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Sample records for tenuis xylose reductase

  1. Whole-cell bioreduction of aromatic α-keto esters using Candida tenuis xylose reductase and Candida boidinii formate dehydrogenase co-expressed in Escherichia coli

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    Egger Sigrid

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole cell-catalyzed biotransformation is a clear process option for the production of chiral alcohols via enantioselective reduction of precursor ketones. A wide variety of synthetically useful reductases are expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli to a high level of activity. Therefore, this microbe has become a prime system for carrying out whole-cell bioreductions at different scales. The limited capacity of central metabolic pathways in E. coli usually requires that reductase coenzyme in the form of NADPH or NADH be regenerated through a suitable oxidation reaction catalyzed by a second NADP+ or NAD+ dependent dehydrogenase that is co-expressed. Candida tenuis xylose reductase (CtXR was previously shown to promote NADH dependent reduction of aromatic α-keto esters with high Prelog-type stereoselectivity. We describe here the development of a new whole-cell biocatalyst that is based on an E. coli strain co-expressing CtXR and formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH. The bacterial system was evaluated for the synthesis of ethyl R-4-cyanomandelate under different process conditions and benchmarked against a previously described catalyst derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing CtXR. Results Gene co-expression from a pETDuet-1 vector yielded about 260 and 90 units of intracellular CtXR and CbFDH activity per gram of dry E. coli cell mass (gCDW. The maximum conversion rate (rS for ethyl 4-cyanobenzoylformate by intact or polymyxin B sulphate-permeabilized cells was similar (2 mmol/gCDWh, suggesting that the activity of CbFDH was partly rate-limiting overall. Uncatalyzed ester hydrolysis in substrate as well as inactivation of CtXR and CbFDH in the presence of the α-keto ester constituted major restrictions to the yield of alcohol product. Using optimized reaction conditions (100 mM substrate; 40 gCDW/L, we obtained ethyl R-4-cyanomandelate with an enantiomeric excess (e.e. of 97.2% in a yield of 82

  2. Electrostatic stabilization in a pre-organized polar active site: the catalytic role of Lys-80 in Candida tenuis xylose reductase (AKR2B5) probed by site-directed mutagenesis and functional complementation studies.

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    Kratzer, Regina; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2005-07-15

    Lys-80 of Candida tenuis xylose reductase (AKR2B5) is conserved throughout the aldo-keto reductase protein superfamily and may prime the nearby Tyr-51 for general acid catalysis to NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl group reduction. We have examined the catalytic significance of side-chain substitutions in two AKR2B5 mutants, Lys-80-->Ala (K80A) and Asp-46-->Asn Lys-80-->Ala (D46N K80A), using steady-state kinetic analysis and restoration of activity with external amines. Binding of NAD+ (Kd = 24 microM) and NADP+ (Kd = 0.03 microM) was 10- and 40-fold tighter in K80A than the wild-type enzyme, whereas binding of NADH (Kd = 51 microM) and NADPH (Kd = 19 microM) was weakened 2- and 16-fold in this mutant respectively. D46N K80A bound NAD(P)H and NAD(P)+ uniformly approx. 5-fold less tightly than the wild-type enzyme. The second-order rate constant for non-covalent restoration of NADH-dependent reductase activity (kmax/Kamine) by protonated ethylamine was 0.11 M(-1).s(-1) for K80A, whereas no detectable rescue occurred for D46N K80A. After correction for effects of side-chain hydrophobicity, we obtained a linear free energy relationship of log (kmax/Kamine) and amine group pKa (slope = +0.29; r2 = 0.93) at pH 7.0. pH profiles of log (kcat/Km) for carbonyl group reduction by wild-type and D46N K80A revealed identical and kinetically unperturbed pKa values of 8.50 (+/-0.20). Therefore the protonated side chain of Lys-80 is not an essential activator of general acid catalysis by AKR2B5. Stabilized structurally through the salt-link interaction with the negatively charged Asp-46, it is proposed to pull the side chain of Tyr-51 into the catalytic position, leading to a preorganized polar environment of overall neutral charge, in which approximation of uncharged reactive groups is favoured and thus hydride transfer from NAD(P)H is strongly preferred. Lys-80 affects further the directional preference of AKR2B5 for NAD(P)H-dependent reduction by increasing NAD(P)H compared with NAD

  3. Fermentation of mixed glucose-xylose substrates by engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of the coenzyme specificity of xylose reductase, and effect of glucose on xylose utilization

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    Klimacek Mario

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the substantial metabolic engineering effort previously devoted to the development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting both the hexose and pentose sugars present in lignocellulose hydrolysates, the productivity of reported strains for conversion of the naturally most abundant pentose, xylose, is still a major issue of process efficiency. Protein engineering for targeted alteration of the nicotinamide cofactor specificity of enzymes catalyzing the first steps in the metabolic pathway for xylose was a successful approach of reducing xylitol by-product formation and improving ethanol yield from xylose. The previously reported yeast strain BP10001, which expresses heterologous xylose reductase from Candida tenuis in mutated (NADH-preferring form, stands for a series of other yeast strains designed with similar rational. Using 20 g/L xylose as sole source of carbon, BP10001 displayed a low specific uptake rate qxylose (g xylose/g dry cell weight/h of 0.08. The study presented herein was performed with the aim of analysing (external factors that limit qxylose of BP10001 under xylose-only and mixed glucose-xylose substrate conditions. We also carried out a comprehensive investigation on the currently unclear role of coenzyme utilization, NADPH compared to NADH, for xylose reduction during co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. Results BP10001 and BP000, expressing C. tenuis xylose reductase in NADPH-preferring wild-type form, were used. Glucose and xylose (each at 10 g/L were converted sequentially, the corresponding qsubstrate values being similar for each strain (glucose: 3.0; xylose: 0.05. The distribution of fermentation products from glucose was identical for both strains whereas when using xylose, BP10001 showed enhanced ethanol yield (BP10001 0.30 g/g; BP000 0.23 g/g and decreased yields of xylitol (BP10001 0.26 g/g; BP000 0.36 g/g and glycerol (BP10001 0.023 g/g; BP000 0.072 g/g as compared

  4. Xylose reductase from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Given the potential application of xylose reductase enzymes that preferentially utilize the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) rather than NADPH in the fermentation of five carbon sugars by genetically engineered microorganisms, the coenzyme selectivity of TeXR was altered by site-directed ...

  5. Genome sequence and physiological analysis of Yamadazyma laniorum f.a. sp. nov. and a reevaluation of the apocryphal xylose fermentation of its sister species, Candida tenuis

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    Xylose fermentation is a rare trait that is immensely important to the cellulosic biofuel industry, and Candida tenuis is one of the few yeasts that has been reported with this trait. Here we report the isolation of two strains representing a candidate sister species to C. tenuis. Integrated analysi...

  6. Engineering of a matched pair of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase for xylose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Krahulec, Stefan; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2009-05-01

    Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for xylose fermentation has often relied on insertion of a heterologous pathway consisting of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR) and NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). Low ethanol yield, formation of xylitol and other fermentation by-products are seen for many of the S. cerevisiae strains constructed in this way. This has been ascribed to incomplete coenzyme recycling in the steps catalyzed by XR and XDH. Despite various protein-engineering efforts to alter the coenzyme specificity of XR and XDH individually, a pair of enzymes displaying matched utilization of NAD(H) and NADP(H) was not previously reported. We have introduced multiple site-directed mutations in the coenzyme-binding pocket of Galactocandida mastotermitis XDH to enable activity with NADP(+), which is lacking in the wild-type enzyme. We describe four enzyme variants showing activity for xylitol oxidation by NADP(+) and NAD(+). One of the XDH variants utilized NADP(+) about 4 times more efficiently than NAD(+). This is close to the preference for NADPH compared with NADH in mutants of Candida tenuis XR. Compared to an S. cerevisiae-reference strain expressing the genes for the wild-type enzymes, the strains comprising the gene encoding the mutated XDH in combination a matched XR mutant gene showed up to 50% decreased glycerol yield without increase in ethanol during xylose fermentation.

  7. Characterization of xylose reductase from Candida tropicalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... which is found generally in various fruits and vegetables. Xylitol has been highly valued by the ... In xylose-assimilating yeast and fungi, XR catalyzes the reduction of xylose for xylitol at the first step .... activity of the immobilized XR in aqueous medium with standard method already mentioned. Preparation ...

  8. Altering the coenzyme preference of xylose reductase to favor utilization of NADH enhances ethanol yield from xylose in a metabolically engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Nidetzky Bernd

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for xylose fermentation into fuel ethanol has oftentimes relied on insertion of a heterologous pathway that consists of xylose reductase (XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH and brings about isomerization of xylose into xylulose via xylitol. Incomplete recycling of redox cosubstrates in the catalytic steps of the NADPH-preferring XR and the NAD+-dependent XDH results in formation of xylitol by-product and hence in lowering of the overall yield of ethanol on xylose. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis was previously employed to change the coenzyme preference of Candida tenuis XR about 170-fold from NADPH in the wild-type to NADH in a Lys274→Arg Asn276→Asp double mutant which in spite of the structural modifications introduced had retained the original catalytic efficiency for reduction of xylose by NADH. This work was carried out to assess physiological consequences in xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae resulting from a well defined alteration of XR cosubstrate specificity. Results An isogenic pair of yeast strains was derived from S. cerevisiae Cen.PK 113-7D through chromosomal integration of a three-gene cassette that carried a single copy for C. tenuis XR in wild-type or double mutant form, XDH from Galactocandida mastotermitis, and the endogenous xylulose kinase (XK. Overexpression of each gene was under control of the constitutive TDH3 promoter. Measurement of intracellular levels of XR, XDH, and XK activities confirmed the expected phenotypes. The strain harboring the XR double mutant showed 42% enhanced ethanol yield (0.34 g/g compared to the reference strain harboring wild-type XR during anaerobic bioreactor conversions of xylose (20 g/L. Likewise, the yields of xylitol (0.19 g/g and glycerol (0.02 g/g were decreased 52% and 57% respectively in the XR mutant strain. The xylose uptake rate per gram of cell dry weight was identical (0.07 ± 0.02 h-1 in both strains

  9. Xylose reductase from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    National University of Ireland, Galway, University Road, Galway, Ireland. 2Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre, Limerick Institute Technology, Moylish Park, Limerick, Ireland. *Corresponding authors (Fax, 0035361208208; Email, patrick.murray@lit.ie). Xylose reductase is involved in the first step of the fungal pentose ...

  10. Comparison of the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase and the xylose isomerase pathways for xylose fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two heterologous pathways have been used to construct recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: i the xylose reductase (XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH pathway and ii the xylose isomerase (XI pathway. In the present study, the Pichia stipitis XR-XDH pathway and the Piromyces XI pathway were compared in an isogenic strain background, using a laboratory host strain with genetic modifications known to improve xylose fermentation (overexpressed xylulokinase, overexpressed non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and deletion of the aldose reductase gene GRE3. The two isogenic strains and the industrial xylose-fermenting strain TMB 3400 were studied regarding their xylose fermentation capacity in defined mineral medium and in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Results In defined mineral medium, the xylose consumption rate, the specific ethanol productivity, and the final ethanol concentration were significantly higher in the XR- and XDH-carrying strain, whereas the highest ethanol yield was achieved with the strain carrying XI. While the laboratory strains only fermented a minor fraction of glucose in the undetoxified lignocellulose hydrolysate, the industrial strain TMB 3400 fermented nearly all the sugar available. Xylitol was formed by the XR-XDH-carrying strains only in mineral medium, whereas in lignocellulose hydrolysate no xylitol formation was detected. Conclusion Despite by-product formation, the XR-XDH xylose utilization pathway resulted in faster ethanol production than using the best presently reported XI pathway in the strain background investigated. The need for robust industrial yeast strains for fermentation of undetoxified spruce hydrolysates was also confirmed.

  11. Changing flux of xylose metabolites by altering expression of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Yong-Su Jin; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    We changed the fluxes of xylose metabolites in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae by manipulating expression of Pichia stipitis genes(XYL1 and XYL2) coding for xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively. XYL1 copy number was kept constant by integrating it into the chromosome. Copy numbers of XYL2 were varied either by integrating XYL2 into...

  12. Xylose reductase from Pichia stipitis with altered coenzyme preference improves ethanolic xylose fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylose reductase (XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH from Pichia stipitis are the two enzymes most commonly used in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains engineered for xylose utilization. The availability of NAD+ for XDH is limited during anaerobic xylose fermentation because of the preference of XR for NADPH. This in turn results in xylitol formation and reduced ethanol yield. The coenzyme preference of P. stipitis XR was changed by site-directed mutagenesis with the aim to engineer it towards NADH-preference. Results XR variants were evaluated in S. cerevisiae strains with the following genetic modifications: overexpressed native P. stipitis XDH, overexpressed xylulokinase, overexpressed non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and deleted GRE3 gene encoding an NADPH dependent aldose reductase. All overexpressed genes were chromosomally integrated to ensure stable expression. Crude extracts of four different strains overexpressing genes encoding native P. stipitis XR, K270M and K270R mutants, as well as Candida parapsilosis XR, were enzymatically characterized. The physiological effects of the mutations were investigated in anaerobic xylose fermentation. The strain overexpressing P. stipitis XR with the K270R mutation gave an ethanol yield of 0.39 g (g consumed sugars-1, a xylitol yield of 0.05 g (g consumed xylose-1 and a xylose consumption rate of 0.28 g (g biomass-1 h-1 in continuous fermentation at a dilution rate of 0.12 h-1, with 10 g l-1 glucose and 10 g l-1 xylose as carbon sources. Conclusion The cofactor preference of P. stipitis XR was altered by site-directed mutagenesis. When the K270R XR was combined with a metabolic engineering strategy that ensures high xylose utilization capabilities, a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain was created that provides a unique combination of high xylose consumption rate, high ethanol yield and low xylitol yield during ethanolic xylose fermentation.

  13. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase/xylulokinase ratio affects product formation in recombinant xylose-utilising Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Anna; Hofmeyr, J.H.S.; Pedler, S.

    2001-01-01

    Data simulations based on a kinetic model implied that under simplified simulation conditions a 1:greater than or equal to 10:greater than or equal to4 relation of the xylose reductase (XR)/xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH)/xylulokinase (XK) ratio was optimal in minimising xylitol formation during xylose...... utilisation in yeast. The steady-state level of the intermediary xylitol depended also, to a great extent, on the NADH and NAD(+) concentrations. Anaerobic xylose utilisation was investigated for three different recombinant. XR-, XDH- and XK-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, TMB 3002, TMB 3003...... and TMB 3004, to verify the model predictions. Overexpression of XK was found to be necessary for ethanol formation from xylose. Furthermore, the xylitol formation decreased with decreasing XR/XDH ratio, while the ethanol formation increased. Of the three strains, TMB 3004, which was the strain with a XR/XDH...

  14. Molecular simulation to investigate the cofactor specificity for pichia stipitis Xylose reductase.

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    Xia, Xiao-Le; Cong, Shan; Weng, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Jin-Hua; Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-11-01

    Xylose is one of the most abundant carbohydrates in nature, and widely used to produce bioethanol via fermentation in industry. Xylulose can produce two key enzymes: xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase. Owing to the disparate cofactor specificities of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, intracellular redox imbalance is detected during the xylose fermentation, resulting in low ethanol yields. To overcome this barrier, a common strategy is applied to artificially modify the cofactor specificity of xylose reductase. In this study, we utilized molecular simulation approaches to construct a 3D (three-dimensional) structural model for the NADP-dependent Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (PsXR). Based on the 3D model, the favourable binding modes for both cofactors NAD and NADP were obtained using the flexible docking procedure and molecular dynamics simulation. Structural analysis of the favourable binding modes showed that the cofactor binding site of PsXR was composed of 3 major components: a hydrophilic pocket, a hydrophobic pocket as well as a linker channel between the aforementioned two pockets. The hydrophilic pocket could recognize the nicotinamide moiety of the cofactors by hydrogen bonding networks, while the hydrophobic pocket functioned to position the adenine moiety of the cofactors by hydrophobic and Π-Π stacking interactions. The linker channel contained some key residues for ligand-binding; their mutation could have impact to the specificity of PsXR. Finally, it was found that any of the two single mutations, K21A and K270N, might reverse the cofactor specificity of PsXR from major NADP- to NADdependent, which was further confirmed by the additional experiments. Our findings may provide useful insights into the cofactor specificity of PsXR, stimulating new strategies for better designing xylose reductase and improving ethanol production in industry.

  15. NADPH-dependent D-aldose reductases and xylose fermentation in Fusarium oxysporum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, P.

    2004-01-01

    Two aldose (xylose) reductases (ARI and ARII) from Fusarium oxysporum were purified and characterized. The native ARI was a monomer with M-r 41000, pI 5.2 and showed a 52-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, while ARII was homodimeric with a subunit of M-r 37000, pI 3.6 and a 60-fold preference...... for NADPH over NADH. In this study, the influence of aeration and the response to the addition of electron acceptors on xylose fermentation by F. oxysporum were also studied. The batch cultivation of F. oxysporum on xylose was performed under aerobic, anaerobic and oxygen-limited conditions in stirred tank...

  16. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel xylose reductase from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Jiang, Shao-tong; Zheng, Zhi; Li, Xing-jiang; Luo, Shui-zhong; Wu, Xue-feng

    2015-07-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is valuable as a producer of organic acids via lignocellulose catalysis. R. oryzae metabolizes xylose, which is one component of lignocellulose hydrolysate. In this study, a novel NADPH-dependent xylose reductase gene from R. oryzae AS 3.819 (Roxr) was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. Homology alignment suggested that the 320-residue protein contained domains and active sites belonging to the aldo/keto reductase family. SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the recombinant xylose reductase has a molecular weight of approximately 37 kDa. The optimal catalytic pH and temperature of the purified recombinant protein were 5.8 and 50 °C, respectively. The recombinant protein was stable from pH 4.4 to 6.5 and at temperatures below 42 °C. The recombinant enzyme has bias for D-xylose and L-arabinose as substrates and NADPH as its coenzyme. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR tests suggested that native Roxr expression is regulated by a carbon catabolite repression mechanism. Site-directed mutagenesis at two possible key sites involved in coenzyme binding, Thr(226)  → Glu(226) and Val(274)  → Asn(274), were performed, respectively. The coenzyme specificity constants of the resulted RoXR(T226E) and RoXR(V274N) for NADH increased 18.2-fold and 2.4-fold, which suggested possibility to improve the NADH preference of this enzyme through genetic modification. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Engineering of xylose reductase and overexpression of xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase improves xylose alcoholic fermentation in the thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha

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    Voronovsky Andriy Y

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is capable of alcoholic fermentation of xylose at elevated temperatures (45 – 48°C. Such property of this yeast defines it as a good candidate for the development of an efficient process for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. However, to be economically viable, the main characteristics of xylose fermentation of H. polymorpha have to be improved. Results Site-specific mutagenesis of H. polymorpha XYL1 gene encoding xylose reductase was carried out to decrease affinity of this enzyme toward NADPH. The modified version of XYL1 gene under control of the strong constitutive HpGAP promoter was overexpressed on a Δxyl1 background. This resulted in significant increase in the KM for NADPH in the mutated xylose reductase (K341 → R N343 → D, while KM for NADH remained nearly unchanged. The recombinant H. polymorpha strain overexpressing the mutated enzyme together with native xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase on Δxyl1 background was constructed. Xylose consumption, ethanol and xylitol production by the constructed strain were determined for high-temperature xylose fermentation at 48°C. A significant increase in ethanol productivity (up to 7.3 times was shown in this recombinant strain as compared with the wild type strain. Moreover, the xylitol production by the recombinant strain was reduced considerably to 0.9 mg × (L × h-1 as compared to 4.2 mg × (L × h-1 for the wild type strain. Conclusion Recombinant strains of H. polymorpha engineered for improved xylose utilization are described in the present work. These strains show a significant increase in ethanol productivity with simultaneous reduction in the production of xylitol during high-temperature xylose fermentation.

  18. Altering coenzyme specificity of Pichia stipitis xylose reductase by the semi-rational approach CASTing

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    Zhang Jingqing

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NAD(PH-dependent Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (PsXR is one of the key enzymes for xylose fermentation, and has been cloned into the commonly used ethanol-producing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to eliminate the redox imbalance resulting from the preference of this enzyme toward NADPH, efforts have been made to alter the coenzyme specificity of PsXR by site-directed mutagenesis, with limited success. Given the industrial importance of PsXR, it is of interest to investigate further ways to create mutants of PsXR that prefers NADH rather than NADPH, by the alternative directed evolution approach. Results Based on a homology model of PsXR, six residues were predicted to interact with the adenine ribose of NAD(PH in PsXR and altered using a semi-rational mutagenesis approach (CASTing. Three rounds of saturation mutagenesis were carried to randomize these residues, and a microplate-based assay was applied in the screening. A best mutant 2-2C12, which carried four mutations K270S, N272P, S271G and R276F, was obtained. The mutant showed a preference toward NADH over NADPH by a factor of about 13-fold, or an improvement of about 42-fold, as measured by the ratio of the specificity constant kcat/Kmcoenzyme. Compared with the wild-type, the kcatNADH for the best mutant was only slightly lower, while the kcatNADPH decreased by a factor of about 10. Furthermore, the specific activity of 2-2C12 in the presence of NADH was 20.6 U·mg-1, which is highest among PsXR mutants reported. Conclusion A seemingly simplistic and yet very effective mutagenesis approach, CASTing, was applied successfully to alter the NAD(PH preference for Pichia stipitis xylose reductase, an important enzyme for xylose-fermenting yeast. The observed change in the NAD(PH preference for this enzyme seems to have resulted from the altered active site that is more unfavorable for NADPH than NADH in terms of both Km and kcat. There are potentials for

  19. Point mutation of the xylose reductase (XR) gene reduces xylitol accumulation and increases citric acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyda, István; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Peter S

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius accumulates xylitol when it grows on D-xylose. In fungi, D-xylose is reduced to xylitol by the NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR). Xylitol is then further oxidized by the NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). The cofactor impairment between the XR and XDH can lead to the accumulation of xylitol under oxygen-limiting conditions. Most of the XRs are NADPH dependent and contain a conserved Ile-Pro-Lys-Ser motif. The only known naturally occurring NADH-dependent XR (from Candida parapsilosis) carries an arginine residue instead of the lysine in this motif. In order to overcome xylitol accumulation in A. carbonarius a Lys-274 to Arg point mutation was introduced into the XR with the aim of changing the specificity toward NADH. The effect of the genetic engineering was examined in fermentation for citric acid production and xylitol accumulation by using D-xylose as the sole carbon source. Fermentation with the mutant strain showed a 2.8-fold reduction in xylitol accumulation and 4.5-fold increase in citric acid production compared to the wild-type strain. The fact that the mutant strain shows decreased xylitol levels is assumed to be associated with the capability of the mutated XR to use the NADH generated by the XDH, thus preventing the inhibition of XDH by the high levels of NADH and ensuring the flux of xylose through the pathway. This work shows that enhanced production of citric acid can be achieved using xylose as the sole carbon source by reducing accumulation of other by-products, such as xylitol.

  20. Analysis and prediction of the physiological effects of altered coenzyme specificity in xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase during xylose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahulec, Stefan; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-04-30

    An advanced strategy of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain development for fermentation of xylose applies tailored enzymes in the process of metabolic engineering. The coenzyme specificities of the NADPH-preferring xylose reductase (XR) and the NAD⁺-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) have been targeted in previous studies by protein design or evolution with the aim of improving the recycling of NADH or NADPH in their two-step pathway, converting xylose to xylulose. Yeast strains expressing variant pairs of XR and XDH that according to in vitro kinetic data were suggested to be much better matched in coenzyme usage than the corresponding pair of wild-type enzymes, exhibit widely varying capabilities for xylose fermentation. To achieve coherence between enzyme properties and the observed strain performance during fermentation, we explored the published kinetic parameters for wild-type and engineered forms of XR and XDH as possible predictors of xylitol by-product formation (Y(xylitol)) in yeast physiology. We found that the ratio of enzymatic reaction rates using NADP(H) and NAD(H) that was calculated by applying intracellular reactant concentrations to rate equations derived from bi-substrate kinetic analysis, succeeded in giving a statistically reliable forecast of the trend effect on Y(xylitol). Prediction based solely on catalytic efficiencies with or without binding affinities for NADP(H) and NAD(H) were not dependable, and we define a minimum demand on the enzyme kinetic characterization to be performed for this purpose. An immediate explanation is provided for the typically lower Y(xylitol) in the current strains harboring XR engineered for utilization of NADH as compared to strains harboring XDH engineered for utilization of NADP⁺. The known XDH enzymes all exhibit a relatively high K(m) for NADP⁺ so that physiological boundary conditions are somewhat unfavorable for xylitol oxidation by NADP⁺. A criterion of physiological fitness is developed for

  1. Induction of D-xylose uptake and expression of NAD(P)H-linked xylose reductase and NADP + -linked xylitol dehydrogenase in the oleaginous microalga Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yubin; Yu, Xiaochen; Li, Tingting; Xiong, Xiaochao; Chen, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    The heterotrophic and mixotrophic culture of oleaginous microalgae is a promising process to produce biofuel feedstock due to the advantage of fast growth. Various organic carbons have been explored for this application. However, despite being one of the most abundant and economical sugar resources in nature, D-xylose has never been demonstrated as a carbon source for wild-type microalgae. The purpose of the present work was to identify the feasibility of D-xylose utilization by the oleaginous microalga Chlorella sorokiniana. The sugar uptake kinetic analysis was performed with (14)C-labeled sugars and the data showed that the D-glucose induced algal cells (the alga was heterotrophically grown on D-glucose and then harvested as D-glucose induced cells) exhibited a remarkably increased D-xylose uptake rate. The maximum D-xylose transport rate was 3.8 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) dry cell weight (DCW) with K m value of 6.8 mM. D-xylose uptake was suppressed in the presence of D-glucose, D-galactose and D-fructose but not L-arabinose and D-ribose. The uptake of D-xylose activated the related metabolic pathway, and the activities of a NAD(P)H-linked xylose reductase (XR) and a unique NADP(+)-linked xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) were detected in C. sorokiniana. Compared with the culture in the dark, the consumption of D-xylose increased 2 fold under light but decreased to the same level with addition of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), indicating that extra chemical energy from the light-dependent reaction contributed the catabolism of D-xylose for C. sorokiniana. An inducible D-xylose transportation system and a related metabolic pathway were discovered for microalga for the first time. The transportation of D-xylose across the cell membrane of C. sorokiniana could be realized by an inducible hexose symporter. The uptake of D-xylose subsequently activated the expression of key catalytic enzymes that enabled D-xylose entering central metabolism. Results of this

  2. NADH-linked aldose reductase : The key to anaerobic alcoholic fermentation of xylose by yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinenberg, P.M.; De Bot, P.H.M.; Van Dijken, J.P.; Scheffers, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics and enzymology of o-xylose utilization were studied in aerobic and anaerobic batch cultures of the facultatively fermentative yeasts Candida utilis, Pachysolen tannophilus, and Pichia stipitis. These yeasts did not produce ethanol under aerobic conditions. When shifted to anaerobiosis

  3. Anaerobic poly-3-D-hydroxybutyrate production from xylose in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a NADH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Las Heras, Alejandro Muñoz; Portugal-Nunes, Diogo J; Rizza, Nathasha; Sandström, Anders G; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2016-11-18

    Poly-3-D-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) that is a promising precursor for bioplastic with similar physical properties as polypropylene, is naturally produced by several bacterial species. The bacterial pathway is comprised of the three enzymes β-ketothiolase, acetoacetyl-CoA reductase (AAR) and PHB synthase, which all together convert acetyl-CoA into PHB. Heterologous expression of the pathway genes from Cupriavidus necator has enabled PHB production in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae from glucose as well as from xylose, after introduction of the fungal xylose utilization pathway from Scheffersomyces stipitis including xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). However PHB titers are still low. In this study the acetoacetyl-CoA reductase gene from C. necator (CnAAR), a NADPH-dependent enzyme, was replaced by the NADH-dependent AAR gene from Allochromatium vinosum (AvAAR) in recombinant xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae and PHB production was compared. A. vinosum AAR was found to be active in S. cerevisiae and able to use both NADH and NADPH as cofactors. This resulted in improved PHB titers in S. cerevisiae when xylose was used as sole carbon source (5-fold in aerobic conditions and 8.4-fold under oxygen limited conditions) and PHB yields (4-fold in aerobic conditions and up to 5.6-fold under oxygen limited conditions). Moreover, the best strain was able to accumulate up to 14% of PHB per cell dry weight under fully anaerobic conditions. This study reports a novel approach for boosting PHB accumulation in S. cerevisiae by replacement of the commonly used AAR from C. necator with the NADH-dependent alternative from A. vinosum. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, it is the first demonstration of anaerobic PHB synthesis from xylose.

  4. Enhanced production of xylitol from xylose by expression of Bacillus subtilis arabinose:H+ symporter and Scheffersomyces stipitis xylose reductase in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoju; Lee, Hyun-Soo; Park, Haeseong; Lee, Dae-Hee; Boles, Eckhard; Chung, Donghwa; Park, Yong-Cheol

    2017-12-01

    Inefficient transport of xylose into Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a major hurdle for production of xylitol, a natural sweetener with five carbons. To facilitate the xylose transport and hence increase xylose conversion to xylitol, the araE gene encoding an arabinose:H+ symporter (AraE) from Bacillus subtilis and the XYL1 gene from Scheffersomyces stipitis were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY.VW4000, a hxt null mutant. The resulting strain of EXHA exhibited 4.1 fold increases in xylose consumption rate and xylitol productivity, relative to the control strain without AraE. Also, overexpression of AraE in wild type S. cerevisiae D452-2 having all hexose transporters and the XYL1 gene increased both xylose consumption and xylitol production considerably. In a glucose-limited fed-batch culture with intermittent addition of xylose, the DXXA strain with multiple copies of araE and XYL1 produced 177.8g/L xylitol with 2.47g/L-h productivity, which were 26.9 and 17.6 times higher than those for a batch culture of the DX strain expressing the XYL1 gene only, respectively. It was concluded that B. subtilis AraE might be a potent xylose transporter and conferred much higher xylose-consuming and xylitol-producing abilities to S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Obtaining partial purified xylose reductase from Candida guilliermondii Obtenção de xilose redutase de Candida guilliermondii parcialmente purificada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Junko Tomotani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic bioconversion of xylose into xylitol by xylose reductase (XR is an alternative for chemical and microbiological processes. The partial purified XR was obtained by using the following three procedures: an agarose column, a membrane reactor or an Amicon Ultra-15 50K Centrifugal Filter device at yields of 40%, 7% and 67%, respectively.A bioconversão enzimática da xilose em xilitol pela xilose redutase (XR é uma alternativa para as vias química e microbiológica. Avaliouse a purificação parcial da XR, utilizando os três seguintes procedimentos: uma coluna de agarose, um reator com membrana ou tubos de ultracentrifugação Amicon Ultra-15 50K, com rendimento de 40%, 7% ou 67%, respectivamente.

  6. Xylose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koetter, P.; Ciriacy, M. (Institut fuer Mikrobiologie, Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    We have performed a comparative study of xylose utilization in Saccaromyces cerevisiae transformants expressing two key enzymes in xylose metabolism, xylose reductase (XR) and xylithol dehydrogenase (XDH), and in a prototypic xylose-utilizing yeast, Pichia stipitis. In the absence of respiration (see text), baker's yeast cells convert half of the xylose to xylitol and ethanol, whereas P. stipitis cells display rather a homofermentative conversion of xylose to ethanol. Xylitol production by baker's yeast is interpreted as a result of the dual cofactor dependence of the XR and the generation of NADPH by the pentose phosphate pathway. Further limitations of xylose utilization in S. cerevisiae cells are very likely caused by an insufficient capacity of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, as indicated by accumulation of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate and the absence of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and pyruvate accumulation. By contrast, uptake at high substrate concentrations probably does not limit xylose conversion in S. cerevisiae XYL1/XYL2 transformants. (orig.).

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for xylose metabolism exhibits a respiratory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Su Jin; Jose M. Laplaza; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2004-01-01

    Native strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae do not assimilate xylose. S. cerevisiae engineered for D-xylose utilization through the heterologous expression of genes for aldose reductase ( XYL1), xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2), and D-xylulokinase ( XYL3 or XKS1) produce only limited amounts of ethanol in xylose medium. In recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing XYL1, XYL2,...

  8. Transposon mutagenesis to improve the growth of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae on D-xylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiying Ni; Jose M. Laplaza; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2007-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae L2612 transformed with genes for xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL1 and XYL2) grows well on glucose but very poorly on D-xylose. When a gene for D-xylulokinase (XYL3 or XKS1) is overexpressed, growth on glucose is unaffected, but growth on xylose is blocked. Spontaneous or chemically induced mutants of this engineered yeast that...

  9. Carrageenan and agaran structures from the red seaweed Gymnogongrus tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Recalde, Mercedes; Canelón, Dilsia J; Compagnone, Reinaldo S; Matulewicz, María C; Cerezo, Alberto S; Ciancia, Marina

    2016-01-20

    The galactan system biosynthesized by the red seaweed Gymnogongrus tenuis (Phyllophoraceae) is constituted by major amounts of κ/ι-carrageenans, with predominance of ι-structures, which were isolated by extraction with hot water in high yield (∼ 45%). A small amount of non-cyclized carrageenans mostly of the ν-type was also obtained. Besides, 12% of these galactans are agaran structures, which were present in major quantities in the room temperature water extracts, but they were also found in the hot water extract. They are constituted by 3-linked β-D-galactose units partially substituted on C-6 with sulfate or single stubs of β-D-xylose and 4-linked residues that comprise α-L-galactose units partially sulfated or methoxylated on C-3 or sulfated on C-3 and C-6 and 3,6-anhydro-α-L-galactose. Related structural patterns were previously found for agarans synthesized by other carrageenophytes. Results presented here show that these agarans are low molecular weight molecules independent of the carrageenan structures, with strong interactions between them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. D-xylose absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  11. Xylose utilizing recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walfridsson, M.

    1996-04-01

    Through metabolic engineering, S. cerevisiae was provided with the necessary enzymes required for xylose utilisation during ethanolic fermentation of xylose-rich lignocellulose raw materials. For xylitol production, S. cerevisiae was provided with the Pichia stipitis XYL1 gene encoding xylose reductase (XR). The in-vivo reduction and the following excretion of xylitol, requires a co-substrate for maintenance and cofactor regeneration. Xylitol yields close to 100% were obtained with the XYL1 containing S. cerevisiae. Introducing P. stipitis XYL1 and XYL2 genes, encoding XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively, enabled S. cerevisiae to convert xylose to xylulose, via xylitol. During the screening work of P. stipitis XDH gene, another gene encoding a polyol dehydrogenase was isolated and cloned in S. cerevisiae. The gene was identified as a D-arabinitol dehydrogenase gene. In P. stipitis it may function as a redox sink by reducing D-ribulose to D-arabinitol. The metabolism through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) was enhanced by over-expressing the native genes TKL1 and TAL1 encoding transketolase and transaldolase, respectively, resulting in improved xylose utilisation. The XR and XDH activities in recombinant S. cerevisiae were produced at different levels by constructing yeast vectors in which the PGK1 and ADHI promoters controlled XYL1 and XYL2. With higher XDH than XR activities, less by-products, in the form of xylitol and glycerol, were formed by the recombinant S. cerevisiae strains. The Thermus thermophilus xylA gene encoding a thermostable xylose isomerase was cloned and expressed in S. cerevisiae. The recombinant xylose isomerase was actively produced and a new functional metabolic pathway was established in S. cerevisiae resulting in ethanol production from xylose. 150 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for xylose metabolism requires gluconeogenesis and the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway for aerobic xylose assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces strains engineered to ferment xylose using Scheffersomyces stipitis xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes appear to be limited by metabolic imbalances due to differing cofactor specificities of XR and XDH. The S. stipitis XR, which uses nicotinamide adenine dinucl...

  13. Evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient aerobic xylose consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Otero, José Manuel; Van Vleet, Jennifer R. H.

    2012-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology aims to develop robust microbial cell factories, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to produce an array of added value chemicals presently dominated by petrochemical processes. Xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose and the most prevalent pentose...... flux to biomass production. Such a platform may then be enhanced with complementary metabolic engineering strategies that couple biomass production with high value-added chemical. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulose kinase, from the native xylose......-metabolizing yeast Pichia stipitis, was constructed, followed by a directed evolution strategy to improve xylose utilization rates. The resulting S. cerevisiae strain was capable of rapid growth and fast xylose consumption producing only biomass and negligible amount of byproducts. Transcriptional profiling...

  14. Comparative xylose metabolism among the Ascomycetes C. albicans, S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcus, Doreen; Dignard, Daniel; Lépine, Guylaine; Askew, Chris; Raymond, Martine; Whiteway, Malcolm; Wu, Cunle

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycetes Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Scheffersomyces stipitis metabolize the pentose sugar xylose very differently. S. cerevisiae fails to grow on xylose, while C. albicans can grow, and S. stipitis can both grow and ferment xylose to ethanol. However, all three species contain highly similar genes that encode potential xylose reductases and xylitol dehydrogenases required to convert xylose to xylulose, and xylulose supports the growth of all three fungi. We have created C. albicans strains deleted for the xylose reductase gene GRE3, the xylitol dehydrogenase gene XYL2, as well as the gre3 xyl2 double mutant. As expected, all the mutant strains cannot grow on xylose, while the single gre3 mutant can grow on xylitol. The gre3 and xyl2 mutants are efficiently complemented by the XYL1 and XYL2 from S. stipitis. Intriguingly, the S. cerevisiae GRE3 gene can complement the Cagre3 mutant, while the ScSOR1 gene can complement the Caxyl2 mutant, showing that S. cerevisiae contains the enzymatic capacity for converting xylose to xylulose. In addition, the gre3 xyl2 double mutant of C. albicans is effectively rescued by the xylose isomerase (XI) gene of either Piromyces or Orpinomyces, suggesting that the XI provides an alternative to the missing oxido-reductase functions in the mutant required for the xylose-xylulose conversion. Overall this work suggests that C. albicans strains engineered to lack essential steps for xylose metabolism can provide a platform for the analysis of xylose metabolism enzymes from a variety of species, and confirms that S. cerevisiae has the genetic potential to convert xylose to xylulose, although non-engineered strains cannot proliferate on xylose as the sole carbon source.

  15. Xylose fermentation efficiency and inhibitor tolerance of the recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NAPX37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Cheng; Mitsumasu, Kanako; Gou, Zi-Xi; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Akamatsu, Takashi; Taguchi, Hisataka; Kida, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Industrial yeast strains with good xylose fermentation ability and inhibitor tolerance are important for economical lignocellulosic bioethanol production. The flocculating industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NAPX37, harboring the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase (XR-XDH)-based xylose metabolic pathway, displayed efficient xylose fermentation during batch and continuous fermentation. During batch fermentation, the xylose consumption rates at the first 36 h were similar (1.37 g/L/h) when the initial xylose concentrations were 50 and 75 g/L, indicating that xylose fermentation was not inhibited even when the xylose concentration was as high as 75 g/L. The presence of glucose, at concentrations of up to 25 g/L, did not affect xylose consumption rate at the first 36 h. Strain NAPX37 showed stable xylose fermentation capacity during continuous ethanol fermentation using xylose as the sole sugar, for almost 1 year. Fermentation remained stable at a dilution rate of 0.05/h, even though the xylose concentration in the feed was as high as 100 g/L. Aeration rate, xylose concentration, and MgSO4 concentration were found to affect xylose consumption and ethanol yield. When the xylose concentration in the feed was 75 g/L, a high xylose consumption rate of 6.62 g/L/h and an ethanol yield of 0.394 were achieved under an aeration rate of 0.1 vvm, dilution rate of 0.1/h, and 5 mM MgSO4. In addition, strain NAPX37 exhibited good tolerance to inhibitors such as weak acids, furans, and phenolics during xylose fermentation. These findings indicate that strain NAPX37 is a promising candidate for application in the industrial production of lignocellulosic bioethanol.

  16. Comparative genomics of xylose-fermenting fungi for enhanced biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Kuo, Alan; Sato, Trey K.; Potts, Katlyn M.; Salamov, Asaf A.; LaButti, Kurt M.; Sun, Hui; Clum, Alicia; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Jin, Mingjie; Gunawan, Christa; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E.; Jeffries, Thomas W.; Zinkel, Robert; Barry, Kerrie W.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2011-02-24

    Cellulosic biomass is an abundant and underused substrate for biofuel production. The inability of many microbes to metabolize the pentose sugars abundant within hemicellulose creates specific challenges for microbial biofuel production from cellulosic material. Although engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can use the pentose xylose, the fermentative capacity pales in comparison with glucose, limiting the economic feasibility of industrial fermentations. To better understand xylose utilization for subsequent microbial engineering, we sequenced the genomes of two xylose-fermenting, beetle-associated fungi, Spathaspora passalidarum and Candida tenuis. To identify genes involved in xylose metabolism, we applied a comparative genomic approach across 14 Ascomycete genomes, mapping phenotypes and genotypes onto the fungal phylogeny, and measured genomic expression across five Hemiascomycete species with different xylose-consumption phenotypes. This approach implicated many genes and processes involved in xylose assimilation. Several of these genes significantly improved xylose utilization when engineered into S. cerevisiae, demonstrating the power of comparative methods in rapidly identifying genes for biomass conversion while reflecting on fungal ecology.

  17. Ethanol production by recombinant and natural xylose-utilising yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, Anna

    2000-07-01

    The xylose-fermenting capacity of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis, which encode xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively, is poor due to high xylitol formation. Whereas, P. stipitis exhibits high ethanol yield on xylose, the tolerance towards inhibitors in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate is low. A recombinant strain possessing the advantageous characteristics of both S. cerevisiae and P. stipitis would constitute a biocatalyst capable of efficient ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysate. In the work presented in this thesis, factors influencing xylose fermentation in recombinant S. cerevisiae and in the natural xylose-fermenting yeast P. stipitis have been identified and investigated. Anaerobic xylulose fermentation was compared in strains of Zygosaccharomyces and S. cerevisiae, mutants and wild-type strains to identify host strain background and genetic modifications beneficial for xylose fermentation. The greatest positive effect was found for over-expression of the gene XKS1 for the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) enzyme xylulokinase (XK), which increased the ethanol yield by almost 85%. The Zygosaccharomyces strains tested formed large amounts of polyols, making them unsuitable as host strains. The XR/XDH/XK ratio was found to determine whether carbon accumulated in a xylitol pool or was further utilised for ethanol production in recombinant xylose-utilising S. cerevisiae. Simulations, based on a kinetic model, and anaerobic xylose cultivation experiments implied that a 1:{>=}10:{>=}4 relation was optimal in minimising xylitol formation. Ethanol formation increased with decreasing XR/XDH ratio, whereas xylitol formation decreased and XK overexpression was necessary for adequate ethanol formation. Based on the knowledge of optimal enzyme ratios, a stable, xylose-utilising strain, S. cerevisiae TMB 3001, was constructed by chromosomal integration of the XYL1 and XYL2 genes

  18. Impact of overexpressing NADH kinase on glucose and xylose metabolism in recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Vemuri, G. N.; Bao, X. M.

    2009-01-01

    During growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose, the redox cofactors NADH and NADPH are predominantly involved in catabolism and biosynthesis, respectively. A deviation from the optimal level of these cofactors often results in major changes in the substrate uptake and biomass formation....... However, the metabolism of xylose by recombinant S. cerevisiae carrying xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from the fungal pathway requires both NADH and NADPH and creates cofactor imbalance during growth on xylose. As one possible solution to overcoming this imbalance, the effect...... of overexpressing the native NADH kinase (encoded by the POS5 gene) in xylose-consuming recombinant S. cerevisiae directed either into the cytosol or to the mitochondria was evaluated. The physiology of the NADH kinase containing strains was also evaluated during growth on glucose. Overexpressing NADH kinase...

  19. Xylose fermentation to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  20. Minimal metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient anaerobic xylose fermentation: a proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyper, Marko; Winkler, Aaron A; van Dijken, Johannes P; Pronk, Jack T

    2004-03-01

    When xylose metabolism in yeasts proceeds exclusively via NADPH-specific xylose reductase and NAD-specific xylitol dehydrogenase, anaerobic conversion of the pentose to ethanol is intrinsically impossible. When xylose reductase has a dual specificity for both NADPH and NADH, anaerobic alcoholic fermentation is feasible but requires the formation of large amounts of polyols (e.g., xylitol) to maintain a closed redox balance. As a result, the ethanol yield on xylose will be sub-optimal. This paper demonstrates that anaerobic conversion of xylose to ethanol, without substantial by-product formation, is possible in Saccharomyces cerevisiae when a heterologous xylose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.5) is functionally expressed. Transformants expressing the XylA gene from the anaerobic fungus Piromyces sp. E2 (ATCC 76762) grew in synthetic medium in shake-flask cultures on xylose with a specific growth rate of 0.005 h(-1). After prolonged cultivation on xylose, a mutant strain was obtained that grew aerobically and anaerobically on xylose, at specific growth rates of 0.18 and 0.03 h(-1), respectively. The anaerobic ethanol yield was 0.42 g ethanol x g xylose(-1) and also by-product formation was comparable to that of glucose-grown anaerobic cultures. These results illustrate that only minimal genetic engineering is required to recruit a functional xylose metabolic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activities and/or regulatory properties of native S. cerevisiae gene products can subsequently be optimised via evolutionary engineering. These results provide a gateway towards commercially viable ethanol production from xylose with S. cerevisiae.

  1. Chronic environmental exposure to Alternaria tenuis may manifest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... non-brain damaged functioning was observed. These findings seem to indicate that chronic exposures to Alternaria tenuis, Pullularia pullulans, and Epicoccum nigrum might have neuropsychological effects, and that most likely, only one abnormal antibody to toxigenic mold antigen could have the most dominant adverse ...

  2. Cross-reactions between engineered xylose and galactose pathways in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Sanchez Rosa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overexpression of the PGM2 gene encoding phosphoglucomutase (Pgm2p has been shown to improve galactose utilization both under aerobic and under anaerobic conditions. Similarly, xylose utilization has been improved by overexpression of genes encoding xylulokinase (XK, enzymes from the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (non-ox PPP and deletion of the endogenous aldose reductase GRE3 gene in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying either fungal or bacterial xylose pathways. In the present study, we investigated how the combination of these traits affect xylose and galactose utilization in the presence or absence of glucose in S. cerevisiae strains engineered with the xylose reductase (XR-xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH pathway. Results In the absence of PGM2 overexpression, the combined overexpression of XK, the non-ox PPP and deletion of the GRE3 gene significantly delayed aerobic growth on galactose, whereas no difference was observed between the control strain and the xylose-engineered strain when the PGM2 gene was overexpressed. Under anaerobic conditions, the overexpression of the PGM2 gene increased the ethanol yield and the xylose consumption rate in medium containing xylose as the only carbon source. The possibility of Pgm2p acting as a xylose isomerase (XI could be excluded by measuring the XI activity in both strains. The additional copy of the PGM2 gene also resulted in a shorter fermentation time during the co-consumption of galactose and xylose. However, the effect was lost upon addition of glucose to the growth medium. Conclusions PGM2 overexpression was shown to benefit xylose and galactose fermentation, alone and in combination. In contrast, galactose fermentation was impaired in the engineered xylose-utilizing strain harbouring extra copies of the non-ox PPP genes and a deletion of the GRE3 gene, unless PGM2 was overexpressed. These cross-reactions are of particular relevance for the fermentation

  3. Sources of pheromones in the lizard Liolaemus tenuis Fuentes de feromonas en el lagarto Liolaemus tenuis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonieta Labra

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tests were conducted with the lizard Liolaemus tenuis (Tropiduridae, to determine the potential sources of pheromones used in its chemical communication, centered in the phenomenon of self-recognition. During the post-reproductive season, feces of both sexes and secretions of precloacal pores (present only in males were tested. Stimuli were presented to lizards spread on rocks, and the number of tongue-flicks (TF to the rocks was used as a bioassay to determine pheromone recognition. Feces contained pheromones involved in self-recognition, since lizards showed less TF confronted to rocks with suspensions of their own feces than with suspensions of feces of conspecifics or with water (control. In order to assess the chemical nature of self-recognition pheromones, feces were submitted to a sequential extraction with three solvents of increasing polarity, thereby obtaining three feces fractions. There were no differences in TF towards rocks with different fractions with own feces. Additionally, lizards showed similar TF to rocks with fractions of own and conspecific feces, suggesting that the separation procedure broke up a complex stimulus into parts that were not active individually as pheromones. Finally, males did not discriminate between precloacal secretions from themselves and from another male. It is possible that these secretions convey information relevant to or detectable by females onlySe realizaron pruebas experimentales con la especie Liolaemus tenuis (Tropiduridae, para determinar las potenciales fuentes de feromonas usadas en su comunicación química. El estudio se centró en el fenómeno de auto-reconocimiento. Durante la estación post-reproductiva, las fecas de ambos sexos y las secreciones precloacales (presentes sólo en machos fueron probadas. Los estímulos fueron presentados a los lagartos esparcidos sobre rocas, y el número de lamidos (TF a la roca fue utilizado como un bioensayo para determinar

  4. Engineering Saccharomyces pastorianus for the co-utilisation of xylose and cellulose from biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kricka, William; James, Tharappel C; Fitzpatrick, James; Bond, Ursula

    2015-04-28

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a viable source of renewable energy for bioethanol production. For the efficient conversion of biomass into bioethanol, it is essential that sugars from both the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of lignocellulose be utilised. We describe the development of a recombinant yeast system for the fermentation of cellulose and xylose, the most abundant pentose sugar in the hemicellulose fraction of biomass. The brewer's yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus was chosen as a host as significantly higher recombinant enzyme activities are achieved, when compared to the more commonly used S. cerevisiae. When expressed in S. pastorianus, the Trichoderma reesei xylose oxidoreductase pathway was more efficient at alcohol production from xylose than the xylose isomerase pathway. The alcohol yield was influenced by the concentration of xylose in the medium and was significantly improved by the additional expression of a gene encoding for xylulose kinase. The xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulose kinase genes were co-expressed with genes encoding for the three classes of T. reesei cellulases, namely endoglucanase (EG2), cellobiohydrolysase (CBH2) and β-glucosidase (BGL1). The initial metabolism of xylose by the engineered strains facilitated production of cellulases at fermentation temperatures. The sequential metabolism of xylose and cellulose generated an alcohol yield of 82% from the available sugars. Several different types of biomass, such as the energy crop Miscanthus sinensis and the industrial waste, brewer's spent grains, were examined as biomass sources for fermentation using the developed yeast strains. Xylose metabolism and cell growth were inhibited in fermentations carried out with acid-treated spent grain liquor, resulting in a 30% reduction in alcohol yield compared to fermentations carried out with mixed sugar substrates. Reconstitution of complete enzymatic pathways for cellulose hydrolysis and xylose utilisation in S

  5. Co-utilization of L-arabinose and D-xylose by laboratory and industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boles Eckhard

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive alternative for the production of bioethanol. Traditionally, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used in industrial ethanol fermentations. However, S. cerevisiae is naturally not able to ferment the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose, which are present in high amounts in lignocellulosic raw materials. Results We describe the engineering of laboratory and industrial S. cerevisiae strains to co-ferment the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose. Introduction of a fungal xylose and a bacterial arabinose pathway resulted in strains able to grow on both pentose sugars. Introduction of a xylose pathway into an arabinose-fermenting laboratory strain resulted in nearly complete conversion of arabinose into arabitol due to the L-arabinose reductase activity of the xylose reductase. The industrial strain displayed lower arabitol yield and increased ethanol yield from xylose and arabinose. Conclusion Our work demonstrates simultaneous co-utilization of xylose and arabinose in recombinant strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the co-utilization of arabinose together with xylose significantly reduced formation of the by-product xylitol, which contributed to improved ethanol production.

  6. Genetic analysis of D-xylose metabolism by endophytic yeast strains of Rhodotorula graminis and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ping; Bura, Renata; Doty, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Two novel endophytic yeast strains, WP1 and PTD3, isolated from within the stems of poplar (Populus) trees, were genetically characterized with respect to their xylose metabolism genes. These two strains, belonging to the species Rhodotorula graminis and R. mucilaginosa, respectively, utilize both hexose and pentose sugars, including the common plant pentose sugar, D-xylose. The xylose reductase (XYL1) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2) genes were cloned and characterized. The derived amino acid sequences of xylose reductase (XR) and xylose dehydrogenase (XDH) were 32%∼41% homologous to those of Pichia stipitis and Candida. spp., two species known to utilize xylose. The derived XR and XDH sequences of WP1 and PTD3 had higher homology (73% and 69% identity) with each other. WP1 and PTD3 were grown in single sugar and mixed sugar media to analyze the XYL1 and XYL2 gene regulation mechanisms. Our results revealed that for both strains, the gene expression is induced by D-xylose, and that in PTD3 the expression was not repressed by glucose in the presence of xylose. PMID:21931522

  7. Genetic analysis of D-xylose metabolism by endophytic yeast strains of Rhodotorula graminis and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two novel endophytic yeast strains, WP1 and PTD3, isolated from within the stems of poplar (Populus trees, were genetically characterized with respect to their xylose metabolism genes. These two strains, belonging to the species Rhodotorula graminis and R. mucilaginosa, respectively, utilize both hexose and pentose sugars, including the common plant pentose sugar, D-xylose. The xylose reductase (XYL1 and xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2 genes were cloned and characterized. The derived amino acid sequences of xylose reductase (XR and xylose dehydrogenase (XDH were 32%~41% homologous to those of Pichia stipitis and Candida. spp., two species known to utilize xylose. The derived XR and XDH sequences of WP1 and PTD3 had higher homology (73% and 69% identity with each other. WP1 and PTD3 were grown in single sugar and mixed sugar media to analyze the XYL1 and XYL2 gene regulation mechanisms. Our results revealed that for both strains, the gene expression is induced by D-xylose, and that in PTD3 the expression was not repressed by glucose in the presence of xylose.

  8. Occurrence of Hydroclathrus tenuis Tseng and Baoren, (Phaeophyta) from Gulf of Kutch, northwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jagtap, T.G.; Untawale, A.G.

    Hydroclathrus tenuis (C. Agardh), a marine brown alga was considered to be a monotypic, till H. tenuis Tseng and Baoren was reported during 1983 from south China Sea. Recently the same alga was noticed to be abundant from Kalubhar Island in the Gulf...

  9. Increased expression of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis in anaerobically growing xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermentation of xylose to ethanol has been achieved in S. cerevisiae by genetic engineering. Xylose utilization is however slow compared to glucose, and during anaerobic conditions addition of glucose has been necessary for cellular growth. In the current study, the xylose-utilizing strain TMB 3415 was employed to investigate differences between anaerobic utilization of glucose and xylose. This strain carried a xylose reductase (XYL1 K270R engineered for increased NADH utilization and was capable of sustained anaerobic growth on xylose as sole carbon source. Metabolic and transcriptional characterization could thus for the first time be performed without addition of a co-substrate or oxygen. Results Analysis of metabolic fluxes showed that although the specific ethanol productivity was an order of magnitude lower on xylose than on glucose, product yields were similar for the two substrates. In addition, transcription analysis identified clear regulatory differences between glucose and xylose. Respiro-fermentative metabolism on glucose during aerobic conditions caused repression of cellular respiration, while metabolism on xylose under the same conditions was fully respiratory. During anaerobic conditions, xylose repressed respiratory pathways, although notably more weakly than glucose. It was also observed that anaerobic xylose growth caused up-regulation of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis, which may be driven by an increased demand for NADPH during anaerobic xylose catabolism. Conclusion Co-factor imbalance in the initial twp steps of xylose utilization may reduce ethanol productivity by increasing the need for NADP+ reduction and consequently increase reverse flux in glycolysis.

  10. Enhanced xylose fermentation by engineered yeast expressing NADH oxidase through high cell density inoculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Chang; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2017-03-01

    Accumulation of reduced byproducts such as glycerol and xylitol during xylose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae hampers the economic production of biofuels and chemicals from cellulosic hydrolysates. In particular, engineered S. cerevisiae expressing NADPH-linked xylose reductase (XR) and NAD + -linked xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) produces substantial amounts of the reduced byproducts under anaerobic conditions due to the cofactor difference of XR and XDH. While the additional expression of a water-forming NADH oxidase (NoxE) from Lactococcus lactis in engineered S. cerevisiae with the XR/XDH pathway led to reduced glycerol and xylitol production and increased ethanol yields from xylose, volumetric ethanol productivities by the engineered yeast decreased because of growth defects from the overexpression of noxE. In this study, we introduced noxE into an engineered yeast strain (SR8) exhibiting near-optimal xylose fermentation capacity. To overcome the growth defect caused by the overexpression of noxE, we used a high cell density inoculum for xylose fermentation by the SR8 expressing noxE. The resulting strain, SR8N, not only showed a higher ethanol yield and lower byproduct yields, but also exhibited a high ethanol productivity during xylose fermentation. As noxE overexpression elicits a negligible growth defect on glucose conditions, the beneficial effects of noxE overexpression were substantial when a mixture of glucose and xylose was used. Consumption of glucose led to rapid cell growth and therefore enhanced the subsequent xylose fermentation. As a result, the SR8N strain produced more ethanol and fewer byproducts from a mixture of glucose and xylose than the parental SR8 strain without noxE overexpression. Our results suggest that the growth defects from noxE overexpression can be overcome in the case of fermenting lignocellulose-derived sugars such as glucose and xylose.

