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Sample records for teplitz red rose

  1. An efficient protocol for in vitro propagation of Rosa gruss an teplitz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rose is a beautiful flower having commercial and ornamental value. In order to establish protocol shoot tips explants of Rosa gruss an teplitz and Rosa centifolia were proliferated in vitro using MS medium supplemented with different levels of benzylaminopurine (0, 0.5,1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 mg l-1 ). Maximum numbers of ...

  2. THE GENERATIVE REPRODUCTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF RED DRAGON FRUIT (Hylocereus.polyrhizus (Web.) Britton & Rose, CACTACEAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Eniek Kriswiyanti

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the generative reproductive characteristics of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus (Web.) Britton & Rose), that is the characteristics and the development of male and female reproductive system and the embryo. The flowering morphology was observed through the gametogenesis process and the process of embryogenesis was observed using the methods of squash, cytolysis, and embedding of flower before anthesis, during and after anthesis. The results showed th...

  3. The Rose-red Glow of Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The vivid red cloud in this new image from ESO's Very Large Telescope is a region of glowing hydrogen surrounding the star cluster NGC 371. This stellar nursery lies in our neighbouring galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud. The object dominating this image may resemble a pool of spilled blood, but rather than being associated with death, such regions of ionised hydrogen - known as HII regions - are sites of creation with high rates of recent star birth. NGC 371 is an example of this; it is an open cluster surrounded by a nebula. The stars in open clusters all originate from the same diffuse HII region, and over time the majority of the hydrogen is used up by star formation, leaving behind a shell of hydrogen such as the one in this image, along with a cluster of hot young stars. The host galaxy to NGC 371, the Small Magellanic Cloud, is a dwarf galaxy a mere 200 000 light-years away, which makes it one of the closest galaxies to the Milky Way. In addition, the Small Magellanic Cloud contains stars at all stages of their evolution; from the highly luminous young stars found in NGC 371 to supernova remnants of dead stars. These energetic youngsters emit copious amounts of ultraviolet radiation causing surrounding gas, such as leftover hydrogen from their parent nebula, to light up with a colourful glow that extends for hundreds of light-years in every direction. The phenomenon is depicted beautifully in this image, taken using the FORS1 instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). Open clusters are by no means rare; there are numerous fine examples in our own Milky Way. However, NGC 371 is of particular interest due to the unexpectedly large number of variable stars it contains. These are stars that change in brightness over time. A particularly interesting type of variable star, known as slowly pulsating B stars, can also be used to study the interior of stars through asteroseismology [1], and several of these have been confirmed in this cluster. Variable stars

  4. THE GENERATIVE REPRODUCTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF RED DRAGON FRUIT (Hylocereus.polyrhizus (Web. Britton & Rose, CACTACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eniek Kriswiyanti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the generative reproductive characteristics of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus (Web. Britton & Rose, that is the characteristics and the development of male and female reproductive system and the embryo. The flowering morphology was observed through the gametogenesis process and the process of embryogenesis was observed using the methods of squash, cytolysis, and embedding of flower before anthesis, during and after anthesis. The results showed that the flower funnelled form with many calyxes, stamens and crowns. The pollen was circular, sulcus, trilate, reticulate, and spheroid. The development of microgametophyte was at the 2nd stages with three nucleuses and the pistil developed after anthesis.  Anthesis was taken place at night time, fertilization and pollen developed before anthesis and has not germinating. A single pistil, the head of pistil with many branches, the style longer than the stamen, open type.  Seeds anathrophus, endosperm and embryo with the globular shaped, developed 5 days after anthesis, the embryo torpedo likes and the differentiation of primer tissues seen in the seeds 7 days after anthesis, and arilus generated from development of megasporangium. Keywords: embedding, self incompatibility, sferoidal, anatrophus, arillus.

  5. Immobilization of Rose Waste Biomass for Uptake of Pb(II from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Mahmood Ansari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosa centifolia and Rosa gruss an teplitz distillation waste biomass was immobilized using sodium alginate for Pb(II uptake from aqueous solutions under varied experimental conditions. The maximum Pb(II adsorption occurred at pH 5. Immobilized rose waste biomasses were modified physically and chemically to enhance Pb(II removal. The Langmuir sorption isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic models fitted well to the adsorption data of Pb(II by immobilized Rosa centifolia and Rosa gruss an teplitz. The adsorbed metal is recovered by treating immobilized biomass with different chemical reagents (H2SO4, HCl and H3PO4 and maximum Pb(II recovered when treated with sulphuric acid (95.67%. The presence of cometals Na, Ca(II, Al(III, Cr(III, Cr(VI, and Cu(II, reduced Pb(II adsorption on Rosa centifolia and Rosa gruss an teplitz waste biomass. It can be concluded from the results of the present study that rose waste can be effectively used for the uptake of Pb(II from aqueous streams.

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF VARIOUS CONCENTRATION OF RED ROSES (ROSA DAMASCENA MILL FLOWER EXTRACT TO ANTHOCYANIN COLOR STABILITY JELLY AS BIOLOGY LEARNING SOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Wulandari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Red roses flower (Rosa damascena Mill is plant which can be cultivated in Indonesia. Red roses flower have a natural pigment contain that anthocyanin which can be used as food coloring. The crown of roses flower contain an anthocyanin pigment that include to flavonoid and kind of sianidin anthocyanin which have a function as antioxidant or free radical preventing. Pigment as bioactive is important compound that useful for human health. The aim of this research is to know various concentration influence of red roses flower extract and to know effective concentration that the most influence to color stability of anthocyanin jelly. Research types with treatment, repetition, and control. The design of this research using completely randomized design (RAL, with 6 treatment (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, and 5% and repeated 4 times. Population of this research is jelly. Sample of this research is jelly which added by red roses flower extract. If the data result is have normality, that the data is analysed by Anava one-way test and continue with Duncan’s 5%. Result of this research shown that there was influence of various concentration of red roses flower extract to color stability of anthocyanin jelly. Result test for color stability, the most influence concentration for brightness is 4%, red color is 5%, and yellow color is 0%.

  7. Complete mitogenome sequences of the pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru) and the spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus gutattus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayona-Vásquez, Natalia Juliana; Hernández-Álvarez, Cristóbal Alejandro; Glenn, Travis; Domínguez-Domínguez, Omar; Uribe-Alcocer, Manuel; Díaz-Jaimes, Píndaro

    2017-03-01

    The structure of the mitochondrial genome for the Pacific red snapper, Lutjanus peru, and the spotted rose snapper, Lutjanus gutattus, of specimens collected in the eastern Pacific is similar to the reported for other teleosts and shares the same configuration with other members of the family Lutjanidae. It has a total length of 16 502 and 16 508 base pairs (bp) for Lutjanus peru and L. gutattus, respectively; on average the base composition was A (27.9%), T (24.8%) C (30.9%), and G (16.4%), containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 22 tRNA genes; and the leucine (Leu) tRNA is duplicated.

  8. [Rose necrosis: Necrotizing granulomatous reaction with infected node at red pigment of a tattoo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fray, J; Lekieffre, A; Parry, F; Huguier, V; Guillet, G

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays, necrotizing cutaneous reaction after a tattoo is rare especially with the sterile tattoo equipment and antisepsis rules. We report the rare case of a necrotizing reaction secondary to a granulomatous reaction after a red tattoo, with a satellite node. A 40-year-old patient suffering from a granulomatous reaction to red dye of a large pectoral tattoo, with cutaneous and sub-cutaneous necrosis, and an infected axillary node. This pectoral tattoo also triggered a necrotizing granulomatous reaction on red-pigmented areas of other older tattoos. Local treatments (dressings, antibiotics, repeated excisions of necrotizing tissues) did not stop the allergic reaction, and an infectious origin was eliminated. The patient asked for a complete excision of the pectoral tattoo. Black intramacrophagic pigment was found in the black lymph node analysed. We did not experience any complications and the patient is satisfied with the results. Very few examples of cutaneous necrotizing secondary to a tattoo have been found in the literature. The hypothesis of a primitive infection that had secondarily led to necrosis is refuted by the lack of infective structures found in the analysed node, and most of all by the same reaction on other older tattoos on red-pigmented areas. This rare complication must be known by plastic surgeons, who will probably be called upon to take care of more and more tattooed patients. Even if it's rare, necrosis with a granulomatous reaction to red pigment after a tattoo must be known. This case illustrates a very violent immune reaction where infection was not proved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Short Term Salicylic Acid and Ascorbic Acid Treatments on Delaying Flowers’ Senescence of Cut Rose Cv. Red Naomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Samady

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted on rose cut flowers, Red Naomy cultivar, with the length of 35 cm, for 18 hours as a short-term treatment in a factorial based on completely randomized design with five treatments including sucrose + 8-Hydroxyquinoline sulfate, salicylic acid + sucrose + 8-Hydroxyquinoline sulfate, ascorbic acid + sucrose + 8-Hydroxyquinoline sulfate, Salicylic acid + ascorbic acid + sucrose‌ + 8-Hydroxyquinoline sulfate and distilled water as control, and three replications in bottles. Morphological traits such as shelf life, changes in water uptake, fresh weight, flower diameter and physiological traits such as total protein and proline contents were measured. The results showed that combination of Salicylic acid + sucrose + 8-Hydroxyquinoline sulfate treatment significantly affected shelf life compared to control and other treatments. The results also revealed that the combination of Salicylic acid + ascorbic acid + sucrose‌ + 8-Hydroxyquinoline sulfate delayed flowers senescence and increased the amount of water uptake, fresh weight and flower diameter. Moreover, the greatest protein and proline contents were obtained under ascorbic acid + sucrose + 8-Hydroxyquinoline sulfate treatment and sucrose + 8-Hydroxyquinoline sulfate, respectively.

  10. Nursery areas of red mullet ( Mullus barbatus), hake ( Merluccius merluccius) and deep-water rose shrimp ( Parapenaeus longirostris) in the Eastern-Central Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Roberto; Giuseppe, Lembo; Porzia, Maiorano; Francesca, Capezzuto; Alessandra, Marano Chiara; Letizia, Sion; Teresa, Spedicato Maria; Nicola, Ungaro; Angelo, Tursi; D'Onghia, Gianfranco

    2009-08-01

    The spatial pattern of the nursery areas of red mullet ( Mullus barbatus), hake ( Merluccius merluccius) (Linnaeus, 1758) and deep-water rose shrimp ( Parapenaeus longirostris) (Lucas, 1846) was studied in the South Adriatic and North Ionian Seas (Eastern-Central Mediterranean) applying geostatistical techniques and data from time series trawl surveys conducted in the area. The analysed variables were: R (number of recruits/km 2) and R/Tot (fraction of recruits on the total sampled population). The structural analysis showed a spatial pattern of both variables characterized by continuity on a small scale. Predictions of nursery area localization with probability of finding recruits at different threshold values were obtained through median indicator kriging. For the red mullet the nurseries were mainly identified in the South Adriatic Sea off the Gargano peninsula and between Molfetta and Monopoli within 50 m in depth. The main concentration of hake juveniles was found to be between 100 and 200 m in depth along the Gargano peninsula and between Otranto and Santa Maria di Leuca, where a nursery of deep-water rose shrimp was also detected. An overlapping depth, between 100 and 200 m, was identified for hake and deep-water rose shrimp nurseries. Protection of these areas through limitations of fishing pressure is discussed.

  11. Axillary budbreak in a cut rose crop as influenced by light intensity and red:far-red ratio at bud level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubs-Timmermans, A.M.; Heuvelink, E.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Buck-Sorlin, G.H.; Vos, J.

    2014-01-01

    When flower-bearing shoots in cut rose (Rosa ·hybrida) are harvested, a varying number of repressed axillary buds on the shoot remainder start to grow into new shoots (budbreak). Earlier experiments indicated that light reaching the bud affected the number of budbreaks. In all these studies, whole

  12. Rose Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increase the chance of blood clots or another heart attack. Sickle cell disease: It is rare, but the vitamin C in rose hip might make blood more acidic. This could bring on a sickle cell crisis. It's best to avoid use. Stroke: Rose hip ...

  13. Mobile light in roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, A.; Snel, J.F.H.; Elings, A.; Warmenhoven, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    In order to quantify the claimed differences between mobile and static lighting, and to clarify the mechanisms causing these differences, an experiment with rose `First Red¿ was carried out. In a greenhouse compartment half of the area was equipped with mobile lamps, and the other half with static

  14. Postharvest aspects of roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elka Fabiana Aparecida Almeida

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate respiratory activity, color changes and fresh weight variation of ‘Carola’ (red, ‘Avalanche’ (white and ‘Avalanche Chá’ (tea roses for seven days after harvest. Respiratory activity, coloration of petals and fresh weight loss were evaluated. Treatments were composed of three rose cultivars and seven days of evaluation, in a 3 x 7 factorial and a completely randomized design with four replicates of two flowers per plot. To determine the respiratory activity, in addition to the four replicates, an “experimental control” was used as a fifth replicate without roses. ‘Avalanche’ and ‘Avalanche Chá’ roses with petals of similar luminosity showed no browning during days after harvest, but are distinct in terms of chromaticity. ‘Carola’ rose has less shiny petals. On harvest day, the respiratory activity is elevated and reduces later until the fourth day, in which there is elevation of this parameter again coinciding with high fresh weight loss. During days after harvest, small changes in the color of petals were observed; however, the main changes were observed in respiratory activity and fresh weight loss.

  15. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Anthocyanins from Red Rose Petals and New Spectrophotometric Methods for the Determination of Total Monomeric Anthocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Mahmure Üstün; Çimen, Emrah

    2017-11-28

    In this study, four extraction technologies for the extraction of anthocyanins (Acyns) from red rose petals (RRPs) were investigated and compared, including ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE), reflux extraction, Soxhlet extraction, and marinated extraction. UAE was the most suitable for the extraction of Acyns from RRPs because of its high extraction efficiency and short extraction time. The results showed that the best conditions for UAE are an extraction solution of ethanol–0.1 N HCl (80 + 20, v/v), a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:40 g/mL, a temperature of 30°C, and an extraction time of 15 min performed three times. Using such conditions, 320.4 mg Acyns/100 g RRPs was extracted. UAE was followed by two new difference spectrophotometric (DS) methods, which were developed for the fast and simple determination of Acyns in RRPs. Under the optimum experimental conditions, a linear response was observed for Acyns in the range of 12.5–62.5 μg/mL for the two proposed methods, with correlation coefficients (r) ranging from 0.9988 to 0.9995. The mean recovery values of Acyns for the DS methods were in the range of 99.8–101.5%, and the RSD was 0.5%. The respective LOD and the LOQ values were 1.4 and 4.8 for DS1 and 1.1 and 3.6 μg/mL for DS2. The stability of Acyns was also studied.

  16. Mobile light in roses

    OpenAIRE

    Marissen, A.; Snel, J.F.H.; Elings, A.; Warmenhoven, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    In order to quantify the claimed differences between mobile and static lighting, and to clarify the mechanisms causing these differences, an experiment with rose `First Red¿ was carried out. In a greenhouse compartment half of the area was equipped with mobile lamps, and the other half with static lamps. By mounting the lamps in the centre of the greenhouse, a light gradient was achieved in both treatments. Experimental plots were chosen with daily light integrals of 1 to 3 and 3 to 5 mol m-2...

  17. “I Am the Wolf: Queering ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ and ‘Snow White and Rose Red’ in the Television Show Once Upon a Time”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Warman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In season one, episode 15 of the television show Once Upon a Time, viewers are given a glimpse into the history of Ruby/Red, the series’ version of Red Riding Hood. The episode reveals that, contrary to most oral and written versions of the ATU 333 tale, Red herself is the wolf: a werewolf who must wear an enchanted red cloak in order to keep from turning into a monster. The episode also features the beginnings of the close friendship between Red and Snow White. The sisterly bond that quickly forms between the two women, combined with the striking images of their respective red and white cloaks, easily calls to mind a less familiar fairy tale not explicitly referenced in the series: “Snow White and Rose Red” (ATU 426. Taking queer readings of this text as starting points, I argue that this allusion complicates the bond between the two women, opening up space for a compelling reading of Red’s werewolf nature as a coded depiction of her then latent but later confirmed bisexuality.

  18. Influence of different maceration treatments on the aroma profile of rose and red wines from Croatian aromatic cv. Muskat ruza porecki

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Radeka, Sanja; Lukic, Igor; Persuric, Dordano

    2012-01-01

    The influence of different grape mash maceration treatments on the varietal and secondary aroma profiles of wines produced from an aromatic red grape variety, Muskat ruza porecki, have been investigated...

  19. Salinity in rose production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Reis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The rose is one of the most important ornamental plants in the world. However, the cultivation systems used for roses often impose salt stress. Saline conditions occur naturally in some regions or by human activity in others with use of low quality water or excessive fertilizer application. In general, roses are considered sensitive to salinity. However, tolerance levels can be different among roses species and cultivars. Therefore, studies are needed that take into account characteristics of each species and how the exposure to salinity occurs. Management of water and nutrients can be important tools for mitigating the effects of high salt concentrations. Also, advances in biotechnology can be used for a better understanding of the physiological responses to salinity and to develop more salt tolerant rose cultivars. Thus, this paper aims to review the progress made and future prospects of salinity tolerance in commercial rose production.

  20. Robots in the Roses

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    2014-04 Robots in the Roses A CRUSER Sponsored Event. The 4th Annual Robots in the Roses provides a venue for Faculty & NPS Students to showcase unmanned systems research (current or completed) and recruit NPS Students to join in researching on your project. Posters, robots, vehicles, videos, and even just plain humans welcome! Families are welcome to attend Robots in the Roses as we'll have a STEM activity for children to participate in.

  1. ATTX961014-1R/Y a.k.a. Sierra Rose: A red skin, yellow flesh cultivar for the specialty/gourmet market

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATTX961014-1R/Y is a high yielding, red skin, yellow flesh cultivar which was released by Texas A&M AgriLife Research in 2012. It resulted from a cross of breeding clone A90601-2RDY by the potato cultivar Mazama. ATTX961014-1R/Y is susceptible to Late Blight (Phytopthora infestans), Potato Leaf Roll...

  2. Characteristics of rose mosaic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek S. Szyndel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Presented review of rose diseases, associated with the mosaic symptoms, includes common and yellow rose mosaic, rose ring pattern, rose X disease, rose line pattern, yellow vein mosaic and rose mottle mosaic disease. Based on symptomatology and graft transmissibility of causing agent many of those rose disorders are called "virus-like diseases" since the pathogen has never been identified. However, several viruses were detected and identified in roses expressing mosaic symptoms. Currently the most prevalent rose viruses are Prunus necrotic ringspot virus - PNRSV, Apple mosaic virus - ApMV (syn. Rose mosaic virus and Arabis mosaic virus - ArMV Symptoms and damages caused by these viruses are described. Tomato ringspot virus, Tobacco ringspot virus and Rose mottle mosaic virus are also mentioned as rose pa thogcns. Methods of control of rose mosaic diseases are discussed.

  3. Encyclopedia of Rose Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberts, A.; Debener, T.; Gudin, S.; Byrne, D.B.; Cairns, T.; Vries, de D.P.; Dubois, L.A.M.; Forkmann, G.; Fruchter, M.; Helsper, J.P.F.G.; Horst, R.K.; Jay, M.; Kwakkenbosch, T.A.M.; Pemberton, B.; Put, H.M.C.; Rajapakse, S.; Reid, M.; Schum, A.; Shorthouse, J.D.; Ueda, Y.; Vainstein, A.; Pol, van de P.A.; Zieslin, N.

    2003-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Rose Science brings together a wealth of information on the rose, long treasured for its captivating perfumes and splendid colors. Now, more than ever, science plays a central place in the production of this flower at the center of one of the world's biggest floricultural

  4. ROSE MIU Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Overview of work done by Rebekah Austin during Pathways Internship work tour. Describes ROSE MIU (Reconfigurable Operational Spacecraft for Science and Exploration Module Interface Unit) features and test plan.

  5. White Rose Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, W. [Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The status of Husky's White Rose Project in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland was presented with particular focus on the province of Newfoundland, resource development applications and project challenges. Husky Energy merged with Renaissance Energy in August 2000. It is publicly traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange. Its Q1 2000 production was 270 mboe/d with a clear strategy to deliver an additional 200 mboe/d by 2005. The 5 major projects which represent 80 per cent of Husky's growth are the White Rose, Tucker Lake, Wenchang, Terra Nova and Lloyd Project. This presentation included a map showing the land holdings related to Husky's White Rose Project. The development plans include the drilling of 15-20 wells in the basin which holds an estimated 230 mm/bbls of oil reserves. The presentation also described the Canada-Newfoundland benefits that White Rose will bring in terms of direct person-hours and spin off employment. No gas export infrastructure is currently in place. It is believed that between 7 and 10 tcf of discovered gas reserves is required and there is not enough White Rose gas on which to base an economic gas development. The White Rose challenge will be to deliver a technically and commercially viable project that meets the needs of the owners, governments, unions and supply community. The successful completion of the White Rose Project will demonstrate that the Grand Banks can be developed effectively and efficiently and will contribute to Newfoundland's offshore petroleum industry. tabs., figs.

  6. Inheritance and QTL analysis of the determinants of flower color in tetraploid cut roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gitonga, Virginia W.; Stolker, Robert; Koning-Boucoiran, Carole F.S.; Aelaei, Mitra; Visser, Richard G.F.; Maliepaard, Chris; Krens, Frans A.

    2016-01-01

    The success of cut rose cultivars is a direct result of their aesthetic value. The rose industry thrives on novelty, and the production of novel flower color has been extensively studied. The most popular color is red, and it is, therefore, important for breeders to produce a good red cultivar.

  7. Two unnamed Turkish roses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Kit; Zielinski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Rosa ‘Professor Turhan Baytop’ and Rosa ‘Asuman’, two different morphotypes of the fragrant double whiteflowered cultivar of Rosa beggeriana, are formally named and described. They stem from old roses once cultivated in gardens of Central and East Anatolia and now gradually disappearing when...

  8. Simultanagnosia: when a rose is not red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coslett, H Branch; Lie, Grace

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Information regarding object identity ("what") and spatial location ("where/how to") is largely segregated in visual processing. Under most circumstances, however, object identity and location are linked. We report data from a simultanagnosic patient (K.E.) with bilateral posterior parietal infarcts who was unable to "see" more than one object in an array despite relatively preserved object processing and normal preattentive processing. K.E. also demonstrated a finding that has not, to our knowledge, been reported: He was unable to report more than one attribute of a single object. For example, he was unable to name the color of the ink in which words were written despite naming the word correctly. Several experiments demonstrated, however, that perceptual attributes that he was unable to report influenced his performance. We suggest that binding of object identity and location is a limited-capacity operation that is essential for conscious awareness for which the posterior parietal lobe is crucial.

  9. Euphorbia tirucalli mediated green synthesis of rose like morphology of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} red phosphor: Structural, photoluminescence and photocatalytic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidya, Y.S., E-mail: vidyays.phy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, LBSGFGC, Bangalore 560 032 (India); Anantharaju, K.S., E-mail: ananth.che@gmail.com [Research Center, Department of Science, East West Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 091 (India); Nagabhushana, H. [Prof. C.N.R. Rao Centre for Advanced Materials Research, Tumkur University, Tumkur 572 103 (India); Sharma, S.C. [Chhattisgarh Swami Vivekananda Technical University, Bhilai, Chhattisgarh 490 009 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Various morphology of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles were synthesized using E-tirucalli plant latex as a fuel. • These nanoparticles were characterized by PXRD, SEM, UV–Vis and PL. • Eu{sup 3+} doped Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a promising single phased red phosphor. • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} (7 mol%, 1 ml) nanophosphor exhibits superior photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Eco-friendly, cost effective and bio template route was used for the preparation of cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} nanophosphors using Euphorbia tirucalli (E. tirucalli) plant latex as fuel. As – formed Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} (7 mol%, 1–7 ml), calcined Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} (7 mol%, 1–7 ml) and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} (1–11 mol%, 7 ml) samples were characterized using XRD, SEM and UV–Vis absorption spectrophotometer. With increase in latex concentration, the nanophosphor gets transformed from nano plates to rose – like nanoflowers with size varying from 20 to 30 nm. X-ray diffraction pattern of as – formed product shows hexagonal Gd (OH){sub 3}: Eu{sup 3+} phase and it converts to pure cubic phase of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} on calcination at 600 °C for 3 h. Rietveld refinement of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} (7 mol%, 7 ml) revealed the presence of cations in the 8b (0.25, 0.25, 0. 25) and 24d positions (−0.0287, 0.00, 0. 25) and the anions in the 48e positions (0.39, 0.15, 0. 37) with space group Ia-3(206). The photoluminescence intensities of transitions between different J levels depend on the symmetry of the local environment of Eu{sup 3+} ion activators and the high ratio of intensity of ({sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 2}) and ({sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 1}) provides the conclusion that Eu{sup 3+} ion occupies sites with a low symmetry and without an inversion centre. The chromaticity and the CIE coordinates were very close to the standard red color region. The absorption observed in the excitation spectra

  10. White Rose project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, W. [Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The status of Husky's White Rose Project off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland was presented with particular focus on project achievements from October 2000 to March 2002, execution strategy and the challenge of delivering the project safely, in an environmentally sensitive manner, both on schedule and within budget. The project is the third oil development offshore Newfoundland and Labrador where recoverable reserves are estimated at 884 MMbbls for Hibernia, 40 MMbbls for Terra Nova, and 200 to 250 MMbbls for the White Rose project. Cost competitive methods can be used to develop White Rose, which will then stimulate more exploration activity and expand the base of experienced individuals. This presentation included computer generated images of the field layout depicting 3 glory holes or drill centres. The well count is currently at 21 wells of which 10 are at the stage of first oil. Production capacity is 100 bbls per day. Graphs depicting drilling performance were also included, along with the FPSO execution strategy, turret schematics, and the project schedule. tabs., figs.

  11. Solar drying of rose (Rosa sp.) petals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balladin, D.A.; Headley, Oliver [University of the West Indies, Center for Resource Management and Environmental Studies, St. Michael (Barbados)

    1999-10-01

    The rose (Rosa sp.) petals can be dried after 2 days at about 30degC reaching an equilibrium moisture content after 16 h using the solar wire basket dryer. The initial moisture content (wet wt basis) and final moisture content (dry wt basis), determined by the Dean-Stark toluene were 65.7 and 25.2% respectively. The intensity of the rose red coloured pigment (pelargonidin) decreased by a factor of 2.5 after drying. The pelargonidin ethanoic extract as an acid-base indicator, has a K{sub 4} value of 1 x 10{sup -4} mol 1{sup -1} and pH of end point 4 and imbibed on filter paper and allowed to air dry for 5 min showed excellent properties as acid-based test tapes. (Author)

  12. A Trail of Roses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2015-01-01

    and reality as as well as about what is endlessly the same and endlessly different. And thus the text is seen to voice an entire ontology which, in its utter simplicity, exemplifies the poetical power and philosophical depth of Gertrude Stein’s writing. From this point Gertrude Stein’s influence is visible...... Davidsen who devoted an entire year to roses. While the conceptual artist Stig Brøgger used his reading of Stein’s How To Write to work out textual fields, films and film scripts. Ecchoes of Stein’s writing can also be heard in recent Danish poetry such as Pia Juul’s Radioteateret (2010)....

  13. Axillary bud development in rose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis - van Acker, C.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Axillary buds form the basis of flower production of a rose crop. Within a rose crop there exists an undesired large variation in shoot number and size, which affects flower yield. Part of this variation may be traced back to early variation in axillary buds. The aim of the research

  14. 1999 Rose Site 10P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 10P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  15. 2002 Rose Site 10P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 10P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  16. 2002 Rose Site 8P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 8P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 1999. The site was originally...

  17. 1999 Rose Site 27P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 27P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 24, 1999. The site was...

  18. 2002 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  19. 2004 Rose Site 4P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 4P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 9, 2004. With a start point...

  20. 2004 Rose Site 10P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 10P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  1. 1999 Rose Site 13P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 13P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 25, 1999. The site was...

  2. 2004 Rose Site 13P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 13P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 25, 1999. The site was...

  3. 2006 Rose Site 13P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 13P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 25, 1999. The site was...

  4. 2005 Rose Site 26P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 26P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish (5) = between meters 4 and 5). Quantitative analysis of the...

  5. 2004 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  6. 2006 Rose Site 31P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 22, 1999. The site was...

  7. 2006 Rose Site 26P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 26P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 2004. With a start point...

  8. 2012 Rose Site 25P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 25P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 30, 1999. The site was originally...

  9. 2004 Rose Site 23P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 23P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 10, 2004. With a start point...

  10. 2005 Rose Site 27P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 27P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish (5) = between meters 4 and 5). Quantitative analysis of the...

  11. 2012 Rose Site 4P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 4P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 9, 2004. With a start point...

  12. Properties of Rose Hip Marmalades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Yildiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rose hip, also known as wild rose, is a summer fruit. The aim of this research is to present physical, chemical, rheological, sensory and antioxidant properties of rose hip marmalades. Rose hips cultivated in Turkey are processed into pulp and then marmalade is made by using vacuum evaporator or classical method. For the purposes of this investigation, marmalades produced on a factory scale using two methods were compared to commercial marmalades purchased on market. The marmalades exhibited high levels of antioxidant activity as well as total phenolic content. The consistency indices for the marmalades were determined to be between 64.2 and 321 Pa·s^n. Colour parameters, namely L, a, b, were measured and correlations between the examined parameters were calculated.

  13. 2012 Rose Site 10P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 10P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  14. 2004 Rose Site 14P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 14P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 25, 2002. With a start point...

  15. 2005 Rose Site 13P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 13P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish (5) = between meters 4 and 5). Quantitative analysis of the...

  16. 2012 Rose Site 27P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 27P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 24, 1999. The site was...

  17. 2006 Rose Site 10P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 10P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  18. 2002 Rose Site 7P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 7P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 24, 2002. With a start point...

  19. 1999 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  20. 2006 Rose Site 29P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 29P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 2004. With a start point...

  1. 2012 Rose Site 31P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 22, 1999. The site was...

  2. 2004 Rose Site 32P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 32P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 2, 2004. With a start point...

  3. 2012 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  4. 1999 Rose Site 31P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 22, 1999. The site was...

  5. 2002 Rose Site 5P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 5P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 20, 2002. With a start point...

  6. 2006 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  7. 2006 Rose Site 27P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 27P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 24, 1999. The site was...

  8. 1999 Rose Site 25P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 25P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 30, 1999. The site was originally...

  9. 1999 Rose Site 8P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 8P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 1999. The site was originally...

  10. 2004 Rose Site 26P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 26P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 2004. With a start point...

  11. Biotechnological approaches to rose breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Marchant, Robert

    1994-01-01

    The production of new rose cultivars by sexual crossing is problematic and time consuming due to sexual incompatibility. the failure of seeds to genninate. and to a limited gene pool. Biotechnology provides an obvious alternative for the creation of genetic novelty in rose. This thesis focuses on the development of novel approaches, based on embryo rescue, pollen cryopreservation, protoplast and transformation technologies. A reproducible embryo rescue technique was developed in which embr...

  12. Spectral effects of supplementary lighting on the secondary metabolites in roses, chrysanthemums, and campanulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the light spectrum on photosynthesis, growth, and secondary metabolites Rosa hybrida ‘Scarlet’, Chrysanthemum morifolium ‘Coral Charm’, and Campanula portenschlagiana ‘BluOne’ were grown at 24/18 ◦C day/night temperature under purpose-built LED arrays yielding...... approximately 200 mol m−2 s−1 at plant height for 16 h per day. The four light treatments were (1) 40% Blue/60% Red, (2) 20% Blue/80% Red, (3) 100% Red, and (4) 100% White (Control). The plant height was smallest in 40% Blue/60% Red in roses and chrysanthemums, while the biomass was smallest in the white...... control in roses and in 100% Red in chrysanthemums. The total biomass was unaffected by the spectrum in campanulas, while the leaf area was smallest in the 40% Blue/60% Red treatment. In 100% Red curled leaves and other morphological abnormalities were observed. Increasing the blue to red ratio increased...

  13. Axillary bud development in rose

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelis - van Acker, C.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Axillary buds form the basis of flower production of a rose crop. Within a rose crop there exists an undesired large variation in shoot number and size, which affects flower yield. Part of this variation may be traced back to early variation in axillary buds. The aim of the research reported in this thesis was to enlarge the knowledge and insight in the development of axillary buds. It was investigated to what extent the growth of an axillary bud into a shoot can be influenced during...

