected for the effect of the direct coupling between the magnons and the phonons, and for the field dependence of the relative magnetization at finite temperatures. A large q⃗-dependent difference between the two energy components is observed, showing that the anisotropy of the two...

  17. Spin Waves in Terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden

    1975-01-01

    The selection rules for the linear couplings between magnons and phonons propagating in the c direction of a simple basal-plane hcp ferromagnet are determined by general symmetry considerations. The acoustic-optical magnon-phonon interactions observed in the heavy-rare-earth metals have been...... explained by Liu as originating from the mixing of the spin states of the conduction electrons due to the spin-orbit coupling. We find that this coupling mechanism introduces interactions which violate the selection rules for a simple ferromagnet. The interactions between the magnons and phonons propagating...... in the c direction of Tb have been studied experimentally by means of inelastic neutron scattering. The magnons are coupled to both the acoustic- and optical-transverse phonons. By studying the behavior of the acoustic-optical coupling, we conclude that it is a spin-mixed-induced coupling as proposed...

  18. Rearrangement of valence neutrons in the neutrinoless double-β decay of 136Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwec, S. V.; Kay, B. P.; Cocolios, T. E.; Entwisle, J. P.; Freeman, S. J.; Gaffney, L. P.; Guimarães, V.; Hammache, F.; McKee, P. P.; Parr, E.; Portail, C.; Schiffer, J. P.; de Séréville, N.; Sharp, D. K.; Smith, J. F.; Stefan, I.

    2016-11-01

    A quantitative description of the change in ground-state neutron occupancies between 136Xe and 136Ba, the initial and final state in the neutrinoless double-β decay of 136Xe, has been extracted from precision measurements of the cross sections of single-neutron-adding and -removing reactions. Comparisons are made to recent theoretical calculations of the same properties using various nuclear-structure models. These are the same calculations used to determine the magnitude of the nuclear matrix elements for the process, which at present disagree with each other by factors of 2 or 3. The experimental neutron occupancies show some disagreement with the theoretical calculations.

  19. Study of rotational bands in 136 Pr using on-line γ-spectroscopy methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emediato, L.G.R.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the doubly odd nucleus 136 Pr has been studied using techniques of on-line γ-spectroscopy with the reactions 123 Sb ( 16 O, 3 n) 136 Pr and 126 Te ( 14 N, 4 n) 136 Pr populating high spin states. The excitation functions were measured at four energies, and γ-γ-τ coincidences and angular distributions at 69 M e V and 56 M e V, respectively, using high resolution HPGe detectors (2 K e V) and targets of enriched isotope of 123 Sb (99%) and 126 Te (94%) with thicknesses of approximately 9 mg/cm 2 . (author)

  20. Change of nuclear configurations in the neutrinoless double-β decay of 130Te →130Be and 136Xe136Ba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwisle, J. P.; Kay, B. P.; Tamii, A.; Adachi, S.; Aoi, N.; Clark, J. A.; Freeman, S. J.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Furuno, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Hoffman, C. R.; Ideguchi, E.; Ito, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Kawabata, T.; Liu, B.; Miura, M.; Ong, H. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Sharp, D. K.; Süsoy, G.; Suzuki, T.; Szwec, S. V.; Takaki, M.; Tsumura, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-06-01

    The change in the configuration of valence protons between the initial and final states in the neutrinoless double-β decay of 130Te → 130Be and of 136Xe136Ba has been determined by measuring the cross sections of the (d ,3He) reaction with 101-MeV deuterons. Together with our recent determination of the relevant neutron configurations involved in the process, a quantitative comparison with the latest shell-model and interacting-boson-model calculations reveals significant discrepancies. These are the same calculations used to determine the nuclear matrix elements governing the rate of neutrinoless double-β decay in these systems.

  1. Search for 136Xe neutrinoless double beta decay with the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroux, G.

    2014-01-01

    The EXO collaboration is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136 Xe. Such observation would determine an absolute mass scale for the neutrinos, establish their Majorana nature, and uncover physics beyond the Standard Model. The EXO-200 detector is a single phase liquid xenon ultra low background TPC (Time Projection Chamber), with an active mass of 110 kg of 80.6% enriched xenon in the isotope 136. The detector is currently operating at the WIPP site and has been collecting data with enriched xenon since May 2011. The data collected give a lower limit for the neutrinoless double beta decay half-life of 136 Xe: T > 1.6*10 25 years at 90% C.L. The same data give a lower limit for the 2 neutrinos double beta decay of 136 Xe: T > 2.23*10 21 years that agrees with experimental values found in the literature

  2. 25 CFR 1000.136 - When will this determination be made?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Non-BIA Annual Self-Governance Compacts and Funding Agreements Eligibility § 1000.136 When will this determination be made? It will occur during the pre-negotiation process, subject to the...

  3. Synthesis and crystal structure of terbium(III) meta-oxoborate Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} ({identical_to} TbB{sub 3}O{sub 6}); Synthese und Kristallstruktur von Terbium(III)-meta-Oxoborat Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} ({identical_to} TbB{sub 3}O{sub 6})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikelski, Tanja; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie der Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    The terbium meta-oxoborate Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} ({identical_to} TbB{sub 3}O{sub 6}) is obtained as single crystals by the reaction of terbium, Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7} and TbCl{sub 3} with an excess of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in gastight sealed platinum ampoules at 950 C after three weeks. The compound appears to be air- and water-resistant and crystallizes as long, thin, colourless needles which tend to growth-twinning due to their marked fibrous habit. The crystal structure of Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} (orthorhombic, Pnma; a = 1598.97(9), b = 741.39(4), c = 1229.58(7) pm; Z = 16) contains strongly corrugated oxoborate layers {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}{l_brace}(BO{sub 2}){sup -}{r_brace} built of vertex-linked [BO{sub 4}]{sup 5-} tetrahedra (d(B-O) = 143 - 154 pm, and angsph;(O-B-O) = 102-115 ) which spread out parallel (100). The four crystallographically different Tb{sup 3+} cations all exhibit coordination numbers of eight towards the oxygen atoms (d(Tb-O) = 228-287 pm). The corresponding metal cation polyhedra [TbO{sub 8}]{sup 13+} too convene to layers (composition: {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}{l_brace}(Tb{sub 2}O{sub 11}){sup 16-}{r_brace}) which are likewise oriented parallel to the (100) plane. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Das Terbium-meta-Oxoborat Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} ({identical_to} TbB{sub 3}O{sub 6}) entsteht einkristallin bei der Reaktion von Terbium, Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7} und TbCl{sub 3} mit einem Ueberschuss von B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in gasdicht verschlossenen Platinampullen nach drei Wochen bei 950 C. Die Verbindung ist luft- und wasserstabil und faellt in langen, duennen, farblosen Nadeln an, die aufgrund ihres ausgepraegt faserigen Habitus zur Wachstumsverzwillingung neigen. Die Kristallstruktur von Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} (orthorhombisch, Pnma; a = 1598, 97(9), b = 741, 39(4), c = 1229, 58(7) pm; Z = 16) enthaelt parallel (100) verlaufende, stark gewellte Oxoborat-Schichten {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}{l_brace}(BO{sub 2}){sup -}{r_brace} aus

  4. Study of the spallation reactions 136Xe + p and 136Xe + 12C at 1 GeV per nucleon at the GSI facility (Darmstadt, Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbinet, T.

    2011-11-01

    The collision of 136 Xe with a proton and with 12 C at 1 GeV per nucleon of projectile kinetic energy in the center of mass has been studied in inverse kinematics using the SPALADIN experimental setup at the GSI facility. This manuscript describes the analysis of these collisions realized in spring 2009. The detection in coincidence of the final state fragments (projectile residues, neutrons and light charged fragments) with a large geometrical efficiency is provided by the inverse kinematics combined with a large aperture dipole magnet and large detectors. Such a coincidence, measured on an event basis, allows selecting, in a model independent way, the pre-fragment, the excited nuclear system formed after the intranuclear cascade as a function of its excitation energy. Hence, we were able to study the evolution of the pre-fragment deexcitation mechanism (evaporation of light particles, asymmetric binary decay, multiple fragmentation..) as a function of its excitation energy. The data of the 136 Xe + p reaction have been compared mainly to three deexcitation models (SMM, GEMINI++ and ABLA07) coupled to the intranuclear cascade code INCL4. Despite the relatively good and global agreement between these models and our data, significant discrepancies appeared concerning in particular the production of intermediate mass fragments (IMF). Comparison between the 136 Xe + 12 C and the 136 Xe + p data exhibits an important similarity in the deexcitation of the pre-fragments. This suggests that the nuclear cascade leads, for both targets, to similar pre-fragment types in the range of excitation energy (0 to 4 MeV per nucleon) common to both reactions. Higher excitation energies, reached only in the 136 Xe + 12 C reaction, show a qualitative difference in the deexcitation of the pre-fragment, with much higher multiplicities of IMF per event, increasing with the excitation energy. (author)

  5. Preparation of transparent sol-gel films containing europium, terbium, and ytterbium cations from 4-(3'-triethoxysilylpropylimino)pent-2-en-2-ol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V.V.; Cherepennikova, N.F.; Kuznetsova, O.V.; Melenskova, N.V.; Bushuk, B.A.; Bushuk, S.B.; Kal'vinkovskaya, Yu.A.; Duglas, V.E.

    2007-01-01

    A reaction of 3-aminopropyl(triethoxy)silane with acetylacetone gave a mixture of two isomeric carbon-functionalized organosilicon compounds capable of complexation and sol-gel polymerization. These were 4-(3'-triethoxysilylpropylimino)pent-2-en-2-ol (EtO) 3 Si-CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 -N=C(Me)CH=C(Me)OH (Ia, 83%) and 4-(3'-triethoxysilylpropylamino)pent-3-en-2-one (EtO) 3 Si-CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 -NH-C(Me)=CH-C(O)Me (Ib, 17%). With acetylacetone trimethylsilyl ether instead of acetylacetone itself, compound Ia and silylated derivatives (Me 3 SiO) n (EtO) 3-n Si-CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 -N=C(Me)CH=C(Me)OH were obtained as admixture in 84 and 16% yields, respectively. Reactions of ligands Ia and Ib with europium and terbium propan-2-olates afforded the corresponding complexes. Formulations of lanthanide complexes, oligodimethylsiloxanediols, and 3-aminopropyl(triethoxy)silane were used to prepare transparent sol-gel films. The photoluminescence spectra of the films show narrow bands due to Eu 3+ or Tb 3+ emission. Emission from the organosilicon matrix appears as a broad band at 430 to 435 nm [ru

  6. VUV and UV–vis optical study on KGd2F7 luminescent host doped with terbium and co-doped with europium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisiecki, Radosław

    2013-01-01

    The KGd 2 F 7 :Tb and KGd 2 F 7 :Tb,Eu samples were obtained using a solid state reaction. Excitation spectra and emission spectra are reported and analyzed within the VUV–UV–vis spectral range. The intense green luminescence is observed in the KGd 2 F 7 :Tb while the combined emission of terbium and europium in the KGd 2 F 7 :Tb,Eu covers substantially the region of white light. The materials under study can be effectively excited making use of intense f–d transitions of Tb 3+ in the VUV–UV region. Experimental lifetimes of luminescent levels have been measured and discussed. It was found that the considerable energy transfer from Tb 3+ to Eu 3+ occurs. -- Highlights: • The prospective green and white emitting phosphors. • The effective VUV and UV–vis excitation process. • The considerable energy transfer among optically active ions. • The influence of (Tb, Eu) co-doping on relaxation dynamic of excited states

  7. Preparation of a novel fluorescence probe of terbium-europium co-luminescence composite nanoparticles and its application in the determination of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Feng [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)], E-mail: summit8848cn@hotmail.com; Luo Fabao; Tang Lijuan; Dai Lu [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Wang Lun [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)], E-mail: wanglun@mail.ahnu.edu.cn

    2008-03-15

    Terbium-europium Tb-Eu/acetylacetone(acac)/poly(acrylamide) (PAM) co-luminescence composite nanoparticles were successfully prepared using the ultrasonic approach. The as-prepared composite nanoparticles show the characteristic emission spectra of Tb{sup 3+}, located at 496 and 549 nm. Furthermore, the nanoparticles are water soluble, stable and have extremely narrow emission bands and high internal fluorescence quantum yield due to the co-luminescence effect. Further studies indicate that proteins can interact with the nanoparticles and induce the fluorescence quenching of the nanoparticles. Based on the fluorescence quenching of nanopaticles in the presence of proteins, a novel method for the sensitive determination of trace amounts of proteins was proposed. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the linear ranges of calibration curves are 0-3.5 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for human serum albumin (HSA) and 0-4.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for {gamma}-globulin ({gamma}-IgG), respectively. The limits of detection are 7.1 for HSA and 6.7ng mL{sup -1} for {gamma}-IgG, respectively. The method was applied to the quantification of proteins in synthetic samples and actual human serum samples with satisfactory results. This proposed method is sensitive, simple and has potential application in the clinical assay of proteins.

  8. Determination of terbium in phosphate rock by Tb{sup 3+}-selective fluorimetric optode based on dansyl derivative as a neutral fluorogenic ionophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Morteza, E-mail: smhosseini@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Savadkooh Branch, Savadkooh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Veismohammadi, Bahareh [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush [Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abkenar, Shiva Dehghan [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Savadkooh Branch, Savadkooh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Norouzi, Parviz [Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-04-07

    For the first time a highly sensitive and selective fluorimetric optode membrane was prepared for determination of trace amounts of Tb(III) ions in phosphate rock samples. The Tb(III) sensing system was constructed by incorporating 5-(dimethylamino)-N'-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthoyl) naphthalene-1-sulfonohydrazine (L) as a neutral Tb(III)-selective fluoroionophore, in the plasticized PVC membrane containing sodium tetraphenyl borate as a liphophilic anionic additive. The response of the optode is based on the strong fluorescence quenching of L by Tb{sup 3+} ions. At a pH value of 5.0, the optode displays a wide concentration range of 1.0 x 10{sup -7} to 1.0 x 10{sup -2} M, with a relatively fast response time of less than 45 s. In addition, to high stability and reproducibility, the sensor shows a unique selectivity towards Tb{sup 3+} ion with respect to common cations. The optode was applied successfully to the trace determination of terbium ion in binary mixture and water samples and the determination of Tb{sup 3+} in phosphate rock samples.

  9. Determination of terbium in phosphate rock by Tb3+-selective fluorimetric optode based on dansyl derivative as a neutral fluorogenic ionophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Morteza; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Veismohammadi, Bahareh; Faridbod, Farnoush; Abkenar, Shiva Dehghan; Norouzi, Parviz

    2010-04-07

    For the first time a highly sensitive and selective fluorimetric optode membrane was prepared for determination of trace amounts of Tb(III) ions in phosphate rock samples. The Tb(III) sensing system was constructed by incorporating 5-(dimethylamino)-N'-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthoyl) naphthalene-1-sulfonohydrazine (L) as a neutral Tb(III)-selective fluoroionophore, in the plasticized PVC membrane containing sodium tetraphenyl borate as a liphophilic anionic additive. The response of the optode is based on the strong fluorescence quenching of L by Tb(3+) ions. At a pH value of 5.0, the optode displays a wide concentration range of 1.0 x 10(-7) to 1.0 x 10(-2)M, with a relatively fast response time of less than 45 s. In addition, to high stability and reproducibility, the sensor shows a unique selectivity towards Tb(3+) ion with respect to common cations. The optode was applied successfully to the trace determination of terbium ion in binary mixture and water samples and the determination of Tb(3+) in phosphate rock samples. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular Orientation of a Terbium(III)-Phthalocyaninato Double-Decker Complex for Effective Suppression of Quantum Tunneling of the Magnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabayashi, Tsutomu; Katoh, Keiichi; Breedlove, Brian K; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2017-06-15

    Single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties of crystals of a terbium(III)-phthalocyaninato double-decker complex with different molecular packings ( 1 : TbPc₂, 2 : TbPc₂·CH₂Cl₂) were studied to elucidate the relationship between the molecular packing and SMM properties. From single crystal X-ray analyses, the high symmetry of the coordination environment of 2 suggested that the SMM properties were improved. Furthermore, the shorter intermolecular Tb-Tb distance and relative collinear alignment of the magnetic dipole in 2 indicated that the magnetic dipole-dipole interactions were stronger than those in 1 . This was confirmed by using direct current magnetic measurements. From alternating current magnetic measurements, the activation energy for spin reversal for 1 and 2 were similar. However, the relaxation time for 2 is three orders of magnitude slower than that for 1 in the low- T region due to effective suppression of the quantum tunneling of the magnetization. These results suggest that the SMM properties of TbPc₂ highly depend on the molecular packing.

  11. Study of the role of complete fusion in the reaction of /sup 48/Ca and /sup 56/Fe with cerium and terbium. [Cross sections, yield curves, tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, D.J.

    1978-05-01

    /sup 48/Ca and /sup 56/Fe beams from the Super HILAC accelerator were used to irradiate thick metal foils of cerium and terbium. Product gamma ray activities were detected offline and individual products were identified by half-life, gamma ray energy and gamma ray abundances. The production cross sections were iteratively fit to charge and mass dispersions to allow correction for parent decay and calculation of mass yields. From the mass yield curves contributions from quasielastic transfer, deep inelastic transfer and complete fusion reaction mechanisms were interred. Complete fusion was made up on contributions from both evaporation residue and fusion-fission products for the /sup 48/Ca induced reactions. However, only fusion-fission products were detected in the /sup 56/Fe induced reactions. Critical angular momenta for fusion were found to be 82 +- 8 h for /sup 48/Ca + /sup 159/Tb and 34 +- 5 h for /sup 56/Fe + /sup 140/Ce, which can be compared with 53 +- 8 h for /sup 12/C + /sup 197/Au (Natowitz, 1970) and 86 +- 5 h for /sup 40/Ar + /sup 165/Ho (Hanappe, 1973). All of these reactions lead to essentially the same compound nucleus and seem to show the dramatic decline in complete fusion for heavy ions larger than /sup 40/Ar. The prediction of this decline was found to be beyond the model calculations of Bass and the critical distance approach of Glas and Mosel.

  12. Investigation of concentration-dependence of thermodynamic properties of lanthanum, yttrium, scandium and terbium in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yafei; Zhou, Wentao; Zhang, Jinsuo, E-mail: zhang.3558@osu.edu

    2016-09-15

    Thermodynamic properties of rare earth metals in LiCl-KCl molten salt electrolyte are crucial to the development of electrochemical separation for the treatment of used nuclear fuels. In the present study, activity coefficient, apparent potential, and diffusion coefficient of lanthanum, yttrium, scandium, and terbium in the molten salt (58 at% LiCl and 42 at% KCl) were calculated by the method of molecular dynamics simulation up to a concentration around 3 at% at temperatures of 723 K and 773 K. It was found that the activity coefficient and the apparent potential increase with the species concentration while diffusion coefficient shows a trend of increase followed by decrease. The calculated results were validated by available measurement data of dilution cases. This research extends the range of data to a wide component and would provide further insight to the pyroprocessing design and safeguards. - Highlights: • Investigation of activity coefficient, apparent potential and diffusion coefficient at different concentrations. • MD simulation was studied for the calculation of thermodynamic properties of rare earth elements in molten salt. • The present study is a pioneering work focusing on the concentration dependence of thermodynamic properties.

  13. Search for double-beta decay of 136Xe to excited states of 136Ba with the KamLAND-Zen experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hachiya, T.; Hayashida, S.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishio, S.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Motoki, D.; Nakamura, K.; Obara, S.; Otani, M.; Oura, T.; Shimizu, I.; Shirahata, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Tachibana, H.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Fushimi, K.; Banks, T. I.; Berger, B. E.; Fujikawa, B. K.; O'Donnell, T.; Winslow, L. A.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2016-02-01

    A search for double-beta decays of 136Xe to excited states of 136Ba has been performed with the first phase data set of the KamLAND-Zen experiment. The 01+, 21+ and 22+ transitions of 0 νββ decay were evaluated in an exposure of 89.5 kg ṡyr of 136Xe, while the same transitions of 2 νββ decay were evaluated in an exposure of 61.8 kg ṡyr. No excess over background was found for all decay modes. The lower half-life limits of the 21+ state transitions of 0 νββ and 2 νββ decay were improved to T1/20ν (0+ →21+) > 2.6 ×1025 yr and T1/22ν (0+ →21+) > 4.6 ×1023 yr (90% C.L.), respectively. We report on the first experimental lower half-life limits for the transitions to the 01+ state of 136Xe for 0 νββ and 2 νββ decay. They are T1/20ν (0+ →01+) > 2.4 ×1025 yr and T1/22ν (0+ → 01+) > 8.3 ×1023 yr (90% C.L.). The transitions to the 22+ states are also evaluated for the first time to be T1/20ν (0+ →22+) > 2.6 ×1025 yr and T1/22ν (0+ →22+) > 9.0 ×1023 yr (90% C.L.). These results are compared to recent theoretical predictions.

  14. 2,2',3,3',6,6'-Hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) is Enantioselectively Oxidized to Hydroxylated Metabolites by Rat Liver Microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianai; Pramanik, Ananya; Duffel, Michael W.; Hrycay, Eugene G.; Bandiera, Stelvio M.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Kania-Korwel, Izabela

    2011-01-01

    Developmental exposure to multiple-ortho substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) causes adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in laboratory animals and humans by mechanisms involving the sensitization of Ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In the case of PCB 136, the sensitization of RyR is enantiospecific, with only (-)-PCB 136 being active. However, the role of enantioselective metabolism in the developmental neurotoxicity of PCB 136 is poorly understood. The present study employed hepatic microsomes from phenobarbital (PB-), dexamethasone (DEX-) and corn oil (VEH-)treated male Sprague-Dawley rats to investigate the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers are enantioselectively metabolized by P450 enzymes to potentially neurotoxic, hydroxylated PCB 136 metabolites. The results demonstrated the time- and isoform-dependent formation of three metabolites, with 5-OH-PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol) being the major metabolite. The formation of 5-OH-PCB 136 increased with the activity of P450 2B enzymes in the microsomal preparation, which is consistent with PCB 136 metabolism by rat P450 2B1. The minor metabolite 4-OH-PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-4-ol) was produced by a currently unidentified P450 enzymes. An enantiomeric enrichment of (-)-PCB 136 was observed in microsomal incubations due to the preferential metabolism of (+)-PCB 136 to the corresponding 5-OH-PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol) atropisomer. 4-OH-PCB 136 displayed an enrichment of the atropisomer formed from (-)-PCB 136; however, the enrichment of this metabolite atropisomer didn't affect the enantiomeric enrichment of the parent PCB because 4-OH-PCB 136 is only a minor metabolite. Although the formation of 5- and 4-OH-PCB 136 atropisomers increased with time, the enantioselective formation of the OH-PCB metabolites resulted in constant enantiomeric enrichment, especially at later incubation times. These observations not only demonstrate that the chiral signatures of

  15. New limit on rate of 2ν ββ decay of 136Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzminov, V.V.; Lobashev, V.M.; Novikov, V.M.; Ovchinnikov, B.M.; Pomansky, A.A.; Pritychenko, B.V.

    1991-01-01

    A significant background suppression was achieved in a new step of measurements in the Baksan underground laboratory 136 Xe ββ experiment, using a high-pressure gridded ionization chamber. In order to reduce outer γ-ray background, the chamber was placed inside the passive shielding consisting of 15 cm of lead and of 10 cm of copper. Half-life limit of 2.7x10 20 yrs is obtained for 2ν ββ mode of 136 Xe. (R.P.) 12 refs., 2 figs

  16. Structure of 2{sub 1,2}{sup +} states in {sup 132,134,136}Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severyukhin, A. P., E-mail: sever@theor.jinr.ru; Arsenyev, N. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation); Pietralla, N.; Werner, V. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Kernphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    Starting fromthe Skyrme interaction f- together with the volume pairing interaction, we study the g factors for the 2{sub 1,2}{sup +} excitations of {sup 132,134,136}Te. The coupling between one- and two-phonon terms in the wave functions of excited states is taken into account within the finite-rank separable approximation. Using the same set of parameters we describe the available experimental data and give the prediction for {sup 136}Te, g(2{sub 1}{sup +}) = −0.18 in comparison to +0.32 in the case of {sup 132}Te.

  17. Enterocin P Selectively Dissipates the Membrane Potential of Enterococcus faecium T136

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, C.; Chen, Y.; Chung, H.-J.; Cintas, L. M.; Hernández, P. E.; Montville, T. J.; Chikindas, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Enterocin P is a pediocin-like, broad-spectrum bacteriocin which displays a strong inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes. The bacteriocin was purified from the culture supernatant of Enterococcus faecium P13, and its molecular mechanism of action against the sensitive strain E. faecium T136 was evaluated. Although enterocin P caused significant reduction of the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and the intracellular ATP pool of the indicator organism, the pH gradient (ΔpH) component of the proton motive force (Δp) was not dissipated. By contrast, enterocin P caused carboxyfluorescein efflux from E. faecium T136-derived liposomes. PMID:11282622

  18. Investigation of {sup 136} Ba gamma-Transitions in the (n,n` gamma) Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergiwa, S M [University of Garyuonis, Benghazi, (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Rateb, G M; Zleetni, S M; dufani, M M; Shermit, A M; Al Hamidi, M M [Tajoura Nuclear Research Center, Tripoli, (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); El-Ahrash, M S [7th of April University, Zawia, (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-10-01

    Using the reactor fast neutron beam, angular distribution and linear polarization of gamma-rays emitted from the {sup 136} Ba (n,n` gamma) reaction were measured. From these measurements, a decay scheme of {sup 1}36{sup B}a has been constructed. New spin and parity (J{pi}) assignments as well as resolving ambiguities in previous assignments for some levels were done. In addition, multipole mixing rations ({delta} - values, important for model comparison) have been unambiguously determined for many gamma-transitions. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Search for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 136}Xe with EXO-200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmeier, Wolfhart

    2015-02-19

    Several properties of neutrinos, such as their absolute mass, their possible Majorana nature or the mechanisms that lead to small neutrino masses, are still unknown. The EXO-200 experiment is trying to answer some of these questions by searching for the hypothetical neutrinoless double beta decay of the isotope {sup 136}Xe. This thesis describes an analysis of two years of detector data, which yields a lower limit on the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe of 1.1 x 10{sup 25} years.

  20. Observation of Two-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay in Xe-136 with EXO-200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, N.; /SLAC; Aharmim, B.; /Laurentian U.; Auger, M.; /Bern U.; Auty, D.J.; /Alabama U.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barry, K.; Bartoszek, L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Beauchamp, E.; /Laurentian U.; Belov, V.; /Moscow, ITEP; Benitez-Medina, C.; /Colorado State U.; Breidenbach, M.; /SLAC; Burenkov, A.; /Moscow, ITEP; Cleveland, B.; /Laurentian U.; Conley, R.; Conti, E.; /SLAC; Cook, J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst; Cook, S.; /Colorado State U.; Coppens, A.; /Carleton U.; Counts, I.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Craddock, W.; /SLAC; Daniels, T.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Moscow, ITEP /Maryland U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Bern U. /SLAC /Bern U. /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Carleton U. /Maryland U. /Colorado State U. /SLAC /Carleton U. /SLAC /Alabama U. /SLAC /Moscow, ITEP /Indiana U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Seoul U. /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2012-09-14

    We report the observation of two-neutrino double-beta decay in {sup 136}Xe with T{sub 1/2} = 2.11 {+-} 0.04(stat) {+-} 0.21(syst) x 10{sup 21} yr. This second-order process, predicted by the standard model, has been observed for several nuclei but not for {sup 136}Xe. The observed decay rate provides new input to matrix element calculations and to the search for the more interesting neutrinoless double-beta decay, the most sensitive probe for the existence of Majorana particles and the measurement of the neutrino mass scale.

  1. Coulomb excitation of neutron-rich $^{134-136}$Sn isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study excited states in the isotopes $^{134,136}$Sn by $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy following "safe" Coulomb excitation. The experiment aims to investigate the evolution of quadrupole collectivity beyond the magic shell closure at N = 82 by the determination of B(E2) values and electric quadrupole moments $\\mathcal{Q}_2$. Recent shell-model calculations using realistic interactions predict possible enhanced collectivity in neutron-rich regions. Evidence for this could be obtained by this experiment. Furthermore, the currently unknown excitation energies of the 2$^+_{1}$ and 4$^+_{1}$ states in $^{136}$Sn will be measured for the first time.

  2. A Broad G Protein-Coupled Receptor Internalization Assay that Combines SNAP-Tag Labeling, Diffusion-Enhanced Resonance Energy Transfer, and a Highly Emissive Terbium Cryptate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levoye, Angélique; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Jaracz-Ros, Agnieszka; Klipfel, Laurence; Cottet, Martin; Maurel, Damien; Bdioui, Sara; Balabanian, Karl; Prézeau, Laurent; Trinquet, Eric; Durroux, Thierry; Bachelerie, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization has long been considered as a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive-induced GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET) between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z'-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization.

  3. A broad G protein-coupled receptor internalization assay that combines SNAP-tag labeling, diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer, and a highly emissive terbium cryptate acceptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique eLEVOYE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR internalization has long been considered a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z’-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization.

  4. 45 CFR 146.136 - Parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Parity in mental health and substance use disorder... Benefits § 146.136 Parity in mental health and substance use disorder benefits. (a) Meaning of terms. For... benefits and mental health or substance use disorder benefits must comply with paragraph (b)(2), (b)(3), or...

  5. 7 CFR 400.136 - Procedures for salary offset; when deductions may begin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for salary offset; when deductions may... Management-Regulations for the 1986 and Succeeding Crop Years § 400.136 Procedures for salary offset; when... amount outlined in the Notice of Intent to collect from the employee's salary, as provided for in § 400...

  6. 21 CFR 133.136 - Washed curd and soaked curd cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 133.136 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... this section or by any other procedure which produces a finished cheese having the same physical and... bacterial culture. One or more of the clotting enzymes specified in paragraph (b)(2) of this section is...

  7. High-spin states in 136La and possible structure change in the N =79 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibata, H.; Leguillon, R.; Odahara, A.; Shimoda, T.; Petrache, C. M.; Ito, Y.; Takatsu, J.; Tajiri, K.; Hamatani, N.; Yokoyama, R.; Ideguchi, E.; Watanabe, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yoshinaga, K.; Suzuki, T.; Nishimura, S.; Beaumel, D.; Lehaut, G.; Guinet, D.; Desesquelles, P.; Curien, D.; Higashiyama, K.; Yoshinaga, N.

    2015-05-01

    High-spin states in the odd-odd nucleus 136La, which is located close to the β -stability line, have been investigated in the radioactive-beam-induced fusion-evaporation reaction 124Sn(17N,5 n ). The use of the radioactive beam enabled a highly sensitive and successful search for a new isomer [14+,T1 /2=187 (27 ) ns] in 136La. In the A =130 -140 mass region, no such long-lived isomer has been observed at high spin in odd-odd nuclei. The 136La level scheme was revised, incorporating the 14+ isomer and six new levels. The results were compared with pair-truncated shell model (PTSM) calculations which successfully explain the level structure of the π h11 /2⊗ν h11/2 -1 bands in 132La and 134La. The isomerism of the 14+ state was investigated also by a collective model, the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) model, which explains various high-spin structures in the medium-heavy mass region. It is suggested that a new type of collective structure is induced in the PTSM model by the increase of the number of π g7 /2 pairs, and/or in the CNS model by the configuration change associated with the shape change in 136La.

  8. 7 CFR 1955.136 - Environmental Assessment (EA) and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Environmental Assessment (EA) and Environmental Impact... Disposal of Inventory Property General § 1955.136 Environmental Assessment (EA) and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). (a) Prior to a final decision on some disposal actions, an environmental assessment must be...

  9. 30 CFR 250.136 - How will MMS determine if my operating performance is unacceptable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How will MMS determine if my operating... Disqualification § 250.136 How will MMS determine if my operating performance is unacceptable? In determining if your operating performance is unacceptable, MMS will consider, individually or collectively: (a...

  10. 42 CFR 136.30 - Payment to Medicare-participating hospitals for authorized Contract Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH... responsible after the provider of services has coordinated benefits and all other alternative resources have... consistent with part 136 of this title or section 503(a) of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (IHCIA...

  11. 34 CFR 668.136 - Institutional determinations of eligibility based on INS responses to secondary confirmation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Immigration-Status Confirmation § 668.136 Institutional... the student an opportunity to submit documents to the institution to support the student's claim to be... immigration status to make that determination; (3) At least 15 business days have elapsed from the date that...

  12. New information on the T1/2=47 s isomer in the 136I nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, W.; Rzaca-Urban, T.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Sarkar, S.; Durell, J.L.; Smith, A.G.; Genevey, J.A.; Pinston, J.A.; Simpson, G.S.; Ahmad, I.

    2006-01-01

    The 136 I nucleus, populated in the spontaneous fission of 248 Cm, was studied by means of prompt γ-ray spectroscopy using the EUROGAM2 array. The observation in this work of the 42.6 keV prompt-γ, M1+E2 transition de-exciting the 7 - level in 136 I indicates that this level, interpreted as the (πg 7/2 3 νf 7/2 ) 7- configuration, does not correspond to the T=47 s, β-decaying isomer in 136 I. The isomer is placed 42.6 keV below the 7 - level. It has spin 6 - and is interpreted as the (πg 7/2 2 d 5/2 νf 7/2 ) 6- configuration. This and other members of both multiplets can be reproduced properly only if one assumes that the πd 5/2 orbital in 136 I is located 400keV lower than in 133 Sb. Possible mechanisms causing this effect are discussed. (orig.)

  13. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 136 - Special Operating Rules for Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Operators in the State of Hawaii A Appendix A to Part 136 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Appendix A to Part 136—Special Operating Rules for Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii Section 1... flights conducted in the State of Hawaii under 14 CFR parts 91, 121, and 135. This appendix does not apply...

  14. 42 CFR 136.405 - What are the minimum standards of character for individuals placed in, or applying for, a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... prostitution; crimes against persons; or offenses committed against children, are placed in positions involving... children? 136.405 Section 136.405 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Child...

  15. 42 CFR 435.136 - State agency implementation requirements for one-time notice and annual review system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-time notice and annual review system. 435.136 Section 435.136 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... agency implementation requirements for one-time notice and annual review system. An agency must— (a...) Establish an annual review system to identify individuals who meet the requirements of § 435.135 (a) or (c...