  11. L-lactic acid production from D-xylose with Candida sonorensis expressing a heterologous lactate dehydrogenase encoding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuranta, Kari T; Ilmén, Marja; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Ruohonen, Laura; Suominen, Pirkko; Penttilä, Merja

    2014-08-08

    Bioplastics, like polylactic acid (PLA), are renewable alternatives for petroleum-based plastics. Lactic acid, the monomer of PLA, has traditionally been produced biotechnologically with bacteria. With genetic engineering, yeast have the potential to replace bacteria in biotechnological lactic acid production, with the benefits of being acid tolerant and having simple nutritional requirements. Lactate dehydrogenase genes have been introduced to various yeast to demonstrate this potential. Importantly, an industrial lactic acid producing process utilising yeast has already been implemented. Utilisation of D-xylose in addition to D-glucose in production of biochemicals such as lactic acid by microbial fermentation would be beneficial, as it would allow lignocellulosic raw materials to be utilised in the production processes. The yeast Candida sonorensis, which naturally metabolises D-xylose, was genetically modified to produce L-lactic acid from D-xylose by integrating the gene encoding L-lactic acid dehydrogenase (ldhL) from Lactobacillus helveticus into its genome. In microaerobic, CaCO3-buffered conditions a C. sonorensis ldhL transformant having two copies of the ldhL gene produced 31 g l-1 lactic acid from 50 g l-1 D-xylose free of ethanol.Anaerobic production of lactic acid from D-xylose was assessed after introducing an alternative pathway of D-xylose metabolism, i.e. by adding a xylose isomerase encoded by XYLA from Piromyces sp. alone or together with the xylulokinase encoding gene XKS1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains were further modified by deletion of the endogenous xylose reductase encoding gene, alone or together with the xylitol dehydrogenase encoding gene. Strains of C. sonorensis expressing xylose isomerase produced L-lactic acid from D-xylose in anaerobic conditions. The highest anaerobic L-lactic acid production (8.5 g l-1) was observed in strains in which both the xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoding genes had been

  12. Impact of xylose and mannose on central metabolism of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.P.

    2005-07-01

    In this study, understanding of the central metabolism was improved by quantification of metabolite concentrations, enzyme activities, protein abundances, and gene transcript concentrations. Intracellular fluxes were estimated by applying stoichiometric models of metabolism. The methods were applied in the study of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in two separate projects. A xylose project aimed at improved utilization of D- xylose as a substrate for, e.g., producing biomaterial- based fuel ethanol. A mannose project studied the production of GDP-mannose from D-mannose in a strain lacking the gene for phosphomannose isomerase (PMI40 deletion). Hexose, D-glucose is the only sugar more abundant than pentose D-xylose. D-xylose is common in hardwoods (e.g. birch) and crop residues (ca. 25% of dry weight). However, S. cerevisiae is unable to utilize D- xylose without a recombinant pathway where D-xylose is converted to Dxylulose. In this study D-xylose was converted in two steps via xylitol: by D-xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoded by XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis, respectively. Additionally, endogenous xylulokinase (XKS1) was overexpressed in order to increase the consumption of D-xylose by enhancing the phosphorylation of D-xylulose. Despite of the functional recombinant pathway the utilization rates of D xylose still remained low. This study proposes a set of limitations that are responsible for the low utilization rates of D-xylose under microaerobic conditions. Cells compensated for the cofactor imbalance, caused by the conversion of D-xylose to D- xylulose, by increasing the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and by shuttling NADH redox potential to mitochondrion to be oxidized in oxidative phosphorylation. However, mitochondrial NADH inhibits citrate synthase in citric acid cycle, and consequently lower flux through citric acid cycle limits oxidative phosphorylation. Further, limitations in the uptake of D- xylose, in the

  13. Inhibition of spore germination of Alternaria tenuis by sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couey, H.M.

    1962-08-01

    As a part of a continuing study of SO/sub 2/ fumigation of table grapes, the effect of SO/sub 2/ on spores of an isolate of A. tenuis Auct. causing decay of table grapes was determined. The amount of SO/sub 2/ required to inhibit completely spore germination depended on availability of moisture and the temperature. At 20/sup 0/C, wet spores required 20-min exposure to 100 ppm SO/sub 2/ to prevent germination, but spores equilibrated at 90% relative humidity (RH) required 10-min exposure to 1000 ppm SO/sub 2/. Dry spores at 60% RH were unaffected by a 20-min exposure to 4000 ppm SO/sub 2/. Increasing the temperature in the range 5-20/sup 0/C increased effectiveness of the SO/sub 2/ treatment. A comparison of Alternaria with Botrytis cinerea Fr. (studied earlier) showed that wet spores of these organisms were about equally sensitive to SO/sub 2/, but that dry Alternaria spores were more resistant to SO/sub 2/ than dry Botrytis spores under comparable conditions.

  14. Expression of protein engineered NADP{sup +}-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production from xylose in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Katsuji; Takimura, Osamu; Sawayama, Shigeki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Hiroshima (Japan). Biomass Technology Research Center; Watanabe, Seiya; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Makino, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    2008-11-15

    A recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain transformed with xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes from Pichia stipitis has the ability to convert xylose to ethanol together with the unfavorable excretion of xylitol, which may be due to cofactor imbalance between NADPH-preferring XR and NAD{sup +}-dependent XDH. To reduce xylitol formation, we have already generated several XDH mutants with a reversal of coenzyme specificity toward NADP{sup +}. In this study, we constructed a set of recombinant S. cerevisiae strains with xylose-fermenting ability, including protein-engineered NADP{sup +}-dependent XDH-expressing strains. The most positive effect on xylose-to-ethanol fermentation was found by using a strain named MA-N5, constructed by chromosomal integration of the gene for NADP{sup +}-dependent XDH along with XR and endogenous xylulokinase genes. The MA-N5 strain had an increase in ethanol production and decrease in xylitol excretion compared with the reference strain expressing wild-type XDH when fermenting not only xylose but also mixed sugars containing glucose and xylose. Furthermore, the MA-N5 strain produced ethanol with a high yield of 0.49 g of ethanol/g of total consumed sugars in the nonsulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips. The results demonstrate that glucose and xylose present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be efficiently fermented by this redox-engineered strain. (orig.)

  15. Breeding of a xylose-fermenting hybrid strain by mating genetically engineered haploid strains derived from industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Seitaro; Matsushika, Akinori; Watanabe, Seiya; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2014-12-01

    The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae IR-2 is a promising host strain to genetically engineer xylose-utilizing yeasts for ethanol fermentation from lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Two IR-2-based haploid strains were selected based upon the rate of xylulose fermentation, and hybrids were obtained by mating recombinant haploid strains harboring heterogeneous xylose dehydrogenase (XDH) (wild-type NAD(+)-dependent XDH or engineered NADP(+)-dependent XDH, ARSdR), xylose reductase (XR) and xylulose kinase (XK) genes. ARSdR in the hybrids selected for growth rates on yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) agar and YP-xylose agar plates typically had a higher activity than NAD(+)-dependent XDH. Furthermore, the xylose-fermenting performance of the hybrid strain SE12 with the same level of heterogeneous XDH activity was similar to that of a recombinant strain of IR-2 harboring a single set of genes, XR/ARSdR/XK. These results suggest not only that the recombinant haploid strains retain the appropriate genetic background of IR-2 for ethanol production from xylose but also that ARSdR is preferable for xylose fermentation.

  16. Expression of protein engineered NADP+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production from xylose in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Watanabe, Seiya; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Makino, Keisuke; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Katsuji; Takimura, Osamu; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2008-11-01

    A recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain transformed with xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes from Pichia stipitis has the ability to convert xylose to ethanol together with the unfavorable excretion of xylitol, which may be due to cofactor imbalance between NADPH-preferring XR and NAD(+)-dependent XDH. To reduce xylitol formation, we have already generated several XDH mutants with a reversal of coenzyme specificity toward NADP(+). In this study, we constructed a set of recombinant S. cerevisiae strains with xylose-fermenting ability, including protein-engineered NADP(+)-dependent XDH-expressing strains. The most positive effect on xylose-to-ethanol fermentation was found by using a strain named MA-N5, constructed by chromosomal integration of the gene for NADP(+)-dependent XDH along with XR and endogenous xylulokinase genes. The MA-N5 strain had an increase in ethanol production and decrease in xylitol excretion compared with the reference strain expressing wild-type XDH when fermenting not only xylose but also mixed sugars containing glucose and xylose. Furthermore, the MA-N5 strain produced ethanol with a high yield of 0.49 g of ethanol/g of total consumed sugars in the nonsulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips. The results demonstrate that glucose and xylose present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be efficiently fermented by this redox-engineered strain.

  17. Compatibility of insecticides and fungicides with the zoophytophagous mirid predator Nesidiocoris tenuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei Madbouni, Mohammad Ali; Samih, Mohammad Amin; Biondi, Antonio; Namvar, Peyman

    2017-01-01

    Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is an effective predator of multiple pests of vegetable crops, such as thrips, mites, aphids, whiteflies, leafminers. It is mass-reared and released for augmentative biocontrol programs mainly aimed at controlling whiteflies and Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in greenhouses and open field. We evaluated the lethal and sublethal toxicity upon N. tenuis adults of label doses of three insecticides (pyriproxyfen, spirotetramat, cypermethrin) and seven fungicides (benomyl, chlorothalonil, copper oxychloride, cyazofamid, fluopicolide + propamocarb hydrochloride (FPH), penconazol, trifloxystrobin) commonly used in various crops. Two exposure routes were tested: (i) contact with dry residues of insecticides or fungicides on tomato sprouts and (ii) multiple exposure to these chemicals via topical sprays on adults which foraged on treated sprouts; and fed on treated eggs of Ephestia kuehniella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) simultaneously. Mortality and reproductive capacity were investigated as indicators of lethal and sublethal effects on N. tenius. The tested insecticides and fungicides were all classified as harmless when predator was exposed only to the dry residues of each. However, the multiple exposure to either cypermethrin, benomyl, chlorothalonil, copper oxychloride or trifloxystrobin caused significant mortality of N. tenuis adults. Cypermethrin also significantly reduced its reproductive capacity. Interestingly, N. tenuis produced a higher number of progeny when exposed to fungicides penconazol and FPH in both exposure scenarios. Overall, findings suggest that the two insecticides, pyriproxyfen and spirotetramat but not cypermethrin, and all tested fungicides can be considered compatible with N. tenuis. PMID:29095873

  18. Compatibility of insecticides and fungicides with the zoophytophagous mirid predator Nesidiocoris tenuis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ziaei Madbouni

    Full Text Available Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter (Hemiptera: Miridae is an effective predator of multiple pests of vegetable crops, such as thrips, mites, aphids, whiteflies, leafminers. It is mass-reared and released for augmentative biocontrol programs mainly aimed at controlling whiteflies and Tuta absoluta (Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae in greenhouses and open field. We evaluated the lethal and sublethal toxicity upon N. tenuis adults of label doses of three insecticides (pyriproxyfen, spirotetramat, cypermethrin and seven fungicides (benomyl, chlorothalonil, copper oxychloride, cyazofamid, fluopicolide + propamocarb hydrochloride (FPH, penconazol, trifloxystrobin commonly used in various crops. Two exposure routes were tested: (i contact with dry residues of insecticides or fungicides on tomato sprouts and (ii multiple exposure to these chemicals via topical sprays on adults which foraged on treated sprouts; and fed on treated eggs of Ephestia kuehniella (Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae simultaneously. Mortality and reproductive capacity were investigated as indicators of lethal and sublethal effects on N. tenius. The tested insecticides and fungicides were all classified as harmless when predator was exposed only to the dry residues of each. However, the multiple exposure to either cypermethrin, benomyl, chlorothalonil, copper oxychloride or trifloxystrobin caused significant mortality of N. tenuis adults. Cypermethrin also significantly reduced its reproductive capacity. Interestingly, N. tenuis produced a higher number of progeny when exposed to fungicides penconazol and FPH in both exposure scenarios. Overall, findings suggest that the two insecticides, pyriproxyfen and spirotetramat but not cypermethrin, and all tested fungicides can be considered compatible with N. tenuis.

  19. Compatibility of insecticides and fungicides with the zoophytophagous mirid predator Nesidiocoris tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei Madbouni, Mohammad Ali; Samih, Mohammad Amin; Qureshi, Jawwad A; Biondi, Antonio; Namvar, Peyman

    2017-01-01

    Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is an effective predator of multiple pests of vegetable crops, such as thrips, mites, aphids, whiteflies, leafminers. It is mass-reared and released for augmentative biocontrol programs mainly aimed at controlling whiteflies and Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in greenhouses and open field. We evaluated the lethal and sublethal toxicity upon N. tenuis adults of label doses of three insecticides (pyriproxyfen, spirotetramat, cypermethrin) and seven fungicides (benomyl, chlorothalonil, copper oxychloride, cyazofamid, fluopicolide + propamocarb hydrochloride (FPH), penconazol, trifloxystrobin) commonly used in various crops. Two exposure routes were tested: (i) contact with dry residues of insecticides or fungicides on tomato sprouts and (ii) multiple exposure to these chemicals via topical sprays on adults which foraged on treated sprouts; and fed on treated eggs of Ephestia kuehniella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) simultaneously. Mortality and reproductive capacity were investigated as indicators of lethal and sublethal effects on N. tenius. The tested insecticides and fungicides were all classified as harmless when predator was exposed only to the dry residues of each. However, the multiple exposure to either cypermethrin, benomyl, chlorothalonil, copper oxychloride or trifloxystrobin caused significant mortality of N. tenuis adults. Cypermethrin also significantly reduced its reproductive capacity. Interestingly, N. tenuis produced a higher number of progeny when exposed to fungicides penconazol and FPH in both exposure scenarios. Overall, findings suggest that the two insecticides, pyriproxyfen and spirotetramat but not cypermethrin, and all tested fungicides can be considered compatible with N. tenuis.

  20. Comparison of xylose fermentation by two high-performance engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Economical biofuel production from plant biomass requires the conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose in the plant cell wall. The best industrial fermentation organism, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been developed to utilize xylose by heterologously expressing either a xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase (XR/XDH pathway or a xylose isomerase (XI pathway. Although it has been proposed that the optimal means for fermenting xylose into biofuels would use XI instead of the XR/XDH pathway, no clear comparison of the best publicly-available yeast strains engineered to use XR/XDH or XI has been published. We therefore compared two of the best-performing engineered yeast strains in the public domain—one using the XR/XDH pathway and another using XI—in anaerobic xylose fermentations. We find that, regardless of conditions, the strain using XR/XDH has substantially higher productivity compared to the XI strain. By contrast, the XI strain has better yields in nearly all conditions tested.

  1. Comparison of xylose fermentation by two high-performance engineered strains ofSaccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Park, Annsea; Estrela, Raissa; Kim, Soo-Rin; Jin, Yong-Su; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-03-01

    Economical biofuel production from plant biomass requires the conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose in the plant cell wall. The best industrial fermentation organism, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been developed to utilize xylose by heterologously expressing either a xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase (XR/XDH) pathway or a xylose isomerase (XI) pathway. Although it has been proposed that the optimal means for fermenting xylose into biofuels would use XI instead of the XR/XDH pathway, no clear comparison of the best publicly-available yeast strains engineered to use XR/XDH or XI has been published. We therefore compared two of the best-performing engineered yeast strains in the public domain-one using the XR/XDH pathway and another using XI-in anaerobic xylose fermentations. We find that, regardless of conditions, the strain using XR/XDH has substantially higher productivity compared to the XI strain. By contrast, the XI strain has better yields in nearly all conditions tested.

  2. Fine-tuning of NADH oxidase decreases byproduct accumulation in respiration deficient xylose metabolic Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jin; Suo, Fan; Wang, Chengqiang; Li, Xiaowei; Shen, Yu; Bao, Xiaoming

    2014-02-14

    Efficiently utilizing all available carbon from lignocellulosic feedstock presents a major barrier to the production of economically feasible biofuel. Previously, to enable xylose utilization, we introduced a cofactor-dependent xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) pathway, or a cofactor-independent xylose isomerase (XI) pathway, into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The resulting strains metabolized xylose with high efficiency. However, in both pathway recombinant strains, the cofactor imbalance caused accumulation of the byproducts glycerol and/or xylitol and reduced the ethanol production efficiency. In this study, we introduced NADH oxidase from Lactococcus lactis into both XI and XR-XDH pathway recombinant strains. To reduce byproduct accumulation while maintaining xylose metabolism, we optimized the expression level of NADH oxidase by comparing its expression under the control of different promoters and plasmids. In recombinant XI strains, NADH oxidase was expressed at different levels, regulated by the GPD2 promoter or TEF1 promoter in the 2 μ plasmid. The expression under the control of GPD2 promoter decreased glycerol production by 84% and increased the ethanol yield and specific growth rate by 8% and 12%, respectively. In contrast, in the recombinant XR-XDH strains, such expression level was not efficient enough to decrease the byproduct accumulation. Therefore, higher NADH oxidase expression levels were tested. In the strain expressing NADH oxidase under the control of the TEF1 promoter in the centromeric plasmids, xylitol and glycerol production were reduced by 60% and 83%, respectively, without significantly affecting xylose consumption. By fine-tuning NADH oxidase expression, we decreased the glycerol or/and xylitol production in both recombinant XI and XR-XDH xylose-metabolizing yeast strains. The optimal NADH oxidase expression levels depend on metabolic pathways. Similar cofactor engineering strategies could maximize the production of

  3. Three new species of Macrobiotus (Eutardigrada, Macrobiotidae, tenuis-group from Tien Shan (Kirghizia and Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis V. TUMANOV

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Illustrated descriptions of Macrobiotus danilovi sp. n., Macrobiotus tenuiformis sp. n. from Tien Shan (Kirghizia and Macrobiotus voronkovi sp. n. from Spitsbergen are given. These new species belong to the tenuis-group of the genus Macrobiotus. Members of the tenius-group have claws with a particularly long and thin common tract with a prominent frontal appendage at the base. Macrobiotus danilovi and M. tenuiformis differ from all known species of this group in the structure of their buccal armature. Macrobiotus voronkovi differs from all known species of the tenuis-group in its combination of features in adult animals and in the egg shell.

  4. Dynamic metabolomics differentiates between carbon and energy starvation in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting xylose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergdahl Basti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concerted effects of changes in gene expression due to changes in the environment are ultimately reflected in the metabolome. Dynamics of metabolite concentrations under a certain condition can therefore give a description of the cellular state with a high degree of functional information. We used this potential to evaluate the metabolic status of two recombinant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during anaerobic batch fermentation of a glucose/xylose mixture. Two isogenic strains were studied, differing only in the pathways used for xylose assimilation: the oxidoreductive pathway with xylose reductase (XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH or the isomerization pathway with xylose isomerase (XI. The isogenic relationship between the two strains ascertains that the observed responses are a result of the particular xylose pathway and not due to unknown changes in regulatory systems. An increased understanding of the physiological state of these strains is important for further development of efficient pentose-utilizing strains for bioethanol production. Results Using LC-MS/MS we determined the dynamics in the concentrations of intracellular metabolites in central carbon metabolism, nine amino acids, the purine nucleotides and redox cofactors. The general response to the transition from glucose to xylose was increased concentrations of amino acids and TCA-cycle intermediates, and decreased concentrations of sugar phosphates and redox cofactors. The two strains investigated had significantly different uptake rates of xylose which led to an enhanced response in the XI-strain. Despite the difference in xylose uptake rate, the adenylate energy charge remained high and stable around 0.8 in both strains. In contrast to the adenylate pool, large changes were observed in the guanylate pool. Conclusions The low uptake of xylose by the XI-strain led to several distinguished responses: depletion of key metabolites in glycolysis and NADPH

  5. Dynamic metabolomics differentiates between carbon and energy starvation in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting xylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The concerted effects of changes in gene expression due to changes in the environment are ultimately reflected in the metabolome. Dynamics of metabolite concentrations under a certain condition can therefore give a description of the cellular state with a high degree of functional information. We used this potential to evaluate the metabolic status of two recombinant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during anaerobic batch fermentation of a glucose/xylose mixture. Two isogenic strains were studied, differing only in the pathways used for xylose assimilation: the oxidoreductive pathway with xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) or the isomerization pathway with xylose isomerase (XI). The isogenic relationship between the two strains ascertains that the observed responses are a result of the particular xylose pathway and not due to unknown changes in regulatory systems. An increased understanding of the physiological state of these strains is important for further development of efficient pentose-utilizing strains for bioethanol production. Results Using LC-MS/MS we determined the dynamics in the concentrations of intracellular metabolites in central carbon metabolism, nine amino acids, the purine nucleotides and redox cofactors. The general response to the transition from glucose to xylose was increased concentrations of amino acids and TCA-cycle intermediates, and decreased concentrations of sugar phosphates and redox cofactors. The two strains investigated had significantly different uptake rates of xylose which led to an enhanced response in the XI-strain. Despite the difference in xylose uptake rate, the adenylate energy charge remained high and stable around 0.8 in both strains. In contrast to the adenylate pool, large changes were observed in the guanylate pool. Conclusions The low uptake of xylose by the XI-strain led to several distinguished responses: depletion of key metabolites in glycolysis and NADPH, a reduced GTP/GDP ratio

  6. Anaerobic xylose fermentation by Spathaspora passalidarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru

    2012-01-01

    A cost-effective conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into bioethanol requires that the xylose released from the hemicellulose fraction (20–40% of biomass) can be fermented. Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, efficiently ferments glucose but it lacks the ability to ferment xylose. Xylose-fermenting...... yeast such as Pichia stipitis requires accurately controlled microaerophilic conditions during the xylose fermentation, rendering the process technically difficult and expensive. In this study, it is demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions Spathaspora passalidarum showed high ethanol production...

  7. First records of the dicyphine plant bug Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Miridae: Bryocorinae) in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread plant bug Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter) is reported for the first time from Mexico. In this paper we provide a diagnosis and photographs of the adult male and female, discuss its habits as a plant pest and a predator and potential biocontrol agent of soft-bodied arthropods, and review ...

  8. Stage-Related Defense Response Induction in Tomato Plants by Nesidiocoris tenuis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Naselli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of direct predation by zoophytophagous biological control agents (BCAs, such as the mirid bug Nesidiocoris tenuis, are well-known. However, the benefits of zoophytophagous BCAs’ relation with host plants, via induction of plant defensive responses, have not been investigated until recently. To date, only the females of certain zoophytophagous BCAs have been demonstrated to induce defensive plant responses in tomato plants. The aim of this work was to determine whether nymphs, adult females, and adult males of N. tenuis are able to induce defense responses in tomato plants. Compared to undamaged tomato plants (i.e., not exposed to the mirid, plants on which young or mature nymphs, or adult males or females of N. tenuis fed and developed were less attractive to the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, but were more attractive to the parasitoid Encarsia formosa. Female-exposed plants were more repellent to B. tabaci and more attractive to E. formosa than were male-exposed plants. When comparing young- and mature-nymph-exposed plants, the same level of repellence was obtained for B. tabaci, but mature-nymph-exposed plants were more attractive to E. formosa. The repellent effect is attributed to the signaling pathway of abscisic acid, which is upregulated in N. tenuis-exposed plants, whereas the parasitoid attraction was attributed to the activation of the jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that all motile stages of N. tenuis can trigger defensive responses in tomato plants, although these responses may be slightly different depending on the stage considered.

  9. Metabolic engineering and classical selection of the methylotrophic thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha for improvement of high-temperature xylose alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylenko, Olena O; Ruchala, Justyna; Hryniv, Orest B; Abbas, Charles A; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2014-08-20

    The methylotrophic yeast, Hansenula polymorpha is an industrially important microorganism, and belongs to the best studied yeast species with well-developed tools for molecular research. The complete genome sequence of the strain NCYC495 of H. polymorpha is publicly available. Some of the well-studied strains of H. polymorpha are known to ferment glucose, cellobiose and xylose to ethanol at elevated temperature (45 - 50°C) with ethanol yield from xylose significantly lower than that from glucose and cellobiose. Increased yield of ethanol from xylose was demonstrated following directed metabolic changes but, still the final ethanol concentration achieved is well below what is considered feasible for economic recovery by distillation. In this work, we describe the construction of strains of H. polymorpha with increased ethanol production from xylose using an ethanol-non-utilizing strain (2EthOH-) as the host. The transformants derived from 2EthOH- overexpressing modified xylose reductase (XYL1m) and native xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2) were isolated. These transformants produced 1.5-fold more ethanol from xylose than the original host strain. The additional overexpression of XYL3 gene coding for xylulokinase, resulted in further 2.3-fold improvement in ethanol production with no measurable xylitol formed during xylose fermentation. The best ethanol producing strain obtained by metabolic engineering approaches was subjected to selection for resistance to the known inhibitor of glycolysis, the anticancer drug 3-bromopyruvate. The best mutant selected had an ethanol yield of 0.3 g/g xylose and produced up to 9.8 g of ethanol/l during xylose alcoholic fermentation at 45°C without correction for ethanol evaporation. Our results indicate that xylose conversion to ethanol at elevated temperature can be significantly improved in H. polymorpha by combining methods of metabolic engineering and classical selection.

  10. Quantitative metabolomics of a xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron xylose isomerase on glucose and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, M J; Rose, S H; la Grange, D C; Bamba, T; Hasunuma, T; Kondo, A; van Zyl, W H

    2017-10-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot utilize xylose, but the introduction of a xylose isomerase that functions well in yeast will help overcome the limitations of the fungal oxido-reductive pathway. In this study, a diploid S. cerevisiae S288c[2n YMX12] strain was constructed expressing the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron xylA (XI) and the Scheffersomyces stipitis xyl3 (XK) and the changes in the metabolite pools monitored over time. Cultivation on xylose generally resulted in gradual changes in metabolite pool size over time, whereas more dramatic fluctuations were observed with cultivation on glucose due to the diauxic growth pattern. The low G6P and F1,6P levels observed with cultivation on xylose resulted in the incomplete activation of the Crabtree effect, whereas the high PEP levels is indicative of carbon starvation. The high UDP-D-glucose levels with cultivation on xylose indicated that the carbon was channeled toward biomass production. The adenylate and guanylate energy charges were tightly regulated by the cultures, while the catabolic and anabolic reduction charges fluctuated between metabolic states. This study helped elucidate the metabolite distribution that takes place under Crabtree-positive and Crabtree-negative conditions when cultivating S. cerevisiae on glucose and xylose, respectively.

  11. Alcoholic fermentation of xylose and mixed sugars using recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for xylose utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Anjali; Tamalampudi, Sriappareddy; Srivastava, Aradhana; Fukuda, Hideki; Bisaria, Virendra S; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-04-01

    Previously, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain was engineered for xylose assimilation by the constitutive overexpression of the Orpinomyces xylose isomerase, the S. cerevisiae xylulokinase, and the Pichia stipitis SUT1 sugar transporter genes. The recombinant strain exhibited growth on xylose, under aerobic conditions, with a specific growth rate of 0.025 h(-1), while ethanol production from xylose was achieved anaerobically. In the present study, the developed recombinant yeast was adapted for enhanced growth on xylose by serial transfer in xylose-containing minimal medium under aerobic conditions. After repeated batch cultivations, a strain was isolated which grew with a specific growth rate of 0.133 h(-1). The adapted strain could ferment 20 g l(-1) of xylose to ethanol with a yield of 0.37 g g(-1) and production rate of 0.026 g l(-1) h(-1). Raising the fermentation temperature from 30 degrees C to 35 degrees C resulted in a substantial increase in the ethanol yield (0.43 g g(-1)) and production rate (0.07 g l(-1) h(-1)) as well as a significant reduction in the xylitol yield. By the addition of a sugar complexing agent, such as sodium tetraborate, significant improvement in ethanol production and reduction in xylitol accumulation was achieved. Furthermore, ethanol production from xylose and a mixture of glucose and xylose was also demonstrated in complex medium containing yeast extract, peptone, and borate with a considerably high yield of 0.48 g g(-1).

  12. Directed evolution of xylose specific transporters to facilitate glucose-xylose co-utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Yu, Chenzhao; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-03-01

    A highly active xylose specific transporter without glucose inhibition is highly desirable in cost-effective production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. However, currently available xylose specific transporters suffer from low overall activity and most are inhibited by glucose. In this study, we applied a directed evolution strategy to engineer the xylose specific transporter AN25 from Neurospora crassa with improved xylose transportation capacity. After four rounds of directed evolution using two different strategies, we obtained an AN25 mutant AN25-R4.18 with 43-fold improvement in terms of xylose transportation capacity while maintaining its high xylose specificity. In addition, glucose inhibition was almost completely eliminated in the final evolved mutant. We demonstrated that improved xylose transportation of AN25 mutants in the exponential growth phase led to significant improvement of xylose consumption in high cell-density fermentation. Finally, we showed that AN25 mutant AN25-R4.18 can enable relatively efficient glucose-xylose co-utilization in high concentrations of mixed sugars. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Engineering xylose utilization in Yarrowia lipolytica by understanding its cryptic xylose pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Hussain, Murtaza Shabbir; Gambill, Lauren; Gao, Difeng; Yaguchi, Allison; Blenner, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, has been utilized as an industrial host for about 60 years for various applications. Recently, the metabolic engineering of this host has become increasingly popular due to its ability to accumulate lipids as well as improvements made toward developing new genetic tools. Y. lipolytica can robustly metabolize glucose, glycerol, and even different lipid classes. However, little is known about its xylose metabolizing capability. Given the desirability of having a robust xylose utilizing strain of Y. lipolytica, we performed a comprehensive investigation and elucidation of the existing components of its xylose metabolic pathway. A quick and efficient means of determining functionality of the candidate xylose pathway genes (XYR, XDH, and XKS) from Y. lipolytica was desirable. We challenged Escherichia coli mutants lacking either the xylose isomerase (xylA) gene or the xylulose kinase (xylB) gene to grow on xylose minimal media by expressing the candidate genes from Y. lipolytica. We showed that the XKS of Y. lipolytica is able to rescue xylose growth of E. coli ΔxylB, and the XDH enabled growth on xylitol, but not on xylose, of E. coli ΔxylA. Overexpression of XKS and XDH in Y. lipolytica improved growth on xylitol, indicating that expression of the native enzymes was limiting. Overexpression of XKS and XDH in Y. lipolytica also enables robust growth on xylose under high nitrogen conditions without the need for adaptation. These results prove that a complete xylose pathway exists in Y. lipolytica, but the pathway is poorly expressed. To elucidate the XYR gene, we applied the E. coli ΔxylA xylose growth challenge with 14 candidate XYR genes and XDH. The XYR2 candidate was able to rescue growth of E. coli ΔxylA xylose on minimal media. While a native xylose pathway exists in Y. lipolytica, the microorganism's inability to grow robustly on xylose is an effect of cryptic genetic circuits that control expression of key enzymes

  14. Expanding xylose metabolism in yeast for plant cell wall conversion to biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Vivian Yaci; Lin, Yuping; Chomvong, Kulika; Estrela, Raíssa; Park, Annsea; Liang, Julie M; Znameroski, Elizabeth A; Feehan, Joanna; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su; Glass, N Louise; Cate, Jamie HD

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable biofuel production from renewable biomass will require the efficient and complete use of all abundant sugars in the plant cell wall. Using the cellulolytic fungus Neurospora crassa as a model, we identified a xylodextrin transport and consumption pathway required for its growth on hemicellulose. Reconstitution of this xylodextrin utilization pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that fungal xylose reductases act as xylodextrin reductases, producing xylosyl-xylitol oligomers as metabolic intermediates. These xylosyl-xylitol intermediates are generated by diverse fungi and bacteria, indicating that xylodextrin reduction is widespread in nature. Xylodextrins and xylosyl-xylitol oligomers are then hydrolyzed by two hydrolases to generate intracellular xylose and xylitol. Xylodextrin consumption using a xylodextrin transporter, xylodextrin reductases and tandem intracellular hydrolases in cofermentations with sucrose and glucose greatly expands the capacity of yeast to use plant cell wall-derived sugars and has the potential to increase the efficiency of both first-generation and next-generation biofuel production. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05896.001 PMID:25647728

  15. Analysis of Heavy-Chain Antibody Responses and Resistance to Parelaphostrongylus tenuis in Experimentally Infected Alpacas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, S. R.; Gagliardo, L. F.; Lefman, S.; Hamel, P. J. S.; Ku, S.; Mainini, T.; Hoyt, G.; Justus, K.; Daley-Bauer, L. P.; Duffy, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    The parasitic nematode Parelaphostrongylus tenuis is an important cause of neurologic disease of camelids in central and eastern North America. The aim of this study was to determine whether alpacas develop resistance to disease caused by P. tenuis in response to a previous infection or a combination of controlled infection and immunization. Alpacas were immunized with a homogenate of third-stage larvae (L3) and simultaneously implanted subcutaneously with diffusion chambers containing 20 live L3. Sham-treated animals received adjuvant alone and empty chambers. The protocol was not effective in inducing resistance to oral challenge with 10 L3, and disease developed between 60 and 71 days following infection. Immediately following the onset of neurologic disease, affected animals were treated with a regimen of anthelmintic and anti-inflammatory drugs, and all recovered. One year later, a subset of alpacas from this experiment was challenged with 20 L3 and the results showed that prior infection induced resistance to disease. Primary and secondary infections induced production of conventional and heavy-chain IgGs that reacted with soluble antigens in L3 homogenates but did not consistently recognize a recombinant form of a parasite-derived aspartyl protease inhibitor. Thus, the latter antigen may not be a good candidate for serology-based diagnostic tests. Antibody responses to parasite antigens occurred in the absence of overt disease, demonstrating that P. tenuis infection can be subclinical in a host that has been considered to be highly susceptible to disease. The potential for immunoprophylaxis to be effective in preventing disease caused by P. tenuis was supported by evidence of resistance to reinfection. PMID:22593238

  16. Xylose fermentation to ethanol. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J D

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  17. Heterologous xylose isomerase pathway and evolutionary engineering improve xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin eQi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Xylose utilization is one key issue for the bioconversion of lignocelluloses. It is promising approach to engineer heterologous pathway for xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we constructed xylose-fermenting yeast SyBE001 by combinatorial fine-tuning the expression of XylA and endogenous XKS1. Overexpression of genes RKI1, RPE1, TKL1 and TAL1 in the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway in SyBE002 accelerated xylose utilization by 19%. By repetitive adaptation, the xylose utilization rate increased to about 10 folds in strain SyBE003 evolved from SyBE002. Gene expression analysis identified variety of genes with significantly different expressions in pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle in SyBE003.

  18. Grateloupia tenuis Wang et Luan sp. nov. (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta: A New Species from South China Sea Based on Morphological Observation and rbcL Gene Sequences Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Grateloupia tenuis Wang et Luan sp. nov. is a new species described from Lingshui, Hainan Province, South China Sea. Based on the external form and internal structure, combined with rbcL gene sequence analysis, Grateloupia tenuis is distinct from other Grateloupia species as follows: (1 thalli is slippery and cartilaginous in texture; possess fewer branches, relatively slight main axes, and two or three dichotomous branches; (2 cortex is 5-6 layers; medulla is solid when young, but hollow in old branches; reproductive structures are dispersed in main axes of thalli and lower portions of branchlets; exhibits Grateloupia-type auxiliary cell ampullae; (3 the four studied G. tenuis sequences were positioned in a large Grateloupia clade of Halymeniaceae, which included sister group generitype G. filicina with 68 bp differences; G. tenuis was determined to be a sister taxon to the G. catenata, G. ramosissima, G. orientalis, and G. filiformis subclade. The pairwise distances between G. tenuis and these species were 39 to 50 bp. The sequences of G. tenuis differed by 81–108 bp from the sequences of other samples in Grateloupia; there are 114–133 bp changes between G. tenuis and other genera of Halymeniaceae. In final analysis, we considered Grateloupia tenuis Wang et Luan sp. nov. to be a new species of genus Grateloupia.

  19. Grateloupia tenuis Wang et Luan sp. nov. (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta): a new species from South China Sea based on morphological observation and rbcL gene sequences analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ling; Wang, Hongwei; Luan, Rixiao

    2013-01-01

    Grateloupia tenuis Wang et Luan sp. nov. is a new species described from Lingshui, Hainan Province, South China Sea. Based on the external form and internal structure, combined with rbcL gene sequence analysis, Grateloupia tenuis is distinct from other Grateloupia species as follows: (1) thalli is slippery and cartilaginous in texture; possess fewer branches, relatively slight main axes, and two or three dichotomous branches; (2) cortex is 5-6 layers; medulla is solid when young, but hollow in old branches; reproductive structures are dispersed in main axes of thalli and lower portions of branchlets; exhibits Grateloupia-type auxiliary cell ampullae; (3) the four studied G. tenuis sequences were positioned in a large Grateloupia clade of Halymeniaceae, which included sister group generitype G. filicina with 68 bp differences; G. tenuis was determined to be a sister taxon to the G. catenata, G. ramosissima, G. orientalis, and G. filiformis subclade. The pairwise distances between G. tenuis and these species were 39 to 50 bp. The sequences of G. tenuis differed by 81-108 bp from the sequences of other samples in Grateloupia; there are 114-133 bp changes between G. tenuis and other genera of Halymeniaceae. In final analysis, we considered Grateloupia tenuis Wang et Luan sp. nov. to be a new species of genus Grateloupia.

  20. Employing a combinatorial expression approach to characterize xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Luke N; Lee, Michael E; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Nomura, Daniel K; Dueber, John E

    2014-09-01

    Fermentation of xylose, a major constituent of lignocellulose, will be important for expanding sustainable biofuel production. We sought to better understand the effects of intrinsic (genotypic) and extrinsic (growth conditions) variables on optimal gene expression of the Scheffersomyces stipitis xylose utilization pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using a set of five promoters to simultaneously regulate each gene. Three-gene (xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), and xylulokinase) and eight-gene (expanded with non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway enzymes and pyruvate kinase) promoter libraries were enriched under aerobic and anaerobic conditions or with a mutant XDH with altered cofactor usage. Through characterization of enriched strains, we observed (1) differences in promoter enrichment for the three-gene library depending on whether the pentose phosphate pathway genes were included during the aerobic enrichment; (2) the importance of selection conditions, where some aerobically-enriched strains underperform in anaerobic conditions compared to anaerobically-enriched strains; (3) improved growth rather than improved fermentation product yields for optimized strains carrying the mutant XDH compared to the wild-type XDH. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stoichiometric network constraints on xylose metabolism by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Su Jin; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering is constrained by the thermodynamic and stoichiometric feasibility of enzymatic activities of introduced genes. Engineering of xylose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has focused on introducing genes for the initial xylose assimilation steps from Pichia stipitis, a xylose-fermenting yeast, into S. cerevisiae, a yeast raditionally...

  2. Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization in stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimi, Perry G; Emptage, Mark; Li, Xu; Viitanen, Paul V; Chou, Yat-Chen; Franden, Mary Ann; Zhang, Min

    2013-06-18

    Strains of xylose utilizing Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization and ethanol production during fermentation in stress conditions were obtained using an adaptation method. The adaptation involved continuously growing xylose utilizing Zymomonas in media containing high sugars, acetic acid, ammonia, and ethanol.

  3. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prathumpai, W.; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Groot, de M.J.L.; McIntyre, M.; Nielsen, J.

    2003-01-01

    A kinetic model for xylose catabolism in Aspergillus is proposed. From a thermodynamic analysis it was found that the intermediate xylitol will accumulate during xylose catabolism. Use of the kinetic model allowed metabolic control analysis (MCA) of the xylose catabolic pathway to be carried out,

  4. Expression and Characterisation of Recombinant Rhodocyclus tenuis High Potential Iron-Sulphur Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael Bjerg; Bennet, K.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2000-01-01

    The high potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) from Rhodocyclus tenuis strain 2761 has been overproduced in Escherichia coli from its structural gene, purified to apparent homogeneity, and then characterized by an array of methods. UV-visible spectra of the reduced and oxidized recombinant protein...... of the apoprotein was 6296.6 Da compared to the expected average molecular mass of 6297.2 Da of the apoprotein, The reduction potential was determined using cyclic and square-wave voltammetry to be 321 and 314 mV versus NHE, respectively. All the observed properties of the recombinant protein parallel those...

  5. Molecular characterization of a gene for aldose reductase (CbXYL1) from Candida boidinii and its expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min Hyung Kang; Haiying Ni; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    Candida boidinii produces significant amounts of xylitol from xylose, and assays of crude homogenates for aldose (xylose) reductase (XYL1p) have been reported to show relatively high activity with NADH as a cofactor even though XYL1p purified from this yeast does not have such activity. A gene coding for XYL1p from C. boidinii (CbXYL1) was isolated by amplifying the...

  6. Reduction of furan derivatives by overexpressing NADH-dependent Adh1 improves ethanol fermentation using xylose as sole carbon source with Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring XR-XDH pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Jun; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-03-01

    Several alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-related genes have been identified as enzymes for reducing levels of toxic compounds, such as, furfural and/or 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), in hydrolysates of pretreated lignocelluloses. To date, overexpression of these ADH genes in yeast cells have aided ethanol production from glucose or glucose/xylose mixture in the presence of furfural or 5-HMF. However, the effects of these ADH isozymes on ethanol production from xylose as a sole carbon source remain uncertain. We showed that overexpression of mutant NADH-dependent ADH1 derived from TMB3000 strain in the recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae, into which xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) pathway of Pichia stipitis has been introduced, improved ethanol production from xylose as a sole carbon source in the presence of 5-HMF. Enhanced furan-reducing activity is able to regenerate NAD(+) to relieve redox imbalance, resulting in increased ethanol yield arising from decreased xylitol accumulation. In addition, we found that overexpression of wild-type ADH1 prevented the more severe inhibitory effects of furfural in xylose fermentation as well as overexpression of TMB3000-derived mutant. After 120 h of fermentation, the recombinant strains overexpressing wild-type and mutant ADH1 completely consumed 50 g/L xylose in the presence of 40 mM furfural and most efficiently produced ethanol (15.70 g/L and 15.24 g/L) when compared with any other test conditions. This is the first report describing the improvement of ethanol production from xylose as the sole carbon source in the presence of furan derivatives with xylose-utilizing recombinant yeast strains via the overexpression of ADH-related genes.

  7. Ultrastructural study of sperm cells in Acanthocolpidae: the case of Stephanostomum murielae and Stephanostomoides tenuis (Digenea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoulaye J.S. Bakhoum

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mature spermatozoa of Stephanostomum murielae and Stephanostomoides tenuis are described by transmission electron microscopy. They present several ultrastructural features previously reported in other digeneans. Their spermatozoa possess two axonemes of different length showing the 9 + ‘1’ trepaxonematan pattern, four attachment zones, two mitochondria (with an anterior moniliform one in S. murielae, a nucleus, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, external ornamentation of the plasma membrane, spine-like bodies and granules of glycogen. The main differences between the mature spermatozoon of S. murielae and S. tenuis are the maximum number of cortical microtubules, the morphology of the anterior spermatozoon extremity and the anterior mitochondrion. This study is the first concerning members of the family Acanthocolpidae. The main ultrastructural characteristics discussed are the morphology of the anterior and posterior spermatozoon extremities, antero-lateral electron dense material, external ornamentations, spine-like bodies and number and morphology of mitochondria. In addition, the phylogenetic significance of all these ultrastructural features is discussed and compared to molecular results in order to highlight the complex relationships in the Digenea.

  8. Alterations in cell pigmentation, protein expression, and photosynthetic capacity of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria tenuis grown under low iron conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trick, C G; Wilhelm, S W; Brown, C M

    1995-12-01

    To better describe the iron-limited nutrient status of aquatic photosynthetic microorganisms, we examined the effects of iron limitation on pigment content, maximum rates of photosynthetic oxygen evolution, and respiratory oxygen consumption in the filamentous cyanobacterium Oscillatoria tenuis Ag. Within the range of iron (4.2 x 10(-5)-5.1 x 10(-9) M FeCl3), growth rates were not limited by photosynthetic capacity but rather by another, as of yet undetermined, iron-requiring cellular function. We have also investigated membrane proteins that are induced when the cells are grown in low iron medium. Using membrane fractionation techniques we were able to recognize specific proteins localized in the outer membrane and periplasmic space of O. tenuis. The recovery of growth rates at low iron levels occurred in parallel with the induction of these proteins and the production of extracellular siderophores. The additional iron acquired by this high affinity transport system did not reestablish photosynthesis in O. tenuis to the iron-satiated level but did reestablish growth to iron-replete levels. Oscillatoria tenuis appears to invoke an alternate physiology to compensate for iron deficiency.

  9. Analysis of metabolisms and transports of xylitol using xylose- and xylitol-assimilating Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Tatsunori; Taguchi, Hisataka; Akamatsu, Takashi

    2017-05-01

    To clarify the relationship between NAD(P) + /NAD(P)H redox balances and the metabolisms of xylose or xylitol as carbon sources, we analyzed aerobic and anaerobic batch cultures of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a complex medium containing 20 g/L xylose or 20 g/L xylitol at pH 5.0 and 30°C. The TDH3p-GAL2 or gal80Δ strain completely consumed the xylose within 24 h and aerobically consumed 92-100% of the xylitol within 96 h, but anaerobically consumed only 20% of the xylitol within 96 h. Cells of both strains grew well in aerobic culture. The addition of acetaldehyde (an effective oxidizer of NADH) increased the xylitol consumption by the anaerobically cultured strain. These results indicate that in anaerobic culture, NAD + generated in the NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase reaction was likely needed in the NAD + -dependent xylitol dehydrogenase reaction, whereas in aerobic culture, the NAD + generated by oxidation of NADH in the mitochondria is required in the xylitol dehydrogenase reaction. The role of Gal2 and Fps1 in importing xylitol into the cytosol and exporting it from the cells was analyzed by examining the xylitol consumption in aerobic culture and the export of xylitol metabolized from xylose in anaerobic culture, respectively. The xylitol consumptions of gal80Δ gal2Δ and gal80Δ gal2Δ fps1Δ strains were reduced by 81% and 88% respectively, relative to the gal80Δ strain. The maximum xylitol concentration accumulated by the gal80Δ, gal80Δ gal2Δ, and gal80Δ gal2Δ fps1Δ strains was 7.25 g/L, 5.30 g/L, and 4.27 g/L respectively, indicating that Gal2 and Fps1 transport xylitol both inward and outward. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ecología química de las esponjas excavadoras Cliona aprica, C. caribbaea, C. delitrix y C. tenuis

    OpenAIRE

    Chaves-Fonnegra, A.; López-Victoria, M.; Parra-Velandia, F.; Zea, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Caribbean encrusting and excavating sponges Cliona aprica, C. caribbaea, C. delitrix and C. tenuis (Porifera, Hadromerida, Clionaidae), aggresively undermine and displace live coral tissue. At San Andrés island and Islas del Rosario (Colombian Caribbean), in all 145 observed cases of direct contact of the sponges C. aprica, C. caribbaea and C. tenuis with 17 coral species, corals showed unhealthy signs in their tissue. It was also noticed that the surface of these sponges is colonized by ...

  11. Xylose-induced dynamic effects on metabolism and gene expression in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae in anaerobic glucose-xylose cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alff-Tuomala, Susanne; Salusjärvi, Laura; Barth, Dorothee; Oja, Merja; Penttilä, Merja; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka; Ruohonen, Laura; Jouhten, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Xylose is present with glucose in lignocellulosic streams available for valorisation to biochemicals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has excellent characteristics as a host for the bioconversion, except that it strongly prefers glucose to xylose, and the co-consumption remains a challenge. Further, since xylose is not a natural substrate of S. cerevisiae, the regulatory response it induces in an engineered strain cannot be expected to have evolved for its utilisation. Xylose-induced effects on metabolism and gene expression during anaerobic growth of an engineered strain of S. cerevisiae on medium containing both glucose and xylose medium were quantified. The gene expression of S. cerevisiae with an XR-XDH pathway for xylose utilisation was analysed throughout the cultivation: at early cultivation times when mainly glucose was metabolised, at times when xylose was co-consumed in the presence of low glucose concentrations, and when glucose had been depleted and only xylose was being consumed. Cultivations on glucose as a sole carbon source were used as a control. Genome-scale dynamic flux balance analysis models were simulated to analyse the metabolic dynamics of S. cerevisiae. The simulations quantitatively estimated xylose-dependent flux dynamics and challenged the utilisation of the metabolic network. A relative increase in xylose utilisation was predicted to induce the bi-directionality of glycolytic flux and a redox challenge even at low glucose concentrations. Remarkably, xylose was observed to specifically delay the glucose-dependent repression of particular genes in mixed glucose-xylose cultures compared to glucose cultures. The delay occurred at a cultivation time when the metabolic flux activities were similar in the both cultures.

  12. Comportamento intra-específico do cupim Heterotermes tenuis (Hagen (Isoptera, Rhinotermitidae em condições de laboratório Intraspecific behavior of the termite Heterotermes tenuis (Hagen (Isoptera, Rhinotermitidae in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia R.R. de Camargo-Dietrich

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Groups of Heterotemies tenuis (Hagen, 1858 from five infestation points were paired in bioassays to investigate the intercolony aggression. The combinations of arena sizes (Petri dishes of 6.0 and 9.0 cm and temperatures (25 and 28 ºC were assessed for effects on intraspecific agonism. Agonistic behavior was scored positive in arena if more than half of the starting number of termites was dead and injured after 17 hours. After the intraspecific encounters it was possible to delimitate three colonies from the five infestation points. No significant differential survival was seen in two different arena sizes and two different temperatures. These assays indicate that the factors governing the agonistic behavior in H. tenuis are complex and seems to be dependent on environmental conditions and individual characteristies (age, size and caste.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia is a sensitive and specific test for the diagnosis of Parelaphostrongylus tenuis in camelids in the northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinn, Toby L; Bender, Hannah S; Stokol, Tracy; Erb, Hollis N; Schlafer, Donald H; Perkins, Gillian A

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant migration of Parelaphostrongylus tenuis in camelids results in neurologic deficits, recumbency, and sometimes death. An antemortem diagnosis of P. tenuis in camelids is typically based upon the presence of characteristic asymmetric neurologic deficits, known exposure to white-tailed deer, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia, and response to treatment. The diagnostic accuracy of CSF eosinophil percentage for the diagnosis of P. tenuis in camelids has not been critically examined. The objective of the current study was to determine the sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of CSF eosinophil percentage, CSF eosinophil concentration, total nucleated cell concentration, and protein concentration for the antemortem diagnosis of P. tenuis. Medical records of camelids admitted to Cornell University with clinical signs of neurologic disease, CSF analysis, and necropsy were examined from January 2000 through December 2009. Se and Sp were determined by receiver operating characteristic curves in camelids diagnosed with P. tenuis (n = 13) or other conditions (n = 24) based on postmortem examination. More than 17% of eosinophils in CSF had a Se of 85% and Sp of 92% for P. tenuis diagnosis (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.87; SE AUC: 0.07; P 1.4 eosinophils/µl of CSF had a Se of 85% and Sp of 96% (AUC: 0.9; SE AUC: 0.06; P camelids residing in regions endemic to white-tailed deer.

  14. Scale‐up and intensification of (S)‐1‐(2‐chlorophenyl)ethanol bioproduction: Economic evaluation of whole cell‐catalyzed reduction of o‐Chloroacetophenone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eixelsberger, Thomas; Woodley, John; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells co‐expressing genes coding for Candida tenuis xylose reductase and Candida boidinii formate dehydrogenase were used for the bioreduction of o‐chloroacetophenone with in situ coenzyme recycling. The product, (S)‐1‐(2‐chlorophenyl)ethanol, is a key chiral intermediate...

  15. Effect of mineral nutrients on cell growth and self-flocculation of Tolypothrix tenuis for the production of a biofertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P G; Silva, H J

    2007-02-01

    The influence of mineral nutrients on the growth and self-flocculation of Tolypothrix tenuis was studied. The identification of possible limiting nutrients in the culture medium was performed by the biomass elemental composition approach. A factorial experimental design was used in order to estimate the contribution of macronutrients and micronutrients, as well as their interactions. Iron was identified to be limiting in the culture medium. The micronutrients influenced mainly cellular growth without effects on self-flocculation. Conversely, the self-flocculation capacity of the biomass increased at higher concentrations of macronutrients. The optimization of mineral nutrition of T. tenuis allowed a 73% increase in the final biomass level and 3.5 times higher flocculation rates.

  16. Production of ethylene glycol or glycolic acid from D-xylose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salusjärvi, Laura; Toivari, Mervi; Vehkomäki, Maija-Leena; Koivistoinen, Outi; Mojzita, Dominik; Niemelä, Klaus; Penttilä, Merja; Ruohonen, Laura

    2017-11-01

    The important platform chemicals ethylene glycol and glycolic acid were produced via the oxidative D-xylose pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of genes encoding D-xylose dehydrogenase (XylB) and D-xylonate dehydratase (XylD) from Caulobacter crescentus and YagE or YjhH aldolase and aldehyde dehydrogenase AldA from Escherichia coli enabled glycolic acid production from D-xylose up to 150 mg/L. In strains expressing only xylB and xylD, 29 mg/L 2-keto-3-deoxyxylonic acid [(S)-4,5-dihydroxy-2-oxopentanoic acid] (2K3DXA) was produced and D-xylonic acid accumulated to ca. 9 g/L. A significant amount of D-xylonic acid (ca. 14%) was converted to 3-deoxypentonic acid (3DPA), and also, 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid was formed. 2K3DXA was further converted to glycolaldehyde when genes encoding by either YagE or YjhH aldolase from E. coli were expressed. Reduction of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol by an endogenous aldo-keto reductase activity resulted further in accumulation of ethylene glycol of 14 mg/L. The possibility of simultaneous production of lactic and glycolic acids was evaluated by expression of gene encoding lactate dehydrogenase ldhL from Lactobacillus helveticus together with aldA. Interestingly, this increased the accumulation of glycolic acid to 1 g/L. The D-xylonate dehydratase activity in yeast was notably low, possibly due to inefficient Fe-S cluster synthesis in the yeast cytosol, and leading to D-xylonic acid accumulation. The dehydratase activity was significantly improved by targeting its expression to mitochondria or by altering the Fe-S cluster metabolism of the cells with FRA2 deletion.

  17. Nutritional implications of D-xylose in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J.B.; Jong, J.de; Polziehn, R.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    1991-01-01

    Hemicellulose consists primarily of pentose sugars, joined together in a polysaccharide chain with D-xylose as the most abundant component. Ileal digestibility and urinary excretion of D-xylose and associated effects of this pentose sugar on ileal and faecal digestibility of dry matter (DM), organic

  18. Metabolic engineering of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii for xylose fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peilian; Lin, Meng; Wang, Zhongqiang; Fu, Hongxin; Yang, Hopen; Jiang, Wenyan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2016-11-01

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii cannot use xylose, the second most abundant sugar in lignocellulosic biomass. Although Propionibacterium acidipropionici can use xylose as a carbon source, it is difficult to genetically modify, impeding further improvement through metabolic engineering. This study identified three xylose catabolic pathway genes encoding for xylose isomerase (xylA), xylose transporter (xylT), and xylulokinase (xylB) in P. acidipropionici and overexpressed them in P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii via an expression plasmid pKHEM01, enabling the mutant to utilize xylose efficiently even in the presence of glucose without glucose-induced carbon catabolite repression. The mutant showed similar fermentation kinetics with glucose, xylose, and the mixture of glucose and xylose, respectively, as carbon source, and with or without the addition of antibiotic for selection pressure. The engineered P. shermanii thus can provide a novel cell factory for industrial production of propionic acid and other value-added products from lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ethanol production in fermentation of mixed sugars containing xylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, Paul V [West Chester, PA; Mc Cutchen, Carol M [Wilmington, DE; Li,; Xu, [Newark, DE; Emptage, Mark [Wilmington, DE; Caimi, Perry G [Kennett Square, PA; Zhang, Min [Lakewood, CO; Chou, Yat-Chen [Lakewood, CO; Franden, Mary Ann [Centennial, CO

    2009-12-08

    Xylose-utilizing Z. mobilis strains were found to have improved ethanol production when grown in medium containing mixed sugars including xylose if sorbitol or mannitol was included in the medium. The effect was seen in concentrations of mixed sugars where no growth lag period occurs, as well as in higher sugars concentrations.

  20. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.

    2003-01-01

    nidulans grown on media containing xylose, and a concentration up to 30 mM was found. Applying MCA showed that the first polyol dehydrogenase (XDH) in the catabolic pathway of xylose exerted the main flux control in the two strains of A. nidulans and A. niger NW324, but the flux control was exerted mainly...

  1. Influence of ecological factors on prevalence of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis infection in South Dakota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Christopher N.; Jenks, Jonathan A.; Grovenburg, Troy W.; Klaver, Robert W.; Dubay, Shelli A.

    2015-01-01

    The meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) is a nematode parasite that commonly infects white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; WTD) throughout the deciduous forest biome and deciduous-coniferous ecotone of eastern and central North America; the species is not known to occur west of the grassland biome of central North America. We used county-specific prevalence data to evaluate potential effects of landscape and climatologic factors on the spatial distribution of meningeal worm infection in South Dakota, US. Probability of infection increased 4-fold between eastern and western South Dakota and 1.3-fold for each 1-cm increase in summer precipitation. Sixty-three percent of WTD had only a single worm in the cranium. Expansion of meningeal worm infection across western South Dakota may be inherently low due to the combined effects of arid climate and potential attributes of the Missouri River that limit regional movements by infected WTD. Use of landscape genetic analyses to identify potential relationships between landscape features and population genetic structure of infected deer and parasites may contribute to a greater understanding of regional heterogeneity in meningeal worm infection rates across South Dakota, particularly in counties adjacent to the Missouri River. Future research evaluating heterogeneity in prevalence and intensity of infection between fawn and yearling deer, and the potential role of yearling male deer as dispersal agents of meningeal worms across the Missouri River, also is warranted.

  2. Risk of damage to tomato crops by the generalist zoophytophagous predator Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnó, J; Castañé, C; Riudavets, J; Gabarra, R

    2010-02-01

    Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter) (Hem. Miridae) is a native zoophytophagous predator of the Mediterranean region, and its populations colonize tomato crops when they are not heavily treated with insecticides. This generalist predator has a high capacity for controlling insect pests, and it is currently commercially produced and released in some areas to control Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hem. Aleyrodidae). However, its status as a pest and/or as beneficial is controversial. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of damage to tomatoes in extreme conditions of prey scarcity, as well as high predator populations. Three predator densities were tested in a greenhouse cage experiment during a summer tomato crop. The crop did not display any negative effect caused by the predators during the first six weeks of interaction, independently of the density released. However, subsequently, the effect was dramatic, both on the vegetative growth of the plant and on the production of fruits. The reduction in vegetative growth was located at truss eight and it was expressed mainly by a lower number of leaves and a shorter length of the shoot above the truss. There was a significant reduction of yield with a lower number of fruits collected and a smaller mean weight, although this was not observable until truss seven. It seems that feeding on the plant by this mirid bug competed with the vegetative growth and fruiting processes of the plant in the extreme conditions of prey shortage maintained in our experiment.

  3. Genome sequence of the lignocellulose-bioconverting and xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas W. Jeffries; Igor V. Grigroriev; Jane Grimwood; Jose M. Laplaza; Andrea Aerts; Asaf Salamov; Jeremy Schmutz; Erika Lindquist; Paramvir Dehal; Harris Shapiro; Yong-Su Jin; Volkmar Passoth; Paul M. Richardson

    2007-01-01

    Xylose is a major constituent of plant lignocellulose, and its fermentation is important for the bioconversion of plant biomass to fuels and chemicals. Pichia stipitis is a well-studied, native xylose-fermenting yeast. The mechanism and regulation of xylose metabolism in P. stipitis have been characterized and genes from P. stipitis have been used to engineer xylose...