  14. Analysis of rose crop production.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.T.N.; Koning, de J.C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Measured and simulated dry-matter production of two rose crops different in cultivar and growing conditions were compared. Differences in dry-matter production between the two crops could be explained to a large extend by differences in harvest index, leaf area index, supplementary lighting and

  15. Rose breeding: past, present, prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de D.P.; Dubois, L.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    In this review the PAST, PRESENT and PROSPECT will be considered as three separate periods in the history of the breeding and development of rose cultivars. The recurring theme is the genetic variation. This theme was chosen because there is justified doubt as to sufficient genetic variation

  16. Numerical prediction of rose growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernsen, E.; Bokhove, Onno; van der Sar, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    A new mathematical model is presented for the prediction of rose growth in a greenhouse. Given the measured ambient environmental conditions, the model consists of a local photosynthesis model, predicting the photosynthesis per unit leaf area, coupled to a global greenhouse model, which predicts the

  17. Numerical prediction of rose growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, Onno; Bernsen, E.; van der Sar, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    A new mathematical model is presented for the prediction of rose growth in a greenhouse. Given the measured ambient environmental conditions, the model consist of a local photosynthesis model, predicting the photosynthesis per unit leaf area, coupled to a global greenhouse model, which predicts the

  18. The Rose Art Museum Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Paul

    2010-01-01

    On January 26, 2009, the Brandeis University Board of Trustees voted unanimously to close the Rose Art Museum (Waltham, Massachusetts). The proceeds from the subsequent auction were to be reinvested in the university to ensure its long-term financial health. The reaction to the decision by campus constituencies provides a case study to show the…

  19. The Fishes of Rose Atoll - Supplement I

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A previous paper titled THE FISHES OF ROSE ATOLL discusses the results of a fish survey conducted November 12-13, 1980 within the four lagoon habitats of Rose Atoll,...

  20. PEMUNGUTAN MINYAK ATSIRI MAWAR (Rose Oil DENGAN METODE MASERASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrilia Damayanti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Minyak mawar merupakan salah satu produk minyak bunga yang memungkinkan diproduksi di Indonesia dengan kualitas ekspor. Manfaat dari minyak mawar adalah untuk parfum, kosmestik, dan obat-obatan. Minyak mawar dapat diproduksi dengan menggunakan metode diantaranya maserasi. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui rendemen minyak atsiri mawar merah (Rosa damascena dan komponen minyak atsiri yang terambil dengan etanol dan n-heksana. Bahan baku yang digunakan berupa mahkota bunga mawar sebanyak 50 gram yang dipotong kecil-kecil, kemudian direndam dalam pelarut dengan perbandingan 1:3. Pelarut yang digunakan yaitu etanol dan n-heksana. Proses maserasi dilakukan dengan pengadukan selama 1 menit secara manual pada suhu ruang dan didiamkan selama 12 jam di tempat tertutup dan gelap (tanpa terkena cahaya. Hasil maserasi berupa ekstrak mawar dipisahkan dengan cara penyaringan dan pemerasan bunga. Filtrat yang mengandung minyak bunga mawar dievaporasi dengan  rotary vacuum evaporator. Maserasi menggunakan etanol pada suhu 60ºC selama 20 menit, sedangkan maserasi menggunakan n-heksana pada suhu 55 ºC selama 10 menit. Minyak atsiri hasil maserasi bunga mawar merah dilakukan uji GC-MS. Komponen utama minyak atsiri dari bunga mawar dengan pelarut etanol dan pelarut n-heksana secara berurutan adalah phenyl ethyl alcohol (2,73% dan (31,69%. Rendemen hasil maserasi minyak bunga mawar dengan pelarut etanol adalah 8,76%, sedangkan pelarut n-heksana menghasilkan 0,34 %. Rose oil is one of the flower oil products which is potentially produced in Indonesia with export quality. The uses of rose oils are for perfume, cosmestics, and medicine. Rose oil can be produced using methods such as maceration. The purpose of this reasearch was to determine the yield of essential oil of red roses (Rosa damascena and the essential oil components taken using ethanol and n-hexane. The raw material used was 50 grams of red roses which subsequently soaked into solvent with

  1. General Appearances of Turkish Roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan ÖZÇELİK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is carried out in between 2006-2012 years. Materials of it collected from all over the country and identified by the classic systematic literatures. Voucher specimens are deposited in GUL Herbarium of Süleyman Demirel University in Isparta. In this paper, important new systematic, geographical and ecological characters, and also economical usage values of all Türkiye’s roses were determined by literature and field observations. In addition to this, some known characters in the genus were broadened

  2. Network topology of the desert rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigmund Mongstad Hope

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Desert roses are gypsum crystals that consist of intersecting disks. We determine their geometrical structure using computer assisted tomography. By mapping the geometrical structure onto a graph, the topology of the desert rose is analyzed and compared to a model based on diffusion limited aggregation. By comparing the topology, we find that the model gets a number of the features of the real desert rose right, whereas others do not fit so well.

  3. Network topology of the desert rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Sigmund; Kundu, Sumanta; Roy, Chandreyee; Manna, Subhrangshu; Hansen, Alex

    2015-09-01

    Desert roses are gypsum crystals that consist of intersecting disks. We determine their geometrical structure using computer assisted tomography. By mapping the geometrical structure onto a graph, the topology of the desert rose is analyzed and compared to a model based on diffusion limited aggregation. By comparing the topology, we find that the model gets a number of the features of the real desert rose right, whereas others do not fit so well.

  4. [A case of anaphylaxis due to rose-flavored soft-serve ice cream with pollen food allergy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabayashi, Taeru; Sato, Sayuri; Adachi, Mitsuru

    2013-05-01

    We experienced a 10-year-old boy who had anaphylaxis after eating rose-flavored soft-serve ice cream. The patient felt a sense of discomfort in his throat when eating apple, peach, loquat, Japanese pear, and kiwi fruit. Therefore, we measured specific IgE antibodies to allergen components by ImmunoCAP ISAC. Consequently, the patient gave positive results for all PR-10 proteins from birch, alder, hazel, apple, peach, peanut, hazelnut, and soybean, so we diagnosed him with Pollen Food Allergy Syndrome (PFAS) induced by cross reactivity with pollens of birch family and fruits of rose family. When we conducted the skin prick test as is for red rose syrup because of the belief that anaphylaxis was caused by the rose ingredient contained in rose-flavored soft-serve ice cream, the patient gave a strong positive result. However, the results were negative for rose essence and Food Red No. 2 contained. Subsequently, it was found that red rose syrup contained apple juice. Therefore, we conducted the prick-prick test for apple, and the patient was confirmed to be strongly positive to apple. We thus identified apple as the cause of anaphylaxis. Since there is no legal obligation of labeling specific raw materials when directly selling manufactured and processed food products to general consumers, it is possible for general consumers to mistakenly take them in without knowing the containment of allergic substances. It is believed that the labeling method should be improved in the future.

  5. Rose's Life Lessons: Signed and Spoken

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Chris

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the experiences of his wife, Cheryl, and his 5-year-old daughter, Rose, when they visited their local high school's child development class. Cheryl and Rose met with over a 100 teenagers teenagers in eight different classes to talk about their family, raising a child with Down syndrome, and their experiences with…

  6. Improving rooting uniformity in rose cuttings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telgen, van H.J.; Eveleens-Clark, B.A.; Garcia Victoria, N.

    2007-01-01

    Studies to improve rooting uniformity of single node stem cuttings for rose are reported. We found that the variation in shoot growth in a young rose crop depended on the variation in root number of the cuttings, which, in turn, was related to the auxin concentration applied to the cutting before

  7. Den danske ROSE-undersøgelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Annemarie Møller; Allerup, Peter; Arnvig, Birgitte

    ROSE (Relevance of Science Education) er en international komparativ undersøgelse af 15-åriges holdninger til og interesse for naturfagsundervisning, naturvidenskab og teknologi med deltagelse af ca. 40. lande. Dataindsamlingen til den danske del af ROSE-undersøgelsen blev gennemført i 2003....... Antologien giver et overblik over  og forskellige perspektiver på de danske 15-åriges besvarelser af de ca. 280 spørgsmål i det danske ROSE-skema....

  8. The Purple Rose of Virgo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Until now NGC 5584 was just one galaxy among many others, located to the West of the Virgo Cluster. Known only as a number in galaxy surveys, its sheer beauty is now revealed in all its glory in a new VLT image. Since 1 March, this purple cosmic rose also holds the brightest stellar explosion of the year, known as SN 2007af. Located about 75 million light years away towards the constellation Virgo ('the Virgin'), NGC 5584 is a galaxy slightly smaller than the Milky Way. It belongs, however, to the same category: both are barred spirals. ESO PR Photo 16/07 ESO PR Photo 16/07 The Purple Rose of Virgo Spiral galaxies are composed of a 'bulge' and a flat disc. The bulge hosts old stars and usually a central supermassive black hole. Younger stars reside in the disc, forming the characteristic spiral structures from which the galaxies get their name. Barred spirals are crossed by a bright band of stars. In 2000, using ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers discovered the smallest, faintest, and most massive spirals (see ESO PR 12/00 and 25/00). In this amazing new image of NGC 5584 two dominant spiral arms are clearly visible, while the others are deformed, probably due to interactions with other galaxies. Luminous patches are spread all over the disc, indicating that stars are being formed in this gigantic rose at a frantic pace. Something even brighter, however, catches the eye in this picture. Any image taken before the end of February would not have shown the luminous spot located at the lower right of the galaxy's centre. As can be seen, the newly found object is much brighter than the centre of the galaxy itself. Its name? SN 2007af, the 32nd supernova discovered this year. Its presence signals the dramatic death of a star with a mass comparable to that of the Sun. SN 2007af, the brightest supernova of the year (so far), was discovered on 1 March by the Japanese supernova hunter Koichi Itagaki. He pointed his 60-centimetre telescope towards the Virgo constellation

  9. 2016 Rose Ojowhoh Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OJOHWOH ROSE

    ) 2016. Rose Ojowhoh. Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro, Nigeria. Abstract. The study examined staff development and library services in academic libraries in Bayelsa and Delta States. Descriptive survey research design was used for this study, ...

  10. Rose Atoll 1993 Shipwreck Restoration Status Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summarizes efforts undertaken to remove grounded shipwreck at Rose Atoll and monitor impacts to community composition between 1993 and 2012.

  11. Uudised : Guns N' Roses Soomes. Valmis ulmeraadio

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Ameerika hard-rock-bändi Guns N' Roses kontserdist 5. juulil Hartwall Areenal Soomes. Kord kuus on Ulmeplaatide kodulehekülel www. ulmeplaadid.ee võimalus kuulata ulmeraadiot, kus esitusel eesti kergemuusika

  12. In vitro germination of desert rose varieties(

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiane Lemos Varella; Gizelly Mendes Silva; Kaliane Zaira Camacho Maximiliano da Cruz; Andréia Izabel Mikovski; Josué Ribeiro da Silva Nunes; Ilio Fealho de Carvalho; Maurecilne Lemes Silva

    2015-01-01

    The drought stress resistance is a characteristic of the desert rose and its estimable beauty flowers, which gave it great relevance in the ornamental market. However, the desert rose production and germination is hampered by possible sterility of their male and female flowers and frequent problems in pollination, so the tissue culture is a promising alternative to the propagation of these plants. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of gibberellic acid on four commercial varieties of dese...

  13. [Using physiological tests on the selection of cut roses' varieties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudin, Serge; Crespel, Laurent; Le Bris, Manuel

    2007-09-01

    We have observed that the evolution of the senescence in vase can be appreciated by the measures of pH, conductivity, or osmolarity of the petal cell sap of a rose variety. We wanted to check whether these physiological tests could be used to select the post-harvest quality of varieties in process of evaluation. Whereas the measures of pH and osmolarity do not seem to be correlated with the flower's vase life, those of conductivity seem to be linked to it (r=-0.74). As far as the pH is concerned, when the correlation is tested on varieties grouped in colours (white, yellow and ochre; pink and red; multicoloured) and not on the whole mixed varieties, then the correlation seems to be satisfactory, being characterized by r coefficients between -0.78 and -0.91.

  14. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y.

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  15. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H. E-mail: yhiroya@nias.affrc.go.jp; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  16. INFLUENCE OF PHOTOACTIVATED ROSE BENGAL ON MICROCIRCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Gryshachova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of mean blood velocity changes in rat mesenteric venules (15–30 µm due to photoactivation (λ = 532 nm, 0,175 W/cm2, 300 s of i.v. injected Rose Bengal (17 mg/kg is represented in the article. Using in vivo biomicroscopy the progressive decrease of mean blood velocity both during the laser irradiation and after it was registered. The calculation of thermal effects in the irradiated part of microvessel due to laser absorption by hemoglobin and Rose Bengal showed the rise of temperature was not exceed 0.2оC as compared to initial level. Thus, thermal effect has nearly no significant influence on microvascular disturbances caused by Rose Bengal photoactivation.

  17. High-density SNP-based genetic maps for the parents of an outcrossed and a selfed tetraploid garden rose cross, inferred from admixed progeny using the 68k rose SNP array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukosavljev, Mirjana; Arens, Paul; Voorrips, Roeland E; van 't Westende, Wendy Pc; Esselink, G D; Bourke, Peter M; Cox, Peter; van de Weg, W Eric; Visser, Richard Gf; Maliepaard, Chris; Smulders, Marinus Jm

    2016-01-01

    Dense genetic maps create a base for QTL analysis of important traits and future implementation of marker-assisted breeding. In tetraploid rose, the existing linkage maps include fertilization of 'Red New Dawn'. Subsequently, linkage maps were generated for a bi-parental and a self-pollinated population with 'Red New Dawn' as the common maternal parent. The densest map, for the selfed parent, had 1929 SNP markers on 25 linkage groups, covering 1765.5 cM at an average marker distance of 0.9 cM. Synteny with the strawberry ( Fragaria vesca ) genome was extensive. Rose ICM1 corresponded to F. vesca pseudochromosome 7 (Fv7), ICM4 to Fv4, ICM5 to Fv3, ICM6 to Fv2 and ICM7 to Fv5. Rose ICM2 corresponded to parts of F. vesca pseudochromosomes 1 and 6, whereas ICM3 is syntenic to the remainder of Fv6.

  18. White Rose sustains east coast development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.

    2004-11-01

    The White Rose Oil Project, located in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin 350 km east of St. John's, is reported to continue paying benefits for the oil and gas industry in eastern Canada. The operator, Husky Energy, is said to be on target and expects first oil from the project in late 2005 or early 2006. Peak production for the White Rose Field is projected at 100,000 bbl/d. The project has a total capital cost of $2.35 billion. The first phase of the project, comprised of four wells, including an oil producer, was completed in July. The estimated productive capacity of this well is between 25,000 and 35,000 bbl/d. Other major milestones achieved at the White Rose project include movement of the topside modules onto the Sea Rose floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel, consisting of 17 lifts during the seven-week program. Individual lifts up to 1,250 tons were carried by the Lampson 2600 Trans-lift crane at the Cow Head Fabrication Facility in Marystown. Towing of the riser buoy from Bay Bulls to the White Rose Field has also been accomplished, and Husky Energy has commenced a program to evaluate the viability of producing and transporting natural gas from the White Rose Field. Several dozen expressions of interest have been received from contractors and engineering firms to assess the key technical, economic and regulatory issues critical to a safe and reliable natural gas development on the Grand Banks. Reserves and resources in the Newfoundland and Labrador offshore region have been estimated by the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board at approximately 2.1 billion barrels of oil and 9.6 trillion cubic feet of gas. The White Rose Field alone is estimated to have natural gas reserves of 2.7 trillion cubic feet. Husky expects the White Rose project to bring in 5.8 million person hours of direct employment in Newfoundland and Labrador and in excess of 1.3 million person hours of direct employment elsewhere in Canada. Approximately 375 long

  19. Rose: an island of stereotypes on Lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério de Almeida

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the result of research made on Geifec and has as a goal to analyze the modes of representation of the character Rose Nadler, from the American series Lost. Woman, African-American, close to 60s, overweight, Rose is in the intersection of a series of minority groups and her presence occurs as an overlapping of unusual stereotypes in the series. The theoretical references use the contributions of Mazzara (1998 and Mittell (2010 and the methodology takes the apparitions of the character in the first three seasons of the series, with images and dialogues transcriptions.

  20. 'Rose Blanche, Rosa Weiss, Rosa Blanca': A comparative view of a controversial picture book

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Emer

    2005-01-01

    Published in Switzerland, the USA, and Britain in 1985, Rose Blanche, Roberto Innocenti's controversial and prize-winning picture book about a young German girl's experience of the Second World War and the Holocaust, has been translated into at least ten different languages. It has remained in print in the United States since publication, and a paperback edition of the British translation was issued by Red Fox in 2004, testifying to the ongoing topicality of Innocenti's story. Its cultural im...

  1. Perfect roses and energy efficient cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, De A.

    2017-01-01

    How to grow roses with a constant quality year round in an energy efficient manner? That is the question for an applied research in which assimilation lighting, existing of HPS lamps and inter lighting LED, and cooling equipment and forced ventilation for semi-closed cultivation are combined. The

  2. Locally active Hindmarsh-Rose neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Paolo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy); Fortuna, Luigi [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: lfortuna@diees.unict.it; Frasca, Mattia [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: mfrasca@diees.unict.it; Rosa, Manuela La [SST Group, Corporate R and D, STMicroelectronics, Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: manuela.la-rosa@st.com

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the locally active and the edge of chaos regions of the Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) model for neuron dynamics are studied. From these regions parameters are chosen to set emergent phenomena both in 2D and 3D grids of HR neurons.

  3. The Rose Report [Continued]: "The Invisible Worm"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Mary Jane

    2009-01-01

    While Colin Richards' article is a trenchant analysis of the big themes and missed opportunities of the Rose Report, this response examines some of the small print. It concludes that the document is disfigured by many minor blemishes, and is also fatally flawed by a crude misapprehension of the nature of progress and the purpose of education.

  4. White Rose oilfield comprehensive study report : final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    The potential environmental effects, including those resulting from malfunctions or accidents as well as any cumulative environmental effects of the White Rose oilfield development project are described in this Comprehensive Study Report. The report was prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. The White Rose oilfield development project is a proposed energy project aimed at recovering approximately 36 million cubic meters (230 million barrels) of recoverable oil. The deposits are contained in an area that covers approximately 40 square kilometers. It is located approximately 350 km east of Newfoundland on the eastern edge of the Jeanne d'Arc Basin. The oilfield is also located 50 km from both the Terra Nova and Hibernia oilfields. Husky Oil Operations Limited (Husky Oil), a major presence in the region, is working in a co-venture with Petro-Canada. Husky Oil submitted the Comprehensive Study Report on behalf of both partners. Both companies are seeking the appropriate regulatory approvals for the development of the White Rose oilfield. The document describes the regulatory context, scope of the project and the scope of the environmental assessment. Section 2 details the proposed White Rose oilfield development, while section 3 describes the assessment methodology. Section 4 is concerned with the environmental effects assessment and section 5 discusses the socio-economic effects assessment. 53 refs., 11 tabs., 8 figs.

  5. White Rose Development Plan amendment South White Rose extension tie back : supplemental information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-12-15

    Husky Energy submitted an amendment to its White Rose Development Plan entitled White Rose Development Plan Amendment, the South White Rose Extension Tie-back to the Canada Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB) on September 29, 2006. In addition, Husky submitted supporting documents entitled Review of the White Rose Benefits Plan and its Application to the SWRX Tie-back and Safety Assessment of the South White Rose Expansion Project. Following submission of the these documents, the C-NLOPB conducted a completeness review. On October 26, 2006, the C-NLOPB requested additional information from Husky. This supplemental report addressed the request for additional information received from the C-NLOPB. For example, the C-NLOPB stated that the discussion of research and development and education and training in subsections 3.4 and 4.5 was not adequate as a commitment by Husky to comply with the Board's Guidelines for Research and Development Expenditures October 2004 is not stated and is required. It also stated that the document references increased dimensions resulting from enhancements to the original White Rose Development glory hole design. There were approximately 19 items that Husky was requested to provide more information, to which it has provided responses in this document. 10 tabs., 7 figs., 1 appendix.

  6. QTL analysis of variation for vigour in rose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.; Visser, P.B.; Hendriks, T.; Prins, T.W.; Stam, P.; Dolstra, O.

    2007-01-01

    The improvement of energy efficiency in the greenhouse production of cut rose and pot rose can be achieved through the use of rose cultivars having vigorous growth. A better understanding of the inheritance of vigour and its related traits will assist the breeding activities. Quantitative trait

  7. Les Brulures Chimiques Par Le Laurier Rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkali, H.; Ababou, M.; Nassim Sabah, T.; Moussaoui, A.; Ennouhi, A.; Fouadi, F.Z.; Siah, S.; Ihrai, H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Le laurier rose ou Nerium oleander est un arbuste qui pousse naturellement dans les régions méditerranéennes. Au Maroc on le trouve dans les lieux humides. Il est réputé par ses risques de toxicité systémique en cas d'empoisonnement à cause de la présence de deux alcaloïdes, surtout l'oléandrine. La littérature illustre des cas d'utilisation locale des feuilles de cette plante contre la gale, les hémorroïdes et les furoncles. Nous rapportons deux cas de brûlures chimiques par le laurier rose de gravité différente. Cela doit aboutir à une information élargie de la population, ainsi qu'une réglementation stricte de sa commercialisation. PMID:21991211

  8. Les Brulures Chimiques Par Le Laurier Rose

    OpenAIRE

    Bakkali, H.; Ababou, M.; Nassim Sabah, T.; Moussaoui, A.; Ennouhi, A.; Fouadi, F.Z.; Siah, S.; Ihrai, H.

    2010-01-01

    Le laurier rose ou Nerium oleander est un arbuste qui pousse naturellement dans les régions méditerranéennes. Au Maroc on le trouve dans les lieux humides. Il est réputé par ses risques de toxicité systémique en cas d'empoisonnement à cause de la présence de deux alcaloïdes, surtout l'oléandrine. La littérature illustre des cas d'utilisation locale des feuilles de cette plante contre la gale, les hémorroïdes et les furoncles. Nous rapportons deux cas de brûlures chimiques par le laurier rose ...

  9. An Autotetraploid Linkage Map of Rose (Rosa hybrida) Validated Using the Strawberry (Fragaria vesca) Genome Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gar, Oron; Sargent, Daniel J.; Tsai, Ching-Jung; Pleban, Tzili; Shalev, Gil; Byrne, David H.; Zamir, Dani

    2011-01-01

    Polyploidy is a pivotal process in plant evolution as it increase gene redundancy and morphological intricacy but due to the complexity of polysomic inheritance we have only few genetic maps of autopolyploid organisms. A robust mapping framework is particularly important in polyploid crop species, rose included (2n = 4x = 28), where the objective is to study multiallelic interactions that control traits of value for plant breeding. From a cross between the garden, peach red and fragrant cultivar Fragrant Cloud (FC) and a cut-rose yellow cultivar Golden Gate (GG), we generated an autotetraploid GGFC mapping population consisting of 132 individuals. For the map we used 128 sequence-based markers, 141 AFLP, 86 SSR and three morphological markers. Seven linkage groups were resolved for FC (Total 632 cM) and GG (616 cM) which were validated by markers that segregated in both parents as well as the diploid integrated consensus map. The release of the Fragaria vesca genome, which also belongs to the Rosoideae, allowed us to place 70 rose sequenced markers on the seven strawberry pseudo-chromosomes. Synteny between Rosa and Fragaria was high with an estimated four major translocations and six inversions required to place the 17 non-collinear markers in the same order. Based on a verified linear order of the rose markers, we could further partition each of the parents into its four homologous groups, thus providing an essential framework to aid the sequencing of an autotetraploid genome. PMID:21647382

  10. White Rose Project : preparing for first oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoon, R. [Husky Energy Inc., East Coast Development, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    An update of Husky Energy's participation in the White Rose Project was presented with reference to the remaining steps to first oil, final development challenges, the lasting legacy of benefits and relevant issues beyond first oil. The White Rose Project is located 350 km southeast of St. John's, Newfoundland and has recoverable reserves of 200 to 250 million bbls. Production life is estimated to be 12 to 15 years with a total development cost of $2.35 billion. The project development schedule was included along with an update on the glory hole excavation, the floating production storage and off-loading (FPSO) system and subsea production system. Five of the 10 development wells have been completed. Completion of the subsea installation program involves the installation of the riser, flowline, buoy and glory hole tie-ins. The ongoing challenges include safety performance at work sites, final regulatory approvals, and offshore environmental conditions. The White Rose Project has demonstrated local capabilities in engineering, fabrication and research and development for the province of Newfoundland. Husky East Coast employment trends were illustrated. It was also noted that Husky Energy currently holds 15 significant discovery licenses and signed 3 new exploration blocks in 2004. The largest gas areas in Newfoundland and Labrador include the White Rose Project (2.7 Tcf); Hibernia (1.3 Tcf); and Terra Nova (0.5 Tcf). The Grand Banks total gas reserves are estimated at 5.4 Tcf. Potential gas markets include Nova Scotia and the New England States. An evaluation of gas development and gas export options were listed with reference to the technical and economic feasibility of compressed natural gas; subsea pipelines; onshore liquid natural gas; offshore liquid natural gas; onshore or offshore gas to liquid; and, onshore or offshore methanol conversion. figs.

  11. Multiplication of Patio roses by cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denysko Iryna Leonidivna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment involved plants of 10 Patio rose cultivars of the National Dendrological Park "Sofiyivka" collection. The methods of propagation by cuttings worked out by Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy were assumed as a basis. Callogenesis and regenerative capacity were estimated in accordance with Z.J. Ivanova scale (1982. The fact is ascertained that the success of rooting substantially depends on particularities of certain Patio rose cultivar. It is advisable to use cuttings from basal and medial parts of stems, with remaining leaves, taken within the last ten-day period of May – the first ten-day period of June. The pretreatment with rhizogenic medium "Kornevin" (reactant — indolebutyric acid is the most effective for rooting cuttings. The optimal for rooting is the two-layered substrate: the lower layer is a multicomponent soil compound of peat, perlite, sod soil and humus in ratio 1:1:1:1; the upper layer consists of sand. Seedlings of Patio roses cultivated in open ground during vegetation period form stems 1.8 times more vigorously than ones grown on the same place where they were rooted. The optimal period to transfer into bed is May. It is reasonable to use top removal in order to form vigorous stem system.

  12. Oil flows during White Rose test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2004-11-01

    During a test conducted this summer, the White Rose test well, with a horizontal section of approximately 1,200 metres, has produced 9,000 barrels per day from a horizontal oil producer, the maximum allowed by the testing facilities aboard the submersible drill rig Glomar Grand Bank. The test indicates that the oil well can pump between 25,000 to 30,000 barrels per day when production begins in late 2005 or early 2006. Initial development involves 7 or 8 oil production wells, 10 or 11 water injection wells, and two gas injection wells in the North Avalon pool. Husky Energy is aiming for initial production of 100,000 barrels per day from four production wells when full production begins from the Sea Rose floating production, storage and off-loading vessel. The floating production, storage and off-loading (FPSO) vessel, currently under construction at the Marystown Fabrication Facility, is expected to head to the oilfield during the fourth quarter of 2005 for final testing of various systems. First official production is expected to commence soon after final testing is completed. The White Rose project has a site-specific environmental protection plan, and environmental compliance monitoring will be conducted on a regular basis to ensure that project activities comply with environmental legislation and standards, to assess performance, and identify areas where improvements are needed.

  13. Obituary: William K. Rose (1935-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2011-12-01

    Stellar astrophysicist William Kenneth Rose died near his home in Potomac, Maryland, on September 30, 2010, after an extended illness. Rose was the son of pharmacist Kenneth William Rose and Shirley Near Rose and was born in Ossining, New York, on August 10, 1935. He received an AB from Columbia College in 1957 and a PhD in physics from Columbia University in 1963, with a thesis on "measurements of linear polarization in discrete radio sources using a 9.4 cm maser," under the direction of Charles H. Townes. Rose played a major role in designing and constructing the maser and used it at a radio telescope at Maryland Point that belonged to the Naval Research Lab. He observed Jupiter and Saturn and a number of extra-solar-system sources, and also diffuse centimeter emission (see appendix). The thesis was not published in an archival journal, but can be found under Library of Congress code QB 475.R67. While in graduate School, Bill married Sheila Tuchman, whose primary scientific interests were biological. None of their three children chose to be scientists, but two are CPAs. Bill moved successfully through the academic hurdles) from a research position at Princeton (1963-67), where a collaboration with Nick Woolf and Martin Schwarzchild on the infrared spectra of giant stars became one of his most-cited papers, to assistant and associate professorships at MIT (1967-71), and then associate and full professorships at the University of Maryland (1971 to retirement in 2005). His most innovative work was probably that on nova explosions arising from degenerate ignition of hydrogen accreted on white dwarfs in close binary systems, published in 1968. The same idea occurred to others at about the same time, and Bill did not, perhaps, get quite his fair share of the credit. I first met Sheila and Bill in summer 1969 at the Stony Brook summer school on stellar evolution (not published until 1972). He lectured on the nature of nova explosions and on nuclear burning in thin

  14. Characteristics of virus and virus-like rose degeneration and dieback diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek S. Szyndel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Presented review of rose diseases, associated with the plant degeneration symptoms, includes rose streak, rose colour break, rose rosette or rose witches' broom, rose dieback, rose wilt, rose stunt, rose leaf curl, rose spring dwarf, rose little leaf, rose "frisure", rose bud proliferation and rose flower proliferation. Most of these disorders are characterized by stunting or dwarfing of plants accompanied by a partial wilt and dieback of shoots. Proliferation and epinasty often occurred. Apart from detected viruses (TSV. SLRSV parts of degeneration syndrome have been transmitted by grafting other have failed to achieve any transmission of the causal agent. It seems likely that rose degeneration disorders in spite of symptom similarities are due to a complex of interacting factors including probably viruses.

  15. Characterisation of flower bud opening in roses; a comparison of Madelon and Sonia roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, D.; Reenen, van H.S.; Ribôt, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Cut cv. Madelon rose buds do not open satisfactorily when kept under low light (LL) conditions, in contrast to cv. Sonia buds. Adding sucrose to the keeping solution or storage in high light (HL) helped Madelon buds to open, but probably two different mechanisms were involved. Satisfactory

  16. Using Rose and Compass for Authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G

    2009-07-09

    Many recent non-proliferation software projects include a software authentication component. In this context, 'authentication' is defined as determining that a software package performs only its intended purpose and performs that purpose correctly and reliably over many years. In addition to visual inspection by knowledgeable computer scientists, automated tools are needed to highlight suspicious code constructs both to aid the visual inspection and to guide program development. While many commercial tools are available for portions of the authentication task, they are proprietary, and have limited extensibility. An open-source, extensible tool can be customized to the unique needs of each project. ROSE is an LLNL-developed robust source-to-source analysis and optimization infrastructure currently addressing large, million-line DOE applications in C, C++, and FORTRAN. It continues to be extended to support the automated analysis of binaries (x86, ARM, and PowerPC). We continue to extend ROSE to address a number of security specific requirements and apply it to software authentication for non-proliferation projects. We will give an update on the status of our work.

  17. Losio Antioksidan Buah Naga Merah (Hylocereus polyrhizus Britton and Rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Angelina Sinaga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hylocereus polyrhizus Britton and Rose (Red dragon fruit has been shown to have antioxidant activity which contains vitamin C, polyphenol, and flavonoid. This research was aimed to investigate antioxidant effectivity from H. polyrhizus in form of lotion. Lotion were made with 5 concentrations from H. polyrhizus methanol extract which were 0.04; 0.08; 0.16; 0.32 and 0.64%. The antioxidant activity of lotion was measured using DPPH method. The research showed that H. polyrhizus methanol extract had antioxidant activity with inhibition concentration were 19.99±0.33; 25.01±0.08; 39.14±0.04; 66.69±0.12 and 83.37±0.05. The result showed significant differences on antioxidant activity. The physical stability observation of five formula with cycling test method showed unstability because of discolouration (oxidation. As well as the methods of mechanical test showed unstability of lotion because saponification process.

  18. In vitro germination of desert rose varieties(

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Lemos Varella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The drought stress resistance is a characteristic of the desert rose and its estimable beauty flowers, which gave it great relevance in the ornamental market. However, the desert rose production and germination is hampered by possible sterility of their male and female flowers and frequent problems in pollination, so the tissue culture is a promising alternative to the propagation of these plants. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of gibberellic acid on four commercial varieties of desert rose (Adenium obesum cultivated in vitro. The seeds of the varieties ‘Orange Pallet’, ‘Carnation violet’, ‘Diamond ring’ and ‘Vermiliont’ were sterilized and inoculated on Water + Agar (T0, medium MS (T1, ½ MS (T2, MS + 0.25 mg L-1 GA3 (T3, MS + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 (T4, ½ MS + 0.25 mg L-1 GA3 (T5, ½ MS 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 (T6. The seeds germination of A. obesum was initiated on the fourth day of cultivation and on the tenth day was possible to observe the expansion of the cotyledons and leaf expansion with subsequent development of early secondary root. The ‘Orange pallet’ variety germinated 100% of seeds on water + agar and MS ½ + 0.5 mg L-1 of GA3. For ‘Diamond Ring’ and ‘Carnation violet’ the highest rate of germination occurred in treatments MS ½; 0.25 mg L-1 GA3; MS + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 MS ½ + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 averaging 80% and 70%, respectively. For ‘Vermiliont’ the best response was in MS and MS ½ + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 ranging between 70-90% germinated embryos. It was registered different malformations in all treatments like absence of roots and apexes during seedling development. The concentrations of GA3 did not affect significantly the seed germination.