  16. A scanning tunneling microscopy study of the electronic and spin states of bis(phthalocyaninato)terbium(iii) (TbPc2) molecules on Ag(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Ferdous; Qi, Zhi Kun; Hou, Jie; Komeda, Tadahiro; Katoh, Keiichi; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2016-10-25

    In this article, we investigate a single molecule magnet bis(phthalocyaninato)terbium(iii) (TbPc 2 ) molecule film by using low temperature STM. In order to investigate the effect of molecule-substrate interaction on the electronic and spin properties of the adsorbed molecule, we tune the molecule-substrate coupling by switching the substrate between Au(111) and Ag(111), the latter of which provides stronger interaction with the molecule than the former. Despite the enhanced chemical reactivity of the Ag(111) surface compared with Au(111), a well-organized pseudo-square film is formed. In addition, a checker-board type contrast variation is identified, which is well explained by the existence of two types of molecules whose rotational angle between the top and bottom Pc is θ = 45° (bright molecule) and θ = 30° (dark molecule). The expected stronger molecule-substrate interaction, however, appears as an intriguing dI/dV mapping image which reveals the spatial distribution of the density of states (DOS). We identify the contrast reversal in the dI/dV mapping for the molecules of θ = 45° and θ = 30° at the sample voltages of V = 0.7 eV and 1.1 eV. Combined with the density functional theory (DFT) calculation, we attribute this change to the shift of an electronic state due to the rotation of the mutual angle between the top and bottom Pc. For the spin behavior, we previously observed a Kondo resonance for the TbPc 2 molecule adsorbed on the Au(111) surface. On the Ag(111) surface, the Kondo resonance is hardly observed, which is due to the annihilation of the π radical spin by the charge transfer from the substrate to the molecule. Instead we observe a Kondo peak for the molecule on the second layer, for which the spin recovers due to the reduction of the coupling with the substrate. In addition, when a magnetic field of 2 T normal to the surface is applied, the second layer molecule shows a sharp dip at the Fermi level. We attribute this to the inelastic

  17. Influence of intramolecular f-f interactions on nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetizations in quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes containing two terbium or dysprosium magnetic centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takamitsu; Matsumura, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Naoto

    2013-10-10

    Nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) phenomena, which arise from admixture of more than two orthogonal electronic spin wave functions through the couplings with those of the nuclear spins, are one of the important magnetic relaxation processes in lanthanide single molecule magnets (SMMs) in the low temperature range. Although recent experimental studies have indicated that the presence of the intramolecular f-f interactions affects their magnetic relaxation processes, little attention has been given to their mechanisms and, to the best of our knowledge, no rational theoretical models have been proposed for the interpretations of how the nuclear spin driven QTMs are influenced by the f-f interactions. Since quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes with two terbium or dysprosium ions as the magnetic centers show moderate f-f interactions, these are appropriate to investigate the influence of the f-f interactions on the dynamic magnetic relaxation processes. In the present paper, a theoretical model including ligand field (LF) potentials, hyperfine, nuclear quadrupole, magnetic dipolar, and the Zeeman interactions has been constructed to understand the roles of the nuclear spins for the QTM processes, and the resultant Zeeman plots are obtained. The ac susceptibility measurements of the magnetically diluted quadruple-decker monoterbium and diterbium phthalocyanine complexes, [Tb-Y] and [Tb-Tb], have indicated that the presence of the f-f interactions suppresses the QTMs in the absence of the external magnetic field (H(dc)) being consistent with previous reports. On the contrary, the faster magnetic relaxation processes are observed for [Tb-Tb] than [Tb-Y] at H(dc) = 1000 Oe, clearly demonstrating that the QTMs are rather enhanced in the presence of the external magnetic field. Based on the calculated Zeeman diagrams, these observations can be attributed to the enhanced nuclear spin driven QTMs for [Tb-Tb]. At the H(dc) higher than 2000 Oe, the

  18. Pillars of Creation among Destruction: Star Formation in Molecular Clouds near R136 in 30 Doradus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalari, Venu M.; Rubio, Mónica; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Guzmán, Viviana V.; Zinnecker, Hans; Herrera, Cinthya N.

    2018-01-01

    We present new sensitive CO(2–1) observations of the 30 Doradus region in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We identify a chain of three newly discovered molecular clouds that we name KN1, KN2, and KN3 lying within 2–14 pc in projection from the young massive cluster R136 in 30 Doradus. Excited H2 2.12 μm emission is spatially coincident with the molecular clouds, but ionized Brγ emission is not. We interpret these observations as the tails of pillar-like structures whose ionized heads are pointing toward R136. Based on infrared photometry, we identify a new generation of stars forming within this structure.

  19. Enterocin P Causes Potassium Ion Efflux from Enterococcus faecium T136 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M.; Hernández, Pablo E.; Moll, Gert N.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Enterocin P is a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecium P13. We studied the mechanism of its bactericidal action using enterocin-P-sensitive E. faecium T136 cells. The bacteriocin is incapable of dissipating the transmembrane pH gradient. On the other hand, depending on the buffer used, enterocin P dissipates the transmembrane potential. Enterocin P efficiently elicits efflux of potassium ions, but not of intracellularly accumulated anions like phosphate and glutamate. Taken together, t...

  20. Single event effects induced by 15.14 MeV/u 136Xe ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Mingdong; Zhang Qingxiang; Liu Jie; Wang Zhiguang; Jin Yunfan; Zhu Zhiyong; Zhen Honglou; Liu Changlong; Chen Xiaoxi; Wei Xinguo; Zhang Lin; Fan Youcheng; Zhu Zhourong; Zhang Yiting

    2002-01-01

    Single event effects induced by 15.14 MeV/u 136 Xe ions in different batches of 32k x 8 bits static random access memory are studied. The incident angle dependences of the cross sections for single event upset and single event latch up are presented. The SEE cross sections are plotted versus energy loss instead of linear energy transfer value in sensitive region. The depth of sensitive volume and thickness of 'dead' layer above the sensitive volume are estimated

  1. Effects of thiol antioxidants on the atropselective oxidation of 2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) by rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianai; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2016-02-01

    Chiral polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, such as PCB 136, are atropselectively metabolized to various hydroxylated PCB metabolites (HO-PCBs). The present study investigates the effect of two thiol antioxidants, glutathione and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), on profiles and chiral signatures of PCB 136 and its HO-PCB metabolites in rat liver microsomal incubations. Liver microsomes prepared from rats pretreated with phenobarbital were incubated with PCB 136 (5 μM) in the presence of the respective antioxidant (0-10 mM), and levels and chiral signatures of PCB 136 and its HO-PCB metabolites were determined. Three metabolites, 5-136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol), 4-136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-4-ol), and 4,5-136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-4,5-diol), were detected in all incubations, with 5-136 being the major metabolite. Compared to microsomal incubations without antioxidant, levels of 4,5-136 increased with increasing antioxidant concentration, whereas levels of PCB 136 and both mono-HO-PCBs were not affected by the presence of either antioxidant. PCB 136, 4-136, and 5-136 displayed significant atropisomeric enrichment; however, the direction and extent of the atropisomeric enrichment was not altered in the presence of an antioxidant. Because 4,5-136 can either be conjugated to a sulfate or glucuronide metabolite that is readily excreted or further oxidized a potentially toxic PCB 136 quinone, the effect of both thiol antioxidants on 4,5-136 formation suggests that disruptions of glutathione homeostasis may alter the balance between both metabolic pathways and, thus, PCB 136 toxicity in vivo.

  2. Studies on the rare earth complexes with pyridine derivatives and their N-oxide(II) - Synthesis and properties of fluorescent solid complexes of samarium, europium, gadolium and terbium chlorides with 2,2'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minyu, T.; Ning, T.; Yingli, Z.; Jiyuan, B.

    1985-01-01

    The solid complexes of rare earth nitrates perchlorates and thiocyanates with 2,2'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide (bipyO/sub 2/) have been reported. However, the corresponding complexes of other rear earth chlorides have not been investigated except lanthanum, cerium and yttrium. As an extension of our previous work on the synthesis of complexes of praseodymium and neodymium chlorides wiht bipoyO/sub 2/, the authors have now prepared fluorescent solid complexes of samarium, europium, gadolium and terbium chlorides with biphyO/sub 2/, using methanol as a reaction medium. The new synthesized compounds have been identified by means of elemental analysis, infrared spectrometry, conductometry, differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetry (TG) and X-ray powder diffraction

  3. Investigating the intra-nuclear cascade process using the reaction 136Xe on deuterium at 500 AMeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejmund F.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available More than 600 residual nuclei, formed in the spallation of 136Xe projectiles impinging on deuterium at 500 AMeV of incident energy, have been unambiguously identified and their production cross sections have been determined with high accuracy. By comparing these data to others previously measured for the reactions 136Xe  +  p at 1 AGeV and 136Xe  +  p at 500 AMeV we investigated the role that neutrons play in peripheral collisions and to understand the energy dissipation in frontal collisions in spallation reactions.

  4. Picomolar traces of americium(III) introduce drastic changes in the structural chemistry of terbium(III). A break in the ''gadolinium break''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Jan M. [TU Wien, Atominstitut, Vienna (Austria); Mueller, Danny; Knoll, Christian; Wilkovitsch, Martin; Weinberger, Peter [TU Wien, Institute of Applied Synthetic Chemistry, Vienna (Austria); Giester, Gerald [University of Vienna, Institute of Mineralogy and Crystallography, Vienna (Austria); Ofner, Johannes; Lendl, Bernhard [TU Wien, Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna (Austria); Steinhauser, Georg [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institute of Radioecology and Radiation Protection (Germany)

    2017-10-16

    The crystallization of terbium 5,5{sup '}-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] (ZT) in the presence of trace amounts (ca. 50 Bq, ca. 1.6 pmol) of americium results in 1) the accumulation of the americium tracer in the crystalline solid and 2) a material that adopts a different crystal structure to that formed in the absence of americium. Americium-doped [Tb(Am)(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}ZT]{sub 2} ZT.10 H{sub 2}O is isostructural to light lanthanide (Ce-Gd) 5,5{sup '}-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] compounds, rather than to the heavy lanthanide (Tb-Lu) 5,5{sup '}-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] (e.g., [Tb(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}]{sub 2}ZT{sub 3}.6 H{sub 2}O) derivatives. Traces of Am seem to force the Tb compound into a structure normally preferred by the lighter lanthanides, despite a 10{sup 8}-fold Tb excess. The americium-doped material was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, radiochemical neutron activation analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the inclusion properties of terbium 5,5{sup '}-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] towards americium were quantified, and a model for the crystallization process is proposed. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. 42 CFR 136.410 - Who conducts the background investigation and prepares determinations of eligibility for employment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention § 136.410 Who conducts the... private firms, or may request that a Federal or State agency conduct investigations. (FBI criminal history...

  6. Atropisomers of 2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) exhibit stereoselective effects on activation of nuclear receptors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Brenerová, Petra; Svržková, Lucie; Hrubá, Eva; Pálková, Lenka; Vondráček, Jan; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Machala, Miroslav

    2017-11-09

    PCB 136 is an environmentally relevant chiral PCB congener, which has been found in vivo to be present in form of rotational isomers (atropisomers). Its atropselective biotransformation or neurotoxic effects linked with sensitization of ryanodine receptor suggest that it might interact also with other intracellular receptors in a stereospecific manner. However, possible atropselective effects of PCB 136 on nuclear receptor transactivation remain unknown. Therefore, in this study, atropselective effects of PCB 136 on nuclear receptors controlling endocrine signaling and/or expression of xenobiotic and steroid hormone catabolism were investigated. PCB136 atropisomers were found to exert differential effects on estrogen receptor (ER) activation; (+)-PCB 136 was estrogenic, while (-)-PCB 136 was antiestrogenic. In contrast, inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) activity was not stereospecific. Both PCB136 stereoisomers induced the constitutive androgen receptor (CAR)-dependent gene expression; however, no significant stereospecificity of PCB 136 atropisomers was observed. PCB136 was a partial inducer of the pregnane X receptor (PXR)-dependent gene expression. Here, (-)-PCB 136 was a significantly more potent inducer of PXR activity than (+)-PCB 136. Taken together, the present results indicate that at least two nuclear receptors participating in endocrine regulation or metabolism, ER and PXR, could be regulated in an atropselective manner by chiral PCB 136. The enantioselective enrichment of PCB atropisomers in animal and human tissues may thus have significant consequences for endocrine-disrupting effects of chiral ortho-substituted PCB congeners.

  7. New Technique for Barium Daughter Ion Identification in a Liquid Xe-136 Double Beta Decay Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbank, William

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses long-standing issues of fundamental interest in elementary particle physics. The most important outcome of this work is a new limit on neutrinoless double beta decay. This is an extremely rare and long-sought-after type of radioactive decay. If discovered, it would require changes in the standard model of the elementary constituents of matter, and would prove that neutrinos and antineutrinos are the same, a revolutionary concept in particle physics. Neutrinos are major components of the matter in the universe that are so small and so weakly interacting with other matter that their masses have not yet been discovered. A discovery of neutrinoless double beta decay could help determine the neutrino masses. An important outcome of the work on this project was the Colorado State University role in operating the EXO-200 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and in analysis of the data from this experiment. One type of double beta decay of the isotope "1"3"6Xe, the two-neutrino variety, was discovered in this work. Although the other type of double beta decay, the neutrinoless variety, was not yet discovered in this work, a world's best sensitivity of 1.9x10"2"5 year half-life was obtained. This result rules out a previous claim of a positive result in a different isotope. This work also establishes that the masses of the neutrinos are less than one millionth of that of electrons. A unique EXO-200 analysis, in which the CSU group had a leading role, has established for the first time ever in a liquid noble gas the fraction of daughter atoms from alpha and beta decay that are ionized. This result has important impact on other pending studies, including nucleon decay and barium tagging. Novel additional discoveries include multiphoton ionization of liquid xenon with UV pulsed lasers, which may find application in calibration of future noble liquid detectors, and studies of association and dissociation reactions of Ba"+ ions in gaseous xenon. Through

  8. Enterocin P Causes Potassium Ion Efflux from Enterococcus faecium T136 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M.; Hernández, Pablo E.; Moll, Gert N.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Enterocin P is a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecium P13. We studied the mechanism of its bactericidal action using enterocin-P-sensitive E. faecium T136 cells. The bacteriocin is incapable of dissipating the transmembrane pH gradient. On the other hand, depending on the buffer used, enterocin P dissipates the transmembrane potential. Enterocin P efficiently elicits efflux of potassium ions, but not of intracellularly accumulated anions like phosphate and glutamate. Taken together, these data demonstrate that enterocin P forms specific, potassium ion-conducting pores in the cytoplasmic membrane of target cells. PMID:11181377

  9. Optimization calculations for slow neutron production with the 136 MeV Harwell electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, J.; Sinclair, R.N.

    1978-10-01

    The new 136 MeV Harwell electron linac is to be used to produce pulsed beams of slow neutrons for condensed matter research. Design details and performance of the two types of moderator which will be available have been optimised using a Monte Carlo neutronics code (TIMOC). The choice of reflector, the necessary decoupling energy to prevent pulse broadening and the influence of γ shields and moderator shape have been investigated. The predicted yield of leakage neutrons of energy 1 eV is compared to published values for comparable facilities. (author)

  10. The central object R 136 in the gas nebula 30 Doradus - Structure, color, mass and excitation parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitzinger, J. V.; Schlosser, W.; Schmidt-Kaler, T.; Winkler, C.

    1980-04-01

    Photographic observations with the 3,6 m ESO and 0,61 m Bochum telescopes in different colours of the central part of the 30 Doradus Nebula are presented. The structure of the central object R 136 is studied by image analysis methods, i.e. digitalisation and contrast enhancement. The central object R 136 of the supergiant gas nebula 30 Doradus consists of three components; the main component covers an area of (0.7 pc)2. The components show a colour gradient, R 136a being much bluer than R 136c. This composite structure is seen in photographic IR, U and V likewise. A plot of the spectral intensity distribution from λ = 73 cm to 1550 Å of the central 2'.5 × 2'.5 region of 30 Doradus is given. The main contribution in the UV can be attributed to R 136. This object dominates the of the central part of 30 Doradus. It determines together with 16 other bright stars in the center the excitation parameter of the nebula. Its effective temperature lies between 50000 and 55000K and the tipper and lower mass values are 250 and 103 solar masses. The bolometric magnitude is brighter than -l4m. The inner structure of 30 Doradus can be explained as the result of the stellar-wind of R 136.

  11. Hepatic metabolism affects the atropselective disposition of 2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianai; Barnhart, Christopher; Lein, Pamela J; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-06

    To understand the role of hepatic vs extrahepatic metabolism in the disposition of chiral PCBs, we studied the disposition of 2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) and its hydroxylated metabolites (HO-PCBs) in mice with defective hepatic metabolism due to the liver-specific deletion of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (KO mice). Female KO and congenic wild type (WT) mice were treated with racemic PCB 136, and levels and chiral signatures of PCB 136 and HO-PCBs were determined in tissues and excreta 3 days after PCB administration. PCB 136 tissue levels were higher in KO compared to WT mice. Feces was a major route of PCB metabolite excretion, with 2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol being the major metabolite recovered from feces. (+)-PCB 136, the second eluting PCB 136 atropisomers, was enriched in all tissues and excreta. The second eluting atropisomers of the HO-PCBs metabolites were enriched in blood and liver; 2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol in blood was an exception and displayed an enrichment of the first eluting atropisomers. Fecal HO-PCB levels and chiral signatures changed with time and differed between KO and WT mice, with larger HO-PCB enantiomeric fractions in WT compared to KO mice. Our results demonstrate that hepatic and, possibly, extrahepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes play a role in the disposition of PCBs.

  12. The Solomon Sea eddy activity from a 1/36° regional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djath, Bughsin; Babonneix, Antoine; Gourdeau, Lionel; Marin, Frédéric; Verron, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    In the South West Pacific, the Solomon Sea exhibits the highest levels of eddy kinetic energy but relatively little is known about the eddy activity in this region. This Sea is directly influenced by a monsoonal regime and ENSO variability, and occupies a strategical location as the Western Boundary Currents exiting it are known to feed the warm pool and to be the principal sources of the Equatorial UnderCurrent. During their transit in the Solomon Sea, meso-scale eddies are suspected to notably interact and influence these water masses. The goal of this study is to give an exhaustive description of this eddy activity. A dual approach, based both on altimetric data and high resolution modeling, has then been chosen for this purpose. First, an algorithm is applied on nearly 20 years of 1/3° x 1/3° gridded SLA maps (provided by the AVISO project). This allows eddies to be automatically detected and tracked, thus providing some basic eddy properties. The preliminary results show that two main and distinct types of eddies are detected. Eddies in the north-eastern part shows a variability associated with the mean structure, while those in the southern part are associated with generation/propagation processes. However, the resolution of the AVISO dataset is not very well suited to observe fine structures and to match with the numerous islands bordering the Solomon Sea. For this reason, we will confront these observations with the outputs of a 1/36° resolution realistic model of the Solomon Sea. The high resolution numerical model (1/36°) indeed permits to reproduce very fine scale features, such as eddies and filaments. The model is two-way embedded in a 1/12° regional model which is itself one-way embedded in the DRAKKAR 1/12° global model. The NEMO code is used as well as the AGRIF software for model nestings. Validation is realized by comparison with AVISO observations and available in situ data. In preparing the future wide-swath altimetric SWOT mission that is

  13. Two-phonon giant resonances in 136Xe, 208Pb, and 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boretzky, K.; Gruenschloss, A.; Ilievski, S.; Adrich, P.; Aumann, T.; Bertulani, C.A.; Cub, J.; Dostal, W.; Eberlein, B.; Elze, T.W.; Emling, H.; Fallot, M.; Holeczek, J.; Holzmann, R.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kratz, J.V.; Kulessa, R.; Leifels, Y.; Leistenschneider, A.; Lubkiewicz, E.; Mordechai, S.; Ohtsuki, T.; Reiter, P.; Simon, H.; Stelzer, K.; Stroth, J.; Suemmerer, K.; Surowiec, A.; Wajda, E.; Walus, W.

    2003-07-01

    The excitation of the double-phonon giant dipole resonance was observed in heavy projectile nuclei impinging on targets of high nuclear charge with energies of 500-700 MeV/nucleon. New experimental data are presented for 136 Xe and 238 U together with further analysis of earlier data on 208 Pb. Differential cross sections dσ/dE * and dσ/dθ for electromagnetic excitations were deduced. Depending on the isotope, cross sections appear to be enhanced in comparison to those expected from a purely harmonic nuclear dipole response. The cumulative effect of excitations of two-phonon states composed of one dipole and one quadrupole phonon, of predicted anharmoniticies in the double-phonon dipole response, and of damping of the dipole resonance during the collision may account for the discrepancy. In addition, decay properties of two-phonon resonances were studied and compared to that of a statistical decay. (orig.)

  14. Acid-catalyzed reductive amination of aldoses with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, R A; Guttman, A; Chen, F T

    1996-02-01

    The reductive amination of monosaccharides with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (APTS) in seven different organic acids including the commonly used acetic acid was investigated by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. The correlation between the yields of the saccharide-APTS adducts and pKa of the organic acid catalyst is consistent with general acid catalysis of the rate-determining step of the reductive amination reaction. Derivatization in the presence of organic acids of higher strength than acetic acid produced substantially higher yields of APTS-sugar adducts, an effect which is more pronounced for N-acetylamino sugars. Optimum yields were obtained using citric acid as a catalyst. Conversion of a few nanomoles of neutral saccharides to the APTS derivatives is achieved at 75 degrees C in less than 60 min.

  15. Results of the radiological survey at 136 West Central Avenue (MJ030), Maywood, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the private, residential property at 136 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on April 29, 1987

  16. Device for X-ray fluorescence logging with PRK-1-36 controlled remote unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volfshtejn, P.M.; Kireev, V.A.; Peskov, V.N.

    1981-01-01

    To conduct studies in the long-wave energy range, a well logging device with a remote detection unit controlled with the help of DPM-30 electric motor has been developed. A current circuit of signal pick-up from a proportional counter is used. The circuit allows to decrease the length of the outside unit to 180 mm, sag being 130 mm long. It is shown that under conditions intensive cavernity of ore intervals and technically complicated well logs the application of PRK-1-36 units instead of SKR-300 devices permits to obtain more representative results, decrease the accident rate and increase the efficiency of investigations where X-ray fluorescence logging is used [ru

  17. Device for X-ray fluorescence logging with PRK-1-36 controlled remote unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volfshtejn, P M; Kireev, V A; Peskov, V N [Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij i Proektno-Konstruktorskij Inst. Geofizicheskikh Issledovanij Geologorazvedochnykh Skvazhin, Oktyabr' skij (USSR)

    1981-01-01

    To conduct studies in the long-wave energy range, a well logging device with a remote detection unit controlled with the help of DPM-30 electric motor has been developed. A current circuit of signal pick-up from a proportional counter is used. The circuit allows to decrease the length of the outside unit to 180 mm, sag being 130 mm long. It is shown that under conditions intensive cavernity of ore intervals and technically complicated well logs the application of PRK-1-36 units instead of SKR-300 devices permits to obtain more representative results, decrease the accident rate and increase the efficiency of investigations where X-ray fluorescence logging is used.

  18. PROJECTED ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES OF 136 EARLY B-TYPE STARS IN THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garmany, C. D.; Glaspey, J. W. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bragança, G. A.; Daflon, S.; Fernandes, M. Borges; Cunha, K. [Observatório Nacional-MCTI, Rua José Cristino, 77. CEP: 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oey, M. S. [University of Michigan, Department of Astronomy, 311 West Hall, 1085 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI: 48109-1107 (United States); Bensby, T., E-mail: garmany@noao.edu [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Box 43, SE-22100, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    We have determined projected rotational velocities, v sin i, from Magellan/MIKE echelle spectra for a sample of 136 early B-type stars having large Galactocentric distances. The target selection was done independently of their possible membership in clusters, associations or field stars. We subsequently examined the literature and assigned each star as Field, Association, or Cluster. Our v sin i results are consistent with a difference in aggregate v sin i with stellar density. We fit bimodal Maxwellian distributions to the Field, Association, and Cluster subsamples representing sharp-lined and broad-lined components. The first two distributions, in particular, for the Field and Association are consistent with strong bimodality in v sin i. Radial velocities are also presented, which are useful for further studies of binarity in B-type stars, and we also identify a sample of possible new double-lined spectroscopic binaries. In addition, we find 18 candidate Be stars showing emission at Hα.

  19. New Technique for Barium Daughter Ion Identification in a Liquid Xe-136 Double Beta Decay Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank, William [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2016-06-08

    This work addresses long-standing issues of fundamental interest in elementary particle physics. The most important outcome of this work is a new limit on neutrinoless double beta decay. This is an extremely rare and long-sought-after type of radioactive decay. If discovered, it would require changes in the standard model of the elementary constituents of matter, and would prove that neutrinos and antineutrinos are the same, a revolutionary concept in particle physics. Neutrinos are major components of the matter in the universe that are so small and so weakly interacting with other matter that their masses have not yet been discovered. A discovery of neutrinoless double beta decay could help determine the neutrino masses. An important outcome of the work on this project was the Colorado State University role in operating the EXO-200 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and in analysis of the data from this experiment. One type of double beta decay of the isotope 136Xe, the two-neutrino variety, was discovered in this work. Although the other type of double beta decay, the neutrinoless variety, was not yet discovered in this work, a world’s best sensitivity of 1.9x1025 year half-life was obtained. This result rules out a previous claim of a positive result in a different isotope. This work also establishes that the masses of the neutrinos are less than one millionth of that of electrons. A unique EXO-200 analysis, in which the CSU group had a leading role, has established for the first time ever in a liquid noble gas the fraction of daughter atoms from alpha and beta decay that are ionized. This result has important impact on other pending studies, including nucleon decay and barium tagging. Novel additional discoveries include multiphoton ionization of liquid xenon with UV pulsed lasers, which may find application in calibration of future noble liquid detectors, and studies of association and dissociation reactions of Ba

  20. HOPS 136: An edge-on orion protostar near the end of envelope infall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, William J.; Megeath, S. Thomas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Tobin, John J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Hartmann, Lee; Kounkel, Marina [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Stutz, Amelia M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany); Poteet, Charles A. [New York Center for Astrobiology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Ali, Babar [NHSC/IPAC/Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States); Osorio, Mayra [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Granada (Spain); Manoj, P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Remming, Ian [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Stanke, Thomas [ESO, Garching bei München (Germany); Watson, Dan M., E-mail: wjfischer@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Edge-on protostars are valuable for understanding the disk and envelope properties of embedded young stellar objects, since the disk, envelope, and envelope cavities are all distinctly visible in resolved images and well constrained in modeling. Comparing Two Micron All Sky Survey, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Spitzer, Herschel, and APEX photometry and an IRAM limit from 1.2 to 1200 μm, Spitzer spectroscopy from 5 to 40 μm, and high-resolution Hubble imaging at 1.60 and 2.05 μm to radiative transfer modeling, we determine envelope and disk properties for the Class I protostar HOPS 136, an edge-on source in Orion's Lynds 1641 region. The source has a bolometric luminosity of 0.8 L {sub ☉}, a bolometric temperature of 170 K, and a ratio of submillimeter to bolometric luminosity of 0.8%. Via modeling, we find a total luminosity of 4.7 L {sub ☉} (larger than the observed luminosity due to extinction by the disk), an envelope mass of 0.06 M {sub ☉}, and a disk radius and mass of 450 AU and 0.002 M {sub ☉}. The stellar mass is highly uncertain but is estimated to fall between 0.4 and 0.5 M {sub ☉}. To reproduce the flux and wavelength of the near-infrared scattered-light peak in the spectral energy distribution, we require 5.4 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} of gas and dust in each cavity. The disk has a large radius and a mass typical of more evolved T Tauri disks in spite of the significant remaining envelope. HOPS 136 appears to be a key link between the protostellar and optically revealed stages of star formation.

  1. Identification of Clusters that Condition Resistance to Anthracnose in the Common Bean Differential Cultivars AB136 and MDRK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Ana; Trabanco, Noemí; Ferreira, Juan José

    2017-12-01

    The correct identification of the anthracnose resistance systems present in the common bean cultivars AB136 and MDRK is important because both are included in the set of 12 differential cultivars proposed for use in classifying the races of the anthracnose causal agent, Colletrotrichum lindemuthianum. In this work, the responses against seven C. lindemuthianum races were analyzed in a recombinant inbred line population derived from the cross AB136 × MDRK. A genetic linkage map of 100 molecular markers distributed across the 11 bean chromosomes was developed in this population to locate the gene or genes conferring resistance against each race, based on linkage analyses and χ 2 tests of independence. The identified anthracnose resistance genes were organized in clusters. Two clusters were found in AB136: one located on linkage group Pv07, which corresponds to the anthracnose resistance cluster Co-5, and the other located at the end of linkage group Pv11, which corresponds to the Co-2 cluster. The presence of resistance genes at the Co-5 cluster in AB136 was validated through an allelism test conducted in the F 2 population TU × AB136. The presence of resistance genes at the Co-2 cluster in AB136 was validated through genetic dissection using the F 2:3 population ABM3 × MDRK, in which it was directly mapped to a genomic position between 46.01 and 47.77 Mb of chromosome Pv11. In MDRK, two independent clusters were identified: one located on linkage group Pv01, corresponding to the Co-1 cluster, and the second located on LG Pv04, corresponding to the Co-3 cluster. This report enhances the understanding of the race-specific Phaseolus vulgaris-C. lindemuthianum interactions and will be useful in breeding programs.

  2. A Review of Subsurface Behavior of Plutonium and Americium at the 200-PW-1/3/6 Operable Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Riley, Robert G.

    2008-01-31

    This report begins with a brief summary of the history and current status of 200-PW-1/3/6 OUs in section 2.0. This is followed by a description of our concentual model of Pu/Am migration at the 200-PW-1/3/6 OUs, during both past artificial recharge conditions and current natural recharge condictions (section 3.0). Section 4.0 discusses data gaps and information needs. The final section (section 5.0) provides recommendations for futher work to address the data gaps and information needs identified in section 4.0.

  3. A Review of Subsurface Behavior of Plutonium and Americium at the 200-PW-1/3/6 Operable Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Riley, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    This report begins with a brief summary of the history and current status of 200-PW-1/3/6 OUs in section 2.0. This is followed by a description of our conceptual model of Pu/Am migration at the 200-PW-1/3/6 OUs, during both past artificial recharge conditions and current natural recharge conditions (section 3.0). Section 4.0 discusses data gaps and information needs. The final section (section 5.0) provides recommendations for further work to address the data gaps and information needs identified in section 4.0

  4. Inner-sphere and outer-sphere complexes of yttrium(III), lanthanum (III), neodymium(III), terbium(III) and thulium(III) with halide ions in N,N-dimethylformamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryouta; Ishiguro, Shin-ichi

    1991-01-01

    The formation of chloro, bromo and iodo complexes of yttrium(III), and bromo and iodo complexes of lanthanum(III), neodymium(III), terbium(III) and thulium(III) has been studied by precise titration calorimetry in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) at 25 o C. The formation of [YCl] 2+ , [YCl 2 ] + , [YCl 3 ] and [YCl 4 ] - , and [MBr] 2+ and [MBr 2 ] + (M = Y, La, Nd, Tb, Tm) was revealed, and their formation constants, enthalpies and entropies were determined. It is found that the formation enthalpies change in the sequence ΔH o (Cl) > ΔH o (l), which is unusual for hard metal (III) ions. This implies that, unlike the chloride ion, the bromide ion forms outer-sphere complexes with the lanthanide(III) and yttrium(III) ions in DMF. Evidence for either an inner- or outer-sphere complex was obtained from 89 Y NMR spectra for Y(ClO 4 ) 3 , YCl 3 and YBr 3 DMF solutions at room temperature. (author)

  5. The effects of moistening Herbal-acupuncture at Blood Pressure Point(HN136 on the Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Sung, Owi

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the possibility of Hypertension by moistening Herbal-acupuncture at Blood Pressure Point(HN136. Methods: We reviewed 14 patients of Hypertension. They were hospitalized at oriental medical hospital of Sang-Ji university for 2002. 1. 2. - 2002. 5. 2. First, we divided into two groups; Group Ⅰ was administrated by moistening Herbal-acupuncture at Blood Pressure Point(HN136, and was not given any western medicine about Hypertension during the period of experiment. Group Ⅱ was administrated by moistening Herbal-acupuncture at Blood Pressure Point(HN136, and given western medicine about Hypertension during the period of experiment. we observed the change of systolic and diastolic for 2 weeks, and compared Group Ⅰ with Group Ⅱ . Results: The results obtained as follows: 1. The figure of systolic in Group Ⅰ was decreased, but there was no signification. There was a significant decrease in Group Ⅱ (p<0.05 2. The figure of diastolic in Group Ⅰ was decreased, but there was no signification. There was a significant decrease in Group Ⅱ (p<0.05 3. Group Ⅱ was more effective than Group Ⅰ in the results. Conclusion: The results suggest that moistening Herbal-acupuncture at Blood Pressure Point(HN136 was effective treatment of Hypertension. So further research is needed continuously.

  6. 42 CFR 136.414 - How does the IHS determine eligibility for placement or retention of individuals in positions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... prostitution; crimes against persons; or offenses committed against children. (f) After an opportunity has been... placement or retention of individuals in positions involving regular contact with Indian children? 136.414... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Child Protection and Family Violence...

  7. 42 CFR 136.412 - What questions must the IHS ask as part of the background investigation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., exploitation, contact, or prostitution; crimes against persons; or offenses committed against children? If yes... Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention § 136.412 What questions must the IHS ask as part of the...: (1) Has the individual been arrested or charged with a crime involving a child? If yes, the...

  8. Differential effect of PYY1-36 and PYY3-36 on gastric emptying in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witte, A-B; Grybäck, P; Holst, Jens Juul

    2009-01-01

    Peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) is a prandially controlled hormone in endocrine ileal and colonic mucosa cells. In plasma, PYY appears as full-length PYY1-36 and truncated PYY3-36. Both have different pharmacological profile, and PYY3-36 seems to inhibit food intake. We aimed at investigating...... the effect of intravenously administered PYY1-36 and PYY3-36 on gastric emptying and short-term metabolic control. Eight healthy adults were studied in single-blinded, randomized design. At separate occasions, intravenous infusion of saline, PYY1-36 or PYY3-36 (0.8 pmol kg(-1) min(-1)) and a radio......-labelled omelette were given. Gastric emptying (scintigraphy), appetite ratings (VAS), and plasma concentrations of insulin, glucose, GLP-1 and PYY were measured. PYY3-36 and PYY1-36 both inhibited gastric emptying, PYY3-36 most effectively. Half-emptying time was prolonged from 63.1+/-5.2 (saline) to 87...

  9. Electronic structure of self-organized InAs/GaAs quantum dots bounded by {136} facets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Weidong; Lee, Hao; Johnson, Thomas J.; Sercel, Peter C.; Norman, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments indicate that the shape of self-organized InAs quantum dots grown on GaAs [001] is an elongated pyramid with bounding facets corresponding to a family of four {136} planes. This structure, which possesses C 2v symmetry, is quite different from square-base pyramidal or lens geometries, which have been assumed in previous electronic structure calculations for this system. In this paper, we consider theoretically the influence of the {136} shape on the electronic structure and optical properties of the quantum dots. We present a valence force-field calculation of the inhomogeneous strain and incorporate the results into an eight band k(vector sign)·p(vector sign) electronic structure calculation. The size dependence of the electronic structure is calculated and compared to experimental photoluminescence spectra. The effects of perturbations on the {136} shape are also considered. Calculations based on the {136} shape give good agreement with the observed level structure and optical polarization properties of self-organized InAs/GaAs quantum dots. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  10. Influence of 1,3,6 naphthalene trisulfonic acid on microstructure & hardness in electrodeposited Ni-layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anette Alsted; Møller, Per; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of the additive 1,3,6 naphthalene trisulfonic acid on the microstructure and hardness of electrodeposited nickel layers was investigated. The microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy; the Vickers hardness was measured in cross sections. The additive wa...