  4. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao (NYMEDCO)

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  5. Regulation of xylose metabolism in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penttilä Merja

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable interest in the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol has led to metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for fermentation of xylose. In the present study, the transcriptome and proteome of recombinant, xylose-utilising S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic batch cultures on xylose were compared with those of glucose-grown cells both in glucose repressed and derepressed states. The aim was to study at the genome-wide level how signalling and carbon catabolite repression differ in cells grown on either glucose or xylose. The more detailed knowledge whether xylose is sensed as a fermentable carbon source, capable of catabolite repression like glucose, or is rather recognised as a non-fermentable carbon source is important for further engineering this yeast for more efficient anaerobic fermentation of xylose. Results Genes encoding respiratory proteins, proteins of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate cycles, and gluconeogenesis were only partially repressed by xylose, similar to the genes encoding their transcriptional regulators HAP4, CAT8 and SIP1-2 and 4. Several genes that are repressed via the Snf1p/Mig1p-pathway during growth on glucose had higher expression in the cells grown on xylose than in the glucose repressed cells but lower than in the glucose derepressed cells. The observed expression profiles of the transcription repressor RGT1 and its target genes HXT2-3, encoding hexose transporters suggested that extracellular xylose was sensed by the glucose sensors Rgt2p and Snf3p. Proteome analyses revealed distinct patterns in phosphorylation of hexokinase 2, glucokinase and enolase isoenzymes in the xylose- and glucose-grown cells. Conclusion The results indicate that the metabolism of yeast growing on xylose corresponds neither to that of fully glucose repressed cells nor that of derepressed cells. This may be one of the major reasons for the suboptimal fermentation of xylose by

  6. Physiological effects of over-expressing compartment-specific components of the protein folding machinery in xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F; van Niel, Ed W J

    2014-04-23

    Efficient utilization of both glucose and xylose is necessary for a competitive ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials. Although many advances have been made in the development of xylose-fermenting strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the productivity remains much lower compared to glucose. Previous transcriptional analyses of recombinant xylose-fermenting strains have mainly focused on central carbon metabolism. Very little attention has been given to other fundamental cellular processes such as the folding of proteins. Analysis of previously measured transcript levels in a recombinant XR/XDH-strain showed a wide down-regulation of genes targeted by the unfolded protein response during xylose fermentation. Under anaerobic conditions the folding of proteins is directly connected with fumarate metabolism and requires two essential enzymes: FADH2-dependent fumarate reductase (FR) and Ero1p. In this study we tested whether these enzymes impair the protein folding process causing the very slow growth of recombinant yeast strains on xylose under anaerobic conditions. Four strains over-expressing the cytosolic (FRD1) or mitochondrial (OSM1) FR genes and ERO1 in different combinations were constructed. The growth and fermentation performance was evaluated in defined medium as well as in a complex medium containing glucose and xylose. Over-expression of FRD1, alone or in combination with ERO1, did not have any significant effect on xylose fermentation in any medium used. Over-expression of OSM1, on the other hand, led to a diversion of carbon from glycerol to acetate and a decrease in growth rate by 39% in defined medium and by 25% in complex medium. Combined over-expression of OSM1 and ERO1 led to the same diversion of carbon from glycerol to acetate and had a stronger detrimental effect on the growth in complex medium. Increasing the activities of the FR enzymes and Ero1p is not sufficient to increase the anaerobic growth on xylose. So additional components of

  7. Pnp gene modification for improved xylose utilization in Zymomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimi, Perry G G; Qi, Min; Tao, Luan; Viitanen, Paul V; Yang, Jianjun

    2014-12-16

    The endogenous pnp gene encoding polynucleotide phosphorylase in the Zymomonas genome was identified as a target for modification to provide improved xylose utilizing cells for ethanol production. The cells are in addition genetically modified to have increased expression of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (RPI) activity, as compared to cells without this genetic modification, and are not limited in xylose isomerase activity in the absence of the pnp modification.

  8. Efficient xylose fermentation by the brown rot fungus Neolentinus lepideus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kenji; Kanawaku, Ryuichi; Masumoto, Masaru; Yanase, Hideshi

    2012-02-10

    The efficient production of bioethanol on an industrial scale requires the use of renewable lignocellulosic biomass as a starting material. A limiting factor in developing efficient processes is identifying microorganisms that are able to effectively ferment xylose, the major pentose sugar found in hemicellulose, and break down carbohydrate polymers without pre-treatment steps. Here, a basidiomycete brown rot fungus was isolated as a new biocatalyst with unprecedented fermentability, as it was capable of converting not only the 6-carbon sugars constituting cellulose, but also the major 5-carbon sugar xylose in hemicelluloses, to ethanol. The fungus was identified as Neolentinus lepideus and was capable of assimilating and fermenting xylose to ethanol in yields of 0.30, 0.33, and 0.34 g of ethanol per g of xylose consumed under aerobic, oxygen-limited, and anaerobic conditions, respectively. A small amount of xylitol was detected as the major by-product of xylose metabolism. N. lepideus produced ethanol from glucose, mannose, galactose, cellobiose, maltose, and lactose with yields ranging from 0.34 to 0.38 g ethanol per g sugar consumed, and also exhibited relatively favorable conversion of non-pretreated starch, xylan, and wheat bran. These results suggest that N. lepideus is a promising candidate for cost-effective and environmentally friendly ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. To our knowledge, this is the first report on efficient ethanol fermentation from various carbohydrates, including xylose, by a naturally occurring brown rot fungus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The intra- and extracellular proteome of Aspergillus niger growing on defined medium with xylose or maltose as carbon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    identified as the most abundant extracellular protein. Surprisingly, the intracellular proteome of A. niger growing on xylose in bioreactor cultures differed more from a culture growing in shake flasks using the same medium than from the bioreactor culture growing on maltose. For example, in shake flask cultures with xylose as carbon source the most abundant intracellular proteins were not the glycolytic and the TCA cycle enzymes and the flavohemoglobin, but CipC, a protein of yet unknown function, superoxide dismutase and an NADPH dependent aldehyde reductase. Moreover, vacuolar proteases accumulated to higher and ER-resident chaperones and foldases to lower levels in shake flask compared to the bioreactor cultures. Conclusions The utilization of xylose or maltose was strongly affecting the composition of the secretome but of minor influence on the composition of the intracellular proteome. On the other hand, differences in culture conditions (pH control versus no pH control, aeration versus no aeration and stirring versus shaking) have a profound effect on the intracellular proteome. For example, lower levels of ER-resident chaperones and foldases and higher levels of vacuolar proteases render shake flask conditions less favorable for protein production compared to controlled bioreactor cultures. PMID:20406453

  10. The intra- and extracellular proteome of Aspergillus niger growing on defined medium with xylose or maltose as carbon substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissing Josef

    2010-04-01

    glucoamylase (multiple spots was identified as the most abundant extracellular protein. Surprisingly, the intracellular proteome of A. niger growing on xylose in bioreactor cultures differed more from a culture growing in shake flasks using the same medium than from the bioreactor culture growing on maltose. For example, in shake flask cultures with xylose as carbon source the most abundant intracellular proteins were not the glycolytic and the TCA cycle enzymes and the flavohemoglobin, but CipC, a protein of yet unknown function, superoxide dismutase and an NADPH dependent aldehyde reductase. Moreover, vacuolar proteases accumulated to higher and ER-resident chaperones and foldases to lower levels in shake flask compared to the bioreactor cultures. Conclusions The utilization of xylose or maltose was strongly affecting the composition of the secretome but of minor influence on the composition of the intracellular proteome. On the other hand, differences in culture conditions (pH control versus no pH control, aeration versus no aeration and stirring versus shaking have a profound effect on the intracellular proteome. For example, lower levels of ER-resident chaperones and foldases and higher levels of vacuolar proteases render shake flask conditions less favorable for protein production compared to controlled bioreactor cultures.

  11. External development of the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae in the subterranean termite Heterotermes tenuis Desenvolvimento dos fungos entomopatogênicos Beauveria bassiana E Metarhizium anisopliae no cupim subterrâneo Heterotermes tenuis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcides Moino Jr.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The subterranean termite Heterotermes tenuis is one of the main pests of sugarcane and eucalyptus in Brazil, and the use of entomopathogenic fungi, alone or associated to chemicals, is an efficient and environmentally favorable method for its control. Studies related to the fungal development on these insects are important due to the effect of insect behavior on entomopathogens. The objective of this work was to describe the external development of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae on H. tenuis using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, determining the duration of the different phases of fungal infection. Two fixation techniques for preparing SEM samples were also evaluated. Worker specimens of H. tenuis were inoculated with a 1 x 10(9 conidia mL-1 suspension of the fungi and maintained at 25±1ºC and 70±10% relative humidity. Insects were collected from 0 to 144 hours after inoculation and prepared on SEM stubs for each of the two fixation techniques. The results obtained with the two techniques were compared and duration of the different phases of the infection process were estimated from SEM observations and compared for three fungal isolates. B. bassiana and M. anisopliae have similar development cycles on the termite, but some important differences exist. The penetration, colonization and conidiogenesis phases are relatively faster for M. anisopliae than for B. bassiana, which results in a faster rate of insect mortality. The fixation technique with OsO4 vapor is suitable for preparation of insects to be used in SEM observation of the developmental stages of entomopathogenic fungi.O cupim subterrâneo Heterotermes tenuis , uma das principais pragas da cana-de-açúcar e eucalipto no Brasil, e o uso de fungos entomopatogênicos, isoladamente ou associados a produtos químicos, é um método eficiente e ambientalmente seguro para seu controle. Estudos relacionados ao desenvolvimento fúngico nestes insetos são importantes devido

  12. Construction of xylose dehydrogenase displayed on the surface of bacteria using ice nucleation protein for sensitive D-xylose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Li, Liang; Mascin, Marco; Liu, Aihua

    2012-01-03

    A novel method was developed to detect d-xylose (INS 967) sensitively and selectively, which is based on a xylose dehydrogenase (XDH) cell-surface displaying system using a newly identified ice nucleation protein from Pseudomonas borealis DL7 as an anchoring motif. With coenzyme NAD(+), the XDH-displayed bacteria facilitates the catalysis of the oxidization of xylose and the resultant NADH can be detected spectrometrically at 340 nm. The fusion protein was characterized by proteinase accessibility, Western blot, and enzyme activity assays. The established XDH surface displaying system did not inhibit the growth of the recombinant Escherichia coli strain. The XDH was mainly displayed on the surface of host cells, which is of high XDH activity and high D-xylose specificity. The optimal temperature and pH of cell displayed XDH were found at 30 °C and pH 8.0, respectively. The XDH-displayed bacteria can be used directly without further enzyme extraction and purification, and it improved the stability of the enzyme. Moreover, the cell-surface-displayed-protein-based approach showed a wide linear range (5-900 μM) and a low detection limit of 2 μM of d-xylose. More importantly, the recombinant cells could be used for precise detection of D-xylose from the real samples such as foods and degradation products of lignocellulose. The method shown here provides a simple, rapid, and low-cost strategy for the sensitive and selective measurement of D-xylose. In addition, the XDH-displayed bacteria showed an interesting response in developing electrochemical biosensors. Thus, the genetically engineered cells may find broad application in such biosensors and biocatalysts. Similarly, this type of genetic approach may be used for the expression of other intracellular enzymes of interest for certain purposes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Production of Acetoin through Simultaneous Utilization of Glucose, Xylose, and Arabinose by Engineered Bacillus subtilis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Xin-Li; Fu, Jing; Li, Ning; Wang, Zhiwen; Tang, Ya-Jie; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    .... In our previous study, the recombinant Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was already shown to efficiently utilize xylose for production of acetoin, with a yield of 0.36 g/g xylose...

  14. The effect of CreA in glucose and xylose catabolism in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    The catabolism of glucose and xylose was studied in a wild type and creA deleted (carbon catabolite de-repressed) strain of Aspergillus nidulans. Both strains were cultivated in bioreactors with either glucose or xylose as the sole carbon source, or in the presence of both sugars....... In the cultivations on single carbon sources, it was demonstrated that xylose acted as a carbon catabolite repressor (xylose cultivations), while the enzymes in the xylose utilisation pathway were also subject to repression in the presence of glucose (glucose cultivations). In the wild type strain growing...... on the sugar mixture, glucose repression of xylose utilisation was observed; with xylose utilisation occurring only after glucose was depleted. This phenomenon was not seen in the creA deleted strain, where glucose and xylose were catabolised simultaneously. Measurement of key metabolites and the activities...

  15. Co-fermentation of glucose, xylose and/or cellobiose by yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Thomas W.; Willis, Laura B.; Long, Tanya M.; Su, Yi-Kai

    2013-09-10

    Provided herein are methods of using yeast cells to produce ethanol by contacting a mixture comprising xylose with a Spathaspora yeast cell under conditions suitable to allow the yeast to ferment at least a portion of the xylose to ethanol. The methods allow for efficient ethanol production from hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic material and sugar mixtures including at least xylose and glucose or xylose, glucose and cellobiose.

  16. Growth rate dispersion in seeded batch D-xylose crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabas, N.; Biscans, B.; Laguérie, C.

    1990-01-01

    Laboratoire de Genie Chimique (URA CNRS 192), ENSIGC, Chemin de la Loge, F-31078 Toulouse Cedex, France Batch crystallization runs of D-xylose from aqueous solutions have been performed. Growth rate kinetics of xylose crystals have been evaluated from successive crystal size distribution records by means of a laser light scattering size analyser. The experiments have emphasized a broadening of the crystal size distribution during growth. Solutions to population balance equations have provided evidence for growth rate dispersion. A time-averaged growth rate equation as well as a growth rate diffusivity parameter have been identified.

  17. Convergent Synthesis of Pancratistatin from Piperonal and Xylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Johan Hygum; Madsen, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A synthesis of the antitumour agent pancratistatin is described from piperonal and D-xylose. Piperonal is converted into cinnamyl bromide 11 while methyl 5-iodoribofuranoside 12 is derived from xylose. The allylic bromide and the iodocarbohydrate are combined in a zinc-mediated tandem reaction...... to afford a highly functionalised 1,7-diene, which is then converted into the corresponding cyclohexene by ring-closing olefin metathesis. Subsequent Overman rearrangement, dihydroxylation and deprotection afford the natural product in a total of 25 steps from the two starting materials. The longest linear...

  18. Xylitol synthesis mutant of xylose-utilizing zymomonas for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, Paul V.; Chou, Yat-Chen; McCutchen, Carol M.; Zhang, Min

    2010-06-22

    A strain of xylose-utilizing Zymomonas was engineered with a genetic modification to the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase gene resulting in reduced expression of GFOR enzyme activity. The engineered strain exhibits reduced production of xylitol, a detrimental by-product of xylose metabolism. It also consumes more xylose and produces more ethanol during mixed sugar fermentation under process-relevant conditions.

  19. Engineering industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for xylose fermentation and comparison for switchgrass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces physiology and fermentation related properties vary broadly among industrial strains. In this study, six industrial strains of varied genetic background were engineered to ferment xylose. Aerobic growth rates on xylose were 0.040 h**-1 to 0.167 h**-1. Fermentation of xylose, glucose/xy...

  20. Effects of coal contamination on early life history processes of a reef-building coral, Acropora tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kathryn L E; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Brinkman, Diane L; Burns, Kathryn A; Negri, Andrew P

    2017-01-15

    Successful reproduction and larval dispersal are important for the persistence of marine invertebrate populations, and these early life history processes can be sensitive to marine pollution. Coal is emerging as a contaminant of interest due to the proximity of ports and shipping lanes to coral reefs. To assess the potential hazard of this contaminant, gametes, newly developed embryos, larvae and juveniles of the coral Acropora tenuis were exposed to a range of coal leachate, suspended coal, and coal smothering treatments. Fertilisation was the most sensitive reproductive process tested. Embryo survivorship decreased with increasing suspended coal concentrations and exposure duration, effects on larval settlement varied between treatments, while effects on juvenile survivorship were minimal. Leachate exposures had negligible effects on fertilisation and larval settlement. These results indicate that coral recruitment could be affected by spills that produce plumes of suspended coal particles which interact with gametes and embryos soon after spawning. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Production of xylitol from D-xylose by Debaryomyces hansenii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, J.M. [Univ. of Vigo, Ornese (Spain); Gong, Cheng S.; Tsao, G.T. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Xylitol, a naturally occurring five-carbon sugar alcohol, can be produced from D-xylose through microbial hydrogenation. Xylitol has found increasing use in the food industries, especially in confectionary. It is the only so-called {open_quotes}second-generation polyol sweeteners{close_quotes} that is allowed to have the specific health claims in some world markets. In this study, the effect of cell density on the xylitol production by the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii NRRL Y-7426 from D-xylose under microaerobic conditions was examined. The rate of xylitol production increased with increasing yeast cell density to 3 g/L. Beyond this amount there was no increase in the xylitol production with increasing cell density. The optimal pH range for xylitol production was between 4.5 and 5.5. The optimal temperature was between 28 and 37{degrees}C, and the optimal shaking speed was 300 rpm. The rate of xylitol production increased linearly with increasing initial xylose concentration. A high concentration of xylose (279 g/L) was converted rapidly and efficiently to produce xylitol with a product concentration of 221 g/L was reached after 48 h of incubation under optimum conditions. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Enabling xylose utilization in Yarrowia lipolytica for lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibo; Alper, Hal S

    2016-09-01

    The conversion of lignocellulosic sugars, in particular xylose, is important for sustainable fuels and chemicals production. While the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a strong candidate for lipid production, it is currently unable to effectively utilize xylose. By introducing a heterologous oxidoreductase pathway and enabling starvation adaptation, we obtained a Y. lipolytica strain, E26 XUS, that can use xylose as a sole carbon source and produce over 15 g/L of lipid in bioreactor fermentations (29.3% of theoretical yield) with a maximal lipid productivity of 0.19 g/L/h. Genomic sequencing and genetic analysis pointed toward increases in genomic copy number of the pathway and resulting elevated expression levels as the causative mutations underlying this improved phenotype. More broadly, many regions of the genome were duplicated during starvation of Yarrowia. This strain can form the basis for further engineering to enhance xylose catabolic rates and conversion. Finally, this study also reveals the flexibility and dynamic nature of the Y. lipolytica genome, and the means at which starvation can be used to induce genomic duplications. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1820 - Xylose test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Xylose test system. 862.1820 Section 862.1820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... treatment of gastrointestinal malabsorption syndrome (a group of disorders in which there is subnormal...

  4. Biofuel from D-xylose-the Second Most Abundant Sugar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 5. Biofuel from D-xylose – the Second Most Abundant Sugar. Anil Lachke. General Article Volume 7 Issue 5 May 2002 pp 50-58. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/05/0050-0058 ...

  5. Fermentation of xylose to ethanol by genetically modified enteric bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolan, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis describes the fermentation of D-xylose by wild type and recombinant Klebsiella planticola ATCC 33531 and Erwinia chrysanthemi B374. The recombinant strains bear multi-copy plasmids containing the pdc gene inserted from Zymomonas mobilis. Expression of the gene in K. planticola markedly increased the yield of ethanol, up to 1.3 mole/mole xylose, or 25.1 g/L. Concurrently, there were significant decreases in the yields of formation acetate, lactate, and butanediol. Transconjugant Klebsiella grew almost as fast as the wild type and tolerated up to 4% ethanol. The plasmid was retained by the cells during at least one batch culture, even in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics to maintain the plasmid. The cells produced 31.6 g/L ethanol from 79.6 g/L of a D-glucose-D-xylose-L-arabinose mixture designed to simulate hydrolyzed hemicellulose. The physiology of the wild type K. planticola is described in more detail than in the original report of its isolation. E. chrysanthemi PDC transconjugants also produced ethanol in high yield (up to 1.45 mole/mole xylose). However, transconjugant E. chrysanthemi grew only 1/4 as rapidly as the wild type and tolerated only 2% ethanol. The plasmid PZM15 apparently exhibits pleiotropic effects when inserted into K. planticola and into E. chrysanthemi.

  6. Alcohol Fermentation and Biomass formation from xylose, glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper addresses the potential for utilizing xylose fermenting yeasts in fermenting pentoses from lignocellulosic materials obtained from saw dust and agricultural based products such as post harvest straws from maize, rice, sorghum, millet and bagasse from the sugar industries. Key words: wort, hydrolyzate, glucose, ...

  7. Evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient aerobic xylose consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gionata Scalcinati; Jose´ Manuel Otero; Jennifer R.H. Van Vleet; Thomas W. Jeffries; Lisbeth Olsson; Jens. Nielsen

    2012-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology aims to develop robust microbial cell factories, such as , to produce an array of added value chemicals presently dominated by petrochemical processes. Xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose and the most prevalent pentose sugar found in lignocelluloses. Significant research...

  8. Screening of oleaginous yeast with xylose assimilating capacity for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in industrial-scale production. In our preliminary study, 57 oleaginous yeast with xylose assimilating capacity were isolated from 13 soil samples, 16 strains were identified as potential lipid biomass producer. Four strains which showed higher lipid content were used for further ethanol fermentation at different conditions.

  9. Recycling carbon dioxide during xylose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we introduced the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) into an engineered S. cerevisiae (SR8) harboring the XR/XDH pathway and up-regulated PPP 10, to enable CO2 recycling through a synthetic rPPP during xylose fermentation (Fig. 1). ...

  10. Genomic analysis and D-xylose fermentation of three novel Spathaspora species: Spathaspora girioi sp. nov., Spathaspora hagerdaliae f. a., sp. nov. and Spathaspora gorwiae f. a., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Mariana R; Morais, Camila G; Kominek, Jacek; Cadete, Raquel M; Soares, Marco A; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula T; Fonseca, César; Lachance, Marc-André; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rosa, Carlos A

    2016-06-01

    Three novel D-xylose-fermenting yeast species of Spathaspora clade were recovered from rotting wood in regions of the Atlantic Rainforest ecosystem in Brazil. Differentiation of new species was based on analyses of the gene encoding the D1/D2 sequences of large subunit of rRNA and on 642 conserved, single-copy, orthologous genes from genome sequence assemblies from the newly described species and 15 closely-related Debaryomycetaceae/Metschnikowiaceae species. Spathaspora girioi sp. nov. produced unconjugated asci with a single elongated ascospore with curved ends; ascospore formation was not observed for the other two species. The three novel species ferment D-xylose with different efficiencies. Spathaspora hagerdaliae sp. nov. and Sp. girioi sp. nov. showed xylose reductase (XR) activity strictly dependent on NADPH, whereas Sp. gorwiae sp. nov. had XR activity that used both NADH and NADPH as co-factors. The genes that encode enzymes involved in D-xylose metabolism (XR, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulokinase) were also identified for these novel species. The type strains are Sp. girioi sp. nov. UFMG-CM-Y302(T) (=CBS 13476), Sp. hagerdaliae f.a., sp. nov. UFMG-CM-Y303(T) (=CBS 13475) and Sp. gorwiae f.a., sp. nov. UFMG-CM-Y312(T) (=CBS 13472). © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. TAMANHO DA ÁREA DE FORRAGEAMENTO DO CUPIM SUBTERRÂNEO Heterotermes tenuis (ISOPTERA; RHINOTERMITIDAE EM CANA-DE-AÇÚCAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida José Eduardo Marcondes

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a área de forrageamento do cupim Heterotermes tenuis utilizando-se a isca Termitrap® marcada com o radioisótopo 32P. O experimento foi conduzido numa área com cana-de-açúcar, em Piracicaba-SP. Foram localizados 20 focos de H. tenuis, com iscas. Em cada um desses focos aplicou-se uma isca Termitrap® impregnada com 18,5 MBb (500 mCi 32P na forma de fosfato de sódio diluído em 15 ml de água destilada. Ao redor das iscas marcadas, foram instaladas iscas sem marcador em quatro pontos: Norte, Sul, Leste e Oeste, eqüidistantes de 1, 5, 10 e 20 metros. Cada tratamento foi representado por um foco previamente determinado e marcado e uma das distâncias estipuladas para a isca de monitoramento, sendo repetido de 4 a 6 vezes. Após 15 dias da marcação, procedeu-se a avaliação coletando-se 15 indivíduos de H. tenuis de cada isca de monitoramento infestada, acondicionando-os em frascos de vidro com água destilada, que foram analisados em cintilador líquido, pelo teste de Cerenkov. Verificou-se que em apenas 20% das iscas de monitoramento coletaram-se cupins e 11,3% estavam marcadas com o radioisótopo. Constatou-se que ocorrem diversas colônias forrageando numa mesma área. A área de forrageamento de H. tenuis em cana-de-açúcar pode variar de 3 a 1.250 m2.

  12. Seasonal occurrence of Opechona pyriforme metacercariae (Digenea: Lepocreadiidae) in Eirene tenuis medusae (Hydrozoa: Leptothecata) from a hypersaline lagoon in western Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell-Hernández, Luis Felipe; Ocaña-Luna, Alberto; Sánchez-Ramírez, Marina

    2011-02-01

    Seasonal occurrence of Opechona pyriforme metacercariae in the Eirene tenuis population from Laguna Madre, Mexico was analyzed in zooplankton samples collected in October 1997 and January, May, and July 1998. Eirene tenuis medusae were present in May, July, and October, although parasites were found only in October and July samples. Host population density was positively correlated with both surface water temperature and salinity. Total sample prevalence was 3.74%, mean abundance of the parasite was 0.06, and intensity of infection ranged between 1 and 59 metacercariae/host. Prevalence differed significantly among seasons, while intensity of infection did not. Parasite distribution was found to be highly aggregated. Although O. pyriforme infected hydromedusae of all sizes, prevalence was higher in sizes above 2.11 mm umbrella diameter. Additionally, a tendency towards increasing intensity of infection values with increasing umbrella diameter of medusae was observed. This is the first record of E. tenuis as a second intermediate host of O. pyriforme, as well as the first record of this helminth in the Gulf of Mexico.

  13. The effect of compost treatments and a plant cover with Agrostis tenuis on the immobilization/mobilization of trace elements in a mine-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, P; de Varennes, A; Cunha-Queda, A C

    2014-01-01

    A semi-field experiment was conducted to evaluate the use of mixed municipal solid waste compost (MMSWC) and green waste-derived compost (GWC) as immobilizing agents in aided-phytostabilization of a highly acidic soil contaminated with trace elements, with and without a plant cover of Agrostis tenuis. The compost application ratio was 50 Mg ha(-1), and GWC amended soil was additionally limed and supplemented with mineral fertilizers. Both treatments had an equivalent capacity to raise soil organic matter and pH, without a significant increase in soil salinity and in pseudo-total As, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations, allowing the establishment of a plant cover. Effective bioavailable Cu and Zn decreased as a consequence of both compost treatments, while effective bioavailable As increased by more than twice but remained as a small fraction of its pseudo-total content. Amended soil had higher soil enzymatic activities, especially in the presence of plants. Accumulation factors for As, Cu, Pb, and Zn by A. tenuis were low, and their concentrations in the plant were lower than the maximum tolerable levels for cattle. As a consequence, the use of A. tenuis can be recommended for assisted phytostabilization of this type of mine soil, in combination with one of the compost treatments evaluated.

  14. Mutations in PMR1 stimulate xylose isomerase activity and anaerobic growth on xylose of engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae by influencing manganese homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Maarten D; Lee, Misun; Kamoen, Lycka; van den Broek, Marcel; Janssen, Dick B; Daran, Jean-Marc G; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2017-01-01

    Combined overexpression of xylulokinase, pentose-phosphate-pathway enzymes and a heterologous xylose isomerase (XI) is required but insufficient for anaerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on d-xylose. Single-step Cas9-assisted implementation of these modifications yielded a yeast strain

  15. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuza Nogueira Moysés

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review.

  16. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26927067

  17. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2016-02-25

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review.

  18. Bypassing the Pentose Phosphate Pathway: Towards Modular Utilization of Xylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulika Chomvong

    Full Text Available The efficient use of hemicellulose in the plant cell wall is critical for the economic conversion of plant biomass to renewable fuels and chemicals. Previously, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been engineered to convert the hemicellulose-derived pentose sugars xylose and arabinose to d-xylulose-5-phosphate for conversion via the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP. However, efficient pentose utilization requires PPP optimization and may interfere with its roles in NADPH and pentose production. Here, we developed an alternative xylose utilization pathway that largely bypasses the PPP. In the new pathway, d-xylulose is converted to d-xylulose-1-phosphate, a novel metabolite to S. cerevisiae, which is then cleaved to glycolaldehyde and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. This synthetic pathway served as a platform for the biosynthesis of ethanol and ethylene glycol. The use of d-xylulose-1-phosphate as an entry point for xylose metabolism opens the way for optimizing chemical conversion of pentose sugars in S. cerevisiae in a modular fashion.

  19. Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulous and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharoyces pombe, cellulase, .beta.-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastick, Stanley M.; Mohagheghi, Ali; Tucker, Melvin P.; Grohmann, Karel

    1994-01-01

    A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35.degree. C. to about 40.degree. C. until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

  20. Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cellulase, [beta]-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

    1994-12-13

    A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35 C to about 40 C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol. 2 figures.

  1. Effect of in situ acids removal on mixed glucose and xylose fermentation by Clostridium tyrobutyricum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; V. Skiadas, Ioannis; Westermann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . tyrobutyricum has a lower affinity for xylose than for glucose. Potassium ions negatively affected the effective maximum growth rate of C. tyrobutyricum at concentrations higher than 5 g L-1 exhibiting a non-competitive type of inhibition. Continuous fermentation of a glucose and xylose mixture......In the present study, the effect of potassium ions and increasing concentrations of glucose and xylose on the growth of a strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum, adapted to wheat straw hydrolysate, was investigated. Application of continuous fermentation of a mixture of glucose and xylose and in situ...... of 50 and 37 g L-1 respectively, and that they were consumed at comparable rates when fermented alone. However, continuous fermentation of a mixture of glucose and xylose resulted in a significantly decreased xylose consumption rate compared to that of glucose alone, supporting the conclusion that C...

  2. Improved xylose and arabinose utilization by an industrial recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain using evolutionary engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, R.G.; Karhumaa, Kaisa; Fonseca, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cost-effective fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires efficient mixed sugar utilization. Notably, the rate and yield of xylose and arabinose co-fermentation to ethanol must be enhanced. Results: Evolutionary engineering was used...... to improve the simultaneous conversion of xylose and arabinose to ethanol in a recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying the heterologous genes for xylose and arabinose utilization pathways integrated in the genome. The evolved strain TMB3130 displayed an increased consumption rate...... prolonged continuous culture in xylose and arabinose medium resulted in the improved transport of xylose and arabinose as well as increased levels of the enzymes from the introduced fungal xylose pathway. No mutation was found in any of the genes from the pentose converting pathways. Conclusion: To the best...

  3. Engineering of carbon catabolite repression in recombinant xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Haack, Martin Brian; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    Two xylose-fermenting glucose-derepressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were constructed in order to investigate the influence of carbon catabolite repression on xylose metabolism. S. cerevisiae CPB.CR2 (Deltamig1, XYL1, XYL2, XKS1) and CPB.MBH2 (Deltamig1, Deltamig2, XYL1, XYL2, XKS1) were...... analysed for changes in xylose consumption rate and ethanol production rate during anaerobic batch and chemostat cultivations on a mixture of 20 g l(-1) glucose and 50 g l(-1) xylose, and their characteristics were compared to the parental strain S. cerevisiae TMB3001 (XYL1, XYL2, XKS1). Improvement...... of CPB.CR2, where the cells are assumed to grow under non-repressive conditions as they sense almost no glucose, invertase activity was lower during growth on xylose and glucose than on glucose only. The 3-fold reduction in invertase activity could only be attributed to the presence of xylose, suggesting...

  4. Cumulative effects of suspended sediments, organic nutrients and temperature stress on early life history stages of the coral Acropora tenuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humanes, Adriana; Ricardo, Gerard F.; Willis, Bette L.; Fabricius, Katharina E.; Negri, Andrew P.

    2017-03-01

    Coral reproduction is vulnerable to both declining water quality and warming temperatures, with simultaneous exposures likely compounding the negative impact of each stressor. We investigated how early life processes of the coral Acropora tenuis respond to increasing levels of suspended sediments in combination with temperature or organic nutrients. Fertilization success and embryo development were more sensitive to suspended sediments than to high temperatures or nutrient enrichment, while larval development (after acquisition of cilia) and settlement success were predominantly affected by thermal stress. Fertilization success was reduced 80% by suspended sediments, and up to 24% by temperature, while the addition of nutrients to suspended sediments had no further impact. Larval survivorship was unaffected by any of these treatments. However, settlement success of larvae developing from treatment-exposed embryos was negatively affected by all three stressors (e.g. up to 55% by suspended sediments), while exposure only during later larval stages predominantly responded to temperature stress. Environmentally relevant levels of suspended sediments and temperature had the greatest impacts, affecting more processes than the combined impacts of sediments and nutrients. These results suggest that management strategies to maintain suspended sediments at low concentrations during coral spawning events will benefit coral recruitment, especially with warming climate.

  5. Engineering of the redox imbalance of Fusarium oxysporum enables anaerobic growth on xylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, Paul; Grotkjær, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction metabolism, of the natural xylose-fermenting fungus Fusarium oxysporum, was used as a strategy to achieve anaerobic growth and ethanol production from xylose. Beneficial alterations of the redox fluxes and thereby of the xylose metabolism were obtained by taking ad...... of this poorly described microorganism. It was demonstrated that dissimilatory nitrate reduction allows F oxysporum to exhibit typical respiratory metabolic behaviour with a highly active TCA cycle and a large demand for NADPH....

  6. Selection of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae promoters available for xylose cultivation and fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambu-Nishida, Yumiko; Sakihama, Yuri; Ishii, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-08-28

    To efficiently utilize xylose, a major sugar component of hemicelluloses, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the proper expression of varied exogenous and endogenous genes. To expand the repertoire of promoters in engineered xylose-utilizing yeast strains, we selected promoters in S. cerevisiae during cultivation and fermentation using xylose as a carbon source. To select candidate promoters that function in the presence of xylose, we performed comprehensive gene expression analyses using xylose-utilizing yeast strains both during xylose and glucose fermentation. Based on microarray data, we chose 29 genes that showed strong, moderate, and weak expression in xylose rather than glucose fermentation. The activities of these promoters in a xylose-utilizing yeast strain were measured by lacZ reporter gene assays over time during aerobic cultivation and microaerobic fermentation, both in xylose and glucose media. In xylose media, PTDH3, PFBA1, and PTDH1 were favorable for high expression, and PSED1, PHXT7, PPDC1, PTEF1, PTPI1, and PPGK1 were acceptable for medium-high expression in aerobic cultivation, and moderate expression in microaerobic fermentation. PTEF2 allowed moderate expression in aerobic culture and weak expression in microaerobic fermentation, although it showed medium-high expression in glucose media. PZWF1 and PSOL4 allowed moderate expression in aerobic cultivation, while showing weak but clear expression in microaerobic fermentation. PALD3 and PTKL2 showed moderate promoter activity in aerobic cultivation, but showed almost no activity in microaerobic fermentation. The knowledge of promoter activities in xylose cultivation obtained in this study will permit the control of gene expression in engineered xylose-utilizing yeast strains that are used for hemicellulose fermentation. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced biofuel production through coupled acetic acid and xylose consumption by engineered yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei, Na; Quarterman, Josh; Kim, Soo Rin; Cate, Jamie H D; Jin, Yong-Su

    2013-01-01

    .... However, commercial production of cellulosic biofuel has been hampered by inefficient fermentation of xylose and the toxicity of acetic acid, which constitute substantial portions of cellulosic biomass...

  8. Evidence that biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical.

    OpenAIRE

    Shalloe, F; Elliott, G; Ennis, O; Mantle, T J

    1996-01-01

    A search of the database shows that human biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical. We have isolated flavin reductase from bovine erythrocytes and show that the activity co-elutes with biliverdin-IX beta reductase. Preparations of the enzyme that are electrophoretically homogeneous exhibit both flavin reductase and biliverdin-IX beta reductase activities; however, they are not capable of catalysing the reduction of biliverdin-IX alpha. Although there is little obvious s...

  9. Butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by engineered Clostridium tyrobutyricum overexpressing xylose catabolism genes for glucose and xylose co-utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongxin; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Minqi; Wang, Jufang; Tang, I-Ching

    2017-06-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum can utilize glucose and xylose as carbon source for butyric acid production. However, xylose catabolism is inhibited by glucose, hampering butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates containing both glucose and xylose. In this study, an engineered strain of C. tyrobutyricum Ct-pTBA overexpressing heterologous xylose catabolism genes (xylT, xylA, and xylB) was investigated for co-utilizing glucose and xylose present in hydrolysates of plant biomass, including soybean hull, corn fiber, wheat straw, rice straw, and sugarcane bagasse. Compared to the wild-type strain, Ct-pTBA showed higher xylose utilization without significant glucose catabolite repression, achieving near 100% utilization of glucose and xylose present in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates in bioreactor at pH 6. About 42.6g/L butyrate at a productivity of 0.56g/L·h and yield of 0.36g/g was obtained in batch fermentation, demonstrating the potential of C. tyrobutyricum Ct-pTBA for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reaction mechanisms and kinetics of processing glucose, xylose and glucose-xylose mixtures under hot compressed water conditions for predicting bio-crude composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grigoras, Ionela; Toor, Saqib Sohail; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup

    Mechanisms for bio-crude formation during the conversion of glucose, xylose and glucose-xylose mixtures as biomass model compounds under hot compressed water conditions are investigated. Studies in literature have shown that the diverse products formed at the early stages of glucose or xylose...... conversion are 5-HMF, erythrose, glyceraldehyde, dihydroxyacetone, pyruvaldehyde, and saccharinic acids resulted through reactions such as dehydration, retro-aldol condensation and isomerization. However, these compounds are mostly water soluble compounds and lack the final steps towards formation of water...

  11. [Fermentations of xylose and arabinose by Kluyveromyces marxianus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shengbo; Feng, Hualiang; Gao, Jiaoqi; Li, Yimin; Yuan, Wenjie; Bai, Fengwu

    2017-06-25

    Kluyveromyces marxianus, as unconventional yeast, attracts more and more attention in the biofuel fermentation. Although this sort of yeasts can ferment pentose sugars, the fermentation capacity differs largely. Xylose and arabinose fermentation by three K. marxianus strains (K. m 9009, K. m 1911 and K. m 1727) were compared at different temperatures. The results showed that the fermentation performance of the three strains had significant difference under different fermentation temperatures. Especially, the sugar consumption rate and alcohol yield of K. m 9009 and K. m 1727 at 40 ℃ were better than 30 ℃. This results fully reflect the fermentation advantages of K. marxianus yeast under high-temperature. On this basis, five genes (XR, XDH, XK, AR and LAD) coding key metabolic enzymes in three different yeasts were amplified by PCR, and the sequence were compared by Clustalx 2.1. The results showed that the amino acid sequences coding key enzymes have similarity of over 98% with the reference sequences reported in the literature. Furthermore, the difference of amino acid was not at the key site of its enzyme, so the differences between three stains were not caused by the gene level, but by transcribed or translation regulation level. By real-time PCR experiment, we determined the gene expression levels of four key enzymes (XR, XDH, XK and ADH) in the xylose metabolism pathway of K. m 1727 and K. m 1911 at different fermentation time points. The results showed that, for thermotolerant yeast K. m 1727, the low expression level of XDH and XK genes was the main factors leading to accumulation of xylitol. In addition, according to the pathway of Zygosaccharomyces bailii, which have been reported in NCBI and KEGG, the xylose and arabinose metabolic pathways of K. marxianus were identified, which laid foundation for further improving the pentose fermentation ability by metabolic engineering.

  12. X-ray Laue diffraction from crystals of xylose isomerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Farber, G. K.; Machin, P; Almo, S C; Petsko, G A; Hajdu, J.

    1988-01-01

    The Laue method (stationary crystal, polychromatic x-rays) was used to collect native and heavy-atom-derivative data on crystals of xylose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.5). These data were used to find the heavy-atom positions. The positions found by use of Laue data are the same as those found by use of monochromatic data collected on a diffractometer. These results confirm that Laue diffraction data sets, which can be obtained on a millisecond time scale, can be used to locate small molecules bound t...

  13. Pigmentation and dermal conservative effects of the astonishing algae Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis on guinea pigs, human epidermal melanocytes (HEM) and Chang cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Chin Chew; Kim, Kah Hwi; Lau, Mei Siu; Kim, Wee Ric; Cheah, Swee Hung; Gundamaraju, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    The preference for a fairer skin-tone has become a common trend among both men and women around the world. In this study, seaweeds Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis were investigated for their in vitro and in vivo potentials in working as skin whitening agents. Seaweed has been used as a revolutionary skin repairing agent in both traditional and modern preparations. The high antioxidant content is one of the prime reasons for its potent action. It has been employed in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine. For centuries, most medical practitioners in the Asian cultures have known seaweed as an organic source of vitamins, minerals, fatty acids like omega-3 and omega-6 and antioxidants. The present objective of the study was to evaluate the potent dermal protective effect of the two seaweeds Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis on human cell lines and guinea pigs. Seaweeds were extracted with ethanol and further fractionated with hexane, ethyl acetate and water. The extracts were tested for mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity, cytotoxicity in human epidermal melanocyte (HEM), and Chang cells. Extracts with potent melanocytotoxicity were formulated into cosmetic cream and tested on guinea pigs in dermal irritation tests and de-pigmentation assessments. Both Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis seaweeds showed significant inhibitory effect on mushroom tyrosinase in the concentration tested. SPEt showed most potent cytotoxicity on HEM (IC50 of 36µg/ml), followed by SPHF (65µg/ml), and PTHF (78.5µg/ml). SPHF and SPEt reduced melanin content in skin of guinea pigs when assessed histologically. SPEt, SPHF and PTHF were able to inhibit HEM proliferation in vitro, with SPHF being most potent and did not cause any dermal irritation in guinea pigs. The results obtained indicate that SPHF is a promising pharmacological or cosmetic agent.

  14. Xylose fermentation to biofuels (hydrogen and ethanol) by extreme thermophilic (70 C) mixed culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenxi, Zhao; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Lu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Combined biohydrogen and bioethanol (CHE) production from xylose was achieved by an extreme thermophilic (70 degrees C) mixed culture. Effect of initial pH, xylose, peptone, FeSO4, NaHCO3, yeast extract, trace mineral salts, vitamins, and phosphate buffer concentrations on bioethanol and biohydro...

  15. Ethanol production using xylitol synthesis mutant of xylose-utilizing zymomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, Paul V.; McCutchen, Carol M.; Emptage, Mark; Caimi, Perry G.; Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen

    2010-06-22

    Production of ethanol using a strain of xylose-utilizing Zymomonas with a genetic modification of the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase gene was found to be improved due to greatly reduced production of xylitol, a detrimental by-product of xylose metabolism synthesized during fermentation.

  16. Electricity production from xylose using a mediator-less microbial fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation was investigated in a two-chamber mediator-less microbial fuel cell (MFC). Voltage output followed saturation kinetics as a function of xylose concentration for concentration below 9.7 mM, with a predicted maximum of 86 mV (6.3 mW m(-2...

  17. Cofermentation of Glucose, Xylose, and Cellobiose by the Beetle-Associated Yeast Spathaspora passalidarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanya M. Long; Yi-Kai Su; Jennifer Headman; Alan Higbee; Laura B. Willis; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2012-01-01

    Fermentation of cellulosic and hemicellulosic sugars from biomass could resolve food-versus-fuel conflicts inherent in the bioconversion of grains. However, the inability to coferment glucose and xylose is a major challenge to the economical use of lignocellulose as a feedstock. Simultaneous cofermentation of glucose, xylose, and cellobiose is problematic for most...

  18. Continuous xylose fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum – Kinetics and energetics issues under acidogenesis conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Procentese, A.; Raganati, F.; Olivieri, G.; Russo, M.E.; Salatino, P.; Marzocchella, A.

    2014-01-01

    The paper reports the assessment of the growth kinetics of Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 adopting xylose as carbon source. Xylose is the fundamental component of hemicellulose hydrolysis, a relevant fraction of lignocellulosic feedstocks for biofuel production. Tests were carried out in a CSTR

  19. Transcriptional activator Cat8 is involved in regulation of xylose alcoholic fermentation in the thermotolerant yeast Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchala, Justyna; Kurylenko, Olena O.; Soontorngun, Nitnipa; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V.; Sibirny, Andriy A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Efficient xylose alcoholic fermentation is one of the key to a successful lignocellulosic ethanol production. However, regulation of this process in the native xylose-fermenting yeasts is poorly understood. In this work, we paid attention to the transcriptional factor Cat8 and its possible role in xylose alcoholic fermentation in Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, organism, which does not metabolize xylose, gene CAT8 encodes a Zn-cluster transcriptional ac...

  20. Pseudoazurin-nitrite reductase interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impagliazzo, Antonietta; Krippahl, Ludwig; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2005-09-01

    The nitrite reductase-binding site on pseudoazurin has been determined by using NMR chemical-shift perturbations. It comprises residues in the hydrophobic patch surrounding the exposed copper ligand His81 as well as several positively charged residues. The binding site is similar for both redox states of pseudoazurin, despite differences in the binding mode. The results suggest that pseudoazurin binds in a well-defined orientation. Docking simulations provide a putative structure of the complex with a binding site on nitrite reductase that has several hydrophobic and polar residues as well as a ridge of negatively charged side chains and a copper-to-copper distance of 14 A.

  1. Improved xylose uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to directed evolution of galactose permease Gal2 for sugar co-consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reznicek, Ondrej; Facey, Sandra J; de Waal, Paul P; Teunissen, Aloys W R H; de Bont, Jan A M; Nijland, J.G.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Hauer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: S. cerevisiae does not express any xylose-specific transporters. To enhance the xylose uptake of S. cerevisiae, directed evolution of the Gal2 transporter was performed. METHODS AND RESULTS: Three rounds of error-prone PCR were used to generate mutants with improved xylose transport

  2. Simultaneous fermentation of glucose and xylose at elevated temperatures co-produces ethanol and xylitol through overexpression of a xylose-specific transporter in engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dongmei; Han, Ruixiang; Ding, Rui; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2016-09-01

    Engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus strains were constructed through over-expression of various transporters for simultaneous co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. The glucose was converted into ethanol, whereas xylose was converted into xylitol which has higher value than ethanol. Over-expressing xylose-specific transporter ScGAL2-N376F mutant enabled yeast to co-ferment glucose and xylose and the co-fermentation ability was obviously improved through increasing ScGAL2-N376F expression. The production of glycerol was blocked and acetate production was reduced by disrupting gene KmGPD1. The obtained K. marxianus YZJ119 utilized 120g/L glucose and 60g/L xylose simultaneously and produced 50.10g/L ethanol and 55.88g/L xylitol at 42°C. The yield of xylitol from consumed xylose was over 98% (0.99g/g). Through simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation at 42°C, YZJ119 produced a maximal concentration of 44.58g/L ethanol and 32.03g/L xylitol or 29.82g/L ethanol and 31.72g/L xylitol, respectively, from detoxified or non-detoxified diluted acid pretreated corncob. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mutations in PMR1 stimulate xylose isomerase activity and anaerobic growth on xylose of engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae by influencing manganese homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Maarten D.; Lee, Misun; Kamoen, Lycka; van den Broek, Marcel; Janssen, Dick B.; Daran, Jean-Marc G.; van Maris, Antonius J. A.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2017-01-01

    Combined overexpression of xylulokinase, pentose-phosphate-pathway enzymes and a heterologous xylose isomerase (XI) is required but insufficient for anaerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on d-xylose. Single-step Cas9-assisted implementation of these modifications yielded a yeast strain expressing Piromyces XI that showed fast aerobic growth on d-xylose. However, anaerobic growth required a 12-day adaptation period. Xylose-adapted cultures carried mutations in PMR1, encoding a Golgi Ca2+/Mn2+ ATPase. Deleting PMR1 in the parental XI-expressing strain enabled instantaneous anaerobic growth on d-xylose. In pmr1 strains, intracellular Mn2+ concentrations were much higher than in the parental strain. XI activity assays in cell extracts and reconstitution experiments with purified XI apoenzyme showed superior enzyme kinetics with Mn2+ relative to other divalent metal ions. This study indicates engineering of metal homeostasis as a relevant approach for optimization of metabolic pathways involving metal-dependent enzymes. Specifically, it identifies metal interactions of heterologous XIs as an underexplored aspect of engineering xylose metabolism in yeast. PMID:28401919

  4. A Novel Technique that Enables Efficient Conduct of Simultaneous Isomerization and Fermentation (SIF) of Xylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kripa; Chelikani, Silpa; Relue, Patricia; Varanasi, Sasidhar

    Of the sugars recovered from lignocellulose, D-glucose can be readily converted into ethanol by baker's or brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). However, xylose that is obtained by the hydrolysis of the hemicellulosic portion is not fermentable by the same species of yeasts. Xylose fermentation by native yeasts can be achieved via isomerization of xylose to its ketose isomer, xylulose. Isomerization with exogenous xylose isomerase (XI) occurs optimally at a pH of 7-8, whereas subsequent fermentation of xylulose to ethanol occurs at a pH of 4-5. We present a novel scheme for efficient isomerization of xylose to xylulose at conditions suitable for the fermentation by using an immobilized enzyme system capable of sustaining two different pH microenvironments in a single vessel. The proof-of-concept of the two-enzyme pellet is presented, showing conversion of xylose to xylulose even when the immobilized enzyme pellets are suspended in a bulk solution whose pH is sub-optimal for XI activity. The co-immobilized enzyme pellets may prove extremely valuable in effectively conducting "simultaneous isomerization and fermentation" (SIF) of xylose. To help further shift the equilibrium in favor of xylulose formation, sodium tetraborate (borax) was added to the isomerization solution. Binding of tetrahydroxyborate ions to xylulose effectively reduces the concentration of xylulose and leads to increased xylose isomerization. The formation of tetrahydroxyborate ions and the enhancement in xylulose production resulting from the complexation was studied at two different bulk pH values. The addition of 0.05 M borax to the isomerization solution containing our co-immobilized enzyme pellets resulted in xylose to xylulose conversion as high as 86% under pH conditions that are suboptimal for XI activity. These initial findings, which can be optimized for industrial conditions, have significant potential for increasing the yield of ethanol from xylose in an SIF approach.

  5. C-Phycocyanin from Oscillatoria tenuis exhibited an antioxidant and in vitro antiproliferative activity through induction of apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangam, R; Suresh, V; Asenath Princy, W; Rajkumar, M; Senthilkumar, N; Gunasekaran, P; Rengasamy, R; Anbazhagan, C; Kaveri, K; Kannan, S

    2013-09-01

    This study was undertaken to develop an efficient single step chromatographic method for purification of C-phycocyanin (CPC) from species of Oscillatoria tenuis. Purification of CPC involves a multistep treatment of the crude extract by precipitation with ammonium sulphate, followed by gel filtration chromatography. Pure CPC was finally obtained from O. tenuis with purity ratio (A620/A280) 4.88. SDS-PAGE of pure CPC yielded two bands corresponding to α and β subunits; the molecular weight of α subunit is 17.0 kDa, whereas the molecular weight of β subunit is 19.5 kDa. Fluorescence and phase contrast microscopy revealed characteristic apoptotic features like cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. CPC exhibited antioxidant and antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells through apoptosis; nuclear apoptosis induction was accompanied by G0/G1 phase arrest and DNA fragmentation. CPC is a natural pigment with potential as an anticancer agent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are associated with abortion, early embryo loss and recurrent spontaneous abortion in human. However, information on the association between MTHFR polymorphism and cow abortion is scarce. In the present study, the effects of MTHFR ...

  7. COMPOSICIÓN QUIMICA Y ACTIVIDAD ANTIFOULING DE LA FRACCION LIPIDICA DE LA ESPONJA MARINA Cliona tenuis (Clionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Castellanos

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false st1\\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Del extracto orgánico de la esponja marina Cliona tenuis, recolectada en las Islas del Rosario (Colombia, Mar Caribe, fue obtenida la fracción lipídica, la cual presentó propiedades antifouling en pruebas en campo. Esta fracción fue separada por CC sobre gel de sílice hasta obtener fracciones de ésteres metílicos, glicéridos, glicolípidos, fosfolípidos y ácidos grasos libres, las cuales fueron identificadas por CCD y técnicas de dereplicación (RMN 1H y 13C. Posteriormente, las fracciones de glicéridos, glicolípidos y fosfolípidos fueron hidrolizadas y los ácidos obtenidos, junto con los provenientes de la fracción de ácidos grasos libres, fueron transformados en ésteres metílicos y todos se analizaron por CGAR-EM. Para ubicar las insaturaciones y ramificaciones, los ésteres metílicos se transformaron luego en sus correspondientes pirrolididas, las cuales también se analizaron por CGAR-EM. El estudio cromatográfico (valores de ECL y de los espectros de masas de los ésteres metílicos y de sus derivados pirrolididas permitió identificar 81 ácidos grasos diferentes, de los cuales no habían sido previamente reportados: los ácidos 4,8-hexadecadienoico, 11-metil-4,10-octadecadienoico, 6,9,12,14-icosatetraenoico, y 6,9,12,14,17-icosapentanoico.

  8. Engineered xylose utilization enhances bio-products productivity in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai-Chi; Xiong, Wei; Paddock, Troy; Carrieri, Damian; Chang, Ing-Feng; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Ungerer, Justin; Hank Juo, Suh-Hang; Maness, Pin-Ching; Yu, Jianping

    2015-06-12

    Hydrolysis of plant biomass generates a mixture of simple sugars that is particularly rich in glucose and xylose. Fermentation of the released sugars emits CO2 as byproduct due to metabolic inefficiencies. Therefore, the ability of a microbe to simultaneously convert biomass sugars and photosynthetically fix CO2 into target products is very desirable. In this work, the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis 6803, was engineered to grow on xylose in addition to glucose. Both the xylA (xylose isomerase) and xylB (xylulokinase) genes from Escherichia coli were required to confer xylose utilization, but a xylose-specific transporter was not required. Introducing xylAB into an ethylene-producing strain increased the rate of ethylene production in the presence of xylose. Additionally, introduction of xylAB into a glycogen-synthesis mutant enhanced production of keto acids. Moreover, isotopic tracer studies found that nearly half of the carbon in the excreted keto acids was derived from the engineered xylose metabolism, while the remainder was derived from CO2 fixation.

  9. Transport of D-xylose in Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus plantarum: Evidence for a mechanism of facilitated diffusion via the phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Pouwels, P.H.; Postma, P.W.

    1999-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the D-xylose transport system of Lactobacillus pentosus. Uptake of D-xylose was not driven by the proton motive force generated by malolactic fermentation and required D-xylose metabolism. The kinetics of D-xylose transport were indicative of a low- affinity

  10. A Burkholderia sacchari cell factory: production of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, xylitol and xylonic acid from xylose-rich sugar mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Rodrigo S; de Almeida, M Catarina M D; de Oliveira, M da Conceição M A; da Fonseca, M Manuela; Cesário, M Teresa

    2017-01-25

    Efficient production of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P(3HB)) based on glucose-xylose mixtures simulating different types of lignocellulosic hydrolysate (LCH) was addressed using Burkholderia sacchari, a wild strain capable of metabolizing both sugars and producing P(3HB). Carbon catabolite repression was avoided by maintaining glucose concentration below 10g/L. Xylose concentrations above 30g/L were inhibitory for growth and production. In fed-batch cultivations, pulse size and feed addition rate were controlled in order to reach high productivities and efficient sugar consumptions. High xylose uptake and P(3HB) productivity were attained with glucose-rich mixtures (glucose/xylose ratio in the feed=1.5w/w) using high feeding rates, while with xylose-richer feeds (glucose/xylose=0.8w/w), a lower feeding rate is a robust strategy to avoid xylose build-up in the medium. Xylitol production was observed with xylose concentrations in the medium above 30-40g/L. With sugar mixtures featuring even lower glucose/xylose ratios, i.e. xylose-richer feeds (glucose/xylose=0.5), xylonic acid (a second byproduct) was produced. This is the first report of the ability of Burkholderia sacchari to produce both xylitol and xylonic acid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinetics of growth and ethanol production on different carbon substrates using genetically engineered xylose-fermenting yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindaswamy, S.; Vane, L.M. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST) strain was used for fermentation of glucose and xylose. Growth kinetics and ethanol productivity were calculated for batch fermentation on media containing different combinations of glucose and xylose to give a final sugar concentration of 20 {+-} 0.8 g/L. Growth rates obtained in pure xylose-based medium were less than those for media containing pure glucose and glucose-xylose mixtures. A maximum specific growth rate {mu}{sub max} of 0.291 h{sup -1} was obtained in YPD medium containing 20 g/L glucose as compared to 0.206 h{sup -1} in YPX medium containing 20 g/L xylose. In media containing combinations of glucose and xylose, glucose was exhausted first followed by xylose. Ethanol production on pure xylose entered log phase during the 12-24 h period as compared to the 4-10 h for pure glucose based medium using 2% inoculum. When glucose was added to fermentation flasks which had been initiated on a pure xylose-based medium, the rate of xylose usage was reduced indicating cosubstrate inhibition of xylose consumption by glucose. (author)

  12. An efficient xylose-fermenting recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain obtained through adaptive evolution and its global transcription profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Peng, Bingyin; Chen, Liyuan; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Technology

    2012-11-15

    Factors related to ethanol production from xylose in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae that contain an exogenous initial metabolic pathway are still to be elucidated. In the present study, a strain that expresses the xylose isomerase gene of Piromyces sp. Pi-xylA and overexpresses XKS1, RPE1, RKI1, TAL1, and TKL1, with deleted GRE3 and COX4 genes was constructed. The xylose utilization capacity of the respiratory deficiency strain was poor but improved via adaptive evolution in xylose. The {mu}{sub max} of the evolved strain in 20 gl{sup -1} xylose is 0.11 {+-} 0.00 h{sup -1}, and the evolved strain consumed 17.83 gl{sup -1} xylose within 72 h, with an ethanol yield of 0.43 gg{sup -1} total consumed sugars during glucose-xylose cofermentation. Global transcriptional changes and effect of several specific genes were studied. The result revealed that the increased xylose isomerase activity, the upregulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and glutamate synthesis, and the downregulation of trehalose and glycogen synthesis, may have contributed to the improved xylose utilization of the strain. Furthermore, the deletion of PHO13 decreased the xylose growth in the respiration deficiency strain although deleting PHO13 can improve the xylose metabolism in other strains. (orig.)