  19. Postharvest quality of essential oil treated roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Mariano Manfredini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The loss of commercial quality during storage and transportation of roses is one of the factors that reflect on production costs, leading producers to preventively apply harmful chemicals, mainly to hamper Botrytis cinerea development and reduce further losses. An alternative to increase flower longevity without contaminating the environment with harmful chemicals is the use of natural products, such as essential oils, which have fungistatic and insecticide properties, as well as low toxicity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of essential oils on the vase life of Rosa cv. Avalanche: 12 treatments were tested, resulting from the combination of 5 types of essential oils plus the control in two cold storage periods (2 to 6 days at 1 °C, 90-95% RH. The essential oils tested were eucalyptus, cinnamon, lemongrass and peppermint (1%, clove (0.1%, plus a control with distilled water. Application was made by spraying the flower buds. After storage at low temperatures, the flower stems were kept in a room (16 °C, 70% RH during 10 days for evaluation. Flower stems stored for 2 days in a cold chamber showed better means for darkening, turgor and bent neck, as well as a lower weight loss by the stems. The application of lemongrass essential oil at 1% caused burns on the petals, compromising quality and pot life. The essential oils of peppermint and eucalyptus allowed flower quality maintenance until the 10th day of evaluation. It is possible to conclude that post-harvest spraying with peppermint or eucalyptus essential oil at 1%, combined with cold storage for 2 days, provided greater longevity and quality for cv. Avalanche roses.

  20. Genetic diversity and differentiation in roses: A gardenrose perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukosavljev, M.; Zhang, J.; Esselink, G.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Cox, P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Arens, P.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    tFor the first time genetic diversity among modern garden rose cultivars has been evaluated using a setof 24 microsatellite markers covering most chromosomes. A total of 518 different alleles were obtainedin the set of 138 rose cultivars and this led to the conclusion that in terms of genetic

  1. Pomological and phenological characteristics of promising rose hip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    production is the standardization of improved fruit cultivars. However, this standardization has not yet been accom- plished in many fruit species, and some, such as rose hips, are still collected from the wild in many countries. Studies on the selection and improvement of rose hip are at the initial stage in Turkey as in some ...

  2. Cytokinins and bud break in rose combination plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the rose is the most important glasshouse cut flower. Approximately 50% of the glasshouse roses are combination plants, consisting of a scion cultivar and a rootstock of a different genotype. Rootstocks inducing differences in the vigour of the scion are suggested to

  3. Breaking seed dormancy in oil rose ( Rosa damascena Mill.) by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of microbial inoculation in breaking seed dormancy and on the germination of Rosa damascena Mill. Seeds of R. damascena Mill. are the most used scented rose species in rose oil production. The most important production centers around the world are Turkey and ...

  4. Vigour evaluation for genetics and breeding in rose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.; Dolstra, O.; Hendriks, T.; Prins, T.W.; Stam, P.; Visser, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Breeding of cut and pot rose cultivars for efficient production under low-energy conditions in greenhouses will be facilitated by understanding the inheritance of vigour. To get insight into the genetic variation of vigour-related traits, a diploid rose population was employed for an evaluation

  5. Genetic diversity and genetic similarities between Iranian rose species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samiei, L.; Naderi, R.; Khalighi, A.; Shahnejat-Bushehri, A.A.; Mozaffarian, V.; Esselink, G.D.; Kazempour Osaloo, S.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Wild rose species were collected from different regions of Iran for a rose breeding programme. They included accessions from Rosa persica, R. foetida, R. pimpinellifolia, R. hemisphaerica, R. canina, R. iberica, R. damascena, R. beggeriana, and R. orientalis. Ten microsatellite (simple sequence

  6. Those who pull a rose of sharon off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Yeong

    2011-06-15

    The contents of this book are going over the U. S. policy on nuclear issue, to bloom a rose of sharon, people who pull a rose of sharon off discharge out of appointment and participation into administration and trial on election law, over the farm hardship period, the story about development of nuclear energy. The report and the contract and the related articles.

  7. Pollutant roses for daily averaged ambient air pollutant concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosemans, Guido; Kretzschmar, Jan; Mensink, Clemens

    Pollutant roses are indispensable tools to identify unknown (fugitive) sources of heavy metals at industrial sites whose current impact exceeds the target values imposed for the year 2012 by the European Air Quality Daughter Directive 2004/207/EC. As most of the measured concentrations of heavy metals in ambient air are daily averaged values, a method to obtain high quality pollutant roses from such data is of practical interest for cost-effective air quality management. A computational scheme is presented to obtain, from daily averaged concentrations, 10° angular resolution pollutant roses, called PRP roses, that are in many aspects comparable to pollutant roses made with half-hourly concentrations. The computational scheme is a ridge regression, based on three building blocks: ordinary least squares regression; outlier handling by weighting based on expected values of the higher percentiles in a lognormal distribution; weighted averages whereby observed values, raised to a power m, and daily wind rose frequencies are used as weights. Distance measures are used to find the optimal value for m. The performance of the computational scheme is illustrated by comparing the pollutant roses, constructed with measured half-hourly SO 2 data for 10 monitoring sites in the Antwerp harbour, with the PRP roses made with the corresponding daily averaged SO 2 concentrations. A miniature dataset, made up of 7 daily concentrations and of half-hourly wind directions assigned to 4 wind sectors, is used to illustrate the formulas and their results.

  8. White Rose Development Plan amendment South White Rose extension tie back

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-09-15

    In January 2001, Husky Oil Operations Limited (Husky), in joint-venture with Petro-Canada submitted a Development Application (DA) to the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB) for the White Rose Development. This DA was prepared following the Canada-Newfoundland Atlantic Accord Implementation Act and the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Atlantic Accord Implementation Newfoundland and Labrador Act. In December 2001, the C-NLOPB approved the White Rose DA. This document outlined a proposed amendment to the original Development Plan involving an expansion of its White Rose Development in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin on the Grand Bank. The expansion will consist of a subsea tie-back to the Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel through the existing Southern Glory Hole (SGH) and utilizing a new glory hole constructed approximately 4 km south of the SGH. The document presented an overview of the development; geology, geophysics and petrophysics; reservoir engineering; facilities design criteria; operations and maintenance; safety analysis; and development costs. 8 tabs., 16 figs.

  9. Alternaria toxin-induced resistance in rose plants against rose aphid (Macrosiphum rosivorum): effect of tenuazonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fa-zhong; Yang, Bin; Li, Bei-bei; Xiao, Chun

    2015-04-01

    Many different types of toxins are produced by the fungus, Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler. Little is known, however, regarding the influence of these toxins on insects. In this study, we investigated the toxin-induced inhibitory effects of the toxin produced by A. alternata on the rose aphid, Macrosiphum rosivorum, when the toxin was applied to leaves of the rose, Rosa chinensis. The results demonstrated that the purified crude toxin was non-harmful to rose plants and rose aphids, but had an intensive inhibitory effect on the multiplication of aphids. The inhibitory index against rose aphids reached 87.99% when rose plants were sprayed with the toxin solution at a low concentration. Further results from bioassays with aphids and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses demonstrated that tenuazonic acid (TeA) was one of the most important resistance-related active components in the crude toxin. The content of TeA was 0.1199% in the crude toxin under the HPLC method. Similar to the crude toxin, the inhibitory index of pure TeA reached 83.60% 15 d after the rose plants were sprayed with pure TeA solution at the lower concentration of 0.060 μg/ml, while the contents of residual TeA on the surface and in the inner portion of the rose plants were only 0.04 and 0.00 ng/g fresh weight of TeA-treated rose twigs, respectively, 7 d after the treatment. Our results show that TeA, an active component in the A. alternata toxin, can induce the indirect plant-mediated responses in rose plants to intensively enhance the plant's resistances against rose aphids, and the results are very helpful to understand the plant-mediated interaction between fungi and insects on their shared host plants.

  10. Alternaria toxin-induced resistance in rose plants against rose aphid (Macrosiphum rosivorum): effect of tenuazonic acid*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fa-zhong; Yang, Bin; Li, Bei-bei; Xiao, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Many different types of toxins are produced by the fungus, Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler. Little is known, however, regarding the influence of these toxins on insects. In this study, we investigated the toxin-induced inhibitory effects of the toxin produced by A. alternata on the rose aphid, Macrosiphum rosivorum, when the toxin was applied to leaves of the rose, Rosa chinensis. The results demonstrated that the purified crude toxin was non-harmful to rose plants and rose aphids, but had an intensive inhibitory effect on the multiplication of aphids. The inhibitory index against rose aphids reached 87.99% when rose plants were sprayed with the toxin solution at a low concentration. Further results from bioassays with aphids and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses demonstrated that tenuazonic acid (TeA) was one of the most important resistance-related active components in the crude toxin. The content of TeA was 0.1199% in the crude toxin under the HPLC method. Similar to the crude toxin, the inhibitory index of pure TeA reached 83.60% 15 d after the rose plants were sprayed with pure TeA solution at the lower concentration of 0.060 μg/ml, while the contents of residual TeA on the surface and in the inner portion of the rose plants were only 0.04 and 0.00 ng/g fresh weight of TeA-treated rose twigs, respectively, 7 d after the treatment. Our results show that TeA, an active component in the A. alternata toxin, can induce the indirect plant-mediated responses in rose plants to intensively enhance the plant’s resistances against rose aphids, and the results are very helpful to understand the plant-mediated interaction between fungi and insects on their shared host plants. PMID:25845360

  11. Determination of volatile compounds of the first rose oil and the first ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proff.Adewunmi

    Background: Rose water and rose oil are used in the perfume, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food industries. The determination of volatile compounds in rose oil and rose water obtained from oil-bearing rose is highly important in terms of availability in the industry and in human health. Materials and Methods: Twenty four ...

  12. Genetics and genomics of flower initiation and development in roses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendahmane, Mohammed; Dubois, Annick; Raymond, Olivier; Bris, Manuel Le

    2013-02-01

    Roses hold high symbolic value and great cultural importance in different societies throughout human history. They are widely used as garden ornamental plants, as cut flowers, and for the production of essential oils for the perfume and cosmetic industries. Domestication of roses has a long and complex history, and the rose species have been hybridized across vast geographic areas such as Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. The domestication processes selected several flower characters affecting floral quality, such as recurrent flowering, double flowers, petal colours, and fragrance. The molecular and genetic events that determine some of these flower characters cannot be studied using model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana, or at least only in a limited manner. In this review, we comment on the recent development of genetic, genomic, and transcriptomic tools for roses, and then focus on recent advances that have helped unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying several rose floral traits.

  13. Rose, a rotating system for 4D emittance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Michael; Groening, Lars; Xiao, Chen; Mickat, Sascha; Du, Xiaonan; Gerhard, Peter; Vormann, Hartmut [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A ROtating System for Emittance measurements ROSE, to measure the full 4 dimensional transverse beam matrix of a heavy ion beam has been developed and commissioned. Different heavy ion beams behind the HLI at GSI have been used in two commissioning beam times. All technical aspects of Rose have been tested, Rose has been benchmarked against existing emittance scanners for horizontal and vertical projections and the method, hard- and software to measure the 4D beam matrix has been upgraded, refined and successfully commissioned. The inter plane correlations of the HLI beam have been measured, yet as no significant initial correlations were found to be present, controlled coupling of the beam by using a skew triplet has been applied and confirmed with Rose. The next step is to use ROSE to measure and remove the known inter plane correlations of a Uranium beam before SIS18 injection.

  14. An autotetraploid linkage map of rose (Rosa hybrida validated using the strawberry (Fragaria vesca genome sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oron Gar

    Full Text Available Polyploidy is a pivotal process in plant evolution as it increase gene redundancy and morphological intricacy but due to the complexity of polysomic inheritance we have only few genetic maps of autopolyploid organisms. A robust mapping framework is particularly important in polyploid crop species, rose included (2n = 4x = 28, where the objective is to study multiallelic interactions that control traits of value for plant breeding. From a cross between the garden, peach red and fragrant cultivar Fragrant Cloud (FC and a cut-rose yellow cultivar Golden Gate (GG, we generated an autotetraploid GGFC mapping population consisting of 132 individuals. For the map we used 128 sequence-based markers, 141 AFLP, 86 SSR and three morphological markers. Seven linkage groups were resolved for FC (Total 632 cM and GG (616 cM which were validated by markers that segregated in both parents as well as the diploid integrated consensus map.The release of the Fragaria vesca genome, which also belongs to the Rosoideae, allowed us to place 70 rose sequenced markers on the seven strawberry pseudo-chromosomes. Synteny between Rosa and Fragaria was high with an estimated four major translocations and six inversions required to place the 17 non-collinear markers in the same order. Based on a verified linear order of the rose markers, we could further partition each of the parents into its four homologous groups, thus providing an essential framework to aid the sequencing of an autotetraploid genome.

  15. Dieback of rose caused by Acremonium sclerotigenum as a new causal agent of rose dieback in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirtalebi, M.; Banihashemi, Z.; Sabahi, F.; Mafakheri, H.

    2016-07-01

    Severe dieback of rose has been recently observed in several rose greenhouses in Fars province of Iran. During 2014 and 2015, stems of rose plants showing yellow to brown discoloration and dieback were collected from rose greenhouses. Coniothyrium fuckelii, Botrytis cinerea and Acremonium were subsequently isolated from the margin between healthy and symptomatic tissue. B. cinerea and C. fuckelii isolates were similar to those previously reported for dieback of rose worldwide. Morphological and cultural characters along with molecular analysis based on partial sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal RNA genome allowed confirming the affiliation of the Acremonium isolates, corresponding to A. sclerotigenum as a new causal agent of rose dieback. To determine its pathogenicity on rose, Koch's postulates were fulfilled by stem inoculation of nine rose cultivars under greenhouse conditions. While A. sclerotigenum is considered as a soil-born pathogen, and produces sclerotia that are resistant to adverse conditions enables the fungus to survive extended period in soil, propagule trapping in our study revealed that conidia can become airborn, imply that an aerial phase, forms an important component of the disease cycle.

  16. Volatile constituents of essential oil and rose water of damask rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) cultivars from North Indian hills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ram Swaroop; Padalia, Rajendra Chandra; Chauhan, Amit; Singh, Anand; Yadav, Ajai Kumar

    2011-10-01

    Rosa damascena Mill. is an important aromatic plant for commercial production of rose oil, water, concrete and absolute. The rose water and rose oil produced under the mountainous conditions of Uttarakhand were investigated for their chemical composition. The major components of rose water volatiles obtained from the bud, half bloom and full bloom stages of cultivar 'Ranisahiba' were phenyl ethyl alcohol (66.2-79.0%), geraniol (3.3-6.6%) and citronellol (1.8-5.5%). The rose water volatiles of cultivar 'Noorjahan' and 'Kannouj' also possessed phenyl ethyl alcohol (80.7% and 76.7%, respectively) as a major component at full bloom stage. The essential oil of cultivar 'Noorjahan' obtained from two different growing sites was also compared. The major components of these oils were citronellol (15.9-35.3%), geraniol (8.3-30.2%), nerol (4.0-9.6%), nonadecane (4.5-16.0%), heneicosane (2.6-7.9%) and linalool (0.7-2.8%). This study clearly showed that the flower ontogeny and growing site affect the composition of rose volatiles. The rose oil produced in this region was comparable with ISO standards. Thus, it was concluded that the climatic conditions of Uttarakhand are suitable for the production of rose oil of international standards.

  17. Microsatellite analysis of Rosa damascena Mill. accessions reveals genetic similarity between genotypes used for rose oil production and old Damask rose varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, K; Kovacheva, N; Vosman, B; Zhang, L; Rajapakse, S; Atanassov, A; Atanassov, I

    2005-08-01

    Damask roses are grown in several European and Asiatic countries for rose oil production. Twenty-six oil-bearing Rosa damascena Mill. accessions and 13 garden Damask roses were assayed by molecular markers. Microsatellite genotyping demonstrated that R. damascena Mill. accessions from Bulgaria, Iran, and India and old European Damask rose varieties possess identical microsatellite profiles, suggesting a common origin. At the same time, the data indicated that modern industrial oil rose cultivation is based on a very narrow genepool and that oil rose collections contain many genetically identical accessions. The study of long-term vegetative propagation of the Damask roses also reveals high somatic stability for the microsatellite loci analyzed.

  18. Evapotranspiration of rose cultivated in protected environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo C. Oliveira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the evapotranspiration and crop coefficient for the cut rose (cv. Carola cultivated in protected environment and the coefficient of small tank installed inside the greenhouse during the period of one year. Five rows of plants were planted with spacing of 1.20 m between rows and 0.20 m between plants. Each line consisted of five plots with five plants per plot. Plants of the second and fourth rows and of the second and fourth plots were installed in four drainage lysimeters with dimensions of 1.20 x 1.20 x 0.80 m. The plants of the remaining plots were considered as border plants. A drip irrigation system was used. An automatic weather station was installed in the greenhouse and the data were collected and stored daily at an interval of one hour in a data-logger. The crop coefficient (Kc showed mean values of 0.75 in the vegetative phase and 1.18 during the productive phase. The small pan (tank coefficient (Ktr was 0.72.

  19. Genetic dissection of scent metabolic profiles in diploid rose populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, M; Berger, R G; Debener, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The scent of flowers is a very important trait in ornamental roses in terms of both quantity and quality. In cut roses, scented varieties are a rare exception. Although metabolic profiling has identified more than 500 scent volatiles from rose flowers so far, nothing is known about the inheritance of scent in roses. Therefore, we analysed scent volatiles and molecular markers in diploid segregating populations. We resolved the patterns of inheritance of three volatiles (nerol, neryl acetate and geranyl acetate) into single Mendelian traits, and we mapped these as single or oligogenic traits in the rose genome. Three other volatiles (geraniol, beta-citronellol and 2-phenylethanol) displayed quantitative variation in the progeny, and we mapped a total of six QTLs influencing the amounts of these volatiles onto the rose marker map. Because we included known scent related genes and newly generated ESTs for scent volatiles as markers, we were able to link scent related QTLs with putative candidate genes. Our results serve as a starting point for both more detailed analyses of complex scent biosynthetic pathways and the development of markers for marker-assisted breeding of scented rose varieties.

  20. White Rose: the weight of the local content; White Rose: le poids du contenu local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2002-12-01

    Technip-Coflexip company announced on September 4, 2002, that its daughter company Technip CSO Canada ltd (the former Coflexip Stena Offshore Newfoundland ltd) based at St John's in Newfoundland (Canada), obtained from Husky Oil Operations ltd, an integrated contract for the development of the White Rose field in the Newfoundland offshore. This contract, of 165 Meuro, represents an important reference for the offshore industry of Newfoundland, because for the very first time the project control and the underwater engineering of a project of this size will be entirely performed locally. (J.S.)

  1. The effectiveness of a standardized rose hip powder, containing seeds and shells of Rosa canina, on cell longevity, skin wrinkles, moisture, and elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phetcharat, L; Wongsuphasawat, K; Winther, K

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a rose hip powder (Hyben Vital(®)) made from seeds and shells on cell senescence, skin wrinkling, and aging. A total of 34 healthy subjects, aged 35-65 years, with wrinkles on the face (crow's-feet) were subjected to a randomized and double-blinded clinical study of the effects of the rose hip powder, as compared to astaxanthin, a well-known remedy against wrinkles. During the 8-week study, half of the participants ingested the standardized rose hip product, while the other half ingested astaxanthin. Objective measurements of facial wrinkles, skin moisture, and elasticity were made by using Visioscan, Corneometer, and Cutometer at the beginning of the study, after 4 weeks, and after 8 weeks. Evaluation of participant satisfaction of both supplements was assessed using questionnaires. In addition, the effect of the rose hip preparation on cell longevity was measured in terms of leakage of hemoglobin through red cell membranes (hemolytic index) in blood samples kept in a blood bank for 5 weeks. Significance of all values was attained with P≤0.05. In the double-blinded study, the rose hip group showed statistically significant improvements in crow's-feet wrinkles (P<0.05), skin moisture (P<0.05), and elasticity (P<0.05) after 8 weeks of treatment. A similar improvement was observed for astaxanthin, with P-values 0.05, 0.001, and 0.05. Likewise, both groups expressed equal satisfaction with the results obtained in their self-assessment. The rose hip powder further resulted in increased cell longevity of erythrocyte cells during storage for 5 weeks in a blood bank. Results suggest that intake of the standardized rose hip powder (Hyben Vital(®)) improves aging-induced skin conditions. The apparent stabilizing effects of the rose hip product on cell membranes of stored erythrocyte cells observed in this study may contribute to improve the cell longevity and obstructing skin aging.

  2. The effectiveness of a standardized rose hip powder, containing seeds and shells of Rosa canina, on cell longevity, skin wrinkles, moisture, and elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phetcharat, L; Wongsuphasawat, K; Winther, K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of a rose hip powder (Hyben Vital®) made from seeds and shells on cell senescence, skin wrinkling, and aging. Methods A total of 34 healthy subjects, aged 35–65 years, with wrinkles on the face (crow’s-feet) were subjected to a randomized and double-blinded clinical study of the effects of the rose hip powder, as compared to astaxanthin, a well-known remedy against wrinkles. During the 8-week study, half of the participants ingested the standardized rose hip product, while the other half ingested astaxanthin. Objective measurements of facial wrinkles, skin moisture, and elasticity were made by using Visioscan, Corneometer, and Cutometer at the beginning of the study, after 4 weeks, and after 8 weeks. Evaluation of participant satisfaction of both supplements was assessed using questionnaires. In addition, the effect of the rose hip preparation on cell longevity was measured in terms of leakage of hemoglobin through red cell membranes (hemolytic index) in blood samples kept in a blood bank for 5 weeks. Significance of all values was attained with P≤0.05. Results In the double-blinded study, the rose hip group showed statistically significant improvements in crow’s-feet wrinkles (Pelasticity (P<0.05) after 8 weeks of treatment. A similar improvement was observed for astaxanthin, with P-values 0.05, 0.001, and 0.05. Likewise, both groups expressed equal satisfaction with the results obtained in their self-assessment. The rose hip powder further resulted in increased cell longevity of erythrocyte cells during storage for 5 weeks in a blood bank. Conclusion Results suggest that intake of the standardized rose hip powder (Hyben Vital®) improves aging-induced skin conditions. The apparent stabilizing effects of the rose hip product on cell membranes of stored erythrocyte cells observed in this study may contribute to improve the cell longevity and obstructing skin aging. PMID:26604725

  3. Luminescence dating at Rose cottage cave: a progress report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Woodborne, S

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Deal with infrared-stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence dates from Rose Cottage Cave in South Africa. Discrepancy between luminescence and radiocarbon dates; Concentration of radioactive elements in sediments before and after leaching...

  4. Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Rose Atoll NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  5. Optically stimulated luminescence dating at Rose Cottage Cave

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pienaar, M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Six Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates are compared with stratigraphically associated C-14 dates from Rose Cottage Cave. The OSL dates overlap the accepted C-14 chronology except for one sample that overestimates the expected age...

  6. Water Control in Cut Stems of Rose and Carnation

    OpenAIRE

    Di Stasio, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    This PhD Thesis address, on cut flowers vase life, physiological mechanisms aimed at maintaining and regulating tissues hydration, cellular turgor, water use and senescence phenomena. Specifically we considered the effect of compatible solutes (osmoregulation) on water status, hydration state and vase life of cut stems of rose and carnation (chapter 1). In the second chapter we evaluated the application of anti-transpirant compounds that may act indirectly or directly on rose cut stems trans...

  7. Bekæmpelse af rynket rose II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buttenschøn, Rita M.; Ransijn, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Rynket rose er en invasiv art, der har spredt sig voldsomt gennem de seneste år – ikke kun i Danmark men i hele Europa. Den er svær at bekæmpe, og derfor har Naturstyrelsen Thy og Thisted Kommune i perioden 2010-2013 gennemført en række kontrollerede forsøg med slåning, græsning og kemisk...... bekæmpelse af rynket rose....

  8. An alternative bifurcation analysis of the Rose-Hindmarsh model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 4, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: s.nikolov@imbm.bas.bg

    2005-03-01

    The paper presents an alternative study of the bifurcation behavior of the Rose-Hindmarsh model using Lyapunov-Andronov's theory. This is done on the basis of the obtained analytical formula expressing the first Lyapunov's value (this is not Lyapunov exponent) at the boundary of stability. From the obtained results the following new conclusions are made: Transition to chaos and the occurrence of chaotic oscillations in the Rose-Hindmarsh system take place under hard stability loss.

  9. Eye redness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral injection; Conjunctival injection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies. Others are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Many are nothing to worry about. Eye ...

  10. Red Clover

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Red Clover Share: On This Page Background How Much ... Foster This fact sheet provides basic information about red clover—common names, usefulness and safety, and resources ...

  11. Review of White Rose Benefits Plan and its application to the South White Rose extension tie-back

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-09-15

    In January 2001, Husky Oil Operations Limited (Husky), in joint-venture with Petro-Canada, submitted a Benefits Plan for the White Rose Development to the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB). It was prepared following the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Atlantic Accord Implementation Act and the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Atlantic Accord Implementation (Newfoundland) Act. In December 2001, the C-NLOPB approved the White Rose Benefits Plan. This document described the work that Husky proposes to undertake within its significant discovery license areas 1043 and 1044 for the development of the South White Rose Extension (SWRX) Tie-back to the White Rose Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel as it will require an amendment to the original White Rose Development Plan and is subject to the review and approval of the C-NLOPB. The statutory requirements as well as the actual policies and procedures were identified and discussed in detail. Policies and procedures around the following topics were also presented: project management, supplier development, procurement and contracting strategy, employment and training, research and development, and disadvantaged individuals and groups. The report also discussed the capacity of Newfoundland and Labrador and Canadian economies. It was concluded that, after re-examining the original White Rose Benefits Plan, Husky has determined that the basic principles and philosophy that applied in the base development also apply to the tie-back development. 2 tabs., 7 figs., 3 appendices.

  12. The effectiveness of a standardized rose hip powder, containing seeds and Shells of Rosa canina, on cell longevity, skin wrinkles, moisture, and elasticity 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phetcharat, L; Wongsuphasawat, K; Winther, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of a rose hip powder (Hyben Vital®) made from seeds and shells on cell senescence, skin wrinkling, and aging. Methods: A total of 34 healthy subjects, aged 35–65 years, with wrinkles on the face (crow’s-feet) were subjected to a randomized and double...... moisture, and elasticity were made by using Visioscan, Corneometer, and Cutometer at the beginning of the study, after 4 weeks, and after 8 weeks. Evaluation of participant satisfaction of both supplements was assessed using questionnaires. In addition, the effect of the rose hip preparation on cell...... longevity was measured in terms of leakage of hemoglobin through red cell membranes (hemolytic index) in blood samples kept in a blood bank for 5 weeks. Significance of all values was attained with P#0.05. Results: In the double-blinded study, the rose hip group showed statistically significant improvements...

  13. Qualitative comparison of Dutch and Ethiopian Rose production systems. Why Dutch rose growers move to African Nations and what consequences does this migration have?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries de, Willem

    2010-01-01

    Summary The rose cultivation is used as a study example in this report to facilitate the understanding of the overall differences between the cultivation of agricultural products in the Netherlands and those in warmer countries. The Dutch rose cultivat

  14. Indolbutyric acid on rooting of cuttings of mini rose bush

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kelli Pirola

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The roses are considered as the main cut flowers exported from Brazil and also the most popular in the domestic market. Usually, roses can be propagated by grafting or cutting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cuttings’ size and IBA concentration on mini-cutting rooting of roses variety Mary Rose. Cuttings were obtained from mother plants grown in gardens, with sizes of 3, 5 and 7 cm of length, 1.0 cm in diameter, and treated with IBA, in the concentrations of 0; 500 and 1000 mg L-1. The experimental design was installed in randomized blocks, in a factorial 3 x 3 (mini-cutting sizes x IBA concentration, with 4 repetitions and 10 mini-cuttings per plot. After 60 days rooted cuttings (%, cuttings with callus (%, primary sprouting, leaves and roots numbers, length of the three major roots (cm and mortality (% were evaluated. It is recommended to propagate roses by the use of mini-cuttings with 7 cm treated with 500 mg L-1 of IBA.

  15. Back to Hegel? On Gillian Rose's critique of sociological reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Brian W

    2017-08-22

    Thirty-five years ago, Gillian Rose articulated a significant critique of classical sociological reason, emphasizing its relationship to its philosophical forebears. In a series of works, but most significantly in her Hegel contra Sociology, Rose worked to specify the implications of sociology's failure, both in its critical Marxist and its 'scientific' forms, to move beyond Kant and to fully come to terms with the thought of Hegel. In this article, I unpack and explain the substance of her criticisms, developing the necessary Hegelian philosophical background on which she founded them. I argue that Rose's attempted recuperation of 'speculative reason' for social theory remains little understood, despite its continued relevance to contemporary debates concerning the nature and scope of sociological reason. As an illustration, I employ Rose to critique Chernilo's recent call for a more philosophically sophisticated sociology. From the vantage point of Rose, this particular account of a 'philosophical sociology' remains abstract and rooted in the neo-Kantian contradictions that continue to characterize sociology. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  16. White Rose development plan amendment production volume increase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-09-15

    In January 2001, Husky Oil Operations Limited (Husky), in joint-venture with Petro-Canada, submitted a Benefits Plan for the White Rose Development to the Canada- Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB). This revised document provided the case for requesting an increase in the facility maximum daily production rate and the average annual production rate for the White Rose field from 100,000 barrels per day (bpd) as stated in the approved White Rose Development Plan to 140,000 bpd. In order to determine the potential for increasing oil production through the Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel, two things were considered, namely the proper reservoir management of the White Rose field to ensure optimum resource recovery, and the capacity of the FPSO topsides processing system and supporting utilities to accommodate increased production. This document presented a detailed review of all the implications of increased production on the South White Rose Reservoir. In addition, the results from FPSO performance testing were reviewed, including a study of options for de-bottlenecking the process plant on the topsides and capacity testing of selected process streams and support systems. Vibration analysis was conducted before and during performance testing in July 2006 and a small number of areas addressed. The document also addressed flow metering, resource management, certifying authority review, safety plan revisions, environmental effects, as well as benefits to Canada and Newfoundland. 21 tabs., 60 refs.

  17. Production of desert rose seedlings in different potting media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Carlos Colombo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade the desert rose received fame in the flower market due to its striking and sculptural forms; however, the commercial production of these species is quite recent and little is known about its crop management, including substrates recommendation. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of different substrates on desert rose seed germination and production of its seedlings. Experiment I: freshly harvested seeds of desert rose were sown in different substrates e.g. sand, coconut fiber, semi-composted pine bark, sand + coconut fiber, semi-composted pine bark + sand and coconut fiber + semicomposted pine bark. These substrates were evaluated to study the emergence percentage of seeds, initial growth of seedlings and seedling emergence speed index (ESI. Experiment II: desert rose from the experiment I were transferred to plastic pots filled with the same substrates as in experiment I. The pH and electrical conductivity (EC of the substrates were noted every 30 days while the growth parameters of seedlings were recorded after 240 days. Results from experiment I showed higher germination rate and seedling growth in substrates containing semi-composted pine bark. Similarly, in experiment II, better quality seedlings were observed in substrates containing semi-composted pine bark. Thus, for desert rose seed germination and seedling growth, it is recommended to use substrates containing semi-composted pine bark.

  18. Microsatellite analysis of Rosa damascena Mill. accessions reveals genetic similarity between genotypes used for rose oil production and old Damask rose varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusanov, K.; Kovacheva, N.; Vosman, B.J.; Zhang, L.; Rajapakse, S.; Atanassov, A.; Atanassov, I.