  11. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. III. A very massive star in apparent isolation from the massive cluster R136

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bestenlehner, J.M.; Vink, J.S.; Gräfener, G.; Najarro, F.; Evans, C.J.; Bastian, N.; Bonanos, A.Z.; Bressert, E.; Crowther, P.A.; Doran, E.; Friedrich, K.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Herrero, A.; de Koter, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D.J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Sana, H.; Soszynski, I.; Taylor, W.D.

    2011-01-01

    VFTS 682 is located in an active star-forming region, at a projected distance of 29 pc from the young massive cluster R136 in the Tarantula Nebula of the Large Magellanic Cloud. It was previously reported as a candidate young stellar object, and more recently spectroscopically revealed as a

  12. Search for anomalous production of single photons at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leser, G; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; Wiele

    1996-01-01

    This letter reports the results of the measurement of single photon production in the reaction $e^+e^- \\rightarrow \\gamma +$ invisible particles at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=$~130 and 136 GeV and an integrated luminosity of 5.83~pb$

  13. A catalogue of 136 microbial draft genomes from Red Sea metagenomes

    KAUST Repository

    Haroon, Mohamed; Thompson, Luke R.; Parks, Donovan H.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Earth is expected to continue warming and the Red Sea is a model environment for understanding the effects of global warming on ocean microbiomes due to its unusually high temperature, salinity and solar irradiance. However, most microbial diversity analyses of the Red Sea have been limited to cultured representatives and single marker gene analyses, hence neglecting the substantial uncultured majority. Here, we report 136 microbial genomes (completion minus contamination is ≥50%) assembled from 45 metagenomes from eight stations spanning the Red Sea and taken from multiple depths between 10 to 500 m. Phylogenomic analysis showed that most of the retrieved genomes belong to seven different phyla of known marine microbes, but more than half representing currently uncultured species. The open-access data presented here is the largest number of Red Sea representative microbial genomes reported in a single study and will help facilitate future studies in understanding the physiology of these microorganisms and how they have adapted to the relatively harsh conditions of the Red Sea.

  14. A catalogue of 136 microbial draft genomes from Red Sea metagenomes

    KAUST Repository

    Haroon, Mohamed

    2016-07-05

    Earth is expected to continue warming and the Red Sea is a model environment for understanding the effects of global warming on ocean microbiomes due to its unusually high temperature, salinity and solar irradiance. However, most microbial diversity analyses of the Red Sea have been limited to cultured representatives and single marker gene analyses, hence neglecting the substantial uncultured majority. Here, we report 136 microbial genomes (completion minus contamination is ≥50%) assembled from 45 metagenomes from eight stations spanning the Red Sea and taken from multiple depths between 10 to 500 m. Phylogenomic analysis showed that most of the retrieved genomes belong to seven different phyla of known marine microbes, but more than half representing currently uncultured species. The open-access data presented here is the largest number of Red Sea representative microbial genomes reported in a single study and will help facilitate future studies in understanding the physiology of these microorganisms and how they have adapted to the relatively harsh conditions of the Red Sea.

  15. Status of double beta decay experiments using isotopes other than 136Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandola, L.

    2014-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a lepton-number violating process predicted by many extensions of the standard model. It is actively searched for in several candidate isotopes within many experimental projects. The status of the experimental initiatives which are looking for the neutrinoless double beta decay in isotopes other than 136Xe is reviewed, with special emphasis given to the projects that passed the R&D phase. The results recently released by the experiment GERDA are also summarized and discussed. The GERDA data give no positive indication of neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge and disfavor in a model-independent way the long-standing observation claim on the same isotope. The lower limit reported by GERDA for the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge is T1/20ν > 2.1 ṡ1025 yr (90% C.L.), or T1/20ν > 3.0 ṡ1025 yr, when combined with the results of other 76Ge predecessor experiments.

  16. A catalogue of 136 microbial draft genomes from Red Sea metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Mohamed F; Thompson, Luke R; Parks, Donovan H; Hugenholtz, Philip; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-07-05

    Earth is expected to continue warming and the Red Sea is a model environment for understanding the effects of global warming on ocean microbiomes due to its unusually high temperature, salinity and solar irradiance. However, most microbial diversity analyses of the Red Sea have been limited to cultured representatives and single marker gene analyses, hence neglecting the substantial uncultured majority. Here, we report 136 microbial genomes (completion minus contamination is ≥50%) assembled from 45 metagenomes from eight stations spanning the Red Sea and taken from multiple depths between 10 to 500 m. Phylogenomic analysis showed that most of the retrieved genomes belong to seven different phyla of known marine microbes, but more than half representing currently uncultured species. The open-access data presented here is the largest number of Red Sea representative microbial genomes reported in a single study and will help facilitate future studies in understanding the physiology of these microorganisms and how they have adapted to the relatively harsh conditions of the Red Sea.

  17. Near-Field Phase-Change Optical Recording of 1.36 Numerical Aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Isao; Kishima, Koichiro; Osato, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kuroda, Yuji; Saito, Kimihiro

    2000-02-01

    A bit density of 125 nm was demonstrated through near-field phase-change (PC) optical recording at the wavelength of 657 nm by using a supersphere solid immersion lens (SIL). The lens unit consists of a standard objective and a φ2.5 mm SIL@. Since this lens size still prevents the unit from being mounted on an air-bearing slider, we developed a one-axis positioning actuator and an active capacitance servo for precise gap control to thoroughly investigate near-field recording. An electrode was fabricated on the bottom of the SIL, and a capacitor was formed facing a disk material. This setup realized a stable air gap below 50 nm, and a new method of simulating modulation transfer function (MTF) optimized the PC disk structure at this gap height. Obtained jitter of 8.8% and a clear eye-pattern prove that our system successfully attained the designed numerical-aperture (\\mathit{NA}) of 1.36.

  18. American Fisheries Society 136th Annual Meeting Lake Placid, NY 10-14 September, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einhouse, D.; Walsh, M.G.; Keeler, S.; Long, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The New York Chapter of the American Fisheries Society and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation invite you to experience the beauty of New York's famous Adirondack Park as the American Fisheries Society (AFS) convenes its 136th Annual Meeting in the legendary Olympic Village of Lake Placid, NY, 10-14 September 2006. Our meeting theme "Fish in the Balance" will explore the interrelation between fish, aquatic habitats, and man, highlighting the challenges facing aquatic resource professionals and the methods that have been employed to resolve conflicts between those that use or have an interest in our aquatic resources. As fragile as it is beautiful, the Adirondack Region is the perfect location to explore this theme. Bordered by Mirror Lake and its namesake, Lake Placid, the Village of Lake Placid has small town charm, but all of the conveniences that a big city would provide. Whether its reliving the magic of the 1980 hockey team's "Miracle on Ice" at the Lake Placid Olympic Center, getting a panoramic view of the Adirondack high peaks from the top of the 90 meter ski jumps, fishing or kayaking in adjacent Mirror Lake, hiking a mountain trail, or enjoying a quiet dinner or shopping excursion in the various shops and restaurants that line Main Street, Lake Placid has something for everyone.

  19. PCB 136 Atropselectively Alters Morphometric and Functional Parameters of Neuronal Connectivity in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons via Ryanodine Receptor-Dependent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca2+-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (−)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (−)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca2+-sensitive dye demonstrates that (−)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations. Similarly, (−)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure. PMID:24385416

  20. Cerebellar stroke presenting with isolated dizziness: Brain MRI in 136 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloff, Michael D; Patel, Nimesh S; Kase, Carlos S; Oza, Anuja U; Voetsch, Barbara; Romero, Jose R

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate occurrence of cerebellar stroke in Emergency Department (ED) presentations of isolated dizziness (dizziness with a normal exam and negative neurological review of systems). A 5-year retrospective study of ED patients presenting with a chief complaint of "dizziness or vertigo", without other symptoms or signs in narrative history or on exam to suggest a central nervous system lesion, and work-up included a brain MRI within 48h. Patients with symptoms commonly peripheral in etiology (nystagmus, tinnitus, gait instability, etc.) were included in the study. Patient demographics, stroke risk factors, and gait assessments were recorded. One hundred and thirty-six patients, who had a brain MRI for isolated dizziness, were included. There was a low correlation of gait assessment between ED physician and Neurologist (49 patients, Spearman's correlation r 2 =0.17). Based on MRI DWI sequence, 3.7% (5/136 patients) had acute cerebellar strokes, limited to or including, the medial posterior inferior cerebellar artery vascular territory. In the 5 cerebellar stroke patients, mean age, body mass index (BMI), hemoglobin A1c, gender distribution, and prevalence of hypertension were similar to the non-cerebellar stroke patient group. Mean LDL/HDL ratio was 3.63±0.80 and smoking prevalence was 80% in the cerebellar stroke group compared to 2.43±0.79 and 22% (respectively, p valuesstroke group. Though there was preselection bias for stroke risk factors, our study suggests an important proportion of cerebellar stroke among ED patients with isolated dizziness, considering how common this complaint is. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. LatY136F knock-in mouse model for human IgG4-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazunori; Zuka, Masahiko; Ito, Kiyoaki; Mizuguchi, Keishi; Kakuchi, Yasushi; Onoe, Tamehito; Suzuki, Yasunori; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Izui, Shozo; Malissen, Marie; Malissen, Bernard; Kawano, Mitsuhiro

    2018-01-01

    The adaptor protein Linker for activation of T cell (LAT) is a key signaling hub used by the T cell antigen receptor. Mutant mice expressing loss-of-function mutations affecting LAT and including a mutation in which tyrosine 136 is replaced by a phenylalanine (LatY136F) develop lymphoproliferative disorder involving T helper type 2 effector cells capable of triggering a massive polyclonal B cell activation that leads to hypergammaglobulinemia G1 and E and to non-resolving inflammation and autoimmunity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the phenotypes of LatY136F knock-in mice resemble the immunohistopathological features of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). LatY136F knock-in mice were sacrificed at 4-20 weeks of age, and pancreas, kidney, salivary gland and lung were obtained. All organs were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and with Azan for estimation of collagen in fibrosis, and the severity scores of inflammation and fibrosis were evaluated. Immunostainings were performed to analyze the types of infiltrating cells. In addition, the effects of corticosteroid treatment on the development of tissue lesions and serum levels of IgG1 were assessed. Tissue lesions characterized by inflammatory mononuclear cell infiltration and fibrosis were detected in pancreas, kidney, and salivary gland starting from 6 weeks of age. Immunostainings showed pronounced infiltration of plasma cells, CD4-positive T cells, and macrophages. Infiltrating plasma cells predominantly expressed IgG1. The extent of inflammation in pancreas and salivary glands was markedly reduced by corticosteroid treatment. LatY136F knock-in mice displayed increased production of Th2-type IgG1 (a homologue of human IgG4) and developed multiple organ tissue lesions reminiscent of those seen in patients with IgG4-RD. Moreover, the development of these tissue lesions was highly sensitive to corticosteroid treatment like in IgG4-RD. For these reasons we consider the LatY136F knock-in mouse

  2. The 136 MHz/400 MHz earth station antenna-noise temperature prediction program documentation for RAE-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, M.

    1972-01-01

    A simulation study to determine the 136 MHz and 400 MHz noise temperature of the ground network antennas which will track the RAE-B satellite during data transmission periods is described. Since the noise temperature of the antenna effectively sets the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the received signal, a knowledge of SNR will be helpful in locating the optimum time windows for data transmission during low-noise periods. Antenna-noise temperatures at 136 MHz and 400 MHz will be predicted for selected earth-based ground stations which will support RAE-B. The antenna-noise temperature predictions will include the effects of galactic-brightness temperature, the sun, and the brightest radio stars. Predictions will cover the ten-month period from March 1, 1973 to December 31, 1973. The RAE-B mission will be expecially susceptible to SNR degradation during the two eclipses of the Sun occurring in this period.

  3. The 136 MHZ/400 MHz earth station antenna-noise temperature prediction program for RAE-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. E.; Fee, J. J.; Chin, M.

    1972-01-01

    A simulation study was undertaken to determine the 136 MHz and 400 MHz noise temperature of the ground network antennas which will track the RAE-B satellite during data transmission periods. Since the noise temperature of the antenna effectively sets the signal-to-noise ratio of the received signal, a knowledge of SNR will be helpful in locating the optimum time windows for data transmission during low noise periods. Antenna noise temperatures will be predicted for selected earth-based ground stations which will support RAE-B. Telemetry data acquisition will be at 400 MHz; tracking support at 136 MHz will be provided by the Goddard Range and Range Rate (RARR) stations. The antenna-noise temperature predictions will include the effects of galactic-brightness temperature, the sun, and the brightest radio stars. Predictions will cover the ten-month period from March 1, 1973 to December 31, 1973.

  4. Enhancing Sm{sup 3+} red emission via energy transfer from Bi{sup 3+}→Sm{sup 3+} based on terbium bridge mechanism in Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7} phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minhong; Wang, LiLi; Ran, Weiguang; Ren, Chunyan; Song, Zeling; Shi, Jinsheng, E-mail: jsshiqn@aliyun.com

    2017-04-15

    Currently, the key change for white-LED is to improve the luminescence efficiency of red phosphor. Sm{sup 3+} activated phosphor was considered due to suitable emission position of red light. However, the luminescence intensity in the red region is weak. For enhancing red-emitting of Sm{sup 3+}, Bi{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions were introduced into Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors based on the concept of energy transfer. For Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7}:Bi{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+} samples, it can be observed that the energy transfer process was blocked. Hence, Tb{sup 3+} was introduced into Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7}:Bi{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+} samples to increase Sm{sup 3+} luminescence intensity based on Bi{sup 3+}→Tb{sup 3+}→Sm{sup 3+} energy transfer process. Compared with Sm{sup 3+} single-doped Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7} phosphor, the luminescence intensity of Sm{sup 3+} was enhanced by 2.6 times. It can be found that Tb{sup 3+} ions play a role of storing the energy or transfer bridge from Bi{sup 3+}→ Sm{sup 3+} by investigating the Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7}:Bi{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} and Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7}:Tb{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+} energy transfer mechanism. All these results suggest that terbium branch mechanism plays an important role on enhancing activators luminescence intensity.

  5. Deep-inelastic scattering in 124,136Xe+58,64Ni at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehring, J.; Back, B.B.; Chan, K.C.; Freer, M.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C.L.; Rehm, K.E.; Schiffer, J.P.; Wolanski, M.; Wuosmaa, A.H.; Gehring, J.; Wolanski, M.

    1997-01-01

    Cross sections, angular distributions, and mass distributions have been measured for deep-inelastic scattering in 124 Xe+ 58 Ni and 136 Xe+ 64 Ni at laboratory energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. The mass distributions show distinct components due to deep-inelastic and fissionlike processes. The strength of deep-inelastic scattering is similar in the two systems measured and comparable to previous measurements in 58 Ni+ 112,124 Sn. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. EFFECTS OF THIOL ANTIOXIDANTS ON THE ATROPSELECTIVE OXIDATION OF 2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-HEXACHLOROBIPHENYL (PCB 136) BY RAT LIVER MICROSOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianai; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Chiral polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, such as PCB 136, are atropselectively metabolized to various hydroxylated PCB metabolites (HO-PCBs). The present study investigates the effect of two thiol antioxidants, glutathione and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), on profiles and chiral signatures of PCB 136 and its HO-PCB metabolites in rat liver microsomal incubations. Liver microsomes prepared from rats pretreated with phenobarbital were incubated with PCB 136 (5 μM) in the presence of the respective antioxidant (0–10 mM), and levels and chiral signatures of PCB 136 and its HO-PCB metabolites were determined. Three metabolites, 5-136 (2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol), 4-136 (2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl-4-ol) and 4,5-136 (2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl-4,5-diol), were detected in all incubations, with 5-136 being the major metabolite. Compared to microsomal incubations without antioxidant, levels of 4,5-136 increased with increasing antioxidant concentration, whereas levels of PCB 136 and both mono-HO-PCBs were not affected by the presence of either antioxidant. PCB 136, 4-136 and 5-136 displayed significant atropisomeric enrichment; however, the direction and extent of the atropisomeric enrichment was not altered in the presence of an antioxidant. Because 4,5-136 can either be conjugated to a sulfate or glucuronide metabolite that is readily excreted or further oxidized a potentially toxic PCB 136 quinone, the effect of both thiol antioxidants on 4,5-136 formation suggests that disruptions of glutathione homeostasis may alter the balance between both metabolic pathways and, thus, PCB 136 toxicity in vivo. PMID:26155892

  7. PP136. Blood pressure patterns in pregnant women who developed pre-eclampsia or hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, W

    2012-07-01

    Early recognition of pregnant women at risk of pre-eclampsia (PE) in developing countries is essential to ensure timely transfer to the appropriate level of care. Our aim was to determine the predictive value of blood pressure (BP) measurements taken in 4 week windows to identify women who will develop PE or new onset hypertension (NOHPT). A prospective observational study.Women with one or more risk factors for PE presenting at a tertiary hospital for antenatal care before 14 weeks' gestation were approached to participate. After obtaining informed consent, a single researcher completed a comprehensive structured questionnaire regarding previous medical, pregnancy and contraceptive history, also including information of the patient's mother, siblings and the father. Clinical findings and the results of routine antenatal tests were documented. Subsequent care was according to existing management policies. The primary outcome was the development of PE (ISSHP definition). We enrolled 318 women, 9 of whom had uncomplicated deliveries elsewhere. There were 35 cases (12.6%) of PE and 39 cases of NOHPT amongst women who delivered after 20 weeks' gestation. Systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP) did not differ between groups at presentation. SBP was significantly higher in women in the PE group from 12-15 weeks' gestation (129.1±13.6 vs. 115.9±16.1mmHg) onwards, while the DBP became significantly higher from 24-27 weeks' gestation (84.0±13.3 vs. 69.3mmHg) onwards. MAP was also higher from 12-15 weeks' gestation (94.8±8.5mmHg) onwards. PP was not of value. In women with NOHPT, SBP became significantly higher at 16-19 weeks' gestation (124.1±12.1 vs. 118.4±14.6), MAP became significantly higher at 24-27 weeks' gestation (89.8±14.6 vs. 85.7±11.3mmHg) and DBP at 32-35 weeks' gestation (78.8±72 vs. 72.1±10.9mmHg). ROC curve analysis revealed poor ability of all four parameters to distinguish between women who will

  8. Cleft lip and cleft palate relationship with familial marriage: a study in 136 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azimi C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Clefts of the lip and palate are one of the most common congenital birth anomalies. Genetic factors play a great role in the etiology of them and the high percentage of the consanguineous marriage of the parents of the affected persons is one of the reasons. These defects not only make abnormal changes on appearance of the neonate, but also make a lot of stress and psychological problems for the patients and their families. Study on the prevalence of clefts, their risk factors and also genetic counseling for affected persons and their families can be a guideline for general population and probably reduce these anomalies over the generations."n"nMethods: Patients referred to the Department of Genetics, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran were studied. A total of 7374 pedigrees of all the patients admitted to the Department, were studied during 2002-2005 and 99 pedigrees with the patients with cleft lip± palate or isolated cleft palate were separated. The total number of cases among these 99 pedigrees was 136. The effects of consanguineous marriage, positive family history and sex were investigated among cases."n"nResults: 70.8% of patients with syndromic clefts and 58.7% of patients with nonsyndromic CL

  9. 42 CFR 137.136 - What happens if the agency takes no action within the 45 day review period (or any extensions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Final Offer § 137.136 What happens if the agency takes no action within the 45 day review period (or any extensions thereof)? The final offer is accepted automatically by operation of law. ...

  10. Four fermion production in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jacobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Four-fermion events have been selected in a data sample of 5.8 pb**-1 collected with the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV. The final states l^+l^- qqbar, l^+l^-l^+l^-, nunubar qqbar, and nunubar l^+l^- have been examined. Five events are observed in the data, in agreement with the Standard Model predictions of 6.67 +/- 0.38 events from four-fermion processes and 0.14+0.19-0.05 from background processes.

  11. Search for charginos and neutralinos with R-parity violation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palla, Fabrizio; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Searches for charginos and neutralinos produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed under the assumptions that R-parity is not conserved, that the dominant R-parity violating coupling involves only leptonic fields, and that the lifetime of the lightest supersymmetric particle can be neglected. In the 5.7 pb-1 data sample collected by ALEPH, no candidate events were found. As a result, chargino and neutralino masses and couplings are constrained and the domains previously excluded at LEP1 are extended.

  12. Search for charginos and neutralinos with R-parity violation at √s = 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palla, F.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lunch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Searches for charginos and neutralinos produced in e +e - collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed under the assumptions that R-parity is not conserved, that the dominant R-parity violating coupling involves only leptonic fields, and that the lifetime of the lightest supersymmetric particle can be neglected. In the 5.7 pb -1 data sample collected by ALEPH, no candidate events were found. As a result, chargino and neutralino masses and couplings are constrained and the domains previously excluded at LEP1 are extended.

  13. Cloning, production, and functional expression of the bacteriocin enterocin A, produced by Enterococcus faecium T136, by the yeasts Pichia pastoris, Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, and Arxula adeninivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, Juan; Kunze, Gotthard; Jiménez, Juan J; Böer, Erik; Gútiez, Loreto; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M; Hernández, Pablo E

    2012-08-01

    The bacteriocin enterocin A (EntA) produced by Enterococcus faecium T136 has been successfully cloned and produced by the yeasts Pichia pastoris X-33EA, Kluyveromyces lactis GG799EA, Hansenula polymorpha KL8-1EA, and Arxula adeninivorans G1212EA. Moreover, P. pastoris X-33EA and K. lactis GG799EA produced EntA in larger amounts and with higher antimicrobial and specific antimicrobial activities than the EntA produced by E. faecium T136.

  14. miR-136 targets MIEN1 and involves the metastasis of colon cancer by suppressing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren H

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Haipeng Ren,1 Yuanling Qi,1 Xiaoyan Yin,2 Jianfeng Gao1 1Department of Internal Medicine of Oncology, People’s Hospital of Weifang, Weifang, 2Health and Family Planning Bureau of Weifang, Shouguang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: MIEN1 is a novel oncogene, and it involves tumor progression in various cancer types, including colon cancer. However, the definite molecular mechanisms of MIEN1 in colon cancer progression remain to be completely elucidated. In the present study, bioinformatics prediction showed that miR-136 could be an upstream regulator of MIEN1; a luciferase assay and Western blot assay revealed that miR-136 negatively regulates MIEN1 expression via directly targeting its 3'-untranslated region sequence. Moreover, a functional assay using wound healing and transwell invasion showed that overexpressed miR-136 inhibited cell migration and invasion, and overexpression of MIEN1 partly rescued the above-mentioned effects of miR-136 in colon cancer cells. Additionally, a clinical sample assay showed that miR-136 expression was generally downregulated in colon cancer tissue, which was inversely correlated with MIEN1 expression. Furthermore, we found that miR-136 suppressed the Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in colon cancer. These results suggest that miR-136, as a tumor suppressor, acts in tumor metastasis by suppressing MIEN1 expression in colon cancer, providing a novel target for the treatment of colon cancer. Keywords: colon cancer, miR-136, MIEN1, migration, invasion

  15. PandaX-III: Searching for neutrinoless double beta decay with high pressure 136Xe gas time projection chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun; Fu, ChangBo; Galan, Javier; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Gu, LingHui; Han, Ke; Ji, XiangDong; Lin, Heng; Liu, JiangLai; Ni, KaiXiang; Kusano, Hiroki; Ren, XiangXiang; Wang, ShaoBo; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Sun, XiangMing; Hu, ShouYang; Jian, SiYu; Li, XingLong; Li, XiaoMei; Liang, Hao; Zhang, HuanQiao; Zhao, MingRui; Zhou, Jing; Mao, YaJun; Qiao, Hao; Wang, SiGuang; Yuan, Ying; Wang, Meng; Khan, Amir N.; Raper, Neill; Tang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Dong, JiaNing; Feng, ChangQing; Li, Cheng; Liu, JianBei; Liu, ShuBin; Wang, XiaoLian; Zhu, DanYang; Castel, Juan F.; Cebrián, Susana; Dafni, Theopisti; Garza, Javier G.; Irastorza, Igor G.; Iguaz, Francisco J.; Luzón, Gloria; Mirallas, Hector; Aune, Stephan; Berthoumieux, Eric; Bedfer, Yann; Calvet, Denis; d'Hose, Nicole; Delbart, Alain; Diakaki, Maria; Ferrer-Ribas, Esther; Ferrero, Andrea; Kunne, Fabienne; Neyret, Damien; Papaevangelou, Thomas; Sabatié, Franck; Vanderbroucke, Maxence; Tan, AnDi; Haxton, Wick; Mei, Yuan; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Yan, Yu-Peng

    2017-06-01

    Searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (NLDBD) is now regarded as the topmost promising technique to explore the nature of neutrinos after the discovery of neutrino masses in oscillation experiments. PandaX-III (particle and astrophysical xenon experiment III) will search for the NLDBD of 136Xe at the China Jin Ping Underground Laboratory (CJPL). In the first phase of the experiment, a high pressure gas Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will contain 200 kg, 90% 136Xe enriched gas operated at 10 bar. Fine pitch micro-pattern gas detector (Microbulk Micromegas) will be used at both ends of the TPC for the charge readout with a cathode in the middle. Charge signals can be used to reconstruct the electron tracks of the NLDBD events and provide good energy and spatial resolution. The detector will be immersed in a large water tank to ensure 5 m of water shielding in all directions. The second phase, a ton-scale experiment, will consist of five TPCs in the same water tank, with improved energy resolution and better control over backgrounds.

  16. Studies of QCD in $e^{+}e^{-}\\to$ hadrons at E$_{cm}$ = 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    Studies of QCD in $\\mbox{e}^+\\mbox{e}^- \\rightarrow$ Hadrons at $E_{cm} = $} 130 and 136 GeV The ALEPH Collaboration An analysis of the properties of hadronic final states produced in electron-positron annihilation at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV is presented. The measurements are based on a data sample of 5.7 $\\mbox{pb}^{-1}$ collected in November 1995 with the \\Aleph detector at LEP. Inclusive charged particle distributions, jet rates and event-shape distributions are measured and the results are compared with the predictions of QCD-based models. From the measured distributions quantities are determined for which the dependence on the centre-of-mass energy can be predicted by QCD, including the mean multiplicity of charged particles, the peak position of the inclusive distribution of $\\xi = -\\ln x_p$ ($x_p = p / p_{beam}$), and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$. The QCD predictions are tested by comparing with corresponding measurements at $E_{cm} = 91.2$ GeV and at lower energies.

  17. Low-lying magnetic dipole strength distribution in the γ-soft even-even 130-136Ba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guliyev, E.; Ertugral, F.; Kuliev, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study the scissors mode 1 + states are systematically investigated within the rotational invariant Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) for 130-136 Ba isotopes. We consider the 1 + vibrations generated by the isovector spin-spin interactions and the isoscalar and isovector quadrupole-type separable forces restoring the broken symmetry by a deformed mean field according to A.A. Kuliev et al. (Int. J. Mod. Phys. E 9, 249 (2000)). It has been shown that the restoration of the broken rotational symmetry of the Hamiltonian essentially decreases the B(M1) value of the low-lying 1 + states and increases the collectivization of the scissors mode excitations in the spectroscopic energy region. The agreement between the calculated mean excitation energies as well as the summed B(M1) value of the scissors mode excitations and the available experimental data of 134 Ba and 136 Ba is rather good. A destructive interference between the orbit and spin part of the M1 strength has been found for barium isotopes near the shell closer. For all the nuclei under investigation, the low-lying M1 transitions have ΔK=1 character as it is the case for the well-deformed nuclei. (orig.)

  18. Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136. Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting Mode and Searching for Majoron-Emitting Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrin, Steven [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Observations of neutrino flavor oscillations have demonstrated that neutrinos have mass. Since the discovery of these oscillations, much progress has been made at mea- suring the neutrino mass-squared differences and lepton mixing angles that character- ize them. However, the origin and absolute scale of neutrino masses remain unknown. Unique among fermions, neutrinos can be Majorana particles, which could provide an explanation for neutrino masses. Discovery of a hypothetical process known as neutrinoless double beta decay would show that neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine the mass scale for neutrinos. The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) is a series of experiments searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The first experiment, EXO-200, began operation in 2011 and makes use of 200 kg of xenon enriched to 80.6% in 136Xe. The analysis presented here makes use of data from EXO-200 to obtain a more precise measurement of the half-life for the two-neutrino-emitting mode of double beta decay than previously reported. The analysis also sets limits on the half-lives for exotic, Majoron-emitting modes of neutrinoless double beta decay. Data from EXO-200 is also used to produce a measurement of the cosmic muon flux at the WIPP under- ground site where EXO-200 is located.

  19. 法莫替丁联合硫糖铝治疗急性胃炎136例临床分析%Clinical analysis of famotidine combined with sucralfate in the treatment of acute gastritis in 136 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丙军

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨法莫替丁联合硫糖铝治疗急性胃炎的效果.方法:将136例急性胃炎患者随机分为观察组和对照组.对照组给予法莫替丁治疗,观察组给予法莫替丁联合硫糖铝治疗.观察两组患者的治疗效果及不良反应.结果:观察组总有效率明显高于对照组(P<0.05).结论:法莫替丁联合硫糖铝治疗急性胃炎能够提高临床治疗效果,且具有较高的安全性.

  20. Clipping treatment of posterior communicating artery aneurysms associated with arteriosclerosis and calcification: A single center study of 136 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Yu, Jing; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Kan; Yu, Jinlu

    2018-02-01

    It is widely acknowledged that arteriosclerosis and calcification of the parent artery and aneurysm neck make it difficult to clip posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms. A total of 136 cases of PCoA aneurysms accompanied by arteriosclerosis and calcification were collected and treated with clipping in the present study. Of the 136 patients, 112 were females (82.4%) and 24 were males (17.6%), with ages ranging from 37 to 76 years (mean age, 60.2 years). Rupture of a PCoA aneurysm was identified in 132 cases (97.1%), and there were 4 cases of unruptured PCoA aneurysms (2.9%). According to the severity of arteriosclerosis and calcification, the aneurysms were divided into type I, II or III. The treatment of type I aneurysms achieved the best curative effect. It is difficult to temporarily occlude type II and III aneurysms during surgery, and temporary occlusion failed in almost 50% of cases. Types II and III were prone to intraoperative aneurysm ruptures. A significantly higher rate of intraoperative aneurysm rupture was seen in type III compared with type II cases. Type II and III cases were more likely to be treated using a fenestrated clip for aneurysm clipping compared with type I cases, and fenestrated clips were used significantly more frequently in type III cases compared with type II cases. Arteriosclerosis and calcification were likely to affect the prognosis of patients, particularly in cases with type III arteriosclerosis and calcification of the parent artery and aneurysm neck. Therefore, the stratification of the arteriosclerosis and calcification of the parent artery and aneurysm neck into types I-III can guide the intraoperative aneurysm clipping strategy, aid in choosing the correct clips, and inform predictions of the occurrence of rupture and hemorrhage, as well as the prognosis for aneurysms.

  1. Predictions on the modes of decay of even Z superheavy isotopes within the range 104 ≤ Z ≤ 136

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Nithya, C.

    2018-01-01

    The decay modes and half lives of all the even Z isotopes of superheavy elements within the range 104 ≤ Z ≤ 136 have been predicted by comparing the alpha decay half-lives with the spontaneous fission half-lives. The Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN) and the shell-effect-dependent formula of Santhosh et al. are used to calculate the alpha half-lives and spontaneous fission half-lives respectively. For theoretical comparison the alpha decay half-lives are also calculated using Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM), the Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski semi-empirical (VSS) relation, the universal (UNIV) curve of Poenaru et al., the analytical formula of Royer and the universal decay law (UDL) of Qi et al. Another tool used for the evaluation of spontaneous fission half-lives is the semi-empirical formula of Xu et al. The nuclei with alpha decay half-lives less than spontaneous fission half-lives will survive fission and hence decay through alpha emission. The predicted half lives and decay modes are compared with the available experimental results. The one-proton and two-proton separation energies of all the isotopes are calculated to find nuclei which lie beyond the proton drip line. Among 1119 even Z nuclei within the range 104 ≤ Z ≤ 136, 164 nuclei show sequential alpha emission followed by subsequent spontaneous fission. Since the isotopes decay through alpha decay chain and the half-lives are in measurable range, these isotopes are predicted to be synthesized and detected in laboratory via alpha decay. 2 nuclei will decay by alpha decay followed by proton emission, 54 nuclei show full alpha chains, 642 nuclei will decay through spontaneous fission, 166 nuclei exhibit proton decay and 91 isotopes are found to be stable against alpha decay. All the isotopes are tabulated according to their decay modes. The study is intended to enhance further experimental investigations in superheavy region.

  2. Identification of a RAPD marker linked to the Co-6 anthracnose resistant gene in common bean cultivar AB 136

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzate-Marin Ana Lilia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic variability of the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum represents an obstacle for the creation of resistant common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. varieties. Gene pyramiding is an alternative strategy for the development of varieties with durable resistance. RAPD markers have been proposed as a means to facilitate pyramiding of resistance genes without the need for multiple inoculations of the pathogens. The main aims of this work were to define the inheritance pattern of resistance present in common bean cultivar AB 136 in segregating populations derived from crosses with cultivar Rudá (susceptible to most C. lindemuthianum races and to identify RAPD markers linked to anthracnose resistance. The two progenitors, populations F1 and F2, F2:3 families and backcross-derived plants were inoculated with race 89 of C. lindemuthianum under environmentally controlled greenhouse conditions. The results indicate that a single dominant gene, Co-6, controls common bean resistance to this race, giving a segregation ratio between resistant and susceptible plants of 3:1 in the F2, 1:0 in the backcrosses to AB 136 and 1:1 in the backcross to Rudá. The segregation ratio of F2:3 families derived from F2 resistant plants was 1:2 (homozygous to heterozygous resistant. Molecular marker analyses in the F2 population identified a DNA band of approximately 940 base pairs (OPAZ20(940, linked in coupling phase at 7.1 cM of the Co-6 gene. This marker is being used in our backcross breeding program to develop Rudá-derived common bean cultivars resistant to anthracnose and adapted to central Brazil.

  3. Effects of PYY1-36 and PYY3-36 on appetite, energy intake, energy expenditure, glucose and fat metabolism in obese and lean subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Birgitte; Holst, Jens Juul; Flint, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Peptide YY (PYY)(3-36) has been shown to produce dramatic reductions in energy intake (EI), but no human data exist regarding energy expenditure (EE), glucose and fat metabolism. Nothing is known regarding PYY1-36. To compare effects of PYY(1-36) and PYY(3-36) on appetite, EI, EE, insulin, glucose...... and eight obese participants completed 0.2 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1) PYY(3-36) and 1.6 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1) PYY(1-36) infusions. PYY(3-36) [corrected] produced [corrected] lower ratings of well-being and [corrected] increases in heart rate, [corrected] FFA, and [corrected] postprandial [corrected] insulin...