  13. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Timothy L; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Kim, Soo Rin; Subramaniam, Vijay; Steffen, David; Skory, Christopher D; Jang, Ji Yeon; Yu, Byung Jo; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-10-01

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite that cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose. Microbial strains capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose into lactic acid are needed for sustainable and economic lactic acid production. In this study, we introduced a lactic acid-producing pathway into an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting xylose. Specifically, ldhA from the fungi Rhizopus oryzae was overexpressed under the control of the PGK1 promoter through integration of the expression cassette in the chromosome. The resulting strain exhibited a high lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced lactic acid from glucose or xylose. Interestingly, we observed that the engineered strain exhibited substrate-dependent product formation. When the engineered yeast was cultured on glucose, the major fermentation product was ethanol while lactic acid was a minor product. In contrast, the engineered yeast produced lactic acid almost exclusively when cultured on xylose under oxygen-limited conditions. The yields of ethanol and lactic acid from glucose were 0.31 g ethanol/g glucose and 0.22 g lactic acid/g glucose, respectively. On xylose, the yields of ethanol and lactic acid were <0.01 g ethanol/g xylose and 0.69 g lactic acid/g xylose, respectively. These results demonstrate that lactic acid can be produced from xylose with a high yield by S. cerevisiae without deleting pyruvate decarboxylase, and the formation patterns of fermentations can be altered by substrates.

  14. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  15. Fermentation performance and intracellular metabolite patterns in laboratory and industrial xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaldivar, Jesus; Borges, A.; Johansson, B.

    2002-01-01

    Heterologous genes for xylose utilization were introduced into an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain A, with the aim of producing fuel ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks. Two transformants, A4 and A6, were evaluated by comparing the performance in 4-1 anaerobic batch cultivations...... to both the parent strain and a laboratory xylose-utilizing strain: S. cerevisiae TMB 3001. During growth in a minimal medium containing a mixture of glucose and xylose (50 g/l each), glucose was preferentially consumed. During the first growth phase on glucose, the specific growth rates were 0.26, 0...

  16. Fermentation performance of engineered and evolved xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonderegger, M.; Jeppsson, M.; Larsson, C.

    2004-01-01

    in the hydrolysate. A particular biological problem are the pentoses, which are not naturally metabolized by the main industrial ethanol producer Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several recombinant, mutated, and evolved xylose fermenting S. cerevisiae strains have been developed recently. We compare here the fermentation...... performance and robustness of eight recombinant strains and two evolved populations on glucose/xylose mixtures in defined and lignocellulose hydrolysate-containing medium. Generally, the polyploid industrial strains depleted xylose faster and were more resistant to the hydrolysate than the laboratory strains...

  17. Optimized Production of Xylitol from Xylose Using a Hyper-Acidophilic Candida tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tamburini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Candida tropicalis DSM 7524 produces xylitol, a natural, low-calorie sweetener, by fermentation of xylose. In order to increase xylitol production rate during the submerged fermentation process, some parameters-substrate (xylose concentration, pH, aeration rate, temperature and fermentation strategy-have been optimized. The maximum xylitol yield reached at 60–80 g/L initial xylose concentration, pH 5.5 at 37 °C was 83.66% (w/w on consumed xylose in microaerophilic conditions (kLa = 2·h−1. Scaling up on 3 L fermenter, with a fed-batch strategy, the best xylitol yield was 86.84% (w/w, against a 90% of theoretical yield. The hyper-acidophilic behaviour of C. tropicalis makes this strain particularly promising for industrial application, due to the possibility to work in non-sterile conditions.

  18. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  19. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2014-08-05

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  20. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2016-11-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  1. Genomic sequence of the xylose fermenting, insect-inhabitingyeast, Pichia stipitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffries, Thomas W.; Grigoriev, Igor; Grimwood, Jane; Laplaza,Jose M.; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lindquist, Erika; Dehal, Paramvir; Shapiro, Harris; Jin, Yong-Su; Passoth, Volkmar; Richardson, Paul M.

    2007-06-25

    Xylose is a major constituent of angiosperm lignocellulose,so its fermentation is important for bioconversion to fuels andchemicals. Pichia stipitis is the best-studied native xylose fermentingyeast. Genes from P. stipitis have been used to engineer xylosemetabolism in Saccharomycescerevisiae, and the regulation of the P.stipitis genome offers insights into the mechanisms of xylose metabolismin yeasts. We have sequenced, assembled and finished the genome ofP.stipitis. As such, it is one of only a handful of completely finishedeukaryotic organisms undergoing analysis and manual curation. Thesequence has revealed aspects of genome organization, numerous genes forbiocoversion, preliminary insights into regulation of central metabolicpathways, numerous examples of co-localized genes with related functions,and evidence of how P. stipitis manages to achieve redox balance whilegrowing on xylose under microaerobic conditions.

  2. Metabolic engineering and comparative performance studies of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strains for effective utilization of xylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh eRanade

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wood sugars such as xylose can be used as an inexpensive carbon source for biotechnological applications. The model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks the ability to catabolize wood sugars as an energy source. Here, we generated four Synechocystis strains that heterologously expressed XylAB enzymes, which mediate xylose catabolism, either in combination with or without one of three xylose transporters, namely XylE, GalP, or Glf. Except for glf, which is derived from the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4, the heterologous genes were sourced from Escherichia coli K-12. All of the recombinant strains were able to utilize xylose in the absence of catabolite repression. When xylose was the lone source of organic carbon, strains possessing the XylE and Glf transporters were most efficient in terms of dry biomass production and xylose consumption and the strain lacking a heterologous transporter was the least efficient. However, in the presence of a xylose-glucose mixed sugar source, the strains exhibited similar levels of growth and xylose consumption. This study demonstrates that various bacterial xylose transporters can boost xylose catabolism in transgenic Synechocystis strains, and paves the way for the sustainable production of bio-compounds and green fuels from lignocellulosic biomass.

  3. Improved xylose uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to directed evolution of galactose permease Gal2 for sugar co-consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznicek, O; Facey, S J; de Waal, P P; Teunissen, A W R H; de Bont, J A M; Nijland, J G; Driessen, A J M; Hauer, B

    2015-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not express any xylose-specific transporters. To enhance the xylose uptake of S. cerevisiae, directed evolution of the Gal2 transporter was performed. Three rounds of error-prone PCR were used to generate mutants with improved xylose-transport characteristics. After developing a fast and reliable high-throughput screening assay based on flow cytometry, eight mutants were obtained showing an improved uptake of xylose compared to wild-type Gal2 out of 41 200 single yeast cells. Gal2 variant 2·1 harbouring five amino acid substitutions showed an increased affinity towards xylose with a faster overall sugar metabolism of glucose and xylose. Another Gal2 variant 3·1 carrying an additional amino acid substitution revealed an impaired growth on glucose but not on xylose. Random mutagenesis of the S. cerevisiae Gal2 led to an increased xylose uptake capacity and decreased glucose affinity, allowing improved co-consumption. Random mutagenesis is a powerful tool to evolve sugar transporters like Gal2 towards co-consumption of new substrates. Using a high-throughput screening system based on flow-through cytometry, various mutants were identified with improved xylose-transport characteristics. The Gal2 variants in this work are a promising starting point for further engineering to improve xylose uptake from mixed sugars in biomass. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Bulk segregant analysis by high-throughput sequencing reveals a novel xylose utilization gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared W Wenger

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation of xylose is a fundamental requirement for the efficient production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass sources. Although they aggressively ferment hexoses, it has long been thought that native Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains cannot grow fermentatively or non-fermentatively on xylose. Population surveys have uncovered a few naturally occurring strains that are weakly xylose-positive, and some S. cerevisiae have been genetically engineered to ferment xylose, but no strain, either natural or engineered, has yet been reported to ferment xylose as efficiently as glucose. Here, we used a medium-throughput screen to identify Saccharomyces strains that can increase in optical density when xylose is presented as the sole carbon source. We identified 38 strains that have this xylose utilization phenotype, including strains of S. cerevisiae, other sensu stricto members, and hybrids between them. All the S. cerevisiae xylose-utilizing strains we identified are wine yeasts, and for those that could produce meiotic progeny, the xylose phenotype segregates as a single gene trait. We mapped this gene by Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA using tiling microarrays and high-throughput sequencing. The gene is a putative xylitol dehydrogenase, which we name XDH1, and is located in the subtelomeric region of the right end of chromosome XV in a region not present in the S288c reference genome. We further characterized the xylose phenotype by performing gene expression microarrays and by genetically dissecting the endogenous Saccharomyces xylose pathway. We have demonstrated that natural S. cerevisiae yeasts are capable of utilizing xylose as the sole carbon source, characterized the genetic basis for this trait as well as the endogenous xylose utilization pathway, and demonstrated the feasibility of BSA using high-throughput sequencing.

  5. Evidence that biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalloe, F; Elliott, G; Ennis, O; Mantle, T J

    1996-01-01

    A search of the database shows that human biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical. We have isolated flavin reductase from bovine erythrocytes and show that the activity co-elutes with biliverdin-IX beta reductase. Preparations of the enzyme that are electrophoretically homogeneous exhibit both flavin reductase and biliverdin-IX beta reductase activities; however, they are not capable of catalysing the reduction of biliverdin-IX alpha. Although there is little obvious sequence identity between biliverdin-IX alpha reductase (BVR-A) and biliverdin-IX beta reductase (BVR-B), they do show weak immunological cross-reactivity. Both enzymes bind to 2',5'-ADP-Sepharose. PMID:8687377

  6. [Aldehyde reductase activity and blood aldo-keto reductase spectrum in adolescents with neuroendocrine obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshova, D K; Davydov, V V; Shvets, V N

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of aldehyde-reductase activity and blood aldo-keto reductase spectrum has been performed in 13-15 and 16-18-years old adolescents with obesity to clear up the mechanisms of neuroendocrine obesity at the age of puberty. It has been established that basal aldehyde reductase activity and blood aldo-keto reductase spectrum of healthy adolescents in early puberty do not differ from those of healthy adolescents in late puberty. A decreased aldehyde reductase activity and some alterations in blood aldo-keto reductase spectrum have been observed in late puberty in adolescents with neuroendocrine obesity. In adolescents with obesity there have been registered some changes in blood aldo-keto reductase spectrum which are not accompanied by any alterations in its aldehyde reductase activity. The results obtained suggest that certain prerequisites are formed in late puberty to complicate the course of neuroendocrine obesity.

  7. Design of Xylose-Based Semisynthetic Polyurethane Tissue Adhesives with Enhanced Bioactivity Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Sevgi; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Vardi, Nigar; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Karaaslan, Merve Goksin; Gulgen, Selam; Taslidere, Elif; Koytepe, Suleyman; Ates, Burhan

    2016-02-01

    Developing biocompatible tissue adhesives with high adhesion properties is a highly desired goal of the tissue engineering due to adverse effects of the sutures. Therefore, our work involves synthesis, characterization, adhesion properties, protein adsorption, in vitro biodegradation, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility properties of xylose-based semisynthetic polyurethane (NPU-PEG-X) bioadhesives. Xylose-based semisynthetic polyurethanes were developed by the reaction among 4,4'-methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate) (MCI), xylose and polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG). Synthesized polyurethanes (PUs) showed good thermal stability and high adhesion strength. The highest values in adhesion strength were measured as 415.0 ± 48.8 and 94.0 ± 2.8 kPa for aluminum substrate and muscle tissue in 15% xylose containing PUs (NPU-PEG-X-15%), respectively. The biodegradation of NPU-PEG-X-15% was also determined as 19.96 ± 1.04% after 8 weeks of incubation. Relative cell viability of xylose containing PU was above 86%. Moreover, 10% xylose containing NPU-PEG-X (NPU-PEG-X-10%) sample has favorable tissue response, and inflammatory reaction between 1 and 6 weeks implantation period. With high adhesiveness and biocompatibility properties, NPU-PEG-X can be used in the medical field as supporting materials for preventing the fluid leakage after abdominal surgery or wound closure.

  8. The effect of sedation on D(+)-xylose absorption tests in 6 normal horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fintl, C; Ihler, C F

    2011-08-01

    D(+)-xylose absorption tests are commonly performed when investigating suspected small intestinal malabsorption in the horse. The test involves the administration of a D(+)-xylose solution via a nasogastric tube followed by serial blood sampling to determine its rate of absorption. In some horses, nasogastric intubation cannot be safely performed without prior administration of a sedative. Due to its short duration of action, the α(2) agonist xylazine is commonly used for this purpose. However, α(2) agonists have also been reported to influence the rate of gastric emptying as well as small intestinal motility patterns. To evaluate if prior sedation with xylazine would influence the rate of absorption of D(+)-xylose in 6 normal Standardbred horses in a randomised cross-over study. D(+)-xylose was administered by nasogastric intubation at a dose rate of 0.5 g/kg bwt given as a 10% solution with water while xylazine was administered iv at a dose rate of 0.5 mg/kg bwt. A heparinised blood sample was collected prior to administration of D(+)-xylose (and xylazine when used) and then at 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150, 180 and 240 min following administration. Samples were immediately analysed using a modified colorimetric micro method. The cumulative amount of D(+)-xylose absorbed at each time point with and without prior sedation were. The significance rate was set at Pabsorption test in the normal horse. © 2011 EVJ Ltd.

  9. Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli K12 for Homofermentative Production of L-Lactate from Xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting; Zhang, Chen; He, Qin; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Ouyang, Jia

    2018-02-01

    The efficient utilization of xylose is regarded as a technical barrier to the commercial production of bulk chemicals from biomass. Due to the desirable mechanical properties of polylactic acid (PLA) depending on the isomeric composition of lactate, biotechnological production of lactate with high optical pure has been increasingly focused in recent years. The main objective of this work was to construct an engineered Escherichia coli for the optically pure L-lactate production from xylose. Six chromosomal deletions (pflB, ldhA, ackA, pta, frdA, adhE) and a chromosomal integration of L-lactate dehydrogenase-encoding gene (ldhL) from Bacillus coagulans was involved in construction of E. coli KSJ316. The recombinant strain could produce L-lactate from xylose resulting in a yield of 0.91 g/g xylose. The chemical purity of L-lactate was 95.52%, and the optical purity was greater than 99%. Moreover, three strategies, including overexpression of L-lactate dehydrogenase, intensification of xylose catabolism, and addition of additives to medium, were designed to enhance the production. The results showed that they could increase the concentration of L-lactate by 32.90, 20.13, and 233.88% relative to the control, respectively. This was the first report that adding formate not only could increase the xylose utilization but also led to the fewer by-product levels.

  10. Utilization of xylose as a carbon source for mixotrophic growth of Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Suling; Liu, Guijun; Meng, Youting; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Sijing; Shang, Hongzhong

    2014-11-01

    Mixotrophic cultivation is one potential mode for microalgae production, and an economically acceptable and environmentally sustainable organic carbon source is essential. The potential use of xylose for culturing Scenedesmus obliquus in a mixotrophic mode and physiological features of xylose-grown S. obliquus were studied. S. obliquus had a certain xylose tolerance, and was capable of utilizing xylose for growth. At a xylose concentration of 4gL(-1), the maximal cell density was 2.2gL(-1), being 2.9-fold of that under photoautotrophic condition and arriving to the level of mixotrophic growth using 4gL(-1) glucose. No changes in cellular morphology of the cells grown with or without xylose were detected. Fluorescence emission from photosystem II (PS II) relative to photosystem I (PS I) was decreased in mixotrophic cells, implying that the PSII activity was decreased. The biomass lipid content was enhanced and carbohydrate concentration was decreased, in relation to photoautotrophic controls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptome analysis of Rhizopus oryzae in response to xylose during fumaric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing; Liu, Ying; Li, Shuang; Jiang, Ling; Huang, He; Wen, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    Xylose is one of the most abundant lignocellulosic components, but it cannot be used by R. oryzae for fumaric acid production. Here, we applied high-throughput RNA sequencing to generate two transcriptional maps of R. oryzae following fermentation in glucose or xylose. The differential expression analysis showed that, genes involved in amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and gluconeogenesis, were up-regulated in response to xylose. Moreover, we discovered the potential presence of oxidative stress in R. oryzae during xylose fermentation. To adapt to this unfavorable condition, R. oryzae displayed reduced growth and induce of a number of antioxidant enzymes, including genes involved in glutathione, trehalose synthesis, and the proteasomal pathway. These responses might divert the flow of carbon required for the accumulation of fumaric acid. Furthermore, using high-throughput RNA sequencing, we identified a large number of novel transcripts and a substantial number of genes that underwent alternative splicing. Our analysis provides remarkable insight into the mechanisms underlying xylose fermentation by R. oryzae. These results may reveal potential target genes or strategies to improve xylose fermentation.

  12. Variation in the health and biochemical condition of the coral Acropora tenuis along two water quality gradients on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocker, Melissa M; Francis, David S; Fabricius, Katharina E; Willis, Bette L; Bay, Line K

    2017-06-30

    This study explores how plasticity in biochemical attributes, used as indicators of health and condition, enables the coral Acropora tenuis to respond to differing water quality regimes in inshore regions of the Great Barrier Reef. Health attributes were monitored along a strong and weak water quality gradient, each with three reefs at increasing distances from a major river source. Attributes differed significantly only along the strong gradient; corals grew fastest, had the least dense skeletons, highest symbiont densities and highest lipid concentrations closest to the river mouth, where water quality was poorest. High nutrient and particulate loads were only detrimental to skeletal density, which decreased as linear extension increased, highlighting a trade-off. Our study underscores the importance of assessing multiple health attributes in coral reef monitoring. For example, autotrophic indices are poor indicators of coral health and condition, but improve when combined with attributes like lipid content and biomass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Seleção de iscas celulósicas para o cupim Heterotermes tenuis (isoptera: rhinotermitidae) em cultura de cana-de-açúcar

    OpenAIRE

    CAMPOS,M.B.S.; ALVES, S. B.; MACEDO N.

    1998-01-01

    Estudou-se em condições de campo a atratividade ao cupim subterrâneo Heterotermes tenuis (H.,1858), importante praga da cana-de-açúcar no Brasil, de dezessete produtos com alto teor celulósico (bagaço de cana-de-açúcar "in natura"-T1; bagaço de cana + papelão ondulado picado-T2; bagaço de cana + açúcar refinado-T3; bagaço de cana + açúcar refinado + papelão picado-T4; bagaço de cana-de-açúcar decomposto-T5; bagaço decomposto + papelão picado-T6; bagaço decomposto + açúcar refinado-T7; bagaço ...

  14. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  15. Genetic Diversity and Host Range of Rhizobia Nodulating Lotus tenuis in Typical Soils of the Salado River Basin (Argentina)▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrella, María Julia; Muñoz, Socorro; Soto, María José; Ruiz, Oscar; Sanjuán, Juan

    2009-01-01

    A total of 103 root nodule isolates were used to estimate the diversity of bacteria nodulating Lotus tenuis in typical soils of the Salado River Basin. A high level of genetic diversity was revealed by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR, and 77 isolates with unique genomic fingerprints were further differentiated into two clusters, clusters A and B, after 16S rRNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Cluster A strains appeared to be related to the genus Mesorhizobium, whereas cluster B was related to the genus Rhizobium. 16S rRNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis further supported the distribution of most of the symbiotic isolates in either Rhizobium or Mesorhizobium: the only exception was isolate BA135, whose 16S rRNA gene was closely related to the 16S rRNA gene of the genus Aminobacter. Most Mesorhizobium-like isolates were closely related to Mesorhizobium amorphae, Mesorhizobium mediterraneum, Mesorhizobium tianshanense, or the broad-host-range strain NZP2037, but surprisingly few isolates grouped with Mesorhizobium loti type strain NZP2213. Rhizobium-like strains were related to Rhizobium gallicum, Rhizobium etli, or Rhizobium tropici, for which Phaseolus vulgaris is a common host. However, no nodC or nifH genes could be amplified from the L. tenuis isolates, suggesting that they have rather divergent symbiosis genes. In contrast, nodC genes from the Mesorhizobium and Aminobacter strains were closely related to nodC genes from narrow-host-range M. loti strains. Likewise, nifH gene sequences were very highly conserved among the Argentinian isolates and reference Lotus rhizobia. The high levels of conservation of the nodC and nifH genes suggest that there was a common origin of the symbiosis genes in narrow-host-range Lotus symbionts, supporting the hypothesis that both intrageneric horizontal gene transfer and intergeneric horizontal gene transfer are important mechanisms for the spread of symbiotic capacity in the Salado River Basin. PMID

  16. Xylitol production from xylose mother liquor: a novel strategy that combines the use of recombinant Bacillus subtilis and Candida maltosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Mingguo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylose mother liquor has high concentrations of xylose (35%-40% as well as other sugars such as L-arabinose (10%-15%, galactose (8%-10%, glucose (8%-10%, and other minor sugars. Due to the complexity of this mother liquor, further isolation of xylose by simple method is not possible. In China, more than 50,000 metric tons of xylose mother liquor was produced in 2009, and the management of sugars like xylose that present in the low-cost liquor is a problem. Results We designed a novel strategy in which Bacillus subtilis and Candida maltosa were combined and used to convert xylose in this mother liquor to xylitol, a product of higher value. First, the xylose mother liquor was detoxified with the yeast C. maltosa to remove furfural and 5-hydromethylfurfural (HMF, which are inhibitors of B. subtilis growth. The glucose present in the mother liquor was also depleted by this yeast, which was an added advantage because glucose causes carbon catabolite repression in B. subtilis. This detoxification treatment resulted in an inhibitor-free mother liquor, and the C. maltosa cells could be reused as biocatalysts at a later stage to reduce xylose to xylitol. In the second step, a recombinant B. subtilis strain with a disrupted xylose isomerase gene was constructed. The detoxified xylose mother liquor was used as the medium for recombinant B. subtilis cultivation, and this led to L-arabinose depletion and xylose enrichment of the medium. In the third step, the xylose was further reduced to xylitol by C. maltosa cells, and crystallized xylitol was obtained from this yeast transformation medium. C. maltosa transformation of the xylose-enriched medium resulted in xylitol with 4.25 g L-1·h-1 volumetric productivity and 0.85 g xylitol/g xylose specific productivity. Conclusion In this study, we developed a biological method for the purification of xylose from xylose mother liquor and subsequent preparation of xylitol by C. maltosa

  17. Transcriptional activator Cat8 is involved in regulation of xylose alcoholic fermentation in the thermotolerant yeast Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchala, Justyna; Kurylenko, Olena O; Soontorngun, Nitnipa; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2017-02-28

    Efficient xylose alcoholic fermentation is one of the key to a successful lignocellulosic ethanol production. However, regulation of this process in the native xylose-fermenting yeasts is poorly understood. In this work, we paid attention to the transcriptional factor Cat8 and its possible role in xylose alcoholic fermentation in Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, organism, which does not metabolize xylose, gene CAT8 encodes a Zn-cluster transcriptional activator necessary for expression of genes involved in gluconeogenesis, respiration, glyoxylic cycle and ethanol utilization. Xylose is a carbon source that could be fermented to ethanol and simultaneously could be used in gluconeogenesis for hexose synthesis. This potentially suggests involvement of CAT8 in xylose metabolism. Here, the role of CAT8 homolog in the natural xylose-fermenting thermotolerant yeast O. polymorpha was characterized. The CAT8 ortholog was identified in O. polymorpha genome and deleted both in the wild-type strain and in advanced ethanol producer from xylose. Constructed cat8Δ strain isolated from wild strain showed diminished growth on glycerol, ethanol and xylose as well as diminished respiration on the last substrate. At the same time, cat8Δ mutant isolated from the best available O. polymorpha ethanol producer showed only visible defect in growth on ethanol. CAT8 deletant was characterized by activated transcription of genes XYL3, DAS1 and RPE1 and slight increase in the activity of several enzymes involved in xylose metabolism and alcoholic fermentation. Ethanol production from xylose in cat8Δ mutants in the background of wild-type strain and the best available ethanol producer from xylose increased for 50 and 30%, respectively. The maximal titer of ethanol during xylose fermentation was 12.5 g ethanol/L at 45 °C. Deletion of CAT8 did not change ethanol production from glucose. Gene CAT8 was also overexpressed under control of the strong constitutive

  18. Oxygen and xenobiotic reductase activities of cytochrome P450.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeptar, A.R.; Scheerens, H.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen reductase and xenobiotic reductase activities of cytochrome P450 (P450) are reviewed. During the oxygen reductase activity of P450, molecular oxygen is reduced to superoxide anion radicals (O

  19. Ethanol Production from Glucose and Xylose by Immobilized Zymomonas mobilis CP4(pZB5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, M.; Davison, B.H.; Krishnan, M.S.; Nghiem, n.P.; Shattuck, C.K.

    1999-05-02

    Fermentation of glucose-xylose mixtures to ethanol was investigated in batch and continuous experiments using immobilized recombinant Zymomonas mobilis CP4(pZB5). This microorganism was immobilized by entrapment in k-carrageenan beads having a diameter of 1.5-2.5 mm. Batch experiments showed that the immobilized cells co-fermented glucose and xylose to ethanol and that the presence of glucose improved the xylose utilization rate. Batch fermentation of rice straw hydrolyzate containing 76 g/L glucose and 33.8 g/L xylose gave an ethanol concentration of 44.3 g/L after 24 hours, corresponding to a yeild of 0.46 g ethanol/g sugars. Comparable results were achieved with a synthetic sugar control. Continuous fermentation runs were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR). Glucose-xylose feed mixtures were run through the FBR at residence times of 2 to 4 hours. Glucose conversion to ethanol was maintained above 98% in all continuous runs. Xylose conversion to ethanol was highest at 91.5% for a feed containing 50 g/L glucose-13 g/L xylose at a dilution rate of 0.24 h-1. The xylose conversion to ethanol decreased with increasing feed xylose concentration, dilution rate and age of the immobilized cells. Volumetric ethanol productivities in the range of 6.5 to 15.3 g/L-h were obtained.

  20. Simultaneous glucose and xylose uptake by an acetone/butanol/ethanol producing laboratory Clostridium beijerinckii strain SE-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Wen; Xu, Haipeng; Li, Yan; Hua, Dongliang; Jin, Fuqiang; Gao, Mintian; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    Most butanol-producing strains of Clostridium prefer glucose over xylose, leading to a slower butanol production from lignocellulose hydrolysates. It is therefore beneficial to find and use a strain that can simultaneously use both glucose and xylose. Clostridium beijerinckii SE-2 strain assimilated glucose and xylose simultaneously and produced ABE (acetone/butanol/ethanol). The classic diauxic growth behavior was not seen. Similar rates of sugar consumption (4.44 mM glucose h(-1) and 6.66 mM xylose h(-1)) were observed suggesting this strain could use either glucose or xylose as the substrate and it has a similar capability to degrade these two sugars. With different initial glucose:xylose ratios, glucose and xylose were consumed simultaneously at rates roughly proportional to their individual concentrations in the medium, leading to complete utilization of both sugars at the same time. ABE production profiles were similar on different substrates. Transcriptional studies on the effect of glucose and xylose supplementation, however, suggests a clear glucose inhibition on xylose metabolism-related genes is still present.

  1. Lactobacillus oligofermentans glucose, ribose and xylose transcriptomes show higher similarity between glucose and xylose catabolism-induced responses in the early exponential growth phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreevskaya, Margarita; Johansson, Per; Jääskeläinen, Elina; Rämö, Tanja; Ritari, Jarmo; Paulin, Lars; Björkroth, Johanna; Auvinen, Petri

    2016-08-03

    Lactobacillus oligofermentans has been mostly isolated from cold-stored packaged meat products in connection with their spoilage, but its precise role in meat spoilage is unknown. It belongs to the L. vaccinostercus group of obligate heterofermentative lactobacilli that generally ferment pentoses (e.g. xylose and ribose) more efficiently than hexoses (e.g. glucose). However, more efficient hexose utilization can be induced. The regulation mechanisms of the carbohydrate catabolism in such bacteria have been scarcely studied. To address this question, we provided the complete genome sequence of L. oligofermentans LMG 22743(T) and generated time course transcriptomes during its growth on glucose, ribose and xylose. The genome was manually annotated and its main functional features were examined. L. oligofermentans was confirmed to be able to efficiently utilize several hexoses and maltose, which is, presumably, induced by its repeated cultivation with glucose in vitro. Unexpectedly, in the beginning of the exponential growth phase, glucose- and xylose-induced transcriptome responses were more similar, whereas toward the end of the growth phase xylose and ribose transcriptomes became more alike. The promoter regions of genes simultaneously upregulated both on glucose and xylose in comparison with ribose (particularly, hexose and xylose utilization genes) were found to be enriched in the CcpA- binding site. Transcriptionally, no glucose-induced carbon catabolite repression was detected. The catabolism of glucose, which requires initial oxidation, led to significant overexpression of the NAD(P)H re-oxidation genes, the upstream regions of which were found to contain a motif, which was highly similar to a Rex repressor binding site. This paper presents the second complete genome and the first study of carbohydrate catabolism-dependent transcriptome response for a member of the L. vaccinostercus group. The transcriptomic changes detected in L. oligofermentans for growth

  2. Simultaneous utilization of glucose and xylose for lipid production by Trichosporon cutaneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Guojie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical conversion of lignocellulose hydrolysates remains challenging, largely because most microbial processes have markedly reduced efficiency in the presence of both hexoses and pentoses. Thus, identification of microorganisms capable of efficient and simultaneous utilization of both glucose and xylose is pivotal to improving this process. Results In this study, we found that the oleaginous yeast strain Trichosporon cutaneum AS 2.571 assimilated glucose and xylose simultaneously, and accumulated intracellular lipid up to 59 wt% with a lipid coefficient up to 0.17 g/g sugar, upon cultivation on a 2:1 glucose/xylose mixture in a 3-liter stirred-tank bioreactor. In addition, no classic pattern of diauxic growth behavior was seen; the microbial cell mass increased during the whole culture process without any lag periods. In shake-flask cultures with different initial glucose:xylose ratios, glucose and xylose were consumed simultaneously at rates roughly proportional to their individual concentrations in the medium, leading to complete utilization of both sugars at the same time. Simultaneous utilization of glucose and xylose was also seen during fermentation of corn-stover hydrolysate with a lipid content and coefficient of 39.2% and 0.15 g/g sugar, respectively. The lipid produced had a fatty-acid compositional profile similar to those of conventional vegetable oil, indicating that it could have potential as a raw material for biodiesel production. Conclusion Efficient lipid production with simultaneous consumption of glucose and xylose was achieved in this study. This process provides an exciting opportunity to transform lignocellulosic materials into biofuel molecules, and should also encourage further study to elucidate this unique sugar-assimilation mechanism.

  3. Biohydrogen production from xylose at extreme thermophilic temperatures (70 degrees C) by mixed culture fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongjan, Prawit; Min, Booki; Angelidaki, Irini

    2009-03-01

    Biohydrogen production from xylose at extreme thermophilic temperatures (70 degrees C) was investigated in batch and continuous-mode operation. Biohydrogen was successfully produced from xylose by repeated batch cultivations with mixed culture received from a biohydrogen reactor treating household solid wastes at 70 degrees C. The highest hydrogen yield of 1.62+/-0.02 mol-H2/mol-xylose(consumed) was obtained at initial xylose concentration of 0.5 g/L with synthetic medium amended with 1g/L of yeast extract. Lower hydrogen yield was achieved at initial xylose concentration higher than 2g/L. Addition of yeast extract in the cultivation medium resulted in significant improvement of hydrogen yield. The main metabolic products during xylose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, and lactate. The specific growth rates were able to fit the experimental points relatively well with Haldane equation assuming substrate inhibition, and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: the maximum specific growth rate (mu(max)) was 0.17 h(-1), the half-saturation constant (K(s)) was 0.75g/L, and inhibition constant (K(i)) was 3.72 g/L of xylose. Intermittent N2 sparging could enhance hydrogen production when high hydrogen partial pressure (> 0.14 atm) was present in the headspace of the batch reactors. Biohydrogen could be successfully produced in continuously stirred reactor (CSTR) operated at 72-h hydraulic retention time (HRT) with 1g/L of xylose as substrate at 70 degrees C. The hydrogen production yield achieved in the CSTR was 1.36+/-0.03 mol-H2/mol-xylose(sonsumed), and the production rate was 62+/-2 ml/d x L(reactor). The hydrogen content in the methane-free mixed gas was approximately 31+/-1%, and the rest was carbon dioxide. The main intermediate by-products from the effluent were acetate, formate, and ethanol at 4.25+/-0.10, 3.01+/-0.11, and 2.59+/-0.16 mM, respectively.

  4. Deep eutectic solvent and inorganic salt pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for improving xylose recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loow, Yu-Loong; Wu, Ta Yeong; Yang, Ge Hoa; Ang, Lin Yang; New, Eng Kein; Siow, Lee Fong; Md Jahim, Jamaliah; Mohammad, Abdul Wahab; Teoh, Wen Hui

    2017-07-29

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received considerable attention in recent years due to their low cost, low toxicity, and biodegradable properties. In this study, a sequential pretreatment comprising of a DES (choline chloride:urea in a ratio of 1:2) and divalent inorganic salt (CuCl2) was evaluated, with the aim of recovering xylose from oil palm fronds (OPF). At a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:10 (w/v), DES alone was ineffective in promoting xylose extraction from OPF. However, a combination of DES (120°C, 4h) and 0.4mol/L of CuCl2 (120°C, 30min) resulted in a pretreatment hydrolysate containing 14.76g/L of xylose, remarkably yielding 25% more xylose than the CuCl2-only pretreatment (11.87g/L). Characterization studies such as FE-SEM, BET, XRD, and FTIR confirmed the delignification of OPF when DES was implemented. Thus, the use of this integrated pretreatment system enabled xylose recoveries which were comparable with other traditional pretreatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased ethanol production by deletion of HAP4 in recombinant xylose-assimilating Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2015-12-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAP4 gene encodes a transcription activator that plays a key role in controlling the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial respiration and reductive pathways. This work examines the effect of knockout of the HAP4 gene on aerobic ethanol production in a xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strain. A hap4-deleted recombinant yeast strain (B42-DHAP4) showed increased maximum concentration, production rate, and yield of ethanol compared with the reference strain MA-B42, irrespective of cultivation medium (glucose, xylose, or glucose/xylose mixtures). Notably, B42-DHAP4 was capable of producing ethanol from xylose as the sole carbon source under aerobic conditions, whereas no ethanol was produced by MA-B42. Moreover, the rate of ethanol production and ethanol yield (0.44 g/g) from the detoxified hydrolysate of wood chips was markedly improved in B42-DHAP4 compared to MA-B42. Thus, the results of this study support the view that deleting HAP4 in xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strains represents a useful strategy in ethanol production processes.

  6. Xylose isomerization with zeolites in a two-step alcohol-water process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, Marta; Saravanamurugan, Shunmugavel; Melian-Rodriguez, Mayra; Melero, Juan A; Riisager, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Isomerization of xylose to xylulose was efficiently catalyzed by large-pore zeolites in a two-step methanol-water process that enhanced the product yield significantly. The reaction pathway involves xylose isomerization to xylulose, which, in part, subsequently reacts with methanol to form methyl xyluloside (step 1) followed by hydrolysis after water addition to form additional xylulose (step 2). NMR spectroscopy studies performed with (13) C-labeled xylose confirmed the proposed reaction pathway. The most active catalyst examined was zeolite Y, which proved more active than zeolite beta, ZSM-5, and mordenite. The yield of xylulose obtained over H-USY (Si/Al=6) after 1 h of reaction at 100 °C was 39%. After water hydrolysis in the second reaction step, the yield increased to 47%. Results obtained from pyridine adsorption studies confirm that H-USY (6) is a catalyst that combines Brønsted and Lewis acid sites, and isomerizes xylose in alcohol media to form xylulose at low temperature. The applied zeolites are commercially available; do not contain any auxiliary tetravalent metals, for example, tin, titanium, or zirconium; isomerize xylose efficiently; are easy to regenerate; and are prone to recycling. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Xylose from lignocellulosic waste in the production and industrial processing of pinneaple (Ananascomusus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Ramírez Amador

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosicwaste from the pineapple production is a raw material useful for the xylose production by hydrolysis and it can be converted to xylitol. The objective of this work was to study the hydrolysis of pineapple peel with sulfuric acid at variable concentration (2-6%, reaction time (0-350 min and temperature at 98 ˚C. The concentration of xylose, glucose and degradation products as acetic acid and furfural was determined. Optimal conditions found for hydrolysis were 6% H2SO4 at 98 ˚C for 83 min which yield was 26,9 g xylose/L, 2,61 g glucose/L, 7,71 g acetic acid/L and 0,29 g furfural/L.

  8. Selective Preparation of Furfural from Xylose over Sulfonic Acid Functionalized Mesoporous Sba-15 Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Li

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous SBA-15 materials were prepared using the co-condensation and grafting methods, respectively, and their catalytic performance in the dehydration of xylose to furfural was examined. SBA-15-SO3H(C prepared by the co-condensation method showed 92–95% xylose conversion and 74% furfural selectivity, and 68–70% furfural yield under the given reaction conditions. The deactivation and regeneration of the SBA-15-SO3H(C catalyst for the dehydration of xylose was also investigated. The results indicate that the used and regeneration catalysts retained the SBA-15 mesoporous structure, and the S content of SBA-15-SO3H(C almost did not change. The deactivation of the catalysts is proposed to be associated with the accumulation of byproducts, which is caused by the loss reaction of furfural. After regeneration by H2O2, the catalytic activity of the catalyst almost recovered.

  9. Xylose Isomerization with Zeolites in a Two-Step Alcohol–Water Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paniagua, Marta; Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan; Melián Rodriguez, Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Isomerization of xylose to xylulose was efficiently catalyzed by large-pore zeolites in a two-step methanol–water process that enhanced the product yield significantly. The reaction pathway involves xylose isomerization to xylulose, which, in part, subsequently reacts with methanol to form methyl...... xyluloside (step 1) followed by hydrolysis after water addition to form additional xylulose (step 2). NMR spectroscopy studies performed with 13C-labeled xylose confirmed the proposed reaction pathway. The most active catalyst examined was zeolite Y, which proved more active than zeolite beta, ZSM-5......, and mordenite. The yield of xylulose obtained over H-USY (Si/Al=6) after 1 h of reaction at 1008C was 39%. After water hydrolysis in the second reaction step, the yield increased to 47%. Results obtained from pyridine adsorption studies confirm that H-USY (6) is a catalyst that combines Brønsted and Lewis acid...

  10. Effective biosynthesis of ethyl (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate by supplementation of l-glutamine, d-xylose and β-cyclodextrin in n-butyl acetate-water media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu-Cai; Tao, Zhi-Cheng; Ding, Yun; Zhang, Dan-Ping; Wu, Yin-Qin; Lu, Yun; Liu, Feng; Xue, Yu-Feng; Wang, Cheng; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-06-10

    To avoid adding NAD(+) and effectively transform ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate, the mixture of l-glutamine (200mM) and d-xylose (250mM) was added into in n-butyl acetate-water (10:90, v/v) biphasic system instead of NAD(+) for increasing the biocatalytic efficiency. To further improve the synthesis of optically pure ethyl (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate (>99% ee), β-cyclodextrin was also added into this reaction media, and ethyl (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate (>99% ee) could be effectively synthesized from 800mM ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate in the yield of 100% by whole-cells of recombinant E. coli CCZU-A13. Finally, the possible mechanism for improving the reductase activity by supplementation of l-glutamine, d-xylose and β-CD was proposed. In conclusion, this strategy has high potential for the effective biosynthesis of ethyl (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate (>99% ee). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lotus tenuis x L. corniculatus interspecific hybridization as a means to breed bloat-safe pastures and gain insight into the genetic control of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaray, Francisco J; Passeri, Valentina; Babuin, Florencia M; Marco, Francisco; Carrasco, Pedro; Damiani, Francesco; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Paolocci, Francesco; Ruiz, Oscar A

    2014-02-03

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are secondary metabolites that strongly affect plant quality traits. The concentration and the structure of these metabolites influence the palatability and nutritional value of forage legumes. Hence, modulating PAs in the leaves of forage legumes is of paramount relevance for forage breeders worldwide. The lack of genetic variation in the leaf PA trait within the most important forage species and the difficulties in engineering this pathway via the ectopic expression of regulatory genes, prompted us to pursue alternative strategies to enhance this trait in forage legumes of agronomic interest. The Lotus genus includes forage species which accumulate PAs in edible organs and can thus be used as potential donor parents in breeding programs. We recovered a wild, diploid and PA-rich population of L. corniculatus and crossed with L. tenuis. The former grows in an alkaline-salty area in Spain while the latter is a diploid species, grown extensively in South American pastures, which does not accumulate PAs in the herbage. The resulting interspecific hybrids displayed several traits of outstanding agronomic relevance such as rhizome production, PA levels in edible tissues sufficient to prevent ruminal bloating (around 5 mg of PAs/g DW), biomass production similar to the cultivated parent and potential for adaptability to marginal lands. We show that PA levels correlate with expression levels of the R2R3MYB transcription factor TT2 and, in turn, with those of the key structural genes of the epicatechin and catechin biosynthetic pathways leading to PA biosynthesis. The L. tenuis x L. corniculatus hybrids, reported herein, represent the first example of the introgression of the PA trait in forage legumes to levels known to provide nutritional and health benefits to ruminants. Apart from PAs, the hybrids have additional traits which may prove useful to breed forage legumes with increased persistence and adaptability to marginal conditions. Finally, our

  12. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from glucose and xylose by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    biomass into the products of interest. We engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), a potential building block for acrylates, from glucose and xylose. We introduced the 3HP biosynthetic pathways via malonyl-CoA or β-alanine intermediates into a xylose...

  13. KINETICS OF GROWTH AND ETHANOL PRODUCTION ON DIFFERENT CARBON SUBSTRATES USING GENETICALLY ENGINEERED XYLOSE-FERMENTING YEAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST) strain was used for fermentation of glucose and xylose. Growth kinetics and ethanol productivity were calculated for batch fermentation on media containing different combinations of glucose and xylose to give a final sugar concentra...

  14. Influence of genetic background of engineered xylose-fermenting industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    An industrial ethanol-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with genes needed for xylose-fermentation integrated into its genome was used to obtain haploids and diploid isogenic strains. The isogenic strains were more effective in metabolizing xylose than their parental strain (p < 0.05) and abl...

  15. Effect of xylose on the synthesis of phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine in rat lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, H M; Ekambaram, M C; Blum, P S; Blanchard, M S

    1993-03-01

    Choline, an essential phospholipid precursor, enters the lens by a facilitated transport system and is phosphorylated to form phosphorylcholine (P-choline). Intact lenses incubated with [3H]choline accumulate both [3H]choline and P-[3H]choline. The rate and extent of this accumulation have been used to study the effects of osmotic or oxidative cataractogenic stress, and also to test the ability of compounds to protect lenses from stress-related damage. The initial effect of oxidative stress on choline metabolism is decreased choline transport, but the mechanism by which osmotic stress affects the accumulation of [3H]choline is not understood. The effects of osmotic and oxidative stress on choline influx and metabolism were compared in rat lenses incubated in TC-199 medium. After osmotic stress by incubation with 30 mM xylose for up to 24 hr, lenses accumulated the same amount of radiolabel as controls during a 30 min pulse with [3H]choline. However, if the lenses were exposed to [3H]choline for 6 hr so that accumulation of radiolabel in the lenses was limited by the rate of P-choline synthesis, xylose treated lenses accumulated less choline than controls. Separation of the lenticular radiolabel into [3H]choline and P-[3H]choline confirmed that xylose decreased synthesis of P-choline, although adequate unphosphorylated [3H]choline was available in the lenses. A decrease in P-[3H]ethanolamine synthesis was also seen in xylose-treated lenses incubated with [3H]ethanolamine. Ethanolamine can enter lenses by a non-saturable process which is not dependent upon a transporter. Although xylose decreased P-choline synthesis in intact lenses, neither xylose nor xylitol inhibited choline kinase in lens homogenates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Xylose from lignocellulosic waste in the production and industrial processing of pinneaple (Ananascomusus)

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez Amador, Karla; Rojas Carrillo, Óscar; Alvarado Aguilar, Patricia; Vega-Baudrit, José

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosicwaste from the pineapple production is a raw material useful for the xylose production by hydrolysis and it can be converted to xylitol. The objective of this work was to study the hydrolysis of pineapple peel with sulfuric acid at variable concentration (2-6%), reaction time (0-350 min) and temperature at 98 ˚C. The concentration of xylose, glucose and degradation products as acetic acid and furfural was determined. Optimal conditions found for hydrolysis were 6% H2SO4 at 98 ˚...

  17. Increasing ethanol productivity during xylose fermentation by cell recycling of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    (-1). Consequently, the volumetric ethanol productivity increased ten-fold, from 0.5 g l(-1) h(-1) to 5.35 g l(-1) h(-1). By increasing the biomass concentration, the xylose consumption rate increased from 0.75 g xylose l(-1) h(-1) without recycling to 1.9 g l(-1) h(-1) with recycling. The specific...... ethanol productivity was in the range of 0.23-0.26 g g(-1) h(-1) with or without cell recycling, showing that an increased cell-mass concentration did not influence the efficiency of the yeast....

  18. Improved inhibitor tolerance in xylose-fermenting yeast Spathaspora passalidarum by mutagenesis and protoplast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru; Yao, Shuo

    2012-01-01

    from fusion of the protoplasts of S. passalidarum M7 and a robust yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581, were able to grow in 75% WSLQ and produce around 0.4 g ethanol/g consumed xylose. Among the selected hybrid strains, the hybrid FS22 showed the best fermentation capacity in 75% WSLQ...... final ethanol than the wild-type strain in a synthetic xylose medium containing 2 g/l furfural. However, this mutant was unable to grow in a medium containing 75% liquid fraction of pretreated wheat straw (WSLQ), in which furfural and many other inhibitors were present. Hybrid yeast strains, obtained...... to inhibitors from S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581....

  19. Improved Xylose Metabolism by a CYC8 Mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijland, Jeroen G; Shin, Hyun Yong; Boender, Leonie G M; de Waal, Paul P; Klaassen, Paul; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2017-06-01

    Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the utilization of pentose sugars is an important goal for the production of second-generation bioethanol and biochemicals. However, S. cerevisiae lacks specific pentose transporters, and in the presence of glucose, pentoses enter the cell inefficiently via endogenous hexose transporters (HXTs). By means of in vivo engineering, we have developed a quadruple hexokinase deletion mutant of S. cerevisiae that evolved into a strain that efficiently utilizes d-xylose in the presence of high d-glucose concentrations. A genome sequence analysis revealed a mutation (Y353C) in the general corepressor CYC8, or SSN6, which was found to be responsible for the phenotype when introduced individually in the nonevolved strain. A transcriptome analysis revealed altered expression of 95 genes in total, including genes involved in (i) hexose transport, (ii) maltose metabolism, (iii) cell wall function (mannoprotein family), and (iv) unknown functions (seripauperin multigene family). Of the 18 known HXTs, genes for 9 were upregulated, especially the low or nonexpressed HXT10, HXT13, HXT15, and HXT16 Mutant cells showed increased uptake rates of d-xylose in the presence of d-glucose, as well as elevated maximum rates of metabolism (Vmax) for both d-glucose and d-xylose transport. The data suggest that the increased expression of multiple hexose transporters renders d-xylose metabolism less sensitive to d-glucose inhibition due to an elevated transport rate of d-xylose into the cell.IMPORTANCE The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used for second-generation bioethanol formation. However, growth on xylose is limited by pentose transport through the endogenous hexose transporters (HXTs), as uptake is outcompeted by the preferred substrate, glucose. Mutant strains were obtained with improved growth characteristics on xylose in the presence of glucose, and the mutations mapped to the regulator Cyc8. The inactivation of Cyc8 caused increased expression

  20. Oxidative production of xylonic acid using xylose in distillation stillage of cellulosic ethanol fermentation broth by Gluconobacter oxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongsen; Han, Xushen; Wei, Chengxiang; Bao, Jie

    2017-01-01

    An oxidative production process of xylonic acid using xylose in distillation stillage of cellulosic ethanol fermentation broth was designed, experimentally investigated, and evaluated. Dry dilute acid pretreated and biodetoxified corn stover was simultaneously saccharified and fermented into 59.80g/L of ethanol (no xylose utilization). 65.39g/L of xylose was obtained in the distillation stillage without any concentrating step after ethanol was distillated. Then the xylose was completely converted into 66.42g/L of xylonic acid by Gluconobacter oxydans. The rigorous Aspen Plus modeling shows that the wastewater generation and energy consumption was significantly reduced comparing to the previous xylonic acid production process using xylose in pretreatment liquid. This study provided a practical process option for xylonic acid production from lignocellulose feedstock with significant reduction of wastewater and energy consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Production of D-arabitol from D-xylose by the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides IFO0880.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Sujit Sadashiv; Rao, Christopher V

    2017-11-11

    The sugar alcohol D-arabitol is one of the Department of Energy's top twelve bio-based building block chemicals. In this study, we found that the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides IFO0880 produces D-arabitol during growth on xylose in nitrogen-rich medium. Efficient xylose utilization was a prerequisite for extracellular D-arabitol production. During growth in complex media, R. toruloides produced 22 ± 2, 32 ± 2, and 49 ± 2 g/L D-arabitol from 70, 105, and 150 g/L xylose, respectively. In addition, we found that R. toruloides could potentially be used for the co-production of lipids and D-arabitol from xylose. These results demonstrate that R. toruloides can be used to produce multiple value-added chemicals from xylose.

  2. Engineered yeast with a CO2-fixation pathway to improve the bio-ethanol production from xylose-mixed sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Jie; Wang, Miao-Miao; Chen, Ya-Wei; Wang, Meng; Fan, Li-Hai; Tan, Tian-Wei

    2017-03-06

    Bio-ethanol production from lignocellulosic raw materials could serve as a sustainable potential for improving the supply of liquid fuels in face of the food-to-fuel competition and the growing energy demand. Xylose is the second abundant sugar of lignocelluloses hydrolysates, but its commercial-scale conversion to ethanol by fermentation is challenged by incomplete and inefficient utilization of xylose. Here, we use a coupled strategy of simultaneous maltose utilization and in-situ carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation to achieve efficient xylose fermentation by the engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results showed that the introduction of CO2 as electron acceptor for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidation increased the total ethanol productivity and yield at the expense of simultaneous maltose and xylose utilization. Our achievements present an innovative strategy using CO2 to drive and redistribute the central pathways of xylose to desirable products and demonstrate a possible breakthrough in product yield of sugars.

  3. Deleting the para-nitrophenyl phosphatase (pNPPase), PHO13, in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves growth and ethanol production on D-xylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Van Vleet; Thomas W. Jeffries; Lisbeth Olsson

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of D-xylulokinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for assimilation of xylose results in growth inhibition that is more pronounced at higher xylose concentrations. Mutants deficient in the para-nitrophenyl phosphatase, PHO13, resist growth inhibition on xylose. We studied this inhibition under aerobic growth conditions in well-controlled...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... G. New mutations, hotspots, and founder effects in Brazilian patients with steroid 5alpha-reductase deficiency type 2. ... should consult with a qualified healthcare professional . About Selection Criteria for Links Data Files & API Site Map ...

  5. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase A1298C Polymorphism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epigenetic alterations in cancer-related genes are recognized to play an important role in BC carcinogenesis. Epidemiological studies have consistently supported that ... Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) enzyme is essential for DNA synthesis ...... disease: A common mutation in methylenetetrahydrofolate.

  6. The Influence of Sugar Cane Bagasse Type and Its Particle Size on Xylose Production and Xylose-to-Xylitol Bioconversion with the Yeast Debaryomyces hansenii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghcheh, Razieh Karimi; Bonakdarpour, Babak; Ashtiani, Farzin Zokaee

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the effect of the type of sugar cane bagasse (non-depithed or depithed) and its particle size on the production of xylose and its subsequent fermentation to xylitol by Debaryomyces hansenii CBS767 was investigated using a full factorial experimental design. It was found that the particle size range and whether bagasse was depithed or not had a significant effect on the concentration and yield of xylose in the resulting hemicellulose hydrolysate. Depithed bagasse resulted in higher xylose concentrations compared to non-depithed bagasse. The corresponding detoxified hemicellulose hydrolysates were used as fermentation media for the production of xylitol. The hemicellulose hydrolysate prepared from depithed bagasse also yielded meaningfully higher xylitol fermentation rates compared to non-depithed bagasse. However, in the case of non-depithed bagasse, the hemicellulose hydrolysate prepared from larger particle size range resulted in higher xylitol fermentation rates, whereas the effect in the case of non-depithed bagasse was not pronounced. Therefore, depithing of bagasse is an advantageous pretreatment when it is to be employed in bioconversion processes.

  7. Effects of alumina refinery wastewater and signature metal constituents at the upper thermal tolerance of: 2. The early life stages of the coral Acropora tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Andrew P; Harford, Andrew J; Parry, David L; van Dam, Rick A

    2011-03-01

    The success of early life history transitions of the coral Acropora tenuis were used as endpoints to evaluate thermal stress and the effects of wastewater discharged to a tropical marine environment. The studies assessed the effects of: (i) temperature; (ii) three signature metals of the wastewater, aluminium (Al), vanadium (V) and gallium (Ga); and (iii) the wastewater (at 27°C and 32°C) on fertilisation and larval metamorphosis. The median inhibition temperatures for fertilisation and metamorphosis were 32.8°C and 33.0°C, respectively. Fertilisation IC(50)s for Al, V and Ga were 2997, 2884 and 3430 μg L(-1), respectively. Metamorphosis IC(50)s for Al, V and Ga were 1945, 675 and 3566 μg L(-1), respectively. The wastewater only affected fertilisation and metamorphosis at moderate concentrations (IC(50)s=63% and 67%, v/v, respectively, at 27°C), posing a low risk to this species in the field. The effects of wastewater and temperature on fertilisation and metamorphosis were additive. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional and Evolutionary Characterization of a UDP-Xylose Synthase Gene from the Plant Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, Involved in the Synthesis of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Valquíria Campos; Jabes, Daniela Leite; Menegidio, Fabiano Bezerra; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; de Souza, Lucas Rodrigo; Puzer, Luciano; Meneghetti, Maria Cecília Zorél; Lima, Marcelo Andrade; Tersariol, Ivarne Luis Dos Santos; de Oliveira, Regina Costa; Nunes, Luiz R

    2017-02-07

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-infecting bacillus, responsible for many important crop diseases, such as Pierce's disease of vineyards, citrus variegated chlorosis, and coffee leaf scorch (CLS), among others. Recent genomic comparisons involving two CLS-related strains, belonging to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca, revealed that one of them carries a frameshift mutation that inactivates a gene encoding an oxidoreductase of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily, which may play important roles in determining structural variations in bacterial glycans and glycoconjugates. However, the exact nature of this SDR has been a matter of controversy, as different annotations of X. fastidiosa genomes have implicated it in distinct reactions. To confirm the nature of this mutated SDR, a comparative analysis was initially performed, suggesting that it belongs to a subgroup of SDR decarboxylases, representing a UDP-xylose synthase (Uxs). Functional assays, using a recombinant derivative of this enzyme, confirmed its nature as XfUxs, and carbohydrate composition analyses, performed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules obtained from different strains, indicate that inactivation of the X. fastidiosa uxs gene affects the LPS structure among CLS-related X. fastidiosa strains. Finally, a comparative sequence analysis suggests that this mutation is likely to result in a morphological and evolutionary hallmark that differentiates two subgroups of CLS-related strains, which may influence interactions between these bacteria and their plant and/or insect hosts.

  9. Furfural synthesis from D-xylose in the presence of sodium chloride : Microwave versus conventional heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiouras, C.; Radacsi, N.; Sturm, G.S.J.; Stefanidis, G.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the existence of specific/nonthermal microwave effects for the dehydration reaction of xylose to furfural in the presence of NaCl. Such effects are reported for sugars dehydration reactions in several literature reports. To this end, we adopted three approaches that compare

  10. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from glucose and xylose by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchana R. Kildegaard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomass, the most abundant carbon source on the planet, may in the future become the primary feedstock for production of fuels and chemicals, replacing fossil feedstocks. This will, however, require development of cell factories that can convert both C6 and C5 sugars present in lignocellulosic biomass into the products of interest. We engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP, a potential building block for acrylates, from glucose and xylose. We introduced the 3HP biosynthetic pathways via malonyl-CoA or β-alanine intermediates into a xylose-consuming yeast. Using controlled fed-batch cultivation, we obtained 7.37±0.17 g 3HP L−1 in 120 hours with an overall yield of 29±1% Cmol 3HP Cmol−1 xylose. This study is the first demonstration of the potential of using S. cerevisiae for production of 3HP from the biomass sugar xylose.

  11. Fermentation of D-xylose and L-arabinose to ethanol by Erwinia chrysanthemi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolan, J.S.; Finn, R.K.

    1987-09-01

    Erwinia spp. are gram-negative facultative anaerobes within the family Enterobacteriacae which possess several desirable traits for the conversion of pentose sugars to ethanol, such as the ability to ferment a broad range of carbohydrates and the ease with which they can be genetically modified. Twenty-eight strains of Erwinia carotovora and E. chrysanthemi were screened for the ability to ferment D-xylose to ethanol. E. chrysanthemi B374 was chosen for further study on the basis of its superior (4%) ethanol tolerance. They have characterized the fermentation of D-xylose and L-arabinose by the wild type and mutants which bear plasmids containing the pyruvate decarboxylase gene from Zymomonas mobilis. Expression of the gene markedly increased the yields of ethanol (from 0.7 up to 1.45 mol/mol of xylose) and decreased the yields of formate, acetate, and lactate. However, the cells with pyruvate decarboxylase grew only one-fourth as fast as the wild type and tolerated only 2% ethanol. Alcohol tolerance was stimulated by the addition of yeast extract to the growth medium. Xylose catabolism was characterized by a high saturation constant K/sub s/ (4.5 mM).

  12. Creation of a synthetic xylose-inducible promoter for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is currently used to produce ethanol from glucose, but it cannot utilize five-carbon sugars contained in the hemicellulose component of biomass feedstocks. S. cerevisiae strains engineered for xylose fermentation have been made using constitutive promoters to express the req...

  13. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose....

  14. Comparative genomics of xylose-fermenting fungi for enhanced biofuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana J. Wolbach; Alan Kuo; Trey K. Sato; Katlyn M. Potts; Asaf A. Salamov; Kurt M. LaButti; Hui Sun; Alicia Clum; Jasmyn L. Pangilinan; Erika A. Lindquist; Susan Lucas; Alla Lapidus; Mingjie Jin; Christa Gunawan; Venkatesh Balan; Bruce E. Dale; Thomas W. Jeffries; Robert Zinkel; Kerrie W. Barry; Igor V. Grigoriev; Audrey P. Gasch

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosic biomass is an abundant and underused substrate for biofuel production. The inability of many microbes to metabolize the pentose sugars abundant within hemicellulose creates specific challenges for microbial biofuel production from cellulosic material. Although engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can use the pentose xylose, the fermentative...