    2005-01-01

    Damask roses are grown in several European and Asiatic countries for rose oil production. Twenty-six oil-bearing Rosa damascena Mill. accessions and 13 garden Damask roses were assayed by molecular markers. Microsatellite genotyping demonstrated that R. damascena Mill. accessions from Bulgaria,

  19. Rose hip (Rosa canina L: A functional food perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Fan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rose hip (Rosa canina L. is the pseudo-fruit of the rose plant, which is widely known as a valuable source of polyphenols and vitamin C. Both in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that this fruit exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiobesogenic activities. The health benefits of Rose hip (RH have been attributed to its wide range of bioactive compounds including the anti-inflammatory galactolipid: (2S-1,2-di-O-[(9Z,12Z,15Z-octadeca-9,12,15-trienoyl]-3-O-β-D galactopyranosyl glycerol (GOPO, vitamin C, phenolics, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and other carotenoids. As cyclooxygenase inhibitors, RH compounds may reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease, and various inflammatory conditions. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the functional, medical, and physiological properties of RH.

  20. [Endophytic fungi in rose (Rosa hybrida) in Bogota, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Salazar, Catalina; Cepero de Garcia, María Caridad

    2005-06-01

    We have investigated the presence of endophytic fungi associated with rose plants (Rosa hybrida) in Colombia. Endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy leaves of ten ornamental roses plants from gardens cultured in malt extract, peptone, yeast extract agar plates (MPY). We sampled 560 leaves fragments, 56 per sample. Endophytic fungi comprised 92 isolates (16.4%); of these isolates, 41 were classified as sterile mycelium (without reproductive structures that allowed their identification), 31 isolates were identified to genus or to species, and 20 isolates could not be identified at all. The identified endophytic fungi were as follow: Nigrospora oryzae, Aureobasidium spp, Acremonium spp. The fungi Nodulisporium sp, Gliocladium virens, Cladosporium sp, Alternaria sp, Phoma sp and Chaetomium globosum were represented by one isolate each. Since the endophytic fungi are known for their capacity to produce metabolites with biological activity, it is possible that the microorganisms found in this study have potential as antagonist of rose pathogens.

  1. Luminescent, optical and color properties of natural rose quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibar, R. [Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Cetin, A.; Selvi, S. [Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Karal, T. [Institute of Nuclear Science, Ege University, 35100 Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Can, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey)], E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com

    2007-11-15

    Rose quartz is an interesting mineral with numerous impurities that have been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cathodoluminescence (CL), ion beam luminescence (IBL), radioluminescence (RL), thermoluminescence (TL) and optical absorption (OA). After HF etching, rose quartz from Oliva de Plasencia (Caceres, Spain) shows under SEM the presence of other silicate phases such as dumortierite [Al{sub 6.5-7}(BO{sub 3})(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}(O,OH){sub 3}]. The OA spectrum of rose quartz suggests that these inclusions are the cause of coloration of rose quartz. The luminescence (CL, IBL, RL, TL) spectra behavior, at both room temperature and lower, confirms that the {approx}340nm emission could be associated with Si-O strain structures, including non-bridging oxygen or silicon vacancy-hole centers; the observed {approx}400nm emission could be associated with recombination of a hole trapped adjacent to a substitutional, charge-compensated aluminum alkali ion center; the {approx}500nm emission could be associated with substitutional Al{sup 3+} and the {approx}700nm peak could be associated with Fe{sup 3+} point defects in Si{sup 4+} sites. These results suggest that, while defect properties of rose quartz are not greatly dissimilar to those of purer forms of quartz and silica, further research seems necessary to determine criteria for the evolution of the newly-formed self-organized microstructures in the rose quartz lattice under irradiation.

  2. Description of Idiomatic Expression Found in Guns N’ Roses songs

    OpenAIRE

    Hutabarat, Chandra Xaverius Putra

    2011-01-01

    A paper with title “ Description of Idiomatic Expression Found in Guns N’ Roses Songs. Describing idiomatic expression in three songs of Guns N’ Roses, which are chosen randomly in Use Your Illusion I album. The method of reseach applies in this study is library reseach, and method of analysis the data is descriptive method. This study is analyzed because most of people can sing a English song, but most of them can not understand the meaning of the song. Describing idiomatic expression in a ...

  3. Allergy symptoms and IgE immune response to rose: an occupational and an environmental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, A U; Karakaya, Gül; Kalyoncu, A F

    2002-10-01

    Turkey is one of the four major producers of rose. Cultivation of rose is the main economic activity of many villagers in the Lakes region. Rose allergy has not been reported before. We investigated the prevalence of allergy symptoms and specific-IgE immune response due to rose in villagers who had been cultivating rose in Güneykent village in the Lakes region. A screening questionnaire including respiratory and allergic symptoms was administered to 290 villagers. The investigation team visited and studied 75 randomly selected villagers with an interviewer-administered questionnaire, pulmonary function testing, skin prick testing and serum total IgE. Specific IgE against Rosa rugosa was measured in 41 villagers. Villagers reported asthma/allergy symptoms outside the rose season (17.6%), during the rose season (6.2%), and both during the rose season and outside the rose season (whole the year) (17.6%). Atopy and specific IgE against Rosa rugosa were detected in 12 (19%), and 8 (19.5%) of the villagers tested. Villagers who had symptoms whole the year reported wheeze more frequently than those who reported symptoms only outside the rose season (41.2% vs 11.1%). IgE-mediated allergy could occur due to rose and/or its pollen. Symptoms mainly affect the upper airways. Further studies in the rose handlers, florists and workers of the rose industry would help elucidate the occurrence of rose allergy.

  4. Factors affecting the germination of hybrid rose achenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, De D.P.; Dubois, L.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The smooth germination of mature Hybrid rose achenes is hampered by (i) hardseededness (HS), (ii) primary dormancy (PD) and (iii) germination polymorphism (GP). HS is owing to the hard pericarp. PD is, in principle, a natural phenomenon that protects the seeds from precocious germination. For

  5. Vascular occlusion in cut rose flowers - a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.

    1995-01-01

    The causes of low water uptake and water stress symptoms in cut rose flowers are briefly reviewed. Low water uptake is due to an occlusion, mainly located in the basal stem end. No evidence has been found for a reaction of the plant after cutting, in the formation of this occlusion. The blockage has

  6. Use of stabilization pond sludge in cultivation of roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. da Paixão Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One option for the increasing production of sewage sludge (SS is its agricultural use in crops with high nutritional demand, such as the rose. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the application of SS from primary stabilization pond in roses of the variety 'Carola'. For the experiment, the roses were planted in 20 L recipients using increasing doses of sludge (T2 - 12 Mg ha-1, T3 - 24 Mg ha-1 and T4 - 36 Mg ha-1, mineral fertilizer (T5 and control treatment (T1, without N in a randomized block design. The evaluated parameters were: roots dry mass, aerial dry mass, total biomass, leaflets area and nitrogen concentration in the leaf. The SS application resulted in better development of the rose, increasing the roots and the aerial biomasses, the leaflets area, and nitrogen content in the leaves compared to the control (T1. There was no statistical difference between the use of mineral fertilizer (T5, and the SS under the highest dose (T4. With these benefits, the use in agriculture of sewage sludge derived from stabilization ponds proved to be an adequate option for its disposal.

  7. Scion - rootstock relationships and root behaviour in glasshouse roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, H.W.M.

    1994-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the cultivation of cut roses in the glasshouse is commonly carried out yearround. Most cultivars are grown on a rootstock. The first part of this study investigates various rootstocks for their ability to influence production and quality throughout the year. The mutual influence

  8. Growth and flower development in roses as affected by light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, F.M.; Bakx, E.

    1997-01-01

    Growth and flowering of shoots of rose ‘Mercedes’ were investigated as a function of the level and spectral quality of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Experiments were performed with single-shoot plants decapitated above the two most basal leaves with five leaflets. The development of

  9. Rose bengal-sensitized nanocrystalline ceria photoanode for dye ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quest for new materials and/or methods is continuous process in scientific investigation, for getting desired comparative results. The conduction band (CB) position of CeO 2 photoanode lies below lowest unoccupied molecular orbital level (LUMO) of rose bengal (RB) dye.Due to this, faster electron transfer from LUMO level ...

  10. Cultural and religious unification through music in Desert Rose's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Silence of the Musicis a musical theatre piece produced by Desert Rose in 2010. The production not only addresses themes of prejudice and intercultural discrepancies in post-apartheid South Africa, but also carries a message of love and unity. The unifying factor in the show is music – the fusing together of the musics of ...

  11. Tips From Former Smokers – Rose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    Rose developed lung cancer from smoking cigarettes and needed surgery. She talks about the difficulties she faced recovering from surgery.  Created: 7/7/2014 by Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  12. Genetic Diversity of Rose germplasm based on RAPD analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AHSAN IQBAL

    2012-06-12

    Jun 12, 2012 ... The rose is the largest and most important ornamental crop in many countries. The genus ... management of plant genetic resources for any crop. Indo-Pak subcontinent has always been a sight of ... Floriculture, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. Morphological data collection. The plant descriptor for the ...

  13. Isolation, Molecular Characterization, and Mapping of Four Rose MLO Orthologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Helgard; Qiu, Xianqin; Wehmeyer, Juliane; Debener, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Powdery mildew is a major disease of economic importance in cut and pot roses. As an alternative to conventional resistance breeding strategies utilizing single-dominant genes or QTLs, mildew resistance locus o (MLO)-based resistance might offer some advantages. In dicots such as Arabidopsis, pea, and tomato, loss-of-function mutations in MLO genes confer high levels of broad-spectrum resistance. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of four MLO homologs from a large rose EST collection isolated from leaves. These genes are phylogenetically closely related to other dicot MLO genes that are involved in plant powdery mildew interactions. Therefore, they are candidates for MLO genes involved in rose powdery mildew interactions. Two of the four isolated genes contain all of the sequence signatures considered to be diagnostic for MLO genes. We mapped all four genes to three linkage groups and conducted the first analysis of alternative alleles. This information is discussed in regards to a reverse genetics approach aimed at the selection of rose plants that are homozygous for loss-of-function in one or more MLO genes.

  14. Isolation, molecular characterisation and mapping of four rose MLO orthologues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgard eKaufmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew is a major disease of economic importance in cut and pot roses. As an alternative to conventional resistance breeding strategies utilising single-dominant genes or QTLs, mildew resistance locus o (MLO-based resistance might offer some advantages. In dicots such as Arabidopsis, pea and tomato, loss-of-function mutations in MLO genes confer high levels of broad-spectrum resistance. Here, we report the isolation and characterisation of four MLO homologues from a large rose EST collection isolated from leaves. These genes are phylogenetically closely related to other dicot MLO genes that are involved in plant powdery mildew interactions. Therefore, they are candidates for MLO genes involved in rose powdery mildew interactions. Two of the four isolated genes contain all of the sequence signatures considered to be diagnostic for MLO genes. We mapped all four genes to three linkage groups and conducted the first analysis of alternative alleles. This information is discussed in regards to a reverse genetics approach aimed at the selection of rose plants that are homozygous for loss of function in one or more MLO genes.

  15. Pomological and phenological characteristics of promising rose hip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine pomological and phenological characteristics of eleven promising rose hip (Rosa) genotypes chosen from wild populations in Tokat region of northern Anatolia, Turkey. Plants were propagated by cuttings and planted in 2000 at the research station of the Horticultural Department of ...

  16. Dried rose ( Rosa damascena Mill.) dreg: an alternative litter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was carried out to determine the effects of using dried rose dreg (DRD) as an alternative litter material for broiler performance and microbiological characteristics of litter. A total of 225 day-old broiler chicks was raised on pine wood shavings (PS), DRD and PS+DRD until 42 days. The effects of litter ...

  17. Interaction of rose bengal with mung bean aspartate transcarbamylase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. The fluorescein dye, rose bengal in the dark: (i) inhibited the activity of mung bean aspartate transcarbamylase (EC 2.1.3.2) in a non-competitive manner, when aspartate was the varied substrate; (ii) induced a lag in the time course of reaction and this hysteresis was abolished upon preincubation with carbamyl ...

  18. Genetic diversity of rose germplasm in Pakistan characterized by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers have been found to be very useful in studying the genetic variability of different species, including Rosa. Present studies were undertaken for the identification and analysis of genetic variation within a collection of 4 species and 30 accessions of rose using RAPD ...

  19. Growth analysis of four types of the rose cv. 'Motrea'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van de P.A.; Glorie, W.G.; Goudriaan, J.

    1988-01-01

    A growth analysis of the rose cv. 'Motrea' was carried out during 6 months after planting, in January. The purpose of the experiment was to investigate the effect of plant propagation: cutting, stenting, bench grafting or budding. During the first 5 weeks of plant growth, cuttings and stentlings

  20. Genetic mapping of QTLs associated with growth vigour in rose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.; Dolstra, O.; Denneboom, C.; Stam, P.; Visser, P.B.

    2003-01-01

    Parental linkage maps of a segregating population of diploid rose hybrids (2n=2x =14), composed of 365 uni-parental AFLP and SSR markers, have been constructed using a population (n=88) derived from a cross between two half-sib parents (P119 and P117). Of the markers, 157 P119 markers (85 %) mapped

  1. Recent results from the RD-48 (ROSE) Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzin, A. E-mail: aruzin@eng.tau.ac.il

    2000-06-01

    The current status of the research carried out by the RD-48 (ROSE) Collaboration is presented. Results of macroscopic and microscopic experimental studies are described as well as the progress in modeling. Detectors with improved radiation hardness were achieved by oxygen enrichment of silicon. The oxygen concentration required to obtain the improvement is {approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}.

  2. Recent results from the RD48 (ROSE) Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruzin, A

    2000-01-01

    The current status of the research carried out by the RD-48 (ROSE) Collaboration is presented. Results of macroscopic and microscopic experimental studies are described as well as the progress in modeling. Detectors with improved radiation hardness were achieved by oxygen enrichment of silicon. The oxygen concentration required to obtain the improvement is ~10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/. (10 refs).

  3. Erythrocyte Antioxidant Protection of Rose Hips (Rosa spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Widén

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rose hips are popular in health promoting products as the fruits contain high content of bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate whether health benefits are attributable to ascorbic acid, phenols, or other rose-hip-derived compounds. Freeze-dried powder of rose hips was preextracted with metaphosphoric acid and the sample was then sequentially eluted on a C18 column. The degree of amelioration of oxidative damage was determined in an erythrocyte in vitro bioassay by comparing the effects of a reducing agent on erythrocytes alone or on erythrocytes pretreated with berry extracts. The maximum protection against oxidative stress, 59.4±4.0% (mean ± standard deviation, was achieved when incubating the cells with the first eluted meta-phosphoric extract. Removal of ascorbic acid from this extract increased the protection against oxidative stress to 67.9±1.9%. The protection from the 20% and 100% methanol extracts was 20.8±8.2% and 5.0±3.2%, respectively. Antioxidant uptake was confirmed by measurement of catechin by HPLC-ESI-MS in the 20% methanol extract. The fact that all sequentially eluted extracts studied contributed to protective effects on the erythrocytes indicates that rose hips contain a promising level of clinically relevant antioxidant protection.

  4. Resurrecting the Feminine in "The Name of the Rose."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentz, Thomas S.

    1988-01-01

    Examines how the repressed feminine principle affects the four major discourses in Umberto Eco's "The Name of the Rose." Discusses the historical relationship between the masculine and the feminine in language and religion. Uses that historical frame to guide a close textual analysis of dialectical interplay between the masculine and the…

  5. Spreading tendencies of multiflora rose in the Southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosene, W.

    1950-01-01

    In 1948-49 studies were made on the spreading of multiflora rose at the sites of three old plantings in Alabama and Georgia. The age of these plantings varied from 14-40 years. Roses were invading surrounding land at each site. Observations indicated that seeds are carried by water and birds. Seedlings were numerous in drainageways leading from old shrubs. Birds had deposited seed under trees, in thickets, and along hedgerows. Seedlings growing under a single tree varied in number from a few to 50. Two rose bushes were found under a tree a mile from the probable point of origin. Seedlings were spreading in unimproved pastures by growing in thickets where they were protected from grazing and mowing. Plants were not found in cultivated fields. Spreading was similar near all three locations in like plant communities. Competition from trees affected multiflora more than that of any other type of vegetation. Plants thrive in pine woodlands with an open canopy, but growth is weak in a thick hardwood stand. Control will be necessary if multiflora rose is to be kept from spreading in idle land and unimproved pastures.

  6. The effectiveness of a standardized rose hip powder, containing seeds and shells of Rosa canina, on cell longevity, skin wrinkles, moisture, and elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phetcharat L

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available L Phetcharat,1,2 K Wongsuphasawat,1,2 K Winther31School of Antiaging and Regenerative Medicine, Mae Fah University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Anti-aging and Regenerative Medicine, Mae Fah University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3Institute for Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C, DenmarkObjective: To evaluate the effects of a rose hip powder (Hyben Vital® made from seeds and shells on cell senescence, skin wrinkling, and aging.Methods: A total of 34 healthy subjects, aged 35–65 years, with wrinkles on the face (crow’s-feet were subjected to a randomized and double-blinded clinical study of the effects of the rose hip powder, as compared to astaxanthin, a well-known remedy against wrinkles. During the 8-week study, half of the participants ingested the standardized rose hip product, while the other half ingested astaxanthin. Objective measurements of facial wrinkles, skin moisture, and elasticity were made by using Visioscan, Corneometer, and Cutometer at the beginning of the study, after 4 weeks, and after 8 weeks. Evaluation of participant satisfaction of both supplements was assessed using questionnaires. In addition, the effect of the rose hip preparation on cell longevity was measured in terms of leakage of hemoglobin through red cell membranes (hemolytic index in blood samples kept in a blood bank for 5 weeks. Significance of all values was attained with P≤0.05.Results: In the double-blinded study, the rose hip group showed statistically significant improvements in crow’s-feet wrinkles (P<0.05, skin moisture (P<0.05, and elasticity (P<0.05 after 8 weeks of treatment. A similar improvement was observed for astaxanthin, with P-values 0.05, 0.001, and 0.05. Likewise, both groups expressed equal satisfaction with the results obtained in their self-assessment. The rose hip powder further resulted in increased cell longevity of erythrocyte cells during storage for 5 weeks in a blood bank

  7. Red Capes, Red Herrings, and Red Flags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Donald W.

    The argument that the personality structures obtained from retrospective ratings reflect semantic similarity structures has been as provocative as a red cape in the bull ring. High congruence between those two kinds of structures seems well established. What is less clear is how and why those structures differ from that for immediate judgments of…

  8. Chemical and Histochemical Analysis of ‘Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseux’, a Moss Rose of the Rosa × damascena Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAISSARD, JEAN-CLAUDE; BERGOUGNOUX, VÉRONIQUE; MARTIN, MAGALI; MAURIAT, MÉLANIE; BAUDINO, SYLVIE

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Moss roses are old garden roses covered with a mossy growth on flower pedicel and calyx. This moss releases a pine-scented oleoresin that is very sticky and odoriferous. Rosa × centifolia ‘muscosa’ was the first moss rose to be obtained by bud-mutation but, interestingly, R. × damascena ‘Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseux’ was the first repeat-blooming cultivar, thus interesting breeders. In the present study, the anatomy of these sports (i.e. bud-mutations) is characterized and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the moss versus the petals are identified. They are compared between the two lines and their respective parents. • Methods Anatomy of the moss is studied by environmental scanning electron microscopy and histochemical light microscopy. Sudan Red IV and Fluorol Yellow 088 are used to detect lipids, and 1-naphthol reaction with N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine to detect terpenes (Nadi reaction). Head-space or solid/liquid extraction followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are used to identify VOCs in moss, trichomes and petals. • Key Results Moss of the two cultivars has the same structure with trichomes on other trichomes but not exactly the same VOCs. These VOCs are specific to the moss, with lots of terpenes. An identical VOC composition is found in leaves but not in petals. They are nearly the same in the moss mutants and in the respective wild types. • Conclusions Sepals of moss roses and their parents have a specific VOC pattern, different from that of the petals. The moss corresponds to a heterochronic mutation with trichomes developing on other trichomes. Such a mutation has probably appeared twice and independently in the two lines. PMID:16344264

  9. Chemical and histochemical analysis of 'Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseux', a Moss Rose of the Rosa x damascena group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caissard, Jean-Claude; Bergougnoux, Véronique; Martin, Magali; Mauriat, Mélanie; Baudino, Sylvie

    2006-02-01

    Moss roses are old garden roses covered with a mossy growth on flower pedicel and calyx. This moss releases a pine-scented oleoresin that is very sticky and odoriferous. Rosa x centifolia 'muscosa' was the first moss rose to be obtained by bud-mutation but, interestingly, R. x damascena 'Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseux' was the first repeat-blooming cultivar, thus interesting breeders. In the present study, the anatomy of these sports (i.e. bud-mutations) is characterized and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the moss versus the petals are identified. They are compared between the two lines and their respective parents. Anatomy of the moss is studied by environmental scanning electron microscopy and histochemical light microscopy. Sudan Red IV and Fluorol Yellow 088 are used to detect lipids, and 1-naphthol reaction with N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine to detect terpenes (Nadi reaction). Head-space or solid/liquid extraction followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are used to identify VOCs in moss, trichomes and petals. Moss of the two cultivars has the same structure with trichomes on other trichomes but not exactly the same VOCs. These VOCs are specific to the moss, with lots of terpenes. An identical VOC composition is found in leaves but not in petals. They are nearly the same in the moss mutants and in the respective wild types. Sepals of moss roses and their parents have a specific VOC pattern, different from that of the petals. The moss corresponds to a heterochronic mutation with trichomes developing on other trichomes. Such a mutation has probably appeared twice and independently in the two lines.

  10. White Rose oilfield development application: Response to additional information requests from the White Rose Public Review Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    This documents contains the responses by Husky Oil as the operator of the White Rose Project in offshore Atlantic Canada to the White Rose Public Review Commission. The responses address questions concerning the development plan, showing that the economic projections meet investment criteria, provide requested details about engineering and management plans, and discuss the financial and economic considerations. Specifically, the Company offers a defence of the proposed floating platform production, storing and offloading (FPSO) system as opposed to the gravity-based structure (GBS) used in the Hibernia development; it also provides employment projections associated with the White Rose development. In this regard, the Company forecasts that 60 to 80 per cent of direct employment will be undertaken in Newfoundland and up to 75 per cent of the engineering for White Rose will likely be carried out in Newfoundland, depending on the result of the competitive bidding process for topsides. Benefits of long-term operations to Newfoundland are estimated at several hundred million dollars as a result of some 400 direct, long-term, high quality jobs associated with the operation and the support of the FPSO; the incremental indirect and induced jobs have been estimated to be about 2.5 times the number of direct jobs. Data is also provided to support the rationale for the deferred development of the North Avalon and West Avalon oil pools. 2 refs., 9 tabs., 4 figs.

  11. Red Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AskMayoExpert. Conjunctivitis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014. Jan. 11, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/red-eye/basics/definition/SYM-20050748 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  12. Red Hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), an enforceable agreement of the Hawaii Department of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Navy -- Defense Logistics Agency.

  13. Product (RED)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponte, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    of complex social, economic, and environmental processes. At the same time, we argue that there are important distinctions as well—labels and certifications are ultimately about improving the conditions of production, whereas RED is about accepting existing production and trade systems and donating......(PRODUCT)RED™ (hereafter RED) is a cobranding initiative launched in 2006 by the aid celebrity Bono to raise money from product sales to support The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. In this paper we argue that RED is shifting the boundaries of ‘causumerism’ (shopping...... for a better world) by enrolling consumers in ways that do not rely on accurate knowledge of the products or specific understanding of the cause that The Global Fund engages but, instead, rely on a system of more general, affective affinity between the ‘aid celebrities’ who are behind RED (such as Bono...

  14. Enhancing the Antioxidant Activities of Wines by Addition of White Rose Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Hyunbin; Heo, Jieun; Lee, Kyun Hee; Lee, Yoon Bok; Kim, Yun Bae; Han, Nam Soo

    2017-09-28

    White rose petal extract (WRE) contains large amounts of phenolic compounds and is considered edible. In this study, red and white wines were prepared by the addition of WRE (0.10% or 0.25% (w/v)), followed by fermentation at 25°C for 15 days. The fermentation profiles, colors, sensory test results, and antioxidant activities of the wines were compared. As reported herein, the fermentation profiles of the pH, CO₂ production rate, and final ethanol concentration were not affected by the addition of WRE, but a slow consumption rate of sugar was observed in 0.25% WRE-added wine. In contrast, the total polyphenol concentrations in WRE-added wines increased significantly ( p wines. Chromaticity tests showed slight changes in the redness and yellowness, but sensory tests showed that the overall flavor qualities of the WRE-added wines were acceptable to the panels. This study demonstrates that addition of WRE to wine confers beneficial health effects and this treatment results in better outcome in white wine.

  15. Towards efficient improvement of greenhouse grown roses: genetic analysis of vigour and powdery mildew resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Rose (Rosa) is one of the important ornamental crops worldwide. Greenhouse production of cut rose and pot rose requires much fossil fuel for optimal plant growth and is adversely affected by infection with powdery mildew ( Podosphaera pannosa ). The heavy energy input and frequent

  16. Determination of volatile compounds of the first rose oil and the first ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... respectively, whereas geraniol contents were 11.81% and 15.97%, respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that HS-SPME/GC/MS is a suitable technique for the determination of volatile compounds of rose oil and rose water. Keywords: Oil-bearing rose, Rosa damascena, HS-SPME/GC/MS, volatile compounds.

  17. Development of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to Rose rosette virus nucleoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden roses, which form the cornerstone of the multi-billion dollar landscape industry, annually generate wholesale US domestic production valued at ca. $400 million. Over the past few decades Rose rosette disease, caused by Rose rosette virus (RRV; genus Emaravirus), has become a major threat to t...

  18. Therapeutic Applications of Rose Hips from Different Rosa Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Mármol

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rosa species, rose hips, are widespread wild plants that have been traditionally used as medicinal compounds for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. The therapeutic potential of these plants is based on its antioxidant effects caused by or associated with its phytochemical composition, which includes ascorbic acid, phenolic compounds and healthy fatty acids among others. Over the last few years, medicinal interest in rose hips has increased as a consequence of recent research that has studied its potential application as a treatment for several diseases including skin disorders, hepatotoxicity, renal disturbances, diarrhoea, inflammatory disorders, arthritis, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity and cancer. In this review, the role of different species of Rosa in the prevention of treatment of various disorders related to oxidative stress, is examined, focusing on new therapeutic approaches from a molecular point of view.

  19. Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of rose bengal: Effect of operational parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Japinder; Singhal, Sonal

    2014-10-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of rose bengal dye has been investigated using ZnO nanoparticles as photocatalyst. ZnO nanoparticles were found to be efficient catalyst for the degradation of dye and 98% degradation was observed in 90 min. Effect of various operational parameters such as amount of catalyst (0.25-2.00 g/L), concentration of dye (0.01-0.05 mM) and pH (3-11) of dye solution on the rate of dye degradation was studied. The most favorable results for the degradation of rose bengal were observed at pH 5 at a catalyst loading of 1 g/L. Moreover, hydroxyl radicals have been detected in the photocatalytic reaction mixture by using terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technique. The reusability of the catalyst has also been studied and catalyst was found to be active even after being used for 5 times.

  20. Therapeutic Applications of Rose Hips from Different Rosa Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mármol, Inés; Sánchez-de-Diego, Cristina; Jiménez-Moreno, Nerea; Ancín-Azpilicueta, Carmen; Rodríguez-Yoldi, María Jesús

    2017-05-25

    Rosa species, rose hips, are widespread wild plants that have been traditionally used as medicinal compounds for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. The therapeutic potential of these plants is based on its antioxidant effects caused by or associated with its phytochemical composition, which includes ascorbic acid, phenolic compounds and healthy fatty acids among others. Over the last few years, medicinal interest in rose hips has increased as a consequence of recent research that has studied its potential application as a treatment for several diseases including skin disorders, hepatotoxicity, renal disturbances, diarrhoea, inflammatory disorders, arthritis, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity and cancer. In this review, the role of different species of Rosa in the prevention of treatment of various disorders related to oxidative stress, is examined, focusing on new therapeutic approaches from a molecular point of view.

  1. Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of rose bengal: Effect of operational parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Japinder, E-mail: jap.chawla@gmail.com; Singhal, Sonal, E-mail: sonal1174@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of rose bengal dye has been investigated using ZnO nanoparticles as photocatalyst. ZnO nanoparticles were found to be efficient catalyst for the degradation of dye and 98% degradation was observed in 90 min. Effect of various operational parameters such as amount of catalyst (0.25–2.00 g/L), concentration of dye (0.01–0.05 mM) and pH (3–11) of dye solution on the rate of dye degradation was studied. The most favorable results for the degradation of rose bengal were observed at pH 5 at a catalyst loading of 1 g/L. Moreover, hydroxyl radicals have been detected in the photocatalytic reaction mixture by using terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technique. The reusability of the catalyst has also been studied and catalyst was found to be active even after being used for 5 times.

  2. Pesticide analysis in rose wines by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelo-Pérez, Lidia M; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Borges-Miquel, Teresa M; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel

    2007-12-01

    In this work, the determination of 11 pesticides (pirimicarb, metalaxyl, pyrimethanil, procymidone, nuarimol, azoxystrobin, tebufenozide, fenarimol, benalaxyl, penconazole, and tetradifon) in rose wines by micellar EKC (MEKC) using reversed electrode polarity stacking mode (REPSM) as online preconcentration strategy is described. The MEKC buffer consisted of 100 mM sodium tetraborate and 30 mM SDS at pH 8.5 with 6% v/v 1-propanol. A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) procedure using PDMS/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibers was applied to extract the selected pesticides from the rose wine samples. The comparison between the calibration curves obtained from hydroalcoholic solutions (12% v/v ethanol) and from rose wines (matrix matched calibration) showed the existence of a strong matrix effect. Furthermore, a comparison with calibration curves obtained with white wine samples also showed significant differences for most of the analyzed pesticides. As a result, a matrix matched calibration was developed. Quantitative extraction from spiked wine samples was carried out in triplicate at two levels of concentration (range 0.18-6.00 mg/L). LODs between 0.040 and 0.929 mg/L were achieved, which are below the maximum residue limits (MRLs) established for wine grapes (except for pirimicarb) by the EU and Spain legislation as well as by the Codex Alimentarius. The established method - which is solvent free, cost effective, and fast - was also applied to the analysis of several homemade rose wine samples and a commercial one. Two of the selected pesticides were found in some of the analyzed samples.

  3. Partial preferential chromosome pairing is genotype dependent in tetraploid rose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Peter M; Arens, Paul; Voorrips, Roeland E; Esselink, G Danny; Koning-Boucoiran, Carole F S; Van't Westende, Wendy P C; Santos Leonardo, Tiago; Wissink, Patrick; Zheng, Chaozhi; van Geest, Geert; Visser, Richard G F; Krens, Frans A; Smulders, Marinus J M; Maliepaard, Chris

    2017-04-01

    It has long been recognised that polyploid species do not always neatly fall into the categories of auto- or allopolyploid, leading to the term 'segmental allopolyploid' to describe everything in between. The meiotic behaviour of such intermediate species is not fully understood, nor is there consensus as to how to model their inheritance patterns. In this study we used a tetraploid cut rose (Rosa hybrida) population, genotyped using the 68K WagRhSNP array, to construct an ultra-high-density linkage map of all homologous chromosomes using methods previously developed for autotetraploids. Using the predicted bivalent configurations in this population we quantified differences in pairing behaviour among and along homologous chromosomes, leading us to correct our estimates of recombination frequency to account for this behaviour. This resulted in the re-mapping of 25 695 SNP markers across all homologues of the seven rose chromosomes, tailored to the pairing behaviour of each chromosome in each parent. We confirmed the inferred differences in pairing behaviour among chromosomes by examining repulsion-phase linkage estimates, which also carry information about preferential pairing and recombination. Currently, the closest sequenced relative to rose is Fragaria vesca. Aligning the integrated ultra-dense rose map with the strawberry genome sequence provided a detailed picture of the synteny, confirming overall co-linearity but also revealing new genomic rearrangements. Our results suggest that pairing affinities may vary along chromosome arms, which broadens our current understanding of segmental allopolyploidy. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. FinROSE - middle atmospheric chemistry transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damski, J.; Thoelix, L.; Backman, L. (Research and Development, Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (FI)); Taalas, P. (Regional and Technical Cooperation for Development Dept. World Meteorological Organization, Geneve (CH)); Kulmala, M. (Helsinki Univ. (FI). Div. of Atmospheric Sciences)

    2007-07-01

    The development and performance of a three-dimensional global middle atmospheric chemistry transport model FinROSE is described. The FinROSE chemistry transport model includes a numerical scheme for stratospheric chemistry with parameterizations for heterogeneous processing on polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) and on liquid binary aerosols together with a parameterisation of large nitric acid trihydrate particles (i.e. NAT-rocks) and PSC sedimentation. The total number of trace species in the model is 34 and the total number of gas-phase reactions, photodissociation processes and heterogeneous reactions is about 150. The model is forced by external wind and temperature fields. The simulations are normally performed in a 5 deg x 10 deg (lat. x long.) grid from the surface up to around 0.1 hPa, with a vertical resolution of ca. 1.5 km in the stratosphere. Long-term simulations (40 to 50 years) have been done using winds and temperatures from ECMWF ERA40 analyses. The performance of the model in describing the stratospheric composition and chemistry is shown and evaluated in this paper. In general, the FinROSE results show a good comparison with measured total ozone. Also the timing, the depth and the deepening of the Antarctic ozone hole, and the responsible processes are captured well in the model simulations. (orig.)