  4. Tb3O2Cl[SeO3]2 and Tb5O4Cl3[SeO3]2: Oxide Chloride Oxoselenates(IV) of Trivalent Terbium with ''Lone-Pair'' Channel or Layer Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wontcheu, Joseph; Schleid, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Orthorhombic Tb 3 O 2 Cl[SeO 3 ] 2 (Pnma; a = 535.16(4), b = 1530.51(9), c = 1081.72(7) pm; Z = 4) is formed by reacting a stoichiometric mixture of Tb 4 O 7 , Tb, TbCl 3 , and SeO 2 in a suitable molar ratio (12: 8: 7: 42) within seven days in an evacuated sealed silica tube at 850 C. The needle-shaped, colourless single crystals (light, water and air stable) exhibit one-dimensional strands [(Tb1) 3/3 (Tb2) 2/1 O 4/2 ] 5+ [O 2 Tb 3 ] 5+ along [100] formed by two parallel chains [OTb 4/2 ] 4+ of trans-edge connected [OTb 4 ] 10+ tetrahedra (d(O-Tb) = 220 - 231 pm) which share an extra edge per chain link. The crystal structure contains two crystallographically different Tb 3+ cations: Tb1 is coordinated as bicapped trigonal prism, while Tb2 resides in square antiprismatic coordination. The Se 4+ coordination is best described as Ψ 1 tetrahedral ([SeO 3 E] 2- ; E: non-binding electron pair). The non-binding ''lone-pair'' electrons of four [SeO 3 ] 2- groups and two Cl - anions form pseudo-hexagonal empty channels along [100] between four cationic double chains. Tb 5 O 4 Cl 3 [SeO 3 ] 2 was prepared likewise as plate-like, colourless single crystals by solid-state reaction of an admixture of Tb 4 O 7 , Tb, TbOCl, TbCl 3 , and SeO 2 (molar ratio: 9: 6: 21: 7: 28) in an evacuated sealed silica tube during seven days at 850 C. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system (C2/m; a = 1229.13(9), b = 546.17(4), c = 978.79(7) pm, β = 90.485(6) ; Z = 2) and contains three crystallographically different Tb 3+ cations in seven- and eightfold coordination of O 2- and Cl - anions, respectively. The crystal structure of Tb 5 O 4 Cl 3 [SeO 3 ] 2 is layered and built up of corrugated terbium-oxygen sheets [O 4 Tb 5 ] 7+ formed by edge- and vertex-shared [OTb 4 ] 10+ tetrahedra (d(O-Tb) = 226-232 pm) spreading parallel (001). The structure is strongly related to the ''lone-pair'' channel structures of Tb 2 O[SeO 3 ] 2 and Tb 3 O 2 Cl[SeO 3 ] 2 , where single ([OTb 2 ] 4

  5. Hepatic Metabolism Affects the Atropselective Disposition of 2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-Hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    To understand the role of hepatic vs extrahepatic metabolism in the disposition of chiral PCBs, we studied the disposition of 2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) and its hydroxylated metabolites (HO-PCBs) in mice with defective hepatic metabolism due to the liver-specific deletion of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (KO mice). Female KO and congenic wild type (WT) mice were treated with racemic PCB 136, and levels and chiral signatures of PCB 136 and HO-PCBs were determined in tissues and excreta 3 days after PCB administration. PCB 136 tissue levels were higher in KO compared to WT mice. Feces was a major route of PCB metabolite excretion, with 2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol being the major metabolite recovered from feces. (+)-PCB 136, the second eluting PCB 136 atropisomers, was enriched in all tissues and excreta. The second eluting atropisomers of the HO-PCBs metabolites were enriched in blood and liver; 2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol in blood was an exception and displayed an enrichment of the first eluting atropisomers. Fecal HO-PCB levels and chiral signatures changed with time and differed between KO and WT mice, with larger HO-PCB enantiomeric fractions in WT compared to KO mice. Our results demonstrate that hepatic and, possibly, extrahepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes play a role in the disposition of PCBs. PMID:25420130

  6. Magnon energies and exchange interactions in terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden

    1968-01-01

    The magnon density of states, and hence the magnetic contribution to the specific heat, and also the exchange interaction between ions in the same sublattice have been calculated for Tb at 90°K, using experimental results obtained by inelastic neutron scattering.......The magnon density of states, and hence the magnetic contribution to the specific heat, and also the exchange interaction between ions in the same sublattice have been calculated for Tb at 90°K, using experimental results obtained by inelastic neutron scattering....

  7. Magnon lifetimes in terbium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerrum Moeller, H.; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The lifetimes of magnons propagating in the c-direction of Tb at 4.2 K have been measured by inelastic neutron scattering. In contrast to the behaviour at higher temperatures, where magnon-magnon scattering predominates, the broadening of the magnons increases towards the boundary of the single Brillouin zone, both in the acoustic and optical branches. This suggests that the scattering of the magnons by conduction electrons is important, and the observed lifetimes are consistent with a recent estimate of the magnitude of this effect. The acoustic magnons of very long wavelength behave anomalously, presumably due to dipolar interactions

  8. Spin-glass transition in disordered terbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    While crystalline Tb is a helix antiferromagnet with a Neel temperature of 229 K which becomes ferromagnetic at 222 K, disordered Tb exhibits a spin-glass transition. The spin-glass freezing temperature ranges from 183 to 53 K, the lowest temperatures corresponding to the greatest degree of atomic disorder. These experiments constitute the first evidence for an elemental spin-glass. (author)

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of lithium terbium tetrafluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    The absorption spectra of Tb3+ in LiTbF4 have been recorded in the spectral interval from 4000 to 25000 cm-1 and for temperatures between 2.3 and 150 K. This covers the transitions from the ground multiplet 7F6 to the multiplets 7F3, 7F2, 7F1, 7F0, and 5D4. The transitions were predominantly of e...

  10. Production of high-energetic photons in the heavy ion reaction 136Xe + 48Ti at ELab = 18.5 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enders, G.

    1991-05-01

    The production mechanism for high-energetic photons in heavy ion collisions was studied on the example of the deep inelastic reaction 136 Xe+ 48 Ti at a projectile energy of 18.5 MeV/u in an exclusive experiment, in which photons and heavy reaction fragments were detected in coincidence. (orig.) [de

  11. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Incorporation of ancillary terrestrial component base station into an L-band mobile-satellite service system... ancillary terrestrial component (ATC) base stations as defined in § 25.201 at its own risk and subject to... Applications and Licenses Earth Stations § 25.136 Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz...

  12. 42 CFR 136.404 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Protection and Family Violence Prevention § 136.404 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and Indian Tribes or Tribal organizations receiving funds under...

  13. Identification and localization of a soluble antigen, Ag2, of 136 kDa from Plasmodium falciparum in vitro cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Grellier, P; Theander, T G

    1991-01-01

    as a duplet with molecular masses of 136 and 120 kDa when tested by immunoblotting. Immunoprecipitation experiments on Triton X-100 extracted antigens from synchronized cultures showed that the antigen was synthesized in the schizont stage. Ag2 was located near the surface of schizonts in the parasitophorous...

  14. Charge-state distribution measurements of ^{238}U and ^{136}Xe at 11  MeV/nucleon using gas charge stripper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kuboki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The charge-state distributions and equilibrium charge states of uranium (^{238}U and xenon (^{136}Xe ions at 11  MeV/nucleon were determined using a gas charge stripper. A differential pumping system facilitated the increase of the nitrogen gas thickness up to 1.3  mg/cm^{2}, which is sufficient for the most probable charge state to attain equilibrium. The charge states of ^{238}U attain equilibrium at 56.0, 56.6, and 55.7 in N_{2}, Ar, and CO_{2} media with thicknesses of 125, 79, and 126  μg/cm^{2}, respectively, while those of ^{136}Xe attain equilibrium at 40.5, 40.1, and 40.3 in N_{2}, Ar, and CO_{2} media with thicknesses of 163, 95, and 139  μg/cm^{2}, respectively. The equilibrium charge states of ^{136}Xe are acceptable for acceleration by the subsequent cyclotron. The measured data of ^{238}U were used to devise an empirical formula for the prediction of the equilibrium charge state in gaseous media over the energy region of 0.01–60  MeV/nucleon. The equilibrium charge state of ^{136}Xe as predicted by the devised formula is in good agreement with the data.

  15. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calculated method detection limit. To insure that the estimate of the method detection limit is a good...) where: MDL = the method detection limit t(n-1,1- α=.99) = the students' t value appropriate for a 99... Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11 B Appendix B to Part 136 Protection of Environment...

  16. Search for neutralinos, scalar leptons and scalar quarks in $e^+ e^-$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$=130 GeV and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Chikilev, O G; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    Using data accumulated by DELPHI during the November 1995 LEP run at 130~GeV -- 136~GeV, searches have been made for events with jets or leptons in conjunction with missing momentum. The results are interpreted in terms of limits on the production of neutralinos, scalar leptons, and scalar quarks.

  17. The expanding spectrum of COL2A1 gene variants IN 136 patients with a skeletal dysplasia phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barat-Houari, Mouna; Dumont, Bruno; Fabre, Aurélie; Them, Frédéric Tm; Alembik, Yves; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Amiel, Jeanne; Audebert, Séverine; Baumann-Morel, Clarisse; Blanchet, Patricia; Bieth, Eric; Brechard, Marie; Busa, Tiffany; Calvas, Patrick; Capri, Yline; Cartault, François; Chassaing, Nicolas; Ciorca, Vidrica; Coubes, Christine; David, Albert; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Dupin-Deguine, Delphine; El Chehadeh, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Giuliano, Fabienne; Goldenberg, Alice; Isidor, Bertrand; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Julia, Sophie; Kaplan, Josseline; Lacombe, Didier; Lebrun, Marine; Marlin, Sandrine; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Martinovic, Jelena; Masurel, Alice; Melki, Judith; Mozelle-Nivoix, Monique; Nguyen, Karine; Odent, Sylvie; Philip, Nicole; Pinson, Lucile; Plessis, Ghislaine; Quélin, Chloé; Shaeffer, Elise; Sigaudy, Sabine; Thauvin, Christel; Till, Marianne; Touraine, Renaud; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Le Merrer, Martine; Geneviève, David; Touitou, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    Heterozygous COL2A1 variants cause a wide spectrum of skeletal dysplasia termed type II collagenopathies. We assessed the impact of this gene in our French series. A decision tree was applied to select 136 probands (71 Stickler cases, 21 Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita cases, 11 Kniest dysplasia cases, and 34 other dysplasia cases) before molecular diagnosis by Sanger sequencing. We identified 66 different variants among the 71 positive patients. Among those patients, 18 belonged to multiplex families and 53 were sporadic. Most variants (38/44, 86%) were located in the triple helical domain of the collagen chain and glycine substitutions were mainly observed in severe phenotypes, whereas arginine to cysteine changes were more often encountered in moderate phenotypes. This series of skeletal dysplasia is one of the largest reported so far, adding 44 novel variants (15%) to published data. We have confirmed that about half of our Stickler patients (46%) carried a COL2A1 variant, and that the molecular spectrum was different across the phenotypes. To further address the question of genotype-phenotype correlation, we plan to screen our patients for other candidate genes using a targeted next-generation sequencing approach.

  18. Evaluation of diagnostic and prognostic significance of SPECT scintigraphy in hematologic disorders (a report of 136 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Zhenghui; Yu Fei; Fu Jinxiang; Lu Wendong

    1994-06-01

    By using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), 136 patients with various hematologic diseases were investigated. Bone marrow imaging in 46 patients with aplastic anemia showed type I 28 cases, type II 9 cases, type III 3 cases, and type IV 6 cases. Among 28 patients with type I, 8 patients died. This result indicates that patients with character of type I has a poor prognosis. The results in 24 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) showed type I 7 cases, type II 2 cases, type III 12 cases, and type IV 3 cases. Bone marrow scintigraphy in 18 patients with Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) showed type I 2 cases, type II 8 cases, type III 2 cases, type IV 2 cases, and type V 4 cases. 5 out of 18 cases transformed to leukemia rapidly. The other hematologic disease had different imaging characters. The rate of conformation between lymphnodeimaging and pathological examination in 12 patients with enlargement lymph nodes were higher than 90%. With imaging, useful information for diagnosis of hematologic disorders can be obtained. The results showed that it is a safety, convenient, and non-invasive method for dynamic monitoring in some patients with hematologic disease. (1 tab., 5 figs.)

  19. Search for the lightest chargino at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 and 136 GeV in DELPHI

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Chikilev, O G; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    A search for pair production of the lightest chargino at $\\rs=$ 130.4 and 136.3~GeV has been carried out using the data sample corresponding to the 5.92~${\\rm pb}^{-1}$ recorded by the DELPHI detector during the high energy run of LEP in the last period of 1995. The theoretical reference model has been the Mi\\-ni\\-mal Supersymmetric Standard Model with R-parity conservation. The three topologies expected for the decay of a pair of charginos, namely two acoplanar leptons plus missing energy (\\ll), two jets and an isolated lepton plus missing energy (\\jjl) and missing energy in a hadronic environment (\\jj), were investigated. No evidence of a signal was found. Lower mass limits were derived for various scenarios, including the case of a low mass difference between the chargino and the neutralino and of a light sneutrino. The mass limits range between 56.3~GeV/${\\rm c}^2$ and the kinematic limit.

  20. 136 ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    Key words:-Staphylococcus aureus, antibiotic resistant plasmid, plasmid profile, resistance pattern, ... Alimosho Local Government Areas of Lagos ... Transport medium pending culture on ... methicillin disc plates were incubated at 30Oc for.

  1. 1972, pp. 136. 76

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WERNER MASER: Adolf Hitler. legende, mythe, werkelijkheid. Uitgeverij De Arbeiders- pers, Amsterdam, 1973, pp. 531. Met aante- keninge [pp. 429 -. 506] en bibliografie. [pp. 507 - 531]. In 1945 het die skrywer van hierdie studie, op grond van 'n proefskrif oor die doelbewuste aankweek van die Hitlerlegende tot 1924,.

  2. INHIBITION OF THE GROWTH OF TOLERANT YEAST Saccharomyces cerevisiae STRAIN I136 BY A MIXTURE OF SYNTHETIC INHIBITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eny Ida Riyanti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomass from lignocellulosic wastes is a potential source for biobased products.  However, one of the constraints in utilization of biomass hydrolysate is the presence of inhibitors. Therefore, the use of inhibitor-tolerant microorganisms in the fermentation is required. The study aimed to investigate the effect of a mixture of inhibitors on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain I136 grown in medium containing synthetic inhibitors (acetic acid, formic acid, furfural, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural/5-HMF, and levulinic acid in four different concentrations with a mixture of carbon sources, glucose  (50 g.l-1 and xylose (50 g.l-1 at 30oC. The parameters related to growth and fermentation products were observed. Results showed that the strain was able to grow in media containing natural inhibitors (BSL medium with µmax of 0.020/h. Higher level of synthetic inhibitors prolonged the lag phase, decreased the cell biomass and ethanol production, and specific growth rate. The strain could detoxify furfural and 5-HMF and produced the highest ethanol (Y(p/s of 0.32 g.g-1 when grown in BSL. Glucose was utilized as its level decreased in a result of increase in cell biomass, in contrast to xylose which was not consumed. The highest cell biomass was produced in YNB with Y (x/s value of 0.25 g.g-1. The strain produced acetic acid as a dominant side product and could convert furfural into a less toxic compound, hydroxyl furfural. This robust tolerant strain provides basic information on resistance mechanism and would be useful for bio-based cell factory using lignocellulosic materials. 

  3. New limits on 2ε, εβ{sup +} and 2β{sup +} decay of {sup 136}Ce and {sup 138}Ce with deeply purified cerium sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, P.; Bernabei, R. [INFN Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Boiko, R.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Cappella, F. [INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Cerulli, R.; Laubenstein, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Danevich, F.A.; Kropivyansky, B.N.; Polischuk, O.G.; Tretyak, V.I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Incicchitti, A. [INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Mokina, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2017-08-15

    A search for double electron capture (2ε), electron capture with positron emission (εβ{sup +}), and double positron emission (2β{sup +}) in {sup 136}Ce and {sup 138}Ce was realized with a 465 cm{sup 3} ultra-low background HP Ge γ spectrometer over 2299 h at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. A 627 g sample of cerium oxide deeply purified by liquid-liquid extraction method was used as a source of γ quanta expected in double β decay of the cerium isotopes. New improved half-life limits were set on different modes and channels of double β decay of {sup 136}Ce and {sup 138}Ce at the level of T{sub 1/2} > 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} yr. (orig.)

  4. Search for supersymmetric particles in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palla, Fabrizio; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Aleppo, M; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Ragusa, F; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Search for supersymmetric particles in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV. Searches for supersymmetric particles produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed in a data sample of 5.7 pb-1 collected in the autumn of 1995 by the ALEPH detector at LEP. No candidate events were found, allowing limits to be set on the masses and production cross-sections of scalar leptons, scalar tops charginos and neutralinos. The domains previously excluded at LEP1 are substantially extended. For instance, masses of gaugino-like charginos smaller than 67.8 GeV/c2 are excluded at the 95% C.L. for scalar neutrino masses larger than 200 GeV/c2.

  5. Measurement of hadron and lepton-pair production from e+e- annihilation at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Hadronic and leptonic cross-sections and forward-backward asymmetries are measured using 5.7~pb$^{-1}$ of data taken with the ALEPH detector at LEP at $\\cms$ energies of 130 and 136~GeV. The results agree with Standard Model expectations. The measurement of hadronic cross-sections far away from the Z resonance improves the determination of the interference between photon and Z exchange. Constraints on models with extra Z bosons are presented.

  6. Measurement of hadron and lepton-pair production from e +e - annihilation at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Hadronic and leptonic cross-sections and forward-backward asymmetries are measured using 5.7 pb -1 of data taken with the ALEPH detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV. The results agree with Standard Model expectations. The measurement of hadronic cross-sections far away from the Z resonance improves the determination of the interference between photon and Z exchange. Constraints on models with extra Z bosons are presented.

  7. Limit on neutrinoless ββ decay of 136Xe from the first phase of KamLAND-Zen and comparison with the positive claim in 76Ge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hanakago, H.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Kato, R.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Motoki, D.; Nakada, T.; Nakamura, K.; Obata, A.; Oki, A.; Ono, Y.; Otani, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yamada, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Yoshida, S.; Banks, T.I.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; O’Donnell, T.; Berger, B.E.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J.A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from the first phase of the KamLAND-Zen double-beta decay experiment, corresponding to an exposure of 89.5 kg yr of Xe136. We obtain a lower limit for the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life of T0ν1/2>1.9×1025  yr at 90% C.L. The combined results from KamLAND-Zen and EXO-200

  8. Measurement of thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 136}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Toshio; Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Motoishi, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu

    1997-03-01

    The thermal neutron(2,200 m/s neutron) capture cross section({sigma}{sub 0}) and the resonance integral(I{sub 0}) of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 136}Cs were measured by an activation method. Targets of radioactive cesium, which include {sup 135}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and stable {sup 133}Cs, were irradiated with reactor neutrons within or without a Cd shield case. The ratio of the number of nuclei of {sup 135}Cs to that of {sup 137}Cs was measured with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. This ratio and the ratio of activity of {sup 136}Cs to that of {sup 137}Cs were used for deduction of the {sigma}{sub 0} and the I{sub 0} of {sup 135}Cs. The {sigma}{sub 0} and the I{sub 0} of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{sigma}){sup 136}Cs were 8.3 {+-} 0.3 barn and 38.1 {+-} 2.6 barn, respectively. (author)

  9. Neutron-capture cross-section measurements of Xe136 between 0.4 and 14.8 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhike, Megha; Tornow, W.

    2014-03-01

    Fast-neutron-capture cross-section data on Xe136 have been measured with the activation method between 0.4 and 14.8 MeV. The cross section was found to be of the order of 1 mb at the eleven energies investigated. This result is important to interpret potential neutron-induced backgrounds in the enriched xenon observatory and KamLAND-Zen neutrinoless double-β decay searches that use xenon as both source and detector. A high-pressure sphere filled with Xe136 was irradiated with monoenergetic neutrons produced by the reactions 3H(p ,n)3He, 2H(d ,n)3He, and 3H(d ,n)4He. Indium and gold monitor foils were irradiated simultaneously with the Xe136 to determine the incident neutron flux. The activities of the reaction products were measured with high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. The present results are compared to predictions from ENDF/B-VII.1 and TENDL-2012.

  10. Defining the spatial relationships between eight anatomic planes in the 11+6 to 13+6 weeks fetus: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rustum, Reem S; Ziade, M Fouad; Abu-Rustum, Sameer E

    2012-09-01

    Our study aims at investigating the spatial relationships between eight anatomic planes in the 11+6 to 13+6 weeks fetus. This is a retrospective pilot study where three-dimensional and four-dimensional stored data sets were manipulated to retrieve eight anatomic planes starting from the midsagittal plane of the fetus. Standardization of volumes was performed at the level of the transverse abdominal circumference plane. Parallel shift was utilized and the spatial relationships between eight anatomic planes were established. The median and the range were calculated for each of the planes, and they were evaluated as a function of the fetal crown-rump length. P planes were found to adhere to normal distribution curves, and most of the planes were in a definable relationship to each other with statistically significant correlations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe the possible spatial relationships between eight two-dimensional anatomic planes in the 11+6 to 13+6 weeks fetus, utilizing a standardized approach. Defining these spatial relationships may serve as the first step for the potential future development of automation software for fetal anatomic assessment at 11+6 to 13+6 weeks. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Mutation I136V alters electrophysiological properties of the NaV1.7 channel in a family with onset of erythromelalgia in the second decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dib-Hajj Sulayman D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary erythromelalgia is an autosomal dominant pain disorder characterized by burning pain and skin redness in the extremities, with onset of symptoms during the first decade in the families whose mutations have been physiologically studied to date. Several mutations of voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.7 have been linked with primary erythromelalgia. Recently, a new substitution NaV1.7/I136V has been reported in a Taiwanese family, in which pain appeared at later ages (9–22 years, with onset at 17 years of age or later in 5 of 7 family members, with relatively slow progression (8–10 years to involvement of the hands. The proband reported onset of symptoms first in his feet at the age of 11, which then progressed to his hands at the age of 19. The new mutation is located in transmembrane segment 1 (S1 of domain I (DI in contrast to all NaV1.7 mutations reported to date, which have been localized in the voltage sensor S4, the linker joining segments S4 and S5 or pore-lining segments S5 and S6 in DI, II and III. Results In this study, we characterized the gating and kinetic properties of I136V mutant channels in HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp. I136V shifts the voltage-dependence of activation by -5.7 mV, a smaller shift in activation than the other erythromelalgia mutations that have been characterized. I136V also decreases the deactivation rate, and generates larger ramp currents. Conclusion The I136V substitution in NaV1.7 alters channel gating and kinetic properties. Each of these changes may contribute to increased excitability of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons, which underlies pain in erythromelalgia. The smaller shift in voltage-dependence of activation of NaV1.7, compared to the other reported cases of inherited erythromelalgia, may contribute to the later age of onset and slower progression of the symptoms reported in association with this mutation.

  12. Four-jet final state production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The four-jet final state is analyzed to search for hadronic decays of pair-produced heavy particles. The analysis uses the ALEPH data collected at LEP in November 1995 at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136~GeV, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 5.7~\\inpb. An excess of four-jet events is observed with respect to the standard model predictions. In addition, these events exhibit an enhancement in the sum of the two di-jet masses around 105~\\Gcs. The properties of these events are studied and compared to the expectations from standard processes and to pair production hypotheses.

  13. Four-fermion production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jacobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Four-fermion events have been selected in a data sample of 5.8 pb -1 collected with the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV. The final states ℓ +ℓ -q overlineq, ℓ +ℓ -ℓ +ℓ -, ν overlineνq overlineq, and ν overlineνℓ +ℓ - have been examined. Five events are observed in the data, in agreement with the Standard Model predictions of 6.67±0.38 events from four-fermion processes and 0.14 -0.05+0.19 from background processes.

  14. Study of the structure of hadronic events and determination of $\\alpha_{s}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 GeV and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bencze, G L; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Brambilla, Elena; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buijs, A; Bujak, A T; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Burgos, C; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Castello, R; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coan, T E; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; De Boeck, H; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Dénes, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabbretti, R; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Fernández, G; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Gailloud, M; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; González, E; Gougas, Andreas; Goujon, D; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gustafson, H R; Gutay, L J; Hangarter, K; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; He, J T; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Ilyas, M M; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapinos, P; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; Koffeman, E; Köngeter, A; Koutsenko, V F; Koulbardis, A; Krämer, R W; Kramer, T; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Lenti, M; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lindemann, B; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Ludovici, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Macchiolo, A; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangla, S; Maolinbay, M; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Möller, M; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nippe, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Raghavan, R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Redaelli, M; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Ricker, A; Riemann, S; Riemers, B C; Riles, K; Rind, O; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Röhner, S; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Salicio, J M; Sánchez, E; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Schöneich, B; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schulte, R; Schultze, K; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Seiler, P G; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Sticozzi, F; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Toker, O; Tonisch, F; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tsaregorodtsev, A Yu; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Urbàn, L; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vuilleumier, L; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weill, R; Willmott, C; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zaccardelli, C; Zalite, A; Zemp, P; Zeng, J Y; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, G J; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Van der Zwaan, B C C

    1996-01-01

    We present a study of the structure of hadronic events recorded by the L3 detector at center-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5 pb-1 collected during the high energy run of 1995. The shapes of the event shape distributions and the energy dependence of their mean values are well reproduced by QCD models. From a comparison of the data with resummed O(alpha_s^2) QCD calculations, we determine the strong coupling constant to be alpha_s(133 GeV) = 0.107 +/- 0.005(exp) +/- 0.006(theor).

  15. Metabolism of 2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-Hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) Atropisomers in Tissue Slices from Phenobarbital or Dexamethasone-Induced Rats is Sex-Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianai; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Dammanahalli, Karigowda J.; Duffel, Michael; Lein, Pamela J.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Chiral polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) such as PCB 136 enantioselectively sensitize the ryanodine receptor (RyR). In light of recent evidence that PCBs cause developmental neurotoxicity via RyR-dependent mechanisms, this suggests that enantioselective PCB metabolism may influence the developmental neurotoxicity of chiral PCBs. However, enantioselective disposition of PCBs has not been fully characterized.The effect of sex and cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme induction on the enantioselective metabolism of PCB 136 was studied using liver tissue slices prepared from naïve control (CTL), phenobarbital (PB; CYP2B inducer) or dexamethasone (DEX; CYP3A inducer) pretreated adult Sprague-Dawley rats. PCB 136 metabolism was also examined in hippocampal slices derived from untreated rat pups.In liver tissue slices, hydroxylated PCB (OH-PCB) profiles depended on sex and inducer pretreatment, and OH-PCB levels followed the rank orders male > female and PB > DEX > CTL. In contrast, the enantiomeric enrichment of PCB 136 and its metabolites was independent of sex and inducer pretreatment. Only small amounts of PCB 136 partitioned into hippocampal tissue slices and no OH-PCB metabolites were detected.Our results suggest that enantioselective metabolism, sex and induction status of P450 enzymes in the liver may modulate the neurotoxic outcomes of developmental exposure to chiral PCBs. PMID:23581876

  16. Improving the Legal System Regime Specific to Biosphere Reservation of Danube Delta achieved by the Law no. 136 of July 5, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tache Bocaniala

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish a regime of protection and conservation of the Danube Delta, but alsoto achieve international commitments of Romania, it was developed and adopted by the Parliament aspecial law, Law no. 82/1993, establishing the Biosphere Reservation of Danube Delta. Theestablished rules had in mind mainly the preservation and protection of the existing natural heritage,promoting the sustainable use of resources resulting from natural ecosystems of the reserve andreconstruction of areas damaged by the impact of human activities. Although repeatedly amended andsupplemented, this regulatory framework has always been overwhelmed by economic and socialdevelopment of the area, requiring practically a major reform that was carried out by Law no 136 ofJuly 5, 2011.

  17. Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles Induce Amyloid Formation of the PrP(110-136 Peptide via an α-Helical Metastable Conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Sauvé

    Full Text Available A peptide encompassing the conserved hydrophobic region and the first β-strand of the prion protein (PrP(110-136 shown to interact with the surface of dodecylphosphocholine micelles adopts an α-helical conformation that is localized below the head-group layer. This surface-bound peptide has a half-life of one day, and readily initiates the formation of amyloid fibrils. The presence of the latter was confirmed using birefringence microscopy upon Congo red binding and thioflavin T-binding induced fluorescence. The observation of this metastable α-helical conformer provides a unique snapshot of the early steps of the inter-conversion pathway. These findings together with the body of evidence from the prion literature allowed us to propose a mechanism for the conversion of PrPC to amyloid material.

  18. Search for heavy lepton pair production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    A search for pair production of new heavy leptons has been performed assuming different scenarios for the mixing of the new particles with Standard Model leptons. No candidate events were found in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 pb**-1 collected by the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV. New limits on production cross-sections and on masses of sequential leptons were obtained which significantly extend the mass regions excluded at LEP1. For instance, charged heavy leptons with masses below 63.5 GeV/c**2 are excluded at 95% C.L. for mass differences to the associated neutral lepton of more than 7 GeV/c**2.

  19. A study of single and multi-photon production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The production of final states involving one or more energetic photons from e+e- collisions at high energies is studied using data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of two samples of 2.9 pb-1 each, recorded at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV and 136 GeV. The data are in agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model. From an analysis of two-photon final states new limits are placed on the parameters of models involving contact interactions and excited electrons. The 95% confidence level lower limits on the QED cut-off parameters are found to be 169 and 132 GeV respectively.

  20. Search for unstable sequential neutral and charged heavy leptons in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Brambilla, Elena; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buijs, A; Bujak, A T; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Castello, R; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; De Boeck, H; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Felcini, Marta; Furetta, C; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hangarter, K; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Ilyas, M M; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapinos, P; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Köngeter, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Koulbardis, A; Krämer, R W; Kramer, T; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Lenti, M; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lindemann, B; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Ludovici, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Macchiolo, A; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Möller, M; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nippe, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Raghavan, R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Ricker, A; Riemann, S; Riemers, B C; Riles, K; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Röhner, S; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Schöneich, B; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schulte, R; Schultze, K; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Sticozzi, F; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Toker, O; Tonisch, F; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tsaregorodtsev, A Yu; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zaccardelli, C; Zalite, A; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino

    1996-01-01

    A search for unstable sequential neutral and charged heavy leptons has been made at center-of-mass energies 130 and 136 \\GeV\\ with the L3 detector at LEP. The neutral leptons are assumed to decay via mixing to electrons and muons. No evidence for their existence was found. We exclude unstable Dirac neutrinos for masses below 59.3 (57.9) \\GeV\\ and unstable Majorana neutrinos below 48.6 (47.2) \\GeV\\ if the neutrino couples to the electron(muon) family. We exclude unstable charged heavy leptons for masses below 61 \\GeV\\ for a wide range of the associated neutral lepton mass.

  1. Production of n-rich Nuclei along the Closed Shell N=126 in the collision 136Xe + 208Pb @E lab =870 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, D.; Vardaci, E.; Kozulin, E. M.; Zagrebaev, V. A.; Corradi, L.; Pulcini, A.; La Rana, G.; Itkis, I. M.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Novikov, K.; Harca, I.; Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Montanari, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Szilner, S.; Mijatović, T.; Trzaska, W. H.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-nucleon transfer reactions are nowadays the only known mean to produce neutron-rich nuclei in the Terra Incognita. The closed-shell region N=126 is crucial for both studying shell-quenching in exotic nuclei and the r-process, being its last “waiting-point”. The choice of suitable reactions is challenging and a favorable case is 136Xe+208Pb, near the Coulomb barrier, because their neutron shell-closures play a stabilizing role, favoring the proton-transfer from lead to xenon. TOF-TOF data were analyzed to reconstruct the mass-energy distribution of the primary fragments. Preliminary results of an experiment held at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro with PRISMA, aimed at A and Z identification of the products, will be shown.

  2. Comment on "Relative variance of the mean squared pressure in multimode media: rehabilitating former approaches" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 136, 2621-2629 (2014)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, John L; Weaver, Richard L

    2015-03-01

    Models for the statistics of responses in finite reverberant structures, and in particular, for the variance of the mean square pressure in reverberation rooms, have been studied for decades. It is therefore surprising that a recent communication has claimed that the literature has gotten the simplest of such calculations very wrong. Monsef, Cozza, Rodrigues, Cellard, and Durocher [(2014). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 136, 2621-2629] have derived a modal-based expression for the relative variance that differs significantly from expressions that have been accepted since 1969. This Comment points out that the Monsef formula is clearly incorrect, and then for the interested reader, points out the subtle place where they made their mistake.

  3. A study of single and multi-photon production in e +e - collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The production of final states involving one or more energetic photons from e +e - collisions at high energies is studied using data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of two samples of 2.9 pb -1 each, recorded at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV and 136 GeV. The data are in agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model. From an analysis of two-photon final states new limits are placed on the parameters of models involving e +e -γγ contact interactions and excited electrons. The 95% confidence level lower limits on the QED cut-off parameters Λ+ and Λ- are found to be 169 and 132 GeV respectively.

  4. Study of muon-pair production at centre-of-mass energies from 20 to 136 GeV with the ALEPH detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Buiosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Sau, Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-02-01

    The total cross section and the forward-backward asymmetry for the process e+e- -> μ+μ-(nγ) are measured in the energy range 20-136 GeV by reconstructing the effective centre-of-mass energy after initial state radiation. The analysis is based on the data recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP between 1990 and 1995, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 143.5 pb-1. Two different approaches are used: in the first one an exclusive selection of events with hard initial state radiation in the energy range 20-88 GeV is directly compared with the Standard Model predictions showing good agreement. In the second one, all events are used to obtain a precise measurement of the energy dependence of σ0 and σ0 and A0FB from a model independent fit, enabling constraints to be placed on models with extra Z bosons.

  5. Search for heavy lepton pair production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, F.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    A search for pair production of new heavy leptons has been performed assuming different scenarios for the mixing of the new particles with Standard Model leptons. No candidate events were found in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 pb -1 collected by the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV. New limits on production cross-sections and on masses of sequential leptons were obtained which significantly extend the mass regions excluded at LEP1. For instance, charged heavy leptons with masses below 63.5 GeV/ c 2 are excluded at 95% C.L. for mass differences to the associated neutral lepton of more than 7 GeV/ c 2.