  15. Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of fuel ethanol from xylose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    For various reasons mankind is looking for alternatives for fossil fuels. One of these alternatives is ethanol made from plant biomass. However, the plant material when broken down by hydrolysis into its sugar monomers contains a significant amount of xylose, a 5-carbon-sugar or pentose. Contrary to

  16. Characterization of the quinine reductase activity of the ferrice reductase B protein from Paracoccus denitrificans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedlacek, V.; van Spanning, R.J.M.; Kucera, I.

    2009-01-01

    The ferric reductase B (FerB) protein of Paracoccus denitrificans exhibits activity of an NAD(P)H: Fe(III) chelate, chromate and quinone oxidoreductase. Sequence analysis places FerB in a family of soluble flavin-containing quinone reductases. The enzyme reduces a range of quinone substrates,

  17. Analytical Validation of a New Enzymatic and Automatable Method for d-Xylose Measurement in Human Urine Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Sánchez-Moreno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypolactasia, or intestinal lactase deficiency, affects more than half of the world population. Currently, xylose quantification in urine after gaxilose oral administration for the noninvasive diagnosis of hypolactasia is performed with the hand-operated nonautomatable phloroglucinol reaction. This work demonstrates that a new enzymatic xylose quantification method, based on the activity of xylose dehydrogenase from Caulobacter crescentus, represents an excellent alternative to the manual phloroglucinol reaction. The new method is automatable and facilitates the use of the gaxilose test for hypolactasia diagnosis in the clinical practice. The analytical validation of the new technique was performed in three different autoanalyzers, using buffer or urine samples spiked with different xylose concentrations. For the comparison between the phloroglucinol and the enzymatic assays, 224 urine samples of patients to whom the gaxilose test had been prescribed were assayed by both methods. A mean bias of −16.08 mg of xylose was observed when comparing the results obtained by both techniques. After adjusting the cut-off of the enzymatic method to 19.18 mg of xylose, the Kappa coefficient was found to be 0.9531, indicating an excellent level of agreement between both analytical procedures. This new assay represents the first automatable enzymatic technique validated for xylose quantification in urine.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a mutant recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with high efficiency xylose utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitaka, Masataka; Taguchi, Hisataka; Fukuda, Kohsai; Akamatsu, Takashi; Kida, Kenji

    2013-12-01

    A recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying one copy of heterologous XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis and endogenous XKS1 under the control of the TDH3 promoter in the chromosomal DNA was constructed from the industrial haploid yeast strain NAM34-4C, which showed thermotolerance and acid tolerance. The recombinant S. cerevisiae strain SCB7 grew in minimal medium containing xylose as the sole carbon source, and its shortest generation time (G(short)) was 5 h. From this strain, four mutants showing rapid growth (G(short) = 2.5 h) in the minimal medium were isolated. The mutants carried four mutations that were classified into three linkage groups. Three mutations were dominant and one mutation was recessive to the wild type allele. The recessive mutation was in the PHO13 gene encoding para-nitrophenyl phosphatase. The other mutant genes were not linked to TAL1 gene encoding transaldolase. When the mutants and their parental strain were used for the batch fermentation in a complex medium at pH 4.0 containing 30 g/L xylose at 35 °C with shaking (60 rpm) and an initial cell density (Absorbance at 660 nm) of 1.0, all mutants showed efficient ethanol production and xylose consumption from the early stage of the fermentation culture. In two mutants, within 24 h, 4.8 g/L ethanol was produced, and the ethanol yield was 47%, which was 1.4 times higher than that achieved with the parental strain. The xylose concentration in the medium containing the mutant decreased linearly at a rate of 1 g/L/h until 24 h. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Glucose(xylose isomerase production by Streptomyces sp. CH7 grown on agricultural residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankiya Chanitnun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces sp. CH7 was found to efficiently produce glucose(xylose isomerase when grown on either xylan or agricultural residues. This strain produced a glucose(xylose isomerase activity of roughly 1.8 U/mg of protein when it was grown in medium containing 1% xylose as a carbon source. Maximal enzymatic activities of about 5 and 3 U/mg were obtained when 1% xylan and 2.5% corn husks were used, respectively. The enzyme was purified from a mycelial extract to 16-fold purity with only two consecutive column chromatography steps using Macro-prep DEAE and Sephacryl-300, respectively. The approximate molecular weight of the purified enzyme is 170 kDa, and it has four identical subunits of 43.6 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. Its Km values for glucose and xylose were found to be 258.96 and 82.77 mM, respectively, and its Vmax values are 32.42 and 63.64 μM/min/mg, respectively. The purified enzyme is optimally active at 85ºC and pH 7.0. It is stable at pH 5.5-8.5 and at temperatures up to 60ºC after 30 min. These findings indicate that glucose(xylose isomerase from Streptomyces sp. CH7 has the potential for industrial applications, especially for high-fructose syrup production and bioethanol fermentation from hemicellulosic hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  20. Deleting the para-nitrophenyl phosphatase (pNPPase), PHO13, in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves growth and ethanol production on D-xylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Vleet, Jennifer; Jeffries, T.W.; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of D-xylulokinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for assimilation of xylose results in growth inhibition that is more pronounced at higher xylose concentrations. Mutants deficient in the para-nitrophenyl phosphatase, PHO13, resist growth inhibition on xylose. We studied...... this inhibition under aerobic growth conditions in well-controlled bioreactors using engineered S. cerevisiae CEN.PK. Growth on glucose was not significantly affected in pho13 Delta mutants, but acetate production increased by 75%. Cell growth, ethanol production, and xylose consumption all increased markedly...... in pho13 Delta mutants. The specific growth rate and rate of specific xylose uptake were approximately 1.5 times higher in the deletion strain than in the parental strain when growing on glucose-xylose mixtures and up to 10-fold higher when growing on xylose alone. In addition to showing higher acetate...

  1. Seleção de iscas celulósicas para o cupim Heterotermes tenuis (isoptera: rhinotermitidae em cultura de cana-de-açúcar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAMPOS M.B.S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se em condições de campo a atratividade ao cupim subterrâneo Heterotermes tenuis (H.,1858, importante praga da cana-de-açúcar no Brasil, de dezessete produtos com alto teor celulósico (bagaço de cana-de-açúcar "in natura"-T1; bagaço de cana + papelão ondulado picado-T2; bagaço de cana + açúcar refinado-T3; bagaço de cana + açúcar refinado + papelão picado-T4; bagaço de cana-de-açúcar decomposto-T5; bagaço decomposto + papelão picado-T6; bagaço decomposto + açúcar refinado-T7; bagaço decomposto + papelão picado + açúcar refinado-T8; torta de filtro "in natura"-T9; torta de filtro decomposta-T10; rolão de milho-T11; fezes frescas e secas de bovino-T12; papelão ondulado picado-T13; papel toalha picado-T14; serragem de pinus-T15; papelão ondulado usado picado-T16; celulose picada-T17. Usando-se a isca TermitrapR localizaram-se os focos do inseto no campo e, através de uma escala de notas, de zero a três, para a quantidade de cupins encontrados nas iscas, selecionaram-se os produtos mais atrativos, que foram em ordem decrescente: T12, T11, T1, T6, T3, T16, e T17.

  2. Impact of defoliation intensities on plant biomass, nutrient uptake and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus tenuis growing in a saline-sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, I; Mendoza, R

    2012-11-01

    The impact of different defoliation intensities on the ability of Lotus tenuis plants to regrowth, mobilise nutrients and to associate with native AM fungi and Rhizobium in a saline-sodic soil was investigated. After 70 days, plants were subjected to 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% defoliation and shoot regrowth was assessed at the end of subsequent 35 days. Compared to non-defoliated plants, low or moderate defoliation up to 75% did not affect shoot regrowth. However, 100% treatment affected shoot regrowth and the clipped plants were not able to compensate the growth attained by non-defoliated plants. Root growth was more affected by defoliation than shoot growth. P and N concentrations in shoots and roots increased with increasing defoliation while Na(+) concentration in shoots of non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants was similar. Non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants prevented increases of Na(+) concentration in shoots through both reducing Na(+) uptake and Na(+) transport to shoots by accumulating Na(+) in roots. At high defoliation, the salinity tolerance mechanism is altered and Na(+) concentration in shoots was higher than in roots. Reduction in the photosynthetic capacity induced by defoliation neither changed the root length colonised by AM fungi nor arbuscular colonisation but decreased the vesicular colonisation. Spore density did not change, but hyphal density and Rhizobium nodules increased with defoliation. The strategy of the AM symbiont consists in investing most of the C resources to preferentially retain arbuscular colonisation as well as inoculum density in the soil. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  4. Improved production of homo-D-lactic acid via xylose fermentation by introduction of xylose assimilation genes and redirection of the phosphoketolase pathway to the pentose phosphate pathway in L-Lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kenji; Yoshida, Shogo; Yamada, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-12-01

    The production of optically pure d-lactic acid via xylose fermentation was achieved by using a Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 strain whose l-lactate dehydrogenase gene was deficient and whose phosphoketolase genes were replaced with a heterologous transketolase gene. After 60 h of fermentation, 41.2 g/liter of d-lactic acid was produced from 50 g/liter of xylose.

  5. Diversity and physiological characterization of D-xylose-fermenting yeasts isolated from the Brazilian Amazonian Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel M Cadete

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study is the first to investigate the Brazilian Amazonian Forest to identify new D-xylose-fermenting yeasts that might potentially be used in the production of ethanol from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 224 yeast strains were isolated from rotting wood samples collected in two Amazonian forest reserve sites. These samples were cultured in yeast nitrogen base (YNB-D-xylose or YNB-xylan media. Candida tropicalis, Asterotremella humicola, Candida boidinii and Debaryomyces hansenii were the most frequently isolated yeasts. Among D-xylose-fermenting yeasts, six strains of Spathaspora passalidarum, two of Scheffersomyces stipitis, and representatives of five new species were identified. The new species included Candida amazonensis of the Scheffersomyces clade and Spathaspora sp. 1, Spathaspora sp. 2, Spathaspora sp. 3, and Candida sp. 1 of the Spathaspora clade. In fermentation assays using D-xylose (50 g/L culture medium, S. passalidarum strains showed the highest ethanol yields (0.31 g/g to 0.37 g/g and productivities (0.62 g/L · h to 0.75 g/L · h. Candida amazonensis exhibited a virtually complete D-xylose consumption and the highest xylitol yields (0.55 g/g to 0.59 g/g, with concentrations up to 25.2 g/L. The new Spathaspora species produced ethanol and/or xylitol in different concentrations as the main fermentation products. In sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic fermentation assays, S. stipitis UFMG-XMD-15.2 generated the highest ethanol yield (0.34 g/g and productivity (0.2 g/L · h, while the new species Spathaspora sp. 1 UFMG-XMD-16.2 and Spathaspora sp. 2 UFMG-XMD-23.2 were very good xylitol producers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the promise of using new D-xylose-fermenting yeast strains from the Brazilian Amazonian Forest for ethanol or xylitol production from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysates.

  6. A selective and sensitive D-xylose electrochemical biosensor based on xylose dehydrogenase displayed on the surface of bacteria and multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Liang, Bo; Shi, Jianguo; Li, Feng; Mascini, Marco; Liu, Aihua

    2012-03-15

    A novel Nafion/bacteria-displaying xylose dehydrogenase (XDH)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composite film-modified electrode was fabricated and applied for the sensitive and selective determination of d-xylose (INS 967), where the XDH-displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria) was prepared using a newly identified ice nucleation protein from Pseudomonas borealis DL7 as an anchoring motif. The XDH-displayed bacteria can be used directly, eliminating further enzyme-extraction and purification, thus greatly improved the stability of the enzyme. The optimal conditions for the construction of biosensor were established: homogeneous Nafion-MWNTs composite dispersion (10 μL) was cast onto the inverted glassy carbon electrode, followed by casting 10-μL of XDH-bacteria aqueous solution to stand overnight to dry, then a 5-μL of Nafion solution (0.05 wt%) is syringed to the electrode surface. The bacteria-displaying XDH could catalyze the oxidization of xylose to xylonolactone with coenzyme NAD(+) in 0.1M PBS buffer (pH7.4), where NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) is reduced to NADH (the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). The resultant NADH is further electrocatalytically oxidized by MWNTs on the electrode, resulting in an obvious oxidation peak around 0.50 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). In contrast, the bacteria-XDH-only modified electrode showed oxidation peak at higher potential of 0.7 V and less sensitivity. Therefore, the electrode/MWNTs/bacteria-XDH/Nafion exhibited good analytical performance such as long-term stability, a wide dynamic range of 0.6-100 μM and a low detection limit of 0.5 μM D-xylose (S/N=3). No interference was observed in the presence of 300-fold excess of other saccharides including D-glucose, D-fructose, D-maltose, D-galactose, D-mannose, D-sucrose, and D-cellbiose as well as 60-fold excess of L-arabinose. The proposed microbial biosensor is stable, specific, sensitive, reproducible, simple, rapid and cost-effective, which holds

  7. A dynamic flux balance model and bottleneck identification of glucose, xylose, xylulose co-fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economically viable production of lignocellulosic ethanol requires efficient conversion of feedstock sugars to ethanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot ferment xylose, the main five-carbon sugars in biomass, but can ferment xylulose, an enzymatically derived isomer. Xylulose fermentation is slow rel...

  8. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreiras, Lucas S; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B; Bice, Benjamin D; Bonfert, Brandi L; Pinhancos, Rebeca C; Balloon, Allison J; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T; Simmons, Blake A; Hodge, David B; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Dale, Bruce E; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P; Sato, Trey K

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH.

  9. Engineering and Two-Stage Evolution of a Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate-Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Anaerobic Fermentation of Xylose from AFEX Pretreated Corn Stover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreiras, Lucas S.; Breuer, Rebecca J.; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J.; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B.; Bice, Benjamin D.; Bonfert, Brandi L.; Pinhancos, Rebeca C.; Balloon, Allison J.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M.; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L.; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Hodge, David B.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Dale, Bruce E.; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H.; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P.; Sato, Trey K.

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH. PMID:25222864

  10. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas S Parreiras

    Full Text Available The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH.

  11. The synthetic xylulose-1 phosphate pathway increases production of glycolic acid from xylose-rich sugar mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Trichez, Débora; Cam, Yvan; Spina, Lucie; François, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glycolic acid (GA) is a two-carbon hydroxyacid with applications in the cosmetic, textile, and medical industry. Microbial GA production from all sugars can be achieved by engineering the natural glyoxylate shunt. The synthetic (D)-xylulose-1 phosphate (X1P) pathway provides a complementary route to produce GA from (D)-xylose. The simultaneous operation of the X1P and glyoxylate pathways increases the theoretical GA yield from xylose by 20 %, which may strongly improve GA producti...

  12. Characterization of the chlorate reductase from Pseudomonas chloritidismutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Schiltz, E.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A chlorate reductase has been purified from the chlorate-reducing strain Pseudomonas chloritidismutans. Comparison with the periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase of strain GR-1 showed that the cytoplasmic chlorate reductase of P. chloritidismutans reduced only chlorate and bromate. Differences were

  13. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375 Glutathione reductase assay. (a) Identification. A glutathione reductase assay is a device used to determine the...

  14. Effect of xylose and nutrients concentration on ethanol production by a newly isolated extreme thermophilic bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    product under most of the conditions tested, including in media lacking vitamins, peptone and yeast extract. The results indicate that this new organism is a promising candidate for the development of a second generation bio-ethanol production process. © IWA Publishing 2011.......An extreme thermophilic ethanol-producing strain was isolated from an ethanol high-yielding mixed culture, originally isolated from a hydrogen producing reactor operated at 70 °C. Ethanol yields were assessed with increasing concentrations of xylose, up to 20 g/l. The ability of the strain to grow...... without nutrient addition (yeast extract, peptone and vitamins) was also assessed. The maximum ethanol yield achieved was 1.28 molethanol/ molxylose consumed (77% of the theoretical yield), at 2 g/l of initial xylose concentration. The isolate was able to grow and produce ethanol as the main fermentation...

  15. Metabolic engineering of Klebsiella oxytoca M5A1 for ethanol production from xylose and glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Beall, D.S.; Mejia, J.P.; Shanmugam, K.T.; Ingram, L.O. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The efficient diversion of pyruvate from normal fermentative pathways to ethanol production in Klebsiella oxytoca M5A1 requires the expression of Zymomanas mobilis genes encoding both pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. Final ethanol concentrations obtained with the best recombinant, strain M5A1 (pLOI555), were in excess of 40 g/liter with an efficiency of 0.48 g of ethanol (xylose) and 0.50 g of ethanol (glucose) per g of sugar, as compared with a theoretical maximum of 0.51 of ethanol per g of sugar. The maximal volumetric productivity per hour for both sugars was 2.0 g/liter. This volumetric productivity with xylose is almost twice that previously obtained with ethanologenic Escherichia coli. Succinate was also produced as a minor product during fermentation.

  16. High performance separation of xylose and glucose by enzyme assisted nanofiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    to gluconic acid, 0.15M total feed concentration, pH 9.5, 25°C and 4bar), we achieved a xylose separation factor of 34 and a throughput of 18.7Lm−2h−1. In comparison, the separation factor was only 1.4 for solutions of xylose and glucose at the same process conditions, thus demonstrating the huge potential...... of the integrated system. Full conversion of glucose to gluconic acid assisted by glucose oxidase (GOD) could be achieved by coupling a parallel reaction catalyzed by catalase (CAT), where H2O2 (GOD-inhibitor formed in the first reaction) was decomposed to water and oxygen. GOD has a high oxygen...

  17. Dehydration of D-xylose to furfural using acid-functionalized MWCNTs catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termvidchakorn, Chompoopitch; Itthibenchapong, Vorranutch; Songtawee, Siripit; Chamnankid, Busaya; Namuangruk, Supawadee; Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Khunchit, Radchadaporn; Hansupaluk, Nanthiya; Sano, Noriaki; Hinode, Hirofumi

    2017-09-01

    Acid-functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) catalysts were prepared by a wet chemical sonication with various acid solutions, i.e. H2SO4, H3PO4, HNO3, and HCl. Sulfonic groups and carboxyl groups were detected on MWCNTs with H2SO4 treatment (s-MWCNTs), while only carboxyl groups were presented from other acid treatments. The catalytic dehydration of D-xylose into furfural was evaluated using a batch reactor at 170 °C for 3 h under N2 pressure of 15 bar. The highest furfural selectivity was achieved around 57% by s-MWCNTs catalyst, suggesting a positive role of the sulfonic functionalized groups. The effect of Co species was related to their Lewis acid property resulting in the enhancement of xylose conversion with low selectivity to furfural product. Invited talk at 5th Thailand International Nanotechnology Conference (Nano Thailand-2016), 27-29 November 2016, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.

  18. Conversion of Xylose to Furfuryl Alcohol and 2-Methylfuran in a Continuous Fixed-Bed Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jinglei; Tan, Jingjing; Cui, Xiaojing; Zhu, Yulei; Deng, Tiansheng; Ding, Guoqiang; Li, Yongwang

    2016-06-08

    An efficient process was designed for the synthesis of furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran from xylose using a continuous fixed-bed reactor over a catalyst combining Hβ zeolite and Cu/ZnO/Al2 O3 in γ-butyrolactone (GBL)/water as solvent. The cooperative effect of Hβ zeolite and GBL facilitated the dehydration of xylose and enhanced largely the furfural yield. The production of furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran can be simply tuned by changing the hydrogenation temperature for furfural over the Cu/ZnO/Al2 O3 catalyst. The yield for furfuryl alcohol reached 87.2 % at 150 °C whereas a yield of 86.8 % was achieved for 2-methylfuran at 190 °C. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Potential of xylose-fermented yeast isolated from sugarcane bagasse waste for xylitol production using hydrolysate as carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusumawadee Thancharoen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Xylitol is a high value sugar alcohol that is used as a sweetener. In the past years, the biological process of D-xylose from lignocellulosic material into xylitol has gained increasing interest as an alternative production method. In this study, sugarcane bagasse was used as raw material for xylitol production because of its high efficiency, reduced industrial cost, and high concentration of xylose. Pre-treatment of sugarcane bagasse with sulfuric acid was performed with various conditions. The results showed that the optimum condition was exhibited for 3.1% sulfuric acid at 126°C for 18 min producing 19 g/l xylose. Isolated yeasts from the sugarcane bagasse were selected and tested for xylitol ability from xylose. Results showed that Candida tropicalis KS 10-3 (from 72 isolates had the highest ability and produced 0.47 g xylitol/ g xylose in 96 hrs of cultivation containing 32.30 g/l xylose was used as the production medium.

  20. Metal Dependence of the Xylose Isomerase from Piromyces sp. E2 Explored by Activity Profiling and Protein Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Misun; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J; de Waal, Paul P; de Jong, Rene M; Dudek, Hanna M; Janssen, Dick B

    2017-11-14

    Xylose isomerase from Piromyces sp. E2 (PirXI) can be used to equip Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the capacity to ferment xylose to ethanol. The biochemical properties and structure of the enzyme have not been described even though its metal content, catalytic parameters, and expression level are critical for rapid xylose utilization. We have isolated the enzyme after high-level expression in Escherichia coli, analyzed the metal dependence of its catalytic properties, and determined 12 crystal structures in the presence of different metals, substrates, and substrate analogues. The activity assays revealed that various bivalent metals can activate PirXI for xylose isomerization. Among these metals, Mn2+ is the most favorable for catalytic activity. Furthermore, the enzyme shows the highest affinity for Mn2+, which was established by measuring the activation constants (Kact) for different metals. Metal analysis of the purified enzyme showed that in vivo the enzyme binds a mixture of metals that is determined by metal availability as well as affinity, indicating that the native metal composition can influence activity. The crystal structures show the presence of an active site similar to that of other xylose isomerases, with a d-xylose binding site containing two tryptophans and a catalytic histidine, as well as two metal binding sites that are formed by carboxylate groups of conserved aspartates and glutamates. The binding positions and conformations of the metal-coordinating residues varied slightly for different metals, which is hypothesized to contribute to the observed metal dependence of the isomerase activity.

  1. Conversion of hemicelluloses and D-xylose into ethanol by the use of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Ethanol is a CO{sub 2} neutral liquid fuel that can substitute the use of fossil fuels in the transportation sector, thereby reducing the CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere. CO{sub 2} emission is suspected to contribute significantly to the so-called greenhouse effect, the global heating. Substrates for production of ethanol must be cheap and plentiful. This can be met by the use of lignocellulosic biomass such as willow, wheat straw, hardwood and softwood. However, the complexity of these polymeric substrates and the presence of several types of carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose) require additional treatment to release the useful carbohydrates and ferment the major carbohydrates fractions. The costs related to the ethanol-production must be kept at a minimum to be price competitive compared to gasoline. Therefore all of the carbohydrates present in lignocellulose need to be converted into ethanol. Glucose can be fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which, however, is unable to ferment the other major carbohydrate fraction, D-xylose. Thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacteria can be used for fermentation of the hemicelluloses fraction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, physiological studies of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria have shown that the ethanol yield decreases at increasing substrate concentration. The biochemical limitations causing this phenomenon are not known in detail. Physiological and biochemical studies of a newly characterized thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter mathranii, was performed. This study included extraction of intracellular metabolites and enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis. These studies revealed several bottlenecks in the D-xylose metabolism. This knowledge makes way for physiological and genetic engineering of this strain to improve the ethanol yield and productivity at high concentration of D-xylose. (au)

  2. Biohydrogen production from xylose at extreme thermophilic temperatures (70 degrees C) by mixed culture fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; Min, Booki; Angelidaki, Irini

    2009-01-01

    /L. Addition of yeast extract in the cultivation medium resulted in significant improvement of hydrogen yield. The main metabolic products during xylose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, and lactate. The specific growth rates were able to fit the experimental points relatively well with Haldane equation...... acetate, formate, and ethanol at 4.25 +/- 0.10, 3.01 +/- 0.11, and 2.59 +/- 0.16 mM, respectively....

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism in type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In patients with type-I diabetes mellitus folate deficiency is associated with endothelial dysfunction. So, polymorphism in genes involved in folate metabolism may have a role in vascular disease. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism ...

  4. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C polymorphism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C polymorphism and breast cancer risk: A meta analysis of 33 studies. ... were searched for case‑control studies relating the association between MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and BC risk and estimated summary odds ratios (ORs) with confidence intervals (CIs) for assessment.

  5. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Trevor M.; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ4-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1–AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1–AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Steroid/Sterol signaling’. PMID:25500069

  6. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase activity, protein production and carbohydrate biosynthesis in response to potassium and sodium ... due to the positive effects of potassium on the enzyme activity, sugars transport, water and nutrient transport, protein synthesis and carbohydrate metabolism.

  7. Two Greek siblings with sepiapterin reductase deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, M.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Wevers, R.A.; Lagerwerf, A.J.; Abeling, N.G.; Blau, N.; Thony, B.; Vargiami, E.; Zafeiriou, D.I.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sepiapterin reductase (SR) deficiency is a rare inherited disorder of neurotransmitter metabolism; less than 25 cases have been described in the literature so far. METHODS: We describe the clinical history and extensive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and urine examination of two Greek

  8. Clipboard: Lymphohematopoietic licence: Sterol C-14 reductase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Clipboard: Lymphohematopoietic licence: Sterol C-14 reductase activity of lamin B receptor (Lbr) is essential for neutrophil differentiation. Durgadas P Kasbekar. Volume 37 ... Keywords. Greenberg/HEM dysplasia; lymphohematopoietic progenitor cells; nuclear envelope; Pelger-Huët anomaly; promyelocyte differentiation ...

  9. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism in type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammed A AboElAsrar

    2012-05-05

    May 5, 2012 ... Elevated homocysteine is a known risk factor for vascular disease. So the polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase may have detrimental consequences [5]. In patients with type-I diabetes mellitus folate deficiency is associated with endothelial dysfunction and folate supplementa- tion improves ...

  10. Xylose phosphorylation functions as a molecular switch to regulate proteoglycan biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianzhong; Xiao, Junyu; Rahdar, Meghdad; Choudhury, Biswa P; Cui, Jixin; Taylor, Gregory S; Esko, Jeffrey D; Dixon, Jack E

    2014-11-04

    Most eukaryotic cells elaborate several proteoglycans critical for transmitting biochemical signals into and between cells. However, the regulation of proteoglycan biosynthesis is not completely understood. We show that the atypical secretory kinase family with sequence similarity 20, member B (Fam20B) phosphorylates the initiating xylose residue in the proteoglycan tetrasaccharide linkage region, and that this event functions as a molecular switch to regulate subsequent glycosaminoglycan assembly. Proteoglycans from FAM20B knockout cells contain a truncated tetrasaccharide linkage region consisting of a disaccharide capped with sialic acid (Siaα2-3Galβ1-4Xylβ1) that cannot be further elongated. We also show that the activity of galactosyl transferase II (GalT-II, B3GalT6), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of the tetrasaccharide linkage region, is dramatically increased by Fam20B-dependent xylose phosphorylation. Inactivating mutations in the GALT-II gene (B3GALT6) associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome cause proteoglycan maturation defects similar to FAM20B deletion. Collectively, our findings suggest that GalT-II function is impaired by loss of Fam20B-dependent xylose phosphorylation and reveal a previously unappreciated mechanism for regulation of proteoglycan biosynthesis.

  11. Xylose fermentation as a challenge for commercialization of lignocellulosic fuels and chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sànchez Nogué, Violeta; Karhumaa, Kaisa

    2015-04-01

    Fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials is at a level where commercial biofuel production is becoming a reality. The solubilization of the hemicellulose fraction in lignocellulosic-based feedstocks results in a large variety of sugar mixtures including xylose. However, allowing xylose fermentation in yeast that normally is used for fuel ethanol production requires genetic engineering. Moreover, the efficiency of lignocellulosic pretreatment, together with the release and generation of inhibitory compounds in this step, are some of the new challenges faced during second generation ethanol production. Successful advances in all these aspects will improve ethanol yield, productivity and titer, which will reduce the impact on capital and operating costs, leading to the consolidation of the fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass as an economically feasible option for the production of renewable fuels. Therefore the development of yeast strains capable of fermenting a wide variety of sugars in a highly inhibitory environment, while maintaining a high ethanol yield and production rate, is required. This review provides an overview of the current status in the use of xylose-engineered yeast strains and describes the remaining challenges to achieve an efficient deployment of lignocellulosic-based ethanol production.

  12. Efficient Hydrolysis of Rice Straw into Xylose and Glucose by a Two-step Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Lu-lu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The hydrolysis of rice straw into xylose and glucose in dilute sulfuric acid aqueous solution was studied with a two-step process in batch autoclave reactor. The results showed that compared with the traditional one-step acid hydrolysis, both xylose and glucose could be produced in high yields from rice straw by using the two-step acid hydrolysis process. The effects of reaction temperature, reaction time, the amount of rice straw and acid concentration on the hydrolysis of rice straw were systematically studied, and showed that except initial rice straw loading amount, the other parameters had remarkable influence on the products distribution and yields. In the first-step of the hydrolysis process, a high xylose yield of 162.6 g·kg-1 was obtained at 140℃ after 120 min reaction time. When the solid residues from the first step were subjected to a second-step hydrolysis, a glucose yield as high as 216.5 g·kg-1 could be achieved at 180℃ after 120 min. This work provides a promising strategy for the efficient and value-added utilization of agricultural wastes such as rice straw.

  13. Iterative optimization of xylose catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using combinatorial expression tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Luke N; Dueber, John E

    2017-06-01

    A common challenge in metabolic engineering is rapidly identifying rate-controlling enzymes in heterologous pathways for subsequent production improvement. We demonstrate a workflow to address this challenge and apply it to improving xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For eight reactions required for conversion of xylose to ethanol, we screened enzymes for functional expression in S. cerevisiae, followed by a combinatorial expression analysis to achieve pathway flux balancing and identification of limiting enzymatic activities. In the next round of strain engineering, we increased the copy number of these limiting enzymes and again tested the eight-enzyme combinatorial expression library in this new background. This workflow yielded a strain that has a ∼70% increase in biomass yield and ∼240% increase in xylose utilization. Finally, we chromosomally integrated the expression library. This library enriched for strains with multiple integrations of the pathway, which likely were the result of tandem integrations mediated by promoter homology. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1301-1309. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Engineering yeast hexokinase 2 for improved tolerance toward xylose-induced inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basti Bergdahl

    Full Text Available Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a bi-functional enzyme being both a catalyst and an important regulator in the glucose repression signal. In the presence of xylose Hxk2p is irreversibly inactivated through an autophosphorylation mechanism, affecting all functions. Consequently, the regulation of genes involved in sugar transport and fermentative metabolism is impaired. The aim of the study was to obtain new Hxk2p-variants, immune to the autophosphorylation, which potentially can restore the repressive capability closer to its nominal level. In this study we constructed the first condensed, rationally designed combinatorial library targeting the active-site in Hxk2p. We combined protein engineering and genetic engineering for efficient screening and identified a variant with Phe159 changed to tyrosine. This variant had 64% higher catalytic activity in the presence of xylose compared to the wild-type and is expected to be a key component for increasing the productivity of recombinant xylose-fermenting strains for bioethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstocks.

  15. Bioprospecting and evolving alternative xylose and arabinose pathway enzymes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2016-03-01

    Bioprospecting is an effective way to find novel enzymes from strains with desirable phenotypes. Such bioprospecting has enabled organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize nonnative pentose sugars. Yet, the efficiency of this pentose catabolism (especially for the case of arabinose) remains suboptimal. Thus, further pathway optimization or identification of novel, optimal pathways is needed. Previously, we identified a novel set of xylan catabolic pathway enzymes from a superior pentose-utilizing strain of Ustilago bevomyces. These enzymes were used to successfully engineer a xylan-utilizing S. cerevisiae through a blended approach of bioprospecting and evolutionary engineering. Here, we expanded this approach to xylose and arabinose catabolic pathway engineering and demonstrated that bioprospected xylose and arabinose catabolic pathways from U. bevomyces offer alternative choices for enabling efficient pentose catabolism in S. cerevisiae. By introducing a novel set of xylose catabolic genes from U. bevomyces, growth rates were improved up to 85 % over a set of traditional Scheffersomyces stipitis pathway genes. In addition, we suggested an alternative arabinose catabolic pathway which, after directed evolution and pathway engineering, enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on arabinose as a sole carbon source in minimal medium with growth rates upwards of 0.05 h(-1). This pathway represents the most efficient growth of yeast on pure arabinose minimal medium. These pathways provide great starting points for further strain development and demonstrate the utility of bioprospecting from U. bevomyces.

  16. Stimulating effects of sorbitol and L-xylose on rat ileal Ca transport in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, B; Ohan, J; Aznag, A; Drüeke, T B

    1995-01-01

    The direct effect of sorbitol and L-xylose on net intestinal calcium transport was compared to that of lactose, by determining unidirectional steady state calcium fluxes in segments of rat ileum in vitro under short-circuited conditions. The iso-molar addition of either 100 mM sorbitol, L-xylose, or lactose in mucosal buffer fluid increased the absorptive flux of Ca from mucosa to serosa to a similar extent and thus reversed ileal net Ca transport from net secretion to a zero net movement. The three substances decreased tissue conductance and reversed tissue polarity. At 200 mM, sorbitol induced a stimulation of net Ca transport due to an enhancement of absorptive Ca flux but in addition due to a decrease of secretory Ca flux from serosa to mucosa. The presence of 1 mM N-ethylmaleimide abolished the effects of sorbitol on ileal Ca flux. In conclusion, the present result shows that sorbitol, L-xylose, and lactose increase net Ca absorption to a comparable extent, in the absence of electrochemical or osmotic gradients. Such an absence of specificity suggests a stimulation of transcellular Ca transport related to the decrease of Na concentration in mucosal solution.

  17. Acid-catalysed xylose dehydration into furfural in the presence of kraft lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamminpää, Kaisa; Ahola, Juha; Tanskanen, Juha

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the effects of kraft lignin (Indulin AT) on acid-catalysed xylose dehydration into furfural were studied in formic and sulphuric acids. The study was done using D-optimal design. Three variables in both acids were included in the design: time (20-80 min), temperature (160-180°C) and initial lignin concentration (0-20 g/l). The dependent variables were xylose conversion, furfural yield, furfural selectivity and pH change. The results showed that the xylose conversion and furfural yield decreased in sulphuric acid, while in formic acid the changes were minor. Additionally, it was showed that lignin has an acid-neutralising capacity, and the added lignin increased the pH of reactant solutions in both acids. The pH rise was considerably lower in formic acid than in sulphuric acid. However, the higher pH did not explain all the changes in conversion and yield, and thus lignin evidently inhibits the formation of furfural. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Studies of Brønsted/Lewis Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Xylose to Furfural and Simultaneous Separation of Furfural by Pervaporation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Alex

    2017-01-01

    A major component of lignocellulosic biomass is hemicellulose, a polysaccharide composed of monomeric sugars, principally xylose. Xylose can be dehydrated, most often in aqueous solution, using Brønsted acid catalysts to form furfural, which can be further reacted to produce fuels, lubricants, polymers, solvents, and pharmaceutical precursors. Furfural production can also be enhanced by using Lewis acid catalysts, which promote the formation of xylulose, an isomer of xylose which more readily...

  19. Conversion of hemicellulose and D-xylose into ethanol by the use of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Peter

    1998-02-01

    Ethanol is a CO{sub 2} neutral liquid fuel that can substitute the use of fossil fuels in the transportation sector, thereby reducing the CO{sub 2} emission to the atmoshpere. CO{sub 2} emission is suspected to contribute significantly to the so-called greenhouse effect, the global heating. Substrates for production of ethanol must be cheap and plentiful. This can be met by the use of lignocellulosic biomass such as willow, wheat straw, hardwood and softwood. However, the complexity of these polymeric substrates and the presence of several types of carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose) require additional treatment to release the useful carbohydrates and ferment the major carbohydrates fractions. The costs related to the ethanol-production must be kept at a minimum to be price competitive compared to gasoline. Therefore all of the carbohydrates present in lignocellulose need to be converted into ethanol. Glucose can be fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which, however, is unable to ferment the other major carbohydrate fraction, D-xylose. The need for a microorganism able to ferment D-xylose is therefore apparent. Thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacteria can therefore be considered for fermentation of D-xylose. Screening of 130 thermophilic anaerobic bacterial strains, from hot-springs, mesophilic and thermophilic biogas plants, paper pulp industries and brewery waste, were examined for production of ethanol from D-xylose and wet-oxidized hemicellulose hydrolysate. Several strains were isolated and one particular strain was selected for best performance during the screening test. This strain was characterized as a new species, Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. However, the ethanol yield on wet-oxidized hemicellulose hydrolysate was not satisfactory. The bacterium was adapted by isolation of mutant strains, now resistant to the inhibitory compounds present in the hydrolysate. Growth and ethanol yield

  20. The synthetic xylulose-1 phosphate pathway increases production of glycolic acid from xylose-rich sugar mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkim, Ceren; Trichez, Debora; Cam, Yvan; Spina, Lucie; François, Jean Marie; Walther, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Glycolic acid (GA) is a two-carbon hydroxyacid with applications in the cosmetic, textile, and medical industry. Microbial GA production from all sugars can be achieved by engineering the natural glyoxylate shunt. The synthetic (d)-xylulose-1 phosphate (X1P) pathway provides a complementary route to produce GA from (d)-xylose. The simultaneous operation of the X1P and glyoxylate pathways increases the theoretical GA yield from xylose by 20 %, which may strongly improve GA production from hemicellulosic hydrolysates. We herein describe the construction of an E. coli strain that produces GA via the glyoxylate pathway at a yield of 0.31 , 0.29 , and 0.37 g/g from glucose, xylose, or a mixture of glucose and xylose (mass ratio: 33:66 %), respectively. When the X1P pathway operates in addition to the glyoxylate pathway, the GA yields on the three substrates are, respectively, 0.39 , 0.43 , and 0.47 g/g. Upon constitutive expression of the sugar permease GalP, the GA yield of the strain which simultaneously operates the glyoxylate and X1P pathways further increases to 0.63 g/g when growing on the glucose/xylose mixture. Under these conditions, the GA yield on the xylose fraction of the sugar mixture reaches 0.75 g/g, which is the highest yield reported to date. These results demonstrate that the synthetic X1P pathway has a very strong potential to improve GA production from xylose-rich hemicellulosic hydrolysates.

  1. Proteomic analysis of the secretory response of Aspergillus niger to D-maltose and D-xylose.

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    José Miguel P Ferreira de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Fungi utilize polysaccharide substrates through extracellular digestion catalyzed by secreted enzymes. Thus far, protein secretion by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger has mainly been studied at the level of individual proteins and by genome and transcriptome analyses. To extend these studies, a complementary proteomics approach was applied with the aim to investigate the changes in secretome and microsomal protein composition resulting from a shift to a high level secretion condition. During growth of A. niger on D-sorbitol, small amounts of D-maltose or D-xylose were used as inducers of the extracellular amylolytic and xylanolytic enzymes. Upon induction, protein compositions in the extracellular broth as well as in enriched secretory organelle (microsomal fractions were analyzed using a shotgun proteomics approach. In total 102 secreted proteins and 1,126 microsomal proteins were identified in this study. Induction by D-maltose or D-xylose resulted in the increase in specific extracellular enzymes, such as glucoamylase A on D-maltose and β-xylosidase D on D-xylose, as well as of microsomal proteins. This reflects the differential expression of selected genes coding for dedicated extracellular enzymes. As expected, the addition of extra D-sorbitol had no effect on the expression of carbohydrate-active enzymes, compared to addition of D-xylose or D-maltose. Furthermore, D-maltose induction caused an increase in microsomal proteins related to translation (e.g., Rpl15 and vesicular transport (e.g., the endosomal-cargo receptor Erv14. Millimolar amounts of the inducers D-maltose and D-xylose are sufficient to cause a direct response in specific protein expression levels. Also, after induction by D-maltose or D-xylose, the induced enzymes were found in microsomes and extracellular. In agreement with our previous findings for D-xylose induction, D-maltose induction leads to recruitment of proteins involved in proteasome-mediated degradation.

  2. New Protocol Based on UHPLC-MS/MS for Quantitation of Metabolites in Xylose-Fermenting Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Christiane Gonçalves; Veras, Henrique César Teixeira; de Aquino Ribeiro, José Antônio; Costa, Patrícia Pinto Kalil Gonçalves; Araújo, Katiúscia Pereira; Rodrigues, Clenilson Martins; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; Abdelnur, Patrícia Verardi

    2017-12-01

    Xylose fermentation is a bottleneck in second-generation ethanol production. As such, a comprehensive understanding of xylose metabolism in naturally xylose-fermenting yeasts is essential for prospection and construction of recombinant yeast strains. The objective of the current study was to establish a reliable metabolomics protocol for quantification of key metabolites of xylose catabolism pathways in yeast, and to apply this protocol to Spathaspora arborariae. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was used to quantify metabolites, and afterwards, sample preparation was optimized to examine yeast intracellular metabolites. S. arborariae was cultivated using xylose as a carbon source under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions. Ion pair chromatography (IPC) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) were shown to efficiently quantify 14 and 5 metabolites, respectively, in a more rapid chromatographic protocol than previously described. Thirteen and eleven metabolites were quantified in S. arborariae under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions, respectively. This targeted metabolomics protocol is shown here to quantify a total of 19 metabolites, including sugars, phosphates, coenzymes, monosaccharides, and alcohols, from xylose catabolism pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle) in yeast. Furthermore, to our knowledge, this is the first time that intracellular metabolites have been quantified in S. arborariae after xylose consumption. The results indicated that fine control of oxygen levels during fermentation is necessary to optimize ethanol production by S. arborariae. The protocol presented here may be applied to other yeast species and could support yeast genetic engineering to improve second generation ethanol production. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. New Protocol Based on UHPLC-MS/MS for Quantitation of Metabolites in Xylose-Fermenting Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Christiane Gonçalves; Veras, Henrique César Teixeira; de Aquino Ribeiro, José Antônio; Costa, Patrícia Pinto Kalil Gonçalves; Araújo, Katiúscia Pereira; Rodrigues, Clenilson Martins; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; Abdelnur, Patrícia Verardi

    2017-09-01

    Xylose fermentation is a bottleneck in second-generation ethanol production. As such, a comprehensive understanding of xylose metabolism in naturally xylose-fermenting yeasts is essential for prospection and construction of recombinant yeast strains. The objective of the current study was to establish a reliable metabolomics protocol for quantification of key metabolites of xylose catabolism pathways in yeast, and to apply this protocol to Spathaspora arborariae. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was used to quantify metabolites, and afterwards, sample preparation was optimized to examine yeast intracellular metabolites. S. arborariae was cultivated using xylose as a carbon source under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions. Ion pair chromatography (IPC) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) were shown to efficiently quantify 14 and 5 metabolites, respectively, in a more rapid chromatographic protocol than previously described. Thirteen and eleven metabolites were quantified in S. arborariae under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions, respectively. This targeted metabolomics protocol is shown here to quantify a total of 19 metabolites, including sugars, phosphates, coenzymes, monosaccharides, and alcohols, from xylose catabolism pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle) in yeast. Furthermore, to our knowledge, this is the first time that intracellular metabolites have been quantified in S. arborariae after xylose consumption. The results indicated that fine control of oxygen levels during fermentation is necessary to optimize ethanol production by S. arborariae. The protocol presented here may be applied to other yeast species and could support yeast genetic engineering to improve second generation ethanol production. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Steroid 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Eugenio; Bratoeff, Eugene; Cabeza, Marisa; Ramirez, Elena; Quiroz, Alexandra; Heuze, Ivonne

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study is to synthesize new steroidal compounds based on the progesterone skeleton with a high inhibitory activity for the enzyme 5alpha-reductase. Presently similar compounds are being used for the treatment of androgen dependent diseases such as: hirsutism, androgenic alopecia, bening prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Dihydrotestosterone 2 (Fig. (1)), a 5alpha-reduced metabolite of testosterone 1 has been implicated as a causative factor in the progression of these diseases, largely through the clinical evaluation of males who are genetically deficient of steroid 5alpha-reductase enzyme. As a result of this study, the inhibition of this enzyme has become a pharmacological strategy for the design and synthesis of new antiandrogenic drugs. The advent of finasteride 8 (Fig. (4)) a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor has grately alleviated the symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia. In our laboratory we recently synthesized several new 16beta-methyl-pregnadiene-3,20-diones derivatives 27 (Fig.(6)), 38-42 (Fig. (11)), 16beta-phenyl-pregnadiene-3,17a-dione derivatives 32-33 (Fig. (7)), 16beta-phenyl-pregnatriene-3,17a-diones, 30, 31 (Fig. (7)) and 16beta-methyl-pregnatriene-3,20-diones 43-46 (Fig. (11)). These compounds were evaluated as 5alpha-reductase inhibitors in the following biological models: Penicillium crustosum broths, the flank organs of gonadectomized male hamsters, the incorporation of radiolabeled sodium acetate into lipids, the effect of the new steroids on the reduction of the weight of the seminal vesicles and on the in vitro metabolism of [(3)H]T to [(3)H]DHT in seminal vesicles homogenates of gonadectomized male hamsters. All trienones 30, 31, and 43-46 in all biological models showed consistently a higher 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activity than the corresponding dienones 27, 32, 33 and 38-42. We believe that with these compounds the 5alpha-reductase enzyme is inactivated by an irreversible Michael type addition

  5. Biliverdin reductase: A major physiologic cytoprotectant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barañano, David E.; Rao, Mahil; Ferris, Christopher D.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2002-01-01

    Bilirubin, an abundant pigment that causes jaundice, has long lacked any clear physiologic role. It arises from enzymatic reduction by biliverdin reductase of biliverdin, a product of heme oxygenase activity. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant that we show can protect cells from a 10,000-fold excess of H2O2. We report that bilirubin is a major physiologic antioxidant cytoprotectant. Thus, cellular depletion of bilirubin by RNA interference markedly augments tissue levels of reactive oxygen species and causes apoptotic cell death. Depletion of glutathione, generally regarded as a physiologic antioxidant cytoprotectant, elicits lesser increases in reactive oxygen species and cell death. The potent physiologic antioxidant actions of bilirubin reflect an amplification cycle whereby bilirubin, acting as an antioxidant, is itself oxidized to biliverdin and then recycled by biliverdin reductase back to bilirubin. This redox cycle may constitute the principal physiologic function of bilirubin. PMID:12456881

  6. Separate hydrolysis and co-fermentation for improved xylose utilization in integrated ethanol production from wheat meal and wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Borbála; Frankó, Balázs; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2012-03-12

    The commercialization of second-generation bioethanol has not been realized due to several factors, including poor biomass utilization and high production cost. It is generally accepted that the most important parameters in reducing the production cost are the ethanol yield and the ethanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Agricultural residues contain large amounts of hemicellulose, and the utilization of xylose is thus a plausible way to improve the concentration and yield of ethanol during fermentation. Most naturally occurring ethanol-fermenting microorganisms do not utilize xylose, but a genetically modified yeast strain, TMB3400, has the ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose. However, the xylose uptake rate is only enhanced when the glucose concentration is low. Separate hydrolysis and co-fermentation of steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS) combined with wheat-starch hydrolysate feed was performed in two separate processes. The average yield of ethanol and the xylose consumption reached 86% and 69%, respectively, when the hydrolysate of the enzymatically hydrolyzed (18.5% WIS) unwashed SPWS solid fraction and wheat-starch hydrolysate were fed to the fermentor after 1 h of fermentation of the SPWS liquid fraction. In the other configuration, fermentation of the SPWS hydrolysate (7.0% WIS), resulted in an average ethanol yield of 93% from fermentation based on glucose and xylose and complete xylose consumption when wheat-starch hydrolysate was included in the feed. Increased initial cell density in the fermentation (from 5 to 20 g/L) did not increase the ethanol yield, but improved and accelerated xylose consumption in both cases. Higher ethanol yield has been achieved in co-fermentation of xylose and glucose in SPWS hydrolysate when wheat-starch hydrolysate was used as feed, then in co-fermentation of the liquid fraction of SPWS fed with the mixed hydrolysates. Integration of first-generation and second-generation processes also increases the ethanol

  7. Separate hydrolysis and co-fermentation for improved xylose utilization in integrated ethanol production from wheat meal and wheat straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdei Borbála

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The commercialization of second-generation bioethanol has not been realized due to several factors, including poor biomass utilization and high production cost. It is generally accepted that the most important parameters in reducing the production cost are the ethanol yield and the ethanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Agricultural residues contain large amounts of hemicellulose, and the utilization of xylose is thus a plausible way to improve the concentration and yield of ethanol during fermentation. Most naturally occurring ethanol-fermenting microorganisms do not utilize xylose, but a genetically modified yeast strain, TMB3400, has the ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose. However, the xylose uptake rate is only enhanced when the glucose concentration is low. Results Separate hydrolysis and co-fermentation of steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS combined with wheat-starch hydrolysate feed was performed in two separate processes. The average yield of ethanol and the xylose consumption reached 86% and 69%, respectively, when the hydrolysate of the enzymatically hydrolyzed (18.5% WIS unwashed SPWS solid fraction and wheat-starch hydrolysate were fed to the fermentor after 1 h of fermentation of the SPWS liquid fraction. In the other configuration, fermentation of the SPWS hydrolysate (7.0% WIS, resulted in an average ethanol yield of 93% from fermentation based on glucose and xylose and complete xylose consumption when wheat-starch hydrolysate was included in the feed. Increased initial cell density in the fermentation (from 5 to 20 g/L did not increase the ethanol yield, but improved and accelerated xylose consumption in both cases. Conclusions Higher ethanol yield has been achieved in co-fermentation of xylose and glucose in SPWS hydrolysate when wheat-starch hydrolysate was used as feed, then in co-fermentation of the liquid fraction of SPWS fed with the mixed hydrolysates. Integration of first-generation and

  8. Glucose and xylose co-fermentation of pretreated wheat straw using mutants of S. cerevisiae TMB3400.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Borbála; Frankó, Balázs; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2013-03-10

    Wheat straw was pretreated and fermented to ethanol. Two strains, which had been mutated from the genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae TMB3400, KE6-12 and KE6-13i, have been used in this study and the results of performance were compared to that of the original strain. The glucose and xylose co-fermentation ability was investigated in batch fermentation of steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS) liquid (undiluted, and diluted 1.5 and 2 times). Both strains showed improved xylose uptake in diluted SPWS liquid, and increased ethanol yields compared with the original TMB3400 strain, although xylitol formation also increased slightly. In undiluted SPWS liquid, however, only KE6-13i performed better than the original strain regarding xylose utilization. Fed-batch fermentation of 1.5 and 2 times diluted liquid was performed by adding the glucose-rich hydrolysates from enzymatic hydrolysis of the solid fraction of SPWS at a constant feed rate after 5 h of fermentation, when the glucose had been depleted. The modified strains showed improved xylose conversion; however, the ethanol yield was not significantly improved due to increased glycerol production. Fed-batch fermentation resulted in faster xylose utilization than in the batch cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of manganese ions on ethanol fermentation by xylose isomerase expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae under acetic acid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Um, Youngsoon; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-12-01

    The efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the presence of inhibitors is highly desirable for bioethanol production. Among the inhibitors, acetic acid released during the pretreatment of lignocellulose negatively affects the fermentation performance of biofuel producing organisms. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of acetic acid on glucose and xylose fermentation by a high performance engineered strain of xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SXA-R2P-E, harboring a xylose isomerase based pathway. The presence of acetic acid severely decreased the xylose fermentation performance of this strain. However, the acetic acid stress was alleviated by metal ion supplementation resulting in a 52% increased ethanol production rate under 2g/L of acetic acid stress. This study shows the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on an engineered isomerase-based xylose utilizing strain and suggests a simple but effective method to improve the co-fermentation performance under acetic acid stress for efficient bioethanol production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibitor tolerance of a recombinant flocculating industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain during glucose and xylose co-fermentation

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    Yun-Cheng Li

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have negative effects on the ethanol fermentation capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, the effects of eight typical inhibitors, including weak acids, furans, and phenols, on glucose and xylose co-fermentation of the recombinant xylose-fermenting flocculating industrial S. cerevisiae strain NAPX37 were evaluated by batch fermentation. Inhibition on glucose fermentation, not that on xylose fermentation, correlated with delayed cell growth. The weak acids and the phenols showed additive effects. The effect of inhibitors on glucose fermentation was as follows (from strongest to weakest: vanillin > phenol > syringaldehyde > 5-HMF > furfural > levulinic acid > acetic acid > formic acid. The effect of inhibitors on xylose fermentation was as follows (from strongest to weakest: phenol > vanillin > syringaldehyde > furfural > 5-HMF > formic acid > levulinic acid > acetic acid. The NAPX37 strain showed substantial tolerance to typical inhibitors and showed good fermentation characteristics, when a medium with inhibitor cocktail or rape straw hydrolysate was used. This research provides important clues for inhibitors tolerance of recombinant industrial xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae.

  11. Fermentation of Xylose Causes Inefficient Metabolic State Due to Carbon/Energy Starvation and Reduced Glycolytic Flux in Recombinant Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Nagashima, Atsushi; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, comprehensive, quantitative metabolome analysis was carried out on the recombinant glucose/xylose-cofermenting S. cerevisiae strain MA-R4 during fermentation with different carbon sources, including glucose, xylose, or glucose/xylose mixtures. Capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to determine the intracellular pools of metabolites from the central carbon pathways, energy metabolism pathways, and the levels of twenty amino acids. When xylose instead of glucose was metabolized by MA-R4, glycolytic metabolites including 3- phosphoglycerate, 2- phosphoglycerate, phosphoenolpyruvate, and pyruvate were dramatically reduced, while conversely, most pentose phosphate pathway metabolites such as sedoheptulose 7- phosphate and ribulose 5-phosphate were greatly increased. These results suggest that the low metabolic activity of glycolysis and the pool of pentose phosphate pathway intermediates are potential limiting factors in xylose utilization. It was further demonstrated that during xylose fermentation, about half of the twenty amino acids declined, and the adenylate/guanylate energy charge was impacted due to markedly decreased adenosine triphosphate/adenosine monophosphate and guanosine triphosphate/guanosine monophosphate ratios, implying that the fermentation of xylose leads to an inefficient metabolic state where the biosynthetic capabilities and energy balance are severely impaired. In addition, fermentation with xylose alone drastically increased the level of citrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and increased the aromatic amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine, strongly supporting the view that carbon starvation was induced. Interestingly, fermentation with xylose alone also increased the synthesis of the polyamine spermidine and its precursor S-adenosylmethionine. Thus, differences in carbon substrates, including glucose and xylose in the fermentation medium, strongly influenced the dynamic metabolism of MA-R4

  12. D-Xylose fermentation, xylitol production and xylanase activities by seven new species of Sugiyamaella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Letícia M F; Morais, Camila G; Lopes, Mariana R; Santos, Renata O; Uetanabaro, Ana P T; Morais, Paula B; Vital, Marcos J S; de Morais, Marcos A; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Sixteen yeast isolates identified as belonging to the genus Sugiyamaella were studied in relation to D-xylose fermentation, xylitol production, and xylanase activities. The yeasts were recovered from rotting wood and sugarcane bagasse samples in different Brazilian regions. Sequence analyses of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of large subunit rRNA gene showed that these isolates belong to seven new species. The species are described here as Sugiyamaella ayubii f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y607(T) = CBS 14108(T)), Sugiyamaella bahiana f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y304(T) = CBS 13474(T)), Sugiyamaella bonitensis f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y608(T) = CBS 14270(T)), Sugiyamaella carassensis f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y606(T) = CBS 14107(T)), Sugiyamaella ligni f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y295(T) = CBS 13482(T)), Sugiyamaella valenteae f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y609(T) = CBS 14109(T)) and Sugiyamaella xylolytica f.a., sp. nov. (UFMG-CM-Y348(T) = CBS 13493(T)). Strains of the described species S. boreocaroliniensis, S. lignohabitans, S. novakii and S. xylanicola, isolated from rotting wood of Brazilian ecosystems, were also compared for traits relevant to xylose metabolism. S. valenteae sp. nov., S. xylolytica sp. nov., S. bahiana sp. nov., S. bonitensis sp. nov., S. boreocarolinensis, S. lignohabitans and S. xylanicola were able to ferment D-xylose to ethanol. Xylitol production was observed for all Sugiyamaella species studied, except for S. ayubii sp. nov. All species studied showed xylanolytic activity, with S. xylanicola, S. lignohabitans and S. valenteae sp. nov. having the highest values. Our results suggest these Sugiyamaella species have good potential for biotechnological applications.

  13. Metabolic engineering of ammonium assimilation in xylose-fermenting Saccharomyes cerevisiae improves ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Christophe Francois Aime; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    , and by over-expressing either GDH2, which encodes an NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, or GLT1 and GLN1, which encode the GS-GOGAT complex. Overexpression of GDH2 increased ethanol yield from 0.43 to 0.51 mol of carbon (Cmol) Cmol(-1), mainly by reducing xylitol excretion by 44%. Overexpression...... of the GS-GOGAT complex did not improve conversion of xylose to ethanol during batch cultivation, but it increased ethanol yield by 16% in carbon-limited continuous cultivation at a low dilution rate....

  14. Separate and Simultaneous enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of wheat hemicellulose with recombinant xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Lisbeth; Sørensen, H. R.; Dam, B. P

    2006-01-01

    Fermentations with three different xylose-utilizing recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (F12, CR4, and CB4) were performed using two different wheat hemicellulose substrates, unfermented starch free fibers, and an industrial ethanol fermentation residue, vinasse. With CR4 and F12...... ethanol concentrations were obtained with SSF. In general, the volumetric ethanol productivity was initially, highest in the SHF, but the overall volumetric ethanol productivity ended up being maximal in the SSF, at 0.013 and 0.010 g/Lh, with starch free fibers and vinasse, respectively....

  15. Effect of humic acids on electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation in microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Pentose and humic acids (HA) are the main components of hydrolysates, the liquid fraction produced during thermohydrolysis of lignocellulosic material. Electricity generation integrated with xylose (typical pentose) degradation as well as the effect of HA on electricity production in microbial fuel...... degradation and formation of more oxidized products (acetate and formate) as well as less reduced products (lactate and ethanol) compared to the controls. The reduced power generation in the presence of DMW was attributed to the presence of bacterial inhibitors such as phenolic compounds. Therefore, new...

  16. Process for assembly and transformation into Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a synthetic yeast artificial chromosome containing a multigene cassette to express enzymes that enhance xylose utilization designed for an automated pla

    Science.gov (United States)

    A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing a multigene cassette for expression of enzymes that enhance xylose utilization (xylose isomerase [XI] and xylulokinase [XKS]) was constructed and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate feasibility as a stable protein expression system ...