  5. Bioclimatic lessons from James C. Rose's architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vissilia, A.M. [Department of Structural Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Kodrou 13, 105 58 Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    This paper attempts to interpret three residences designed by landscape architect James Rose, focusing on their bioclimatic concepts (layout of the buildings: orientation in relation to sun and wind, geometry of the building form; spacing: site planning-landscape; air movement; openings: size, position and orientation, protection; and building envelope: choice of building materials and construction detailing). James Rose (1913-1991) was one of the three pioneer landscape architects who established modern landscape design in the United States. He had the opportunity to design three residences and their landscapes which constitute the clearest expression of his views about environmental design. Residences conceived in Rose's design philosophy result to the creation of an ''environment'' instead of the ordinary approach of architecture plus landscape, exhibiting his contribution to the development of a less aggressive architecture, more attentive and integrated to the environment. This is a rare approach where the design is product of one single mind that of the landscape architect. Several bioclimatic concepts are apparent in the landscape architect's works, showing a deep concern with the integration between construction and environment. The three cases explored are: the landscape architect's environment (1952, 1970), the Zheutlin environment (1956), and the Slutzker environment (1964). (author)

  6. Safety assessment of South White Rose expansion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, G.; Jenkins, J. [Atkins, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-05

    Husky Oil Operations Ltd (Husky) is considering the development of the South White Rose Expansion (SWRX) area, located approximately 4 km south of the current Southern Glory Hole (SGH) in approximately 120 m of water. Within the new glory hole, one new drill centre will be constructed with wells tied back and into the SGH manifolds. The SWRX drill centre will comprise three horizontal production wells and two horizontal water injection wells with expansion capacity for eight wells. Husky is intending to submit a Development Plan Amendment to the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB) as part of the development. This document presented the results of a study that assessed the potential impact of the new development on existing White Rose safety studies. The study reviewed existing safety studies that were developed for the White Rose project to determine the potential impact of the new SWRX development. These studies included Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU) Blowout Risk Assessment; MODU Dropped Object Analysis; and MODU Risk Assessment. This report also detailed the hazards and risks associated with Diving Support Vessel (DSV) operations. The report also contained a review of Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel modifications. 25 refs., 41 tabs., 15 figs., 2 appendices.

  7. Application for Approval : White Rose Canada-Newfoundland Benefits Plan and White Rose Development Plan : Decision 2001.01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, H.H.

    2001-11-26

    The White Rose offshore oil development project is located in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin 350 km east of Newfoundland. It is a co-venture between Husky Oil Operations Ltd. and Petro-Canada. The project is expected to recover 230 million barrels of oil over a 12 year period. This report explains the decision of the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board regarding the application by Husky Oil and its partner for approval of its plans for the development of the White Rose oil field. The White Rose Development Plan describes the proponent's interpretation of the geology and reservoir characteristics of the oil field and provides estimates of hydrocarbon reserves. The drilling approach that the proponents plan to use at their facilities were also described along with the environmental parameters of the facilities. The Board's responsibility is to ensure that hydrocarbons are produced in accordance with good oil field practice including efficient recovery, prevention of waste and safe operational practices. The White Rose Canada-Newfoundland Benefits Plan addresses issues in the areas that will benefit the province, including: an East Coast Regional Office in St. John's, Newfoundland; employment; research and development; goods and services; disadvantaged individuals and groups; and monitoring and reporting. In terms of protection of the environment, the Board makes its assessment under the guidance of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act which deals with issues such as the effects of routine releases of greenhouse gas emissions, drilling discharges, production discharges and accidental discharges. It also sets rules for decommissioning and abandonment of floating production, storage and off loading vessels and underwater facilities. The Board considered the application and has decided to approve the Benefits Plan, subject to certain conditions described in this report. tabs., figs., appendices.

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of rose oil: A comprehensive review of clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safieh Mohebitabar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rose oil is obtained from the petals of difference Rosa species especially Rosa centifolia L. and Rosa damascena Mill. Various pharmacological properties have been attributed to rose oil. The aim of the present study was to review the rose oil therapeutic effects which had been clinically evaluated in trial studies. Materials and Methods: Google scholar, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Scopus were searched for human studies which have evaluated the therapeutic effects of rose oil and published in English language until August 2015. Results: Thirteen clinical trials (772 participants were included in this review. Rose oil was administered via inhalation or used topically. Most of the studies (five trials evaluated the analgesic effect of rose oil. Five studies evaluated the physiological relaxation effect of rose oil. Anti-depressant, psychological relaxation, improving sexual dysfunction, and anti-anxiety effects were the other clinical properties reported for rose oil. Conclusion: Numerous studies on the pharmacological properties of rose oil have been done in animals, but studies in humans are few.  In this study, it was observed that rose oil had physiological and psychological relaxation, analgesic and anti-anxiety effects. To obtain conclusive results on the efficacy and safety of rose oil, further clinical trials with larger sample size and better designation are required.

  9. Photochemical Thrombosis Of Retinal And Choroidal Vessels Using Rose Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary Lou; Winward, Kirk; Watson, Brant D.; Hernandez, Eleut

    1989-09-01

    Rose bengal is an effective photosensitizing agent which interacts with argon green light to induce photochemical thrombosis of irradiated vessels. We used focal, low energy irradiation to occlude retinal and choroidal vessels in both albino and pigmented rabbits. Immediately after intravenous injection of rose bengal at concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/kg, irradiation was performed via a slit lamp-delivered argon green laser (514.5 nm) with the aid of fundus contact lens. In 11 eyes, arteries were treated with 50-100 interrupted bursts of 75u spot size at 0.2 sec and 40-100 mW (9 rose bengal, demonstrated no evidence of thermal injury.

  10. Strengthening Software Authentication with the ROSE Software Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G

    2006-06-15

    Many recent nonproliferation and arms control software projects include a software authentication regime. These include U.S. Government-sponsored projects both in the United States and in the Russian Federation (RF). This trend toward requiring software authentication is only accelerating. Demonstrating assurance that software performs as expected without hidden ''backdoors'' is crucial to a project's success. In this context, ''authentication'' is defined as determining that a software package performs only its intended purpose and performs said purpose correctly and reliably over the planned duration of an agreement. In addition to visual inspections by knowledgeable computer scientists, automated tools are needed to highlight suspicious code constructs, both to aid visual inspection and to guide program development. While many commercial tools are available for portions of the authentication task, they are proprietary and not extensible. An open-source, extensible tool can be customized to the unique needs of each project (projects can have both common and custom rules to detect flaws and security holes). Any such extensible tool has to be based on a complete language compiler. ROSE is precisely such a compiler infrastructure developed within the Department of Energy (DOE) and targeted at the optimization of scientific applications and user-defined libraries within large-scale applications (typically applications of a million lines of code). ROSE is a robust, source-to-source analysis and optimization infrastructure currently addressing large, million-line DOE applications in C and C++ (handling the full C, C99, C++ languages and with current collaborations to support Fortran90). We propose to extend ROSE to address a number of security-specific requirements, and apply it to software authentication for nonproliferation and arms control projects.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OFWASTE BIOMASS FROM GREENHOUSE ROSE CULTIVATION AND PACKAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Cascone

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work a characterization of the waste biomass originating from a rose cultivation under greenhouse was carried out. Two types of biomass were examined: one made of both branches and leaves, and the other made up only of branches. For each type of biomass the following properties were determined: percentage of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen, content of moisture, volatile matter and ashes, gross and net calorific value. The results show that the biomass made of only branches has a better quality than the biomass with leaves for use in thermo-chemical processes.

  12. The effect of the feeding of Macrosiphum rosae (L. and Chaetosiphon tetrarhodus (Walk. on the flowering of roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożenna Jaśkiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies concerning the effect of the feeding of aphids Macrosiphum rosae (L. and Chaetosiphon tetrarhodus (Walk. on the flowering of roses were carried out in four sites in the green area of Lublin in the years 2001-2003. The studies comprised the shrubs of the park rose 'Grandhotel', the Rugosa rose, the multiflorous rose and the flower-bed roses of various cultivars. Aphids Ch. tetrarhodus dominated on Rugosa rose, while M. rosae dominated on the other roses. Aphids M. rosae and Ch. tetrarhodus, when found in greater numbers, caused deformation of the leaf blades, the shortening of shoots and petioles, as well as deformation of the flowers.

  13. Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose and the process of painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hellen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available “One Object” is a British Art Studies series that uses an object from a collection as a starting point for collaborative research. Rebecca Hellen and Elaine Kilmurray have co-authored this essay based on their recent analysis of Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (1885–86 by John Singer Sargent This “One Object” article on John Singer Sargent’s Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (1885–86 brings together recent technical examination of the painting with the “patchwork” of moments, ideas, and themes that inform the history of its making. A variety of observations were recorded by artists and writers who were staying in or visiting Broadway in Worcestershire when Sargent was making his “big picture” there over the late summers and early autumns of 1885 and 1886. By connecting the research carried out in the conservation studio with research from the archive, we present new information about Sargent’s working methods. In considering technical information in tandem with Sargent’s preparatory work, this article explores the evolution of one of Sargent’s best-known paintings.

  14. François de Rose (1910 - 2014)

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2014-01-01

    One of CERN’s founding fathers has passed away.   François de Rose in the ATLAS cavern during his visit to CERN in 2013. Visionaries have the freedom of mind to shape the future when other people’s horizons are obstructed by the present. François de Rose was a visionary. In the aftermath of the Second World War, when Europe was in ruin, when absolutely everything had to be rebuilt, the diplomat understood the importance of reviving fundamental research and, above all, of cooperation on a continental scale as the driving force of this ambition. In a Europe that was just starting to get back on its feet, it would be no mean feat. Nonetheless, François, alongside the prominent physicists of the time, put his energy into making this vision a reality. They lobbied governments for the creation of a centre that would work towards this goal, winning support, and CERN was established in 1954, an achievement of which François was extremely...

  15. Pollen Grain Preservation and Fertility in Valuable Commercial Rose Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Annalisa; Macovei, Anca; Caser, Matteo; Mansuino, Andrea; Ghione, Gian Guido; Savona, Marco; Carbonera, Daniela; Scariot, Valentina; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2017-01-01

    In the cut flower market, traditional breeding is still the best way to achieve new rose cultivars. The geographical delocalization of cultivar constitution (generally made in Europe and North America) and plant cultivation (large areas in Africa and South America) represents a limit point for crossing and selection. Rose breeders often need to overcome geographical distances, resulting in asynchrony in flowering among crossing parents, by storing and sending pollen. Hence, a key aspect in breeding programs is linked to pollen availability and conservation, jointly with the identification of parameters related to pollen fertility. In this study we present the results of three different trials. In the first, pollen diameter and pollen viability were chosen as fertility predictors of 10 Rosa hybrida commercial cultivars. In the second trial, aliquots of dried pollen grains of six R. hybrida cultivar were stored under two different temperatures (freezer at T = −20 °C and deep freezer at T = −80 °C) and after a wide range of conservation period, their viability was measured. In the third trial, the effective fertilization capacity of frozen pollen of 19 pollen donor cultivars was evaluated during 2015 crossing breeding plan, performing 44 hybridizations and correlating the number of seeds and the ratio seeds/crossing, obtained by each cultivar, with in vitro pollen germination ability. PMID:28441780

  16. Pollen Grain Preservation and Fertility in Valuable Commercial Rose Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Giovannini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the cut flower market, traditional breeding is still the best way to achieve new rose cultivars. The geographical delocalization of cultivar constitution (generally made in Europe and North America and plant cultivation (large areas in Africa and South America represents a limit point for crossing and selection. Rose breeders often need to overcome geographical distances, resulting in asynchrony in flowering among crossing parents, by storing and sending pollen. Hence, a key aspect in breeding programs is linked to pollen availability and conservation, jointly with the identification of parameters related to pollen fertility. In this study we present the results of three different trials. In the first, pollen diameter and pollen viability were chosen as fertility predictors of 10 Rosa hybrida commercial cultivars. In the second trial, aliquots of dried pollen grains of six R. hybrida cultivar were stored under two different temperatures (freezer at T = −20 °C and deep freezer at T = −80 °C and after a wide range of conservation period, their viability was measured. In the third trial, the effective fertilization capacity of frozen pollen of 19 pollen donor cultivars was evaluated during 2015 crossing breeding plan, performing 44 hybridizations and correlating the number of seeds and the ratio seeds/crossing, obtained by each cultivar, with in vitro pollen germination ability.

  17. PARAMETRIC ROSE AS A SUBJECT OF MATHEMATICS, PROGRAMMING, AESTHETICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeny Gayev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By using MATLAB we demonstrate a variety of parametric curves of the family "Parametric Rose" (Rhodonea, characterized by four factors. The article is intended to encourage students to study the parametric curves. The values of coefficients affect the shape of the curve and its period. Changes with time one of the curve parameters makes the effect of animation. Different versions of coloring the curve increase the aesthetic impact on results. A beautiful MATLAB-program with Graphical User Interface (GUI is suggested. It allows students to "play" with the curves on the computer screen and demonstrates amazing properties of the "Rose" parametric family depending on the values and the ratio of their coefficients. It may allow and teachers to inspire students by exploring these additional non-school materials. Students can see the beauty of mathematics and gain additional knowledge about parametric functions. From another side, the program provides an exercise example of algorithms and programming accessible for modern students. Animation of curves proposed can also serve as exercises both for mathematics and programming.

  18. ROSE: Compiler Support for Object-Oriented Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qainlant, D.

    1999-11-17

    ROSE is a preprocessor generation tool for the support of compile time performance optimizations in Overture. The Overture framework is an object-oriented environment for solving partial differential equations in two and three space dimensions. It is a collection of C++ libraries that enables the use of finite difference and finite volume methods at a level that hides the details of the associated data structures. Overture can be used to solve problems in complicated, moving geometries using the method of overlapping grids. It has support for grid generation, difference operators, boundary conditions, database access and graphics. In this paper we briefly present Overture, and discuss our approach toward performance within Overture and the A++P++ array class abstractions upon which Overture depends, this work represents some of the newest work in Overture. The results we present show that the abstractions represented within Overture and the A++P++ array class library can be used to obtain application codes with performance equivalent to that of optimized C and Fortran 77. ROSE, the preprocessor generation tool, is general in its application to any object-oriented framework or application and is not specific to Overture.

  19. Pollen Grain Preservation and Fertility in Valuable Commercial Rose Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Annalisa; Macovei, Anca; Caser, Matteo; Mansuino, Andrea; Ghione, Gian Guido; Savona, Marco; Carbonera, Daniela; Scariot, Valentina; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2017-04-24

    In the cut flower market, traditional breeding is still the best way to achieve new rose cultivars. The geographical delocalization of cultivar constitution (generally made in Europe and North America) and plant cultivation (large areas in Africa and South America) represents a limit point for crossing and selection. Rose breeders often need to overcome geographical distances, resulting in asynchrony in flowering among crossing parents, by storing and sending pollen. Hence, a key aspect in breeding programs is linked to pollen availability and conservation, jointly with the identification of parameters related to pollen fertility. In this study we present the results of three different trials. In the first, pollen diameter and pollen viability were chosen as fertility predictors of 10 Rosa hybrida commercial cultivars. In the second trial, aliquots of dried pollen grains of six R. hybrida cultivar were stored under two different temperatures (freezer at T = -20 °C and deep freezer at T = -80 °C) and after a wide range of conservation period, their viability was measured. In the third trial, the effective fertilization capacity of frozen pollen of 19 pollen donor cultivars was evaluated during 2015 crossing breeding plan, performing 44 hybridizations and correlating the number of seeds and the ratio seeds/crossing, obtained by each cultivar, with in vitro pollen germination ability.

  20. Development of blue rose; Aoi bara wa sakuka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, T. [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Yoshida, K.

    1998-06-01

    Precise crystalline structures of pigments in petals have been elucidated by structural analysis of the blue pigment in Commelinaceae petals using X-ray analysis. It is found that the Mg ion is coordinated with the oxygen atom on the B-nucleus in the base nucleus of delphinidin (belonging to anthocyanidine, a pigment obtained by separating sugar from anthocyanin by hydrolysis) to develop a blue color, and that the complex is a stable supermolecule in which 6 pigment molecules are associated regularly with 6 flavone molecules. The similar mechanisms are responsible for development of blue color for flowers, and widely occurring in nature. Biosynthesis of anthocyanin, beginning with phenylalanine, undergoes virtually common processes; cyclization of the flavonoide skeleton, reduction to the anthocyanidine nucleus, hydroxylation of the B-nucleus in the base nucleus and glycoside formation at the 3-site. It will be possible to shift rose color to blue, if anthocyanin belonging to anthocyanidine could be bio-synthesized by introducing the gene of enzyme for 3`, 5`-hydroxylation on the base nucleus, which the rose lacks. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  1. [Development of new SSR markers from EST of SSH cDNA libraries on rose fragrance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Hao; Xie, Ji-Rong; Li, Shu-Fa; Jian, Hong-Ying; Qiu, Xian-Qin; Wang, Qi-Gang; Wang, Ji-Hua; Tang, Kai-Xue

    2009-09-01

    The new SSR markers of rose related fragrance were developed based on the SSH cDNA libraries of rose floral scent mutant. In this study, 10 EST-SSRs (2.6%) from 391 ESTs in the libraries were identified. Six EST-SSRs primers were designed to sequence flanking SSRs. The primer pairs designed were screened on the wild-type Jinyindao, which has flowers full of pleasant scent, and the mutant-type Wangriqinghuai without perceivable floral scent. Five primer pairs were amplified effectively in Jinyindao and Wangriqinghuai, and 3 were polymorphic between Jinyindao and Wangriqinghuai. Eighteen rose cultivars including fragrant roses and nonfragrant roses were identified by the five prime pairs. These results proved that EST-SSR markers are effective markers to identify the polymorphism of the rose.

  2. Sealing of Corneal Lacerations Using Photo-Activated Rose Bengal Dye and Amniotic Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    Activated Rose Bengal Dye and Amniotic Membrane presented at/published to Sun and Science, Galveston, Texas, 22 April 2017 & American Society of...Corneal Lacerations Using Photo-Activated Rose Bengal Dye and Amniotic Membrane 1. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED Sealing of...Corneal Lacerations Using Photo-Activated Rose Bengal Dye and Amniotic Membrane 2. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS STUDY? [gl YES D NO FUNDING SOURCE: jus

  3. Alternaria toxin-induced resistance against rose aphids and olfactory response of aphids to toxin-induced volatiles of rose plants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fa-zhong; Li, Li; Yang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    The search for active toxins for managing weeds or plant diseases is believed to be a promising avenue of investigation. However, the effects of Alternaria toxins on insects have just begun to be investigated. Bioactivities of toxins from four strains of Alternaria alternata on Rosa chinensis and rose aphid Macrosiphum rosivorum were tested in the present study. At a concentration of 50.0 μg/ml, the crude extract (toxin) of strain 7484 was found not to be harmful to rose plants with excised leaf-puncture method (P≥0.079), and rose plants showed enhanced resistance to rose aphids when this Alternaria toxin was sprayed on the plants (P≤0.001). However, this toxin caused no detrimental effects on aphids in insecticidal bioassay at a concentration of 10.0 to 160.0 μg/ml (P≥0.096). Therefore, the Alternaria toxin had significantly induced the resistance of rose plants against rose aphids, demonstrating that the resistance mechanism triggered by the Alternaria toxin in the rose plant may also be used by the plant to defend itself against insects. Further bioassays aimed to discover the olfactory responses of aphids to the toxin-induced volatiles of host plants. The aphids were significantly more attracted to both volatiles emitted and collected from control rose plants than to both volatiles emitted and collected from the toxin-treated rose plants (P≤0.014). This result showed that the toxin-induced resistance related to the volatile changes of host plants. PMID:22302426

  4. Effects of Daffodil Flowers and Cobalt Chloride on Vase Life of Cut Rose

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Aslmoshtaghi; Moslem Jafari; Majid Rahemi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of postharvest application of cobalt chloride were investigated on vase life of rose stood individually in vials and the other ones placing daffodil flowers in a vase with a rose flower.  Therefore, roses were treated with: CoCl2 (100, 200, 300 mg L-1, respectively) or distilled water (control). The results showed that the decreased vase life of rose flowers, after daffodil was placed in their vase water, is due to daffodil mucilage, which blocks water up take, mainly as a result ...

  5. Design of a Model Execution Framework: Repetitive Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (ROSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Justin S.; Briggs, Jeffery L.

    2008-01-01

    The ROSE framework was designed to facilitate complex system analyses. It completely divorces the model execution process from the model itself. By doing so ROSE frees the modeler to develop a library of standard modeling processes such as Design of Experiments, optimizers, parameter studies, and sensitivity studies which can then be applied to any of their available models. The ROSE framework accomplishes this by means of a well defined API and object structure. Both the API and object structure are presented here with enough detail to implement ROSE in any object-oriented language or modeling tool.

  6. Comparative life table analysis of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) on ten rose cultivars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Golizadeh, Ali; Ghavidel, Samira; Razmjou, Jabraeil; Fathi, Syed Ali Asghar; Hassanpour, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    .... This study compared population growth parameters of Tetranychus urticae Koch on 10 rose cultivars, including Bella Vita, Cool Water, Dolce Vita, Maroussia, Orange Juice, Pink Promise, Roulette, Tea...

  7. Replication of rose petal surfaces using a nickel electroforming process and UV nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sang-woo; Choo, Soyoung; Choi, Hak-Jong; Kim, Chae-Hyun; Lee, Heon

    2014-12-01

    In this research, we replicate the hierarchical structures of rose petals by using poly urethane acrylate (PUA) nanomolding technology. After a molding process, we use a PUA replica as the mother mold for nickel electroforming processes. By replicating the original rose petal hierarchical structure, we obtain the rose petal effect with nickel substrates. In order to make a negative-patterned nickel stamp, a second PUA replication was done using the first PUA mother mold and a nickel electroforming process was performed. Using these, the hierarchical structure of rose petals was imprinted in perfluoropolyether (PFPE), which exhibited the petal effect.

  8. White Rose oilfield development application. CD-ROM ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    Located approximately 350 km east of Newfoundland, on the eastern edge of the Jeanne d'Arc Basin, and approximately 50 km from both the Terra Nova and Hibernia oilfields, the White Rose oilfield is considered the main oil producing basin off the eastern coast of North America. Husky Oil is very active in the region and holds almost 32 per cent net working interest in the Significant Discovery License areas in the Jeanne d'Arc basin. The development of an economically significant oil discovery in the White Rose Significant Discovery Area is being proposed jointly by Husky Oil and Petro-Canada. It is estimated that the project would enable the recovery of an estimated 36 million cubic meters (230 million barrels) of recoverable oil in this area that covers approximately 40 square kilometers. The operators propose to use a ship-shaped floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) facility which could store up to 135,000 cubic meters (850,000 barrels) of oil or the equivalent of ten days of oil production. The facility would also provide topside processing units, accommodations and a turret. Both companies are seeking the appropriate regulatory approvals for the development of the White Rose oilfield. The document details the Development Application submitted by Husky Oil Operations Limited on behalf of both itself and the other party involved in the co-venture, Petro-Canada. This Development Application is divided in five volumes and a Project Summary. The five volumes each deal with a separate topic. Volume 1 describes the Canada-Newfoundland Benefits Plan and is divided into 7 sections describing everything from labour requirements to procurement requirements, development and production scenarios and more. Volume 2 details the Development Plan, which is divided into 14 sections such as project overview, geology and geophysics, petrophysics, reservoir engineering, original hydrocarbons in place, reservoir exploitation, development drilling and

  9. The Risk-Stratified Osteoporosis Strategy Evaluation study (ROSE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, Katrine Hass; Holmberg, Teresa; Rothmann, Mette Juel

    2015-01-01

    The risk-stratified osteoporosis strategy evaluation study (ROSE) is a randomized prospective population-based study investigating the effectiveness of a two-step screening program for osteoporosis in women. This paper reports the study design and baseline characteristics of the study population....... 35,000 women aged 65-80 years were selected at random from the population in the Region of Southern Denmark and-before inclusion-randomized to either a screening group or a control group. As first step, a self-administered questionnaire regarding risk factors for osteoporosis based on FRAX......(®) was issued to both groups. As second step, subjects in the screening group with a 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fractures ≥15 % were offered a DXA scan. Patients diagnosed with osteoporosis from the DXA scan were advised to see their GP and discuss pharmaceutical treatment according to Danish...

  10. The Electric Honeycomb; an investigation of the Rose window instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muhammad Shaheer

    2017-10-01

    The Rose window instability is a little-explored electrohydrodynamic instability that manifests when a layer of low-conducting oil is placed in an electric field generated by corona discharge in a point-to-plane configuration. Above a critical voltage, the instability starts as a single dimple in the oil layer right below the point electrode and subsequently evolves into a characteristic pattern of polygonal cells. In this study, we experimentally explore governing parameters that guide the instability and document geometric attributes of the characteristic cellular pattern. The driving force for the instability has been attributed to the buildup of charged ions which in turn apply an electric pressure on the oil surface. We confirm the charged surface distribution using thermal imaging and demonstrate that the instability can be locally inhibited by preventing charge buildup under an ion shadow.

  11. Long-range patterns in Hindmarsh-Rose networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etémé, Armand Sylvin; Tabi, Conrad Bertrand; Mohamadou, Alidou

    2017-02-01

    Long-range diffusive effects are included in a discrete Hindmarsh-Rose neural network. Their impact on the emergence of nonlinear patterns is investigated via the modulational instability. The whole system is first shown to fully reduce to a single nonlinear differential-difference equation, which has plane wave solutions. The stability of such solutions is investigated and regions of instability are found to be importantly influenced by long-range parameters. The analytical results are confirmed through direct numerical simulations, where scattered and chaotic patterns illustrate the long-range effect. Synchronized states are described by quasi-periodic patterns for nearest-neighbor coupling. The external stimulus is also shown to efficiently control strong long-range effects via more regular spatiotemporal patterns.

  12. Kepustakawanan dalam The Name of The Rose karya Umberto Eco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laksmi Laksmi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The Name of the Rose, a detective novel, is set by some issues on librarianship during the Middle Age in Europe. By using discourse analysis approach, I try to know how far the concept of the librarianship was understood at that time—in the novel—based on the understanding of some concepts, starting from “library”, “development system”, “collection handling”, which includes “classification”, “censorship system” and “librarians’ professionalism”, until some matters on borrowing and using collection. Besides, this analysis is aimed at identifying cultural values related to the librarianship. The conclusion shows that the librarianship has an important role in providing suspense elements in a detective novel.

  13. Seeing Red

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available It is an invasion, of sorts: a legion of vases, each about five feet high, made of porcelain. Floridly patterned and scarlet red, they are placed throughout the Yale Center for British Art (YCBA, on every floor, in the galleries, in the library court, on the stairs. The installation, Made in China, is by the artist Clare Twomey. Its effect is most improbable, with a surreal, larger-than-life quality. It is as if caterers were about to deliver a banquet for thousands of people; or a factory floor had been teleported into the galleries; or as if ceramics were finally being recognized as a dominant genre in British art.

  14. Reduce moisture with heat exchanger and air handling unit : research on moisture control in roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, J.; Gelder, de A.

    2015-01-01

    The method of rose production in the Netherlands guarantees top quality flowers. The down side to growing these high quality products is the large energy consumption. And therefore rose growers have been asking: Can production be more energy efficient while maintaining the quality? Arie de Gelder,

  15. Vegetative growth of rose flower in cocopeat and soil in Naivasha, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketter, N.C.; Kariuki, W.; Wesonga, J.M.; Elings, A.; Hoogerwerf, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roses in Kenya are mostly grown in soil with an open drip irrigation system which is inefficient as water and nutrients are lost through drainage. A study was carried out from January to December 2013 at a commercial rose farm in Naivasha, Kenya, to evaluate the potential of a cocopeat-based

  16. Lichtspectrum als middel voor energiezuinige rozenteelt : praktijkproef bij Van der Arend Roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Victoria, N.; Pot, S.

    2015-01-01

    During the winter 2014-2015 a research was conducted at a commercial rose nursery to learn more about the influence of a special lamp light spectrum on the production and quality of the rose Avalanche. A “hybrid” lighting system was installed with 103 µmol /m2s PAR from High Pressure Sodium and from

  17. Algorithms to estimate the rose of directions of a spatial fibre system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus; Pfrang, A.

    2005-01-01

    The directional measure (which is up to normalization the rose of directions) is used to quantify anisotropy of stationary fibre processes in three-dimensional space. There exist a large number of approaches to estimate this measure from the rose of intersections (which is the mean number...

  18. Towards the rose genome sequence and its use in research and breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foucher, F.; Hilbrand-Saint Oyant, L.; Hamama, L.; Sakr, S.; Baudino, S.; Caissard, J.P.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Debener, T.; Riek, de J.; Torres, A.F.; Desnoyé, B.

    2015-01-01

    Rose is one of the most economically important ornamental crops worldwide. Rosa sp. can become a model for woody ornamentals. Its genome size is relatively small (560 Mb), its genetic history with ploïdy events is well documented, and rose has a short life for a woody plant. Furthermore, different

  19. Lifting All Boats? Finance Litigation, Education Resources, and Student Needs in the Post-"Rose" Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, David P.

    2011-01-01

    "Rose v. Council for Better Education" (1989) is often considered a transition point in education finance litigation, heralding an era of increasing concern for measurable adequacy of education across a broad spectrum of student needs. Prior research suggests that post-Rose lawsuits had less effect on the distribution of school spending…

  20. Effects of Daffodil Flowers and Cobalt Chloride on Vase Life of Cut Rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Aslmoshtaghi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of postharvest application of cobalt chloride were investigated on vase life of rose stood individually in vials and the other ones placing daffodil flowers in a vase with a rose flower.  Therefore, roses were treated with: CoCl2 (100, 200, 300 mg L-1, respectively or distilled water (control. The results showed that the decreased vase life of rose flowers, after daffodil was placed in their vase water, is due to daffodil mucilage, which blocks water up take, mainly as a result of increased bacterial growth. Cobalt chloride inhibited vascular blockage in the stem of rose and maintained a high water flow rate through stems, leading to significantly water uptake by cut flowers.

  1. Effects of Daffodil Flowers and Cobalt Chloride on Vase Life of Cut Rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Aslmoshtaghi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of postharvest application of cobalt chloride were investigated on vase life of rose stood individually in vials and the other ones placing daffodil flowers in a vase with a rose flower. Therefore, roses were treated with: CoCl2 (100, 200, 300 mg L-1, respectively or distilled water (control. The results showed that the decreased vase life of rose flowers, after daffodil was placed in their vase water, is due to daffodil mucilage, which blocks water up take, mainly as a result of increased bacterial growth. Cobalt chloride inhibited vascular blockage in the stem of rose and maintained a high water flow rate through stems, leading to significantly water uptake by cut flowers.

  2. Female rose bitterling prefer MHC-dissimilar males: experimental evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Reichard

    Full Text Available The role of genetic benefits in female mate choice remains a controversial aspect of sexual selection theory. In contrast to "good allele" models of sexual selection, "compatible allele" models of mate choice predict that females prefer mates with alleles complementary to their own rather than conferring additive effects. While correlative results suggest complementary genetic effects to be plausible, direct experimental evidence is scarce. A previous study on the Chinese rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus demonstrated a positive correlation between female mate choice, offspring growth and survival, and the functional dissimilarity between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC alleles of males and females. Here we directly tested whether females used cues associated with MHC genes to select genetically compatible males in an experimental framework. By sequentially pairing females with MHC similar and dissimilar males, based on a priori known MHC profiles, we showed that females discriminated between similar and dissimilar males and deposited significantly more eggs with MHC dissimilar males. Notably, the degree of dissimilarity was an important factor for female decision to mate, possibly indicating a potential threshold value of dissimilarity for decision making, or of an indirect effect of the MHC.