  6. Search for supersymmetric particles in e +e - collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palla, F.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Aleppo, M.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Ragusa, F.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles produced in e +e - collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed in a data sample of 5.7 pb -1 collected in the autumn of 1995 by the ALEPH detector at LEP. No candidate events were found, allowing limits to be set on the masses and production cross-sections of scalar leptons, scalar tops, charginos and neutralinos. The domains previously excluded at LEP1 are substantially extended. For instance, masses of gaugino-like charginos smaller than 67.8 GeV/ c2 are excluded at the 95% C.L. for scalar neutrino masses larger than 200 GeV/ c2.

  7. Four-jet final state production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J. P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M. N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J. F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J. C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J. M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H. G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H. G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J. F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A. M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M. H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J. J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignain, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J. F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J. P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1996-03-01

    The four-jet final state is analyzed to search for hadronic decays of pair-produced heavy particles. The analysis uses the ALEPH data collected at LEP in November 1995 at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 5.7 pb-1. An excess of four-jet events is observed with respect to the standard model predictions. In addition, these events exhibit an enhancement in the sum of the two di-jet masses around 105 GeV/ c 2. The properties of these events are studied and compared to the expectations from standard processes and to pair production hypotheses.

  8. Study of the muon-pair production at centre-of-mass energies from 20 to 136 GeV with the ALEPH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The total cross section and the forward-backward asymmetry for the process $e^+ e^- \\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^- (n \\gamma)$ are measured in the energy range 20-136 GeV by reconstructing the effective centre-of-mass energy after initial state radiation. The analysis is based on the data recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP between 1990 and 1995, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 143.5 $\\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$. Two different approaches are used: in the first one an exclusive selection of events with hard initial state radiation in the energy range 20-88 GeV is directly compared with the Standard Model predictions showing good agreement. In the second one, all events are used to obtain a precise measurement of the energy dependence of $\\sigma^0$ and $A_{\\mathrm{FB}}^0$ from a model independent fit, enabling constraints to be placed on models with extra Z bosons.

  9. Study of radiative leptonic events with hard photons and search for excited charged leptons at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solokov, A; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    During the last 1995 data acquisition period at LEP, the DELPHI experiment collected an integrated luminosity of $5.9$ pb$^{-1}$ at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV and 136 GeV. Radiative leptonic events ($e, \\mu, \\tau$) with high energy photons were studied and compared to Standard Model predictions. The data were used to search for charged excited leptons decaying through an electromagnetic transition. No significant signal was found. From the search for pair produced excited leptons, the limits $m_{e^*} > 62.5$ GeV/$c^2$, $m_{\\mu^*} > 62.6$ GeV/$c^2$ and $m_{\\tau^*} > 62.2$ GeV/$c^2$ at 95\\% confidence level were established. For single excited lepton production, upper limits on the ratio $\\lambda/m_{\\ell^*}$ of the coupling of the excited charged lepton to its mass were derived.

  10. Triple-junction thin-film silicon solar cell fabricated on periodically textured substrate with a stabilized efficiency of 13.6%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Hitoshi; Matsui, Takuya; Koida, Takashi; Matsubara, Koji; Kondo, Michio; Sugiyama, Shuichiro; Katayama, Hirotaka; Takeuchi, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Isao

    2015-05-01

    We report a high-efficiency triple-junction thin-film silicon solar cell fabricated with the so-called substrate configuration. It was verified whether the design criteria for developing single-junction microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) solar cells are applicable to multijunction solar cells. Furthermore, a notably high short-circuit current density of 32.9 mA/cm2 was achieved in a single-junction μc-Si:H cell fabricated on a periodically textured substrate with a high-mobility front transparent contacting layer. These technologies were also combined into a-Si:H/μc-Si:H/μc-Si:H triple-junction cells, and a world record stabilized efficiency of 13.6% was achieved.

  11. Expression profiling of O6 methylguanine-DNA-methyl transferase in prolactinomas: a correlative study of promoter methylation and pathological features in 136 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Bing; Hu, Bin; He, Dong-Sheng; Mao, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Xin; Song, Bing-Bing; Zhu, Yong-Hong; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Low-level expression of O 6 methylguanine-DNA-methyl transferase (MGMT) prolactinomas has been noted previously in case reports, although what modulates MGMT expression remains unclear. This study therefore aimed to delineate the factors regulating MGMT expression in prolactinomas. We retrospectively reviewed 136 prolactinoma patients who were treated in our center between January 2000 and September 2013. Expression of MGMT, Ki-67, and p53 protein were examined by immunohistochemical staining, and MGMT promoter methylation evaluated with methylation-specific PCR. MGMT immunopositivity was <25 % in 106/136 tumor specimens (77.94 %). MGMT immunoexpression was positively correlated with age (r = 0.251, p = 0.003), but inversely correlated with p53 staining (r = −0.153, p = 0.021). Moreover, reduced MGMT expression was more frequent in atypical prolactinomas (p = 0.044). Methylated MGMT promoter was confirmed in 10/46 specimens (21.7 %), all of which had low level or absent MGMT staining. Both p53 protein (r = −0.33, p = 0.025) and promoter methylation (r = −0.331, p = 0.025) were negatively associated with MGMT expression. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.127. 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.027–1.236, p = 0.012) and p53 (OR = 0.116. 95 % CI 0.018–0.761, p = 0.025) staining were independent determents of MGMT expression. The majority of prolactinomas, especially atypical prolactinomas, showed low-level or no MGMT immunoexpression, providing a rationale for the utility of temozolomide as an alternative to managing prolactinomas. In summary, epigenetic and transcriptional regulation are involved in silencing MGMT expression

  12. Primary Distributions of Nuclear Charge for Fission-Fragment Masses 132, 134, 136 and 137 from Thermal Fission of U{sup 235}; Repartition Primaire de la Charge Nucleaire pour les Fragments de Masse 132, 134, 136 et 137, Provenant de la Fission de {sup 235}U par Neutrons Thermiques; 041f 0415 0420 0414 ; Distribuciones Primarias de las Cargas Nucleares de los Fragmentos de Masa 132, 134, 136 y 137, Resultantes de la Fision del {sup 235}U por Neutrones Termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konecny, E.; Opower, H.; Guenther, H.; Goebel, H. [Physik-Department der Technischen Hochschule Muenchen, Munich and II. Physikalisches Institut der Justus Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1965-07-15

    By a mass spectrometer fission fragments from thermal fission of U{sup 235} are exactly separated with respect to mass and kinetic energy within a time of 10{sup -6} s after fission. The separated fragments are caught in a {beta}-sensitive Ilford G 5 emulsion that is located in the focal plane of the spectrometer. Development of the irradiated emulsions is carried out, if possible, after a time long compared with the longest half-life of the regarded decay chain. Half-lives of days or longer are not taken into account, but corrections can be easily made for them. After development of the emulsions all beta tracks emerging from the end of every fission-fragment track can be seen under the microscope. The possibility of correlating every single {beta}-track with a particular fission-fragment track allows the evaluation of the number n(x) of fission fragments possessing x {beta}-tracks, thus giving not only the mean chain length but also the {beta}-particle distribution. As the stable end product of each decay chain is known, this {beta}-distribution is an exact image of the primary nuclear charge distribution. In the measurements done up to now only {beta}-particles emitted into the half solid angle formed by the emulsion plate were registered, buta simple statistical calculation enables the desired 4{pi}-distribution to be evaluated. By this method {beta}-distributions at fixed kinetic energies near the mean kinetic energy of each fragment mass are given for the masses 132, 134, 136 and 137. For the lower masses 132 and 134 the neutron shell N = 82 is responsible for the most probable primary charges near 50 and 52 respectively. For M = 136 and 137 the primary charge is about 53 and 53.2. Additional approximative corrections in respect of conversion electrons (by omitting very short {beta}-tracks corresponding to very low {beta}-energies) and to delayed neutrons (for mass 137) were not very large. Similar measurements carried out directly in 4{pi}-geometry to avoid

  13. [Field investigation of occupational disease diagnosis in Guangdong Provincial Hospital for Occupational Disease Prevention and Treatment from 2009 to 2014: an analysis of 136 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, C Y; Li, X D; Wen, W; Wang, Y Y; Zhang, Y; Lang, L

    2016-04-20

    To investigate the characteristics of 136 patients with occupational diseases, to summarize key techniques used in field investigation, and to provide a scientific basis for the development of standard operating procedures for field investigation of occupational disease diagnosis. Field investigation and routine data analysis were performed to analyze the cases diagnosed by Guangdong Provincial Hospital for Occupational Disease Prevention and Treatment from January 2009 to December 2014. A total of 136 cases of occupational diseases were diagnosed by Guangdong Provincial Hospital for Occupational Disease Prevention and Treatment from 2009 to 2014, and there were 66 cases of leukemia, 18 cases of suspected occupational benzene poisoning, 12 cases of suspected occupational handarm vibration disease, and 11 cases of suspected pneumoconiosis. Of all these patients, 41.91% were engaged in at least three types of work, 70.59% were exposed to at least three types of chemicals, 25.74% experienced changes in technical processes and chemicals, and 47.06% had disputes on the chemicals they were exposed to during verification by both parties. Occupational hazard factors were detected. Most samples (358)were used to measure benzene concentration in workplace air, among which 11.7% had a benzene concentration of >6.00 mg/m(3)(exceeding standard), 13.41% had a benzene concentration of 3.26~6.00 mg/m(3), 75.42% had a benzene concentration ofoccupational hand-arm vibration disease, suspected pneumoconiosis, and suspected occupational noiseinduced hearing loss had high overstandard rates (100%, 93.8%, and 83.3%, respectively). Field investigation of occupational disease diagnosis reveals large numbers of cases of leukemia, suspected occupational benzene poisoning, suspected occupational hand-arm vibration disease, and suspected pneumoconiosis. The key aspects of field investigation include confirmation of the history of occupational exposure, identification of occupational hazard

  14. Search for Anomalous Photonic Events with Missing Energy in $e^{+} e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130, 136 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    Photonic events with large missing energy have been observed in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130, 136 and 183 GeV collected in 1997 using the OPAL detector at LEP. Results are presented for event topologies with a single photon and missing transverse energy or with an acoplanar photon pair. Cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of each selection. These results are compared with the expectations from the Standard Model process e+e- to nunubar + photon(s). No evidence is observed for new physics contributions to these final states. Using the data at Ecm = 183 GeV, upper limits on sigma(e+e- to X.Y)*BR(X to Y gamma) and sigma(e+e- to X.X)*BR(X to Y gamma)**2 are derived for the case of stable and invisible Y. These limits apply to single and pair production of excited neutrinos (X = nu*, Y = nu), to neutralino production (X = Chi_2^0, Y = Chi_1^0) and to supersymmetric models in which X = chi_1^0 and Y is a light gravitino.

  15. Effects of Emollient Containing Bee Venom on Atopic Dermatitis: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Base-Controlled, Multicenter Study of 136 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chung Eui; Moon, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Kim, Kyu Han; Park, Chun Wook; Seo, Seong Joon; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, complex disease that follows a chronic relapsing course and significantly affects the quality of life of patients. Skin barrier dysfunction and inflammatory processes induce and aggravate this skin condition. Proper use of an emollient for hydration is a keystone of AD treatment. Bee venom is known to have anti-inflammatory effects and has been widely used in traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory disorders. To find out the beneficial effect of an emollient containing bee venom in the treatment of patients with AD. This study included 136 patients with AD who were randomized to receive either an emollient containing bee venom and silk-protein or a vehicle that was identical except for the bee venom for 4 weeks. The patients were instructed to apply the emollient twice daily on their entire body and not to use other medications, including topicals, during the course of the study. The eczema area and severity index (EASI) score, transepidermal water loss, and visual analogue scale (VAS) score of itching were evaluated at the first visit and after 2 and 4 weeks. The investigator global assessment was evaluated at 2 and 4 weeks after the application of emollient containing bee venom or vehicle. Patients applying emollient containing bee venom showed significantly lower EASI score and VAS value compared to patients applying emollient without bee venom. Emollient containing bee venom is a safe and effective option for patients with AD.

  16. Search for Pair Production of Heavy Objects in 4-Jet Events at $\\sqrt{s}=130-136$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    Results are presented of a search for pair production of heavy objects decaying into four hadronic jets, as expected for example from associated or pair production of MSSM Higgs bosons, \\hA ~or \\HH, using a data sample of $5.9\\;$pb$^{-1}$ of $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=130-136\\;{\\mathrm {GeV}}$ collected with the DELPHI detector at LEP in November 1995. The data and expectations from standard processes agree after four-jet selections. An analysis based on $b$-tagging finds no \\hA ~candidate with high mass. A study optimized to search for \\HH ~events with mass in the $40-50 \\; {\\mathrm{GeV}}/c^2$ range also finds no candidate. Finally a comparison is made with a recent ALEPH analysis which found an excess of four-jet events with high multiplicity and high mass. Such a signal is not observed in the DELPHI data, although a slight excess in the mass region around $105 \\; {\\mathrm{GeV}}/c^2$ is seen.

  17. Limit on neutrinoless ββ decay of 136Xe from the first phase of KamLAND-Zen and comparison with the positive claim in 76Ge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gando, A; Gando, Y; Hanakago, H; Ikeda, H; Inoue, K; Ishidoshiro, K; Kato, R; Koga, M; Matsuda, S; Mitsui, T; Motoki, D; Nakada, T; Nakamura, K; Obata, A; Oki, A; Ono, Y; Otani, M; Shimizu, I; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Takemoto, Y; Tamae, K; Ueshima, K; Watanabe, H; Xu, B D; Yamada, S; Yoshida, H; Kozlov, A; Yoshida, S; Banks, T I; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Han, K; O'Donnell, T; Berger, B E; Efremenko, Y; Karwowski, H J; Markoff, D M; Tornow, W; Detwiler, J A; Enomoto, S; Decowski, M P

    2013-02-08

    We present results from the first phase of the KamLAND-Zen double-beta decay experiment, corresponding to an exposure of 89.5 kg yr of (136)Xe. We obtain a lower limit for the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life of T(1/2)(0ν)>1.9×10(25) yr at 90% C.L. The combined results from KamLAND-Zen and EXO-200 give T(1/2)(0ν)>3.4×10(25) yr at 90% C.L., which corresponds to a Majorana neutrino mass limit of <(120-250) meV based on a representative range of available matrix element calculations. Using those calculations, this result excludes the Majorana neutrino mass range expected from the neutrinoless double-beta decay detection claim in (76)Ge, reported by a part of the Heidelberg-Moscow Collaboration, at more than 97.5% C.L.

  18. Exploration of the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe nucleus by the 'KamLAND-Zen' experiment. Results of the first phase and future prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Satoru; Shirai, Junpei

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the double beta decay without neutrino production (0 ν ββ decay) has come to be considered as one of the clues to the new physics beyond the standard model in the recent years. Searching for this phenomenon is the only possible method to verify if the neutrino itself be the equal particle of the antineutrino (Majorana particle) or not. If this decay process is found, it is the discovery of the nonconservative process of the total lepton number which goes beyond the standard theory. At the same time, it confirms that the neutrinos are the Majorana particles. In addition, from the decay half-lives, the absolute value of neutrino mass and hierarchy as well as the new knowledge of the CP violation in the lepton sector are expected to be obtained. Further progress is expected toward the development of the research of the particle creation mechanism at the beginning of the universe. Strong competitions are now being developed throughout the world to become the first to discover the phenomenon to go beyond the standard theory. In this text, the underground facility of KamLAND-Zen experiment with remodeled KamLAND detector with large amount of 136 Xe isotope is introduced and the results of the data obtained and analyzed by June 2012 are reported. Future prospect is described finally. (S. Funahashi)

  19. Search for pair production of heavy objects in 4-jet events at √s 130-136 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjaer, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    Results are presented for a search for pair production of heavy objects decaying into four hadronic jets, like the production of MSSM Higgs bosons, hA or H + H - , using a data sample of 5.9 pb -1 of e + e - collisions at √s=130-136 GeV collected with the DELPHI detector at LEP in 1995. The data and expectations from standard processes agree after four-jet selections. An analysis based on b-tagging finds no hA candidate with high mass. A study optimized to search for H + H - events with mass in the 40-50 GeV/c 2 range also finds no candidate. Finally a comparison is made with a recent ALEPH analysis which found an excess of four-jet events with high multiplicity and high mass. No evidence for such a signal is observed, although a slight excess in the mass region around 105 GeV/c 2 is seen. (orig.)

  20. Search for Stable Heavy Charged Particles in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    A search for stable or long-lived heavy charged particles in $e^+e^-$ interactions at energies of 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV has been performed using the data taken by the DELPHI experiment at LEP. The search is based on particle identification provided by the Time Projection Chamber and the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Upper limits at 95\\% confidence level are derived on the cross-section for heavy long-lived pair-produced charge $\\pm e$ and $\\pm 2/3e$ particles in the range of 0.4-2.3 pb for masses from 45 to 84 GeV/$c^2$. Within supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, long-lived charginos with masses from 45 to 84 (80)~GeV/$c^2$ for high (low) sneutrino masses can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level. %Mass limits for long-lived sleptons are obtained. %For selectrons no general mass limits can be given. Left-handed (right-handed) long-lived or stable smuons and staus with masses between 45 and 68 (65)~GeV/$c^2$ can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level.

  1. The growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonist JV-1-36 inhibits proliferation and survival of human ectopic endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs) and the T HESC cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Marta; Grande, Cristina; Scarlatti, Francesca; Deltetto, Francesco; Delpiano, Elena; Camanni, Marco; Ghigo, Ezio; Granata, Riccarda

    2010-08-01

    To determine the effect of the GHRH antagonist JV-1-36 on proliferation and survival of primary ectopic human endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs) and the T HESC cell line. Prospective laboratory study. University hospital. 22 women with endometriosis (aged 34.8+/-5.7 years) undergoing therapeutic laparoscopy. Eutopic (n=10) and ectopic (n=22) endometrial tissues were collected from women who underwent therapeutic laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis (stage III/IV). Expression of GHRH, GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) and GHRH-R splice variant (SV) 1 mRNA was determined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The ESC proliferation was assessed by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation, cell survival by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Trypan blue assay. The T HESC survival was evaluated by MTT, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels by ELISA, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation by Western blot, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-2 mRNA by real-time PCR. The ESCs and T HESCs, but not normal endometrial tissues, expressed GHRH-R mRNA; SV1 mRNA was determined in normal endometrial tissues, ESCs, and T HESCs; GHRH mRNAwas found in T HESCs; JV-1-36 inhibited ESC proliferation and ESC and T HESC survival. In T HESCs, JV-1-36 reduced cAMP production and ERK1/2 phosphorylation but had no effect on IGF-2 mRNA expression. The GHRH antagonist JV-1-36 inhibits endometriotic cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that GHRH antagonist may represent promising tools for treatment of endometriosis. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The systems terbium (holmium) nitrate-piperidine nitrate-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khisaeva, D.A.; Zhuravlev, E.F.; Semenova, Eh.B.

    1982-01-01

    Using the method of cross sections at 25 and 50 deg C solubility in the systems Tb(NO 3 ) 2 -C 5 H 10 NHxHNO 3 -H 2 O and Ho(NO 3 ) 3 -C 5 H 10 NHxHNO 3 -H 2 O has been studied. The systems are characterized by chemical interaction of components. Solubility isotherms have crystallization fields of solid phases of the composition Tb(NO 3 ) 3 x3[C 5 H 10 NHxHNO 3 ]x3H 2 O and Ho(NO 3 ) 3 x2[C 5 H 10 NHxHNO 3 ]. The compounds detected are singled out preparatively, their IR spectra are studied, their thermogravimetric analysis is carried out. Investigation results are compared with similar systems formed by nitrates of other representatives of rare earth group

  3. Analysis of the fourth spectrum of terbium (Tb IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spector, N.; Sugar, J.

    1976-01-01

    The low-energy level structure of Tb 3+ has been derived from spectra obtained with a sliding spark light source. The 7 F ground term of the 4f 8 configuration was found as well as all levels of the configurations 4f 7 5d, 6s, and 6p built on the 8 S 7 / 2 core state of 4f 7 . Of the possible 51 lines connecting these levels, 48 were observed. Optimized radial parameters are given for the observed configurations. A value for the ionization energy of 39.37(0.10) eV is derived for Tb 3+

  4. Green fluorescence of terbium ions in lithium fluoroborate glasses ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion and solid-state lasers attracted remarkable attention in the last few decades. .... Figure 1. Vis absorption spectrum of 1.0 mol% Tb3+-doped. LBZLFB glass. Figure 2. .... both ions quickly decay non-radiatively to the ground level. The energy ...

  5. Preparation of extractive resins for producing terbium-161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Cruz B, C. C.; Monroy G, F.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a methodology for extractive resins preparation to base of HDEHP, which allows to separation of Tb from Gd generating an own technology of preparation of these resins. The study included the extractive resins preparation from 6 different supports: kieselguhr Dg, alumina, red volcanic rock, chiluca, quarry and fluorite; two treatment types of of supports and varied concentrations of HDEHP extractant (di(2-etil hexyl) orthophosphoric acid), in order to determine which resin has improved efficiency of Gd and Tb separation, and radionuclide purity of 161 Tb. Resins were prepared to base of kieselguhr to determine the most appropriate silicon deposition process. Two silicon deposition treatments were realized: treatment I , by contact with silicon deposition solution (dimethyldichlorosilane / heptane 1:30) and treatment II by contact with vapors of dimethyldichlorosilane in vacuum. The extractant retention was carried out to different concentrations of HDEHP / acetone: 1:4, 1:8, 1:15, 1:20, 1:30 and 1:40. According to the results, there is not direct relation of HDEHP concentration used in extractive resins preparation to base of kieselguhr over the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation and of radionuclide purity of 161 Tb. The effect of support in the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation was studied to prepare resins with the supports kieselguhr, alumina, quarry, chiluca, volcanic rock and fluorite, using the silicon deposition treatment II for the supports and a concentration of HDEHP / acetone 1:20, for extractant retention. Only resins based on kieselguhr could separate to Gd from Tb quantitatively, the resin at a concentration of HDEHP / Acetone 1:20 was the best results obtained in Gd and Tb separation, achieving a separation efficiency greater than 90% and a radionuclide purity higher than 99%. (Author)

  6. Coherent magnetic structures in terbium/holmium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    to 230 K, two samples retain this magnetic structure while the third undergoes a transition first to a mixed phase of helically and ferromagnetically ordered Tb moments, then to a phase with only helically ordered To moments. Ln all cases, the magnetic ordering is found to be long ranged, with coherence...

  7. Inelastic scattering of neutrons by spin waves in terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden

    1966-01-01

    Measurements of spin-wave dispersion relations for magnons propagating in symmetry directions in ferromagnetic Tb; it is first experiment to give detailed information on magnetic excitations in heavy rare earths; Tb was chosen for these measurements because it is one of few rare-earth metals which...... does not have very high thermal-neutron capture cross section, so that inelastic neutron scattering experiments can give satisfactory information on magnon dispersion relations....

  8. Spin waves in terbium. II. Magnon-phonon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.; Houmann, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    The selection rules for the linear couplings between magnons and phonons propagating in the c direction of a simple basal-plane hcp ferromagnet are determined by general symmetry considerations. The acoustic-optical magnon-phonon interactions observed in the heavy-rare-earth metals have been explained by Liu as originating from the mixing of the spin states of the conduction electrons due to the spin-orbit coupling. We find that this coupling mechanism introduces interactions which violate the selection rules for a simple ferromagnet. The interactions between the magnons and phonons propagating in the c direction of Tb have been studied experimentally by means of inelastic neutron scatttering. The magnons are coupled to both the acoustic- and optical-transverse phonons. By studying the behavior of the acoustic-optical coupling, we conclude that it is a spin-mixed-induced coupling as proposed by Liu. The coupled magnon--transverse-phonon system for the c direction of Tb is analyzed in detail, and the strengths of the couplings are deduced as a function of wave vector by combining the experimental studies with the theory

  9. High pressure phases of terbium: Possibility of a thcp phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staun Olsen, J.; Steenstrup, S.; Gerward, L.

    1985-01-01

    High pressure phases of trivalent Tb studied by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation exhibits the closed packed sequence (hcp -> Sm -> dhcp -> fcc) typical of the trivalent rare earth metals. Furthermore, a phase consistent with a triple hexagonal closed packed (thcp) structure was observed in a narrow pressure range around 30 GPa. (orig.)

  10. Synthesis and production of potassium dichromate as a secondary standard dosimeter; Investigation of its comparative properties with Fricke and clear perspex dosimeters in comprehensive dose mapping of IR-136 Gamma Irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taimoori Seechani; Behzad.

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of the absorbed dose is the principle mode or means of quality control in various application of radiation processing. Specially, the cumulative absorbed dose and its variation in different density product boxes (dose mapping) are often required. Proper discharge of these task would require the use of dosimeters having sufficient degree of accuracy and precision. The secondary standard potassium dichromate dosimeter is synthesized for the first time in Iran. The properties of this dosimeter such as dose response, dose rate dependency, reproducibility, molar extinction coefficient, reduction yield and effect of silver ions on reduction yield of dosimetry solution, irradiation temperature effect as well as pre- and post-irradiation stability of the dosimetry solution have been studied. The comparison of the results of this work with that of the ASTM standard of potassium dichromate has shown very good agreement. The produced dichromate dosimeters were used for comprehensive dose mapping or commissioning of the IR-136 irradiator. The non-uniformity ratio and the isodose lines in various product densities in the IR-136 have been measured. Cumulative dose values were obtained for different rows and levels of the IR-136 irradiator system. The results of dichromate dosimetry, wherever possible, were compared with the response of Fricke and clear perspex dosimeters. At low dose values, the precision of this dosimeter was found to be better than the precision of clear perspex, but about the same as that of Fricke dosimeter. It is thus may be said that this dosimeter has combined the desirable properties of both dosimeter together

  11. Sub-nanosecond Half-life Measurement of the Yrast I{sup π}=5{sup −} State in the N=78 Nucleus {sup 136}{sub 58}Ce using Fast-timing Coincident Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alharbi, T. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science in Zulfi, Almajmaah University, P.O. Box 1712, 11932 (Saudi Arabia); Regan, P.H., E-mail: p.regan@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Mărginean, N. [Horia Hulubei – National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania); Podolyák, Zs.; Bajoga, A.; Britton, R. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bucurescu, D.; Deleanu, D.; Filipescu, D.; Ghită, D.; Glodariu, T.; Mihai, C. [Horia Hulubei – National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania); Mulholland, K. [School of Engineering, University of the West of Scotland, High Street, Paisley PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Mărginean, R.; Negret, A.; Nita, C.R. [Horia Hulubei – National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania); Patel, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Roberts, O.J. [School of Computing Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Stroe, L.; Sava, T. [Horia Hulubei – National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania); and others

    2014-06-15

    We report on the measurement of the half-life of the yrast I{sup π}=5{sup −} state in the transitional nucleus {sup 136}Ce using a combined HPGe-LaBr3(Ce) scintillator gamma-ray detection array. The measured value for the E1 decay is approximately half a nanosecond, which corresponds to an E1 decay strength of approximately 2×10{sup −6} Wu. This value is in line with single-particle type E1 decays in this mass region and suggests no sign of additional K-hindrance associated with axially symmetric quadrupole deformations observed for lighter cerium isotopes.

  12. Functional importance of the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region in the calcium-sensing receptor. Constitutive activity and inverse agonism in a family C G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, T A; Burstein, E S

    2000-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to family C of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. To date 14 activating mutations in CaR showing increased sensitivity to Ca(2+) have been identified in humans with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia. Four of these activating mutations are found......, suppressed the elevated basal response of the constitutively activated Ca/1a mutants demonstrating inverse agonist activity of CPCCOEt. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region is of key importance for the maintenance of the inactive conformation of CaR....

  13. High-resolution Auger spectroscopy on 79 MeV Ar5+, 89 MeV Ar6+, and 136 MeV Ar7+ ions after excitation by helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the atomic structure of highly excited Ar 6+ and Ar 7+ ions was studied. For this 79 MeV Ar 5+ , 89 MeV Ar 6+ , and 136 MeV Ar 7+ ions of a heavy ion accelerator were excited by a He gas target to autoionizing states and the Auger electrons emitted in the decay were measured in highly-resolving state. The spectra were taken under an observational angle of zero degree relative to the beam axis in order to minimize the kinematical broadening of the Auger lines. (orig./HSI) [de

  14. A new insight into high-strength Ti62Nb12.2Fe13.6Co6.4Al5.8 alloys with bimodal microstructure fabricated by semi-solid sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L H; Yang, C; Kang, L M; Qu, S G; Li, X Q; Zhang, W W; Chen, W P; Li, Y Y; Li, P J; Zhang, L C

    2016-03-31

    It is well known that semi-solid forming could only obtain coarse-grained microstructure in a few alloy systems with a low melting point, such as aluminum and magnesium alloys. This work presents that semi-solid forming could also produce novel bimodal microstructure composed of nanostructured matrix and micro-sized (CoFe)Ti2 twins in a titanium alloy, Ti62Nb12.2Fe13.6Co6.4Al5.8. The semi-solid sintering induced by eutectic transformation to form a bimodal microstructure in Ti62Nb12.2Fe13.6Co6.4Al5.8 alloy is a fundamentally different approach from other known methods. The fabricated alloy exhibits high yield strength of 1790 MPa and plastic strain of 15.5%. The novel idea provides a new insight into obtaining nano-grain or bimodal microstructure in alloy systems with high melting point by semi-solid forming and into fabricating high-performance metallic alloys in structural applications.

  15. Uranium Isotope Compositions of Mid-Proterozoic Organic-rich Mudrocks: Evidence for an Episode of Increased Ocean Oxygenation at ca. 1.36 Ga and Evaluation of the Effect of Post-Depositional Hydrothermal Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, B.; Yang, S.; Lu, X.; Zhang, F.; Zheng, W.

    2016-12-01

    The U isotope system represents a relatively new paleoredox proxy that can help trace the evolution of global ocean redox chemistry, but has rarely been applied to the Mid-Proterozoic. We report U isotope data for marine black shales of the early Mesoproterozoic Velkerri Formation (Roper Group) and late Paleoproterozoic Wollogorang Formation (Tawallah Group) from the McArthur Basin, Northern Australia. An average authigenic δ238U of 0.13 ± 0.04‰ (1SD; relative to standard CRM145) was obtained for six euxinic shales from a 1 m interval that previously yielded a precise Re-Os depositional age of 1361 ± 21 Ma. After correcting for a U isotope fractionation of 0.60-0.85‰ between seawater and open-ocean euxinic sediments, we infer that coeval global seawater had a δ238U of -0.47‰ to -0.72‰, which is 0.1-0.3‰ lighter than modern seawater (-0.40 ± 0.03‰). A U isotope mass-balance model suggests that anoxic marine environments accounted for 25-50% of the global oceanic U sink at 1.36 Ga, which is 3-7 times greater than today. The model suggests that a significant proportion, potentially even a majority, of the seafloor was not covered by anoxic waters. Hence, we infer that a significant extent of the ocean floor was covered by O2-bearing waters at 1.36 Ga. The O2 concentrations of those waters were not necessarily high, and a large expanse of weakly to mildly oxygenated deep waters is consistent with the U isotope data. Uranium isotope data from a 1 m interval in the lower Velkerri Formation, deposited at 1417 ± 29 Ma based on Re-Os geochronology, yield a greater estimate for the extent of ocean anoxia. Hence, the upper Velkerri Formation may capture a transient episode of increased ocean oxygenation. Previous Re-Os isotope data from black shales of the ca. 1.73 Ga Paleoproterozoic Wollogorang Formation yielded an erroneously young date of 1359 ± 150 Ma because hydrothermal fluids percolated through the Tawallah Group rocks at ca. 1640 Ma. Higher δ238U

  16. An International Standard Equation of State for Difluoromethane (R-32) for Temperatures from the Triple Point at 136.34 K to 435 K and Pressures up to 70 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillner-Roth, R.; Yokozeki, A.

    1997-01-01

    A fundamental equation of state for the Helmholtz free energy of R-32 (difluoromethane) is presented which is valid from the triple point at 136.34 K to 435 K and pressures up to 70 MPa. It is based on accurate measurements of pressure-density-temperature (p,ρ,T), speed of sound, heat capacity, and vapor pressure currently available. New values for the isobaric heat capacity c p circ of the ideal gas calculated from spectroscopic data taking into account also first order anharmonicity corrections are presented. The Helmholtz free energy equation of state has 19 coefficients and represents all selected experimental data within their estimated accuracy with the exception for heat capacities and speed of sound in the region close to the critical point. Typical uncertainties are ±0.05% for density, ±0.02% for the vapor pressure and ±0.5%endash 1% for the heat capacity. This equation of state has been compared to equations developed by other research groups by Annex 18 of the International Energy Agency and has been selected as an international standard formulation for the thermodynamic properties of R-32 by this group. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society

  17. Functional update of the auxiliary proteins PsbW, PsbY, HCF136, PsbN, TerC and ALB3 in maintenance and assembly of PSII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena ePlöchinger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of Photosystem (PS II in plants has turned out to be a highly complex process which, at least in part, occurs in a sequential order and requires many more auxiliary proteins than subunits present in the complex. Owing to the high evolutionary conservation of the subunit composition and the three-dimensional structure of the PSII complex, most plant factors involved in the biogenesis of PSII originated from cyanobacteria and only rarely evolved de novo. Furthermore, in chloroplasts the initial assembly steps occur in the non-appressed stroma lamellae, whereas the final assembly including the attachment of the major LHCII antenna proteins takes place in the grana regions. The stroma lamellae are also the place where part of PSII repair occurs, which very likely also involves assembly factors. In cyanobacteria initial PSII assembly also occurs in the thylakoid membrane, in so-called thylakoid centres, which are in contact with the plasma membrane. Here, we provide an update on the structures, localisations, topologies, functions, expression and interactions of the low molecular mass PSII subunits PsbY, PsbW and the auxiliary factors HCF136, PsbN, TerC and ALB3, assisting in PSII complex assembly and protein insertion into the thylakoid membrane.

  18. On applicability of the QsUb(gg)-systematics to the description of cross sections for multinucleon transfer reactions induces by 40Ar, 86Kr, and 136Xe ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherepanov, E.A.; Lee Gen Soo; Mezentsev, A.N.; Volkov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    Relative cross sections have been calculated for the production of gold isotopes with mass numbers of the 190-199 range in the 181 Ta+ 40 Ar, 181 Ta+ 86 Kr and 181 Ta+ 136 Xe systems at laboratory bombarding energies of 290, 550 and 840 MeV, respectively. It was assumed that gold isotopes were produced as a result of multinucleon transfers followed by neutron evaporation. The yield of primary gold isotopes was found using the Qsub(gg)-systematics, whereas the neutron evaporation process was calculated within the framework of the Jackson model. The parameters used in the calculation are the average entrance angular momentum anti l, temperature UPSILON and the nuclear parameter r 0 of exit reaction channels. For realistic values of the parameters indicated a good agreement with the experimental data obtained previously has been achieved. This provides evidence for the applicability of the Qsub(gg)-systematics to the description of multinucleon transfer reactions induced by very heavy ions

  19. Energy independent partial wave analysis of the reactions π+-p→Nππ between 1.36 and 1.76GeV c.m.s. energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolbeau, J.; Triantis, F.A.; Neveu, M.; Cadiet, F.