  17. Co-immobilization of glucose oxidase and xylose dehydrogenase displayed whole cell on multiwalled carbon nanotube nanocomposite films modified electrode for simultaneous voltammetric detection of D-glucose and D-xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Liang, Bo; Li, Feng; Shi, Jianguo; Mascini, Marco; Lang, Qiaolin; Liu, Aihua

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, we first report the construction of Nafion/glucose oxidase (GOD)/xylose dehydrogenase displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) modified electrode for simultaneous voltammetric determination of D-glucose and D-xylose. The optimal conditions for the immobilized enzymes were established. Both enzymes retained their good stability and activities. In the mixture solution of D-glucose and D-xylose containing coenzyme NAD⁺ (the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), the Nafion/GOD/XDH-bacteria/MWNTs modified electrode exhibited quasi-reversible oxidation-reduction peak at -0.5 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode, SCE) originating from the catalytic oxidation of D-glucose, and oxidation peak at +0.55 V(vs. SCE) responding to the oxidation of NADH (the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) by the carbon nanotubes, where NADH is the resultant product of coenzyme NAD⁺ involved in the catalysis of D-xylose by XDH-displayed bacteria. For the proposed biosensor, cathodic peak current at -0.5 V was linear with the concentration of D-glucose within the range of 0.25-6 mM with a low detection limit of 0.1 mM D-glucose (S/N=3), and the anodic peak current at +0.55 V was linear with the concentration of d-xylose in the range of 0.25∼4 mM with a low detection limit of 0.1 mM D-xylose (S/N=3). Further, D-xylose and D-glucose did not interfere with each other. 300-fold excess saccharides including D-maltose, D-galactose, D-mannose, D-sucrose, D-fructose, D-cellobiose, and 60-fold excess L-arabinose, and common interfering substances (100-fold excess ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid) as well as 300-fold excess D-xylitol did not affect the detection of D-glucose and D-xylose (both 1 mM). Therefore, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible, simple, rapid and cost-effective, which holds great potential in real applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Real-time NMR monitoring of intermediates and labile products of the bifunctional enzyme UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyett, Paul; Glushka, John; Gu, Xiaogang; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2009-06-12

    The conversion of UDP-alpha-d-glucuronic acid to UDP-alpha-d-xylose and UDP-alpha-d-apiose by a bifunctional potato enzyme UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase was studied using real-time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. UDP-alpha-d-glucuronic acid is converted via the intermediate uridine 5'-beta-l-threo-pentapyranosyl-4''-ulose diphosphate to UDP-alpha-d-apiose and simultaneously to UDP-alpha-d-xylose. The UDP-alpha-d-apiose that is formed is unstable and is converted to alpha-d-apio-furanosyl-1,2-cyclic phosphate and UMP. High-resolution real-time NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the direct and quantitative characterization of previously undetected transient and labile components formed during a complex enzyme-catalyzed reaction.

  19. Utilization of biodiesel-derived glycerol or xylose for increased growth and lipid production by indigenous microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Gustavo B; Paranjape, Kiran; Abdelaziz, Ahmed E M; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are a promising alternative for sustainable biofuel production, but production yields and costs present a significant bottleneck. Here, the use of glycerol and xylose to boost the lipid yield was evaluated using ten strains from the Université de Montréal collection of microalgae. This report shows that some microalgal strains are capable of mixotrophic and heterotrophic growth on xylose, the major carbon source found in wastewater streams from pulp and paper industries, with an increase in growth rate of 2.8-fold in comparison to photoautotrophic growth, reaching up to μ=1.1/d. On glycerol, growth rates reached as high as μ=1.52/d. Lipid productivity increased up to 370% on glycerol and 180% on xylose for the strain LB1H10, showing the suitability of this strain for further development of biofuels production through mixotrophic cultivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental evidence of a xylose-catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Mihasan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The pAO1 megaplasmid of A. nicotinovorans consists of 165 ORF's related mainly to nicotine degradation, uptake and utilization of carbohydrates, amino acids and sarcosine. A putative sugar catabolic pathway consisting of 11 ORF's organized as a single operon were previously described. The current work brings experimental data supporting the existence of a D-Xylose catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid. When grown on D-xylose containing media, the cells harboring the pAO1 megaplasmid grow to higher cell densities and also express the OxRe protein coded by the megaplasmid. A putative pathway similar to Weimberg pentose pathway is postulated, in which D-xylose is transported in the cell by the ABC-type transport system and then transformed using the putative sugar-dehidrogenase OxRe to D-xylonate, which is further degrated to 2-ketoglutarate and integrated into the general metabolism of the cell

  1. Metabolic characterization and transformation of the non-dairy Lactococcus lactis strain KF147, for production of ethanol from xylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kia Vest; Liu, Jianming; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    over-expression of phosphoketolase increased the flux through the phosphoketolase pathway. In general, significant amounts of the mixed-acid products, including lactate, formate, acetate and ethanol, were formed irrespective of xylose concentrations. To demonstrate the potential of KF147 for converting......The non-dairy lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis KF147 can utilize xylose as the sole energy source. To assess whether KF147 could serve as a platform organism for converting second generation sugars into useful chemicals, we characterized growth and product formation for KF147 when grown...... the arcA gene encoding the arginine deiminase. The fermentation product profile suggested two routes for xylose degradation, the phosphoketolase pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway. Inactivation of the phosphoketolase pathway redirected the entire flux through the pentose phosphate pathway whereas...

  2. Structural Elucidation of Chalcone Reductase and Implications for Deoxychalcone Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomati, Erin K.; Austin, Michael B.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Dixon, Richard A.; Noel, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    4,2′,4′,6′-tetrahydroxychalcone (chalcone) and 4,2′,4′-trihydroxychalcone (deoxychalcone) serve as precursors of ecologically important flavonoids and isoflavonoids. Deoxychalcone formation depends on chalcone synthase and chalcone reductase; however, the identity of the chalcone reductase substrate out of the possible substrates formed during the multistep reaction catalyzed by chalcone synthase remains experimentally elusive. We report here the three-dimensional structure of alfalfa chalcone reductase bound to the NADP+ cofactor and propose the identity and binding mode of its substrate, namely the non-aromatized coumaryl-trione intermediate of the chalcone synthase-catalyzed cyclization of the fully extended coumaryl-tetraketide thioester intermediate. In the absence of a ternary complex, the quality of the refined NADP+-bound chalcone reductase structure serves as a template for computer-assisted docking to evaluate the likelihood of possible substrates. Interestingly, chalcone reductase adopts the three-dimensional structure of the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. The aldo/keto reductase fold is structurally distinct from all known ketoreductases of fatty acid biosynthesis, which instead belong to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. The results presented here provide structural support for convergent functional evolution of these two ketoreductases that share similar roles in the biosynthesis of fatty acids/polyketides. In addition, the chalcone reductase structure represents the first protein structure of a member of the aldo/ketoreductase 4 family. Therefore, the chalcone reductase structure serves as a template for the homology modeling of other aldo/ketoreductase 4 family members, including the reductase involved in morphine biosynthesis, namely codeinone reductase. PMID:15970585

  3. Cloning and nitrate induction of nitrate reductase mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Dewdney, Julia; Kleinhofs, Andris; Goodman, Howard M.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate is the major source of nitrogen taken from the soil by higher plants but requires reduction to ammonia prior to incorporation into amino acids. The first enzyme in the reducing pathway is a nitrate-inducible enzyme, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1). A specific polyclonal antiserum raised against purified barley nitrate reductase has been used to immunoprecipitate in vivo labeled protein and in vitro translation products, demonstrating that nitrate induction increases nitrate reductase p...

  4. Enzymatic Xylose Release from Pretreated Corn Bran Arabinoxylan: Differential Effects of Deacetylation and Deferuloylation on Insoluble and Soluble Substrate Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Jane; Viksø-Nielsen, Ander; Meyer, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work enzymatic hydrolysis of arabinoxylan from pretreated corn bran (190 °C, 10 min) was evaluated by measuring the release of xylose and arabinose after treatment with a designed minimal mixture of monocomponent enzymes consisting of α-l-arabinofuranosidases, an endoxylanase......, and a β-xylosidase. The pretreatment divided the corn bran material 50:50 into soluble and insoluble fractions having A:X ratios of 0.66 and 0.40, respectively. Addition of acetyl xylan esterase to the monocomponent enzyme mixture almost doubled the xylose release from the insoluble substrate fraction...

  5. Homofermentative production of optically pure L-lactic acid from xylose by genetically engineered Escherichia coli B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinfang; Xu, Liyuan; Wang, Yongze; Zhao, Xiao; Wang, Jinhua; Garza, Erin; Manow, Ryan; Zhou, Shengde

    2013-06-07

    Polylactic acid (PLA), a biodegradable polymer, has the potential to replace (at least partially) traditional petroleum-based plastics, minimizing "white pollution". However, cost-effective production of optically pure L-lactic acid is needed to achieve the full potential of PLA. Currently, starch-based glucose is used for L-lactic acid fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Due to its competition with food resources, an alternative non-food substrate such as cellulosic biomass is needed for L-lactic acid fermentation. Nevertheless, the substrate (sugar stream) derived from cellulosic biomass contains significant amounts of xylose, which is unfermentable by most lactic acid bacteria. However, the microorganisms that do ferment xylose usually carry out heterolactic acid fermentation. As a result, an alternative strain should be developed for homofermentative production of optically pure L-lactic acid using cellulosic biomass. In this study, an ethanologenic Escherichia coli strain, SZ470 (ΔfrdBC ΔldhA ΔackA ΔpflB ΔpdhR ::pflBp6-acEF-lpd ΔmgsA), was reengineered for homofermentative production of L-lactic acid from xylose (1.2 mole xylose = > 2 mole L-lactic acid), by deleting the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE) and integrating the L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL) of Pediococcus acidilactici. The resulting strain, WL203, was metabolically evolved further through serial transfers in screw-cap tubes containing xylose, resulting in the strain WL204 with improved anaerobic cell growth. When tested in 70 g L-1 xylose fermentation (complex medium), WL204 produced 62 g L-1 L-lactic acid, with a maximum production rate of 1.631 g L-1 h-1 and a yield of 97% based on xylose metabolized. HPLC analysis using a chiral column showed that an L-lactic acid optical purity of 99.5% was achieved by WL204. These results demonstrated that WL204 has the potential for homofermentative production of L-lactic acid using cellulosic biomass derived substrates, which contain a

  6. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT.

  7. Consecutively Preparing D-Xylose, Organosolv Lignin, and Amorphous Ultrafine Silica from Rice Husk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxi; Ding, Xuefeng; Wang, Zichen; Zhao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping from the residue. Finally, the amorphous ultrafine silica was prepared via pyrolysis of the residue produced in the second process. In this way, the three main contents of rice husk (semicellulose, lignin, and silica) are consecutively converted to three fine chemicals, without solid waste produced. The yields of D-xylose and organosolv lignin reach 58.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The purity and specific surface of amorphous ultrafine silica reach 99.92% and 225.20 m2/g. PMID:25140120

  8. Synthesis and microarray-assisted binding studies of core xylose and fucose containing N-glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezicka, Katarzyna; Echeverria, Begoña; Serna, Sonia; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a collection of 33 xylosylated and core-fucosylated N-glycans found only in nonmammalian organisms such as plants and parasitic helminths has been achieved by employing a highly convergent chemo-enzymatic approach. The influence of these core modifications on the interaction with plant lectins, with the human lectin DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin), and with serum antibodies from schistosome-infected individuals was studied. Core xylosylation markedly reduced or completely abolished binding to several mannose-binding plant lectins and to DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor present on antigen presenting cells. Employing the synthetic collection of core-fucosylated and core-xylosylated N-glycans in the context of a larger glycan array including structures lacking these core modifications, we were able to dissect core xylose and core fucose specific antiglycan antibody responses in S. mansoni infection sera, and we observed clear and immunologically relevant differences between children and adult groups infected with this parasite. The work presented here suggests that, quite similar to bisecting N-acetylglucosamine, core xylose distorts the conformation of the unsubstituted glycan, with important implications for the immunogenicity and protein binding properties of complex N-glycans.

  9. Characterization and gene cloning of l-xylulose reductase involved in l-arabinose catabolism from the pentose-fermenting fungus Rhizomucor pusillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki-Yashiki, Shino; Komeda, Hidenobu; Hoshino, Kazuhiro; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-08-01

    l-Xylulose reductase (LXR) catalyzes the reduction of l-xylulose to xylitol in the fungal l-arabinose catabolic pathway. LXR (RpLXR) was purified from the pentose-fermenting zygomycetous fungus Rhizomucor pusillus NBRC 4578. The native RpLXR is a homotetramer composed of 29 kDa subunits and preferred NADPH as a coenzyme. The Km values were 8.71 mM for l-xylulose and 3.89 mM for dihydroxyacetone. The lxr3 (Rplxr3) gene encoding RpLXR consists of 792 bp and encodes a putative 263 amino acid protein (Mr = 28,341). The amino acid sequence of RpLXR showed high similarity to 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) reductase. The Rplxr3 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant RpLXR exhibited properties similar to those of native RpLXR. Transcription of the Rplxr3 gene in R. pusillus NBRC 4578 was induced in the presence of l-arabinose and inhibited in the presence of d-glucose, d-xylose, and d-mannitol, indicating that RpLXR is involved in the l-arabinose catabolic pathway.

  10. Structural and biochemical characterization of cinnamoyl-coa reductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinnamoyl-coenzyme A reductase (CCR) catalyzes the reduction of hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters using NADPH to produce hydroxycinnamyl aldehyde precursors in lignin synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate specificity of cinnamoyl-CoA reductases from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a str...

  11. Optimum conditions for cotton nitrate reductase extraction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    nitrate transformation into nitrite (µg of NO2. -/min/g F.W) is observed when incubation period of enzyme is short (1 to 5 min). Key words: Extraction, dosage, nitrate reductase activity, callus, cotton. INTRODUCTION. Nitrate reductase (EC. 1.7.99.4) is an oxidoreductase enzyme involved in nitrogen assimilation in plant. It.

  12. Biliverdin Reductase: a Target for Cancer Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eGibbs

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biliverdin reductase (BVR is a multifunctional protein that is the primary source of the potent antioxidant, bilirubin. BVR regulates activities/functions in the insulin/IGF-1/IRK/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Activation of certain kinases in these pathways is/are hallmark(s of cancerous cells. The protein is a scaffold/bridge and intracellular transporter of kinases that regulate growth and proliferation of cells, including PKCs, ERK and Akt, and their targets including NF-κB, Elk1, HO-1 and iNOS. The scaffold and transport functions enable activated BVR to relocate from the cytosol to the nucleus or to the plasma membrane, depending on the activating stimulus. This enables the reductase to function in diverse signaling pathways. And, its expression at the transcript and protein levels are increased in human tumors and the infiltrating T-cells, monocytes and circulating lymphocytes, as well as the circulating and infiltrating macrophages. These functions suggest that the cytoprotective role of BVR may be permissive for cancer/tumor growth. In this review, we summarize the recent developments that define the pro-growth activities of BVR, particularly with respect to its input into the MAPK signaling pathway and present evidence that BVR-based peptides inhibit activation of protein kinases, including MEK, PKCδ and ERK as well as downstream targets including Elk1 and iNOS, and thus offers a credible novel approach to reduce cancer cell proliferation.

  13. Draft genome sequence of the D-Xylose-Fermenting yeast Spathaspora xylofermentans UFMG-HMD23.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the yeast Spathaspora xylofermentans UFMG-HMD23.3 (CBMAI 1427=CBS 12681), a D-xylose fermenting yeast isolated from the Amazonian forest. The genome consists of 298 contigs, with a total size of 15.1 Mb, including the mitochondrial genome, and 5,948 predi...

  14. Conformational changes and ligand recognition of Escherichia coli D-xylose binding protein revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Park, Chankyu

    2010-01-01

    . The open liganded structure shows that xylose binds first to the C-terminal domain, with only very small conformational changes resulting. After a 34° closing motion, additional interactions are formed with the N-terminal domain; changes in this domain are larger and serve to make the structure more...

  15. Multiplex growth rate phenotyping of synthetic mutants in selection to engineer glucose and xylose co-utilization in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Joost; Cepress-Mclean, Sidney C; Robbins-Pianka, Adam; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T

    2017-04-01

    Engineering the simultaneous consumption of glucose and xylose sugars is critical to enable the sustainable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. In most major industrial microorganisms glucose completely inhibits the uptake of xylose, limiting efficient sugar mixture conversion. In E. coli removal of the major glucose transporter PTS allows for glucose and xylose co-consumption but only after prolonged adaptation, which is an effective process but hard to control and prone to co-evolving undesired traits. Here we synthetically engineer mutants to target sugar co-consumption properties; we subject a PTS- mutant to a short adaptive step and subsequently either delete or overexpress key genes previously suggested to affect sugar consumption. Screening the co-consumption properties of these mutants individually is very laborious. We show we can evaluate sugar co-consumption properties in parallel by culturing the mutants in selection and applying a novel approach that computes mutant growth rates in selection using chromosomal barcode counts obtained from Next-Generation Sequencing. We validate this multiplex growth rate phenotyping approach with individual mutant pure cultures, identify new instances of mutants cross-feeding on metabolic byproducts, and, importantly, find that the rates of glucose and xylose co-consumption can be tuned by altering glucokinase expression in our PTS- background. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 885-893. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Biosynthesis of D-xylulose 5-phosphate from D-xylose and polyphosphate through a minimized two-enzyme cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-02-01

    Sugar phosphates cannot be produced easily by microbial fermentation because negatively-charged compounds cannot be secreted across intact cell membrane. D-xylulose 5-phosphate (Xu5P), a very expensive sugar phosphate, was synthesized from D-xylose and polyphosphate catalyzed by enzyme cascades in one pot. The synthetic enzymatic pathway comprised of xylose isomerase and xylulokinase was designed to produce Xu5P, along with a third enzyme, polyphosphate kinase, responsible for in site ATP regeneration. Due to the promiscuous activity of the ATP-based xylulokinase from a hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima on polyphosphate, the number of enzymes in the pathway was minimized to two without polyphosphate kinase. The reactions catalyzed by the two-enzyme and three-enzyme pathways were compared for Xu5P production, and the reaction conditions were optimized by examining effects of reaction temperature, enzyme ratio and substrate concentration. The optimized two-enzyme system produced 32 mM Xu5P from 50 mM xylose and polyphosphate after 36 h at 45°C. Biosynthesis of less costly Xu5P from D-xylose and polyphosphate could be highly feasible via this minimized two-enzyme pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Separation of xylose and glucose using an integrated membrane system for enzymatic cofactor regeneration and downstream purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Sigurdardóttir, Sigyn Björk; Meyer, Anne S.

    2017-01-01

    Mixtures of xylose, glucose and pyruvate were fed to a membrane bioreactor equipped with a charged NF membrane (NTR 7450). Value-added products were obtained in the reactor via enzymatic cofactor-dependent catalysis of glucose to gluconic acid and pyruvate to lactic acid, respectively. The initial...

  18. Response surface methodology (RSM) to evaluate moisture effects on corn stover in recovering xylose by DEO hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita C.L.B. Rodrigues; William R. Kenealy; Diane Dietrich; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2012-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM), based on a 22 full factorial design, evaluated the moisture effects in recovering xylose by diethyloxalate (DEO) hydrolysis. Experiments were carried out in laboratory reactors (10 mL glass ampoules) containing corn stover (0.5 g) properly ground. The ampoules were kept at 160 °C for 90 min. Both DEO...

  19. Disruption of the cytochrome c gene in xylose-utilizing yeast Pichia stipitis leads to higher ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian-Qing. Shi; Brian. Davis; Fred. Sherman; Jose. Cruz; Thomas W. Jeffries

    1999-01-01

    The xylose-utilizing yeast, Pichia stipitis, has a complex respiratory system that contains cytochrome and non-cytochrome alternative electron transport chains in its mitochondria. To gain primary insights into the alternative respiratory pathway, a cytochrome c gene (PsCYC1, Accession No. AF030426) was cloned from wild-type P. stipitis CBS 6054 by cross-hybridization...

  20. Effects of pH and substrate concentrations on dark fermentative biohydrogen production from xylose by extreme thermophilic mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chunsheng; Shi, Puyu; Xiao, Shumin; Sun, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Biohydrogen is considered as one of the most promising energy alternatives considering the climate and energy crisis. The dark fermentative hydrogen production from xylose at extreme thermophilic condition (70 °C) using mixed culture was conducted in this study. The effects of initial pH values (ranged from 5.0 to 10.0) and substrate concentrations (ranged from 2.5 to 15.0 g/L) on the hydrogen production, substrate degradation and metabolite distributions were investigated using batch-mode operations. Results showed that initial substrate pH values in the neutral region (6.0-7.0) were beneficial for hydrogen production. The fermentation at initial pH 7.0 and 7.5 g/L xylose reached an optimal hydrogen yield of 1.29 mol-H2/mol-xyloseconsumed. Ethanol, butyrate, and propionate were the major liquid metabolites. The xylose biodegradation efficiency of the mixed culture decreased sharply at high initial culture pH values. The increase of xylose concentration resulted in the accumulation of propionate and an obvious decrease in the final pH value, as well as a low hydrogen yield. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that hydrogen producing bacteria were enriched by repeated culture under extreme thermophilic conditions. Also, the mixed culture was dominated with bacterial species related to Clostridium and Thermoanaerobacterium.

  1. High production of fumaric acid from xylose by newly selected strain Rhizopus arrhizus RH 7-13-9#.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Wang, Weinan; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-06-01

    Fumaric acid, as an important material for polymerization, is highly expected to be produced by fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass which is composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Xylose as the main component of hemicellulose cannot be efficiently utilized by most of the common fermentation. In this study, a new strain Rhizopus arrhizus RH 7-13-9# was selected from the R. arrhizus RH 7-13 through a novel convenient and efficient selection method. Efficient production of fumaric acid (45.31 g/L) from xylose was achieved by the new strain, and the volumetric productivity was still 0.472 g/L h. Moreover, the conversion of xylose reached 73% which is close to the theoretic yield (77%). The production of fumaric acid was increased approximate by 172%, compared with the initial strain counterpart. These results indicated that xylose, as the main component of hemicellulose, has a promising application for the production of fumaric acid on an industrial-scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetically engineered Escherichia coli FBR5: Part I. Comparison of high cell density bioreactors for enhanced ethanol production from xylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five reactor systems (free cell batch, free cell continuous, entrapped cell immobilized, adsorbed cell packed bed, and cell recycle membrane reactors) were compared for ethanol production from xylose employing Escherichia coli FBR5. In the free cell batch and free cell continuous reactors (continuo...

  3. [High throughput screening of active and stereoselective carbonyl reductases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Chen, Xi; Feng, Jinhui; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Qiaqing; Zhu, Dunming

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a fast carbonyl reductases colorimetric screening method for discovering stereoselective carbonyl reductases was established by combining the reverse alcohol oxidation with the azoreductase-catalyzed reduction of azo dye. When azo dye (Orange I , 4-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo) benzenesulfonic acid) and azoreductase (AzoB) were added into the reaction system of alcohol oxidation catalyzed by carbonyl reductase, the produced NAD(P)H served as electron donor for the azoreductase to reduce the azo dye, resulting the color fade. Hence, the carbonyl reductases can be screened by the obvious color change. When chiral alcohol was used as the substrate, the activity and stereoselectivity of carbonyl reductases can be screened at the same time.

  4. Reduced Immunogenicity of Arabidopsis hgl1 Mutant N-Glycans Caused by Altered Accessibility of Xylose and core Fucose Epitopes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulfürst-Soboll, Heidi; Rips, Stephan; Koiwa, Hisashi; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; von Schaewen, Antje

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis N-glycosylation mutants with enhanced salt sensitivity show reduced immunoreactivity of complex N-glycans. Among them, hybrid glycosylation 1 (hgl1) alleles lacking Golgi α-mannosidase II are unique, because their glycoprotein N-glycans are hardly labeled by anti-complex glycan antibodies, even though they carry β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose epitopes. To dissect the contribution of xylose and core fucose residues to plant stress responses and immunogenic potential, we prepared Arabidopsis hgl1 xylT double and hgl1 fucTa fucTb triple mutants by crossing previously established T-DNA insertion lines and verified them by mass spectrometry analyses. Root growth assays revealed that hgl1 fucTa fucTb but not hgl1 xylT plants are more salt-sensitive than hgl1, hinting at the importance of core fucose modification and masking of xylose residues. Detailed immunoblot analyses with anti-β1,2-xylose and anti-α1,3-fucose rabbit immunoglobulin G antibodies as well as cross-reactive carbohydrate determinant-specific human immunoglobulin E antibodies (present in sera of allergy patients) showed that xylose-specific reactivity of hgl1 N-glycans is indeed reduced. Based on three-dimensional modeling of plant N-glycans, we propose that xylose residues are tilted by 30° because of untrimmed mannoses in hgl1 mutants. Glycosidase treatments of protein extracts restored immunoreactivity of hgl1 N-glycans supporting these models. Furthermore, among allergy patient sera, untrimmed mannoses persisting on the α1,6-arm of hgl1 N-glycans were inhibitory to immunoreaction with core fucoses to various degrees. In summary, incompletely trimmed glycoprotein N-glycans conformationally prevent xylose and, to lesser extent, core fucose accessibility. Thus, in addition to N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I, Golgi α-mannosidase II emerges as a so far unrecognized target for lowering the immunogenic potential of plant-derived glycoproteins. PMID:21478158

  5. Reduced immunogenicity of Arabidopsis hgl1 mutant N-glycans caused by altered accessibility of xylose and core fucose epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulfürst-Soboll, Heidi; Rips, Stephan; Koiwa, Hisashi; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; von Schaewen, Antje

    2011-07-01

    Arabidopsis N-glycosylation mutants with enhanced salt sensitivity show reduced immunoreactivity of complex N-glycans. Among them, hybrid glycosylation 1 (hgl1) alleles lacking Golgi α-mannosidase II are unique, because their glycoprotein N-glycans are hardly labeled by anti-complex glycan antibodies, even though they carry β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose epitopes. To dissect the contribution of xylose and core fucose residues to plant stress responses and immunogenic potential, we prepared Arabidopsis hgl1 xylT double and hgl1 fucTa fucTb triple mutants by crossing previously established T-DNA insertion lines and verified them by mass spectrometry analyses. Root growth assays revealed that hgl1 fucTa fucTb but not hgl1 xylT plants are more salt-sensitive than hgl1, hinting at the importance of core fucose modification and masking of xylose residues. Detailed immunoblot analyses with anti-β1,2-xylose and anti-α1,3-fucose rabbit immunoglobulin G antibodies as well as cross-reactive carbohydrate determinant-specific human immunoglobulin E antibodies (present in sera of allergy patients) showed that xylose-specific reactivity of hgl1 N-glycans is indeed reduced. Based on three-dimensional modeling of plant N-glycans, we propose that xylose residues are tilted by 30° because of untrimmed mannoses in hgl1 mutants. Glycosidase treatments of protein extracts restored immunoreactivity of hgl1 N-glycans supporting these models. Furthermore, among allergy patient sera, untrimmed mannoses persisting on the α1,6-arm of hgl1 N-glycans were inhibitory to immunoreaction with core fucoses to various degrees. In summary, incompletely trimmed glycoprotein N-glycans conformationally prevent xylose and, to lesser extent, core fucose accessibility. Thus, in addition to N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I, Golgi α-mannosidase II emerges as a so far unrecognized target for lowering the immunogenic potential of plant-derived glycoproteins.

  6. Evaluation of fermentation kinetics of acid-treated corn cob hydrolysate for xylose fermentation in the presence of acetic acid by Pichia stipitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashid, Mohan; Ghosalkar, Anand

    2017-08-01

    The efficient utilization of lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol production depends on the fermentability of the biomass hydrolysate obtained after pretreatment. In this work we evaluated the kinetics of ethanol production from xylose using Pichia stipitis in acid-treated corn cob hydrolysate. Acetic acid is one of the main inhibitors in corn cob hydrolysate that negatively impacts kinetics of xylose fermentation by P. stipitis. Unstructured kinetic model has been formulated that describes cell mass growth and ethanol production as a function of xylose, oxygen, ethanol, and acetic acid concentration. Kinetic parameters were estimated under different operating conditions affecting xylose fermentation. This is the first report on kinetics of xylose fermentation by P. stipitis which includes inhibition of acetic acid on growth and product formation. In the presence of acetic acid in the hydrolysate, the model accurately predicted reduction in maximum specific growth rate (from 0.23 to 0.15 h -1 ) and increase in ethanol yield per unit biomass (from 3 to 6.2 gg -1 ), which was also observed during experimental trials. Presence of acetic acid in the fermentation led to significant reduction in the cell growth rate, reduction in xylose consumption and ethanol production rate. The developed model accurately described physiological state of P. stipitis during corn cob hydrolysate fermentation. Proposed model can be used to predict the influence of xylose, ethanol, oxygen, and acetic acid concentration on cell growth and ethanol productivity in industrial fermentation.

  7. Improved ethanol production from xylose in the presence of acetic acid by the overexpression of the HAA1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakihama, Yuri; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-03-01

    The hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass liberates sugars, primarily glucose and xylose, which are subsequently converted to ethanol by microbial fermentation. The rapid and efficient fermentation of xylose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains is limited by weak acids generated during biomass pretreatment processes. In particular, acetic acid negatively affects cell growth, xylose fermentation rate, and ethanol production. The ability of S. cerevisiae to efficiently utilize xylose in the presence of acetic acid is an essential requirement for the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Here, an acetic acid-responsive transcriptional activator, HAA1, was overexpressed in a recombinant xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain to yield BY4741X/HAA1. This strain exhibited improved cell growth and ethanol production from xylose under aerobic and oxygen limited conditions, respectively, in the presence of acetic acid. The HAA1p regulon enhanced transcript levels in BY4741X/HAA1. The disruption of PHO13, a p-nitrophenylphosphatase gene, in BY4741X/HAA1 led to further improvement in both yeast growth and the ability to ferment xylose, indicating that HAA1 overexpression and PHO13 deletion act by different mechanisms to enhance ethanol production. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Presence of glucose, xylose, and glycerol fermenting bacteria in the deep biosphere of the former Homestake gold mine, South Dakota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdeep eRastogi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Eight fermentative bacterial strains were isolated from mixed enrichment cultures of a composite soil sample collected at 1.34 km depth from the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD, USA. Phylogenetic analysis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that these isolates were affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes belonging to genera Bacillus and Clostridium. Batch fermentation studies demonstrated that isolates had the ability to ferment glucose, xylose, or glycerol to industrially valuable products such as ethanol and 1,3-propanediol (PDO.Batch fermentation studies on selected seven bacterial strains demonstrated that these have the ability to ferment glucose, xylose, or glycerol to industrially valuable products such as ethanol and 1,3-propanediol (PDO. Ethanol was detected as the major fermentation end product in glucose-fermenting cultures at pH 10 with yields of 0.206 - 0.304 g of ethanol/g of glucose. While a xylose-fermenting strain yielded 0.189 g of ethanol/g of xylose and 0.585 g of acetic acid/g of xylose at the end of fermentation. At pH 7, glycerol-fermenting isolates produced PDO (0.323 - 0.458 g of PDO/g of glycerol and ethanol (0.284 - 0.350 g of ethanol/g of glycerol as major end products while acetic acid and succinic acid were identified as minor by-products in fermentation broths. These results suggest that the deep biosphere of the former Homestake gold mine harbors bacterial strains which could be used in bio-based production of ethanol and PDO.

  9. Discovery of mycangia and the associated xylose-fermenting yeasts in stag beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Masahiko; Kubota, Kôhei; Matsushita, Norihisa; Togashi, Katsumi

    2010-03-01

    Most wood-feeding insects need an association with microbes to utilize wood as food, and some have special organs to store and convey the microbes. We report here the discovery of the microbe-storage organ (mycangium) in stag beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae), which develop in decayed wood. The mycangium, which was discovered in the abdomen, is present in all adult females of 22 lucanid species examined in this study, but absent in adult males. By contrast, adult insects of both sexes of selected Passalidae, Geotrupidae, and Scarabaeidae, which are related to Lucanidae, lacked mycangia similar to those of the lucanid species. Yeast-like microbes were isolated from the mycangium of five lucanid species. DNA sequence analyses indicate that the microbes are closely related to the xylose-fermenting yeasts Pichia stipitis, Pichia segobiensis, or Pichia sp. known from the gut of a passalid species.

  10. Alcoholic fermentation of xylose by immobilized Pichia stipitis in a fixed-bed pulsed bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanroman, A.; Chamy, R.; Nunez, M.J.; Lema, J.M. (Santiago de Compostela Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    To enhance the productivity of the fermentation of xylose by Pichia stipitis, it is important to use bioreactors that (a) allow a high concentration of yeast (this can be achieved by using immobilised yeasts), (b) reduce the diffusional limitations resulting from dead volume (due mainly to the supplied and produced gas), and (c) diminish the effect of inhibition by ethanol. The process of immobilising P. stipitis in [kappa]-carrageenan was amended through the subsequent treatment of the bioparticles with a hardening agent (Al[sup 3+]). The variables examined were the cellular mass/gel mass ratio, the concentration of the hardening solution, and the contact time between the bioparticles and the hardening agent. (author)

  11. Galacturonic Acid Inhibits the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Galactose, Xylose, and Arabinose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisjes, Eline H.; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pKa value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter−1 galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter−1 galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks. PMID:22582063

  12. Monodehydroascorbate reductase mediates TNT toxicity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Emily J; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Beynon, Emily; Lorenz, Astrid; Chechik, Victor; Bruce, Neil C

    2015-09-04

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a highly toxic and persistent environmental pollutant. Due to the scale of affected areas, one of the most cost-effective and environmentally friendly means of removing explosives pollution could be the use of plants. However, mechanisms of TNT phytotoxicity have been elusive. Here, we reveal that phytotoxicity is caused by reduction of TNT in the mitochondria, forming a nitro radical that reacts with atmospheric oxygen, generating reactive superoxide. The reaction is catalyzed by monodehydroascorbate reductase 6 (MDHAR6), with Arabidopsis deficient in MDHAR6 displaying enhanced TNT tolerance. This discovery will contribute toward the remediation of contaminated sites. Moreover, in an environment of increasing herbicide resistance, with a shortage in new herbicide classes, our findings reveal MDHAR6 as a valuable plant-specific target. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Structures of mammalian cytosolic quinone reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C E; Bianchet, M A; Talalay, P; Faig, M; Amzel, L M

    2000-08-01

    The metabolism of quinone compounds presents one source of oxidative stress in mammals, as many pathways proceed by mechanisms that generate reactive oxygen species as by-products. One defense against quinone toxicity is the enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1), which metabolizes quinones by a two-electron reduction mechanism, thus averting production of radicals. QR1 is expressed in the cytoplasm of many tissues, and is highly inducible. A closely related homologue, quinone reductase type 2 (QR2), has been identified in several mammalian species. QR2 is also capable of reducing quinones to hydroquinones, but unlike QR1, cannot use NAD(P)H. X-ray crystallographic studies of QR1 and QR2 illustrate that despite their different biochemical properties, these enzymes have very similar three-dimensional structures. In particular, conserved features of the active sites point to the close relationship between these two enzymes.

  14. Enhancement of nitrate reductase activity by benzyladenine in Agrostemma githago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kende, H.; Hahn, H.; Kays, S.E.

    1971-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity in excised embryos of Agrostemma githago increases in response to both NO/sub 3//sup -/ and cytokinins. Discussed was whether cytokinins affected nitrate reductase activity directly or through NO/sub 3//sup -/, either by amplifying the effect of low endogenous NO/sub 3//sup -/ levels, or by making NO/sub 3//sup -/ available for induction from a metabolically inactive compartment. Nitrate reductase activity was enhanced on the average by 50% after 1 hour of benzyladenine treatment. In some experiments, the cytokinin response was detectable as early as 30 minutes after addition of benzyladenine. Nitrate reductase activity increased linearly for 4 hours and began to decay 13 hours after start of the hormone treatment. When embryos were incubated in solutions containing mixtures of NO/sub 3//sup -/ and benzyladenine, additive responses were obtained. The effects of NO/sub 3//sup -/ and benzyladenine were counteracted by abscisic acid. The increase in nitrate reductase activity was inhibited at lower abscisic acid concentrations in embryos which were induced with NO/sub 3//sup -/, as compared to embryos treated with benzyladenine. Casein hydrolysate inhibited the development of nitrate reductase activity. The response to NO/sub 3//sup -/ was more susceptible to inhibition by casein hydrolysate than the response to the hormone. When NO/sub 3//sup -/ and benzyladenine were withdrawn from the medium after maximal enhancement of nitrate reductase activity, the level of the enzyme decreased rapidly. Nitrate reductase activity increased again as a result of a second treatment with benzyladenine but not with NO/sub 3//sup -/. At the time of the second exposure to benzyladenine, no NO/sub 3//sup -/ was detectable in extracts of Agrostemma embryos. This is taken as evidence that cytokinins enhance nitrate reductase activity directly and not through induction by NO/sub 3//sup -/. 11 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  15. [Fumarate reductase in the mitochondria of the trematode Calicophoron ijimai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarygina, G V; Vykhrestiuk, N P; Burenina, E A

    1983-01-01

    The presence of active fumarate reductase system in mitochondria of the trematode Calicophoron ijimai was shown. Fumarate reductase activities in different collections of C. ijimai vary considerably. Maximum activity accounts for 47.7 +/- 1.0 nM/min/mg protein whereas minimum--for 15.1 +/- 0.1. Some properties of the enzyme were studied. The effect of thiabendazole, bitionol, oxinid and preparations of G-1026 and G-937 on the fumarate reductase activity was investigated. G-1026, G-937 preparations and bitionol have the strongest inhibitory effect on the enzyme. Thiabendazole inhibited but little the fumarate reductase reaction in C. ijimai. The enzyme activity was not affected by oxinid.

  16. Regulation of ribonucleotide reductase by Spd1 involves multiple mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestoras, Konstantinos; Mohammed, Asma Hadi; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie

    2010-01-01

    The correct levels of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and their relative abundance are important to maintain genomic integrity. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulation is complex and multifaceted. RNR is regulated allosterically by two nucleotide-binding sites, by transcriptional control, and...

  17. Reduction of Folate by Dihydrofolate Reductase from Thermotoga maritima

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loveridge, E Joel; Hroch, Lukas; Hughes, Robert L; Williams, Thomas; Davies, Rhidian L; Angelastro, Antonio; Luk, Louis Y P; Maglia, Giovanni; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian dihydrofolate reductases (DHFR) catalyse the reduction of folate more efficiently than the equivalent bacterial enzymes, despite typically having similar efficiencies for the reduction of their natural substrate dihydrofolate. In contrast, we show here that DHFR from the hyperthermophilic

  18. Data for rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H-preferring xylose reductase–xylitol dehydrogenase pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A thermo-tolerant NADP(H-preferring xylose pathway was constructed in Kluyveromyces marxianus for ethanol production with xylose at elevated temperatures (Zhang et al., 2015 [25]. Ethanol production yield and efficiency was enhanced by pathway engineering in the engineered strains. The constructed strain, YZJ088, has the ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose for ethanol and xylitol production, which is a critical step toward enabling economic biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. This study contains the fermentation results of strains using the metabolic pathway engineering procedure. The ethanol-producing abilities of various yeast strains under various conditions were compared, and strain YZJ088 showed the highest production and fastest productivity at elevated temperatures. The YZJ088 xylose fermentation results indicate that it fermented well with xylose at either low or high inoculum size. When fermented with an initial cell concentration of OD600=15 at 37 °C, YZJ088 consumed 200 g/L xylose and produced 60.07 g/L ethanol; when the initial cell concentration was OD600=1 at 37 °C, YZJ088 consumed 98.96 g/L xylose and produced 33.55 g/L ethanol with a productivity of 0.47 g/L/h. When fermented with 100 g/L xylose at 42 °C, YZJ088 produced 30.99 g/L ethanol with a productivity of 0.65 g/L/h, which was higher than that produced at 37 °C.

  19. Effects of acid impregnated steam explosion process on xylose recovery and enzymatic conversion of cellulose in corncob.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Gang; Zhang, Hongjia; Li, Menghua; Wang, Shizeng; Yuan, Qipeng

    2014-12-19

    Corncob residue is a cellulose-rich byproduct obtained from industrial xylose production via dilute acid hydrolysis processes. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in acid hydrolysis residue of corncob (AHRC) is often less efficient without further pretreatment. In this work, the process characteristics of acid impregnated steam explosion were studied in conjunction with a dilute acid process, and their effects on physiochemical changes and enzymatic saccharification of corncob residue were compared. With the acid impregnated steam explosion process, both higher xylose recovery and higher cellulose conversion were obtained. The maximum conversion of cellulose in acid impregnated steam explosion residue of corncob (ASERC) reached 85.3%, which was 1.6 times higher than that of AHRC. Biomass compositional analysis showed similar cellulose and lignin content in ASERC and AHRC. XRD analysis demonstrated comparable crystallinity of ASERC and AHRC. The improved enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency was attributed to higher porosity in ASERC, measured by mercury porosimetry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Overexpression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a putative xylose isomerase from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jea-Won; Han, Byeong-Gu; Park, Sang Youn; Kim, Seung Jun; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Lee, Byung Il

    2013-10-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron BT0793, a putative xylose isomerase, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether 550 as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.10 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron X-rays. The crystal was found to belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a=96.3, b=101.7, c=108.3 Å, α=82.8, β=68.2, γ=83.0°. The asymmetric unit contained eight subunits of xylose isomerase with a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.38 Å3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 48.3%.

  1. Spathaspora arborariae sp. nov., a d-xylose-fermenting yeast species isolated from rotting wood in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadete, Raquel M; Santos, Renata O; Melo, Monaliza A; Mouro, Adriane; Gonçalves, Davi L; Stambuk, Boris U; Gomes, Fátima C O; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2009-12-01

    Four strains of a new yeast species were isolated from rotting wood from two sites in an Atlantic Rain Forest and a Cerrado ecosystem in Brazil. The analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rRNA gene showed that this species belongs to the Spathaspora clade. The new species ferments D-xylose efficiently and is related to Candida jeffriesii and Spathaspora passalidarum, both of which also ferment D-xylose. Similar to S. passalidarum, the new species produces unconjugated asci with a single greatly elongated ascospore with curved ends. The type strain of Spathaspora arborariae sp. nov. is UFMG-HM19.1A(T) (=CBS11463(T)=NRRL Y-48658(T)).

  2. Stepwise metabolic adaption from pure metabolization to balanced anaerobic growth on xylose explored for recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimacek, Mario; Kirl, Elisabeth; Krahulec, Stefan; Longus, Karin; Novy, Vera; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-03-08

    To effectively convert lignocellulosic feedstocks to bio-ethanol anaerobic growth on xylose constitutes an essential trait that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains normally do not adopt through the selective integration of a xylose assimilation route as the rate of ATP-formation is below energy requirements for cell maintenance (mATP). To enable cell growth extensive evolutionary and/or elaborate rational engineering is required. However the number of available strains meeting demands for process integration are limited. In this work evolutionary engineering in just two stages coupled to strain selection under strict anaerobic conditions was carried out with BP10001 as progenitor. BP10001 is an efficient (Yethanol = 0.35 g/g) but slow (qethanol = 0.05 ± 0.01 g/gBM/h) xylose-metabolizing recombinant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that expresses an optimized yeast-type xylose assimilation pathway. BP10001 was adapted in 5 generations to anaerobic growth on xylose by prolonged incubation for 91 days in sealed flasks. Resultant strain IBB10A02 displayed a specific growth rate μ of 0.025 ± 0.002 h-1 but produced large amounts of glycerol and xylitol. In addition growth was strongly impaired at pH below 6.0 and in the presence of weak acids. Using sequential batch selection and IBB10A02 as basis, IBB10B05 was evolved (56 generations). IBB10B05 was capable of fast (μ = 0.056 ± 0.003 h-1; qethanol = 0.28 ± 0.04 g/gBM/h), efficient (Yethanol = 0.35 ± 0.02 g/g), robust and balanced fermentation of xylose. Importantly, IBB10A02 and IBB10B05 displayed a stable phenotype. Unlike BP10001 both strains displayed an unprecedented biphasic formation of glycerol and xylitol along the fermentation time. Transition from a glycerol- to a xylitol-dominated growth phase, probably controlled by CO2/HCO3-, was accompanied by a 2.3-fold increase of mATP while YATP (= 87 ± 7 mmolATP/gBM) remained unaffected. As long as glycerol

  3. The level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity strongly influences xylose fermentation and inhibitor sensitivity in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, M.; Johansson, B.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2003-01-01

    than the strain with wild-type G6PDH-activity, which suggested that the availability of intracellular NADPH correlated with tolerance towards lignocellulose-derived inhibitors. Low G6PDH-activity strains were also more sensitive to H2O2 than the control strain TMB3001....... production levels of G6PDH on xylose fermentation. We used a synthetic promoter library and the copper-regulated CUP1 promoter to generate G6PDH-activities between 0% and 179% of the wildtype level. G6PDH-activities of 1% and 6% of the wild-type level resulted in 2.8- and 5.1-fold increase in specific xylose...

  4. Coutilization of D-Glucose, D-Xylose, and L-Arabinose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Coexpressing the Metabolic Pathways and Evolutionary Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqiang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient and cost-effective fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials requires simultaneous cofermentation of all hydrolyzed sugars, mainly including D-glucose, D-xylose, and L-arabinose. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a traditional D-glucose fermenting strain and could utilize D-xylose and L-arabinose after introducing the initial metabolic pathways. The efficiency and simultaneous coutilization of the two pentoses and D-glucose for ethanol production in S. cerevisiae still need to be optimized. Previously, we constructed an L-arabinose-utilizing S. cerevisiae BSW3AP. In this study, we further introduced the XI and XR-XDH metabolic pathways of D-xylose into BSW3AP to obtain D-glucose, D-xylose, and L-arabinose cofermenting strain. Benefits of evolutionary engineering: the resulting strain BSW4XA3 displayed a simultaneous coutilization of D-xylose and L-arabinose with similar consumption rates, and the D-glucose metabolic capacity was not decreased. After 120 h of fermentation on mixed D-glucose, D-xylose, and L-arabinose, BSW4XA3 consumed 24% more amounts of pentoses and the ethanol yield of mixed sugars was increased by 30% than that of BSW3AP. The resulting strain BSW4XA3 was a useful chassis for further enhancing the coutilization efficiency of mixed sugars for bioethanol production.

  5. A novel method to prepare L-Arabinose from xylose mother liquor by yeast-mediated biopurification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shuangjun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-arabinose is an important intermediate for anti-virus drug synthesis and has also been used in food additives for diets-controlling in recent years. Commercial production of L-arabinose is a complex progress consisting of acid hydrolysis of gum arabic, followed by multiple procedures of purification, thus making high production cost. Therefore, there is a biotechnological and commercial interest in the development of new cost-effective and high-performance methods for obtaining high purity grade L-arabinose. Results An alternative, economical method for purifying L-arabinose from xylose mother liquor was developed in this study. After screening 306 yeast strains, a strain of Pichia anomala Y161 was selected as it could effectively metabolize other sugars but not L-arabinose. Fermentation in a medium containing xylose mother liquor permitted enrichment of L-arabinose by a significant depletion of other sugars. Biochemical analysis of this yeast strain confirmed that its poor capacity for utilizing L-arabinose was due to low activities of the enzymes required for the metabolism of this sugar. Response surface methodology was employed for optimization the fermentation conditions in shake flask cultures. The optimum conditions were: 75 h fermentation time, at 32.5°C, in a medium containing 21% (v/v xylose mother liquor. Under these conditions, the highest purity of L-arabinose reached was 86.1% of total sugar, facilitating recovery of white crystalline L-arabinose from the fermentation medium by simple methods. Conclusion Yeast-mediated biopurification provides a dynamic method to prepare high purity of L-arabinose from the feedstock solution xylose mother liqour, with cost-effective and high-performance properties.

  6. Co-utilization of L-arabinose and D-xylose by laboratory and industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    OpenAIRE

    Boles Eckhard; Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel; Wiedemann Beate; Karhumaa Kaisa; Gorwa-Grauslund Marie-F

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive alternative for the production of bioethanol. Traditionally, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used in industrial ethanol fermentations. However, S. cerevisiae is naturally not able to ferment the pentose sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose, which are present in high amounts in lignocellulosic raw materials. Results We describe the engineering of laboratory and industrial S. cerevisiae strains to co-ferment the pento...

  7. The nitric oxide reductase activity of cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wonderen, Jessica H; Burlat, Bénédicte; Richardson, David J; Cheesman, Myles R; Butt, Julea N

    2008-04-11

    Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (NrfA) from Escherichia coli has a well established role in the respiratory reduction of nitrite to ammonium. More recently the observation that anaerobically grown E. coli nrf mutants were more sensitive to NO. than the parent strain led to the proposal that NrfA might also participate in NO. detoxification. Here we describe protein film voltammetry that presents a quantitative description of NrfA NO. reductase activity. NO. reduction is initiated at similar potentials to NrfA-catalyzed reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine. All three activities are strongly inhibited by cyanide. Together these results suggest a common site for reduction of all three substrates as axial ligands to the lysine-coordinated NrfA heme rather than nonspecific NO. reduction at one of the four His-His coordinated hemes also present in each NrfA subunit. NO. reduction by NrfA is described by a K(m) of the order of 300 microm. The predicted turnover number of approximately 840 NO. s(-1) is much higher than that of the dedicated respiratory NO. reductases of denitrification and the flavorubredoxin and flavohemoglobin of E. coli that are also proposed to play roles in NO. detoxification. In considering the manner by which anaerobically growing E. coli might detoxify exogenously generated NO. encountered during invasion of a human host it appears that the periplasmically located NrfA should be effective in maintaining low NO. levels such that any NO. reaching the cytoplasm is efficiently removed by flavorubredoxin (K(m) approximately 0.4 microm).

  8. Direct ethanol production from glucose, xylose and sugarcane bagasse by the corn endophytic fungi Fusarium verticillioides and Acremonium zeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Maíra N; Guimarães, Valéria M; Falkoski, Daniel L; Visser, Evan M; Siqueira, Germano A; Milagres, Adriane M F; de Rezende, Sebastião T

    2013-10-10

    Production of ethanol with two corn endophytic fungi, Fusarium verticillioides and Acremonium zeae, was studied. The yield of ethanol from glucose, xylose and a mixture of both sugars were 0.47, 0.46 and 0.50g/g ethanol/sugar for F. verticillioides and 0.37, 0.39 and 0.48g/g ethanol/sugar for A. zeae. Both fungi were able to co-ferment glucose and xylose. Ethanol production from 40g/L of pre-treated sugarcane bagasse was 4.6 and 3.9g/L for F. verticillioides and A. zeae, respectively, yielding 0.31g/g of ethanol per consumed sugar. Both fungi studied were capable of co-fermenting glucose and xylose at high yields. Moreover, they were able to produce ethanol directly from lignocellulosic biomass, demonstrating to be suitable microorganisms for consolidated bioprocessing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Inhibitors on the Transcriptional Profiling of Gluconobater oxydans NL71 Genes after Biooxidation of Xylose into Xylonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available D-Xylonic acid belongs to the top 30 biomass-based platform chemicals and represents a promising application of xylose. Until today, Gluconobacter oxydans NL71 is the most efficient microbe capable of fermenting xylose into xylonate. However, its growth is seriously inhibited when concentrated lignocellulosic hydrolysates are used as substrates due to the presence of various degraded compounds formed during biomass pretreatment. Three critical lignocellulosic inhibitors were thereby identified, i.e., formic acid, furfural, and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. As microbe fermentation is mostly regulated at the genome level, four groups of cell transcriptomes were obtained for a comparative investigation by RNA sequencing of a control sample with samples treated separately with the above-mentioned inhibitors. The digital gene expression profiles screened 572, 714 genes, and 408 DEGs was obtained by the comparisons among four transcriptomes. A number of genes related to the different functional groups showed characteristic expression patterns induced by three inhibitors, in which 19 genes were further tested and confirmed by qRT-PCR. We extrapolated many differentially expressed genes that could explain the cellular responses to the inhibitory effects. We provide results that enable the scientific community to better define the molecular processes involved in the microbes' responses to lignocellulosic inhibitors during the cellular biooxidation of xylose into xylonic acid.

  10. Shotgun proteomic monitoring of Clostridium acetobutylicum during stationary phase of butanol fermentation using xylose and comparison with the exponential phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Raghavan, Vijaya G. S. [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Lefsrud, Mark G [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec

    2012-01-01

    Economically viable production of solvents through acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation requires a detailed understanding of Clostridium acetobutylicum. This study focuses on the proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from the stationary phase of ABE fermentation using xylose and compares with the exponential growth by shotgun proteomics approach. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed 22.9% of the C. acetobutylicum genome and 18.6% was found to be common in both exponential and stationary phases. The proteomic profile of C. acetobutylicum changed during the ABE fermentation such that 17 proteins were significantly differentially expressed between the two phases. Specifically, the expression of five proteins namely, CAC2873, CAP0164, CAP0165, CAC3298, and CAC1742 involved in the solvent production pathway were found to be significantly lower in the stationary phase compared to the exponential growth. Similarly, the expression of fucose isomerase (CAC2610), xylulose kinase (CAC2612), and a putative uncharacterized protein (CAC2611) involved in the xylose utilization pathway were also significantly lower in the stationary phase. These findings provide an insight into the metabolic behavior of C. acetobutylicum between different phases of ABE fermentation using xylose.

  11. Catalytic conversion of xylose and corn stalk into furfural over carbon solid acid catalyst in γ-valerolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingwei; Li, Wenzhi; Xu, Zhiping; Liu, Qiyu; Ma, Qiaozhi; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-min; Ma, Longlong

    2016-06-01

    A novel carbon solid acid catalyst was synthesized by the sulfonation of carbonaceous material which was prepared by carbonization of sucrose using 4-BDS as a sulfonating agent. TEM, N2 adsorption-desorption, elemental analysis, XPS and FT-IR were used to characterize the catalyst. Then, the catalyst was applied for the conversion of xylose and corn stalk into furfural in GVL. The influence of the reaction time, temperature and dosage of catalyst on xylose dehydration were also investigated. The Brønsted acid catalyst exhibited high activity in the dehydration of xylose, with a high furfural yield of 78.5% at 170°C in 30min. What's more, a 60.6% furfural yield from corn stalk was achieved in 100min at 200°C. The recyclability of the sulfonated carbon catalyst was perfect, and it could be reused for 5times without the loss of furfural yields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Engineering of ethanolic E. coli with the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene enhances ethanol production from both glucose and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanny, Tony; Arnaldos, Marina; Kunkel, Stephanie A; Pagilla, Krishna R; Stark, Benjamin C

    2010-11-01

    Escherichia coli strain FBR5, which has been engineered to direct fermentation of sugars to ethanol, was further engineered, using three different constructs, to contain and express the Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene (vgb). The three resulting strains expressed Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) at various levels, and the production of ethanol was inversely proportional to the VHb level. High levels of VHb were correlated with an inhibition of ethanol production; however, the strain (TS3) with the lowest VHb expression (approximately the normal induced level in Vitreoscilla) produced, under microaerobic conditions in shake flasks, more ethanol than the parental strain (FBR5) with glucose, xylose, or corn stover hydrolysate as the predominant carbon source. Ethanol production was dependent on growth conditions, but increases were as high as 30%, 119%, and 59% for glucose, xylose, and corn stover hydrolysate, respectively. Only in the case of glucose, however, was the theoretical yield of ethanol by TS3 greater than that achieved by others with FBR5 grown under more closely controlled conditions. TS3 had no advantage over FBR5 regarding ethanol production from arabinose. In 2 L fermentors, TS3 produced about 10% and 15% more ethanol than FBR5 for growth on glucose and xylose, respectively. The results suggest that engineering of microorganisms with vgb/VHb could be of significant use in enhancing biological production of ethanol.

  13. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Activity and Folate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursen Keser

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Folate is a vital B vitamin which is easily water-soluble. It is a natural source which is found in the herbal and animal foods. Folate has important duties in the human metabolism, one of them is the adjustment of the level of plasma homocysteine. Reduction in MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase,which is in charge of the metabolism of homocysteine activity affects the level of homocysteine. Therefore MTHFR is an important enzyme in folate metabolism. Some of the mutations occurring in the MTHFR gene is a risk factor for various diseases and may be caused the hyperhomocysteinemia or the homocystinuria, and they also may lead to metabolic problems. MTHFR is effective in the important pathways such as DNA synthesis, methylation reactions and synthesis of RNA. C677T and A1298C are the most commonly occurring polymorphisms in the gene of MTHFR. The frequency of these polymorphisms show differences in the populations. MTHFR, folate distribution, metabolism of homocysteine and S-adenosylmethionine, by the MTHFR methylation the genetic defects have the potential of affecting the risk of disease in the negative or positive way.

  14. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark, E-mail: mark.petrash@ucdenver.edu

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1{sup GFP} mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR{sup WT} background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.

  15. Xylose Migration During Tandem Mass Spectrometry of N-Linked Glycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Elizabeth S.; Loziuk, Philip L.; Muddiman, David C.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the rearrangement of gas-phase ions via tandem mass spectrometry is critical to improving manual and automated interpretation of complex datasets. N-glycan analysis may be carried out under collision induced (CID) or higher energy collision dissociation (HCD), which favors cleavage at the glycosidic bond. However, fucose migration has been observed in tandem MS, leading to the formation of new bonds over four saccharide units away. In the following work, we report the second instance of saccharide migration ever to occur for N-glycans. Using horseradish peroxidase as a standard, the beta-1,2 xylose was observed to migrate from a hexose to a glucosamine residue on the (Xyl)Man3GlcNac2 glycan. This investigation was followed up in a complex N-linked glycan mixture derived from stem differentiating xylem tissue, and the rearranged product ion was observed for 75% of the glycans. Rearrangement was not favored in isomeric glycans with a core or antennae fucose and unobserved in glycans predicted to have a permanent core-fucose modification. As the first empirical observation of this rearrangement, this work warrants dissemination so it may be searched in de novo sequencing glycan workflows.