  3. The models of Picasso's rose period: The Family of Saltimbanques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Harold P; Blum, Elsa J

    2007-06-01

    The word "model" in this context has a variety of meanings. The concept of "model" encompasses the external person who is represented by the artist, as well as the internal, conscious and unconscious, past and present mental representations of other individuals and the work of other artists. In all of these meanings, the relationships of artist and model have been quite specific to the artist under consideration and the historical-cultural period. For Picasso, the relationship of artist and model was particularly intense, reflecting myriad aspects of his personality and artistic development. The theme of artist and model was the subject of many of his paintings and graphic works. We focus particularly on his use of harlequins, saltimbanques, and circus performers during his blue and rose periods. The change in predominant models and moods between periods is noted. Among the issues considered is the relevance of these models in this particular period. Why were they especially salient objects for identification and for his artistic identity? Identification with the model may represent or be linked to earlier identifications of adolescence and childhood. We discuss the implications of these portrayals for his object relationships and the magical power, possession, and control in the development of his art. The painting "The Family of Saltimbanques," his most ambitious work to date, the integration and culmination of this theme during this period, is of particular interest.

  4. In vitro propagation of Hylocereus monacanthus (Lem. Britton and Rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Belem Montiel-Frausto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of tissue culture contributes to the rapid and massive propagation of economically important species and serves as a basic platform for production strategies. The objective of this work was to establish the in vitro propagation of Hylocereus monacanthus (Lem. Britton and Rose. The seeds were in vitro germinated and then the apical segments containing the apex and areoles were taken and placed in culture medium MS with BAP (1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg l-1 and IAA (0.5 mg l-1 separately and combined for the multiplication phase. For rooting an MS culture medium with different  concentrations of inorganic salts (50, 75 and 100% and IBA (0.1 mg l-1 was used. In vitro plants obtained were planted in greenhouse for their acclimatization. The percentage of seeds germination was 70% with 6% of microbial contamination. With 1 mg l-1 BAP, the best results were obtained for the in vitro multiplication of H. monacanthus. In all treatments 100% of rooted shoots were obtained and only a significant difference was observed for root length with the addition of 0.1 mg l-1 IBA. The average survival of plants transferred to substrate was 97.1%. The results of this work offer an alternative of propagation for H. monacanthus, which will contribute to the establishment of commercial plantations and other studies at the laboratory level.   Keywords: pitahaya, shoot tip, cacti

  5. Offshore intelligence : new telemetry system helps drill White Rose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaremko, D.

    2005-08-01

    The development of a new telemetry system designed by AMEC Earth and Environment Services was discussed. The system will provide real-time information from the rig and the ocean floor for the White Rose project in Newfoundland. It will help operators assess the status of the drill pipe as it moves through the water and will help ensure that drilling is not interrupted. The real-time oceanographic monitoring system (ROMAN) uses acoustic modem technology to relay data on the water column's current speed and direction to a surface buoy. The buoy then sends the information to the rig, which sends it to the company, as well as to AMEC through a high-speed Internet connection. The acoustic technology is capable of sending the data through up to 5 km of water. The information can be incorporated into engineering designs, mooring advisory systems, ice management programs and emergency response, including oil-spill and man-overboard models. A background of the system's design was provided. AMEC is also using the technology to help with a project called SmartBay, part of an initiative by Fisheries and Oceans Canada to foster integrated management of Placentia Bay, an environmentally sensitive area located on the south coast of Newfoundland. The area has many users, as well as substantial oil tanker traffic. The system will be used to provide users with simple access to information about the ocean, in order to better manage resources. 1 fig.

  6. Graft-accelerated virus-induced gene silencing facilitates functional genomics in rose flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huijun; Shi, Shaochuan; Ma, Nan; Cao, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Hao; Qiu, Xianqin; Wang, Qigang; Jian, Hongying; Zhou, Ningning; Zhang, Zhao; Tang, Kaixue

    2018-01-01

    Rose has emerged as a model ornamental plant for studies of flower development, senescence, and morphology, as well as the metabolism of floral fragrances and colors. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has long been used in functional genomics studies of rose by vacuum infiltration of cuttings or seedlings with an Agrobacterium suspension carrying TRV-derived vectors. However, VIGS in rose flowers remains a challenge because of its low efficiency and long time to establish silencing. Here we present a novel and rapid VIGS method that can be used to analyze gene function in rose, called 'graft-accelerated VIGS', where axillary sprouts are cut from the rose plant and vacuum infiltrated with Agrobacterium. The inoculated scions are then grafted back onto the plants to flower and silencing phenotypes can be observed within 5 weeks, post-infiltration. Using this new method, we successfully silenced expression of the RhDFR1, RhAG, and RhNUDX1 in rose flowers, and affected their color, petal number, as well as fragrance, respectively. This grafting method will facilitate high-throughput functional analysis of genes in rose flowers. Importantly, it may also be applied to other woody species that are not currently amenable to VIGS by conventional leaf or plantlet/seedling infiltration methods. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. 78 FR 33047 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Carson Ranger District Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe-Atoma Area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... Forest Service Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Carson Ranger District Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe--Atoma Area... Ski Tahoe (Mt. Rose) to expand its lift and terrain network. The project is located approximately 12.... Fax to 775-355-5399. Please use a fax cover sheet and include ``Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe--Atoma Area EIS...

  8. Isolation of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids as COX-1 and -2 inhibitors in rose hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäger, Anna; Petersen, K N; Thomasen, G.

    2008-01-01

    Rose hip has previously shown clinical efficacy in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and organic solvent extracts of rose hip have showed inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2. A petroleum ether extract of rose hip was fractioned by VLC on silica; on a C-18 column and by HPLC. Each step was COX-1...

  9. Optical properties and switching of a Rose Bengal derivative: A spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akerlind, C., E-mail: christina.akerlind@foi.s [Department of Information Systems, Swedish Defence Research Agency, SE 581 11 Linkoeping (Sweden); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University, SE 581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Arwin, H. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University, SE 581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Jakobsson, F.L.E. [Department of Science and Technology, Linkoeping University, SE 601 74 Norrkoeping (Sweden); Kariis, H. [Department of Information Systems, Swedish Defence Research Agency, SE 581 11 Linkoeping (Sweden); Jaerrendahl, K. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University, SE 581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2011-03-31

    Optical properties in terms of the complex-valued dielectric function were determined for spin-coated films of a Rose Bengal derivative using variable angle of incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry in the visible and infrared wavelength regions. In addition, the thickness and roughness of the films were determined and related to the solution concentration of Rose Bengal. Switching between two different oxidation states of the Rose Bengal derivative was investigated. The two states were chemically induced by exposure to vapors of hydrochloric acid and ammonia, respectively. A substantial and reversible change of the optical properties of the films was observed.

  10. Synthesis of rose-like boron nitride particles with a high specific surface area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hongming; Huang, Xiaoxiao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wen, Guangwu, E-mail: wgw@hitwh.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Tao; Bai, Hongwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Novel rose-like BN nanostructures were synthesized on a large scale via a two-step procedure. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer and nitrogen porosimetry. The results show that the obtained rose-like nanostructures are composed of a large amount of h-BN crystalline flakes and have a surface area of 90.31 m{sup 2}/g. A mechanism was proposed to explain the formation process of the rose-like BN nanostructures.

  11. Purification and some properties of rose (Fructus cynosbati) hips invertase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacan, Ozlem; Yanardag, Refiye

    2012-04-01

    Invertase was purified from rose (Fructus cynosbati) hips by ammonium sulfate fractionation and hydroxyapatite column chromatography. The enzyme was obtained with a yield of 4.25% and about 10.48-fold purification and had a specific activity of 8.59 U/mg protein. The molecular mass of invertase was estimated to be 66.51 kDa by PAGE and 34 kDa by SDS-PAGE, indicating that the native enzyme was a homodimer. The enzyme was a glycoprotein and contained 5.86% carbohydrate. The K(m) for sucrose was 14.55 mM and the optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme were 4.5 and 40 degrees C, respectively. Sucrose was the most preferred substrate of the enzyme. The enzyme also hydrolyzed D(+) raffinose, D(+) trehalose and inulin (activity 39.88, 8.12 and 4.94%, respectively of that of sucrose), while D(+) lactose, cellobiose and D(+) maltose showed no effect on the enzyme. The substrate specificity was consistent with that for a beta-fructofuranoside, which is the most popular type in the higher plants. The enzyme was completely inhibited by HgCl2, MnCl2, MnSO4, FeCl3, Pb(NO3)2, ammonium heptamolybdate, iodoacetamide and pyridoxine hydrochloride. It was also inhibited by Ba(NO3)2 (86.32%), NH4Cl (84.91%), MgCl2 (74.45%), urea (71.63%), I2 (69.64%), LiCl (64.99%), BaCl2 (50.30%), Mg(NO3)2 (49.90%), CrCl3 (31.90%) and CuSO4 (21.45%) and but was activated by Tris (73.99%) and methionine (12.47%).

  12. First oil expected at White Rose in 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, A.

    2002-04-01

    Husky Oil received approval from the government to begin development of its White Rose properties located in the Jean d'Arc Basin, 350 km east of St. John's, offshore Newfoundland and Labrador. First oil is expected by the end of 2005. The South Avalon Pool was discovered in 1988 and is estimated to contain approximately 200-250 million barrels of oil. Husky Oil and Petro-Canada filed a development application with the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board in January 2001. Approval of the $2.35 billion project was received in December 2001. The development plan is based on a newly-built floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel. Initial development will focus on the South Avalon Pool that has been tested in excess of 5,000 barrels per day. The pool will be developed using eight production wells, 11 water injection wells and two gas injection wells. An estimated 150 million cubic feet per day of gas will also be produced from the field. It will be used to fuel production facilities and as an artificial lift into production wells when required. Any excess gas will be preserved by injection into two wells in the North Avalon field. Peak production rates of 100,000 bbl/d of 30 degree API oil is expected for a four-year period. Estimated total production life of the field is 15 years. Aker Maritime Kiewit Contractors landed the contract to complete topside fabrication, with Samsung supplying the hull. Other key contracts will be confirmed shortly with SM/Imodco lined up for the turret and mooring system, Technip-Coflexip for the subsea production system and Boskalis for glory hole excavation.

  13. Historical Summary of Sea Turtle Observations at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 1839-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Compilation of 40 recorded observations of sea turtles at Rose Atoll between 1839 and 1991, with each observation consisting of the source, date, and brief notes.

  14. Developing tools to eradicate ecologically destructive ants on Rose Atoll: effectiveness and attractiveness of formicidal baits

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A key factor contributing to the decline in the population of Pisonia grandis on Rose Atoll is an infestation of the non-native scale, Pulvinaria urbicola...

  15. The survey and criterion of the compass rose in Chinese A-share market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenzhao; Wang, Yanxiang; Huo, Zhao; Li, Yilin

    2018-02-01

    The compass rose is one of the few "recurring patterns" found in financial markets. In this paper, the compass rose in Chinese A-share market is comprehensively investigated. It is newly discovered that among the 1331 A-shares, which had been listed for more than 15 years by the end of 2015, only about 20 show the compass rose. The outcome of the analysis shows that there exists a threshold of the ratio of the data points on main rays to all data points. Only when this ratio is above the threshold, the compass rose appears. The reasons why such a threshold exists, and its interrelationship with the data frequency and the tick/volatility ratio are analyzed.

  16. Final Restoration Plan for Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, including Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Restoration Plan for Rose Atoll NWR consists of removing the metal debris remaining from the grounding of a Taiwanese fishing vessel in 1993, and monitoring the...

  17. Two species of Gelechioidea (Lepidoptera) from Southeast Asia associated with downy rose myrtle, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Myrtaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two species of Gelechioidea (Lepidoptera), Metharmostis multilineata Adamski, n. sp. (Cosmopterigidae), and Idiophantis soreuta Meyrick, 1906 (Gelechiidae), were collected in southeastern Asia for evaluation as potential biocontrol agents against downy rose myrtle, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton) Hass...

  18. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Rose Atoll in American...

  19. CRED REA Algal Assessment at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Rose Atoll in American...

  20. EDTA-assisted synthesis of rose-like ZnO architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhen [Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Shanghai Applied Radiation Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Fang, Yaoguo [Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Peng, Liwei; Wu, Minghong [Shanghai Applied Radiation Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Pan, Dengyu

    2010-10-15

    Rose-like ZnO nanostructures were prepared by a low-temperature solution route with assistance of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium (EDTA-2Na). The morphology of ZnO nanostructures was found to change from nanowire arrays to rose- and tower-like architectures with increasing the molar ratio of EDTA-2Na/Zn{sup 2+}. Also, the shape evolution of ZnO nanostructures with time was observed from flat nanosheets to wrinkled nanosheets and to rose-like nanostructures. EDTA-2Na as a strong complexing agent was found to play a key role in the shape evolution. Photoluminescence spectra show that the rose-like ZnO architectures have more defects than the nanowire arrays. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Martha Rose Construction, Inc., Seattle, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-01-01

    Building America/Builders Challenge fact sheet on Martha Rose Construction, an energy-efficient home builder in marine climate using the German Passiv Haus design, improved insulation, and solar photovoltaics.

  2. Eradication of Polynesian Rats (rattus exulans) from Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, American Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A 38-day poison and trap campaign was conducted on Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge to eradicate Polynesian rats in order to reduce their impact of seabird eggs...

  3. Benthic Habitat Maps for Rose Atoll Marine National Monument in American Samoa from 2004 to 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps for Rose Atoll, American Samoa were derived from high resolution, multispectral satellite imagery for 2004, 2006, and 2010. The benthic habitat...

  4. Recovery of polyphenols from rose oil distillation wastewater using adsorption resins--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, Krasimir; Garo, Eliane; Rusanova, Mila; Fertig, Orlando; Hamburger, Matthias; Atanassov, Ivan; Butterweck, Veronika

    2014-11-01

    The production of rose oil from rose flowers by water steam distillation leaves a water fraction of the distillate as main part of the waste. Therefore, the rose oil distillation wastewater represents a serious environmental problem due to the high content of polyphenols which are difficult to decompose and have to be considered as biopollutants when discarded into the drainage system and rivers. On the other hand, natural polyphenols are valuable compounds with useful properties as bioactive substances. Until now there is no established practice for processing of rose oil distillation wastewater and utilization of contained substances. Thus, it was the aim of this study to develop a strategy to separate this wastewater into a polyphenol depleted water fraction and a polyphenol enriched fraction which could be developed into innovative value-added products. In a first step, the phytochemical profile of rose oil distillation wastewater was determined. Its HPLC-PDA-MS analysis revealed the presence of flavan-3-ols, flavanones, flavonols and flavones. In a second step, the development of a stepwise concentration of rose oil distillation wastewater was performed. The concentration process includes a filtration process to eliminate suspended solids in the wastewater, followed by adsorption of the contained phenolic compounds onto adsorption resins (XAD and SP). Finally, desorption of the polyphenol fraction from the resin matrix was achieved using ethanol and/or aqueous ethanol. The result of the process was a wastewater low in soluble organic compounds and an enriched polyphenol fraction (RF20 SP-207). The profile of this fraction was similar to that of rose oil distillation wastewater and showed the presence of flavonols such as quercetin and kaempferol glycosides as major metabolites. These compounds were isolated from the enriched polyphenol fraction and their structures confirmed by NMR. In summary, a pilot medium scale system was developed using adsorption resins

  5. Leaves Of Cut Rose Flower Convert Exogenously Applied Glucose To Sucrose And Translocate It To Petals

    OpenAIRE

    Horibe Takanori; Yamaki Shohei; Yamada Kunio

    2014-01-01

    To understand the role that the leaves play in the translocation of soluble carbohydrates in cut rose flowers, we first evaluated the effect of leaf removal on flower quality and the sugar content in petals. Cut rose flowers with leaves had higher soluble sugar content in petals compared with cut flower without leaves. Next, we treated cut flowers with radioactive glucose to clarify translocation routes of exogenously applied sugar. There was no significant difference between the specific rad...

  6. Effect of Bactericides and Sucrose Pulsing on Longevity and Vase Life of Rose Cut Flowers

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Yagi; Mohy eldeen; N. E. Elgemaby

    2014-01-01

    The vase life of rose cut flowers was determined by various Physiological factors that determine the rate of their senescence. The vase life of the rose cut flowers studied was pronged by the 8-HQS treatment. The best concentration was 100 ppm, when combined with sucrose 3% gave negative effect. AgNO3 in different concentration, significantly Result in maximum vase life compared to other treatment, while sucrose recorded the lowest vase life especially under lower concentration....

  7. An efficient transient expression system for gene function analysis in rose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Bai, Mengjuan; Ren, Haoran; Liu, Jinyi; Wang, Changquan

    2017-01-01

    Roses are widely used as garden ornamental plants and cut flowers. Rosa chinensis cv 'Old Blush' has been used as a model genotype in rose studies due to its contribution to recurrent flowering and tea scent traits of modern roses. The deficiency of efficient genetic transformation systems is a handicap limiting functional genetics studies of roses. Agrobacterium -mediated transient transformation offers a powerful tool for the characterization of gene function in plants. A convenient and highly efficient Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation protocol using R. chinensis cv 'Old Blush' seedlings in vitro as an expression system is described in this paper. The most important factor affecting transformation efficiency in this system is seedling age; 3/4-week-old rose shoots with or without roots from sub-culturing are optimal for transformation, requiring no complicated inoculation media, supplements, or carefully tuned plant growth conditions. This transient expression system was successfully applied to analysis of the gene promoter activities, DNA binding capacity of transcription factors, protein-protein interaction in physiological contexts using luciferase as a reporter gene. This transient transformation system was validated as a robust and efficient platform, thus providing a new option for gene function and signaling pathway investigation in roses and further extending the utility of R. chinensis cv 'Old Blush' as a model plant to study diverse gene function and signaling pathways in Rosaceae.

  8. Green manure affects cut flower yield and quality of ‘Vegas’ rose bushes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elka Fabiana Aparecida Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rose cultivation requires many inputs for satisfactory production, making the process expensive. Nowadays, alternative practices have been used for sustainable crop production. Green manure is an agricultural practice that aims to maintain or improve soil fertility, increasing its yielding capacity. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of green manure with legumes on the yield and quality of ‘Vegas’ roses. Grafted rose seedlings were cultivated in open field for 30 months. Legumes used as green manure and planted intercropped with rose bushes were forage peanut (Arachis pintoi and jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis. Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan was grown in a separate area, cut, macerated, and applied in the rows between rose bushes every 3 months. Plants of control group received no green manure, only mineral fertilizer and cattle manure, as in all other treatments. The experimental design was randomized block with four treatments (three green manure species plus the control and seven replications. The highest yield and quality of flower stems in ‘Vegas’ occurred with addition of pigeon pea on the soil surface or chemically treated (control. Forage peanut and jack bean are not suitable for intercropping with ‘Vegas’ rose bushes due to possible nutrient and water competition.

  9. Rose Bengal Photodynamic Antimicrobial Therapy: A Novel Treatment for Resistant Fusarium Keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amescua, Guillermo; Arboleda, Alejandro; Nikpoor, Neda; Durkee, Heather; Relhan, Nidhi; Aguilar, Mariela C; Flynn, Harry W; Miller, Darlene; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of rose bengal PDAT for the management of a patient with multidrug-resistant Fusarium keratoplasticum keratitis unresponsive to standard clinical treatment. This case report presents a clinical case of F. keratoplasticum keratitis not responsive to standard medical care. In vitro studies from patients culture isolated responded to rose bengal PDAT. Patient received two treatments with rose bengal 0.1% and exposure to green light with a total energy of 2.7 J/cm. In vitro results demonstrated the efficacy of rose bengal PDAT a multidrug-resistant F. keratoplasticum species. There was complete fungal inhibition in our irradiation zone on the agar plates. In the clinical case, the patient was successfully treated with 2 sessions of rose bengal PDAT, and at 8-month follow-up, there was neither recurrence of infection nor adverse effects to report. Rose bengal PDAT is a novel treatment that may be considered in cases of aggressive infectious keratitis. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of PDAT in vivo.

  10. Presence of rose spring dwarf-associated virus in Chile: partial genome sequence and detection in roses and their colonizing aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Paulina A; Engel, Esteban A

    2010-10-01

    Rose is one of the most important cut flowers produced in the world. It is also grown in landscape plantings and public gardens for ornamental purposes. However, there is no detailed information available about viruses infecting roses in Chile. In order to gain insight about the viruses that could be present, a plant showing yellow vein chlorosis in its leaves was collected from a garden in Santiago. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was isolated and after a random primed RT-PCR amplification procedure followed by sequencing, Rose spring dwarf-associated virus (RSDaV) presence was established. In order to widen the survey, several additional symptomatic and asymptomatic plants as well as aphids were screened by RT-PCR using two different pairs of virus-specific primers. RSDaV was detected in 24% of the analyzed samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of RSDaV in Chilean rose plants and Rhodobium porosum (Sanderson) aphids.

  11. RhMKK9, a rose MAP KINASE KINASE gene, is involved in rehydration-triggered ethylene production in rose gynoecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiwei; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Qigang; Feng, Ming; Li, Yang; Meng, Yonglu; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Guoqin; Ma, Zhimin; Wu, Hongzhi; Gao, Junping; Ma, Nan

    2017-02-23

    Flower opening is an important process in the life cycle of flowering plants and is influenced by various endogenous and environmental factors. Our previous work demonstrated that rose (Rosa hybrida) flowers are highly sensitive to dehydration during flower opening and the water recovery process after dehydration induced ethylene production rapidly in flower gynoecia. In addition, this temporal- and spatial-specific ethylene production is attributed to a transient but robust activation of the rose MAP KINASE6-ACC SYNTHASE1 (RhMPK6-RhACS1) cascade in gynoecia. However, the upstream component of RhMPK6-RhACS1 is unknown, although RhMKK9 (MAP KINASE KINASE9), a rose homologue of Arabidopsis MKK9, could activate RhMPK6 in vitro. In this study, we monitored RhMKK2/4/5/9 expression, the potential upstream kinase to RhMPK6, in rose gynoecia during dehydration and rehydration. We found only RhMKK9 was rapidly and strongly induced by rehydration. Silencing of RhMKK9 significantly decreased rehydration-triggered ethylene production. Consistently, the expression of several ethylene-responsive genes was down regulated in the petals of RhMKK9-silenced flowers. Moreover, we detected the DNA methylation level in the promoter and gene body of RhMKK9 by Chop-PCR. The results showed that rehydration specifically elevated the DNA methylation level on the RhMKK9 gene body, whereas it resulted in hypomethylation in its promoter. Our results showed that RhMKK9 possibly acts as the upstream component of the RhMKK9-RhMPK6-RhACS1 cascade and is responsible for water recovery-triggered ethylene production in rose gynoecia, and epigenetic DNA methylation is involved in the regulation of RhMKK9 expression by rehydration.

  12. The use of rose hips in the technology of alcoholic beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Ivanchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of developing beer drinks with added fruits, berries or extract's of plant is very actual problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using syrup and rose hips in technology Ales. In the work explored the form of the introduction of rose hips, as well as the stage of application, and the maximum allowable amount of additive. The proportion of syrup in different dose was 20 25 and 30% by weight of malt. Syrup made at the stage of wort boiling with hops. Rose hips were added to the number 15,20 and 25 g/l for 5 minutes before the end of wort boiling. The influence of introduced additives on the activity of yeast were studied. It is shown that the biomass growth and activity of yeast in all the variants of the experiment are practically the same. The article discusses the effect of different concentrations of rose hip syrup and insertion of the fruit on the fermentation and quality of final beer. The introduction of the investigated concentrations of the syrup does not impact greatly on the course of fermentation, physico-chemical parameters and organoleptic characteristics of the beverage. Samples with the addition of syrup to the basic characteristics are similar to control sample. They are distinguished caramel taste, aggravated by the increasing share of the syrup. It is shown that the optimal form to make the herbal supplement of rose hips in the technology of production of Ales are rose hips. The most balanced organoleptic characteristics was the sample with the rose hips in a quantity of 0,4 kg on 1 dal Ale.

  13. RED-ML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Heng; Liu, Dongbing; Li, Qiye

    2017-01-01

    using diverse RNA-seq datasets, we have developed a software tool, RED-ML: RNA Editing Detection based on Machine learning (pronounced as "red ML"). The input to RED-ML can be as simple as a single BAM file, while it can also take advantage of matched genomic variant information when available...

  14. Comparison of the Efficiency of Rose Bengal and Methylene Blue as Photosensitizers in Photodynamic Therapy Techniques for Enterococcus faecalis Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebrão, Catia Cilene Nass; Bezerra, Arandi Ginane; de França, Paulo Henrique Condeixa; Ferreira, Leslie Ecker; Westphalen, Vania Portela Ditzel

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the efficiency of a photodynamic therapy (PDT) technique employing rose bengal (RB) and methylene blue (MB) as photosensitizers (PSs) to reduce the viability of Enterococcus faecalis, a well-known pathogen found in root canal systems. Currently, in several clinical applications, including in the field of endodontics, MB is employed in association with a red laser source for the photoinactivation of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, MB was used at 0.01% (31.2 mol/L) in association with a red (660 nm) laser as the excitation source in the MB group (MBG). Alternatively, the same test was performed with RB (25 mol/L) that was associated with a green (532 nm) light laser source in the RB group (RBG). A saline solution (0.9%) was used in the control group. The colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) were calculated after 24 h of incubation at 37°C, and the statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA. The results showed a significant reduction in the CFU/mL in the RBG group (0.12 × 10(8)) compared with the control (2.82 × 10(8)) and MBG groups (2.66 × 10(8)). For the concentration and laser intensity employed in the experiments, the MBG group repeatedly showed no significant reduction in bacterial counts compared with the control. Therefore, the best result regarding the reduction of E. faecalis viable cells was obtained with RB as the PS. PDT may be improved if RB is used in association with a green light laser source for the inactivation of E. faecalis.

  15. The use of the milk ring test and rose bengal test in brucellosis control and eradication in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I.B. Cadmus

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, milk and blood samples collected simultaneously from 532 trade cows to be slaughtered at Bodija abattoir, Ibadan (southwestern, Nigeria were examined for antibodies to Brucella using the milk ring test (MRT and the rose bengal test (RBT. Overall, 18.61%of the milk samples were positive according to the MRT, while 9.77 % of the serum samples were positive according to the RBT. The difference was highly significant (Chi-square value 16.33; P<0.05; only 32 (6.02 % of the samples were positive for both tests. The Red Bororo breed of cattle and the White Fulani had the highest positive rates, namely 20.93 % and 11.69%for the MRT and RBT respectively.No conclusion can be drawn about sensitivity because we do not know the true status of the animals tested. It is, however, obvious that although the MRT and RBT are 1st-line screening tests for brucellosis in cows in some countries, their lack of specificity is of concern. Therefore, the requirement for other confirmatory tests that are more specific should be considered for control and eradication of the disease, especially in Nigeria.

  16. Petal Growth Physiology of Cut Rose Flowers: Progress and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horibe Takanori

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Roses are the most important crop in the floriculture industry and attract both pollinators and human admirers. Until now, a lot of research focusing on postharvest physiology including flower senescence has been conducted, leading to improvement in vase life. However, few studies have focused on the physiology of petal growth, the perception of light by petals, and the relationship between petal growth and environmental conditions. Regarding roses, whose ornamental value lies in the process of blooming from buds, it is also important to understand their flowering mechanisms and establish methods to control such mechanisms, as well as focus on slowing the aging process, in order to achieve high quality of postharvest cut roses. Elucidation of the mechanisms of rose flower opening would contribute to enhanced quality and commercial production of floricultural crops as well as greatly advance basic scientific knowledge regarding plant biology. In this review, we describe the progress and future prospects in the study of petal growth physiology of cut roses.

  17. Role of Petal-Specific Orcinol O-Methyltransferases in the Evolution of Rose Scent1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalliet, Gabriel; Lionnet, Claire; Le Bechec, Mickaël; Dutron, Laurence; Magnard, Jean-Louis; Baudino, Sylvie; Bergougnoux, Véronique; Jullien, Frédéric; Chambrier, Pierre; Vergne, Philippe; Dumas, Christian; Cock, J. Mark; Hugueney, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Orcinol O-methyltransferase (OOMT) 1 and 2 catalyze the last two steps of the biosynthetic pathway leading to the phenolic methyl ether 3,5-dimethoxytoluene (DMT), the major scent compound of many rose (Rosa x hybrida) varieties. Modern roses are descended from both European and Chinese species, the latter being producers of phenolic methyl ethers but not the former. Here we investigated why phenolic methyl ether production occurs in some but not all rose varieties. In DMT-producing varieties, OOMTs were shown to be localized specifically in the petal, predominanty in the adaxial epidermal cells. In these cells, OOMTs become increasingly associated with membranes during petal development, suggesting that the scent biosynthesis pathway catalyzed by these enzymes may be directly linked to the cells' secretory machinery. OOMT gene sequences were detected in two non-DMT-producing rose species of European origin, but no mRNA transcripts were detected, and these varieties lacked both OOMT protein and enzyme activity. These data indicate that up-regulation of OOMT gene expression may have been a critical step in the evolution of scent production in roses. PMID:16361520

  18. Development of green tea scented with organic roses "Vitality" from Nevado Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Beltrán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2014/11/03 - Accepted: 2014/12/15The aim of this study was to obtain a flavored green tea with organic rose petals "Vitality" from Nevado Ecuador. Green tea, purchased from a private company, it was subjected to analysis to verify compliance with the requirements of standard INEN 2381: 2005. The Characterization of fresh rose petals was to made and for the dehydration was used two temperatures and two geometries. Analysis of total polyphenol content (Folin-Ciocalteu and antioxidant capacity (TEACmethod were performed. The dried petals, with a higher content of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity, were used in the preparation to flavored tea. Three formulations with different amounts of dried rose petals (10, 17.5 and 25% were tested sensorially by 100 judges to determine the aroma rose in the tea. The final product was analyzed to determine compliance of the requirements of the standard INEN of the tea. Finally acceptability and purchase intention of the product is evaluated. The values of content total polyphenol in the extracts of rose petals were superior to fruits such as blackberries, and strawberries.

  19. Study on the Ascorbic Acid Content of rose Hip fruit Depending on Stationary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina Ropciuc

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The dog rose area includes southern and central Europe, reaching southern Scandinavia; it is also found in Asia Minor, Central Asia and North Africa. In our country, Rosa canina is the most widespread of the many species of Rosa, common in all areas. The components of the station, known also as the „stationary factors” affect differently the plant life and their chemical composition. Cynosbati fructus is the false fruit of Rosa canina L. (Rosaceae, known in Romanian as rose hip. The rose hip contain as active ingredients 500-1000 % vitamin C, 600-10000 mg% carotenoids, pectin, dextrin, vitamins B2, E, PP, flavone, sugars, organic acids, tannins, volatile oil, vanillin, triterpenoid saponosides, beta-sitosterol, fat (lecithin, glycerides of fatty acids in seeds, minerals (potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid plays an important role in human body. The greatest amount is found in plants which reached maturity. It is concentrated in the rose hip flesh. Solutions easily destroyit in the presence of UV, of copper, silver, iron and oxidative enzymes traces. Vitamin C participates actively in all processes of oxidoreductions of the living cell. Its lack in food causes the disease called scurvy which manifests itself by inflammated and bleeding gums, tooth loss. Rose hip fruits are known as medicines since prehistoric times.

  20. Monitoring the infective process of the downy mildew causal agent within micropropagated rose plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Yamile Gómez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Downy mildew in the rose caused by a species of the Peronospora genus is a very restrictive disease for the Colombian greenhouse rose production. The damage observed in the susceptible varieties of commercial rose include symptoms affect young steams and tiny leaves causing reddish and brown spots and defoliation; leading to 10% production losses. The infective behavior of this pathogen was studied with the aim of increasing the knowledge about the biology of the rose downy mildew. The study of the infective process was performed on the Charlotte variety using micropropagated roses inoculated with suspensions of sporangia. A germinal tube was observed during the germination process, it came from a lateral papilla and reached up to 300 microns in length. During this study, the ability of the pathogen to use vascular sieves as communication systems within the plant was determined. Oogonia and antheridia were also observed inside the epidermal cells, and oospores inside the parenchymal tissue close to xylem vessels. To the best of our knowledge, these sexual structures have not been reported on in Colombia before. This study verifies the ability of the downy mildew causal agent to move through the xylem vessels and produce sexual structures, such as oogonia, antheridia and oospores within those tissues.