    1975-01-01

    A new partial wave analysis of the three reactions π - p→pπ - π 0 , π - p→nπ + π - , and π + p→pπ + π 0 is presented at nine c.m. energies between 1.36 and 1.76GeV, using about 91300 Nππ events. Within the framework of the generalized isobar model it is possible to describe the data with Δ, rho and sigma(ππ, i=0) production, as well as to reproduce the π - p→nπ 0 π 0 and π + p→nπ + π + cross sections. New prescriptions for the description of sigma and for the centrifugal barrier term are obtained. Furthermore, at the highest energy, there is evidence for N* production and for the presence of a ππ interaction, contributing about 5% to the cross sections of the reaction π - p→pπ - π 0 and π + p→pπ + π 0 . Finally, Argand plots are presented, showing the main inelastic couplings for ten resonances in this energy range [fr

  20. Crystal structure of a silver-, cobalt- and iron-based phosphate with an alluaudite-like structure: Ag1.655Co1.64Fe1.36(PO43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Bouraima

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The new silver-, cobalt- and iron-based phosphate, silver cobalt iron tris(orthophosphate, Ag1.655Co1.64Fe1.36(PO43, was synthesized by solid-state reactions. Its structure is isotypic to that of Na2Co2Fe(PO43, and belongs to the alluaudite family, with a partial cationic disorder, the AgI atoms being located on an inversion centre and twofold rotation axis sites (Wyckoff positions 4a and 4e, with partial occupancies of 0.885 (2 and 0.7688 (19, respectively. One of the two P atoms in the asymmetric unit completely fills one 4e site while the Co and Fe atoms fill another 4e site, with partial occupancies of 0.86 (5 and 0.14 (5, respectively. The remaining Co2+ and Fe3+ cations are distributed on a general position, 8f, in a 0.39 (4:0.61 (4 ratio. All O atoms and the other P atoms are in general positions. The structure is built up from zigzag chains of edge-sharing [MO6] (M = Fe/Co octahedra stacked parallel to [101]. These chains are linked together through PO4 tetrahedra, forming polyhedral sheets perpendicular to [010]. The resulting framework displays two types of channels running along [001], in which the AgI atoms (coordination number eight are located.

  1. Oolong tea prevents cardiomyocyte loss against hypoxia by attenuating p-JNK mediated hypertrophy and enhancing P-IGF1R, p-akt, and p-Badser136 activity and by fortifying NRF2 antioxidation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Chen, Bih-Cheng; Ju, Da-Tong; Chen, Ray-Jade; Lai, Chao-Hung; Huang, Pei-Jane; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2018-02-01

    Tea, the most widely consumed natural beverage has been associated with reduced mortality risk from cardiovascular disease. Oolong tea is a partially fermented tea containing high levels of catechins, their degree of oxidation varies between 20%-80% causing differences in their active metabolites. In this study we examined the effect of oolong tea extract (OTE) obtained by oxidation at low-temperature for short-time against hypoxic injury and found that oolong tea provides cyto-protective effects by suppressing the JNK mediated hypertrophic effects and by enhancing the innate antioxidant mechanisms in neonatal cardiomyocytes and in H9c2 cells. OTE effectively attenuates 24 h hypoxia-triggered cardiomyocyte loss by suppressing caspase-3-cleavage and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. OTE also enhances the IGFIR/p-Akt associated survival-mechanism involving the elevation of p-Bad ser136 in a dose-dependent manner to aid cellular adaptations against hypoxic challenge. The results show the effects and mechanism of Oolong tea to provide cardio-protective benefits during hypoxic conditions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. 33 CFR 136.235 - Compensation allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allowable. The amount of compensation allowable is limited to the actual net reduction or loss of earnings or profits suffered. Calculations for net reductions or losses must clearly reflect adjustments for... available; (d) Any saved overhead or normal expenses not incurred as a result of the incident; and (e) State...

  3. 10 CFR 600.136 - Intangible property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... This “recorded” material excludes physical objects (e.g., laboratory samples). Research data also do... person in a research study. (ii) Published is defined as either when: (A) Research findings are published... addition, in response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for research data relating to...

  4. 14 CFR 1260.136 - Intangible property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... research, peer reviews, or communications with colleagues. This “recorded” material excludes physical... information that could be used to identify a particular person in a research study. (ii) Published is defined... response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for research data relating to published research...

  5. 41 CFR 105-71.136 - Procurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... greater economy and efficiency, grantees and subgrantees are encouraged to enter into State and local... characteristics and standards to which it must conform if it is to satisfy its intended use. Detailed product... grantee or subgrantee desires to have the review accomplished after a solicitation has been developed, the...

  6. Search Results | Page 136 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Opportunities in CARICOM Migration : Brain Circulation, Diasporic Tourism, and Investment ... Impact 2.0 : New Mechanisms for Linking Research and Policy ... meet their education targets within the Millennium Development Goals by 2015.

  7. 33 CFR 136.213 - Authorized claimants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS... claimants. (a) A claim for injury to, or economic losses resulting from the destruction of, real or personal... personal property must be included as subpart of the claim under this section and must include the proof...

  8. 13 CFR 136.103 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... learning disabilities. The term physical or mental impairment includes, but is not limited to, such... or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, has a record of... illness, and drug addiction and alcoholism. (2) Major life activities includes functions such as caring...

  9. 42 CFR 136.104 - Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... resources to be utilized to conduct the proposed project. (7) An itemized budget for the budget period... contributions such as cash or services, loans of full or part-time staff, equipment, space materials or... operation and management of those facilities. (c) The application shall contain assurances satisfactory to...

  10. 42 CFR 136.312 - Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... proposed project; (v) The name and qualifications of the project director or other individual responsible... school students through observations, aptitude or other testing, academic performance, performance in... Indians in college or university programs, related employment, upward mobility programs or other areas of...

  11. 42 CFR 136.21 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the expense of the Indian Health Service from public or private medical or hospital facilities other than those of the Service. (f) Emergency means any medical condition for which immediate medical... tribe means any Indian tribe, band, nation, group, Pueblo, or community, including any Alaska Native...

  12. 42 CFR 136a.10 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Service from public or private medical or hospital facilities other than those of the Service or those funded by the Service. Emergency means any medical condition for which immediate medical attention is... Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Alaska Native village or...

  13. Search Results | Page 136 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Background: One of the factors of Maternal and Neonatal Mortality is the lack of knowledge on the cause and how to deal with important complications during pregnancy, labor, and post natal. Published date. January 1, 2012. Journal articles. MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMUNITY ...

  14. Search Results | Page 136 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Fourth Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, to be held in Vancouver ... Entrepreneurship and small business development in Ethiopia ... This project will support the building of leaders of today and tomorrow in West Africa, ...

  15. 36 CFR 223.136 - Debarment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... decision, the debarring official shall consider the seriousness of the purchaser's acts or omissions and any mitigating factors. (b) Effect of proposed debarment. (1) Upon issuance of a notice of proposed debarment by the debarring official and until the final debarment decision is rendered, the Forest Service...

  16. 42 CFR 136.403 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... pleaded guilty or nolo contendere shall be controlling. Crimes of violence means a crime that has as an... another, or any other crime that is a felony and that, by its nature, involves substantial risk that... Federal, State, or Tribal law under which the individual was convicted or pleaded guilty or nolo...

  17. Search Results | Page 136 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... for the use of mobile phones and more-than-voice services to improve the economic status ... perceptions of gender and information and communication technology use ... Making sense of Gender and ICTs in Education: Exploring theoretical ...

  18. 42 CFR 136.302 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the natural child or grandchild of any such member, or (2) is an Eskimo or Aleut or other Alaska... assisting environmental engineers and others in environmental health control and preventive medicine... of Education of the Department of Health and Human Services. (n) School of medicine, school of...

  19. Publications | Page 136 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Research findings show there is limited opportunity for female students to ... Information and communication technologies like mobile phones are being used to address health challenges. ... This is particularly true for women entrepreneurs.

  20. 33 CFR 136.7 - Foreign claimants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES... limitations on presenting claims to the Fund, claims by foreign claimants to recover removal costs or damages...

  1. 33 CFR 136.111 - Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES... which compensation is claimed: (1) The name and address of each insurer. (2) The kind and amount of...

  2. 33 CFR 136.221 - Proof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF... natural resource for which compensation for loss of subsistence use is claimed; (b) A description of the... compensation available to the claimant for loss of subsistence. ...

  3. Publications | Page 136 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    As open data initiatives spread across the globe, research is needed that ... Online Knowledge Management Workshop in Sudan : final technical report ... Knowledge management is about identifying critical knowledge areas that makes a ''big ...

  4. Continuous and intermittent exposure of neonatal rat calvarial cells to PTHrP (1-36 inhibits bone nodule mineralization in vitro by downregulating bone sialoprotein expression via the cAMP signaling pathway [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/18x

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan A Kamel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development and growth of the skeleton in the absence of parathyroid-hormone-related protein (PTHrP is abnormal.  The shortening of appendicular bones in PTHrP gene null mice is explained by an effect of PTHrP on endochondral bone growth.  Whether or not PTHrP influences intramembranous ossification is less clear.  The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of exogenous PTHrP on intramembranous ossification in vitro.  Neonatal rat calvarial cells maintained in primary cell culture conditions that permit spontaneous formation of woven bone nodules by intramembranous ossification were studied. The expression of PTHrP, parathyroid hormone 1 receptor (PTH1R, and alkaline phosphatase (AP by osteogenic cells in developing nodules and the effects of PTHrP (1-36 on nodule development was determined over 3-18 days. PTHrP and PTH1R were detected colonies of osteogenic cells on culture day three, and AP was detected on day six. PTHrP and its receptor were localized in pre-osteoblasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, and AP activity was detected in pre-osteoblasts and osteoblasts but not osteocytes. Continuous and intermittent exposure to PTHrP (1-36 decreased the number of mineralized bone nodules and bone sialoprotein (BSP mRNA and protein, but had no effect on the number of AP-positive osteogenic cell colonies, cell proliferation, apoptosis, or osteopontin (OPN mRNA. These results demonstrate that osteogenic cells that participate in the formation of woven bone nodules in vitro exhibit PTHrP and PTH1R before they demonstrate AP activity. Exogenous PTHrP (1-36 inhibits the mineralization of woven bone deposited during bone nodule formation in vitro, possibly by reducing the expression of BSP.

  5. Photoluminescence studies of a Terbium(III) complex as a fluorescent probe for DNA detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan, E-mail: mkhorasani@chem.usb.ac.ir; Noroozifar, Meissam; Niroomand, Sona; Moodi, Asieh

    2013-11-15

    The photoluminescence properties of a Tb(III) complex of the form [Tb(phen){sub 2}Cl{sub 3}·OH{sub 2}] (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) in different solvents are presented. It shows the characteristic luminescence of the corresponding Ln{sup 3+} ion in the visible region. The emission intensity of this complex in coordinating solvent is higher than non-coordinating one. The suggested mechanism for the energy transfer between the ligand and Tb{sup 3+} ion is the intramolecular energy transfer mechanism. The interactions of the Tb(III) complex with fish salmon DNA are studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism study and viscosity measurements. The results of fluorescence titration reveal that DNA strongly quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of the complex through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant (K{sub b}) of the above metal complex at 25 °C is determined by the fluorescence titration method and it is found to be (8.06±0.01)×10{sup 3} M{sup −1}. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH{sup 0}>0, ΔS{sup 0}>0 and ΔG{sup 0}<0) indicate that the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in DNA–Tb complex association. The results support the claim that the title complex bonds to FS-DNA by a groove mode. -- Highlights: • Photoluminescence of [Tb(phen){sub 2}Cl{sub 3}·OH{sub 2}] in different solvents are studied. • Tb(III) complex shows good binding affinity to FS DNA with K{sub b}=(8.06±0.01)×10{sup 3} M{sup −1}. • Viscosity of DNA almost unchanged by increasing amount of Tb complex. • CD spectrum of DNA has a little change with increasing amount of Tb complex. • Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding reaction is entropically driven.

  6. Selective Sensing of Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Peptides Using Terbium(III Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sumaoka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins, as well as their dephosphorylation, is closely related to various diseases. However, this phosphorylation is usually accompanied by more abundant phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues in the proteins and covers only 0.05% of the total phosphorylation. Accordingly, highly selective detection of phosphorylated tyrosine in proteins is an urgent subject. In this review, recent developments in this field are described. Monomeric and binuclear TbIII complexes, which emit notable luminescence only in the presence of phosphotyrosine (pTyr, have been developed. There, the benzene ring of pTyr functions as an antenna and transfers its photoexcitation energy to the TbIII ion as the emission center. Even in the coexistence of phosphoserine (pSer and phosphothreonine (pThr, pTyr can be efficintly detected with high selectivity. Simply by adding these TbIII complexes to the solutions, phosphorylation of tyrosine in peptides by protein tyrosine kinases and dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatases can be successfully visualized in a real-time fashion. Furthermore, the activities of various inhibitors on these enzymes are quantitatively evaluated, indicating a strong potential of the method for efficient screening of eminent inhibitors from a number of candidates.

  7. Thermally induced depolarization in terbium gallium garnet ceramics rod with natural convection cooling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slezák, Ondřej; Yasuhara, R.; Lucianetti, Antonio; Vojna, David; Mocek, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2015), s. 1-8, č. článku 065610. ISSN 2040-8978 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143; OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : stress-induced birefringence * thermal depolarization * high-power lasers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.847, year: 2015

  8. Charge-transfer-based terbium MOF nanoparticles as fluorescent pH sensor for extreme acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zewan; Chen, Yang

    2017-01-15

    Newly emerged metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have aroused the great interest in designing functional materials by means of its flexible structure and component. In this study, we used lanthanide Tb 3+ ions and small molecular ligands to design and assemble a kind of pH-sensitive MOF nanoparticle based on intramolecular-charge-transfer effect. This kind of made-to-order MOF nanoparticle for H + is highly specific and sensitive and could be used to fluorescently indicate pH value of strong acidic solution via preset mechanism through luminescence of Tb 3+ . The long luminescence lifetime of Tb 3+ allows eliminating concomitant non-specific fluorescence by time-revised fluorescence techniques, processing an advantage in sensing H + in biological media with strong autofluorescence. Our method showed a great potential of MOF structures in designing and constructing sensitive sensing materials for specific analytes directly via the assembly of functional ions/ligands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Understanding charge carrier relaxation processes in terbium arsenide nanoparticles using transient absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhoef, Laura R.

    Erbium arsenide nanoparticles epitaxially grown within III-V semiconductors have been shown to improve the performance of devices for applications ranging from thermoelectrics to THz pulse generation. The small size of rare-earth nanoparticles suggests that interesting electronic properties might emerge as a result of both spatial confinement and surface states. However, ErAs nanoparticles do not exhibit any signs of quantum confinement or an emergent bandgap, and these experimental observations are understood from theory. The incorporation of other rare-earth monopnictide nanoparticles into III-V hosts is a likely path to engineering carrier excitation, relaxation and transport dynamics for optoelectronic device applications. However, the electronic structure of these other rare-earth monopnictide nanoparticles remains poorly understood. The objective of this research is to explore the electronic structure and optical properties of III-V materials containing novel rare-earth monopnictides. We use ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of TbAs nanoparticles in III-V hosts. We start with TbAs:GaAs, which was expected to be similar to ErAs:GaAs. We study the dynamics of carrier relaxation into the TbAs states using optical pump terahertz probe transient absorption spectroscopy. By analyzing how the carrier relaxation rates depend on pump fluence and sample temperature, we conclude that the TbAs states are saturable. Saturable traps suggest the existence of a bandgap for TbAs nanoparticles, in sharp contrast with previous results for ErAs. We then apply the same experimental technique to two samples of TbAs nanoparticles in InGaAs with different concentrations of TbAs. We observe similar relaxation dynamics associated with trap saturation, though the ability to resolve these processes is contingent upon a high enough TbAs concentration in the sample. We have also constructed an optical pump optical probe transient absorption spectroscopy system to allow complimentary measurements to be taken on these materials in the near future.

  10. Luminescence properties of terbium-doped Li 3 PO 4 phosphor for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A polycrystalline sample of Li 3 PO 4 :Tb 3 + phosphor was successfully synthesized using solid-state diffusion method. This synthesis method is of low cost, low temperature and does not require any other atmospheres for the synthesis. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), photoluminescence (PL) emission and excitation ...

  11. Novel Luminescent Probe Based on a Terbium(III) Complex for Hemoglobin Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegorova, A. V.; Leonenko, I. I.; Aleksandrova, D. I.; Scrypynets, Yu. V.; Antonovich, V. P.; Ukrainets, I. V.

    2014-09-01

    We have studied the spectral luminescent properties of Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes with a number of novel derivatives of oxoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid amides (L1-L5 ). We have observed quenching of the luminescence of 1:1 Tb(III)-L1-5 complexes by hemoglobin (Hb), which is explained by resonance energy transfer of electronic excitation from the donor (Tb(III)-L1-5 ) to the acceptor (Hb). Using the novel luminescent probe Tb(III)-L1, we have developed a method for determining Hb in human blood. The calibration Stern-Volmer plot is linear in the Hb concentration range 0.6-36.0 μg/mL, detection limit 0.2 μg/mL (3·10-9 mol/L).

  12. Spin waves in terbium. III. Magnetic anisotropy at zero wave vector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Jensen, J.; Touborg, P.

    1975-01-01

    The energy gap at zero wave vector in the spin-wave dispersion relation of ferromagnetic. Tb has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The energy was measured as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field, and the dynamic anisotropy parameters were deduced from the results...... the effects of zero-point deviations from the fully aligned ground state, and we tentatively propose polarization-dependent two-ion couplings as their origin........ The axial anisotropy is found to depend sensitively on the orientation of the magnetic moments in the basal plane. This behavior is shown to be a convincing indication of considerable two-ion contributions to the magnetic anisotropy at zero wave vector. With the exception of the sixfold basal...

  13. Field-impressed anisotropy of susceptibility in iron-terbium thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, A.; Booth, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Two thin films of Fe 1-x Tb x where x=0.17 and 0.23 are shown to exhibit the effect of field-impressed anisotropy. After application of a direct field of 80 mT, which gives them an isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) in their plane, the anisotropy of initial susceptibility differs from that measured after the films have been tumble-demagnetized. By subtracting the susceptibility results of the tumble-demagnetized state from those obtained after the application of the 80 mT direct field, it is shown that the effect of this field is to decrease the susceptibility measured along the former applied field direction and to increase the susceptibility at right angles to this. The effect is almost certainly due to changes in domain alignment. Even though these films contain many domains, the above results are similar to those previously obtained for single-domain γFe 2 O 3 and magnetite particles. The sense of the effect is opposite to that for multi-domain magnetite particles where the susceptibility has been found to increase along the previously applied field direction. ((orig.))

  14. Spallation of terbium by 170 MeV protons. First part: qualitative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkowsky, J.; Le Pape, M.; Gratot, I.; Cohen, L.

    1959-01-01

    The products of the reaction Tb+p (170 MeV) have been studied by radiochemical methods. For each element, α, β, γ and X rays have been studied and results compared to literature data. The cross sections will be given in a further work. We observe a new alpha emitter of gadolinium, half-life 7 h, with the following γ-rays: X (43 keV), 220 keV, 340 keV, 550 keV, 720 keV. New γ-rays are given: 155 Tb: 480 keV; 880 keV 146 Eu (38 h): 125 keV; 570 keV 147 Eu: 570 keV 145 Eu: 180 keV. Reprint of a paper published in 'Le journal de physique et le radium', tome 20, N. 5, may 1959, p. 549-556 [fr

  15. Luminescence properties of terbium-doped Li3PO4 phosphor for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of faster and multiple readout, very high sensitivity, absence of thermal quenching and possible use of phosphor in plastic binders [3–15]. ... synthesis technique was developed to reduce the time required for the synthesis, which was about.

  16. Effect of terbium substitution on the magnetocaloric properties of Gd3Ga5O12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshmi, C.P.; Savitha Pillai, S.; Varma, Manoj Raama; Suresh, K.G.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic refrigeration is an environment friendly cooling technology based on magnetocaloric effect. The most crucial ingredient behind a magnetic refrigerator is a magnetic material which possesses large magnetocaloric effect. Certain materials when placed in a magnetic field suddenly get heats up and suddenly cooled down by the application and the removal of magnetic field due to their change in entropy. This is measured either in terms of isothermal entropy change and adiabatic temperature change observed when the applied magnetic field is varied. The refrigerators which operate below 15K have applications in liquefying helium and for the development of space based cooling system for the space crafts. The material of choice in this temperature range is rare earth gallium garnets. Rare earth garnets are complex ceramic oxides having the chemical formula A 3 B 2 C 3 O 12 have attracted attention due to their interesting magnetic properties. The magnetism in R 3 Ga 5 O 12 is due to the exchange interaction between the rare earth spins. In the proposed work we have chosen Gd 3 Ga 5 O 12 as parent material, substituted Tb systematically in the place of Gd. The structural studies were done by using Rietveld analysis of X-Ray diffraction. There is a systematic variation of volume and lattice parameter upon substitution of Tb. The magnetic characterizations were done by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The experimental magnetic moments of the materials were calculated from the M-T curve by using Curie-Weiss fit and are good agreement with the theoretical values. There is a systematic increase of magnetic moments by Tb substitution. The magnetocaloric effect is calculated by using the integrated Maxwell's relation from the magnetization data. At low magnetic fields the Tb substituted compounds show good MCE values than GGG. Tb substitution enhances the magnetocaloric effect at low magnetic fields and the ΔS M values are higher for x = 1 and 3 at 1T. Hence these materials can be used as refrigerants for future cryogenic applications. (author)

  17. Determination of adenosine disodium triphosphate using prulifloxacin-terbium(III) as a fluorescence probe by spectrofluorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Fengshan; Li Lin; Chen Fang

    2008-01-01

    A new spectrofluorimetric method is developed for determination of adenosine disodium triphosphate (ATP). The interactions between prulifloxacin (PUFX)-Tb 3+ complex and adenosine disodium triphosphate has been studied by using UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra. Using prulifloxacin-Tb 3+ as a fluorescence probe, under the optimum conditions, ATP can remarkably enhance the fluorescence intensity of the prulifloxacin-Tb 3+ complex at λ = 545 nm and the enhanced fluorescence intensity is in proportion to the concentration of ATP. Optimum conditions for the determination of ATP were also investigated. The dynamic range for the determination of ATP is 4.0 x 10 -7 to 2.0 x 10 -5 mol L -1 , and the detection limit (3 σ/k) is 1.7 x 10 -8 mol L -1 . This method is simple, practical and relatively free interference from coexisting substances and can be successfully applied to determination of ATP in real pharmaceutical samples. The mechanism of fluorescence enhancement of prulifloxacin-Tb 3+ complex by ATP was also discussed

  18. Assessment of terbium (III) as a luminescent probe for the detection of tuberculosis biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamogo, W.; Mugherli, L.; Banyasz, A.; Novelli-Rousseau, A.; Mallard, F.; Tran-Thi, T.-H.

    2015-01-01

    A detection method for nicotinic acid, a specific metabolite marker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in cultures and patients' breath, is studied in complex solutions containing other metabolites and in biological media such as urine, saliva and breath condensate. The method is based on the analysis of the luminescence increase of Tb 3+ complexes in the presence of nicotinic acid due to the energy transfer from the excited ligand to the lanthanide ion. It is shown that other potential markers found in M. tuberculosis culture supernatant, such as methyl phenylacetate, p-methyl anisate, methyl nicotinate and 2-methoxy biphenyl, can interfere with nicotinic acid via a competitive absorption of the excitation photons. A new strategy to circumvent these interferences is proposed with an upstream trapping of volatile markers preceding the detection of nicotinic acid in the liquid phase via the luminescence of Tb 3+ complexes. The cost of the method is evaluated and compared with the Xpert MTB/RIF test endorsed by the World Health Organization. - Highlights: • Nicotinic acid, a specific marker of M. tuberculosis, can be detected via luminescence. • The detection limit with a commercial phosphorimeter is 0.4 µmol·L -1 . • Other metabolites of M. tuberculosis can interfere via absorbed excitation light. • The interference can be removed via trapping of the most volatile metabolites. • A breath analysis procedure's cost is compared with the Xpert TBM/RIF test.

  19. Assessment of terbium (III) as a luminescent probe for the detection of tuberculosis biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamogo, W. [CNRS, IRAMIS, UMR 3685 NIMBE/LEDNA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mugherli, L. [CEA, IRAMIS, UMR 3685 NIMBE/LEDNA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Banyasz, A. [CNRS, IRAMIS, LIDyL/Laboratoire Francis Perrin, URA 2453, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Novelli-Rousseau, A.; Mallard, F. [BioMérieux SA, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Tran-Thi, T.-H., E-mail: thu-hoa.tran-thi@cea.fr [CNRS, IRAMIS, UMR 3685 NIMBE/LEDNA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-10-08

    A detection method for nicotinic acid, a specific metabolite marker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in cultures and patients' breath, is studied in complex solutions containing other metabolites and in biological media such as urine, saliva and breath condensate. The method is based on the analysis of the luminescence increase of Tb{sup 3+} complexes in the presence of nicotinic acid due to the energy transfer from the excited ligand to the lanthanide ion. It is shown that other potential markers found in M. tuberculosis culture supernatant, such as methyl phenylacetate, p-methyl anisate, methyl nicotinate and 2-methoxy biphenyl, can interfere with nicotinic acid via a competitive absorption of the excitation photons. A new strategy to circumvent these interferences is proposed with an upstream trapping of volatile markers preceding the detection of nicotinic acid in the liquid phase via the luminescence of Tb{sup 3+} complexes. The cost of the method is evaluated and compared with the Xpert MTB/RIF test endorsed by the World Health Organization. - Highlights: • Nicotinic acid, a specific marker of M. tuberculosis, can be detected via luminescence. • The detection limit with a commercial phosphorimeter is 0.4 µmol·L{sup -1}. • Other metabolites of M. tuberculosis can interfere via absorbed excitation light. • The interference can be removed via trapping of the most volatile metabolites. • A breath analysis procedure's cost is compared with the Xpert TBM/RIF test.

  20. Influence of dysprosium and terbium additions on aluminium structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridlyander, I.N.; Sokolovskaya, E.M.; Zimina, E.N.; Tkachenko, E.A.; Artemova, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of 0.3%Dy and 0.3%Tb additions were investigated on grain size in aluminium ingots and on recrystallization and mechanical properties in 1.5 mm thick sheets. Grain refinement in ingots was revealed along with an increase of sheet recrystallization temperature and grain growth retardation in the process of secondary recrystallization. Ultimate strength was found to rise at some decrease of specific elongation

  1. Optical lines in europium-terbium double activated calcium tungstate phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarov, M.V. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Tsukerblat, B.S. [Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, 84105 Beer-Sheva (Israel)]. E-mail: tsuker@bgumail.bgu.ac.il; Popovici, E.-J. [' Raluca Ripan' Institute for Research in Chemistry, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Jeon, D.Y. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-20

    The Letter is devoted to the problem of the optical anisotropy of the rare-earth ions occupying low-symmetry positions in crystals. The crystal field multiplets arising from LSJ terms of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions in the crystal field of calcium tungstate scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) are analyzed with regard to the experimental data on the low temperature photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectra. The selection rules as well as an angular (polarization) dependence of the two-photon absorption are discussed.

  2. Magneto-optical studies of valence instability in europium and terbium phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Lucas C.V. [Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, -SP (Brazil); Hölsä, Jorma [Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, -SP (Brazil); Turku University Centre for Materials and Surfaces (MatSurf) (Finland); University of the Free State, Department of Physics, Bloemfontein (South Africa); Brito, Hermi F. [Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, -SP (Brazil); Maryško, Miroslav [Institute of Physics, The Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnická 10, CZ-162 53 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Matos, Jivaldo R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, -SP (Brazil); Paturi, Petriina [Wihuri Physical Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Rodrigues, Rodrigo V. [Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, -SP (Brazil); Lastusaari, Mika, E-mail: miklas@utu.fi [Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Turku University Centre for Materials and Surfaces (MatSurf) (Finland)

    2016-02-15

    The impurities and dopants' inappropriate valences may deteriorate the performance of luminescent materials, cause waste of the precious rare earth (R) material and thus incur financial losses. The usual methods to detect the valence of rare earths; XPS, Mössbauer and XANES spectroscopies, are not sensitive enough for low concentrations and the EPR methods are not very suitable for powders. In this work, the comparison between the theoretical and experimental temperature-dependent paramagnetic susceptibilities was used to obtain quantitatively the concentrations of the impurity valence in Eu{sub 2}O{sub 2}S and Tb{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, both containing nominally only R{sup 3+}. Minute (ppm level) Eu{sup 2+} impurities could be analyzed because of the huge difference in the paramagnetic susceptibility between Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} at low temperatures. However, temperatures below 50 K are then needed whilst the Tb{sup IV} impurity in a Tb{sup 3+} matrix can be observed already at higher temperatures. The latter method based on comparing the slopes of the Tb{sup 3+}/Tb{sup IV} paramagnetic susceptibility vs temperature curves for the Tb{sup 3+}/Tb{sup IV} couple is less sensitive than for the Eu{sup 2+}/Eu{sup 3+} one. Finally, the host independent temperature evolution of the paramagnetic susceptibility was calculated for Gd{sup 3+} (or Eu{sup 2+} or Tb{sup IV}) to yield a simple analytical expression to be used universally. - Highlights: • Wave functions for Eu{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} with crystal field effect calculated for oxysulfide/sulfate. • Paramagnetic susceptibility between 4 and 300 K simulated for 4f{sup 6/7/8} configurations. • Amount of valence impurities (Eu{sup 2+} and Tb{sup IV}) evaluated from susceptibility data. • Waste of raw materials and loss of luminescence intensity of phosphors can be avoided.

  3. Luminescent properties of terbium complexes with catecholamines and their application in analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, T.B.; Bel'tyukova, S.V.; Kononenko, L.I.; Poluehktov, N.S.

    1982-01-01

    Tb complexing with a representative of catecholamines - adrenaline - is studied using the luminescence method. It is found, that the complexing takes place in alkaline medium (pH 12.0). To prevent from compound oxidation with air oxygen and to create the necessary pH in solution sodium borohydride is used. The highest luminescence intensity is achieved when the reaction occurs in aqueous-isopropanol solutions. It is established that in the complexes formed the ratio of components is the following: Tb:adrenaline=1:3. Luminescent properties of Tb complex with adrenaline are used to determine the latter. The least detectable amount of adrenaline constitutes 0.02 μg, the determination error does not exceed 5.5% [ru

  4. Effective photosensitized energy transfer of nonanuclear terbium clusters using methyl salicylate derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omagari, Shun; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Seki, Tomohiro; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Takahata, Yumie; Fushimi, Koji; Ito, Hajime; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2015-03-12

    The photophysical properties of the novel nonanuclear Tb(III) clusters Tb-L1 and Tb-L2 involving the ligands methyl 4-methylsalicylate (L1) and methyl 5-methylsalicylate (L2) are reported. The position of the methyl group has an effect on their photophysical properties. The prepared nonanuclear Tb(III) clusters were identified by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and powder X-ray diffraction. Characteristic photophysical properties, including photoluminescence spectra, emission lifetimes, and emission quantum yields, were determined. The emission quantum yield of Tb-L1 (Φ(ππ*) = 31%) was found to be 13 times larger than that of Tb-L2 (Φ(ππ*) = 2.4%). The photophysical characterization and DFT calculations reveal the effect of the methyl group on the electronic structure of methylsalicylate ligand. In this study, the photophysical properties of the nonanuclear Tb(III) clusters are discussed in relation to the methyl group on the aromatic ring of the methylsalicylate ligand.

  5. Crystal structure of bis{μ2-2,2′-[(4,10-dimethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diylbis(methylene]bis(4-oxo-4H-pyran-3-olato}dicobaltcalcium bis(perchlorate 1.36-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Rossi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [CaCo2(C22H30N4O62](ClO42·1.36H2O or {Ca[Co(H–2L1]2}·2ClO4·1.36H2O {where L1 is 4,10-bis[(3-hydroxy-4-pyron-2-ylmethyl]-1,7-dimethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane}, is a trinuclear complex whose asymmetric unit comprises a quarter of the {Ca[Co(H–2L1]2}2+ trinuclear complex, half of a perchlorate ion and 0.34-water molecules. In the neutral [Co(H–2L1] moiety, the cobalt ion is hexacoordinated in a trigonal–prismatic fashion by the surrounding N4O2 donor set. A Ca2+ cation holds together two neutral [Co(H–2L1] moieties and is octacoordinated in a distorted trigonal–dodecahedral fashion by the surrounding O atoms belonging to the deprotonated oxide and carbonyl groups of two [Co(H–2L1] units. The coordination of the CoII cation preorganizes L1 and an electron-rich area forms, which is able to host hard metal ions. The comparison between the present structure and the previously published ones suggests a high versatility of this ligand; indeed, hard metal ions with different nature and dimensions lead to complexes having different stoichiometry (mono- and dinuclear monomers and trinuclear dimers or even a polymeric structure. The heterotrinuclear CoII–CaII–CoII complexes are connected in three dimensions via weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds, which are also responsible for the interactions with the perchlorate anions and the lattice water molecules. The perchlorate anion is disordered about a twofold rotation axis and was refined giving the two positions a fixed occupancy factor of 0.5. The crystal studied was refined as a two-component inversion twin [BASF parameter = 0.14 (4].

  6. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, theoretical study and anti-hepatic cancer activity study of 4-(1E,3Z,6E)-3-hydroxy-7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5-oxohepta-1,3,6-trien-1-yl)-2-methoxyphenyl 4-nitrobenzoate, a novel curcumin congener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sangeeta; Gupta, Preeti; Singh, Ranvijay Pratap; Jafri, Asif; Arshad, M.; Banerjee, Monisha

    2017-08-01

    In the present work 4-(1E,3Z,6E)-3-hydroxy-7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5-oxohepta-1,3,6-trien-1-yl)-2-methoxyphenyl 4-nitrobenzoate (2), a novel curcumin ester was synthesized. The molecular structure and spectroscopic analysis were performed using experimental techniques like FT-IR, 1H,13C NMR, mass and UV-visible as well as theoretical calculations. The theoretical calculations were done by DFT level of theory using B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) basis set. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated using DFT method and assigned with the help of potential energy distribution (PED). The electronic properties such as frontier orbitals and band gap energies have been calculated using time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The strength and nature of weak intramolecular interactions have been studied by AIM approach. Global and local reactivity descriptors have been computed to predict reactivity and reactive sites in the molecule. First hyperpolarizability values have been calculated to describe the nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the synthesized compounds. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analysis has also been carried out. The anti-hepatic cancer activity of compound 2 was also carried out.

  7. 14 CFR 136.13 - Helicopter performance plan and operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Helicopter performance plan and operations... Helicopter performance plan and operations. (a) Each operator must complete a performance plan before each helicopter commercial air tour, or flight operated under 14 CFR 91.146 or 91.147. The pilot in command must...