  16. Rapid differentiation of Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans by early D-xylose assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellepola, A N B; Khan, Z U

    2012-01-01

    To determine if D-xylose (XYL) and/or α-methyl-D-glucoside (MDG) assimilation can be used reliably as a rapid test to differentiate Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans at an earlier time point such as 2 h after inoculation. Thirty isolates of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis recovered from anatomical sites and clinical specimens were used. Isolates were inoculated into the API 20C AUX yeast identification system, and incubated at 30°C. XYL and MDG assimilations were read at 2-hour intervals beginning 2 h after the initial inoculation and up to 24 h of incubation; thereafter, results were read after 48 and 72 h. Twenty-nine (97%) C. albicans isolates had assimilated XYL at 16 h and, by 24 h, all isolates were positive for XYL assimilation. None of the C. dubliniensis isolates assimilated XYL. The MDG assimilation revealed that 24, 40, 92 and 100% of C. albicans isolates became positive after 16, 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation, respectively, whereas only 3% of C. dubliniensis isolates assimilated MDG after 72 h. The findings showed that it is possible to rapidly differentiate C. albicans from C. dubliniensis isolates using the API 20C AUX carbohydrate assimilation kits after 16 h of incubation at 30°C based on the XYL assimilation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase from Populus trichocarpa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+-catechin and (--epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05 in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus.

  18. The role of light in the inducation of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase in cucumber seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Buczek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity of nitrate reductase (NR and nitrite reductase (NiR was investigated in vivo and in vitro in the roots and NR activity in 3-day-old cotyledons of cucumber seedlings. NR activity in the roots appears almost immediately after addition of nitrate ions to the induction medium, whereas, in the cotyledones NR induction is delayed. In general light enhances NR activity in the cotyledons and depresses it in the roots in experiments of short duration. Etiolation of the cotyledons reduces NR activity in the roots and leads to disappearance of the activity of this enzyme in the cotyledons, whereas the NR activity of roots kept in darkness, after transfer of the etiolated plants to light, increases threefold. In roots growing in darkness a delay in NiR induction is observed, while in those growing in ligth it occurs at the same time as NR induction. Chlormaphenicol (CAP, cycloheximide (CHI and actinomycin D (ACM applied at the beginning of the period of seedling induction with initrates inhibit NR activity in the cotyledons, whereas in the roots only CHI and ACM exert such an effect. To sum up, NR is synthesized in cucumber roots and cotyledons de novo on the cytoplasmic polyribosomes, and light per se is not indispensable for this synthesis, but it has an indirect influence on the activity level of NR and NiR both in the roots and the cotyledons.

  19. Purification and Properties of an NADPH-Aldose Reductase (Aldehyde Reductase) from Euonymus japonica Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Fayek B.

    1986-01-01

    The enzyme aldose (aldehyde) reductase was partially purified (142-fold) and characterized from Euonymus japonica leaves. The reductase, a dimer, had an average molecular weight of 67,000 as determined by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The enzyme was NADPH specific and reduced a broad range of substrates including aldoses, aliphatic aldehydes, and aromatic aldehydes. Maximum activity was observed at pH 8 in phosphate and Tris-HCl buffers and at pH 8.6 to 9.0 in glycine-NaOH buffer using dl-glyceraldehyde or 3-pyridinecarboxaldehyde as substrate. NADP was a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH with a Ki of 60 micromolar. Glycerol was an uncompetitive inhibitor to dl-glyceraldehyde (K′i = 460 millimolar). The Euonymus enzyme was inhibited by sulfhydryl inhibitor, phenobarbital, and high concentrations of Li2SO4. Pyrazol and metal chelating agents inhibited the enzyme slightly. Enzyme activity was detected in the leaves and berries of Celastrus orbiculatus and several species of Euonymus. Probable function of this enzyme is to reduce d-galactose to galactitol, a characteristic metabolite in phloem sap of members of the Celastraceae family. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16664750

  20. 5α-reductases in human physiology: an unfolding story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M

    2012-01-01

    5α-reductases are a family of isozymes expressed in a wide host of tissues including the central nervous system (CNS) and play a pivotal role in male sexual differentiation, development and physiology. A comprehensive literature search from 1970 to 2011 was made through PubMed and the relevant information was summarized. 5α reductases convert testosterone, progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, aldosterone and corticosterone into their respective 5α-dihydro-derivatives, which serve as substrates for 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes. The latter transforms these 5α-reduced metabolites into a subclass of neuroactive steroid hormones with distinct physiological functions. The neuroactive steroid hormones modulate a multitude of functions in human physiology encompassing regulation of sexual differentiation, neuroprotection, memory enhancement, anxiety, sleep and stress, among others. In addition, 5α -reductase type 3 is also implicated in the N-glycosylation of proteins via formation of dolichol phosphate. The family of 5α-reductases was targeted for drug development to treat pathophysiological conditions, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical use of 5α-reductase inhibitors was well established, the scope and the magnitude of the adverse side effects of such drugs, especially on the CNS, is still unrecognized due to lack of knowledge of the various physiological functions of this family of enzymes, especially in the CNS. There is an urgent need to better understand the function of 5α-reductases and the role of neuroactive steroids in human physiology in order to minimize the potential adverse side effects of inhibitors targeting 5α-reductases to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia and androgenic alopecia.

  1. Pancreaticobiliary cancers with deficient methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Skinner, Halcyon G; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Abe, Tadayoshi; Sato, Norihiro; Riall, Taylor Sohn; Yeo, Charles J; Kern, Scott E; Goggins, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Methyl group deficiency might promote carcinogenesis by inducing DNA breaks and DNA hypomethylation. We hypothesized that deficient methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotypes could promote pancreatic cancer development. First, we performed a case-control study of germline MTHFR polymorphisms (C677T, A1298C) in 303 patients with pancreatic cancer and 305 matched control subjects. Pancreatic neoplasms frequently lose an MTHFR allele during tumorigenesis; we hypothesized that such loss could promote carcinogenesis. We therefore evaluated the cancer MTHFR genotypes of 82 patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers and correlated them to genome-wide measures of chromosomal deletion by using 386 microsatellite markers. Finally, MTHFR genotypes were correlated with global DNA methylation in 68 cancer cell lines. Germline MTHFR polymorphisms were not associated with an increased likelihood of having pancreatic cancer. Fractional allelic loss (a measure of chromosomal loss) trended higher in cancers with 677T genotypes than in cancers with other genotypes (P = .055). Among cancers with loss of an MTHFR allele, cancers with 677T MTHFR alleles had more deletions at folate-sensitive fragile sites (36.9%) and at tumor suppressor gene loci (68.5%) than 677C cancers (28.7% and 47.8%, P = .079 and .014, respectively). LINE1 methylation was lower in cancers with less functional 677T/TT genotypes (24.4%) than in those with 677CT (26.0%) and CC/C genotypes (32.5%) (P = .014). Cancers with defective MTHFR genotypes have more DNA hypomethylation and more chromosomal losses. Deficient MTHFR function due to loss of an MTHFR allele by an evolving neoplasm might, by promoting chromosomal losses, accelerate cancer development.

  2. Production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates by sequential feeding of xylose and octanoic acid in engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Meur Sylvaine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is able to synthesize large amounts of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs. To reduce the substrate cost, which represents nearly 50% of the total PHA production cost, xylose, a hemicellulose derivate, was tested as the growth carbon source in an engineered P. putida KT2440 strain. Results The genes encoding xylose isomerase (XylA and xylulokinase (XylB from Escherichia coli W3110 were introduced into P. putida KT2440. The recombinant KT2440 exhibited a XylA activity of 1.47 U and a XylB activity of 0.97 U when grown on a defined medium supplemented with xylose. The cells reached a maximum specific growth rate of 0.24 h-1 and a final cell dry weight (CDW of 2.5 g L-1 with a maximal yield of 0.5 g CDW g-1 xylose. Since no mcl-PHA was accumulated from xylose, mcl-PHA production can be controlled by the addition of fatty acids leading to tailor-made PHA compositions. Sequential feeding strategy was applied using xylose as the growth substrate and octanoic acid as the precursor for mcl-PHA production. In this way, up to 20% w w-1 of mcl-PHA was obtained. A yield of 0.37 g mcl-PHA per g octanoic acid was achieved under the employed conditions. Conclusions Sequential feeding of relatively cheap carbohydrates and expensive fatty acids is a practical way to achieve more cost-effective mcl-PHA production. This study is the first reported attempt to produce mcl-PHA by using xylose as the growth substrate. Further process optimizations to achieve higher cell density and higher productivity of mcl-PHA should be investigated. These scientific exercises will undoubtedly contribute to the economic feasibility of mcl-PHA production from renewable feedstock.

  3. Conversion of an inactive xylose isomerase into a functional enzyme by co-expression of GroEL-GroES chaperonins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temer, Beatriz; Dos Santos, Leandro Vieira; Negri, Victor Augusti; Galhardo, Juliana Pimentel; Magalhães, Pedro Henrique Mello; José, Juliana; Marschalk, Cidnei; Corrêa, Thamy Lívia Ribeiro; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2017-09-09

    Second-generation ethanol production is a clean bioenergy source with potential to mitigate fossil fuel emissions. The engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for xylose utilization is an essential step towards the production of this biofuel. Though xylose isomerase (XI) is the key enzyme for xylose conversion, almost half of the XI genes are not functional when expressed in S. cerevisiae. To date, protein misfolding is the most plausible hypothesis to explain this phenomenon. This study demonstrated that XI from the bacterium Propionibacterium acidipropionici becomes functional in S. cerevisiae when co-expressed with GroEL-GroES chaperonin complex from Escherichia coli. The developed strain BTY34, harboring the chaperonin complex, is able to efficiently convert xylose to ethanol with a yield of 0.44 g ethanol/g xylose. Furthermore, the BTY34 strain presents a xylose consumption rate similar to those observed for strains carrying the widely used XI from the fungus Orpinomyces sp. In addition, the tetrameric XI structure from P. acidipropionici showed an elevated number of hydrophobic amino acid residues on the surface of protein when compared to XI commonly expressed in S. cerevisiae. Based on our results, we elaborate an extensive discussion concerning the uncertainties that surround heterologous expression of xylose isomerases in S. cerevisiae. Probably, a correct folding promoted by GroEL-GroES could solve some issues regarding a limited or absent XI activity in S. cerevisiae. The strains developed in this work have promising industrial characteristics, and the designed strategy could be an interesting approach to overcome the non-functionality of bacterial protein expression in yeasts.

  4. Substrate channeling between the human dihydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nuo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In vivo, as an advanced catalytic strategy, transient non-covalently bound multi-enzyme complexes can be formed to facilitate the relay of substrates, i. e. substrate channeling, between sequential enzymatic reactions and to enhance the throughput of multi-step enzymatic pathways. The human thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase catalyze two consecutive reactions in the folate metabolism pathway, and experiments have shown that they are very likely to bind in the same multi-enzyme complex in vivo. While reports on the protozoa thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase bifunctional enzyme give substantial evidences of substrate channeling along a surface "electrostatic highway," attention has not been paid to whether the human thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase, if they are in contact with each other in the multi-enzyme complex, are capable of substrate channeling employing surface electrostatics. This work utilizes protein-protein docking, electrostatics calculations, and Brownian dynamics to explore the existence and mechanism of the substrate channeling between the human thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase. The results show that the bound human thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase are capable of substrate channeling and the formation of the surface "electrostatic highway." The substrate channeling efficiency between the two can be reasonably high and comparable to that of the protozoa. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  5. Sulfite Reductase Activity in Extracts of Various Photosynthetic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, H. D.; Tedro, S.; Kamen, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    Extracts of representative bacterial strains from the various families of photosynthetic prokaryotes are demonstrated to possess significant levels of sulfite reductase [EC 1.8.99.1; hydrogen-sulfide: (acceptor)oxidoreductase] activity with reduced methyl viologen as electron donor, but not NADPH2. The enzyme is localized primarily in the soluble fraction of the extracts, in contrast to adenylysulfate reductase [EC 1.8.99.2; AMP, sulfite: (acceptor) oxidoreductase], which is bound normally in the membrane fractions of those bacteria in which it is found. Assignment of the sulfite reductase activities to the biosynthetic (“assimilatory”) pathway is suggested by levels of specific activity noted and ready solubility. PMID:4526215

  6. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... is controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity...

  7. Methemoglobin reductase activity in intact fish red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank B; Nielsen, Karsten

    2018-01-01

    Hb reductase activity in fish offsets their higher Hb autoxidation and higher likelihood of encountering elevated nitrite. Deoxygenation significantly raised the rates of RBC metHb reduction, and more so in rainbow trout than in carp. The temperature sensitivity of metHb reduction in rainbow trout RBCs......Red blood cells (RBCs) possess methemoglobin reductase activity that counters the ongoing oxidation of hemoglobin (Hb) to methemoglobin (metHb), which in circulating blood is caused by Hb autoxidation or reactions with nitrite. We describe an assay for determining metHb reductase activity in intact...... of counteracting oxidation. This assay was used to compare metHb reduction in rainbow trout and carp RBCs under both oxygenated and deoxygenated conditions. Washing resulted in effective wash-out of nitrite to low and safe values (~2μM). The subsequent decline in [metHb] with time followed first-order kinetics...

  8. The Drosophila carbonyl reductase sniffer is an efficient 4-oxonon-2-enal (4ONE) reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hans-Jörg; Ziemba, Marta; Kisiela, Michael; Botella, José A; Schneuwly, Stephan; Maser, Edmund

    2011-05-30

    Studies with the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that the enzyme sniffer prevented oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. Mutant flies overexpressing sniffer had significantly extended life spans in a 99.5% oxygen atmosphere compared to wild-type flies. However, the molecular mechanism of this protection remained unclear. Sequence analysis and database searches identified sniffer as a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily with a 27.4% identity to the human enzyme carbonyl reductase type I (CBR1). As CBR1 catalyzes the reduction of the lipid peroxidation products 4HNE and 4ONE, we tested whether sniffer is able to metabolize these lipid derived aldehydes by carbonyl reduction. To produce recombinant enzyme, the coding sequence of sniffer was amplified from a cDNA-library, cloned into a bacterial expression vector and the His-tagged protein was purified by Ni-chelate chromatography. We found that sniffer catalyzed the NADPH-dependent carbonyl reduction of 4ONE (K(m)=24±2 μM, k(cat)=500±10 min(-1), k(cat)/K(m)=350 s(-1) mM(-1)) but not that of 4HNE. The reaction product of 4ONE reduction by sniffer was mainly 4HNE as shown by HPLC- and GC/MS analysis. Since 4HNE, though still a potent electrophile, is less neurotoxic and protein reactive than 4ONE, one mechanism by which sniffer exerts its neuroprotective effects in Drosophila after oxidative stress may be enzymatic reduction of 4ONE. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Proanthocyanidin synthesis in Theobroma cacao: genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase, anthocyanidin reductase, and leucoanthocyanidin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Shi, Zi; Maximova, Siela; Payne, Mark J; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-05

    The proanthocyanidins (PAs), a subgroup of flavonoids, accumulate to levels of approximately 10% total dry weight of cacao seeds. PAs have been associated with human health benefits and also play important roles in pest and disease defense throughout the plant. To dissect the genetic basis of PA biosynthetic pathway in cacao (Theobroma cacao), we have isolated three genes encoding key PA synthesis enzymes, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR). We measured the expression levels of TcANR, TcANS and TcLAR and PA content in cacao leaves, flowers, pod exocarp and seeds. In all tissues examined, all three genes were abundantly expressed and well correlated with PA accumulation levels, suggesting their active roles in PA synthesis. Overexpression of TcANR in an Arabidopsis ban mutant complemented the PA deficient phenotype in seeds and resulted in reduced anthocyanidin levels in hypocotyls. Overexpression of TcANS in tobacco resulted in increased content of both anthocyanidins and PAs in flower petals. Overexpression of TcANS in an Arabidopsis ldox mutant complemented its PA deficient phenotype in seeds. Recombinant TcLAR protein converted leucoanthocyanidin to catechin in vitro. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing TcLAR had decreased amounts of anthocyanidins and increased PAs. Overexpressing TcLAR in Arabidopsis ldox mutant also resulted in elevated synthesis of not only catechin but also epicatechin. Our results confirm the in vivo function of cacao ANS and ANR predicted based on sequence homology to previously characterized enzymes from other species. In addition, our results provide a clear functional analysis of a LAR gene in vivo.

  10. Co-fermentation of a mixture of glucose and xylose to fumaric acid by Rhizopus arrhizus RH 7-13-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Hu, Huirong; Jin, Yuhan; Yue, Xuemin; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei

    2017-06-01

    Lignocellulose is the most abundant biomass, composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. It can be converted into glucose and xylose, which could be utilized as carbon source to produce fumaric acid. But glucose and xylose were commonly used separately to produce fumaric acid, while the co-fermentation of glucose and xylose process was not studied so far. In this work, the co-fermentation process was researched through a new strain R. arrhizus RH 7-13-9# isolated from high concentration xylose. It was firstly proven to utilize glucose efficiently and 37.52g/L fumaric acid was obtained from 80g/L glucose. Furthermore, the effect of different ratios of glucose/xylose and carbon/nitrogen in the co-fermentation process was investigated and the best ratios were 75/25 (w/w) and 800/1 (w/w), where the yield of fumaric acid reached 46.78g/L. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Leavitt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR. Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB. Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB to be 15.3±2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150±0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3 to 0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr-p = 16.1‰ (r – p indicates reactant versus product, n = 648. This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4-H2S = 17.3±1.5‰ and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4-H2S = 17.3±3.8‰. Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in modern

  12. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin-Glutathione Reductase from Larval Taenia crassiceps (Cysticerci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Guevara-Flores

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial thioredoxin-glutathione reductase was purified from larval Taenia crassiceps (cysticerci. The preparation showed NADPH-dependent reductase activity with either thioredoxin or GSSG, and was able to perform thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. At 25∘C specific activities were 437  ±  27 mU mg-1 and 840  ±  49 mU mg-1 with thioredoxin and GSSG, respectively. Apparent Km values were 0.87  ±  0.04  μM, 41  ±  6  μM and 19  ±  10  μM for thioredoxin, GSSG and NADPH, respectively. Thioredoxin from eukaryotic sources was accepted as substrate. The enzyme reduced H2O2 in a NADPH-dependent manner, although with low catalytic efficiency. In the presence of thioredoxin, mitochondrial TGR showed a thioredoxin peroxidase-like activity. All disulfide reductase activities were inhibited by auranofin, suggesting mTGR is dependent on selenocysteine. The reductase activity with GSSG showed a higher dependence on temperature as compared with the DTNB reductase activity. The variation of the GSSG- and DTNB reductase activities on pH was dependent on the disulfide substrate. Like the cytosolic isoform, mTGR showed a hysteretic kinetic behavior at moderate or high GSSG concentrations, but it was less sensitive to calcium. The enzyme was able to protect glutamine synthetase from oxidative inactivation, suggesting that mTGR is competent to contend with oxidative stress.

  13. Plasmid-encoded diacetyl (acetoin) reductase in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, Fergal P; Myling-Petersen, Dorte; Larsen, Dianna

    2003-01-01

    ) reductases reported previously. Downstream of the butA gene of L. pseudomesenteroides, but coding in the opposite orientation, a putative DNA recombinase was identified. A two-step PCR approach was used to construct FPR02, a butA mutant of the wild-type strain, CHCC2114. FPR02 had significantly reduced......A plasmid-borne diacetyl (acetoin) reductase (butA) from Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides CHCC2114 was sequenced and cloned. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 257 amino acids which had high identity at the amino acid level to diacetyl (acetoin...

  14. NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY DURING HEAT SHOCK IN WINTER WHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimenko S.B.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates are the basic source of nitrogen for the majority of plants. Absorption and transformation of nitrates in plants are determined by external conditions and, first of all, temperature and light intensity. The influence of the temperature increasing till +40 0С on activity of nitrate reductase was studied. It is shown, that the rise of temperature was accompanied by sharp decrease of activity nitrate reductase in leaves of winter wheat, what, apparently, occurred for the account deactivations of enzyme and due to its dissociation.

  15. Uridine 5'-diphosphate-xylose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucose-xylosyltransferase from petals of Matthiola incana R.Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusch, M

    1986-12-01

    Petals of genetically defined lines of Matthiola incana R.Br. contain a glycosyltransferase which catalyzes the transfer of the xylosyl moiety of uridine 5'-diphosphate-xylose to the glucose of cyanidin 3-glucoside. The enzyme also uses 3-glucosides of pelargonidin and delphinidin, cyanidin 3-(p-coumaroyl)-glucoside and 3-(caffeoyl)-glucoside as substrates. The xylosyltransferase exhibits a pH optimum of 6.5. The enzyme activity depends on the stage of bud and flower development. Accumulation of cyanidin 3-glucoside during flower development is correlated with xylosyltransferase activity.

  16. Dehydration of D-xylose over SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst: Perspective on the pathways for condensed products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Su Jin; Park, Eun Duck; Park, Myung-June [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    This work addresses the kinetic mechanism for the dehydration of D-xylose over the SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solid catalyst, where the formation of condensed products is included in addition to the production of furfural and its decomposition. The kinetic modeling and parametric sensitivity show that the isomerization of D-xylose takes place in the early stages of the reaction, followed by the dehydration of isomers. Accordingly, the homogeneous polymerization of isomers is found to be dominant. The developed model is used to evaluate the effects of operating conditions on the catalytic performance; high temperature and D-xylose concentration guarantee high furfural yield.

  17. Antigliadin antibody, D-xylose, and cellobiose/mannitol permeability tests as indicators of mucosal damage in children with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncone, R; Starita, A; Coletta, S; Mayer, M; Greco, L

    1992-08-01

    A dual sugar (cellobiose/mannitol) permeability test using an iso-osmolar solution was performed, to compare its ability to predict small-bowel mucosal damage in children affected by coeliac disease with the determination of serum levels of D-xylose and antigliadin antibody. Eighty-three children (67 on gluten-containing diet and 16 on gluten-free diet) were investigated. The D-xylose and the serum antigliadin antibody test predicted accurately 70% and 78% of the small-bowel biopsy results, respectively, whereas the cellobiose-mannitol permeability test predicted 93%. These data confirm the superiority of the permeability test over the D-xylose test, although the former cannot be advocated as a substitute for jejunal biopsy. Our results suggest a complementary use of the permeability test and the antigliadin antibody measurement as screening tests for coeliac disease before applying more invasive procedures.

  18. Process for Assembly and Transformation into Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a Synthetic Yeast Artificial Chromosome Containing a Multigene Cassette to Express Enzymes That Enhance Xylose Utilization Designed for an Automated Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen R; Cox, Elby J; Bang, Sookie S; Pinkelman, Rebecca J; López-Núñez, Juan Carlos; Saha, Badal C; Qureshi, Nasib; Gibbons, William R; Fry, Michelle R; Moser, Bryan R; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Liu, Siqing; Sterner, David E; Butt, Tauseef R; Riedmuller, Steven B; Jones, Marjorie A; Riaño-Herrera, Néstor M

    2015-12-01

    A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing a multigene cassette for expression of enzymes that enhance xylose utilization (xylose isomerase [XI] and xylulokinase [XKS]) was constructed and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate feasibility as a stable protein expression system in yeast and to design an assembly process suitable for an automated platform. Expression of XI and XKS from the YAC was confirmed by Western blot and PCR analyses. The recombinant and wild-type strains showed similar growth on plates containing hexose sugars, but only recombinant grew on D-xylose and L-arabinose plates. In glucose fermentation, doubling time (4.6 h) and ethanol yield (0.44 g ethanol/g glucose) of recombinant were comparable to wild type (4.9 h and 0.44 g/g). In whole-corn hydrolysate, ethanol yield (0.55 g ethanol/g [glucose + xylose]) and xylose utilization (38%) for recombinant were higher than for wild type (0.47 g/g and 12%). In hydrolysate from spent coffee grounds, yield was 0.46 g ethanol/g (glucose + xylose), and xylose utilization was 93% for recombinant. These results indicate introducing a YAC expressing XI and XKS enhanced xylose utilization without affecting integrity of the host strain, and the process provides a potential platform for automated synthesis of a YAC for expression of multiple optimized genes to improve yeast strains. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  19. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Bacterial Mercuric Reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to characterize the bacterial mercuric reductase (merA) gene, mercury resistant (Hgr) Escherichia coli strains have been isolated from various mercury contaminated sites of India. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Hg and zone of inhibition for different antibiotics were measured, and finally mer operon ...

  20. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the.

  1. Sepiapterin reductase deficiency : A Treatable Mimic of Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedman, Jennifer; Roze, Emmanuel; Abdenur, Jose E.; Chang, Richard; Gasperini, Serena; Saletti, Veronica; Wali, Gurusidheshwar M.; Eiroa, Hernan; Neville, Brian; Felice, Alex; Parascandalo, Ray; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I.; Arrabal-Fernandez, Luisa; Dill, Patricia; Eichler, Florian S.; Echenne, Bernard; Gutierrez-Solana, Luis G.; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Hyland, Keith; Kusmierska, Katarzyna; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Lutz, Thomas; Mazzuca, Michel; Penzien, Johann; Bwee Tien Poll-The, [No Value; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Szymanska, Krystyna; Thoeny, Beat; Blau, Nenad

    Objective: Sepiapterin reductase deficiency (SRD) is an under-recognized levodopa-responsive disorder. We describe clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a cohort of patients with this treatable condition. We aim to improve awareness of the phenotype and available diagnostic and

  2. Cloning and characterization of a nitrite reductase gene related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... somatic embryogenesis stages, and that the level of GhNiR mRNA was also higher in the cultivar with higher somatic ..... Planta, 183: 17-24. Alexander H, Treusch, Sven L, Arnulf K, Stephan CS, Hans-Peter K,. Christa S (2005). Novel genes for nitrite reductase and Amo-related proteins indicate a role of ...

  3. Dizygotic twinning is not associated with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase haplotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montgomery, GW; Zhao, Z.Z.; Morley, K.I.; Marsh, A.J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Martin, N.G.; Duffy, DL

    2003-01-01

    Background: Folate metabolism is critical to embryonic development, influencing neural tube defects (NTD) and recurrent early pregnancy loss. Polymorphisms in 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) have been associated with dizygotic (DZ) twinning through pregnancy loss. Methods: The C677T

  4. Bioinformatic analysis of dihydrofolate reductase predicted in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Bioinformatic analysis of dihydrofolate reductase predicted in the genome sequence of Lactobacillus pentosus KCA1. *Kingsley C. Anukam. 1 and Uche Oge. 2. 1TWAS Genomic Research Unit, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, 2Department of Physiology,. School of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Benin, ...

  5. Bioinformatic analysis of dihydrofolate reductase predicted in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genome has open reading frames coding for the complete genes required for folate biosynthesis. Our previous study shows that rats fed with L. pentosus KCA1 led to enhancement of haematological parameters. Bioinformatic tool such as ClustalW algorithm was used to analyze dihydrofolate reductase (folA/dfrA) ...

  6. Optimum conditions for cotton nitrate reductase extraction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conditions of nitrate reductase extraction and activity measurement should be adapted to plant species, and to the organs of the same plant, because of extreme weaknesses and instabilities of the enzyme. Different extraction and reaction media have been compared in order to define the best conditions for cotton callus ...

  7. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the ZmNR1, ZmNR2, ...

  8. Molybdenum-containing nitrite reductases: Spectroscopic characterization and redox mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Keceli, Gizem; Cao, Rui; Su, Jiangtao; Mi, Zhiyuan

    2017-01-01

    This review summarizes the spectroscopic results, which will provide useful suggestions for future research. In addition, the fields that urgently need more information are also advised. Nitrite-NO-cGMP has been considered as an important signaling pathway of NO in human cells. To date, all the four known human molybdenum-containing enzymes, xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, sulfite oxidase, and mitochondrial amidoxime-reducing component, have been shown to function as nitrite reductases under hypoxia by biochemical, cellular, or animal studies. Various spectroscopic techniques have been applied to investigate the structure and catalytic mechanism of these enzymes for more than 20 years. We summarize the published data on the applications of UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies, and X-ray crystallography in studying nitrite reductase activity of the four human molybdenum-containing enzymes. UV-vis has provided useful information on the redox active centers of these enzymes. The utilization of EPR spectroscopy has been critical in determining the coordination and redox status of the Mo center during catalysis. Despite the lack of substrate-bound crystal structures of these nitrite reductases, valuable structural information has been obtained by X-ray crystallography. To fully understand the catalytic mechanisms of these physiologically/pathologically important nitrite reductases, structural studies on substrate-redox center interaction are needed.

  9. Dihydrofolate reductase: A potential drug target in trypanosomes and leishmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccotto, Fabio; Martin, Andrew C. R.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Thornton, Janet M.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    1998-05-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase has successfully been used as a drug target in the area of anti-cancer, anti-bacterial and anti-malarial chemotherapy. Little has been done to evaluate it as a drug target for treatment of the trypanosomiases and leishmaniasis. A crystal structure of Leishmania major dihydrofolate reductase has been published. In this paper, we describe the modelling of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei dihydrofolate reductases based on this crystal structure. These structures and models have been used in the comparison of protozoan, bacterial and human enzymes in order to highlight the different features that can be used in the design of selective anti-protozoan agents. Comparison has been made between residues present in the active site, the accessibility of these residues, charge distribution in the active site, and the shape and size of the active sites. Whilst there is a high degree of similarity between protozoan, human and bacterial dihydrofolate reductase active sites, there are differences that provide potential for selective drug design. In particular, we have identified a set of residues which may be important for selective drug design and identified a larger binding pocket in the protozoan than the human and bacterial enzymes.

  10. Cloning and expression analysis of dihydroxyflavonol 4-reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) gene is a key gene of anthocyanins biosynthesis pathway, which represent an importance pathway for orchid flower. In this study, cloning and expression analysis of DFR gene in Ascocenda spp. were carried out. Nucleotide analysis revealed that the Ascocenda DFR gene was 1,056 bp ...

  11. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory and Antiglycation Activities of Four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thonn., Punica granatum L., and Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni) standardized extracts and their major constituents (morusin, phyllanthin, punicalagin and stevioside) in the treatment of long-term diabetic complications by inhibition of aldose reductase (AR) enzyme and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation.

  12. Toward "homolactic" fermentation of glucose and xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring a kinetically efficient l-lactate dehydrogenase within pdc1-pdc5 deletion background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novy, Vera; Brunner, Bernd; Müller, Gerdt; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    l-Lactic acid is an important platform chemical and its production from the lignocellulosic sugars glucose and xylose is, therefore, of high interest. Tolerance to low pH and a generally high robustness make Saccharomyces cerevisiae a promising host for l-lactic acid fermentation but strain development for effective utilization of both sugars is an unsolved problem. The herein used S. cerevisiae strain IBB10B05 incorporates a NADH-dependent pathway for oxidoreductive xylose assimilation within CEN.PK113-7D background and was additionally evolved for accelerated xylose-to-ethanol fermentation. Selecting the Plasmodium falciparum l-lactate dehydrogenase (pfLDH) for its high kinetic efficiency, strain IBB14LA1 was derived from IBB10B05 by placing the pfldh gene at the pdc1 locus under control of the pdc1 promotor. Strain IBB14LA1_5 additionally had the pdc5 gene disrupted. With both strains, continued l-lactic acid formation from glucose or xylose, each at 50 g/L, necessitated stabilization of pH. Using calcium carbonate (11 g/L), anaerobic shaken bottle fermentations at pH ≥ 5 resulted in l-lactic acid yields (YLA ) of 0.67 g/g glucose and 0.80 g/g xylose for strain IBB14LA1_5. Only little xylitol was formed (≤0.08 g/g) and no ethanol. In pH stabilized aerobic conversions of glucose, strain IBB14LA1_5 further showed excellent l-lactic acid productivities (1.8 g/L/h) without losses in YLA (0.69 g/g glucose). In strain IBB14LA1, the YLA was lower (≤0.18 g/g glucose; ≤0.27 g/g xylose) due to ethanol as well as xylitol formation. Therefore, this study shows that a S. cerevisiae strain originally optimized for xylose-to-ethanol fermentation was useful to implement l-lactic acid production from glucose and xylose; and with the metabolic engineering strategy applied, advance toward homolactic fermentation of both sugars was made. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 163-171. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Engineering a synthetic anaerobic respiration for reduction of xylose to xylitol using NADH output of glucose catabolism by Escherichia coli AI21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Andrew; Garza, Erin; Manow, Ryan; Wang, Jinhua; Gao, Yuanyuan; Grayburn, Scott; Zhou, Shengde

    2016-04-16

    Anaerobic rather than aerobic fermentation is preferred for conversion of biomass derived sugars to high value redox-neutral and reduced commodities. This will likely result in a higher yield of substrate to product conversion and decrease production cost since substrate often accounts for a significant portion of the overall cost. To this goal, metabolic pathway engineering has been used to optimize substrate carbon flow to target products. This approach works well for the production of redox neutral products such as lactic acid from redox neutral sugars using the reducing power NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced) generated from glycolysis (2 NADH per glucose equivalent). Nevertheless, greater than two NADH per glucose catabolized is needed for the production of reduced products (such as xylitol) from redox neutral sugars by anaerobic fermentation. The Escherichia coli strain AI05 (ΔfrdBC ΔldhA ΔackA Δ(focA-pflB) ΔadhE ΔptsG ΔpdhR::pflBp 6-(aceEF-lpd)), previously engineered for reduction of xylose to xylitol using reducing power (NADH equivalent) of glucose catabolism, was further engineered by 1) deleting xylAB operon (encoding for xylose isomerase and xylulokinase) to prevent xylose from entering the pentose phosphate pathway; 2) anaerobically expressing the sdhCDAB-sucABCD operon (encoding for succinate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase) to enable an anaerobically functional tricarboxcylic acid cycle with a theoretical 10 NAD(P)H equivalent per glucose catabolized. These reducing equivalents can be oxidized by synthetic respiration via xylose reduction, producing xylitol. The resulting strain, AI21 (pAI02), achieved a 96 % xylose to xylitol conversion, with a yield of 6 xylitol per glucose catabolized (molar yield of xylitol per glucose consumed (YRPG) = 6). This represents a 33 % improvement in xylose to xylitol conversion, and a 63 % increase in xylitol yield per glucose catabolized over

  14. Optimizing the enzymatic synthesis of beta-D-galactopyranosyl-D-xyloses for their use in the evaluation of lactase activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida, Carmen; Corrales, Guillermo; Cañada, Francisco J; Aragón, Juan J; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso

    2007-07-15

    Disaccharides 2-O-, 3-O-, and 4-O-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-D-xyloses (2, 3, and 1, respectively) were obtained by beta-galactosidase-catalyzed reactions for their use in the evaluation of intestinal lactase activity in vivo. Their administration to suckling rats followed by determination of the derived D-xylose in the urine and measurement of lactase activity in intestinal homogenates showed 1 to be the most suitable disaccharide for a potential test of the deficiency of intestinal lactase. The synthesis of 1 was further studied by evaluating the effect of different variables on the yield and regioselectivity of the enzymatic galactosylation, and the purification process was optimized.

  15. The Polymorphisms in Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase, Methionine Synthase, Methionine Synthase Reductase, and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daijun; Mei, Qiang; Luo, Han; Tang, Bo; Yu, Peiwu

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but data from published studies are conflicting. The current meta-analysis was performed to address a more accurate estimation. A total of 41 (17,552 cases and 26,238 controls), 24(8,263 cases and 12,033 controls), 12(3,758 cases and 5,646 controls), and 13 (5,511 cases and 7,265 controls) studies were finally included for the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1289C, methione synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC, respectively. The data showed that the MTHFR 677T allele was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (OR = 0.93, 95%CI 0.90-0.96), while the MTRR 66G allele was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.18). Sub-group analysis by ethnicity revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC in Asians (OR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.72-0.89) and Caucasians (OR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.76-0.93) in recessive genetic model, while the MTRR 66GG genotype was found to significantly increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36). No significant association was found between MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC. Cumulative meta-analysis showed no particular time trend existed in the summary estimate. Probability of publication bias was low across all comparisons illustrated by the funnel plots and Egger's test. Collectively, this meta-analysis suggested that MTHFR 677T allele might provide protection against CRC in worldwide populations, while MTRR 66G allele might increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies were needed to confirm these results. PMID:22719222

  16. Continuous alcoholic fermentation of glucose/xylose mixtures by co-immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida shehatae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeau, T; Jouenne, T; Junter, G A

    1998-09-01

    Viable Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida shehatae cells were co-immobilized in a composite agar layer/microporous membrane structure. This immobilized-cell structure was placed in a vertical position between the two halves of a double-chambered, stainless-steel bioreactor of original design and applied to the continuous alcoholic fermentation of a mixture of glucose (35 g dm-3) and xylose (15 g dm-3). Various dilution rates and initial cell loadings of the gel layer were tested. Simultaneous consumption of the two sugars was always observed. The best fermentation performance was obtained at low dilution rate (0.02 h-1) with an excess of C. shehatae over S. cerevisiae in the initial cell loading of the gel (5.0 mg dry weight and 0.65 mg dry weight cm-3 gel respectively): 100% of glucose and 73% of xylose were consumed with an ethanol yield coefficient of 0.48 g g total sugars-1. In these conditions, however, the ethanol production rate per unit volume of gel remained low (0.37 g h-1 dm-3). Viable cell counts in gel samples after incubation highlighted significant heterogeneities in the spatial distribution of the two yeast species in both the vertical and the transverse directions. In particular, the overall cell number decreased from the bottom to the top of the agar sheet, which may explain the low ethanol productivity relative to the total gel volume.

  17. Effect of autohydrolysis and enzymatic treatment on oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) frond fibres for xylose and xylooligosaccharides production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiha-Hanim, Saleh; Noor, Mohd Azemi Mohd; Rosma, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is one of the most important commercial crops for the production of palm oil, which generates 10.88 tons of oil palm fronds per hectare of plantation as a by-product. In this study, oil palm frond fibres were subjected to an autohydrolysis treatment using an autoclave, operated at 121 °C for 20-80 min, to facilitate the separation of hemicelluloses. The hemicellulose-rich solution (autohydrolysate) was subjected to further hydrolysis with 4-16 U of mixed Trichoderma viride endo-(1,4)-β-xylanases (EC 3.2.1.8) per 100 mg of autohydrolysate. Autoclaving of palm fronds at 121°C for 60 min (a severity factor of 2.40) recovered 75% of the solid residue, containing 57.9% cellulose and 18% Klason lignin, and an autohydrolysate containing 14.94% hemicellulose, with a fractionation efficiency of 49.20%. Subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the autohydrolysate with 8 U of endoxylanase at 40 °C for 24 h produced a solution containing 17.5% xylooligosaccharides and 25.6% xylose. The results clearly indicate the potential utilization of oil palm frond, an abundantly available lignocellulosic biomass for the production of xylose and xylooligosaccharides which can serve as functional food ingredients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Co-consumption of glucose and xylose for organic acid production by Aspergillus carbonarius cultivated in wheat straw hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Souroullas, Konstantinos; Lübeck, Peter S

    2016-04-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius exhibits excellent abilities to utilize a wide range of carbon sources and to produce various organic acids. In this study, wheat straw hydrolysate containing high concentrations of glucose and xylose was used for organic acid production by A. carbonarius. The results indicated that A. carbonarius efficiently co-consumed glucose and xylose and produced various types of organic acids in hydrolysate adjusted to pH 7. The inhibitor tolerance of A. carbonarius to the hydrolysate at different pH values was investigated and compared using spores and recycled mycelia. This comparison showed a slight difference in the inhibitor tolerance of the spores and the recycled mycelia based on their growth patterns. Moreover, the wild-type and a glucose oxidase deficient (Δgox) mutant were compared for their abilities to produce organic acids using the hydrolysate and a defined medium. The two strains showed a different pattern of organic acid production in the hydrolysate where the Δgox mutant produced more oxalic acid but less citric acid than the wild-type, which was different from the results obtained in the defined medium This study demonstrates the feasibility of using lignocellulosic biomass for the organic acid production by A. carbonarius.

  19. Spathaspora piracicabensis f. a., sp. nov., a D-xylose-fermenting yeast species isolated from rotting wood in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varize, Camila S; Cadete, Raquel M; Lopes, Lucas D; Christofoleti-Furlan, Renata M; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A; Basso, Luiz C

    2017-11-09

    Two strains of a novel yeast species were isolated from rotting wood of an ornamental tree (purple quaresmeira, Tibouchina granulosa, Melastomataceae) in an Atlantic Rainforest area in Brazil. Analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS-5.8S) region and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene showed that this species belongs to the Spathaspora clade, and is phylogenetically related to Spathaspora brasiliensis, Candida materiae and Sp. girioi. The novel species ferments D-xylose, producing ethanol, with amounts between 3.37 and 3.48 g L(-1) ethanol from 2% D-xylose. Ascospores were not observed from this new species. The name Spathaspora piracicabensis f. a., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these isolates. The type strain is UFMG-CM-Y5867(T) (= CBS 15054(T) = ESALQ-I54(T)). The MycoBank number is MB 822,320.

  20. Functional properties of chitosan-xylose Maillard reaction products and their application to semi-dried noodle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ke-Xue; Li, Jie; Li, Man; Guo, Xiao-Na; Peng, Wei; Zhou, Hui-Ming

    2013-02-15

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the antimicrobial, antioxidant and darkening inhibitory activities of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) prepared from chitosan and xylose, and their effects on the preservation and quality of semi-dried noodles. The development of brown color and UV absorbance changes indicated the proceeding of Maillard reaction. The antimicrobial activity, reducing power, DPPH radical scavenging activity, copper-chelating activity and PPO inhibitory effects of chitosan-xylose conjugates increased with the reaction. Addition of MRPs could improve the textural and cooking quality of semi-dried noodles. Incorporation of 0.35% MRPs (6 h) into semi-dried noodle resulted in an extension of shelf life for more than 7 days than the control noodles (at room temperature). The discoloration caused by the addition of MRPs was limited, and MRPs could inhibit darkening of the noodle effectively. Results suggested that the MRPs could be used as a novel promising preservative for semi-dried noodles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Zinc, magnesium, and calcium ion supplementation confers tolerance to acetic acid stress in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizing xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential substrate for ethanol production. However, pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials produces inhibitory compounds such as acetic acid, which negatively affect ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Supplementation of the medium with three metal ions (Zn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) increased the tolerance of S. cerevisiae toward acetic acid compared to the absence of the ions. Ethanol production from xylose was most improved (by 34%) when the medium was supplemented with 2 mM Ca(2+) , followed by supplementation with 3.5 mM Mg(2+) (29% improvement), and 180 μM Zn(2+) (26% improvement). Higher ethanol production was linked to high cell viability in the presence of metal ions. Comparative transcriptomics between the supplemented cultures and the control suggested that improved cell viability resulted from the induction of genes controlling the cell wall and membrane. Only one gene, FIT2, was found to be up-regulated in common between the three metal ions. Also up-regulation of HXT1 and TKL1 might enhance xylose consumption in the presence of acetic acid. Thus, the addition of ionic nutrients is a simple and cost-effective method to improve the acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Recombinant Ralstonia eutropha engineered to utilize xylose and its use for the production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) from sunflower stalk hydrolysate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Su; Oh, Young Hoon; Jang, Young-Ah; Kang, Kyoung Hee; David, Yokimiko; Yu, Ju Hyun; Song, Bong Keun; Choi, Jong-il; Chang, Yong Keun; Joo, Jeong Chan; Park, Si Jae

    2016-06-03

    Lignocellulosic raw materials have extensively been examined for the production of bio-based fuels, chemicals, and polymers using microbial platforms. Since xylose is one of the major components of the hydrolyzed lignocelluloses, it is being considered a promising substrate in lignocelluloses based fermentation process. Ralstonia eutropha, one of the most powerful and natural producers of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), has extensively been examined for the production of bio-based chemicals, fuels, and polymers. However, to the best of our knowledge, lignocellulosic feedstock has not been employed for R. eutropha probably due to its narrow spectrum of substrate utilization. Thus, R. eutropha engineered to utilize xylose should be useful in the development of microbial process for bio-based products from lignocellulosic feedstock. Recombinant R. eutropha NCIMB11599 expressing the E. coli xylAB genes encoding xylose isomerase and xylulokinase respectively, was constructed and examined for the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] using xylose as a sole carbon source. It could produce 2.31 g/L of P(3HB) with a P(3HB) content of 30.95 wt% when it was cultured in a nitrogen limited chemically defined medium containing 20.18 g/L of xylose in a batch fermentation. Also, recombinant R. eutropha NCIMB11599 expressing the E. coli xylAB genes produced 5.71 g/L of P(3HB) with a P(3HB) content of 78.11 wt% from a mixture of 10.05 g/L of glucose and 10.91 g/L of xylose in the same culture condition. The P(3HB) concentration and content could be increased to 8.79 g/L and 88.69 wt%, respectively, when it was cultured in the medium containing 16.74 g/L of glucose and 6.15 g/L of xylose. Further examination of recombinant R. eutropha NCIMB11599 expressing the E. coli xylAB genes by fed-batch fermentation resulted in the production of 33.70 g/L of P(3HB) in 108 h with a P(3HB) content of 79.02 wt%. The concentration of xylose could be maintained as high as 6 g/L, which is

  3. Steroidal antiandrogens and 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratoeff, E; Ramírez, E; Murillo, E; Flores, G; Cabeza, M

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to synthesize a pregnane derivative with a high antiandrogenic effect or a high inhibitory activity for the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase type 2. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer are androgen dependent diseases which afflict a large percentage of the male population. Dihydrotestosterone 3, a 5 alpha-reductase metabolite of testosterone 2 has been implicated as a causative factor in the progression of these diseases, largely through the clinical evaluation of males who are genetically deficient of steroid 5 alpha-reductase enzyme. As a result of this study, the inhibition of this enzyme has become a pharmacological strategy for the design and synthesis of new drugs. The advent of finasteride 22 "figure 5" a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, has greatly alleviated the symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia. On the other hand, the discovery of cyproterone acetate 4 "figure 2" alone or in combination with the antiandrogens flutamide 14 "figure 3" or bicalutamide 21 has greatly reduced the misery of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer kills about 40,000 men in the USA and approximately 400,000 prostatectomies are performed each year. In our laboratory we have recently synthesized ten new progesterone derivatives 17 alpha-acyloyloxy-6-halo (chloro, bromo) 16 beta-methyl-4, 6-pregnadiene-3, 20-diones (54a-54e and 55a-55e), "figure 10". These steroids were evaluated as antiandrogens and exhibited a much higher activity than the commercially available cyproterone acetate 4. The same compounds were also evaluated as 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors and showed a slightly higher inhibitory activity than that of finasteride 22, the drug of choice today for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia In another study we synthesized several new 4-halo (bromo and chloro) 17 alpha-benzoyloxy and also 4-halo-17 alpha-acetoxy progesterone derivatives (58-63) "figure 13". These compounds were prepared from the commercially available 17 alpha

  4. Monitoring Rhodotorula glutinis CCMI 145 physiological response and oil production growing on xylose and glucose using multi-parameter flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Teresa Lopes; Feijão, Daniela; Roseiro, José Carlos; Reis, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    Flow cytometry was used to monitor the lipid content, viability and intrinsic light scatter properties of Rhodotorula glutinis CCMI 145 cells growing on batch cultures using xylose and glucose as carbon sources. The highest lipid content was observed for cells grown on glucose, at the end of the exponential phase (17.8% w/w). The proportion of cells stained with PI attaining 77% at the end of the glucose growth. Cells growing on xylose produced a maximum lipid content of 10.6% (w/w), at the stationary phase. An increase in the proportion of cells stained with PI was observed, reaching 29% at the end of xylose growth. Changes in the side and forward light scatter detected during the yeast batch cultures supported that R. glutinis cells grown on glucose experienced harsher conditions, resulting in a high level of cytoplasmic membrane damage, which did not occur when R. glutinis cells grew on xylose. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular cloning and functional expression in Lactobacillus plantarum 80 of xylT, encoding the D-xylose-H+ symporter of Lactobacillus brevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Bor, Y.-C.; Batt, C.A.; Postma, P.W.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    A 3-kb region, located downstream of the Lactobacillus brevis xylA gene (encoding D-xylose isomerase), was cloned in Escherichia coli TG1. The sequence revealed two open reading frames which could code for the D-xylulose kinase gene (xylB) and another gene (xylT) encoding a protein of 457 amino

  6. Diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Comparison of the 14C-D-xylose breath test and jejunal cultures in 60 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E; Bachmann, E

    1985-01-01

    Sixty consecutive patients suspected of having bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine (BOG) had aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures made of fasting upper jejunal fluid and also a 14C-D-xylose breath test (XBT). Culture-proven BOG was present in 23 patients. In another 15 patients...

  7. Differential RNA-seq, Multi-Network Analysis and Metabolic Regulation Analysis of Kluyveromyces marxianus Reveals a Compartmentalised Response to Xylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Toit W P Schabort

    Full Text Available We investigated the transcriptomic response of a new strain of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, in glucose and xylose media using RNA-seq. The data were explored in a number of innovative ways using a variety of networks types, pathway maps, enrichment statistics, reporter metabolites and a flux simulation model, revealing different aspects of the genome-scale response in an integrative systems biology manner. The importance of the subcellular localisation in the transcriptomic response is emphasised here, revealing new insights. As was previously reported by others using a rich medium, we show that peroxisomal fatty acid catabolism was dramatically up-regulated in a defined xylose mineral medium without fatty acids, along with mechanisms to activate fatty acids and transfer products of β-oxidation to the mitochondria. Notably, we observed a strong up-regulation of the 2-methylcitrate pathway, supporting capacity for odd-chain fatty acid catabolism. Next we asked which pathways would respond to the additional requirement for NADPH for xylose utilisation, and rationalised the unexpected results using simulations with Flux Balance Analysis. On a fundamental level, we investigated the contribution of the hierarchical and metabolic regulation levels to the regulation of metabolic fluxes. Metabolic regulation analysis suggested that genetic level regulation plays a major role in regulating metabolic fluxes in adaptation to xylose, even for the high capacity reactions, which is unexpected. In addition, isozyme switching may play an important role in re-routing of metabolic fluxes in subcellular compartments in K. marxianus.

  8. Furfural Production from d-Xylose and Xylan by Using Stable Nafion NR50 and NaCl in a Microwave-Assisted Biphasic Reaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Le Guenic, Sarah; Gergela, David; Ceballos, Claire; Delbecq, Frederic; Len, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    ...) biphasic system under microwave irradiation. Heated up between 170 and 190 °C in the presence of Nafion NR50 and NaCl, d-xylose, l-arabinose and xylan gave furfural with maximum yields of 80%, 42% and 55%, respectively...

  9. A one-pot synthesis of 1,6,9,13-tetraoxadispiro(4.2.4.2)tetradecane by hydrodeoxygenation of xylose using a palladium catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to expand the number of biobased chemicals available from sugars, xylose has been converted to 1,6,9,13-tetraoxadispiro(4.2.4.2)tetradecane in a one-pot reaction using palladium supported on silica-alumina as the catalyst. The title compound is produced in 35-40% yield under 7 MPa H2 pr...

  10. Membrane separation of enzyme-converted biomass compounds: Recovery of xylose and production of gluconic acid as a value-added product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Zeuner, Birgitte; Meyer, Anne S.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the efficiency of enzyme-assisted nanofiltration for separation of xylose from glucose present in genuine biorefinery liquors obtained from hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw, corn stover and Miscanthus stalks. Glucose oxidase and catalase were...

  11. Multi-stage Continuous Culture Fermentation of Glucose-Xylose Mixtures to Fuel Ethanol using Genetically Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-stage continuous (chemostat) culture fermentation (MCCF) with variable fermentor volumes was carried out to study utilizing glucose and xylose for ethanol production by means of mixed sugar fermentation (MSF). Variable fermentor volumes were used to enable enhanced sugar u...

  12. Beta(1,2)-xylose and alpha(1,3)-fucose residues have a strong contribution in IgE binding to plant glycoallergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ree, R.; Cabanes-Macheteau, M.; Akkerdaas, J.; Milazzo, J. P.; Loutelier-Bourhis, C.; Rayon, C.; Villalba, M.; Koppelman, S.; Aalberse, R.; Rodriguez, R.; Faye, L.; Lerouge, P.

    2000-01-01

    Primary structures of the N-glycans of two major pollen allergens (Lol p 11 and Ole e 1) and a major peanut allergen (Ara h 1) were determined. Ole e 1 and Ara h 1 carried high mannose and complex N-glycans, whereas Lol p 11 carried only the complex. The complex structures all had a beta(1,2)-xylose

  13. A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid compared to hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiacheng; Wyman, Charles E

    2011-10-01

    Pretreatment of corn stover in 0.5% sulfuric acid at 160 °C for 40 min realized a maximum monomeric plus oligomeric xylose yield of 93.1% compared to a maximum of only 71.5% for hydrothermal (no added mineral acid) pretreatment at 180 °C for 30 min. To explain differences in dilute acid and hydrothermal yields, a fast reacting xylan fraction (0.0889) was assumed to be able to directly form monomeric xylose while a slow reacting portion (0.9111) must first form oligomers during hydrothermal pretreatment. Two reactions to oligomers were proposed: reversible from fast reacting xylan and irreversible from slow reacting xylan. A kinetic model and its analytical solution simulated xylan removal data well for dilute acid and hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover. These results suggested that autocatalytic reactions from xylan to furfural in hydrothermal pretreatment were controlled by oligomeric xylose decomposition, while acid-catalytic reactions in dilute acid pretreatment were controlled by monomeric xylose decomposition. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Simultaneous Decolorization and Biohydrogen Production from Xylose by Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 in the Presence of Azo Dyes with Sulfonate and Carboxyl Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Cao, Ming-Yue; Wang, Peng-Tao; Wang, Shi; Yue, Ying-Rong; Yuan, Wen-Duo; Qiao, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Fei; Song, Xin

    2017-05-15

    Biohydrogen production from the pulp and paper effluent containing rich lignocellulosic material could be achieved by the fermentation process. Xylose, an important hemicellulose hydrolysis product, is used less efficiently as a substrate for biohydrogen production. Moreover, azo dyes are usually added to fabricate anticounterfeiting paper, which further increases the complexity of wastewater. This study reports that xylose could serve as the sole carbon source for a pure culture of Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 to achieve simultaneous decolorization and biohydrogen production. With 2 g liter-1 of xylose as the substrate, a maximum xylose utilization rate (URxyl) and a hydrogen molar yield (HMY) of 93.99% and 0.259 mol of H2 mol of xylose-1, respectively, were obtained. Biohydrogen kinetics and electron equivalent (e- equiv) balance calculations indicated that methyl red (MR) penetrates and intracellularly inhibits both the pentose phosphate pathway and pyruvate fermentation pathway, while methyl orange (MO) acted independently of the glycolysis and biohydrogen pathway. The data demonstrate that biohydrogen pathways in the presence of azo dyes with sulfonate and carboxyl groups were different, but the azo dyes could be completely reduced during the biohydrogen production period in the presence of MO or MR. The feasibility of hydrogen production from industrial pulp and paper effluent by the strain if the xylose is sufficient was also proved and was not affected by toxic substances which usually exist in such wastewater, except for chlorophenol. This study offers a promising energy-recycling strategy for treating pulp and paper wastewaters, especially for those containing azo dyes.IMPORTANCE The pulp and paper industry is a major industry in many developing countries, and the global market of pulp and paper wastewater treatment is expected to increase by 60% between 2012 and 2020. Such wastewater contains large amounts of refractory contaminants, such as lignin, whose

  15. Recent structural insights into the function of copper nitrite reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrell, Sam; Kekilli, Demet; Strange, Richard W; Hough, Michael A

    2017-11-15

    Copper nitrite reductases (CuNiR) carry out the first committed step of the denitrification pathway of the global nitrogen cycle, the reduction of nitrite (NO 2 - ) to nitric oxide (NO). As such, they are of major agronomic and environmental importance. CuNiRs occur primarily in denitrifying soil bacteria which carry out the overall reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen. In this article, we review the insights gained into copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR) function from three dimensional structures. We particularly focus on developments over the last decade, including insights from serial femtosecond crystallography using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and from the recently discovered 3-domain CuNiRs.

  16. Hydroxyurea-Mediated Cytotoxicity Without Inhibition of Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Phing Liew

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In many organisms, hydroxyurea (HU inhibits class I ribonucleotide reductase, leading to lowered cellular pools of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. The reduced levels for DNA precursors is believed to cause replication fork stalling. Upon treatment of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus with HU, we observe dose-dependent cell cycle arrest, accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks, stalled replication forks, and elevated levels of recombination structures. However, Sulfolobus has a HU-insensitive class II ribonucleotide reductase, and we reveal that HU treatment does not significantly impact cellular DNA precursor pools. Profiling of protein and transcript levels reveals modulation of a specific subset of replication initiation and cell division genes. Notably, the selective loss of the regulatory subunit of the primase correlates with cessation of replication initiation and stalling of replication forks. Furthermore, we find evidence for a detoxification response induced by HU treatment.

  17. Differential expression of disulfide reductase enzymes in a free-living platyhelminth (Dugesia dorotocephala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Guevara-Flores

    Full Text Available A search of the disulfide reductase activities expressed in the adult stage of the free-living platyhelminth Dugesia dorotocephala was carried out. Using GSSG or DTNB as substrates, it was possible to obtain a purified fraction containing both GSSG and DTNB reductase activities. Through the purification procedure, both disulfide reductase activities were obtained in the same chromatographic peak. By mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments obtained after tryptic digestion of the purified fraction, the presence of glutathione reductase (GR, thioredoxin-glutathione reductase (TGR, and a putative thioredoxin reductase (TrxR was detected. Using the gold compound auranofin to selectively inhibit the GSSG reductase activity of TGR, it was found that barely 5% of the total GR activity in the D. dorotocephala extract can be assigned to GR. Such strategy did allow us to determine the kinetic parameters for both GR and TGR. Although It was not possible to discriminate DTNB reductase activity due to TrxR from that of TGR, a chromatofocusing experiment with a D. dorotocephala extract resulted in the obtention of a minor protein fraction enriched in TrxR, strongly suggesting its presence as a functional protein. Thus, unlike its parasitic counterparts, in the free-living platyhelminth lineage the three disulfide reductases are present as functional proteins, albeit TGR is still the major disulfide reductase involved in the reduction of both Trx and GSSG. This fact suggests the development of TGR in parasitic flatworms was not linked to a parasitic mode of life.

  18. Comparison of Gavage, Water Bottle, and a High-Moisture Diet Bolus as Dosing Methods for Quantitative D-xylose Administration to B6D2F1 (Mus musculus) Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, J. Paul; Lewis, Sherry M.; Moyer, Jerry L.