  1. Anti-prediabetic effect of rose hip (Rosa canina) extract in spontaneously diabetic Torii rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si Jing; Aikawa, Chiwa; Yoshida, Risa; Kawaguchi, Tomoaki; Matsui, Toshiro

    2017-09-01

    Prediabetes, a high-risk state for developing diabetes showing impaired glucose tolerance but a normal fasting blood glucose level, has an increasing prevalence worldwide. However, no study investigating the prevention of impaired glucose tolerance at the prediabetic stage by anti-diabetic functional foods has been reported. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the anti-prediabetic effect of rose hip in a prediabetic rat model. Spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) rats were supplemented with hot-water extract of rose hip at a dose of 100 mg kg-1 body weight day-1 for 12 weeks. The results obtained showed that the supplementation of rose hip extract improved impaired glucose tolerance, promoted insulin secretion, preserved pancreatic beta-cell function and suppressed plasma advanced glycation end-products formation of methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone (MG-H1) residue and Nϵ -carboxymethyl-lysine residues (e.g. MG-H1, control: 465.5 ± 43.8 versus rose hip: 59.1 ± 13.0 pmol mg protein-1 , P < 0.05) in SDT rats at the prediabetic stage (12-20 weeks old). The present study provides the first evidence showing that a hot-water extract of rose hip could exert an anti-prediabetic effect in a rat model. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Quantifying the effect of different irrigation volumes on cut-rose production / M.G.C. Neethling

    OpenAIRE

    Neethling, Maria Gezina Catharina

    2004-01-01

    Rose plants in general, and especially rose plants of the Hybrid Tea cultivar, Grand Gala, are known for their demanding nature with respect to fertiliser, irradiance levels, night and day temperatures, carbon dioxide concentrations as well as irrigation water. The objective of the current experiment was to quantify the effect of different irrigation volumes on the production of cut-roses grown in a commercial greenhouse under South African conditions. Data was collected from late...

  3. Reducing fertilization for cut roses: effect on crop productivity and twospotted spider mite abundance, distribution, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Andrew; Chau, Amanda; Heinz, Kevin M

    2009-10-01

    Fertilization reduction could be a useful pest management tactic for floriculture crops if it reduced pest populations with little loss in crop yield and quality. We evaluated the response of the twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), to different fertilization levels for cut roses, Rosa hybrida L. 'Tropicana' and quantified fertilization effects on (1) management of T. urticae on roses, (2) abundance and distribution of T. urticae on roses, and (3) yield and quality of the cut rose crop. We tested two fertilization levels, 10% (15 ppm N) and 100% (150 ppm N) of the recommended level for commercial production, and three control methods: no control measure; a predatory mite, Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot; and a miticide, bifenazate. Combinations of both bottom up (fertilization) and top down (biological or chemical control) tactics provided a greater degree of T. urticae control than either tactic alone. Rose productivity was reduced with fertilization at 10% of the recommended level; therefore, we conducted studies with T. urticae on roses fertilized with 33% (50 ppm N), 50% (75 ppm N), and 100% (150 ppm N) of the recommended level. Mean numbers of T. urticae and T. urticae eggs per flower shoot were twice as high on roses fertilized with 100 versus 33% or 50% of the recommended level. Number of rose leaves and total leaf area infested by T. urticae were similar at all fertilization levels. Cut rose yield and marketability were not compromised on plants fertilized with 50% of the recommended level.

  4. Report of transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Fontenay aux Roses; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Fontenay aux Roses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Fontenay aux roses for the year 2007. After many years of decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations, the Center is now devoted (since 2005) to the development of research programmes on biology and biomedical technologies. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  5. Investigating the effect of ecommerce on export development of rose water and essences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nataghi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There are some issues in marketing, supply and after-sales services for customers in global markets for production of rose water and essences extracts. Despite the fact that the products are genuine, there is a downward trend for the production of rose water and essences extracts in recent years. The present study aims to evaluate the identified structural barriers affecting exports of rose water and essences of Kashan to United Arabic Emirates. The population consisted of 77 managers of exporter companies in Kashan. Self-made questionnaire approved by supervisor to be valid and reliable, were distributed. The study tried to deliver a model for barriers to e-commerce in the context of Iran's rose water and essences extracts Export by examining different models of and studied in the field of electronic commerce and the application and advantages of systems based on it. The study also tried to identify current obstacles in the way of electronic commerce in export of rose water and essences extracts by using the questionnaire as an indicator in five-point Likert scale. There were three factors associated with the proposed model. Barriers to electronic commerce in export of rose water and essences extracts were determined in the order of priority as follows: 1 Problems and obstacles related to information infrastructure, 2 problems related to legislative, legal and secure infrastructure, 3 problems and obstacles to human, educational, cultural and behavioral infrastructure, 4 problems related to infrastructure of customs, trade and taxation, 5 internet problem, 6 Problems related to technical and hardware infrastructure, 7 Problems related to financial and software infrastructure.

  6. Deep sequencing reveals a novel closterovirus associated with wild rose leaf rosette disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Yang, Zuokun; Hong, Ni; Wang, Guoping; Ning, Guogui; Xu, Wenxing

    2015-06-01

    A bizarre virus-like symptom of a leaf rosette formed by dense small leaves on branches of wild roses (Rosa multiflora Thunb.), designated as 'wild rose leaf rosette disease' (WRLRD), was observed in China. To investigate the presumed causal virus, a wild rose sample affected by WRLRD was subjected to deep sequencing of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for a complete survey of the infecting viruses and viroids. The assembly of siRNAs led to the reconstruction of the complete genomes of three known viruses, namely Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Blackberry chlorotic ringspot virus (BCRV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), and of a novel virus provisionally named 'rose leaf rosette-associated virus' (RLRaV). Phylogenetic analysis clearly placed RLRaV alongside members of the genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae. Genome organization of RLRaV RNA (17,653 nucleotides) showed 13 open reading frames (ORFs), except ORF1 and the quintuple gene block, most of which showed no significant similarities with known viral proteins, but, instead, had detectable identities to fungal or bacterial proteins. Additional novel molecular features indicated that RLRaV seems to be the most complex virus among the known genus members. To our knowledge, this is the first report of WRLRD and its associated closterovirus, as well as two ilarviruses and one capilovirus, infecting wild roses. Our findings present novel information about the closterovirus and the aetiology of this rose disease which should facilitate its control. More importantly, the novel features of RLRaV help to clarify the molecular and evolutionary features of the closterovirus. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  7. "Smite this sleeping world awake": Edward Burne-Jones and "The legend of the briar rose".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rager, Andrea Wolk

    2009-01-01

    Challenging entrenched preconceptions about the supposed escapism and conservatism of Edward Burne-Jones's art, this paper seeks to establish his monumental painted series, "The Legend of the Briar Rose," as a fundamentally radical and confrontational work. Critics have long viewed it as an endorsement of sleepy stasis, antithetical to the political activism espoused by his friend William Morris. By unraveling the intertwining themes of the series -- the transformative dream vision, artistic labor, the decorative mode, and social egalitarianism -- the "Briar Rose" series is revealed instead to be dramatization of the struggle for personal, social, artistic, and even environmental awakening.

  8. Isolation of immunomodulatory triterpene acids from a standardized rose hip powder (Rosa canina L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Lasse; Jäger, Anna Katharina; Moesby, Lise

    2011-01-01

    A previously published systematic review and a metaanalysis have concluded that the consumption of standardized rose hip powder (Rosa canina L.) can reduce pain in osteoarthritis patients. Synovial inflammation has been suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis...... and mainly to involve infiltration of the synovial membrane by macrophages. Therefore, the immunomodulatory effect of standardized rose hip powder of Rosa canina L. was investigated and active principles isolated using the Mono Mac 6 cell line as a model for human macrophages. Treatment of Mono Mac 6 cells...

  9. Current Status of BL06 Beam Line for VIN ROSE at J-PARC/MLF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Sagehashi, Hidenori; Kawabata, Yuji; Seto, Hideki

    We started to construct new beam line for neutron spin echo spectrometers (VIN ROSE) at BL06 J- PARC/MLF from FY2011.The advantage of MIEZE is flexible sample environment and polarimetry analysis. The key device of NRSE is focusing mirror and high-m polarizing device. Both spectrometers are to use intensity gain of J-PARC and dedicated for small sample size. In this study, we show conceptional design of the VIN ROSE and current status of the BL06 beam line at J-PARC/MLF.

  10. Preliminary Studies Regarding the Production of Jam from Organic Rose Petal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cornelia BUTCARU

    2017-11-01

    The final products, seventeen variants of rose jam, were analyzed and tasted. Sensorial analysis was made by consumers of different ages and gender. Jam appearance, general taste, aroma, and the overall impression were noticed. V4 variant - Brother Cadfael with sea buckthorn was the most appreciated variant. For each of these top variants, target group by gender and age was analyzed. The results showed that the customers’ preferences are influenced by age and gender and the organic rose jam is a highly appreciated product.

  11. Enzyme-Assisted Extraction of Polyphenols From Rose (Rosa Damascena Mill. Petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalcheva-Karadzhova Krasimira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available : The efficiency of enzyme-assisted extraction for the recovery of polyphenols from rose (Rosa damascena Mill. petals was evaluated performing a simplex centroid experimental design for mixture with three components (pectinolytic, cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic preparation. The ternary enzyme combinations leaded to the highest contents of total polyphenols, reaching 43% higher average value as compared to the control (without enzymatic treatment sample. Enzymatic treatments also enhanced (9−25% the extractability of total anthocyanins. The results obtained demonstrate that enzyme-assisted extraction improves the recovery of polyphenolic antioxidants from rose petals, especially using ternary enzyme combinations, comprising pectinolytic, cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic preparation.

  12. Comparison of rose bengal-chloramphenicol and modified aureomycin-rose bengal-glucose-peptone agar as media for the enumeration of molds and yeasts in water by membrane filtration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaum, Silva; Masaphy, Segula

    2009-03-01

    The present study compares the suitability of rose bengalchloramphenicol (RBCh) and modified aureomycin-rose bengal glucose-peptone agar for enumerating fungi recovered from diverse water sources using the membrane filtration method. Both mold and yeast colonies were established more rapidly, with more intensified colony colors and higher RBCh counts.

  13. Inquiring into Red/Red Inquiring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Gale

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This layered account of an inquiry into ‘red’ emerged out of a collective biography workshop. In the middle of the Wiltshire countryside, an international and interdisciplinary group of scholars gathered together to write and make other things and marks on paper that asked questions of, and into, the spaces between words, people, things and their environments. We did not set out to workshop or write into or paint ‘red’ but, rather, it was red that slipped in, uninvited, and painted and wrote us. Red arose as a blush or a stain seeping amongst us that became referenced obliquely by material objects, metaphors and fairytales. The stain spread, became noticeable through our weekend together and beyond it, creating another (bright red artery vein of connection to write with.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 14P 2/21/2012 0-1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 14P (14 33.071S, 168 09.421W), between 0 and 1 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P (14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 5P 2/10/2004 1-0M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 5P (14 33.280 S, 168 09.878 W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Rose Atoll Site 7P 2/24/2002 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 7P (14 32.967S, 168 10.086W), between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 32P 2/22/2012 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 32P (14 32.361S, 168 09.430W), between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 7P 2/20/2012 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 7P (14 32.967S, 168 10.086W), between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 5P 2/10/2004 32-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 5P (14 33.280 S, 168 09.878 W), between 32 and 33 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 30P 7/30/2004 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 30P (14 32.277S, 168 09.386W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Epidemiology of Botrytis spotting on gerbera and rose flowers grown under glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssies, A.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments described in this thesis were performed to improve the knowledge on the epidemiology of Botrytis cinerea in glasshouses, with gerbera and rose as model systems. B. cinerea is an airborne fungus, with conidia as the most important

  3. Controlled atmosphere and refrigerated storage in cut roses ‘Avalanche’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Moraes Dias

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, there are few studies on cut flowers cold storage, and there is no research on the association of controlled atmosphere with flower cooling. Worldwide research in this sector is considered scarce; this requires the establishment of adequate postharvest technology, involving cold storage and controlled/modified atmosphere for cutting flowers. In Brazil, roses are the most widely cultivated cut flower and a single producer exports three pallets of this species by airfreight per week. The objectives of this work were to define the concentrations of O2 and CO2 in which cut roses ‘Avalanche’ should be submitted, defining procedures for postharvest conservation and establishing technical guidelines for the exportation of cut roses under controlled atmosphere. The experiments were carried out at 1±1 °C with the help of a flowchart to dose the gases, and the concentration of O2 , CO2 and ethylene were assessed. Phase 1 experiment had O2 concentration set at 21% associated with four different concentrations of CO2 , 10, 20, 30 and 40%. Phase 2 experiment had O2 at 3% associated with four different concentrations of CO2 , 3, 6, 10 and 15%. The controlled atmosphere with 3% O2 and 6% CO2 associated with 1+1 °C was indicated for the storage of cut rose ‘Avalanche’.

  4. Sodium hypochlorite: A promising agent for reducing Botrytis cinerea infection on rose flowers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macnish, A.J.; Morris, K.L.; Theije, de A.; Mensink, M.G.J.; Boerrigter, H.A.M.; Reid, M.S.; Jiang, C.Z.; Woltering, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a fungal pathogen that greatly reduces the postharvest quality of rose flowers. A postharvest dip in 200 µL L-1 sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 10 s at 20 °C provided the greatest control of B. cinerea on ‘Akito’ and ‘Gold Strike’ flowers. NaOCl derived from Clorox® Ultra

  5. Petal abscission in rose flowers: effects of water potential, light intensity and light quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Vojinovic, A.

    1996-01-01

    Petal abscission was studied in roses (Rosa hybrida L.), cvs. Korflapei (trade name Frisco), Sweet Promise (Sonia) and Cara Mia (trade name as officially registered cultivar name). Unlike flowers on plants in greenhouses, cut flowers placed in water in the greenhouse produced visible symptoms of

  6. Rose Atoll Site 13P 2/19/2012 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/31/1999 20-21M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 20 and 21 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 23P 2/10/2004 36-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 23P (14 32.538S, 168 10.341W), between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Reducing Obesity in Students Everywhere (ROSE): A Brief, Interactive, School-Based Approach to Promoting Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alert, Marissa D.; Carucci, Daniella; Clennan, Mary Kate; Chiles, Shannon; Etzel, Erin N.; Saab, Patrice G.

    2015-01-01

    The Reducing Obesity in Students Everywhere (ROSE) health promotion presentations educate students in grades 3-12 about nutrition, physical activity, reducing screen time, sleep, smoking, stress management, and the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. This article describes the content of the presentations, how information is delivered, strategies…

  10. Rose Atoll Site 29P 3/9/2006 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 27P 3/9/2006 33-34M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 27P (14 33.038S, 168 09.251W), between 33 and 34 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 9P 3/9/2006 49-50M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 49 and 50 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Rose Atoll Site 10P 3/9/2006 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 9P 3/9/2006 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 29P 3/9/2006 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 26P 3/6/2006 32-33M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472W), between 32 and 33 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Rose Atoll Site 31P 3/6/2006 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 27P 3/9/2006 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 27P (14 33.038S, 168 09.251W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 29P 3/9/2006 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 26P 3/6/2006 15-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472W), between 15 and 16 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 31P 3/6/2006 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 27P 3/9/2006 0-1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 27P (14 33.038S, 168 09.251W), between 0 and 1 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 29P 3/9/2006 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 9P 3/9/2006 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Rose Atoll Site 31P 3/6/2006 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 29P 3/9/2006 45-46M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 45 and 46 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 27P 3/9/2006 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 27P (14 33.038S, 168 09.251W), between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 13P 3/6/2006 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Rose Atoll Site 27P 3/9/2006 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 27P (14 33.038S, 168 09.251W), between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 13P 3/6/2006 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 31P 3/6/2006 31-32M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), between 31 and 32 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 9P 3/9/2006 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Rose Atoll Site 27P 3/9/2006 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 27P (14 33.038S, 168 09.251W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 13P 3/6/2006 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 13P 3/6/2006 48-49M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 48 and 49 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Development and growth potential of axillary buds in roses as affected by bud age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis-van Acker, C.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of axillary bud age on the development and potential for growth of the bud into a shoot was studied in roses. Age of the buds occupying a similar position on the plant varied from 'subtending leaf just unfolded' up to 1 year later. With increasing age of the axillary bud its dry mass,

  17. Evaluation of a cocopeat-based substrate system for rose production in Naivasha, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketter, N.C.; Wesonga, J.M.; Elings, A.; Hoogerwerf, F.

    2015-01-01

    The current production system of roses in Kenya involves mostly the use of soil and open drip irrigation, which is inefficient as water and nutrients are lost through drainage. A recycling system can improve efficiency, as drainage water containing nutrients is re-used. A study was carried out from

  18. Genome-wide association analysis of the anthocyanin and carotenoid contents of rose petals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, Dietmar F.; Schott, Rena T.; Voorrips, Roeland E.; Smulders, Rene; Linde, Marcus; Debener, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Petal color is one of the key characteristics determining the attractiveness and therefore the commercial value of an ornamental crop. Here, we present the first genome-wide association study for the important ornamental crop rose, focusing on the anthocyanin and carotenoid contents in petals of

  19. Rose Atoll Site 9P 2/19/2012 23-24M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 23 and 24 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. " That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 3. “That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as ... Biotechnology student in Anna University, Chennai. Department of Molecular Reproduction, Development and Genetics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 56 0012. India.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 32P 2/22/2012 28-29M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 32P (14 32.361S, 168 09.430W), between 28 and 29 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 9P 3/9/2006 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 23P 2/10/2004 12-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 23P (14 32.538S, 168 10.341W), between 12 and 13 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 10P 2/19/2012 39-40M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 39 and 40 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Rose Atoll Site 9P 3/9/2006 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 13P 8/25/1999 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Single application prophylaxis against gray mold in pot rose and pelargonium with Ulocladium atrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yohalem, D S; Paaske, K; Kristensen, K

    2007-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to clarify the optimal dose and timing of single applications of Ulocladium atrum for control of gray mold on pot rose and pelargonium under conditions similar to those found in commercial greenhouses. In general, application of the antagonist 1-d prior to infestation...

  8. Rose Atoll Site 26P 7/29/2004 34-35M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472S), between 34 and 35 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 28P 7/29/2004 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 28P (14 32.300S, 168 09.401W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 26P 7/29/2004 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472S), between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Rose Atoll Site 31P 7/30/2004 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/28/2004 19-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P (14 32.282S, 168 09.218W), between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 38-39M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 38 and 39 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 30P 7/30/2004 20-21M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 30P (14 32.277S, 168 09.386W), between 20 and 21 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 33-34M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 33 and 34 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 30P 7/30/2004 36-37M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 30P (14 32.277S, 168 09.386W), between 36 and 37 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 28P 7/29/2004 12-13M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 28P (14 32.300S, 168 09.401W), between 12 and 13 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 26-27M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 26 and 27 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 7-8M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 7 and 8 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 28P 7/29/2004 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 28P (14 32.300S, 168 09.401W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/28/2004 51-52M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P (14 32.282S, 168 09.218W), between 51 and 52 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 14-15M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 14 and 15 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 45-46M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 45 and 46 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/28/2004 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P (14 32.282S, 168 09.218W), between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 4-5M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 4 and 5 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 30P 7/30/2004 6-7M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 30P (14 32.277S, 168 09.386W), between 6 and 7 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 32-33M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 32 and 33 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 30P 7/30/2004 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 30P (14 32.277S, 168 09.386W), between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 0-1M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 0 and 1 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 19-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 19 and 20 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 8P 7/28/2004 42-43M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P (14 32.282S, 168 09.218W), between 42 and 43 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 26P 7/29/2004 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472S), between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Rose Atoll Site 26P 7/29/2004 42-43M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472S), between 42 and 43 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 30P 7/30/2004 9-10M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 30P (14 32.277S, 168 09.386W), between 9 and 10 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 30P 7/30/2004 40-41M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 30P (14 32.277S, 168 09.386W), between 40 and 41 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 21-22M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 21 and 22 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 28P 7/29/2004 21-22M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 28P (14 32.300S, 168 09.401W), between 21 and 22 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 44-45M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 44 and 45 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 28P 7/29/2004 41-42M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 28P (14 32.300S, 168 09.401W), between 41 and 42 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 26P 7/29/2004 47-48M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472S), between 47 and 48 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 28P 7/29/2004 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 28P (14 32.300S, 168 09.401W), between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 47-48M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 47 and 48 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 33-34M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 33 and 34 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 2-3M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 2 and 3 meters along a permanent transect.

  6. Rose Atoll Site 28P 7/29/2004 20-21M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 28P (14 32.300S, 168 09.401W), between 20 and 21 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 26P 7/29/2004 43-44M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472S), between 43 and 44 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/30/2004 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  9. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  10. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 11-12M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 11 and 12 meters along a permanent transect.

  11. Rose Atoll Site 26P 7/29/2004 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472S), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 5-6M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 5 and 6 meters along a permanent transect.

  13. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  14. Rose Atoll Site 30P 7/30/2004 17-18M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 30P (14 32.277S, 168 09.386W), between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  15. Rose Atoll Site 25P 7/28/2004 25-26M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 25P (14 32.297S, 168 09.327W), between 25 and 26 meters along a permanent transect.

  16. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 18-19M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 18 and 19 meters along a permanent transect.

  17. Rose Atoll Site 13P 7/31/2004 42-43M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 42 and 43 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 30P 7/30/2004 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 30P (14 32.277S, 168 09.386W), between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 37-38M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 37 and 38 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 9P 7/30/2004 16-17M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 9P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 16 and 17 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. A desert rose takes shape: plans for National Museum of Qatar unveiled

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanley, Delinda C

    2010-01-01

    ... Museum will be the first monument travelers see arriving from the airport. The French architect's striking design was inspired by the desert rose, an other-worldly mineral formation of crystallized sand found just beneath the desert's surface. The pavilion's sand-colored floors, walls and roofs resemble the sharp bladelike petals of t...

  2. Effect of cold storage on stomatal functionality, water relations and flower performance in cut roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, Ernst J.; Paillart, Maxence J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Symptoms of water stress are the most frequent cause for the “end of vase life” in prior stored roses. It was hypothesized that dark storage may alter the stomatal functionality and may cause water balance problems during the subsequent vase life period. The effect of short- and long-term storage

  3. Rose Atoll Site 27P 2/21/2012 24-25M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 27P (14 33.038S, 168 09.251W), between 24 and 25 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. On the prediction of the remaining vase life of cut roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, S.O.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Vollebregt, H.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present paper was to examine the hypothesis that the time–temperature sum built up during storage and transport at constant as well as stepwise changing temperatures is a good predictor of the remaining vase life of cut roses. Theoretical calculations and graphing of functions

  5. Morphological study of the formation and development of basal shoots in roses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis-van Acker, C.A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Basal shoots are the vigorous shoots at the base of the plant. In roses, basal shoots determine the potential flower production of the plant. Although many attempts have been made to promote the formation of basal shoots for commercial production, little attention has been paid to the origin and

  6. Rose Atoll Site 29P 3/9/2006 13-14M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 13 and 14 meters along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 29P 7/31/2004 46-47M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 29P (14 32.227S, 168 09.122W), between 46 and 47 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Cultivar Differences in the Stomatal Characteristics of Cut Roses Grown at High Relative Humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanourakis, D.; Tapia, A.; Heuvelink, E.; Pinto De Carvalho, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    High relative air humidity (RH>85%) during cultivation is known to reduce the vase life of cut roses, but the magnitude of such effect is cultivar dependent. The reasons behind this genotypic variation are not yet known. In this study, the stomatal density and stomatal responses to two closing

  9. The vigour of glasshouse roses : scion - rootstock relationships : effects of phenotypic and genotypic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de D.P.

    1993-01-01

    Glasshouse roses commonly are combination plants, consisting of a scion variety and a rootstock of different genotypes. In this study, various environmental and genotypic factors have been investigated that influence the vigour of rootstocks and scion varieties, separately and in graft

  10. Stenting of roses; a method for quick propagation by simultaneously cutting and grafting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van de P.A.; Breukelaar, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for quick propagation of roses under conditions prevailing in The Netherlands, based on cutting and grafting in one action and called “stenting” (to stent), being a contraction of the dutch words “stekken” (to strike a cutting) and “enten” (to graft). A piece of stem of the

  11. Rose Atoll Site 10P 7/31/1999 29-30M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 10P (14 33.075S, 168 09.622W), between 29 and 30 meters along a permanent transect.

  12. Strategy for Writing a Good Data Management Plan for a ROSES Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, S. P.; Walker, R. J.; King, T. A.; Mafi, J. N.

    2017-06-01

    For years the ROSES calls have made it clear that all funded activities must archive any data products that are generated with the PDS or an equivalent archive. In this paper we outline a strategy for generating a well written data management plan.

  13. Identification of cut-rose (Rosa hybrida) and rootstock varieties using robust Sequence Tagged Microsatellite markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esselink, D.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Vosman, B.

    2003-01-01

    In this study a DNA fingerprinting protocol was developed for the identification of rose varieties based on the variability of microsatellites. Microsatellites were isolated from Rosa hybrida L. using enriched small insert libraries. In total 24 polymorphic sequenced tagged microsatellite site

  14. In vitro propagation of Rosa hybrida L. cv. Al-Taif Rose plant | Attia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, a protocol for in vitro propagation of Rosa hybrida L. cv. Al-Taif Rose was established using nodal segments harboring axillary buds as explants. In vitro stages of shoot initiation, multiplication and elongation were performed. Explants were cultured on solid Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) supplemented ...

  15. An assessment of genetic fidelity of in vitro grown plantlets of rose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple and routine method for the analysis of somaclonal variation among tissue culture derived rose plants is a prerequisite for precise monitoring of quality control during rapid mass micropropagation. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) molecular marker techniques ...

  16. Review: Maar wie snoei die rose in die nag? | Nel | Tydskrif vir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Maar wie snoei die rose in die nag? A Nel. Abstract. No abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/tvl.v51i2.16 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  17. The effects of Fe-chelate type and PH on substrate grown roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, W.; Sonneveld, C.

    2009-01-01

    Substrate grown roses appear to be susceptible to chlorosis, which indicates problems with Fe or Mn uptake and hence yield reduction. In common practice this problem is often treated by the addition of extra Fe-chelate, or the use of Fe-EDDHA instead of Fe-DTPA. In previous tests, it was shown that

  18. A novel Xanthomonas sp. causes bacterial spot of rose (Rosa spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A severe bacterial spot of rose (Rosa spp.) caused by a xanthomonad was observed in Florida and Texas. A total of 11 strains were collected from the two states. Multilocus sequence typing and analysis (MLST/MLSA) and pathogenicity tests were conducted to characterize the Xanthomonas strains. The MLS...

  19. Rose Atoll Site 28P 2/22/2012 1-2M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 28P (14 32.300S, 168 09.401W), between 1 and 2 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 23P 2/20/2012 47-48M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 23P (14 32.538S, 168 10.341W), between 47 and 48 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 7P 2/10/2004 17-16M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 7P (14 32.967S, 168 10.086W), between 17 and 18 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Rose Atoll Site 26P 2/23/2012 35-36M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 26P (14 32.465S, 168 09.472S), between 35 and 36 meters along a permanent transect.

  3. Rose Atoll Site 4P 2/20/2012 3-4M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 4P (14 33.569 S, 168 09.617 W), between 3 and 4 meters along a permanent transect.

  4. Rose Atoll Site 23P 2/10/2004 21-20M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 23P (14 32.538S, 168 10.341W), between 21 and 22 meters along a permanent transect.

  5. Towards marker assisted breeding in garden roses: from marker development to QTL detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukosavljev, M.

    2014-01-01

      Over the last few decades the rose market in Eastern Europe showed a steady growth, which indicates that there is increasing demand for new cultivars that are adapted to the climate as well as to the customs and beauty criterion of that region. One of the possibilities to speed up breeding is

  6. Rose Atoll Site 31P 6/21/2005 (31)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), at meter 31 along a permanent transect.

  7. Rose Atoll Site 8P 2/19/2012 27-28M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 8P (14 32.282S, 168 09.218W), between 27 and 28 meters along a permanent transect.

  8. Tocopherol, carotene, phenolic contents and antibacterial properties of rose essential oil, hydrosol and absolute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Seyhan; Boşgelmez-Tinaz, Gülgün; Seçilmiş-Canbay, Hale

    2009-11-01

    The antioxidant and antibacterial activities, and total phenolic contents of Rosa damascena Mill. flower extracts (absolute, essential oil and hydrosol) were investigated. The chemical compositions of these extracts were analysed by GC-MS. Phenylethyl alcohol (78.38%) was found to be the main constituent of rose absolute, while citrenellol and geraniol were the major compounds (>55%) of rose essential oil and hydrosol. Tocopherol and carotene levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The levels of beta carotene (422.3+/-35.6 ppm), alpha tocopherol (2397.1+/-72.5 ppm) and gamma tocopherol (343.1+/-28.4 ppm) of rose absolute were found to be higher than that of essential oil and hydrosol. Their total phenolic contents were also evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 5.2 to 2134.3 GAE/mg L(-1). Rose absolute and essential oil contained high levels of phenolics and demonstrated strong antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538), Chromobacterium violaceum (ATCC 12472) and Erwinia carotovora (ATCC 39048) strains.

  9. An ethylene-induced regulatory module delays rose flower senescence by regulating cytokinin content

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many plant species, including rose (Rosa hybrida), flower senescence is promoted by the gaseous hormone, ethylene, and inhibited by cytokinin (CTK) class of hormones. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these antagonistic effects are not well understood. In this current study, we charact...

  10. Acaricide resistance and resistance mechanisms in Tetranychus urticae populations from rose greenhouses in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khajehali, J.; Van Nieuwenhuyse, P.; Demaeght, P.; Tirry, L.; Van Leeuwen, T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spider mites are important crop pests that rapidly develop resistance to acaricides. To investigate whether acaricide resistance is a threat to greenhouse rose culture in the Netherlands, the susceptibility of 15 strains of Tetranychus urticae was tested to several currently used

  11. Water and heat balance during flight in the rose-colored starling (Sturnus roseus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Sophia; Biebach, Herbert; Visser, G. Henk

    2006-01-01

    Water imbalance during flight is considered to be a potentially limiting factor for flight ranges in migrating birds, but empirical data are scarce. We studied flights under controlled ambient conditions with rose-colored starlings in a wind tunnel. In one experiment, we measured water fluxes with

  12. Comments on Mike Rose's Essay "Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldrick-Rab, Sara

    2012-01-01

    The struggle over whether all students have a right to a high-quality, affordable college education, or whether it is a privilege they must "earn" through high test scores and parental savings for tuition, plays out daily in the so-called "remedial" or "developmental" classes. This article presents the author's comments on Mike Rose's essay…

  13. Luciferase-Rose Bengal conjugates for singlet oxygen generation by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonghoon; Jo, HyeongChan; Jeon, Mijeong; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2017-04-20

    Conjugates of Rose Bengal and Renilla luciferase generated singlet oxygen upon binding with coelenterazine via bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). Since the applications of conventional PDT have been limited to superficial lesions due to the limited light penetration in tissue, BRET activated PDT which does not require external light illumination may overcome the limitations of conventional PDT.

  14. Synchrotron X-ray CT of rose peduncles. Evaluation of tissue damage by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herppich, Werner B. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V., Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Technik im Gartenbau; Matsushima, Uzuki [Iwate Univ., Morioka (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture; Graf, Wolfgang [Association for Technology and Structures in Agriculture (KTBL), Darmstadt (Germany); Zabler, Simon [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Integrierte Schaltungen (IIS), Wuerzburg (Germany). Project group NanoCT Systems (NCTS); Dawson, Martin [Salford Univ., Greater Manchester (United Kingdom); Choinka, Gerard; Manke, Ingo [Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy (HZB), Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    ''Bent-neck'' syndrome, an important postharvest problem of cut roses, is probably caused by water supply limitations and/or the structural weakness of vascular bundles of the peduncle tissue. For this reason, advanced knowledge about the microstructures of rose peduncles and their cultivar specific variations may lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (SXCT), especially phase-based CT, is a highly suitable technique to nondestructively investigate plants' micro anatomy. SXCT with monochromatic X-ray beams of 30, 40 and 50 keV photon energy was used to evaluate the three-dimensional inner structures of the peduncles of 3 rose cultivars that differ greatly in their bent-neck susceptibility. Results indicated that this technique achieves sufficiently high spatial resolution to investigate complex tissues. However, further investigations with chlorophyll fluorescence analysis (CFA) and optical microscope imagery reveal different kinds of heavy damage of the irradiated regions induced by synchrotron X-rays; in a cultivar-specific manner, partial destruction of cell walls occurred a few hours after X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, a delayed inhibition of photosynthesis accompanied by the degradation of chlorophyll was obvious from CFA within hours and days after the end of CT measurements. Although SXCT is certainly well suited for three-dimensional anatomical analysis of rose peduncles, the applied technique is not nondestructive.

  15. Diversity and Mentoring in the Workplace: A Conversation with Belle Rose Ragins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Dawn E.; Ellis, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Given projected increases in workplace diversity, an understanding of diversity's intersection with mentoring is a critical topic in the literature. This article involved an interview with Belle Rose Ragins, one of the world's leading thinkers on diversity and mentoring in the workplace. After providing an overview of Ragins' key achievements and…

  16. Estimation of invasive probability of multiflora rose in the upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiming Yu; Zhaofei Fan; W. K. Moser; M. H. Hansen; M. D. Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Multiflora rose (Rosa Multiflora Thunb.) (MFR) is widely spreading across the United States, with up to 38 states in the contiguous United States reporting the presence of this species. In this study, U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data from the Upper Midwest states for the period of 2005-2006 were...