  8. 32 CFR 935.136 - General operating rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... protruding, except when using the left arm to signal a turn; (g) Operate a motor vehicle in a speed contest..., or operate a motor vehicle in a manner that impedes or blocks traffic; (j) Park a motor vehicle in an..., except as a warning signal; (m) Operate a tracked or cleated vehicle in a manner that damages a paved or...

  9. Publications | Page 136 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Principales leçons - Douze facteurs déterminants du succès de la GDE sur les plans politique et opérationnel. La gestion de la demande en eau (GDE) a été mise en oeuvre dans toute la région MOAN et au-delà, avec un succès variable.

  10. All projects related to | Page 136 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Contribution of Civil Society Organizations in Achieving Health for All ... INEQUALITY, ECONOMIC REFORM, SOCIAL REFORM, HEALTH SYSTEM, Civil society ... Women's Economic Empowerment, and China's Inclusive Growth Agenda.

  11. 21 CFR 136.110 - Bread, rolls, and buns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... foods produced by baking mixed yeast-leavened dough prepared from one or more of the farinaceous... identity or adversely affect the physical and nutritional characteristics of the food. (d) Total solids are... the baked unit weighs 454 grams (1 pound) or more, one entire unit is used for the determination; if...

  12. Student Employee Handbook. EP-2008-09-136-MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), 2007

    2007-01-01

    This student employee handbook offers tips on planning, design process, and presentation of a student Lunar Nautics project. Each section includes mission, task, challenge, and guide questions. With the activities presented, students will learn to design a Lunar Lander, Lunar Miner, and Lunar Base; investigate the geography and geology of the moon…

  13. 27 CFR 24.136 - Procedure for alternating proprietors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... initiated, the wine premises, or parts thereof, may be alternated. Any transfer of wine, spirits, or other..., floor, or room to be alternated will be completely finished and all wine, spirits, and other accountable.... However, wine, spirits, and other accountable materials may be retained in locked tanks at wine premises...

  14. 40 CFR 136.6 - Method modifications and analytical requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... modifications and analytical requirements. (a) Definitions of terms used in this section. (1) Analyst means the..., oil and grease, total suspended solids, total phenolics, turbidity, chemical oxygen demand, and.... Except as set forth in paragraph (b)(3) of this section, an analyst may modify an approved test procedure...

  15. 21 CFR 136.115 - Enriched bread, rolls, and buns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION BAKERY PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Bakery Products... dairy products does not apply. (7) The vitamins and minerals added to the food for enrichment purposes... be present in standardized and other commercial egg products. One medium-sized egg is equivalent to 0...

  16. 33 CFR 136.1 - Purpose and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contribute to such a fund; or (4) Affects the authority of the United States or any State or political... into or upon the navigable waters, adjoining shorelines, or the exclusive economic zone; (2... the authority of any State or political subdivision thereof from imposing any additional liability or...

  17. 42 CFR 136.370 - Pregraduate scholarship grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., registration or other types of credentials required for the practice of a health or allied health profession..., audiology, medical technology, dental hygiene, dental technicians, engineering, radiologic technology...

  18. 136 Tax Revenue, Stock Market and Economic Growth of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irfan Javaid Attari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of capital market and fiscal policy influences in determining the nexus of economic growth in Pakistan from July 2003 to July 2012. The authors utilize ADF unit root test, Johansen Cointegration test, VECM test, Granger causality test and variance decomposition analysis to test the relationship among tax revenue, stock market and economic growth in Pakistan. Granger causality analysis is used to answer questions whether “Does tax revenue cause the economic growth?” or “Does tax revenue cause the capital market?”. The results demonstrate that there is a bidirectional casualty between tax revenue and economic growth; and a unidirectional causality from capital market to tax revenue. The estimated result shows that growth of Pakistan economy is strongly contributed from the high collection of direct tax revenue and the development of financial market activity. The findings of this paper have important implications to current and potential investors in Pakistan economy to understand the economic condition of Pakistan and to assist them in making their investment decision.

  19. 136 Tax Revenue, Stock Market and Economic Growth of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Irfan Javaid Attari; Roshaiza Taha; Muhammad Imran Farooq

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of capital market and fiscal policy influences in determining the nexus of economic growth in Pakistan from July 2003 to July 2012. The authors utilize ADF unit root test, Johansen Cointegration test, VECM test, Granger causality test and variance decomposition analysis to test the relationship among tax revenue, stock market and economic growth in Pakistan. Granger causality analysis is used to answer questions whether “Does ...

  20. 40 CFR 136.3 - Identification of test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register... density of the water sample. 8 When the MF method has been used previously to test waters with high... Wastewater, 15th Edition. 31 For samples known or suspected to contain high levels of silver (e.g., in excess...

  1. 10 CFR 13.6 - Prerequisities for issuing a complaint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... amount of money, or the value of property or services, demanded or requested. [56 FR 47135, Sept. 18... time such claim is submitted (as defined in paragraph (b) of this section), the amount of money or the... complaint. (a) The reviewing official may issue a complaint under § 13.7 only if— (1) The Department of...

  2. Dicty_cDB: VSD136 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8 |CB290208.1 UCRCS01_01aa10_g1 Washington Navel orange cold acclimated flavedo & albedo cDNA library Citrus....1 UCRCS01_04cd07_g1 Washington Navel orange cold acclimated flavedo & albedo cDNA library Citrus sinensis c

  3. 136 Constraints to Food Security in Nigeria and Implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2010-10-17

    Oct 17, 2010 ... security measures used by advanced countries. Introduction. Food is ... As a result, there is shortage of food which poses a threat to food security. The heavy ... Certain factors could be responsible for this persistent problem.

  4. 40 CFR 86.136-90 - Engine starting and restarting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... automatic chokes shall be operated according to the manufacturer's operating instructions in the owner's...) The transmission shall be placed in gear 15 seconds after the engine is started. If necessary, braking... instructions in the owner's manual do not specify a warm engine starting procedure, the engine (automatic and...

  5. 33 CFR 136.115 - Settlement and notice to claimant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS... against the Fund is denied. The failure of the Director, NPFC, to make final disposition of a claim within... final. The failure of the Director, NPFC, to make final disposition of a reconsideration within 90 days...

  6. 75 FR 136 - Privacy Act of 1974; Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... THE SYSTEM: STORAGE: Paper records and on electronic storage media. RETRIEVABILITY: Name and/or Social... Institute of Technology Management and Information System (AFITMIS) (February 21, 2008, 73 FR 9548). CHANGES: * * * * * SYSTEM NAME: Delete entry and replace with ``Air Force Institute of Technology Student Information System...

  7. 33 CFR 136.105 - General requirements for a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS... the Fund the claimant receives any compensation for the claimed amounts, the claimant shall... certain for compensation for each category of uncompensated damages or removal costs (as described in...

  8. 136 --7 Dec 2009.indd [FINAL VERSION].indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    7 Des 2009 ... die gepaardgaande omstandighede (kyk 1 Tess 3:13) (Harris. 1978:1206). Die betekenis van su &n in die metafoor. Dit is dus duidelik dat Paulus die voorsetsel su &n gebruik om. 'n intiem persoonlike verhouding aan te dui. Die assosiatiewe datief wat saam met su &n gebruik word, voltooi die voorsetsel.

  9. Conventional high-performance liquid chromatography versus derivative spectrophotometry for the determination of 1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium salt and 1,3,6,8-pyrenetetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt in the color additive D&C Green No. 8 (Pyranine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitian, Simion; White, Samuel R; Yang, H-H Wendy; Weisz, Adrian

    2014-01-10

    Specifications in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations for the color additive D&C Green No. 8 (Colour Index No. 59040) limit the levels of the subsidiary colors 1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium salt (P3S) and 1,3,6,8-pyrenetetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (P4S). The present paper describes a comparative study of two possible methods to replace the currently used multi-step TLC/spectrophotometry method of separating and quantifying the minor components P3S and P4S in G8. One of the new approaches uses conventional high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the other, derivative spectrophotometry. While the derivative spectrophotometric method was shown to be inadequate for the analysis of minor components overwhelmed by components of much higher concentration, the HPLC method was proven highly effective. The closely related, very polar compounds P3S and P4S were separated by the new HPLC method in less than 4 min using a conventional HPLC instrument. P3S and P4S were quantified by using five-point calibration curves with data points that ranged from 0.45 to 7.63% and from 0.13 to 1.82%, by weight, for P3S and P4S, respectively. The HPLC method was applied to the analysis of test portions from 20 batches of D&C Green No. 8 submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for certification. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Potassium terbium fluoride crystal growth development for faraday rotator discs fabrication, 6 July 1978--6 February 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-17

    Crystal growth experiments were performed and growth of KTb/sub 3/F/sub 10/ crystals were accomplished. The crystal growth experiments consisted of hot zone modification and development of growth parameters. Several boules of KTb/sub 3/F/sub 10/ 30 to 40mm in diameter and one boule 50mm in diameter were grown at rates varying from .5mm/hr to 3.0mm/hr. The crystals evaluated display excellent optical quality. The optical path distortion was less than 0.5 fringe/cm at 633nm as viewed in Twyman--Green interferometry. Growth of large crystals has been limited by mechanical cleavage.

  11. Fluorescence enhancement of samarium complex co-doped with terbium complex in a poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiu Hongfang; Zhang Lixin; Liu Guode; Fan Tao

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence property of Sm(DBM) 3 phen- (DBM-dibenzoylmethide, phen-1,10-phenanthroline) and Tb(DBM) 3 phen-co-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was investigated. The excitation, emission spectra and fluorescence lifetime of the co-doped samples were examined. In the co-doped samples, the luminescence intensities of Sm 3+ enhance with an increase of the Tb(DBM) 3 phen content and with a decrease of the Sm(DBM) 3 phen content. The reason for the fluorescence enhancement effect in the co-doped polymer is the intermolecular energy transfer. To give a vivid picture for this co-doped system, a model for the fluorescence enhancement of Sm(DBM) 3 phen- and Tb(DBM) 3 phen-co-doped PMMA is presented

  12. The microstructure and coefficient transmission of think films Bi2Te3-xSex, alloyed by terbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullaev, N.M.; Mekhtieva, S.I.; Jalilov, N.Z.; Memmedov, N.R.; Zeynalov, V.Z.

    2007-01-01

    The defects of films microstructures of the thermoelectric materials n- and p-type Bi 2 Te 3 -xSe x , alloyed by Tb and Cl, with think, obtained by thermic evaporation in vacuum have been investigated by microscopic methods

  13. pH dependent photophysical studies of new europium and terbium complexes of tripodal ligand: Experimental and semiempirical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, Rifat; Baral, Minati; Kanungo, B K

    2015-01-01

    The photophysical properties of adduct of a novel nonadentate tripodal ligand, 5,5′-(2-(((8-hydroxyquinolin-5-yl)methylamino)methyl)-2-methylpropane-1, 3-diyl)bis(azanediyl)bis(methylene diquinolin-8-ol, (TAME5OX), with Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ metal ions have been probed for photonics applications. The absorption spectroscopy of these complexes show remarkable spectral changes due to characteristic lanthanide transitions, which support the use of TAME5OX as a sensitive optical pH based sensor to detect Ln 3+ metal ions in biological systems. In addition, these complexes have also been shown to exhibit strong green fluorescence allowing simultaneous sensing within the visible region under physiological pH in competitive medium for both Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ ions. The intense fluorescence from these compounds were revealed to intermittently get quenched under acidic as well as basic conditions due to the photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer from excited 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) moiety to metal ion, just an opposite process. This renders these compounds the OFF–ON–OFF type of pH-dependent fluorescent sensor. The thermodynamic stability and aqueous coordination chemistry of the chelator with the said lanthanide ions have also been probed by potentiometric, UV–visible and fluorescence spectrophotometric method. TAME5OX has been found to form two protonated complexes [Ln(H 5 L)] 5+ and [Ln(H 4 L)] 4+ below pH 2.5 with both metal ions, which consecutively deprotonates through one proton process with rise of pH. The formation constants (log β 11n ) of neutral complexes have been determined to be 33.51 and 32.16 with pLn (pLn=−log[Ln 3+ ]) values of 16.14 and 19.48 for Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ ions, respectively, calculated at pH 7.4, indicating TAME5OX is a good lanthanide synthetic chelator. The emission lifetimes of the Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ complexes recorded in D 2 O and H 2 O suggest the presence of water molecules in the first coordination sphere of the metal ions. NMR titrations were carried out to determine the stoichiometry of chelates. The complexe's coordination geometries were optimized by using PM7 as sparkle/PM7 model. The theoretical electronic behavior was evaluated to support the experimental findings, based on ZINDO/S methodology at configuration interaction with single excitations (CIS) level. These results emphasize the capability of the use of the theoretical models in prediction of geometries and all other calculations of compounds containing lanthanide ions and create new interesting possibilities for the design in-silico of novel and highly efficient lanthanide–organic edifice. - Highlights: • Photophysical behavior of Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ complexes of TAME5OX has been investigated. • This tripodal ligand forms thermodynamically stable Ln 3+ complexes. • These compounds exhibit strong green fluorescence under physiological pH. • Green fluorescence gets quenched under acidic and basic conditions, due to PET process. • This renders these compounds the OFF–ON–OFF type of pH-dependent fluorescent sensors

  14. Circularly photostimulated electrogyration in europium- and terbium-doped GaN nanocrystals embedded in a silica xerogel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kityk, I V; Nyk, M; Strek, W; Jablonski, J M; Misiewicz, J

    2005-01-01

    Circularly polarized optical poling was proposed and discovered for GaN nanocrystallites embedded in a silica xerogel matrix. The method consists of the creation of screw-like polarization of the medium during the interaction of two circularly polarized coherent bicolour beams. It was shown that doping of the GaN nanocrystallites by Tb 3+ and Eu 3+ ions leads to substantial enhancement of the electrogyration. The effect observed is a consequence of the superposition of nanoconfined effects and the contribution of the localized rare-earth 4f levels. The role of the anharmonic electron-phonon interaction is discussed. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectra of the GaN composites were investigated. It was demonstrated that the Eu-doped nanocrystallites give a substantially higher effect of the electrogyration compared to the Tb-doped and non-doped ones

  15. pH dependent photophysical studies of new europium and terbium complexes of tripodal ligand: Experimental and semiempirical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbar, Rifat [Department of Chemistry, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering & Technology, Longowal, Punjab 148106 (India); Baral, Minati [Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology Kurukshetra, Haryana 136119 (India); Kanungo, B K, E-mail: b.kanungo@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering & Technology, Longowal, Punjab 148106 (India)

    2015-11-15

    The photophysical properties of adduct of a novel nonadentate tripodal ligand, 5,5′-(2-(((8-hydroxyquinolin-5-yl)methylamino)methyl)-2-methylpropane-1, 3-diyl)bis(azanediyl)bis(methylene diquinolin-8-ol, (TAME5OX), with Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} metal ions have been probed for photonics applications. The absorption spectroscopy of these complexes show remarkable spectral changes due to characteristic lanthanide transitions, which support the use of TAME5OX as a sensitive optical pH based sensor to detect Ln{sup 3+} metal ions in biological systems. In addition, these complexes have also been shown to exhibit strong green fluorescence allowing simultaneous sensing within the visible region under physiological pH in competitive medium for both Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions. The intense fluorescence from these compounds were revealed to intermittently get quenched under acidic as well as basic conditions due to the photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer from excited 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) moiety to metal ion, just an opposite process. This renders these compounds the OFF–ON–OFF type of pH-dependent fluorescent sensor. The thermodynamic stability and aqueous coordination chemistry of the chelator with the said lanthanide ions have also been probed by potentiometric, UV–visible and fluorescence spectrophotometric method. TAME5OX has been found to form two protonated complexes [Ln(H{sub 5}L)]{sup 5+} and [Ln(H{sub 4}L)]{sup 4+} below pH 2.5 with both metal ions, which consecutively deprotonates through one proton process with rise of pH. The formation constants (log β{sub 11n}) of neutral complexes have been determined to be 33.51 and 32.16 with pLn (pLn=−log[Ln{sup 3+}]) values of 16.14 and 19.48 for Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions, respectively, calculated at pH 7.4, indicating TAME5OX is a good lanthanide synthetic chelator. The emission lifetimes of the Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} complexes recorded in D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O suggest the presence of water molecules in the first coordination sphere of the metal ions. NMR titrations were carried out to determine the stoichiometry of chelates. The complexe's coordination geometries were optimized by using PM7 as sparkle/PM7 model. The theoretical electronic behavior was evaluated to support the experimental findings, based on ZINDO/S methodology at configuration interaction with single excitations (CIS) level. These results emphasize the capability of the use of the theoretical models in prediction of geometries and all other calculations of compounds containing lanthanide ions and create new interesting possibilities for the design in-silico of novel and highly efficient lanthanide–organic edifice. - Highlights: • Photophysical behavior of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} complexes of TAME5OX has been investigated. • This tripodal ligand forms thermodynamically stable Ln{sup 3+} complexes. • These compounds exhibit strong green fluorescence under physiological pH. • Green fluorescence gets quenched under acidic and basic conditions, due to PET process. • This renders these compounds the OFF–ON–OFF type of pH-dependent fluorescent sensors.

  16. The variation in europium(III) and terbium(III) luminescence lifetimes with concentration in rare earth oxysulphide matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charreire, Y.; Dexpert-Ghys, J.; Leskelae, M.; Niinistoe, L.

    1983-01-01

    The transient properties of the Eu 3+ 5 D 2 , 5 D 1 , 5 D 0 emitting levels in oxysulphide matrices at various doping concentrations were analysed under either charge transfer state or direct 5 Dsub(J) selective excitation using pulsed laser light. At low Eu 3+ concentrations the data can be described in terms of the step process 5 D 2 → 5 D 1 → 5 D 0 . The decrease in the 5 D 2 and 5 D 1 lifetimes with concentration can be interpreted by cross-relaxation (Eu-Eu) processes, whereas the presence of an (unidentified) impurity in the phosphors is proposed to explain the concentration quenching of 5 D 0 . This conclusion is supported by the observation of similar behaviour for Tb 3+ 5 D 4 emission in the same matrices which is attributed to Eu 3+ ions acting as traps. (Auth.)

  17. White- and blue-light-emitting dysprosium(III) and terbium(III)-doped gadolinium titanate phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić, Ž; Kuzman, S; Đorđević, V; Dramićanin, M D; Thundat, T

    2017-06-01

    Here we report the synthesis and structural, morphological, and photoluminescence analysis of white- and blue-light-emitting Dy 3 + - and Tm 3 + -doped Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 nanophosphors. Single-phase cubic Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 nanopowders consist of compact, dense aggregates of nanoparticles with an average size of ~25 nm for Dy 3 + -doped and ~50 nm for Tm 3 + -doped samples. The photoluminescence results indicated that ultraviolet (UV) light excitation of the Dy 3 + -doped sample resulted in direct generation of white light, while a dominant yellow emission was obtained under blue-light excitation. Intense blue light was obtained for Tm 3 + -doped Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 under UV excitation suggesting that this material could be used as a blue phosphor. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Clinical evaluation of the radiolanthanide terbium-152: first-in-human PET/CT with 152Tb-DOTATOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Richard P; Singh, Aviral; Benešová, Martina; Vermeulen, Christiaan; Gnesin, Silvano; Köster, Ulli; Johnston, Karl; Müller, Dirk; Senftleben, Stefan; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; Prior, John O; van der Meulen, Nicholas P; Müller, Cristina

    2017-10-31

    The existence of theragnostic pairs of radionuclides allows the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Radiolanthanides, such as 177 Lu, are successfully used for therapeutic purposes; however, a perfect diagnostic match is currently not available for clinical use. A unique, multi-disciplinary study was performed using 152 Tb (T 1/2 = 17.5 h, Eβ + average = 1140 keV, Iβ + = 20.3%), which resulted in the first-in-human PET/CT images with this promising radionuclide. For this purpose, 152 Tb was produced via a spallation process followed by mass separation at ISOLDE, CERN. The chemical separation and quality control, performed at PSI, resulted in a pure product in sufficient yields. Clinical PET phantom studies revealed an increased image noise level, because of the smaller β + branching ratio of 152 Tb as compared to standard PET nuclides at matched activity concentrations; however, the expected recovery would be comparable at matched signal-to-noise ratios in clinical PET. 152 Tb was used for labeling DOTATOC, at Zentralklinik Bad Berka, and administered to a patient for a first-in-human clinical study. PET scans were performed over a period of 24 h, allowing the visualization of even small metastases with increased tumor-to-background contrast over time. Based on the results obtained in this work, it can be deduced that PET/CT imaging with 152 Tb-labeled targeting agents has promise for clinical application and may be particularly interesting for pre-therapeutic dosimetry.

  19. Obtainment and characterization of pure and doped gadolinium oxy ortho silicates with terbium III, precursor of luminescent silicates with sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoneti, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Silicate and sulfide lattices are uniquely efficient luminescent materials to excitation by cathodic rays and furthermore the cathodoluminescence study of these compounds have been few investigated. In this work it has been prepared, characterized and investigated some spectroscopic properties of pure and Tb a+ - activated Gd 2 Si O 3 system and it has been tried to substitute oxygen by sulphur in order to obtain this or sulfide-silicate lattices. Products were characterized by vibrational infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction patterns and electronic emission in UV-VIS region. (author)

  20. Preparation of three terbium complexes with p-aminobenzoic acid and investigation of crystal structure influence on luminescence property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Chaohong; Sun Haoling; Wang Xinyi; Li Junran; Nie Daobo; Fu Wenfu; Gao Song

    2004-01-01

    Three new rare earth p-aminobenzoic acid complexes, [Tb 2 L 6 (H 2 O) 2 ] n (1), [Tb 2 L 6 (H 2 O) 4 ].2H 2 O (2) and [Tb(phen) 2 L 2 (H 2 O) 2 ](phen)L·4H 2 O (3) (HL: p-aminobenzoic acid; phen: 1, 10-phenanthroline), with different structural forms are reported in this paper. Complex 1 is a polymolecule with a two-dimensional plane structure. Compound 2 is a binuclear molecule, and 3 appears to be a mononuclear complex. The fluorescence intensity, the fluorescence life-time and emission quantum yield of 2, which has two coordination water molecules, is better than those of 1, which has only one coordination water molecule. This is an unusual phenomenon for general fluorescent rare earth complexes. The fluorescence performance of 3 is the most unsatisfactory among the three complexes. Their crystal structures show that the coordination mode of the ligand is an important factor influencing the luminescence properties of a fluorescent rare earth complex

  1. Optical and magnetooptical properties of terbium–scandium–aluminum and terbium-containing (gallates and aluminates) garnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiev, Uygun V. [Faculty of Physics, National University of Uzbekistan, Vuzgorodok, Tashkent 100174 (Uzbekistan); Gruber, John B. [Department of Physics, San Jose State University, retired, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Burdick, Gary W. [Department of Physics, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI 49104 (United States); Ivanov, Igor’ A. [Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119333 (Russian Federation); Fu, Dejun, E-mail: djfu@whu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, 430072 Wuhan (China); Pelenovich, Vasiliy O. [School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, 430072 Wuhan (China); Juraeva, Nafisa I. [Faculty of Physics, National University of Uzbekistan, Vuzgorodok, Tashkent 100174 (Uzbekistan)

    2016-08-15

    Comparative measurements of the Faraday rotation in Tb{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} (TGG) and Tb{sub 3}Sc{sub 2–x}Al{sub 3+x}O{sub 12} (TSAG) garnets shows the values of the Verdet constant for TSAG are about 25% higher than that of TGG in the wavelength range 400–700 nm at the temperatures T=95 and 300 K. The increase of the Verdet constant is explained by increase of the “paramagnetic” frequency factor caused by the shift of the resonance frequency of the first allowed 4f→5d transition to the area of the lower frequencies in UV. The shift and observed strong broadening of the UV absorption bands in TSAG are explained by significant modification of the crystalline environment of the Tb{sup 3+} ion in this garnet. A comparison of the data of the C/D ratio in TSAG with the value of the magnetic moment of the Tb{sup 3+} ground state in Tb{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (TAG) determined from magnetic measurements, showed an acceptable agreement for these parameters measured by fundamentally different methods. Measurements of the visible emission spectra reveal a strong influence of some disordering of the crystal field (CF) in TSAG in comparison with the terbium–aluminum garnet spectra. Magnetooptical effects of the intensity change of the luminescence lines in TSAG is caused by modification of the electronic structure of the {sup 5}D{sub 4} and {sup 7}F{sub 5} multiplets by Sc{sup 3+} ions in the lattice, leading to a local symmetry reduction of the Tb{sup 3+} ion in TSAG.

  2. Photophysical studies of highly luminescent europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes functionalized with amino and mercapto groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, E.R.; Monteiro, J.H.S.K.; Mazali, I.O.; Sigoli, F.A., E-mail: fsigoli@iqm.unicam.br

    2016-02-15

    This work proposes the replacement of coordinated-water molecules from the precursor complexes [Ln(aba){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)] and [Ln(tta){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}], (Ln=Eu{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+} or Tb{sup 3+}, aba{sup −}=aminobenzoate, tta{sup −}=thenoyltrifluoroacetonate) by the ligands mercaptobenzoate (mba{sup −}), mercaptopropionate (mpa{sup −}), phenanthroline (phen), dimethylformamide (dmf) and acetoacetanilide (aaa{sup −}), leading to anionic or neutral amino (–NH{sub 2}) or mercapto (–SH) functionalized-lantanides (III) complexes with reasonable emission quantum yields for potential application on fluorescence microscopy of biological moieties. The complexes photophysical properties were studied using luminescence spectroscopy and theoretical models to determine the transfer and back energy transfer rates and quantum yields, that were compared with experimental ones. The anionic complexes [Eu(tta){sub 3}(L)]{sup −} showed high quantum yield values and their sensitization efficiency are in the range of 39–81%. The overlay of the ground state geometries, obtained from the Sparkle/PM3 model, of the complexes [Eu(tta){sub 3}(aba)]{sup −}, [Eu(tta){sub 3}(mba)]{sup −} and [Eu(tta){sub 3}(mpa)]{sup −}, suggest similar coordination polyhedrons occupied by the europium(III). The highest transfer rates T→{sup 5}D{sub 1,0} were obtained for the anionic complexes [Eu(tta){sub 3}(L)]{sup −} which might be a result of the low triplet level energies and R{sub L} values. - Highlights: • Lanthanides functionalized-complexes. • Free mercapto and amino groups. • Covalence degree of Eu-ligands. • Energy transfer rates. • Intrinsic and absolute quantum yields and sensitization.

  3. Isothermal sections of phase equilibria diagrams for systems (terbium, dysprosium, holmium)-molybdenum-boron at 1273 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'ma, Yu.B.; Zakharchuk, N.P.; Maksimova, L.T.

    1988-01-01

    The methods of X-ray analysis are used to study the R-Mo-B (R-Tb, Dy, Ho) systems and isothermal sections of phase equilibria diagrams at 1273 K are plotted. A formation of RMoB 4 (structure of the YCrB 4 type) is confirmed and borides R 3 MoB 7 (structure of the Er 3 CrB 7 type) and ∼ RMo 4 B 8 (of the unknown structure) are obtained for the first time. Borides DyMoB 3 and HoMoB 3 are of the ErMoB 3 structure. Lattice periods of new compounds are indicated. Diffractogrammes of borides Dy 3 MoB 7 and DyMoB 3 are calculated. A peculiarity of components interaction in the systems rare-earth metal-molybdenum-boron is considered

  4. submitter Clinical evaluation of the radiolanthanide terbium-152: first-in-human PET/CT with $^152$Tb-DOTATOC

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, Richard P; Benešová, Martina; Vermeulen, Christiaan; Gnesin, Silvano; Köster, Ulli; Johnston, Karl; Müller, Dirk; Senftleben, Stefan; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; Prior, John O; van der Meulen, Nicholas P; Müller, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The existence of theragnostic pairs of radionuclides allows the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Radiolanthanides, such as $^{177}$Lu, are successfully used for therapeutic purposes; however, a perfect diagnostic match is currently not available for clinical use. A unique, multi-disciplinary study was performed using $^{152}$Tb ($T_{1/2}$ = 17.5 h, E$\\beta ^+_{average}$ = 1140 keV, I$β^+$ = 20.3%), which resulted in the first-in-human PET/CT images with this promising radionuclide. For this purpose, $^{152}$Tb was produced via a spallation process followed by mass separation at ISOLDE, CERN. The chemical separation and quality control, performed at PSI, resulted in a pure product in sufficient yields. Clinical PET phantom studies revealed an increased image noise level, because of the smaller $\\beta^+$ branching ratio of $^{152}$Tb as compared to standard PET nuclides at matched activity concentrations; however, the expected recovery would be comparable at matched ...

  5. An SH2 domain-based tyrosine kinase assay using biotin ligase modified with a terbium(III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, Shinji; Shinboku, Yuki; Kusaba, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are modules of approximately 100 amino acids and are known to bind phosphotyrosine-containing sequences with high affinity and specificity. In the present work, we developed an SH2 domain-based assay for Src tyrosine kinase using a unique biotinylation reaction from archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. S. tokodaii biotinylation has a unique property that biotin protein ligase (BPL) forms a stable complex with its biotinylated substrate protein (BCCP). Here, an SH2 domain from lymphocyte-specific tyrosine kinase was genetically fused to a truncated BCCP, and the resulting fusion protein was labeled through biotinylation with BPL carrying multiple copies of a luminescent Tb(3+) complex. The labeled SH2 fusion proteins were employed to detect a phosphorylated peptide immobilized on the surface of the microtiter plate, where the phosphorylated peptide was produced by phosphorylation to the substrate peptide by Src tyrosine kinase. Our assay allows for a reliable determination of the activity of Src kinase lower than 10 pg/μL by a simple procedure.

  6. Photoinduced proton transfer coupled with energy transfer: Mechanism of sensitized luminescence of terbium ion by salicylic acid doped in polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Vinita; Mishra, Hirdyesh

    2008-06-28

    In the present work, excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in salicylic acid (SA) monoanion and subsequent sensitization of Tb(3+) ion in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) have been studied. The study has been carried out both by steady state and time domain fluorescence measurement techniques at room temperature. It is found that the SA completely ionizes and exists as monoanion in PVA. It exhibits a large Stokes shifted blue emission (10 000 cm(-1)) due to ESIPT and shows a decay time of 6.85 ns. On the other hand, Tb(3+) ion shows a very weak green emission and a decay time of approximately 641 mus in PVA film. Upon incorporating Tb(3+) ion in SA doped PVA film, both intensity and decay time of SA decrease and sensitized emission from Tb(+3) ion along with 3.8 mus rise time is observed. Energy transfer is found to take place both from excited singlet as well as triplet states. A brief description of the properties of the present system from the viewpoint of luminescent solar collector material is addressed.

  7. A voz reinventada da tradição: ritos iniciáticos na obra de Mia Couto (The reinvented voice of tradition: initiation rites in Mia Couto's work - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n25p136

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Geraldo Cantarela

    2012-03-01

    's fictional strategy has special importance not only because it records and values the knowledge of traditional culture, but also because it deconstructs, tautens and transforms this knowledge. Besides acknowledging and reaffirming the value of traditional wisdom, the reinvented voice from oral tradition present in the voices of the narrator and characters states the assumption of  dynamism in tradition.Keywords: Mozambican literature. Mia Couto. Oral tradition. Initiation rites.- DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n25p136

  8. A search for the double-beta decay of Xenon-136 to an excited state of Barium-136 with exo-200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Shannon Koa

    While greater than 80% of all electricity continues to be generated by heat engines, methods of directly converting heat into electricity will remain appealing. Thermoelectric generators are one technology that is capable of doing this but the low efficiency and high cost has limited their terrestrial deployment. Thermoelectrics are compact, solid state devices, without moving parts that directly convert a temperature difference into a voltage. Developing better thermoelectric materials is challenging and requires that materials be engineered with new transport physics. The interface between organic and inorganic materials is one example where new transport physics manifests. Therefore, it is possible that improvements in thermoelectrics can be made by engineering organic-inorganic hybrid thermoelectric materials. Composite materials exhibit characteristics of their constituents where hybrid materials possess new properties that are distinctly different from their constituents. At the interface between organic and inorganic materials, hybrid properties manifest. One ideal system to understand this interface is in a metal-molecule-metal junction commonly referred to as a molecular junction. This is often a result of the discrete electronic energy levels of the organic hybridizing with the continuum of electronic states in the inorganic. Herein, new transport phenomenon is observed in molecular junctions, which have great promise for thermoelectrics. It is observed that the transport property are positively correlated breaking the historic trends to improving thermoelectric efficiency. Towards the goal of higher efficiency thermoelectrics, the fundamental science of interfaces is first investigated in molecular junctions. Guiding principles from these fundamental studies are then applied to engineer a bulk, polymer-based, thermoelectric materials with high efficiency. These improvements are encouraging and motivated a cost analysis to evaluate their current market potential against competing thermoelectric materials. In all, this dissertation marks the progress in developing a new class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials for thermoelectric applications.

  9. CCDC 954775: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Dimethylammonium tri-terbium tris(2-fluoro-4-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)benzoate) tetrahydroxide tetradecahydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Dongxu

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  10. CCDC 959634: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : octakis(mu~3~-Hydroxo)-undecakis(mu~2~-2-fluorobenzoato)-(N,N-dimethylformamide)-nitrato-hexa-aqua-hexa-terbium

    KAUST Repository

    Guillerm, Vincent; Weseliński, Łukasz J.; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cairns, Amy J.; D'Elia, Valerio; Wojtas, Łukasz; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  11. On the controlled isotropic shrinkage induced fine-tuning of photo-luminescence in terbium ions embedded silica inverse opal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Vishnu Prasad; Kumar, Jitendra; Sivakumar, Sri

    2017-12-01

    Tb3+ embedded silica inverse opal structures with different photonic stop bands have been fabricated by annealing the SiO2-polystyrene spheres (diameter 390 nm) opal template at 320-650 oC. The PSB tuning realized in the wavelength range 498 - 600 nm is shown to depend on annealing temperature and impending isotropic shrinkage of silica matrix. The impact of wide PSB shift on four Tb3+ ion emission bands (blue, green, yellow, and red at 486, 545, 580, and 620 nm, respectively) corresponding to 5D4→7Fj (j = 6,5,4,3) transitions have been investigated. The effect amounts to significant suppression of emission bands at 586, 545 and 486 nm in inverse opals, obtained by annealing opal template at 350, 400, and 650 oC, respectively. Further, luminescence lifetime of Tb3+ ion 5D4 state increases with shrinkage induced in inverse opal progressively and get enhanced up to 2.3 times vis-à-vis reference silica. The changes in refractive index caused by thermal annealing of opal template is found to be responsible for the observed improvement in 5D4 state lifetime.

  12. Effect of adding aluminum ion on the structural, optical, electrical and magnetic properties of terbium doped yttrium iron garnet nanoparticles films prepared by sol–gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldbea, Ftema W.; Ibrahim, N.B., E-mail: baayah@ukm.edu.my; Yahya, M.