  17. Rose Atoll Site 13P 3/6/2006 22-23M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 13P (14 32.946S, 168 09.584W), between 22 and 23 meters along a permanent transect.

  18. Rose Atoll Site 31P 6/21/2005 (39)M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), at meter 39 along a permanent transect.

  19. Rose Atoll Site 31P 3/6/2006 10-11M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 31P (14 32.568S, 168 09.417W), between 10 and 11 meters along a permanent transect.

  20. Rose Atoll Site 32P 8/2/2004 30-31M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 32P (14 32.361S, 168 09.430W), between 30 and 31 meters along a permanent transect.

  1. Rose Atoll Site 14P 8/1/2004 21-22M

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One-meter-square (1 meter x 1 meter) benthic substrate at Rose Atoll, site 14P (14 33.071S, 168 09.421W), between 21 and 22 meters along a permanent transect.

  2. Automated rose cutting in greenhouses with 3D vision and robotics : analysis of 3D vision techniques for stem detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, J.C.; Hemming, J.; Heerde, van C.J.E.; Golbach, F.B.T.F.; Soest, van R.; Wekking, E.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of labour cost is the major motivation to develop a system for robot harvesting of roses in greenhouses that at least can compete with manual harvesting. Due to overlapping leaves, one of the most complicated tasks in robotic rose cutting is to locate the stem and trace the stem down

  3. Influence of temperature on bud break, shoot growth, flower bud atrophy and winter production of glasshouse roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of temperature in the range 15-22 °C on growth, production, quality and flower bud atrophy ('blindness') of the rose cultivars Sweet Promise and Varlon was studied. The roses were grown in Dutch glasshouse soil under natural light conditions and studied from October until May

  4. Rose George: Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry that Brings you 90% of Everything

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudal Poulsen, René

    2014-01-01

    Book review of: Rose George: Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry that Brings you 90% of Everything. London :Portobello Books, 2013. 320 pp. ISBN 9781846272639......Book review of: Rose George: Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry that Brings you 90% of Everything. London :Portobello Books, 2013. 320 pp. ISBN 9781846272639...

  5. 'An appendix of manageable proportions': Heinrich Wölfflin and Hans Rose between Baroque Studies and National-Socialism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, A.

    2016-01-01

    The text by Hans Rose translated here stems from the 1926 version of Heinrich Wölfflin’s Renaissance and Baroque, and was published as an appendix to the fourth edition of the original book. This 'Commentary' by Rose provides an insight into the slowly widening gap between the master's work and the

  6. Determination of diagnostic standards on saturated soil extracts for cut roses grown in greenhouses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jairo Franco-Hermida

    Full Text Available This work comprises the theoretical determination and validation of diagnostic standards for the analysis of saturated soil extracts for cut rose flower crops (Rosa spp. growing in the Bogota Plateau, Colombia. The data included 684 plant tissue analyses and 684 corresponding analyses of saturated soil extracts, all collected between January 2009 and June 2013. The tissue and soil samples were selected from 13 rose farms, and from cultivars grafted on the 'Natal Briar' rootstock. These concurrent samples of soil and plant tissues represented 251 production units (locations of approximately 10,000 m2 distributed across the study area. The standards were conceived as a tool to improve the nutritional balance in the leaf tissue of rose plants and thereby define the norms for expressing optimum productive potential relative to nutritional conditions in the soil. To this end, previously determined diagnostic standard for rose leaf tissues were employed to obtain rates of foliar nutritional balance at each analyzed location and as criteria for determining the diagnostic norms for saturated soil extracts. Implementing this methodology to foliar analysis, showed a higher significant correlation for diagnostic indices. A similar behavior was observed in saturated soil extracts analysis, becoming a powerful tool for integrated nutritional diagnosis. Leaf analyses determine the most limiting nutrients for high yield and analyses of saturated soil extracts facilitate the possibility of correcting the fertigation formulations applied to soils or substrates. Recommendations are proposed to improve the balance in soil-plant system with which the possibility of yield increase becomes more probable. The main recommendations to increase and improve rose crop flower yields would be: continuously check pH values of SSE, reduce the amounts of P, Fe, Zn and Cu in fertigation solutions and carefully analyze the situation of Mn in the soil-plant system.

  7. Determination of diagnostic standards on saturated soil extracts for cut roses grown in greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Hermida, John Jairo; Quintero, María Fernanda; Cabrera, Raúl Iskander; Guzman, José Miguel

    2017-01-01

    This work comprises the theoretical determination and validation of diagnostic standards for the analysis of saturated soil extracts for cut rose flower crops (Rosa spp.) growing in the Bogota Plateau, Colombia. The data included 684 plant tissue analyses and 684 corresponding analyses of saturated soil extracts, all collected between January 2009 and June 2013. The tissue and soil samples were selected from 13 rose farms, and from cultivars grafted on the 'Natal Briar' rootstock. These concurrent samples of soil and plant tissues represented 251 production units (locations) of approximately 10,000 m2 distributed across the study area. The standards were conceived as a tool to improve the nutritional balance in the leaf tissue of rose plants and thereby define the norms for expressing optimum productive potential relative to nutritional conditions in the soil. To this end, previously determined diagnostic standard for rose leaf tissues were employed to obtain rates of foliar nutritional balance at each analyzed location and as criteria for determining the diagnostic norms for saturated soil extracts. Implementing this methodology to foliar analysis, showed a higher significant correlation for diagnostic indices. A similar behavior was observed in saturated soil extracts analysis, becoming a powerful tool for integrated nutritional diagnosis. Leaf analyses determine the most limiting nutrients for high yield and analyses of saturated soil extracts facilitate the possibility of correcting the fertigation formulations applied to soils or substrates. Recommendations are proposed to improve the balance in soil-plant system with which the possibility of yield increase becomes more probable. The main recommendations to increase and improve rose crop flower yields would be: continuously check pH values of SSE, reduce the amounts of P, Fe, Zn and Cu in fertigation solutions and carefully analyze the situation of Mn in the soil-plant system.

  8. Wound Healing Effects of Rose Placenta in a Mouse Model of Full-Thickness Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Woo Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRosa damascena, a type of herb, has been used for wound healing in Eastern folk medicine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of rose placenta from R. damascena in a full-thickness wound model in mice.MethodsSixty six-week-old C57BL/6N mice were used. Full-thickness wounds were made with an 8-mm diameter punch. Two wounds were made on each side of the back, and wounds were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Rose placenta (250 µg was injected in the experimental group, and normal saline was injected in the control group. Wound sizes were measured with digital photography, and specimens were harvested. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to assess the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, and CD31. Vessel density was measured. Quantitative analysis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for EGF was performed. All evaluations were performed on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Statistical analyses were performed using the paired t-test.Results On days 4, 7, and 10, the wounds treated with rose placenta were significantly smaller. On day 2, VEGF and EGF expression increased in the experimental group. On days 7 and 10, TGF-β1 expression decreased in the experimental group. On day 10, vessel density increased in the experimental group. The increase in EGF on day 2 was confirmed with ELISA.ConclusionsRose placenta was found to be associated with improved wound healing in a mouse full-thickness wound model via increased EGF release. Rose placenta may potentially be a novel drug candidate for enhancing wound healing.

  9. Effects of Harvest Times on the Fatty Acids Composition of Rose Hip (Rosa sp. Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Güneş

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the change of fatty acids ratios of some rose hip species seeds in different harvest times. Seeds of five genotypes belonging to rose hip species (Rosa sp. were used in the study. The fruits of species were harvested in six different ripening times and analyzed. Total oil analysis was performed for the fifth harvest only, which was determined as the optimal harvest time. As a result; total oil ratio of rose hip seeds varied as 5.22 and 6.62 g/100g respectively for accessions of Rosa dumalis (MR-12 and MR-15, 6.37 g/100g for R. canina (MR-26, 5.00 g/100g for R. dumalis ssp. boissieri (MR-46 and 5.29 g/100g for R. villosa (MR-84. Eleven fatty acids were determined in rose hip seeds. Among these fatty acids linoleic, oleic, linolenic, palmitic and stearic acids respectively had high ratio. Saturated fatty acids ratio (SFAs was the highest in R. canina (MR-26 and the lowest in R. dumalis (MR-12; monounsaturated fatty acids ratio (MUFAs was the highest in R. dumalis (MR-12 and the lowest in R. dumalis ssp. boissieri (MR-46; polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio (PUFAs was the highest in R. dumalis ssp. boissieri (MR-46 and the lowest in R. dumalis (MR-12. Mono and polyunsaturated fatty acid contents obtained in this study was high; the change of fatty acid profile in the studied species in relation to harvest time was significant for some species and insignificant for others. A conclusion was reached that it is important to pay attention to qualitative and quantitative properties of seeds when conducting studies about rose hip improvement.

  10. Red Pine Shoot Moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Hainze; David Hall

    The red pine shoot moth recently caused significant damage to red pine plantations in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Trees of all ages have been attacked, but the most severe damage has occurred in 20-40 year old plantations growing on sandy soils.

  11. [The red eye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alami, A; Gérard, P; Bremer, F

    2014-09-01

    The red eye is a frequent symptom in emergency consultation. The general practitioner should be aware about the sample of possible etiologies. The diseases causing redness are various, sometimes benign but sometimes threatening vision. The most frequent diagnostic hypotheses will be summarized here, as well as the practical methodological elements allowing gross differential diagnosis in the absence of specific instrumentation.

  12. The pediatric red eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Melissa M; Anninger, William

    2014-06-01

    There is a broad differential for the pediatric red eye, which may range from benign conditions to vision- and/or life-threatening conditions. This article presents a systematic differential, red flags for referral, and treatment options. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Mechanisms of removing red tide organisms by organo-clays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xi-Hua; Song, Xiu-Xian; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Kui

    2006-08-01

    We tested the influence of the preparation conditions of the quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) modified clays on their capacities to remove red tide organisms, then discussed the mechanisms of the organo-clays removing red tide organisms. Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) improved the capacity of clays to flocculate red tide algae, and the HDTMA in metastable state enhanced the toxicity of the clay complexes to algae. The capacities of the organo-clays correlated with the toxicity and the adsorbed amount of the QACs used in clays modification, but as the incubation time was prolonged the stability of the organo-clays was improved and the algal removal efficiencies of the clay complexes decreased. When the adsorbed HDTMA was arranged in different clays in which the spatial resistance was different, there was more HDTMA in metastable state in the three-layer montmorillonite. Because of the homo-ion effect the bivalent or trivalent metal ions induced more HDTMA in metastable state and the corresponding organo-clays had high capacities to remove red tide organisms. When the reaction temperature was 60 degrees C the adsorbed HDTMA was easily arranged on cation exchange sites, if the temperature rose or fell the metastable HDTMA would increase so that the capacity of the clays was improved.

  14. Influence of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4) on erythrocyte photohemolysis via photofrin and Rose Bengal sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Akhras, M-Ali H; Aljarrah, Khaled; Albiss, Borhan; Al-Khalili, Duaa

    2017-06-01

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (IO-NP) were recently employed in medical applications as a diagnostic tool and drug carrier. Photofrin (PF) is a photosensitizer that clinically is used in Photodynamic therapy (PDT). The photosensitivity of PF and Rose Bengal (RB) mixed with (IO-NP) on red blood cells (RBCs) lysis was investigated. Second, Photohemolysis for post-irradiation (delayed) and during irradiation (continuous) with PF, RB and IO-NP combinations at different concentrations was investigated. Third, the photohemolysis rate, relative lysis steepness and power-concentration dependant parameter were evaluated by modeling and fitting the data using Gompertz function and power law. RBCs were isolated from healthy male human volunteer. Washed cells (7.86×106 cells/mm3) were incubated with PF only or with IO-NP for 45min at 37°C then irradiated to a range of temperatures (4-41°C). CPH results were recorded and evaluated using Gompertz function. The relative steepness of the photohemolysis curves was approximately independent on light dose for delayed irradiation. The presence of IO-NP increases the rupturing time for 50% of the RBCs. Photohemolysis rate for delayed irradiation using the power law, led to 1.7 and 2.3 power dependence, respectively, for PF only and PF mixed with IO-NP. The power dependence of continuous irradiation measurements showed inverse proportionality for different concentrations of IO-NP combined with 2μg/ml PF concentration and 1.5μg/ml for RB concentration. Photosensitization of RBC with PF or RB mixed with IO-NP inhibited rupturing erythrocyte membrane and therefore a consideration should be taken against their combination in clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Photodynamic Inactivation of E. coli PTCC 1276 Using Light Emitting Diodes: Application of Rose Bengal and Methylene Blue as Two Simple Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminezhad, Hasan; Amani, Hossein; Khanbabaie, Reza; Biglarnia, Mahbobeh

    2017-07-01

    The lack of a comparative study about potential of high-power light emitting diodes (LEDs) for photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of pathogenic microorganisms has remained as a challenging issue for researchers. Therefore, the aim of this study is to fill this gap through introduction of an efficient model for in vitro PDI in an aqueous medium. For this purpose, two individual 30 mW/cm2 irradiation systems were designed using suitable sets of green and red LEDs. At another work, Methylene blue (MB) and Rose bengal (RB) as two simple models in the range of 5-150 μM were used in order to compare PDI of E. coli PTCC 1276 using red and green LED systems. Our results showed that a first-order mathematical model has the strength to describe the temporal variation of survival curves. Based on our results, when concentration of photosensitizer increased, the rate of inactivation for RB increased while MB depicted a maximum rate value at 25 μM. In a comparative study, optimum inactivation of E. coli PTCC 1276 obtained during 2- and 10-min irradiation of the LED systems using RB and MB at 150 and 25 μM, respectively. With regard to lower value of inactivation time and higher rate of inactivation for RB, use of simultaneous green high-power LEDs and RB is proposed as an efficient approach for PDI of pathogenic bacteria in future industrial applications.

  16. Inteligencia de red

    OpenAIRE

    Barba Martí, Antonio; Hesselbach Serra, Xavier

    2002-01-01

    Bibliografia Actualmente existe una necesidad cada vez mayor de ofrecer servicios de red avanzados, que proporcionen un alto valor añadido al cliente. Eso es ya posible gracias a las nuevas capacidades de computación añadidas a los nodos de red, que proporcionan inteligencia y facilitan la gestión de red a los operadores y proveedores de servicios. En este texto, se presentan las nuevas redes inteligentes basadas en señalización número 7, los nuevos servicios sobre Internet (voz sobre IP, ...

  17. RedNemo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkan, Ferhat; Erten, Cesim

    2017-01-01

    tested on small-scale networks thus far and when applied on large-scale networks of popular PPI databases, the executions require unreasonable amounts of time, or may even crash without producing any output for some instances even after several months of execution. We provide an algorithm, Red...... better with RedNemo than with the alternatives under most of the experimented removal/rewiring ratios. Furthermore, through extensive tests on databases of varying sizes, we show that RedNemo achieves these results with much better running time performances. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: Supplementary...

  18. Ocular Emergencies: Red Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarff, Andreina; Behrens, Ashley

    2017-05-01

    "Red eye" is used as a general term to describe irritated or bloodshot eyes. It is a recognizable sign of an acute/chronic, localized/systemic underlying inflammatory condition. Conjunctival injection is most commonly caused by dryness, allergy, visual fatigue, contact lens overwear, and local infections. In some instances, red eye can represent a true ocular emergency that should be treated by an ophthalmologist. A comprehensive assessment of red eye conditions is required to preserve the patients visual function. Severe ocular pain, significant photophobia, decreased vision, and history of ocular trauma are warning signs demanding immediate ophthalmological consultation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Next generation red teaming

    CERN Document Server

    Dalziel, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Red Teaming is can be described as a type of wargaming.In private business, penetration testers audit and test organization security, often in a secretive setting. The entire point of the Red Team is to see how weak or otherwise the organization's security posture is. This course is particularly suited to CISO's and CTO's that need to learn how to build a successful Red Team, as well as budding cyber security professionals who would like to learn more about the world of information security. Teaches readers how to dentify systemic security issues based on the analysis of vulnerability and con

  20. Chemical investigation of the volatile components of shade-dried petals of damask rose (Rosa damascena Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Swaroop Ram

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Roses are always appreciated because of their inimitable aroma, many uses and of course their beauty. In addition to the different damask rose (Rosa damascena Mill. products (oil, water, concrete, absolute, gulkand etc., its dried petals are also used for various health purposes. The hydrodistilled volatile oil and water of shade-dried damask rose petals were investigated by GC and GC-MS. The predominant components of tThe essential oil and rose water were aliphatic hydrocarbons (56.4 and 46.3%, followed by oxygenated monoterpenes (14.7 and 8.7%. The main aliphatic hydrocarbons of the essential oil and rose water were heneicosane (19.7 and 15.7%, nonadecane (13.0 and 8.4%, tricosane (11.3 and 9.3% and pentacosane (5.3 and 5.1% while the content of 2-phenyl ethyl alcohol was 0.4% and 7.1% in the essential oil and rose water, respectively. The chemical composition of the dried rose petal volatiles is quite different from fresh flower volatiles.

  1. Red Hill Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    This and other periodic updates are intended to keep the public informed on major progress being made to protect public health and the environment at the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii.

  2. Ambiance rose production and nutrient supply in soil irrigated with treated sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Gabrielli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTEffluents from secondary sewage treatment plants may contain amount of nutrients with the potential to cause eutrophication of water bodies. One of the ways to decrease this influx of nutrients would be the agricultural reuse. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the irrigation of roses of the Ambiance variety with the effluent from an anaerobic reactor and an intermittent sand filter (nitrified effluent. The trial lasted for 152 days. The dose of nitrogen applied via effluent was 91% of the crop requirement; of phosphorus, 3.5% (very low; and of potassium, 23%. There was no difference among treatments for the evaluated variables: diameter and length of stem, diameter and length of bud, and fresh weight of flower buds. The production of floral stems was higher in treatments with effluents without conventional fertilization. It is concluded that the irrigation with a treated effluent is an alternative for the fertilization of ambiance roses.

  3. Anaerobic digestion and methane generation potential of rose residue in batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Ismail; Gönüllü, M Talha; Günay, Ahmet

    2004-01-01

    In the study, anaerobic digestion of residues from rose oil industry was investigated by using a laboratory scale completely mixed batch reactor in volume of 10 L and 4 small reactors in volume of 400 mL. Ten liters reactor isolated with a water jacket and 0.4 L reactors settled into a water bath were operated at 35 +/- 1 degrees C. The study supplies biochemical methane potential of hydrolyzed and original residues. Experimental results showed that hydrolyzed rose residue produced a bit more methane than original residue. Methane production results were analyzed with first-order and Chen&Hashimoto's models, and Chen&-Hashimoto's model was found to be more suitable than first-order kinetic model.

  4. Greenhouse irrigation water depths in relation to rose stem and bud qualities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folegatti Marcos Vinícius

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of roses occupies a special place in the flower production of Brazil, the concern with the quality of the buds being intimately related with the appropriate supply of water and nutrients to the plant. With the objective of evaluating stem and bud quality the rose variety 'Osiana' was cultivated in a greenhouse using different irrigation water depths based on fractions of pan evaporation (0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00 and 1.25. The experimental design consisted of total randomized blocks with five replications and five treatments. There is a linear tendency of increasing the length and diameter of the stems and the length and diameter of the buds with increasing irrigation water depths.

  5. ROSE concept′ of fluid management: Relevance in neuroanaesthesia and neurocritical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph N Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid therapy in neurosurgical patients aims to restore intravascular volume, optimise haemodynamic parameters and maintain tissue perfusion, integrity and function. The goal is to minimise the risk of inadequate cerebral perfusion pressure and to maintain good neurosurgical conditions. However, fluid management in brain-injured patients has several distinctive features compared with non-brain-injured critically ill patients. The ROSE concept advocates the restriction of fluids, which is consistent with the prevention of a ′tight brain′ in neurosurgery. Whether this imbalance in fluid management studies between different types of brain injuries is a reflection of differences in clinical relevance of fluid management is not clear. Further randomised controlled trials in the future are essential in subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury patients who are critical and need long-term Intensive Care Unit stay to elucidate and define the role and relevance of the ROSE concept in neuroanaesthesia and neurocritical care.

  6. Sonodynamic Excitation of Rose Bengal for Eradication of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faina Nakonechny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy based on photosensitizers activated by illumination is limited by poor penetration of visible light through skin and tissues. In order to overcome this problem, Rose Bengal was excited in the dark by 28 kHz ultrasound and was applied for inactivation of bacteria. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the sonodynamic technique is effective for eradication of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. The net sonodynamic effect was calculated as a 3-4 log10 reduction in bacteria concentration, depending on the cell and the Rose Bengal concentration and the treatment time. Sonodynamic treatment may become a novel and effective form of antimicrobial therapy and can be used for low-temperature sterilization of medical instruments and surgical accessories.

  7. Optimization of bottom-hinged flap-type wave energy converter for a specific wave rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Hamed; Panahi, Roozbeh

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we conducted a numerical analysis on the bottom-hinged flap-type Wave Energy Convertor (WEC). The basic model, implemented through the study using ANSYS-AQWA, has been validated by a three-dimensional physical model of a pitching vertical cylinder. Then, a systematic parametric assessment has been performed on stiffness, damping, and WEC direction against an incoming wave rose, resulting in an optimized flap-type WEC for a specific spot in the Persian Gulf. Here, stiffness is tuned to have a near-resonance condition considering the wave rose, while damping is modified to capture the highest energy for each device direction. Moreover, such sets of specifications have been checked at different directions to present the best combination of stiffness, damping, and device heading. It has been shown that for a real condition, including different wave heights, periods, and directions, it is very important to implement the methodology introduced here to guarantee device performance.

  8. Chaotic synchronization and control in nonlinear-coupled Hindmarsh-Rose neural systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Hongjie [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200030 Shanghai (China)]. E-mail: yuhongjie@sjtu.edu.cn; Peng Jianhua [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200030 Shanghai (China)

    2006-07-15

    A new approach for chaotic synchronization of Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neural networks linked by special nonlinear coupling function is proposed. The method expands SC method in investigation of chaotic synchronization based on the stability criterion. We provide the error evolutional equation to determine the stability of synchronized states, which has very simple forms corresponding to matrix of star coupling coefficients. The synchronization can be achieved without the requirement to calculate the maximum Lyapunov exponents when the coupling strengths are taken as reference values, and there is a region of stability around them. Besides, the stability criterion control method is applied to control chaotic behaviors of individual Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model. The chaotic orbit is stabilized on 5spike/burst orbit embedded in the chaotic attractor by an input of the nonlinear time-continuous feedback perturbation to membrane potential.

  9. Effects of network structure on the synchronizability of nonlinearly coupled Hindmarsh–Rose neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chun-Hsien, E-mail: chli@nknucc.nknu.edu.tw [Department of Mathematics, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Yanchao District, Kaohsiung City 82444, Taiwan (China); Yang, Suh-Yuh, E-mail: syyang@math.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Mathematics, National Central University, Jhongli District, Taoyuan City 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-23

    This work is devoted to investigate the effects of network structure on the synchronizability of nonlinearly coupled dynamical network of Hindmarsh–Rose neurons with a sigmoidal coupling function. We mainly focus on the networks that exhibit the small-world character or scale-free property. By checking the first nonzero eigenvalue of the outer-coupling matrix, which is closely related to the synchronization threshold, the synchronizabilities of three specific network ensembles with prescribed network structures are compared. Interestingly, we find that networks with more connections will not necessarily result in better synchronizability. - Highlights: • We investigate the effects of network structure on the synchronizability of nonlinearly coupled Hindmarsh–Rose neurons. • We mainly consider the networks that exhibit the small-world character or scale-free property. • The synchronizability of three specific network ensembles with prescribed network structures are compared. • Networks with more connections will not necessarily result in better synchronizability.

  10. Whence the red panda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, J J; Nedbal, M A; Dragoo, J W; Honeycutt, R L

    2000-11-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the "bear-like" arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids plus pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, walrus), raccoons (procyonids), musteloids (raccoons plus weasels, skunks, otters, and badgers [mustelids]), or as a monotypic lineage of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Nucleotide sequence data from three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron were analyzed, with more complete taxonomic sampling of relevant taxa (arctoids) than previously available in analyses of primary molecular data, to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the red panda to other arctoid carnivorans. This study provides detailed phylogenetic analyses (both parsimony and maximum-likelihood) of primary character data for arctoid carnivorans, including bootstrap and decay indices for all arctoid nodes, and three statistical tests of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for the placement of the red panda. Combined phylogenetic analyses reject the hypotheses that the red panda is most closely related to the bears (ursids) or to the raccoons (procyonids). Rather, evidence from nucleotide sequences strongly support placement of the red panda within a broad Musteloidea (sensu lato) clade, including three major lineages (the red panda, the skunks [mephitids], and a clearly monophyletic clade of procyonids plus mustelids [sensu stricto, excluding skunks]). Within the Musteloidea, interrelationships of the three major lineages are unclear and probably are best considered an unresolved trichotomy. These data provide compelling evidence for the relationships of the red panda and demonstrate that small taxonomic sample sizes can result in misleading or possibly erroneous

  11. Photolytic decolorization of Rose Bengal by UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and data optimization using response surface method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, M.A. [Department of Chemistry, UAE University, P.O. Box 17551, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)], E-mail: raufmapk@yahoo.com; Marzouki, N. [Department of Chemistry, UAE University, P.O. Box 17551, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates); Koerbahti, Bahadir K. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Mersin, Ciftlikkoy, 33343 Mersin (Turkey)

    2008-11-30

    Rose Bengal (C.I. name is Acid Red 94) was irradiated with UV light in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The photoinduced decolorization of the dye was monitored spectrophotometrically. The apparent rate of decolorization was calculated from the observed absorption data and was found to be pseudo first order. A systematic study of the effect of dye concentration and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration on the kinetics of dye decolorization was also carried out. Dye decolorization increased with increasing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and decreasing dye concentration. The maximum dye decolorization was determined as 90% with 0.005 mM dye at optimum 0.042 M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and pH 6.6. Additionally, the effect on decolorization of this dye in the presence of some additives (ions) was also investigated. It was seen that sulphite caused a maximum effect on % decolorization of the dye solution. A plausible explanation involving the probable radical initiated mechanism was given to explain the dye decolorization. The experimental data was also optimized using the response surface methodology (RSM). According to ANOVA results, the proposed model can be used to navigate the design space. It was found that the response of Rose Bengal degradation is very sensitive to the independent factors of dye concentration, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, pH and reaction time. The proposed model for D-optimal design fitted very well with the experimental data with R{sup 2} and R{sub adj}{sup 2} correlation coefficients of 0.85 and 0.80, respectively.

  12. Demonstration of traumatic hepato-pleural-cutaneous defect by 131I-rose bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R W; Lee, Y C; Telfer, N

    1978-11-01

    A 19-year-old man was shot in the right chest about 2 cm below the nipple; bloody fluid was drained through a chest tube. Two days later sero-sanguineous fluid tinged with bile was seen to drain from the wound site. 131I-rose bengal, injected intravenously, collected in the dome of the liver and drained into a collection bag placed over the wound site, thus identifying a hepato-pleural-cutaneous fistula, which was confirmed at surgery.

  13. Short communication. First report of Eggplant mottled dwarf virus in China rose in southern Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Parrella, G.; De Stradis, A.; Greco, B.; Villanueva, F.; I. M. Fortes; Navas-Castillo, J

    2013-01-01

    Eggplant mottled dwarf virus (EMDV, genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae) is transmitted in nature by leafhoppers and its natural host range includes vegetable crops (eggplant, tomato, potato, pepper), ornamentals (pittosporum, honeysuckle, pelargonium) and wild plants (caper, Solanum nigrum). The prevalence of infections is generally very low. EMDV has been demonstrated to be the causal agent of a vein yellowing disease of China rose (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis) in southern Italy. In th...

  14. Genome-wide association analysis of the anthocyanin and carotenoid contents of rose petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Frank Schulz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Petal colour is one of the key characteristics determining the attractiveness and therefore the commercial value of an ornamental crop. Here, we present the first genome-wide association study for the important ornamental crop rose, focusing on the anthocyanin and carotenoid contents in petals of 96 diverse tetraploid garden rose genotypes. Cultivated roses display a vast phenotypic and genetic diversity and are therefore ideal targets for association genetics.For marker analysis, we used a recently designed Axiom SNP chip comprising 68,000 SNPs with additionally 281 SSRs, 400 AFLPs and 246 markers from candidate genes. An analysis of the structure of the rose population revealed three subpopulations with most of the genetic variation between individual genotypes rather than between clusters and with a high average proportion of heterozygous loci.The mapping of markers significantly associated with anthocyanin and carotenoid content to the related Fragaria and Prunus genomes revealed clusters of associated markers indicating five genomic regions associated with the total anthocyanin content and two large clusters associated with the carotenoid content. Among the marker clusters associated with the phenotypes, we found several candidate genes with known functions in either the anthocyanin or the carotenoid biosynthesis pathways. Among others, we identified a glutathione-S-transferase, 4CL, an auxin response factor and F3´H as candidate genes affecting anthocyanin concentration, and CCD4 and Zeaxanthine epoxidase as candidates affecting the concentration of carotenoids. These markers are starting points for future validation experiments in independent populations as well as for functional genomic studies to identify the causal factors for the observed colour phenotypes. Furthermore, validated markers may be interesting tools for marker-assisted selection in commercial breeding programmes in that they provide the tools to identify superior

  15. Cultivating Hygiene as a Science: The Welch-Rose Report's Influence at Johns Hopkins and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Karen Kruse

    2016-03-01

    In 1915, William Henry Welch and Wickliffe Rose submitted a report to the Rockefeller Foundation that became the template for public health professional education in the United States and abroad. Based on the Welch-Rose Report's recommendations, the Foundation awarded a grant to Johns Hopkins University in 1916 to establish the first independent graduate school of public health, with Welch serving as the founding dean. The Welch-Rose Report and, by extension, the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health established and transmitted a new model of scientific training that wove the laboratory mindset together with the methods of public health administration and epidemiologic fieldwork. During the School's first quarter-century, faculty and alumni were remarkably active in frontline public health problem-solving, as well as launching public health agencies and schools of all types and sizes. The most lasting contribution of the Welch-Rose Report and the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, has been to "cultivate the science of hygiene" to bring about exponential growth in the evidence base for public health. The schools that have adopted the Johns Hopkins model of public health education worldwide have produced professionals who have worked to achieve wide-ranging reforms dedicated to preserving life, protecting health, and preventing injury across populations and continents. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Étude de la sociologie des exploitants de bois de rose malgaches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mais c'est à Antalaha que leur croissance a été la plus remarquable : les opérateurs historiques ont été rejoints par les membres de leurs familles et leurs anciens collecteurs, puis par des nouveaux venus, pour atteindre le chiffre record de 63 opérateurs dans cette seule ville, malgré l'interdiction d'exploiter le bois de rose ...

  17. Photocatalytic degradation of rose Bengal by semiconducting zinc sulphide used as a photocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Shweta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various semiconductors have been used as photocatalysts for removal of different dyes from their aqueous solutions. Zinc sulphide semiconductor is used in the present investigation as a photocatalyst for the removal of rose Bengal dye. Effect of different parameters, which affect the rate of reaction; like pH, concentration of dye, amount of semiconductor and light intensity have been studied. A mechanism has also been proposed in which hydroxyl radicals are shown as an active oxidizing species.

  18. Sealing of Corneal Lacerations Using Photo-Activated Rose Bengal Dye and Amniotic Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-10

    AM) to the wound using only green light and the dye, rose bengal (RB). 26 Methods: AM was impregnated with RB, then sealed over lacerations using...crosslink 38 AM to the cornea can be used for sealing complex penetrating wounds in the cornea and sclera 39 with minimal inflammation, or secondary...the eye is a frequent ophthalmic emergency at trauma centers worldwide. 49 From the standpoint of the military ophthalmologist, fragments and debris

  19. La Sclérose En Plaques En Mauritanie | Diagana | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction Caractérisée par une démyélinisation de la substance blanche du système nerveux central, la Sclérose en plaques (SEP) se manifeste cliniquement par des tableaux encéphaliques et/ ou médullaires subaigus. Il existerait un gradient Nord-Sud dans la répartition de la maladie. Les populations africaines ...

  20. Angiomyolipome Rénal et Sclérose Tubéreuse de Bourneville ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectif: La sclérose tubéreuse de Bourneville est une affection héréditaire caractérisée par le développement de tumeurs bénignes à type d'hamartomes au niveau de la peau, du rein, du cou, du cerveau et de l'oeil. Le but de rapporter nos deux observations est de rappeler les différentes caractéristiques de cette ...