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • The conductivity of YIG films increased with increasing of Al content. • The saturation magnetization at room temperature decreased with increasing Al{sup 3+} content. • Al{sup 3+} substituted Tb-YIG films has been prepared by a sol-gel method. - Abstract: Tb{sub 0.8}Y{sub 2.2}Al{sub y}Fe{sub 5−y}O{sub 12} nanoparticle films with y = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 were prepared by a sol–gel method for potential use as a magnetic sensor and in magneto-optical applications. The films were deposited onto quartz substrate, followed by annealing at 900 °C in air for 2 h. X-ray diffractometry results confirmed the formation of a pure garnet structure. The lattice parameter decreased with increasing Al{sup 3+} content due to the substitution of Al{sup 3+} ions with the larger Fe{sup 3+} ions. The grain size of the films decreased up to y = 0.6. This variation is discussed based on the stress on the grain surface. The films observed to be transparent between 76 and 92% in the visible and infrared regions. The films demonstrated a strong absorption of 10{sup 4} cm{sup −1} caused by the charge transfer transition in the UV region. The absorption edge shifts to lower wavelengths at higher Al contents of 0.8 and 1 due to electronic transitions. The conductivity of films increased with increasing of Al content due to the increasing in free carrier concentration. The saturation magnetization at room temperature decreased with increasing Al{sup 3+} content, whereas the coercivity increased markedly at y = 0.6.

  13. CCDC 1411423: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[dimethylammonium hexakis(mu-fumarato)-octakis(mu-hydroxo)-hexa-terbium N,N-dimethylformamide solvate hexahydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Assen, Ayalew H.

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  14. CCDC 954773: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Dimethylammonium tri-terbium tris(4-(tetrazol-2-id-5-yl)benzoate) tetrahydroxide trihydrate unknown solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Dongxu

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  15. CCDC 954774: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Dimethylammonium tri-terbium tris(4'-(tetrazol-2-id-5-yl)biphenyl-4-carboxylate) tetrahydroxide trihydrate unknown solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Dongxu

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  16. CCDC 1410946: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[dimethylammonium tris(mu-naphthalene-1,4-dicarboxylato)-tetrakis(mu-hydroxo)-triaqua-tri-terbium(iii) unknown solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  17. Time-Resolved Analysis of a Highly Sensitive Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Immunoassay Using Terbium Complexes as Donors and Quantum Dots as Acceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Hildebrandt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs are used as efficient Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET acceptors in a time-resolved immunoassays with Tb complexes as donors providing a long-lived luminescence decay. A detailed decay time analysis of the FRET process is presented. QD FRET sensitization is evidenced by a more than 1000-fold increase of the QD luminescence decay time reaching ca. 0.5 milliseconds, the same value to which the Tb donor decay time is quenched due to FRET to the QD acceptors. The FRET system has an extremely large Förster radius of approx. 100 Å and more than 70% FRET efficiency with a mean donor-acceptor distance of ca. 84 Å, confirming the applied biotin-streptavidin binding system. Time-resolved measurement allows for suppression of short-lived emission due to background fluorescence and directly excited QDs. By this means a detection limit of 18 attomol QDs within the immunoassay is accomplished, an improvement of more than two orders of magnitude compared to commercial systems.

  18. Comparison of the Magnetic Anisotropy and Spin Relaxation Phenomenon of Dinuclear Terbium(III) Phthalocyaninato Single-Molecule Magnets Using the Geometric Spin Arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takaumi; Damjanović, Marko; Katoh, Keiichi; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Lan, Yanhua; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Breedlove, Brian K; Enders, Markus; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2018-02-28

    Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of a dinuclear Tb III single-molecule magnet (SMM) with two [TbPc 2 ] 0 units connected via a fused-phthalocyaninato ligand. The stable and robust complex [(obPc)Tb(Fused-Pc)Tb(obPc)] (1) was characterized by using synchrotron radiation measurements and other spectroscopic techniques (ESI-MS, FT-IR, UV). The magnetic couplings between the Tb III ions and the two π radicals present in 1 were explored by means of density functional theory (DFT). Direct and alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements were conducted on magnetically diluted and nondiluted samples of 1, indicating this compound to be an SMM with improved properties compared to those of the well-known [TbPc 2 ] -/0/+ and the axially symmetric dinuclear Tb III phthalocyaninato triple-decker complex (Tb 2 (obPc) 3 ). Assuming that the probability of quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) occurring in one TbPc 2 unit is P QTM , the probability of QTM simultaneously occurring in 1 is P QTM 2 , meaning that QTM is effectively suppressed. Furthermore, nondiluted samples of 1 underwent slow magnetic relaxation times (τ ≈ 1000 s at 0.1 K), and the blocking temperature (T B ) was determined to be ca. 16 K with an energy barrier for spin reversal (U eff ) of 588 cm -1 (847 K) due to D 4d geometry and weak inter- and intramolecular magnetic interactions as an exchange bias (H bias ), reducing QTM. Four hyperfine steps were observed by micro-SQUID measurement. Furthermore, solution NMR measurements (one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and dynamic) were done on 1, which led to the determination of the high rotation barrier (83 ± 10 kJ/mol) of the obPc ligand. A comparison with previously reported Tb III triple-decker compounds shows that ambient temperature NMR measurements can indicate improvements in the design of coordination environments for SMMs. A large U eff causes strong uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in 1, leading to a χ ax value (1.39 × 10 -30 m 3 ) that is larger than that for Tb 2 (obPc) 3 (0.86 × 10 -30 m 3 ). Controlling the coordination environment and spin arrangement is an effective technique for suppressing QTM in TbPc 2 -based SMMs.

  19. Anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy is more effective with the radiolanthanide terbium-161 compared to lutetium-177 in an ovarian cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenberg, Juergen; Lindenblatt, Dennis; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane; Dorrer, Holger; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Koester, Ulli; Tuerler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is considered a valuable target for therapeutic intervention in different types of cancer. Recent studies have shown that anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with 67 Cu- and 177 Lu-labelled internalising monoclonal antibody (mAb) chCE7 was effective in the treatment of human ovarian cancer xenografts. In this study, we directly compared the therapeutic efficacy of anti-L1CAM RIT against human ovarian cancer under equitoxic conditions with the radiolanthanide 177 Lu and the potential alternative 161 Tb in an ovarian cancer therapy model. Tb was produced by neutron bombardment of enriched 160 Gd targets. 161 Tb and 177 Lu were used for radiolabelling of DOTA-conjugated antibodies. The in vivo behaviour of the radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) was assessed in IGROV1 tumour-bearing nude mice using biodistribution experiments and SPECT/CT imaging. After ascertaining the maximal tolerated doses (MTD) the therapeutic impact of 50 % MTD of 177 Lu- and 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 was evaluated in groups of ten mice by monitoring the tumour size of subcutaneous IGROV1 tumours. The average number of DOTA ligands per antibody was 2.5 and maximum specific activities of 600 MBq/mg were achieved under identical radiolabelling conditions. RICs were stable in human plasma for at least 48 h. 177 Lu- and 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 showed high tumour uptake (37.8-39.0 %IA/g, 144 h p.i.) with low levels in off-target organs. SPECT/CT images confirmed the biodistribution data. 161 Tb-labelled chCE7 revealed a higher radiotoxicity in nude mice (MTD: 10 MBq) than the 177 Lu-labelled counterpart (MTD: 12 MBq). In a comparative therapy study with equitoxic doses, tumour growth inhibition was better by 82.6 % for the 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 than the 177 Lu-DOTA-chCE7 RIT. Our study is the first to show that anti-L1CAM 161 Tb RIT is more effective compared to 177 Lu RIT in ovarian cancer xenografts. These results suggest that 161 Tb is a promising candidate for future clinical applications in combination with internalising antibodies. (orig.)

  20. Electroluminescence color tuning between green and red from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices fabricated by spin-coating of rare-earth (terbium + europium) organic compounds on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Toshihiro; Hattori, Fumihiro; Iwata, Hideyuki; Ohzone, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    Color tunable electroluminescence (EL) from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with the rare-earth elements Tb and Eu is reported. Organic compound liquid sources of (Tb + Ba) and Eu with various Eu/Tb ratios from 0.001 to 0.4 were spin-coated on an n+-Si substrate and annealed to form an oxide insulator layer. The EL spectra had only peaks corresponding to the intrashell Tb3+/Eu3+ transitions in the spectral range from green to red, and the intensity ratio of the peaks was appropriately tuned using the appropriate Eu/Tb ratios in liquid sources. Consequently, the EL emission colors linearly changed from yellowish green to yellowish orange and eventually to reddish orange on the CIE chromaticity diagram. The gate current +I G current also affected the EL colors for the medium-Eu/Tb-ratio device. The structure of the surface insulator films analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has four layers, namely, (Tb4O7 + Eu2O3), [Tb4O7 + Eu2O3 + (Tb/Eu/Ba)SiO x ], (Tb/Eu/Ba)SiO x , and SiO x -rich oxide. The EL mechanism proposed is that electrons injected from the Si substrate into the SiO x -rich oxide and Tb/Eu/Ba-silicate layers become hot electrons accelerated in a high electric field, and then these hot electrons excite Tb3+ and Eu3+ ions in the Tb4O7/Eu2O3 layers resulting in EL emission from Tb3+ and Eu3+ intrashell transitions.

  1. Tunable white light emission from hafnium oxide films co-doped with trivalent terbium and europium ions deposited by Pyrosol technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Olguin, J.C.; Montes, E.; Guzman-Mendoza, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Legaria (Mexico); Baez-Rodriguez, A.; Zamora-Peredo, L. [Centro de Investigacion en Micro y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Veracruzana, Boca del Rio, Ver (Mexico); Garcia-Hipolito, M.; Alvarez-Fregoso, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan (Mexico); Martinez-Merlin, I.; Falcony, C. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    In this paper, the photo and cathodoluminescent properties of HfO{sub 2} films optically activated with different atomic concentrations of Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions, deposited by the Pyrosol technique, are reported. These films were deposited at temperatures from 400 to 600 C, using chlorides as raw materials. The surface morphologies of all deposited films were rough and dense. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the films deposited at 600 C were polycrystalline exhibiting the HfO{sub 2} monoclinic phase. The tuning by the means of the excitation wavelength generates photoluminescence spectra, for co-doped films, in several emissions from blue to yellow (including white light) due to the characteristic electronic transitions of Tb{sup 3+} (green), Eu{sup 3+}(red) ions and the violet-blue emission associated to the host lattice (HfO{sub 2}). According to the chromaticity diagram, the best white light is reached for the sample S2 excited with 382 nm (x = 0.3343, y = 0.3406). The cathodoluminescence emission spectra for co-doped films showed emissions from green to red (including yellow, orange and other intermediate emissions). The averaged quantum efficiency values of the sample labeled as S2 resulted between 47 and 78% depending on the excitation wavelength. In addition, XPS, TEM, SEM and decay times were performed to characterize these films. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Luminescence of yttrium niobium-tantalate doubly activated by europium and/or terbium under X-ray and electron beam excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, I.D., E-mail: arellano@utp.edu.co [Department of Physics, Technological University of Pereira, Vereda La Julita, Pereira (Colombia); Nazarov, M.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Cortes, J.A. [Department of Physics, Technological University of Pereira, Vereda La Julita, Pereira (Colombia); Ahmad Fauzi, M.N [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2012-09-15

    This paper reports the luminescence emission spectra of Y(Ta,Nb)O{sub 4} activated by rare earth ions such as Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}. The influence of these rare earth ions on the luminescence of yttrium niobium-tantalate phosphors was investigated. The luminescent properties were studied under X-ray and electron beam excitations. Under these excitations, the emission centers of the rare earth activators (Eu{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+}) were found to contribute efficiently to the overall luminescence. Changing the mol concentration of the incorporated activators resulted in a broad variation of visible photoluminescence. Color cathodoluminescence images showed clearly the dependence of chromaticity on the different activators. With their various luminescence chromaticities, these rare earth activated phosphors are promising materials for solid-state lighting applications as well as for X-ray intensifying screens in medical diagnosis, providing a broad variation of visible photoluminescence from blue to red. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Y(Ta,Nb)O{sub 4} phosphors were activated by rare earth ions such as Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphors were studied under X-ray and electron beam excitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The emission centers contribute efficiently to the overall luminescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changing the concentration of the activators resulted in a broad luminescence.

  3. Crystal structure of a mixed-ligand terbium(III coordination polymer containing oxalate and formate ligands, having a three-dimensional fcu topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chainok Kittipong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, poly[(μ3-formato(μ4-oxalatoterbium(III], [Tb(CHO2(C2O4]n, is a three-dimensional coordination polymer, and is isotypic with the LaIII, CeIII and SmIII analogues. The asymmetric unit contains one TbIII ion, one formate anion (CHO2− and half of an oxalate anion (C2O42−, the latter being completed by application of inversion symmetry. The TbIII ion is nine-coordinated in a distorted tricapped trigonal–prismatic manner by two chelating carboxylate groups from two C2O42− ligands, two carboxylate oxygen atoms from another two C2O42− ligands and three oxygen atoms from three CHO2− ligands, with the Tb—O bond lengths and the O—Tb—O bond angles ranging from 2.4165 (19 to 2.478 (3 Å and 64.53 (6 to 144.49 (4°, respectively. The CHO2− and C2O42− anions adopt μ3-bridging and μ4-chelating-bridging coordination modes, respectively, linking adjacent TbIII ions into a three-dimensional 12-connected fcu topology with point symbol (324.436.56. The title compound exhibits thermal stability up to 623 K, and also displays strong green photoluminescence in the solid state at room temperature.

  4. Resonance energy transfer from quinolinone modified polystyrene-block-poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) copolymer to terbium(III) metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Výprachtický, Drahomír, E-mail: vyprachticky@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovský Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Mikeš, František [New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering, Polymer Research Institute, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Lokaj, Jan; Pokorná, Veronika; Cimrová, Věra [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovský Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    Polystyrene-block-poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) was synthesized by nitroxide mediated radical polymerization and modified with 7-amino-4-methylquinolin-2(1H)-one (I) and methanol. The formed block polymer ligand contained a quinolinone fluorophore (Ω) and carboxyl (III) or sodium carboxylate (IV) binding sites. The ligand-to-metal resonance energy transfer (RET) and ligand binding properties of [III–Tb{sup 3+}] and [IV–Tb{sup 3+}] complexes were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy in tetrahydrofuran/methanol and/or tetrahydrofuran/deuterated methanol mixtures and compared with those of a low-molecular-weight model ligand, i.e. the sodium salt of N-(4-methyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-7-yl)succinamic acid (II). The long-lived emission intensities of Tb{sup 3+} at 490, 545, 585, and 620 nm corresponding to the {sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 6}, {sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 5}, {sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 4}, and {sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 3} transitions, respectively, were strongly increased by the addition of ligands in the order [II-Tb{sup 3+}]⪡[III-Tb{sup 3+}]<[IV-Tb{sup 3+}]. The efficiency of energy transfer (E) was evaluated from the emission intensity of the donor (Ω) in the presence or absence of the acceptor (Tb{sup 3+}) depending on the acceptor concentration and ligand neutralization. It was concluded that the macromolecular ligand structural properties (polymer coil and supramolecular structures, e.g. micelles) were responsible for the increase in RET. The time-resolved luminescence measurements revealed that the binding affinity of the ligands II, III, and IV increased in the order II

  5. Anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy is more effective with the radiolanthanide terbium-161 compared to lutetium-177 in an ovarian cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenberg, Juergen; Lindenblatt, Dennis; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); Dorrer, Holger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); Zhernosekov, Konstantin [ITG Isotope Technologies Garching GmbH, Garching (Germany); Koester, Ulli [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Berne (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is considered a valuable target for therapeutic intervention in different types of cancer. Recent studies have shown that anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with {sup 67}Cu- and {sup 177}Lu-labelled internalising monoclonal antibody (mAb) chCE7 was effective in the treatment of human ovarian cancer xenografts. In this study, we directly compared the therapeutic efficacy of anti-L1CAM RIT against human ovarian cancer under equitoxic conditions with the radiolanthanide {sup 177}Lu and the potential alternative {sup 161}Tb in an ovarian cancer therapy model. Tb was produced by neutron bombardment of enriched {sup 160}Gd targets. {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu were used for radiolabelling of DOTA-conjugated antibodies. The in vivo behaviour of the radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) was assessed in IGROV1 tumour-bearing nude mice using biodistribution experiments and SPECT/CT imaging. After ascertaining the maximal tolerated doses (MTD) the therapeutic impact of 50 % MTD of {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 was evaluated in groups of ten mice by monitoring the tumour size of subcutaneous IGROV1 tumours. The average number of DOTA ligands per antibody was 2.5 and maximum specific activities of 600 MBq/mg were achieved under identical radiolabelling conditions. RICs were stable in human plasma for at least 48 h. {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 showed high tumour uptake (37.8-39.0 %IA/g, 144 h p.i.) with low levels in off-target organs. SPECT/CT images confirmed the biodistribution data. {sup 161}Tb-labelled chCE7 revealed a higher radiotoxicity in nude mice (MTD: 10 MBq) than the {sup 177}Lu-labelled counterpart (MTD: 12 MBq). In a comparative therapy study with equitoxic doses, tumour growth inhibition was better by 82.6 % for the {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 than the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-chCE7 RIT. Our study is the first to show that anti-L1CAM {sup 161}Tb RIT is more effective compared to {sup 177}Lu RIT in ovarian cancer xenografts. These results suggest that {sup 161}Tb is a promising candidate for future clinical applications in combination with internalising antibodies. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of blood zinc, calcium and blood lead levels among children aged 1-36 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaojun; He, Hong; Ren, Lisheng; Liu, Ji; Han, Chunhua

    2014-09-01

    Early childhood lead exposure is associated with numerous adverse health effects. Biomonitoring among susceptible populations, such as children, has not been previously conducted. The aim of the study is to evaluate the blood lead (Pb) and total blood calcium (Ca) levels; blood zinc (Zn) levels. A cross-sectional study was designed to collect healthy children age 1- 36 months (Mean ± SD: 1.5 ± 0.6 age, 60% boys) in the study from January 2010 to September 2011. The overall mean blood Pb levels were 42.18 ± 12.13 μg/L, the overall mean blood Zn and total blood Ca concentrations were 62.18 ± 12.33 μmol/L and 1.78 ± 0.13 mmol/L, respectively. The prevalence of elevated blood Pb levels in all children was 1.3%. A significant difference was found between female and male subjects for the blood Pb and Zn. After controlling for gender and age, there was a weak positive correlation between total blood Ca and Zn level. The blood Pb levels had a significant negative correlation with total blood Ca level after adjusting for age and gender, and these findings suggest that Pb had effect on positive blood Zn and total blood Ca levels; parents should pay more attention to the nutrition of girls. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. Expanding Access to Vocational-Technical Education in Massachusetts. White Paper No. 136

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardon, Ken; Fraser, Alison L.

    2015-01-01

    It is clear from assessment, graduation, and follow-up data that career-vocational technical education (CVTE), as it is practiced in Massachusetts, is a success. CVTE is becoming so popular that there are up to 5,000 more applicants for places in Massachusetts' vocational technical schools than there are openings, creating waiting lists. This…

  8. 40 CFR 63.136 - Process wastewater provisions-individual drain systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... restricts wind motion across the open area between the pipe and the drain) that encloses the space between...., there is no pump) or is operated with no more than slight fluctuations in the liquid level, the owner or...

  9. 29 CFR 780.136 - Employment in practices on a farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activity (§§ 780.104 through 780.144). Even though an employee may work on several farms during a workweek... an employee occurs off the farm will not affect this conclusion. Thus, an employee may spend a small amount of time within the workweek in transporting necessary equipment for work to be done on farms...

  10. Sud du Sahara | Page 136 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC-supported researchers at the University of Ghana investigated why ... show that unregulated population growth — averaging 10 births per woman ... est une organisation non gouvernementale à vocation internationale sise au Sénégal.

  11. Review comments on Environmental Analysis Cost Reduction Proposals (WIPP-DOE-136), July 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channell, J.K.

    1982-11-01

    The cost reduction proposals have the laudable goal of significantly reducing the total capital And operating cost connected with WIPP. Furthermore, since the proposed changes would reduce the size and operating rate of the project, they would be expected to have decreased environmental And socioeconomic impacts. However, some of these cost reduction proposals do decrease factors of safety in various components of the project or trade off one type of environmental detriment for another. The report does not contain sufficient detail to justify all of the conclusions reached; more discussion and quantitative information (including costs) is necessary in some cases. Also, there are places where the report is unclear or contradictory. Without a more detailed evaluation, EEG is unable to conclude that each of these cost reduction proposals either has a net environmental/health and safety benefit or a cost savings that justifies a net detriment. A revised Environmental Analysis (EA) should either include additional information or specifically reference backup documents where these conclusions have been justified. In addition, the EA needs to be revised to include the effect of the recently announced (11/18/82) decision by DOE to relocate the underground waste storage areas of the repository to the south

  12. The Neuroscience of Mathematical Cognition and Learning. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 136

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Chung Yen; Thompson, Jacqueline; Krause, Beatrix; Kadosh, Roi Cohen

    2016-01-01

    The synergistic potential of cognitive neuroscience and education for efficient learning has attracted considerable interest from the general public, teachers, parents, academics and policymakers alike. This review is aimed at providing 1) an accessible and general overview of the research progress made in cognitive neuroscience research in…

  13. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 136 - Precision and Recovery Statements for Methods for Measuring Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Spectroscopy (Direction Aspiration) and Colorimetry”, National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal... Spectroscopy (Direct Aspiration) and Colorimetry”, National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road... Absorption Spectroscopy (Direct Aspiration) and Colorimetry”, National Technical Information Service, 5285...

  14. 21 CFR 136.180 - Whole wheat bread, rolls, and buns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION BAKERY PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Bakery Products... composition of milk and/or other dairy products does not apply. (b) The name of the food is “whole wheat bread...

  15. 37 CFR 1.36 - Revocation of power of attorney; withdrawal of patent attorney or agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... be treated as a request to revoke any powers of attorney previously given. Fewer than all of the... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revocation of power of....36 Revocation of power of attorney; withdrawal of patent attorney or agent. (a) A power of attorney...

  16. 136-147 Enclosures to Enhance Woody Species Diversity in The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    *Corresponding author. E-mail: ... population structure in exclosure, and obstructed population structure in open area, showed favorable ... survival rate of planted species. ..... ANOVA test was employed to test the significance of ...... of Norway.

  17. 12 CFR 204.136 - Treatment of trust overdrafts for reserve requirement reporting purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... accounts under Regulation D. Unless the governing trust agreement or state law authorizes the depository... pursuant to trust law or written agreement, or where the amount that caused the overdraft is still... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Treatment of trust overdrafts for reserve...

  18. 136 Determinant of Adoption Pattern of New Product/Services in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    2013-01-28

    Jan 28, 2013 ... the adoption pattern for effective product management in the hotel industry. Specifically the study .... strong impact on NSD performance were strategic human resource .... affect how he/she chooses new services. in the case of night clubs in. Molumber it ..... Marketing in Nigeria Concepts, Principles and.

  19. 50 CFR 86.136 - What must be in the plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM BOATING INFRASTRUCTURE GRANT (BIG... problems. (e) Include information about the longevity of current tie-up facilities. ...

  20. Acid-Catalyzed Degradation of Poly(2-Butyl-1,3,6-Trioxocane)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-10

    was not studied. The "detailed investigation of ring formation by Illuminati and his coworkers" " show that formation of 8-membered rings is highly...with oxygen atom lowers the strain. Thus a trioxocane should be less destabilized relative 11 linear polymer than is cyclooctane. Illuminati et al...I, 1. 4, tw 29 11. G. Illuminati and L. Mandolini, Acct. Chem. Res. ,14. 95. 12. M.A. Casadel, C. Galli and L. Mandolini, 4, . hem. Soc. i123, 10.6

  1. Acid-Catalyzed Degradation of Poly(2-butyl-1,3,6-trioxocane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-21

    case, n = 8, was not studied. The detailed investigation of ring formation by Illuminati and his coworkers 1 1 󈧐 show that formation of 8-membered... Illuminati et al. have evaluated the oxygen effect in eq. 8 by studying the effect of replacing X = CH2 with X= 0. a o- (CCHn 2Br B 8 0 X-(CH )-Br .(H) +B...Macrosol. 16, 21 1000. 10. S. Winsten, E. Allred, R. Heck and R. Olick, Tetrahedron, 10. 3, 1. 29 11. G. Illuminati and L. Mandolini, Acct Ce 14, 95. 12

  2. 136 Identification des risques pluviométriques sur la culture du maïs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boris

    Agronomique pour le Développement (IRAD) qui a mis sur pieds des variétés améliorées de maïs en fonction des zones agroécologiques. Désormais, en plus de la variété locale, sont vulgarisées dans la zone d'étude les variétés telles que le CMS 304 et le Z 290 (variétés à cycle court) ainsi que les variétés Kasaï et Coca.

  3. 22 CFR 136.4 - Restrictions on dispositions of personal property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... this section including any interest earned by the employee or family member on such profits, shall be... currencies, proceeds received and costs incurred in a foreign currency shall be valued in United States dollars at the time of receipt or payment at the rate of exchange that was in effect for reverse...

  4. Base Flow Investigation of the Apollo Command Module in the Frame of AVT-136

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walpot, L.M.G.; Noeding, P.; Schrijer, F.F.J.; Wright, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The current uncertainty levels for afterbody (base) aeroheating are very large for capsule like (re)entry vehicles. The design margin on missions have traditionally ranged up to 200% of CFD predictions. These uncertainties can be attributed to a lack of validation of the CFD tools with suitable

  5. 136 Folkism and Modern Nigerian Theatre: A Study of Sam Ukala's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    important aspect of African theatre - audience participation. This and other ... the play, entails much speech. It is now ... 3. the law of creativity, free enactment and responsibility;. 4. the law of ... engaging a performer in a production of The Last Heroes (1993) ... glance one would think it is a film script until you understand that.

  6. Erratum: "Space Density of Optically Selected Type 2 Quasars" (2008, AJ, 136, 2373)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Strauss, Michael A.; Green, Joshua; Krolik, Julian H.; Shen, Yue; Richards, Gordon T.; Anderson, Scott F.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2010-03-01

    Figure 12 of the paper "Space Density of Optically Selected Type 2 Quasars" compares the obscured quasar fractions derived in our work with those of other studies. Unfortunately, some of the points from these other studies were shown incorrectly. Specifically, the results from X-ray data—Hasinger (2004; open circles) and Ueda et al. (2003; open squares)—which we had taken from Figure 16 of Hopkins et al. (2006), were affected by a luminosity conversion error, in the sense that the displayed luminosities for these data were too high by ~1 dex. With this erratum, we correct this problem and update the figure. The new version (Figure 12) shows more recent results from Hasinger (2008), in lieu of the Hasinger (2004) data points. These are based on data in the redshift range z = 0.2-3.2 (open circles) in that work. The best linear fit to these data (black dashed line) is consistent with that derived for the redshift slice z = 0.4-0.8, which overlaps with the highest redshift bin in our study, and is higher than that derived for redshifts smaller than 0.4 (corresponding to a shift of ~0.7 dex in luminosity). Figure 12 also shows estimates of the obscured quasar fraction derived from the ratio of IR to bolometric luminosities of an AGN sample at redshift z ~ 1 (Treister et al. 2008; filled triangles). Because the obscured quasar fractions derived from our analysis (colored arrows) are strict lower limits, there was already a hint in the previous version of Figure 12 that at high quasar luminosities, we find higher obscured quasar fractions than X-ray surveys. The correction and updates of Figure 12 strengthen this conclusion. At face value, our derived obscured quasar fractions are consistent with those from IR data (Treister et al. 2008; filled triangles). However, we find that they are significantly higher than those derived from X-ray surveys at L_[O\\,\\mathsc {iii]}\\gtrsim 10^{9.5}\\;L_{\\odot }, especially those from the recent analysis by Hasinger (2008). This comparison strongly suggests that optical selection successfully identifies a population of luminous obscured quasars that are missed by X-ray selection.

  7. : tous les projets | Page 136 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Programme: Governance and Justice. Financement total : CA$ 493,300.00. Chaire en écosanté sur la pollution urbaine de l'air et les maladies respiratoires non transmissibles (Afrique de l'Ouest) ... Région: Central Asia, Far East Asia, South Asia, India. Programme: Food, Environment, and Health. Financement total : CA$ ...

  8. 25 CFR 170.136 - How can a tribe obtain funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and have it ready for development; and (2) Have a viable project ready for improvement or construction... them transferred to BIA for tribal self-determination contracts or self-governance agreements under...

  9. 42 CFR 136a.16 - Beneficiary Identification Cards and verification of tribal membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the charter, articles of incorporation, or other legal instruments or traditional processes of the... making their determination. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0915...

  10. The Research Laboratory of Electronics Progress Report Number 136, 1 January-31 December 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    the previous four years for of gravitational lensing-the distortion of radio the Office of Solar System Exploration of the signals from distant radio...355 Energia Nucleare e Energie Alternative (Italy) 249 Geophysics 325 Energy transfer 133 Geraci, James R. 35, 37 Entin, Ilya 209, 225 Gold, Bernard 317

  11. Nguyen et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2014) 11(4):136 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    Hep G2 cells treated with the formula showed increased gene ... Moutan Cortex; RdR, Radix Rehmanniae; ROS, Reactive oxygen species; ... decoction was routinely produced for clinical use in the Traditional Medicine Hospital HCMC.

  12. 45 CFR 147.136 - Internal claims and appeals and external review processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., appropriateness, health care setting, level of care, or effectiveness of a covered benefit. (ii) The State process... pay the cost of the IRO for conducting the external review. Notwithstanding this requirement, the... not impose, for example, a $500 minimum claims threshold. (vi) The State process must allow at least...

  13. SU-E-T-136: Assessment of Seasonal Linear Accelerator Output Variations and Associated Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolac, S; Letourneau, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Application of process control theory in quality assurance programs promises to allow earlier identification of problems and potentially better quality in delivery than traditional paradigms based primarily on tolerances and action levels. The purpose of this project was to characterize underlying seasonal variations in linear accelerator output that can be used to improve performance or trigger preemptive maintenance. Methods: Review of runtime plots of daily (6 MV) output data acquired using in house ion chamber based devices over three years and for fifteen linear accelerators of varying make and model were evaluated. Shifts in output due to known interventions with the machines were subtracted from the data to model an uncorrected scenario for each linear accelerator. Observable linear trends were also removed from the data prior to evaluation of periodic variations. Results: Runtime plots of output revealed sinusoidal, seasonal variations that were consistent across all units, irrespective of manufacturer, model or age of machine. The average amplitude of the variation was on the order of 1%. Peak and minimum variations were found to correspond to early April and September, respectively. Approximately 48% of output adjustments made over the period examined were potentially avoidable if baseline levels had corresponded to the mean output, rather than to points near a peak or valley. Linear trends were observed for three of the fifteen units, with annual increases in output ranging from 2–3%. Conclusion: Characterization of cyclical seasonal trends allows for better separation of potentially innate accelerator behaviour from other behaviours (e.g. linear trends) that may be better described as true out of control states (i.e. non-stochastic deviations from otherwise expected behavior) and could indicate service requirements. Results also pointed to an optimal setpoint for accelerators such that output of machines is maintained within set tolerances and interventions are required less frequently

  14. SU-E-T-136: Assessment of Seasonal Linear Accelerator Output Variations and Associated Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolac, S; Letourneau, D [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Application of process control theory in quality assurance programs promises to allow earlier identification of problems and potentially better quality in delivery than traditional paradigms based primarily on tolerances and action levels. The purpose of this project was to characterize underlying seasonal variations in linear accelerator output that can be used to improve performance or trigger preemptive maintenance. Methods: Review of runtime plots of daily (6 MV) output data acquired using in house ion chamber based devices over three years and for fifteen linear accelerators of varying make and model were evaluated. Shifts in output due to known interventions with the machines were subtracted from the data to model an uncorrected scenario for each linear accelerator. Observable linear trends were also removed from the data prior to evaluation of periodic variations. Results: Runtime plots of output revealed sinusoidal, seasonal variations that were consistent across all units, irrespective of manufacturer, model or age of machine. The average amplitude of the variation was on the order of 1%. Peak and minimum variations were found to correspond to early April and September, respectively. Approximately 48% of output adjustments made over the period examined were potentially avoidable if baseline levels had corresponded to the mean output, rather than to points near a peak or valley. Linear trends were observed for three of the fifteen units, with annual increases in output ranging from 2–3%. Conclusion: Characterization of cyclical seasonal trends allows for better separation of potentially innate accelerator behaviour from other behaviours (e.g. linear trends) that may be better described as true out of control states (i.e. non-stochastic deviations from otherwise expected behavior) and could indicate service requirements. Results also pointed to an optimal setpoint for accelerators such that output of machines is maintained within set tolerances and interventions are required less frequently.

  15. 12 CFR 550.136 - To what extent do State laws apply to my fiduciary operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Recordkeeping; (3) Advertising and marketing; (4) The ability of a federal savings association conducting..., upon review, finds: (i) Furthers a vital State interest; and (ii) Either has only an incidental effect...

  16. Tshikalange et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2016) 13(6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    importance and urgent so that it can be preserved and conserved (Maroyi, 2012). Traditional knowledge is ... Stem. Infusion. Diarrhoea. 1. 11 0.70. Acacia nilotica. Fabaceae. Mugamazu. Mophutin ... Decoction. Fertility in women 2. 10 0.67.

  17. 1/36 DIRECTOR AND OFFICER LIABILITY IN THE ZONE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Tanya du Plessis

    It is a generally accepted proposition that the duty of the directors of a company ..... their businesses without proper care and attention, and worse, to abuse the ..... Legal systems frown on negligence, just like they do on fraud, but the line.

  18. 136 | P a g e THE IMPERATIVE OF REMOVING IMMUNITY CLAUSE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    2007-09-06

    Sep 6, 2007 ... Government would have so obeyed a court order were it not for the immunity clause ... In Africa, immunity in government is not strange especially to ..... personally attend or appear in court or to produce any person or thing.

  19. CCDC 1410822: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : heptakis(dimethylammonium) dodecakis(mu-hydroxo)-bis(mu-oxo)-nonaaqua-nona-terbium tris(octakis(mu-hydroxo)-triaqua-bis(2-fluorobenzoato)-bis(formato)-hexa-terbium) dodecakis(5-[(4-carboxylatophenyl)methoxy]benzene-1,3-dicarboxylate) unknown solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  20. The purification of the rare earth metals. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, R.G.; Jones, D.W.; Hems, V.J.

    1975-01-01

    Solid-state electrotransport processing has been demonstrated as a technique for purifying terbium. The results show that both oxygen and nitrogen migrate rapidly in the same direction as the electron flow. Although hydrogen contamination occurs on contact with air, terbium of better than 99.9 at. % has been prepared from commercially available starting material. The preparation and characterisation of high-quality single-crystal terbium specimens is also described. (Auth.)