    1993-01-01

    Gavage, water bottle, and diet incorporation are 3 dosing methods used orally to administer test compounds to rodents. These 3 methods were compared in mice to determine which represented the most quantitative delivery system. For dietary incorporation, a high-moisture bolus form of NIH-31 rodent meal was developed using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose as an autoclave-stable binding agent. A high-moisture bolus were selected to increase the acceptability of the dosed diet and to promote quantitative consumption through reduced wastage. The test compound used was D-xylose, a pentose sugar that may be quantitatively detected, colorimetrically, in urine following oral dosing. Six male and 6 female B6D2FI mice were placed in metabolism cages and dosed with a known quantity of D-xylose by each of the 3 methods. Urine was collected before and after each method of administration and analysed for total D-xylose; the per cent recovery was based upon the amount of D-xylose consumed. Quantitative consumption was apparently greatest for water bottle dosing with an average recovery of 56.0% of the original D-xylose dose. High-moisture bolus incorporation ranked second with 50.0% D-xylose recovery, and gavage was third with 41.0% D-xylose recovery.

  19. Increased enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse by a novel glucose- and xylose-stimulated β-glucosidase from Anoxybacillus flavithermus subsp. yunnanensis E13T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Rui; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xiaohan; Jia, Rong; Gao, Yi; Peng, Hui

    2017-03-16

    β-Glucosidase is claimed as a key enzyme in cellulose hydrolysis. The cellulosic fibers are usually entrapped with hemicelluloses containing xylose. So there is ongoing interest in searching for glucose- and xylose-stimulated β-glucosidases to increase the efficiency of hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. A thermostable β-glucosidase gene (Bglp) was cloned from Anoxybacillus flavithermus subsp. yunnanensis E13T and characterized. Optimal enzyme activity was observed at 60 °C and pH 7.0. Bglp was relatively stable at 60 °C with a 10-h half-life. The kinetic parameters V max and K m for p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (pNPG) were 771 ± 39 μmol/min/mg and 0.29 ± 0.01 mM, respectively. The activity of Bglp is dramatically stimulated by glucose or xylose at concentrations up to 1.4 M. After Bglp was added to Celluclast® 1.5 L, the conversion of sugarcane bagasse was 48.4 ± 0.8%, which was much higher than of Celluclast® 1.5 L alone. Furthermore, Bglp showed obvious advantages in the hydrolysis when initial concentrations of glucose and xylose are high. The supplementation of BglP significantly enhanced the glucose yield from sugarcane bagasse, especially in the presence of high concentrations of glucose or xylose. Bglp should be a promising candidate for industrial applications.

  20. Enhancing ethanol yields through d-xylose and l-arabinose co-fermentation after construction of a novel high efficient l-arabinose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Antonio; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2017-04-01

    Lignocellulose contains two pentose sugars, l-arabinose and d-xylose, neither of which is naturally fermented by first generation (1G) ethanol-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast. Since these sugars are inaccessible to 1G yeast, a significant percentage of the total carbon in bioethanol production from plant residues, which are used in second generation (2G) ethanol production, remains unused. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting d-xylose are available on the market; however, there are few examples of l-arabinose-fermenting yeasts, and commercially, there are no strains capable of fermenting both d-xylose and l-arabinose because of metabolic incompatibilities when both metabolic pathways are expressed in the same cell. To attempt to solve this problem we have tested d-xylose and l-arabinose co-fermentation. To find efficient alternative l-arabinose utilization pathways to the few existing ones, we have used stringent methodology to screen for new genes (metabolic and transporter functions) to facilitate l-arabinose fermentation in recombinant yeast. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach in a successfully constructed yeast strain capable of using l-arabinose as the sole carbon source and capable of fully transforming it to ethanol, reaching the maximum theoretical fermentation yield (0.43 g g-1). We demonstrate that efficient co-fermentation of d-xylose and l-arabinose is feasible using two different co-cultured strains, and observed no fermentation delays, yield drops or accumulation of undesired byproducts. In this study we have identified a technically efficient strategy to enhance ethanol yields by 10 % in 2G plants in a process based on C5 sugar co-fermentation.

  1. Intraethnic variation in steroid-5-alpha-reductase polymorphisms in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in prostate cancer patients: a potential factor implicated in. 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor treatment. Luis Alberto Henríquez-Hernández, Almudena Valenciano, Palmira Foro-Arnalot, María Jesús Álvarez-Cubero,. José Manuel Cozar, José Francisco Suárez-Novo, Manel Castells-Esteve, Pablo Fernández-Gonzalo,.

  2. Long term treatment with betaine in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Ronge, E; Kjellman, B

    1996-01-01

    A girl aged 7.5 years with deficiency of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was treated from early infancy with betaine, 3-6 g daily. She has slight microcephaly, moderate developmental delay, and impaired vision but there have been no obvious signs of folate deficiency. From 4 years of age, she developed an unexplained extreme increase in appetite and weight. Recent magnetic resonance imaging of her brain was normal. The plasma methionine levels have been normal but in the lower range,...

  3. Carbon-deuterium bonds as probes of dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielges, Megan C; Case, David A; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2008-05-21

    Much effort has been directed toward understanding the contributions of electrostatics and dynamics to protein function and especially to enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, these studies have been limited by the absence of direct experimental probes. We have been developing the use of carbon-deuterium bonds as probes of proteins and now report the application of the technique to the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase, which catalyzes a hydride transfer and has served as a paradigm for biological catalysis. We observe that the stretching absorption frequency of (methyl- d 3) methionine carbon-deuterium bonds shows an approximately linear dependence on solvent dielectric. Solvent and computational studies support the empirical interpretation of the stretching frequency in terms of local polarity. To begin to explore the use of this technique to study enzyme function and mechanism, we report a preliminary analysis of (methyl- d 3) methionine residues within dihydrofolate reductase. Specifically, we characterize the IR absorptions at Met16 and Met20, within the catalytically important Met20 loop, and Met42, which is located within the hydrophobic core of the enzyme. The results confirm the sensitivity of the carbon-deuterium bonds to their local protein environment, demonstrate that dihydrofolate reductase is electrostatically and dynamically heterogeneous, and lay the foundation for the direct characterization protein electrostatics and dynamics and, potentially, their contribution to catalysis.

  4. DIHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE AS A VERSATILE DRUG TARGET IN HEALTHCARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira Rashid

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrofolate reductase is one of the important enzymes for thymidylate and purine synthesis. It has been used as a drug target for treatment of various diseases. A large number of pharmaceutical drugs have been designed to inhibit the activity of dihydrofolate reductase. However, over the period of time some organisms have developed resistance against some of these drugs. There is also a chance of cross reactivity for these drugs, as they may target the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme of other organisms. Although using NMR spectroscopy, phylogenetic sequence analysis, comparative sequence analysis between dihydrofolate enzymes of various organisms and molecular modeling studies, a lot has been unraveled about the difference in the structure of this enzyme in various organisms, yet there is a need for deeper understanding of these differences so as to design drugs that are specific to their targets and reduce the chance for cross reactivity. The dihydrofolate enzyme can also be explored for treatment of various other diseases that are associated with the folate cycle.

  5. A new method of utilizing rice husk: consecutively preparing D-xylose, organosolv lignin, ethanol and amorphous superfine silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxi; Ding, Xuefeng; Chen, Xue; Ma, Yuejia; Wang, Zichen; Zhao, Xu

    2015-06-30

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product with the annual output of 120 and 40 million tons in the world and China, respectively. The common disposal method of rice husk in China has caused the pollution. This manuscript deals with a new method of comprehensively utilizing rice husk, by which hazardous materials are avoided to release. 100.3, 219.4, 50.1 and 170.5 g of D-xylose, organosolv lignin, ethanol and superfine silica are consecutively prepared from 1000 g of rice husk. This new method is helpful to resolving the problem of pollution and waste aroused by rice husk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydrogenation of xylose to xylitol on sponge nickel catalyst: a study of the process and catalyst deactivation kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkola J.-P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of hydrogenation of xylose to xylitol on a sponge nickel catalyst (commonly referred to as Raney Ni catalyst and of catalyst deactivation were studied. Plausible explanations for the decrease in catalytic activity by means of surface studies, nitrogen adsorption and thermogravimetric analyses of the fresh and spent catalysts are presented. The kinetic parameters of the process were estimated by the use of a semi-competitive model, which allows full competition between the organic species and the hydrogen atoms for the adsorption sites on the catalyst surface (competitive case. In the model, a competitiveness factor (alpha is introduced to take into account that even after complete coverage of the surface by the organic species, interstitial sites remain for the adsorption of the hydrogen atoms.

  7. Continuous alcoholic fermentation of glucose/xylose mixtures by co-immobilized saccharomyces cerevisiae and candida shehatae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebeau, T.; Jouenne, T.; Junter, G.A. [Equipe de Technologie Microbienne, CNRS/Univ. de Rouen, 76 Bois Guillaume (France)

    1998-12-31

    Viable Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida shehatae cells were co-immobilized in a composite agar layer/microporous membrane structure. This immobilized-cell structure was placed in a vertical position between the two halves of a double-chambered, stainless-steel bioreactor of original design and applied to the continuous alcoholic fermentation of a mixture of glucose (35 g dm{sup -3}) and xylose (15 g dm{sup -3}). Various dilution rates and initial cell loadings of the gel layer were tested. Simultaneous consumption of the two sugars was always observed. The best fermentation performance was obtained at low dilution rate (0.02 h{sup -1}) with an excess of C. shehatae over S. cerevisiae in the initial cell loading of the gel (5.0 mg dry weight and 0.65 mg dry weight cm{sup -3} gel respectively): 100% of glucose and 73% of xylose were consumed with an ethanol yield coefficient of 0.48 g g total sugars{sup -1}. In these conditions, however, the ethanol production rate per unit volume of gel remained low (0.37 g h{sup -1} dm{sup -3}). Viable cell counts in gel samples after incubation highlighted significant heterogeneities in the spatial distribution of the two yeast species in both the vertical and the transverse directions. In particular, the overall cell number decreased from the bottom to the top of the agar sheet, which may explain the low ethanol productivity relative to the total gel volume. (orig.)

  8. Biohydrogen production from xylose by fresh and digested activated sludge at 37, 55 and 70 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessì, Paolo; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Lens, Piet N L

    2017-05-15

    Two heat-treated inocula, fresh and digested activated sludge from the same municipal wastewater treatment plant, were compared for their H2 production via dark fermentation at mesophilic (37 °C), thermophilic (55 °C) and hyperthermophilic (70 °C) conditions using xylose as the substrate. At both 37 and 55 °C, the fresh activated sludge yielded more H2 than the digested sludge, whereas at 70 °C, neither of the inocula produced H2 effectively. A maximum yield of 1.85 mol H2 per mol of xylose consumed was obtained at 55 °C. H2 production was linked to acetate and butyrate production, and there was a linear correlation (R2 = 0.96) between the butyrate and H2 yield for the fresh activated sludge inoculum at 55 °C. Approximately 2.4 mol H2 per mol of butyrate produced were obtained against a theoretical maximum of 2.0, suggesting that H2 was produced via the acetate pathway prior to switching to the butyrate pathway due to the increased H2 partial pressure. Clostridia sp. were the prevalent species at both 37 and 55 °C, irrespectively of the inoculum type. Although the two inocula originated from the same plant, different thermophilic microorganisms were detected at 55 °C. Thermoanaerobacter sp., detected only in the fresh activated sludge cultures, may have contributed to the high H2 yield obtained with such an inoculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ethanol production from paper sludge by simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation using recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiayi; Lynd, Lee R

    2010-10-01

    Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) of waste paper sludge to ethanol was investigated using two recombinant xylose-fermenting microbes: Zymomonas mobilis 8b and Saccharomyces cerevisiae RWB222. S. cerevisiae RWB222 produced over 40 g/L ethanol with a yield of 0.39 g ethanol/g carbohydrate on paper sludge at 37 degrees C, while similar titers and yields were achieved by Z. mobilis 8b at 30 degrees C. Both S. cerevisiae RWB222 and Z. mobilis 8b exhibited decreasing cell viability at 37 degrees C when producing over 40 g/L ethanol. A high ethanol concentration can account for S. cerevisiae RWB222 viability loss, but ethanol concentration was not the only factor influencing Z. mobilis 8b viability loss at 37 degrees C. Over 3 g/L residual glucose was observed at the end of paper sludge SSCF by Z. mobilis 8b, and a statistical analysis revealed that a high calcium concentration originating from paper sludge, a high ethanol concentration, and a high temperature were the key interactive factors resulting in glucose accumulation. The highest ethanol yields were achieved by SSCF of paper sludge with S. cerevisiae RWB222 at 37 degrees C and Z. mobilis 8b at 30 degrees C. With good sugar consumption at 37 degrees C, S. cerevisiae RWB222 was able to gain an improvement in the polysaccharide to sugar yield compared to that at 30 degrees C, whereas Z. mobilis 8b at 30 degrees C had a lower polysaccharide to sugar yield, but a higher sugar to ethanol yield than S. cerevisiae. Both organisms under optimal conditions achieved a 19% higher overall conversion of paper sludge to ethanol than the non-xylose utilizing S. cerevisiae D5A at its optimal process temperature of 37 degrees C.

  10. Seven novel mutations in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene and genotype/phenotype correlations in severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Goyette, P; Frosst, P.; Rosenblatt, D S; ROZEN, R.

    1995-01-01

    5-Methyltetrahydrofolate, the major form of folate in plasma, is a carbon donor for the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. This form of folate is generated from 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate through the action of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a cytosolic flavoprotein. Patients with an autosomal recessive severe deficiency of MTHFR have homocystinuria and a wide range of neurological and vascular disturbances. We have recently described the isolation of a cDNA fo...

  11. Influence of solid loading on D-xylose production through dilute sulphuric acid hydrolysis of olive stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuevas, M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The selective hydrolysis of hemicellulose from olive stones was attempted in order to achieve a maximum D-xylose yield. For this aim, batch hydrolysis was conducted under different operating conditions of temperature, acid concentration and solid loading. Firstly, distilled water, sulphuric acid and nitric acid were assessed as hydrolytic agents at different temperatures (200, 205, 210 and 220 °C and at a fixed acid concentration (0.025 M. Sulphuric acid and 200 °C were selected for the subsequent dilute acid hydrolysis optimization based on the obtained D-xylose yields. The combined influence of solid loading (from 29.3 to 170.7 g olive stones into 300 mL acid solution and sulphuric acid concentration (0.006–0.034 M on the release of D-xylose was then estimated by response surface methodology. According to a statistical analysis, both parameters had significant interaction effects on D-xylose production. The results illustrated that the higher the solid loading, the higher the required acid concentration. The decrease in the solid/liquid ratio in the reactor had a positive effect on D-xylose extraction and on the amount of acid used. The optimum solid loading and sulphuric acid concentration were determined to be 50 g (solid/liquid ratio 1/6 and 0.016 M, respectively. Under these conditions, the predicted D-xylose yield (expressed as g of sugar per 100 g of dry matter fed was 20.4 (87.2% of maximum attainable.Se ha desarrollado una hidrólisis selectiva de la fracción hemicelulósica del hueso de aceituna con el fin de obtener el máximo rendimiento de D-xilosa. Para ello las hidrólisis se llevaron a cabo en un reactor discontinuo a distintas condiciones de temperatura, concentración de ácido y carga de sólidos. En primer lugar se evaluó la capacidad hidrolítica del agua destilada y de los ácidos nítrico y sulfúrico a distintas temperaturas (200, 205, 210 y 220°C manteniendo fija la concentración de ácido (0,025 M. A partir de

  12. Hepatocyte Hyperproliferation upon Liver-Specific Co-disruption of Thioredoxin-1, Thioredoxin Reductase-1, and Glutathione Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Prigge

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Energetic nutrients are oxidized to sustain high intracellular NADPH/NADP+ ratios. NADPH-dependent reduction of thioredoxin-1 (Trx1 disulfide and glutathione disulfide by thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1 and glutathione reductase (Gsr, respectively, fuels antioxidant systems and deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Mouse livers lacking both TrxR1 and Gsr sustain these essential activities using an NADPH-independent methionine-consuming pathway; however, it remains unclear how this reducing power is distributed. Here, we show that liver-specific co-disruption of the genes encoding Trx1, TrxR1, and Gsr (triple-null causes dramatic hepatocyte hyperproliferation. Thus, even in the absence of Trx1, methionine-fueled glutathione production supports hepatocyte S phase deoxyribonucleotide production. Also, Trx1 in the absence of TrxR1 provides a survival advantage to cells under hyperglycemic stress, suggesting that glutathione, likely via glutaredoxins, can reduce Trx1 disulfide in vivo. In triple-null livers like in many cancers, deoxyribonucleotide synthesis places a critical yet relatively low-volume demand on these reductase systems, thereby favoring high hepatocyte turnover over sustained hepatocyte integrity.

  13. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils.

  14. Induction of NADPH-Cytochroune P-450 (c) Reductase in Wounded Tissues from Helianthus tuberosus Tubers

    OpenAIRE

    Agnes, Lesot; Irene, Benveniste; Marie-Paule, Hasenfratz; Francis, Durst; C.N.R.S.,Institut de Biologie Moleculaire des Plantes. Departement d'Enzymologie Cellulaire et Moieculaire, Institut de Botanique

    1990-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 is not self-sufficient for the catalysis of monooxygenase reaction but requires NADPH and NADPH-cytochrome P-450 (c) reductase. The activity of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase was strongly enhanced by wounding and aging in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tuber tissues. This stimulation was correlated with the synthesis of the enzyme protein based on i) quantitation of the reductase protein by Western blotting, ii) incor-poration of [^S]methionine into the immun...

  15. A substrate-bound structure of cyanobacterial biliverdin reductase identifies stacked substrates as critical for activity

    OpenAIRE

    Takao, Haruna; Hirabayashi, Kei; Nishigaya, Yuki; Kouriki, Haruna; Nakaniwa, Tetsuko; Hagiwara, Yoshinori; Harada, Jiro; Sato, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Asada, Yujiro; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Ken; Fukuyama, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase catalyses the last step in haem degradation and produces the major lipophilic antioxidant bilirubin via reduction of biliverdin, using NAD(P)H as a cofactor. Despite the importance of biliverdin reductase in maintaining the redox balance, the molecular details of the reaction it catalyses remain unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of biliverdin reductase in complex with biliverdin and NADP+. Unexpectedly, two biliverdin molecules, which we designated the proxim...

  16. Histochemical localization of glutathione dependent NBT-reductase in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Y

    2001-09-01

    Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated. The fresh frozen tissue sections (8 m thickness) were prepared and incubated in medium containing NBT, reduced glutathione (GSH) and phosphate buffer. The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange. The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has been found to be localized in the areas rich in glutathione and actively proliferating area of the skin. The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutathione contents.

  17. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression....... Located in the cytosol, nitrate reductase obtains its reductant not from photosynthesis but from carbohydrate catabolism. This relationship prompted us to investigate the indirect role that light might play, via photosynthesis, in the regulation of nitrate reductase gene expression. We show that sucrose...

  18. The mechanism of the quinone reductase reaction of pig heart lipoamide dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienozinskis, J; Butkus, A; Cenas, N; Kulys, J

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the NADH:lipoamide reductase and NADH:quinone reductase reactions of pig heart lipoamide dehydrogenase (EC 1.6.4.3) was investigated. At pH 7.0 the catalytic constant of the quinone reductase reaction (kcat.) is 70 s-1 and the rate constant of the active-centre reduction by NADH (kcat./Km) is 9.2 x 10(5) M-1.s-1. These constants are almost an order lower than those for the lipoamide reductase reaction. The maximal quinone reductase activity is observed at pH 6.0-5.5. The use of [4(S)-2H]NADH as substrate decreases kcat./Km for the lipoamide reductase reaction and both kcat. and kcat./Km for the quinone reductase reaction. The kcat./Km values for quinones in this case are decreased 1.85-3.0-fold. NAD+ is a more effective inhibitor in the quinone reductase reaction than in the lipoamide reductase reaction. The pattern of inhibition reflects the shift of the reaction equilibrium. Various forms of the four-electron-reduced enzyme are believed to reduce quinones. Simple and 'hybrid ping-pong' mechanisms of this reaction are discussed. The logarithms of kcat./Km for quinones are hyperbolically dependent on their single-electron reduction potentials (E1(7]. A three-step mechanism for a mixed one-electron and two-electron reduction of quinones by lipoamide dehydrogenase is proposed. PMID:2375745

  19. Novel transporters from Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enable growth on L-arabinose and D-xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoshaug, Eric P; Vidgren, Virve; Magalhães, Frederico; Jarvis, Eric E; Franden, Mary Ann; Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    Genes encoding L-arabinose transporters in Kluyveromyces marxianus and Pichia guilliermondii were identified by functional complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose growth on L-arabinose was dependent on a functioning L-arabinose transporter, or by screening a differential display library, respectively. These transporters also transport D-xylose and were designated KmAXT1 (arabinose-xylose transporter) and PgAXT1, respectively. Transport assays using L-arabinose showed that KmAxt1p has K(m) 263 mM and V(max) 57 nM/mg/min, and PgAxt1p has K(m) 0.13 mM and V(max) 18 nM/mg/min. Glucose, galactose and xylose significantly inhibit L-arabinose transport by both transporters. Transport assays using D-xylose showed that KmAxt1p has K(m) 27 mM and V(max) 3.8 nM/mg/min, and PgAxt1p has K(m) 65 mM and V(max) 8.7 nM/mg/min. Neither transporter is capable of recovering growth on glucose or galactose in a S. cerevisiae strain deleted for hexose and galactose transporters. Transport kinetics of S. cerevisiae Gal2p showed K(m) 371 mM and V(max) 341 nM/mg/min for L-arabinose, and K(m) 25 mM and V(max) 76 nM/mg/min for galactose. Due to the ability of Gal2p and these two newly characterized transporters to transport both L-arabinose and D-xylose, one scenario for the complete usage of biomass-derived pentose sugars would require only the low-affinity, high-throughput transporter Gal2p and one additional high-affinity general pentose transporter, rather than dedicated D-xylose or L-arabinose transporters. Additionally, alignment of these transporters with other characterized pentose transporters provides potential targets for substrate recognition engineering. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. PENGARUH Ph, KADAR XILOSA DAN KADAR GLUKOSA TERHADAP PRODUKSI XYLITOL OLEH Candida shehatae WAY 08 [The Influence of Intial Xylose and Glucose Consentration on Xylitol production by Candida shehatae WAY 08

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisnu Adi Yulianto 1

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectiviea of this research were to determine the optimum culture conditions of initial pH, xylose and glucose concentration for xylitol production by Candida shehatae WAY 08. The initial pH was altered whitin the range of 4-7, the xylose concentration from 5020%, and the glucose (cosubstrate from 0-4%. The fermentation was performed at 30°C in 500 ml erlenmeyer flaks placed in a shaker incubator at 250 rpm for 7d. biomas concentration war determined by oven method. Xylose, glucose and xylitol concentrations were determined by HPCL.the result incated that the highest xylitol volumetric productivity of Candida shehatae WAY 08 was 0,314 g/I/h at the initial pH of 5 in medium containing 150 g/I xylose. Addition of glucose into media inhibited the xylitol production, but in creased the xylitol yield.

  1. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency presenting as a rash.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crushell, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    We report on the case of a 2-year-old girl recently diagnosed with Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency who originally presented in the neonatal period with a distinctive rash. At 11 weeks of age she developed seizures, she had acquired microcephaly and developmental delay. The rash deteriorated dramatically following commencement of phenobarbitone; both rash and seizures abated following empiric introduction of pyridoxine and folinic acid as treatment of possible vitamin responsive seizures. We postulate that phenobarbitone in combination with MTHFR deficiency may have caused her rash to deteriorate and subsequent folinic acid was helpful in treating the rash and preventing further acute neurological decline as commonly associated with this condition.

  2. Applications of Carboxylic Acid Reductases in Oleaginous Microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Linger, Jeffrey; McGeehan, John; Tyo, Keith; Beckham, Gregg

    2016-05-26

    Carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are recently emerging reductive enzymes for the direct production of aldehydes from biologically-produced carboxylic acids. Recent work has demonstrated that these powerful enzymes are able to reduce a very broad range of volatile- to long-chain fatty acids as well as aromatic acids. Here, we express four CAR enzymes from different fungal origins to test their activity against fatty acids commonly produced in oleaginous microbes. These in vitro results will inform metabolic engineering strategies to conduct mild biological reduction of carboxylic acids in situ, which is conventionally done via hydrotreating catalysis at high temperatures and hydrogen pressures.

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T: Hypoplastic Left Heart and Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronk, Kimberly J; Olivero, Anthony D; Haw, Marcus P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of congenital heart defects is higher in infants with mutation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. The MTHFR C677T gene decreases the bioavailability of folate and increases plasma homocysteine, a risk factor for thrombosis. There have been no reported cases in the literature on the clinical implications of this procoagulable state in the setting of cyanotic heart disease, which itself has prothrombotic predisposition. Two patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome developed postoperative thrombotic complications, both were homozygous for MTHFR C677T. We present these cases and highlight the implications of MTHFR mutation in the management of complex congenital heart disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Untersuchung des Xylose- und Arabinose-Stoffwechsels in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 und Clostridium saccharobutylicum NCP 262.

    OpenAIRE

    Lesiak, Justyna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Xylulose kinase (xylB) and arabinose kinase (araK) mutants of Clostridium acetobutylicum and C. saccharobutylicum were investigated and compared to wild type strains, regarding their abilities to metabolize xylose, arabinose and glucose. To create mutants in C. saccharobutylicum, an effective triparental mating system for DNA transfer was developed, and additionally restrictase mutants were constructed and characterized. Furthermore, growth and gene expression of C. acetobutylicum in continuo...

  5. Functions of Flavin Reductase and Quinone Reductase in 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Degradation by Cupriavidus necator JMP134▿

    OpenAIRE

    Belchik, Sara Mae; Xun, Luying

    2007-01-01

    The tcpRXABCYD operon of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 is involved in the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), a toxic pollutant. TcpA is a reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2)-dependent monooxygenase that converts 2,4,6-TCP to 6-chlorohydroxyquinone. It has been implied via genetic analysis that TcpX acts as an FAD reductase to supply TcpA with FADH2, whereas the function of TcpB in 2,4,6-TCP degradation is still unclear. In order to provide direct biochemical evidence for t...

  6. Analysis of nitrate reductase mRNA expression and nitrate reductase activity in response to nitrogen supply

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Kavoosi; Sadegh Balotf; Homeira Eshghi; Hasan Hasani

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is one of the major sources of nitrogen for the growth of plants. It is taken up by plant roots and transported to the leaves where it is reduced to nitrite in the. The main objective of this research was to investigate stimulatory effects of sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, ammonia and urea on the production/generation of the nitrate reductase mRNA in Triticum aestivum plants. The plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 21 days and then starved in a media without nitrat...

  7. Mutational analysis of the nor gene cluster which encodes nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, A P; van der Oost, J.; Reijnders, W N; Westerhoff, H V; Stouthamer, A.H.; van Spanning, R J

    1996-01-01

    The genes that encode the hc-type nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans have been identified. They are part of a cluster of six genes (norCBQDEF) and are found near the gene cluster that encodes the cd1-type nitrite reductase, which was identified earlier [de Boer, A. P. N.,

  8. Unearthing the ecology of soil microorganisms using a high resolution DNA-SIP approach to explore cellulose and xylose metabolism in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles ePepe-Ranney

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We explored microbial contributions to decomposition using a sophisticated approach to DNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP. Our experiment evaluated the dynamics and ecological characteristics of functionally defined microbial groups that metabolize labile and structural C in soils. We added to soil a complex amendment representing plant derived organic matter substituted with either 13C-xylose or 13C-cellulose to represent labile and structural C pools derived from abundant components of plant biomass. We found evidence for 13C-incorporation into DNA from 13C-xylose and 13C-cellulose in 49 and 63 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, respectively. The types of microorganisms that assimilated 13C in the 13C-xylose treatment changed over time being predominantly Firmicutes at day 1 followed by Bacteroidetes at day 3 and then Actinobacteria at day 7. These 13C-labeling dynamics suggest labile C traveled through different trophic levels. In contrast, microorganisms generally metabolized cellulose-C after 14 days and did not change to the same extent in phylogenetic composition over time. Microorganisms that metabolized cellulose-C belonged to poorly characterized but cosmopolitan soil lineages including Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi and Planctomycetes.

  9. Inverse metabolic engineering based on transient acclimation of yeast improves acid-containing xylose fermentation and tolerance to formic and acetic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Improving the production of ethanol from xylose is an important goal in metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae must produce ethanol in the presence of weak acids (formate and acetate) generated during pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, weak acid-containing xylose fermentation was significantly improved using cells that were acclimated to the weak acids during pre-cultivation. Transcriptome analyses showed that levels of transcripts for transcriptional/translational machinery-related genes (RTC3 and ANB1) were enhanced by formate and acetate acclimation. Recombinant yeast strains overexpressing RTC3 and ANB1 demonstrated improved ethanol production from xylose in the presence of the weak acids, along with improved tolerance to the acids. Novel metabolic engineering strategy based on the combination of short-term acclimation and system-wide analysis was developed, which can develop stress-tolerant strains in a short period of time, although conventional evolutionary engineering approach has required long periods of time to isolate inhibitor-adapted strains.

  10. Ethanol production from glucose and xylose obtained from steam exploded water-extracted olive tree pruning using phosphoric acid as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, M J; Alvarez, C; Ballesteros, I; Romero, I; Ballesteros, M; Castro, E; Manzanares, P; Moya, M; Oliva, J M

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the effect of phosphoric acid (1% w/w) in steam explosion pretreatment of water extracted olive tree pruning at 175°C and 195°C was evaluated. The objective is to produce ethanol from all sugars (mainly glucose and xylose) contained in the pretreated material. The water insoluble fraction obtained after pretreatment was used as substrate in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process by a commercial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The liquid fraction, containing mainly xylose, was detoxified by alkali and ion-exchange resin and then fermented by the xylose fermenting yeast Scheffersomyces stipitis. Ethanol yields reached in a SSF process were close to 80% when using 15% (w/w) substrate consistency and about 70% of theoretical when using prehydrolysates detoxified by ion-exchange resins. Considering sugars recovery and ethanol yields about 160g of ethanol from kg of water extracted olive tree pruning could be obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enterococcus faecium QU 50: a novel thermophilic lactic acid bacterium for high-yield l-lactic acid production from xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Zendo, Takeshi; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Production of optically pure lactic acid from lignocellulosic material for commercial purposes is hampered by several difficulties, including heterofermentation of pentose sugars and high energy consumption by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Here, we report a novel lactic acid bacterium, strain QU 50, that has the potential to produce optically pure l-lactic acid (≥99.2%) in a homofermentative manner from xylose under thermophilic conditions. Strain QU 50 was isolated from Egyptian fertile soil and identified as Enterococcus faecium QU 50 by analyzing its sugar fermentation pattern and 16S rRNA gene sequence. Enterococcus faecium QU 50 fermented xylose efficiently to produce lactic acid over wide pH (6.0-10.0) and temperature ranges (30-52°C), with a pH of 6.5 and temperature of 50°C being optimal. To our knowledge, this is the first report of homofermentative lactic acid production from xylose by a thermophilic lactic acid bacterium. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Variation in the degree of D-xylose substitution in water-extractable European durum wheat (Triticum durum desf.) semolina arabinoxylans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roels, S P; Collado, M; Loosveld, A M; Grobet, P J; Delcour, J A

    1999-05-01

    Durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) semolina water-extractable arabinoxylan (TWEAX) (yield 0.28%, arabinose-to-xylose ratio (A/X) 0. 62) was fractionated by a stepwise increase in ethanol concentration (up to 65%). The A/X ratios of the resulting fractions varied between 0.42 and 0.80. With increasing ethanol concentrations, increasing A/X ratios went hand in hand with a relative increase of low molecular weight compounds, indicating that high molecular weight compounds with a low A/X ratio are preferentially precipitated from alcohol/water mixtures. (1)H NMR showed that, whereas in TWEAX the levels of unsubstituted xyloses (X(0)), monosubstituted (X(1)), and disubstituted (X(2)) xyloses were 63.1%, 11.8%, and 25.1%, respectively, fractions that precipitated with increasing ethanol concentrations had decreasing levels of X(0). Simultaneously, the level of X(1) decreased equally until it leveled of at ca. 10%. Concomitantly, the level of X(2) increased. The levels of X(0), X(1), and X(2) varied between 69.7% and 53.4%, 18.2% and 10.7%, and 12.2% and 35.9%, respectively.

  13. Development of an industrial medium for economical 2,3-butanediol production through co-fermentation of glucose and xylose by Klebsiella oxytoca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiao-Jun; Huang, He; Du, Jun; Zhu, Jian-Guo; Ren, Lu-Jing; Li, Shuang; Nie, Zhi-Kui

    2009-11-01

    An industrial medium containing urea as a sole nitrogen source, low levels of corn steep liquor and mineral salts as nutrition factors to retain high 2,3-butanediol production through co-fermentation of glucose and xylose (2:1, wt/wt) by Klebsiella oxytoca was developed. Urea and corn steep liquor were identified as the most significant factors by the two-level Plackett-Burman design. Steepest ascent experiments were applied to approach the optimal region of the two factors and a central composite design was employed to determine their optimal levels. Under the optimal medium, the yield of 2,3-butanediol plus acetoin relative to glucose and xylose was up to 0.428 g/g, which was 85.6% of theoretical value. The cheap nitrogen source and nutrition factors combining the co-fermentation process using lignocellulose derived glucose and xylose as the carbon source in the developed medium would be a potential solution to improve the economics of microbial 2,3-butanediol production.

  14. Interspecific variation for thermal dependence of glutathione reductase in sainfoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, S P; Mahan, J R; Matches, A G

    1990-05-01

    Understanding the biochemical and physiological consequences of species variation would expedite improvement in agronomically useful genotypes of sainfoin (Onobrychis spp.) Information on variation among sainfoin species is lacking on thermal dependence of glutathione reductase (B.C. 1.6.4.2.), which plays an important role in the protection of plants from both high and low temperature stresses by preventing harmful oxidation of enzymes and membranes. Our objective was to investigate the interspecific variation for thermal dependency of glutathione reductase in sainfoin. Large variation among species was found for: (i) the minimum apparent Km (0.4-2.5 μM NADPH), (ii) the temperature at which the minimum apparent Km was observed (15°-5°C), and (iii) the thermal kinetic windows (2°-30°C width) over a 15°-45°C temperature gradient. In general, tetraploid species had narrower (≤17°C) thermal kinetic windows than did diploid species (∼30°C), with one exception among the diploids. Within the tetraploid species, the cultivars of O. viciifolia had a broader thermal kinetic window (≥7°C) than the plant introduction (PI 212241, >2 °C) itself.

  15. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa; Albrecht, Philipp; Methner, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro . We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase.

  16. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hoffmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2 leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR, a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase.

  17. Crystal structure of human quinone reductase type 2, a metalloflavoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C E; Bianchet, M A; Talalay, P; Zhao, Q; Amzel, L M

    1999-08-03

    In mammals, two separate but homologous cytosolic quinone reductases have been identified: NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1) (EC 1.6.99.2) and quinone reductase type 2 (QR2). Although QR1 and QR2 are nearly 50% identical in protein sequence, they display markedly different catalytic properties and substrate specificities. We report here two crystal structures of QR2: in its native form and bound to menadione (vitamin K(3)), a physiological substrate. Phases were obtained by molecular replacement, using our previously determined rat QR1 structure as the search model. QR2 shares the overall fold of the major catalytic domain of QR1, but lacks the smaller C-terminal domain. The FAD binding sites of QR1 and QR2 are very similar, but their hydride donor binding sites are considerably different. Unexpectedly, we found that QR2 contains a specific metal binding site, which is not present in QR1. Two histidine nitrogens, one cysteine thiol, and a main chain carbonyl group are involved in metal coordination. The metal binding site is solvent-accessible, and is separated from the FAD cofactor by a distance of about 13 A.

  18. The effect of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the growth, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities of Spirodela polyrrhiza (L. Schleiden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Buczek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion into the medium of 5 mg•dm-3 of non-ionic (ENF or ionic (DBST surfactant caused 50-60% inhibition of nitrite reductase MR activity in S. polyrrhiza. At the same time, increased accumulation of NO2- in the plant tissues and lowering of the total and soluble protein contents were found. DBST also lowered the nitrate reductase (NR activity and the dry mass of the plants.

  19. Characterization of the reductase domain of rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase generated in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Calmodulin response is complete within the reductase domain itself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachhui, R; Presta, A; Bentley, D F; Abu-Soud, H M; McArthur, R; Brudvig, G; Ghosh, D K; Stuehr, D J

    1996-08-23

    Rat neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) is comprised of a flavin-containing reductase domain and a heme-containing oxygenase domain. Calmodulin binding to nNOS increases the rate of electron transfer from NADPH into its flavins, triggers electron transfer from flavins to the heme, activates NO synthesis, and increases reduction of artificial electron acceptors such as cytochrome c. To investigate what role the reductase domain plays in calmodulin's activation of these functions, we overexpressed a form of the nNOS reductase domain (amino acids 724-1429) in the yeast Pichia pastoris that for the first time exhibits a complete calmodulin response. The reductase domain was purified by 2',5'-ADP affinity chromatography yielding 25 mg of pure protein per liter of culture. It contained 1 FAD and 0.8 FMN per molecule. Most of the protein as isolated contained an air-stable flavin semiquinone radical that was sensitive to FeCN6 oxidation. Anaerobic titration of the FeCN6-oxidized reductase domain with NADPH indicated the flavin semiquinone re-formed after addition of 1-electron equivalent and the flavins could accept up to 3 electrons from NADPH. Calmodulin binding to the recombinant reductase protein increased its rate of NADPH-dependent flavin reduction and its rate of electron transfer to cytochrome c, FeCN6, or dichlorophenolindophenol to fully match the rate increases achieved when calmodulin bound to native full-length nNOS. Calmodulin's activation of the reductase protein was associated with an increase in domain tryptophan and flavin fluorescence. We conclude that many of calmodulin's actions on native nNOS can be fully accounted for through its interaction with the nNOS reductase domain itself.

  20. Effects of furfural and acetic acid on growth and lipid production from glucose and xylose by Rhodotorula glutinis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guochang; French, William Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Alley, Earl; Paraschivescu, Maria [Dave C. Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, P.O. Box 9595, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Microbial conversion of lignocellulosic sugars to triacylglycerols (a biodiesel or renewable diesel feedstock) was investigated using the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis (ATCC 15125). In the shake flask experiments, R. glutinis was first grown in a nitrogen-rich medium utilizing an artificial acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass switchgrass as the sole carbon and energy source. Once the culture had reached the stationary phase, the cells were harvested and transferred to a fresh nitrogen-free media containing artificial acid hydrolysate sugars for lipid accumulation. Analysis of the data collected showed that the yeast were able to grow in the medium containing artificial acid hydrolysate sugars as the carbon and energy source. The net specific Growth rate(s) indicated that the presence of acetic acid and furfural in the artificial acid hydrolysate inhibited the growth of R. glutinis on glucose, but not the growth on xylose. The lipid accumulated in the cells, determined by gravimetrical method, increased from initial 4.3%-39.0% of dry cell mass weight. The major fatty acids of the accumulated lipids were palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and {gamma}-linoleic acid. These results indicate that it is feasible to convert the sugars in acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass to triacylglycerols using R. glutinis. (author)

  1. Spathaspora boniae sp. nov., a D-xylose-fermenting species in the Candida albicans/Lodderomyces clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Camila G; Batista, Thiago M; Kominek, Jacek; Borelli, Beatriz M; Furtado, Carolina; Moreira, Rennan G; Franco, Gloria R; Rosa, Luiz H; Fonseca, César; Hittinger, Chris T; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2017-10-01

    Two yeast isolates producing asci-containing elongate ascospores with curved ends typical of the genus Spathaspora were isolated from rotting wood samples collected in an Atlantic rainforest ecosystem in Brazil. Phylogenetic analysis of the LSU rRNA gene D1/D2 domain sequences demonstrated that the strains represent a new species and placed it next to Candida blackwellae, in a clade that also contains Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis. Other sequences of the ribosomal gene cluster supported same placementin the same clade, and a phylogenomic analysis placed this new species in an early emerging position relative to the larger C. albicans/Lodderomyces clade. One interpretation is that the genus Spathaspora is, in fact, paraphyletic. In conformity with this view, we propose the novel species Spathaspora boniae sp. nov. to accommodate the isolates. The type strain of Spathaspora boniae sp. nov. is UFMG-CM-Y306(T) (=CBS 13262(T)). The MycoBank number is MB 821297. A detailed analysis of xylose metabolism was conducted for the new species.

  2. Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation for improving the xylose utilization of steam exploded corn stover at high solid loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Hong-Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) of steam exploded corn stover (SECS) was investigated at 5-25% solid loadings compared with other conversion processes. SECS was washed with a 15-fold excess of deionized water to remove inhibitors of hydrolysis and fermentation. The concentration, yield, and productivity of ethanol was 34.3g/L, 90.0%, 2.61g/L/h in the co-fermentation of 60g/L glucose and 10g/L xylose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae IPE003. Ethanol concentration and productivity increased with increasing solid loading while ethanol yield decreased in all conversion processes of SECS. Glucan and xylan conversion was 82.0% and 82.1% in SSCF at 20% solid loading, respectively, while the concentration, yield and productivity of ethanol was 60.8g/L, 75.3% and 0.63g/L/h. The feeding strategy of SECS addition within 24h improved the SSCF performance. Therefore, SSCF increased ethanol productivity and was an effective conversion process for ethanol production at high solid loading. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adaptive evolution of nontransgenic Escherichia coli KC01 for improved ethanol tolerance and homoethanol fermentation from xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongze; Manow, Ryan; Finan, Christopher; Wang, Jinhua; Garza, Erin; Zhou, Shengde

    2011-09-01

    Due to its excellent capability to ferment five-carbon sugars, Escherichia coli has been considered one of the platform organisms to be engineered for production of cellulosic ethanol. Nevertheless, genetically engineered ethanologenic E. coli lacks the essential trait of alcohol tolerance. Development of ethanol tolerance is required for cost-effective ethanol fermentation. In this study, we improved alcohol tolerance of a nontransgenic E. coli KC01 (ldhA pflB ackA frdBC pdhR::pflBp6-aceEF-lpd) through adaptive evolution. During ~350 generations of adaptive evolution, a gradually increased concentration of ethanol was used as a selection pressure to enrich ethanol-tolerant mutants. The evolved mutant, E. coli SZ470, was able to grow anaerobically at 40 g l(-1) ethanol, a twofold improvement over parent KC01. When compared with KC01 for small-scale (500 ml) xylose (50 g l(-1)) fermentation, SZ470 achieved 67% higher cell mass, 48% faster volumetric ethanol productivity, and 50% shorter time to complete fermentation with ethanol titer of 23.5 g l(-1) and yield of 94%. These results demonstrate that an industry-oriented nontransgenic E. coli strain could be developed through incremental improvements of desired traits by a combination of molecular biology and traditional microbiology techniques.

  4. Study the performance of photogalvanic cells for solar energy conversion and storage: Rose Bengal-D-Xylose-NaLS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangotri, K.M. [Department of Chemistry, Jai Narain Vyas University, Jodhpur, Rajasthan 342 033 (India); Bhimwal, Mahesh Kumar [Solar Energy Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Jai Narain Vyas University, Jodhpur, Rajasthan 342 033 (India)

    2010-07-15

    The Rose Bengal is used as photosensitizer with D-Xylose as reductant and sodium lauryl sulphate (NaLS) as surfactant for the enhancement of the conversion efficiency and storage capacity of photogalvanic cell for its commercial viability. The observed value of the photogeneration of photopotential was 885.0 mV and photocurrent was 460.0 {mu}A whereas maximum power of the cell was 407.10 {mu}W. The observed power at power point was 158.72 {mu}W and the conversion efficiency was 1.52%. The fill factor 0.3151 was experimentally determined at the power point of the cell. The rate of initial generation of photocurrent was 63.88 {mu}A min{sup -1}. The photogalvanic cell so developed can work for 145.0 min in dark on irradiation for 165.0 min, i.e. the storage capacity of the photogalvanic cell is 87.87%. A simple mechanism for the photogeneration of photocurrent has also been proposed. (author)

  5. A new cotton SDR family gene encodes a polypeptide possessing aldehyde reductase and 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yu; Song, Wen-Qiang; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Qin, Yong-Mei

    2010-03-01

    To understand regulatory mechanisms of cotton fiber development, microarray analysis has been performed for upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Based on this, a cDNA (GhKCR3) encoding a polypeptide belonging to short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase family was isolated and cloned. It contains an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding a polypeptide of 328 amino acid residues. Following its overexpression in bacterial cells, the purified recombinant protein specifically uses NADPH to reduce a variety of short-chain aldehydes. A fragment between Gly180 and Gly191 was found to be essential for its catalytic activity. Though the GhKCR3 gene shares low sequence similarities to the ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae YBR159w that encodes 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR) catalyzing the second step of fatty acid elongation, it was surprisingly able to complement the yeast ybr159wDelta mutant. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that very long-chain fatty acids, especially C26:0, were produced in the ybr159wDelta mutant cells expressing GhKCR3. Applying palmitoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA as substrates, GhKCR3 showed KCR activity in vitro. Quantitative real time-PCR analysis indicated GhKCR3 transcripts accumulated in rapidly elongating fibers, roots, and stems. Our results suggest that GhKCR3 is probably a novel KCR contributing to very long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis in plants.

  6. Individualized supplementation of folic acid according to polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) reduced pregnant complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiujuan; Jiang, Jing; Xu, Min; Xu, Mei; Yang, Yan; Lu, Wei; Yu, Xuemei; Ma, Jianlin; Pan, Jiakui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, A1298C and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G polymorphisms of pregnant women in Jiaodong region in China, and to investigate whether folic acid supplementation affect the pregnancy complications. A total of 7,812 pregnant women from the Jiaodong region in Shandong province in China. By using Taqman-MGB, 2,928 pregnant women (case group) were tested for the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of MTHFR C677T, A1298C and MTRR A66G polymorphisms. Folic acid metabolism ability was ranked at four levels and then pregnant women in different rank group were supplemented with different doses of folic acid. Their pregnancy complications were followed up and compared with 4,884 pregnant women without folic acid supplementation (control group) in the same hospital. The allele frequencies of MTHFR C677T were 49.1 and 50.9%; those of MTHFR A1298C were 80.2 and 19.8%, and those of MTRR A66G were 74.1 and 25.9%. After supplemented with folic acid, the complication rates in different age groups were significantly reduced, especially for gestational diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Periconceptional folic acid supplementation and healthcare following gene polymorphism testing may be a powerful measure to decrease congenital malformations. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTRR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTR) gene polymorphisms and adult meningioma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Yan-Wen; Shi, Hua-Ping; Wang, Yan-Zhong; Li, Gui-Ling; Yu, Hai-Tao; Xie, Xin-You

    2013-11-01

    The causes of meningiomas are not well understood. Folate metabolism gene polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with various human cancers. It is still controversial and ambiguous between the functional polymorphisms of folate metabolism genes 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTRR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTR) and risk of adult meningioma. A population-based case–control study involving 600 meningioma patients (World Health Organization [WHO] Grade I, 391 cases; WHO Grade II, 167 cases; WHO Grade III, 42 cases) and 600 controls was done for the MTHFR C677T and A1298C, MTRR A66G, and MTR A2756G variants in Chinese Han population. The folate metabolism gene polymorphisms were determined by using a polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Meningioma cases had a significantly lower frequency of MTHFR 677 TT genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 0.49, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.33–0.74; P = 0.001] and T allele (OR = 0.80, 95 % CI 0.67–0.95; P = 0.01) than controls. A significant association between risk of meningioma and MTRR 66 GG (OR = 1.41, 95 % CI 1.02–1.96; P = 0.04) was also observed. When stratifying by the WHO grade of meningioma, no association was found. Our study suggested that MTHFR C677T and MTRR A66G variants may affect the risk of adult meningioma in Chinese Han population.

  8. Monodehydroascorbate reductase 2 and dehydroascorbate reductase 5 are crucial for a mutualistic interaction between Piriformospora indica and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Tripathi, Swati; Prasad, Ram; Varma, Ajit; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2009-08-15

    Ascorbate is a major antioxidant and radical scavenger in plants. Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) are two enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle that maintain ascorbate in its reduced state. MDAR2 (At3g09940) and DHAR5 (At1g19570) expression was upregulated in the roots and shoots of Arabidopsis seedlings co-cultivated with the root-colonizing endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica, or that were exposed to a cell wall extract or a culture filtrate from the fungus. Growth and seed production were not promoted by Piriformospora indica in mdar2 (SALK_0776335C) and dhar5 (SALK_029966C) T-DNA insertion lines, while colonized wild-type plants were larger and produced more seeds compared to the uncolonized controls. After 3 weeks of drought stress, growth and seed production were reduced in Piriformospora indica-colonized plants compared to the uncolonized control, and the roots of the drought-stressed insertion lines were colonized more heavily by the fungus than were wild-type plants. Upregulation of the message for the antimicrobial PDF1.2 protein in drought-stressed insertion lines indicated that MDAR2 and DHAR5 are crucial for producing sufficient ascorbate to maintain the interaction between Piriformospora indica and Arabidopsis in a mutualistic state.

  9. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...... disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism...

  10. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in myeloid leukemia patients from Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynara Gomes Barbosa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR: EC 1.5.1.20 polymorphisms are associated to acute lymphoid leukemia in different populations. We used the polymerase chain reaction and the restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP to investigate MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphism frequencies in 67 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, 27 with acute myeloid leukemia FAB subtype M3 (AML-M3 and 100 apparently healthy controls. The MTHFR mutant allele frequencies were as follows: CML = 17.2% for C677T, 21.6% for A1298C; AML-M3 = 22.2% for C677T, 24.1% for A1298C; and controls = 20.5% for C677T, 21% for A1298C. Taken together, our results provide evidence that MTHFR polymorphisms have no influence on the development of CML or AML-M3.

  11. Go Green: The Antiinflammatory Effects of Biliverdin Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eWegiel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biliverdin (BV has emerged as a cytoprotective and important anti-inflammatory molecule. Conversion of BV to bilirubin (BR is catalyzed by biliverdin reductase (BVR and is required for the downstream signaling and nuclear localization of BVR. Recent data by others and us make clear that BVR is a critical regulator of innate immune responses resulting from acute insult and injury and moreover, that a lack of BVR results in an enhanced pro-inflammatory phenotype. In macrophages, BVR is regulated by its substrate BV which leads to activation of the PI3K-Akt-IL10 axis and inhibition of TLR4 expression via direct binding of BVR to the TLR4 promoter. In this review, we will summarize recent findings on the role of BVR and the bile pigments in inflammation in context with its activity as an enzyme, receptor and transcriptional regulator.

  12. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  13. B-vitamins, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Mary; Wilson, Carol P; Strain, J J; Horigan, Geraldine; Scott, John M; McNulty, Helene

    2011-07-01

    Hypertension is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke. A common polymorphism in the gene encoding the enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), previously identified as the main genetic determinant of elevated homocysteine concentration and also recognized as a risk factor for CVD, appears to be independently associated with hypertension. The B-vitamin riboflavin is required as a cofactor by MTHFR and recent evidence suggests it may have a role in modulating blood pressure, specifically in those with the homozygous mutant MTHFR 677 TT genotype. If studies confirm that this genetic predisposition to hypertension is correctable by low-dose riboflavin, the findings could have important implications for the management of hypertension given that the frequency of this polymorphism ranges from 3 to 32 % worldwide.

  14. 5-Alpha-Reductase Inhibitors and Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllhase, Claudius; Schneider, Marc P

    2016-08-01

    By inhibiting the conversion from testosterone to dihydrotestosterone 5-Alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) are able to hinder prostatic growth, shrink prostate volumes, and improve BPH-related LUTS. 5ARIs are particularly beneficial for patients with larger prostates (>30-40ml). Generally the side effects of 5ARI treatment are mild, and according to the FORTA classification 5ARIs are suitable for frail elderly. 5ARI / alpha-blocker (AB) combination therapy showed the best symptomatic outcome and risk reduction for clinical progression. Combining Phosphodieseterase type 5 inhbibitors (PDE5Is) with 5ARIs counteracts the negative androgenic sexual side effects of 5ARIs, and simultaneously combines their synergistic effects on LUTS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Steroid 5β-Reductase from Leaves of Vitis vinifera: Molecular Cloning, Expression, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Mona; Munkert, Jennifer; Campa, Manuela; Malnoy, Mickael; Martens, Stefan; Müller-Uri, Frieder

    2015-11-25

    A steroid 5β-reductase gene corresponding to the hypothetical protein LOC100247199 from leaves of Vitis vinifera (var. 'Chardonnay') was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein showed 5β-reductase activity when progesterone was used as a substrate. The reaction was stereoselective, producing only 5β-products such as 5β-pregnane-3,20-dione. Other small substrates (terpenoids and enones) were also accepted as substrates, indicating the highly promiscuous character of the enzyme class. Our results show that the steroid 5β-reductase gene, encoding an orthologous enzyme described as a key enzyme in cardenolide biosynthesis, is also expressed in leaves of the cardenolide-free plant V. vinifera. We emphasize the fact that, on some occasions, different reductases (e.g., progesterone 5β-reductase and monoterpenoid reductase) can also use molecules that are similar to the final products as a substrate. Therefore, in planta, the different reductases may contribute to the immense number of diverse small natural products finally leading to the flavor of wine.

  16. Investigation of the antioxidant and aldose reductase inhibitory activities of extracts from Peruvian tea plant infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Guillen Quispe, Yanymee N; Gonzales Arce, Paul H; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-09-15

    In the present study, the antioxidant and aldose reductase inhibitory activities of 24 Peruvian infusion tea plants were investigated by 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), and aldose reductase assays. Phoradendron sp. showed the highest inhibition of aldose reductase (IC 50 , 1.09±0.06μg/mL) and considerable antioxidant (IC 50 of DPPH, 58.36±1.65μg/mL; IC 50 of ABTS, 9.91±0.43μg/mL) effects. In order to identify the antioxidants and aldose reductase inhibitors of Phoradendron sp., DPPH-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ultrafiltration-HPLC assays were performed. Chlorogenic acid, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and 1,3,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid were identified as the antioxidants and aldose reductase inhibitors; apigenin was identified as the antioxidant. Finally, Phoradendron sp. and its aldose reductase inhibitors also showed a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effect without cellular toxicity. These results suggested that Phoradendron sp. can be a potent functional food ingredient as an antioxidant, aldose reductase inhibitor and anti-inflammatory agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi-genome analysis identifies functional and phylogenetic diversity of basidiomycete adenylate-forming reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburger, Eileen; Braga, Daniel; Kombrink, Anja; Lackner, Gerald; Gressler, Julia; Künzler, Markus; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2016-07-22

    Among the invaluable benefits of basidiomycete genomics is the dramatically enhanced insight into the potential capacity to biosynthesize natural products. This study focuses on adenylate-forming reductases, which is a group of natural product biosynthesis enzymes that resembles non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, yet serves to modify one substrate, rather than to condense two or more building blocks. Phylogenetically, these reductases fall in four classes. The phylogeny of Heterobasidion annosum (Russulales) and Serpula lacrymans (Boletales) adenylate-forming reductases was investigated. We identified a previously unrecognized phylogenetic branch within class III adenylate-forming reductases. Three representatives were heterologously produced and their substrate preferences determined in vitro: NPS9 and NPS11 of S. lacrymans preferred l-threonine and benzoic acid, respectively, while NPS10 of H. annosum accepted phenylpyruvic acid best. We also investigated two class IV adenylate-forming reductases of Coprinopsis cinerea, which each were active with l-alanine, l-valine, and l-serine as substrates. Our results show that adenylate-forming reductases are functionally more diverse than previously recognized. As none of the natural products known from the species investigated in this study includes the identified substrates of their respective reductases, our findings may help further explore the diversity of these basidiomycete secondary metabolomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellenbrand Janine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba, domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis.

  19. Nitrite and Nitrous Oxide Reductase Regulation by Nitrogen Oxides in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaty, Monique; Schwintner, Carole; Cahors, Sandrine; Richaud, Pierre; Verméglio, Andre

    1999-01-01

    We have cloned the nap locus encoding the periplasmic nitrate reductase in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106. A mutant with this enzyme deleted is unable to grow under denitrifying conditions. Biochemical analysis of this mutant shows that in contrast to the wild-type strain, the level of synthesis of the nitrite and N2O reductases is not increased by the addition of nitrate. Growth under denitrifying conditions and induction of N oxide reductase synthesis are both restored by the presence of a plasmid containing the genes encoding the nitrate reductase. This demonstrates that R. sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106 does not possess an efficient membrane-bound nitrate reductase and that nitrate is not the direct inducer for the nitrite and N2O reductases in this species. In contrast, we show that nitrite induces the synthesis of the nitrate reductase. PMID:10498715

  20. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Pegan, Scott D; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identi...

  1. Ethanol production from xylose with the yeast Pichia stipitis and simultaneous product recovery by gas stripping using a gas-lift loop fermentor with attached side-arm (GLSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, J M; Cao, N; Gong, C S; Tsao, G T

    2000-02-05

    The bioconversion of xylose into ethanol with the yeast Pichia stipitis CBS 5773 is inhibited when 20 g/L of ethanol are present in the fermentation broth. In order to avoid this limitation, the fermentation was carried out with simultaneous recovery of product by CO(2) stripping. The fermentation was also improved by attaching a side-arm to the main body of a classical gas-lift loop fermentor. This side-arm increases the liquid circulation, mass transfer, and gas distribution, reducing the amount of oxygen in the inlet gas necessary to perform the fermentation of xylose under microaerobic conditions (K(L)a approximately 16 h(-1)). The continuous stripping of ethanol from the fermentation broth in this new bioreactor system allowed the consumption of higher xylose concentrations than using Erlenmeyer shaker flasks, improved significantly the process productivity and provided a clean ethanol solution by using an ice-cooled condenser system. Finally, a fed-batch fermentation was carried out with a K(L)a = 15.8 h(-1). Starting with 248.2 g of xylose, 237.6 g of xylose was consumed to produce 88.1 g of ethanol which represents 72.6% of the theoretical yield (47.2 g/L of ethanol was recovered in the condenser, while 9.6 g/L remained in the fermentation broth). Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Ethanol production from xylose with the yeast Pichia stipitis and simultaneous product recovery by gas stripping using a gas-lift loop fermentor with attached side-arm (GLSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, J.M.; Cao, N.; Gong, C.S.; Tsao, G.T.

    2000-02-05

    The bioconversion of xylose into ethanol with the yeast Pichia stipitis CBS 5773 is inhibited when 20 g/L of ethanol are present in the fermentation broth. In order to avoid this limitation, the fermentation was carried out with simultaneous recovery of product by CO{sub 2} stripping. The fermentation was also improved by attaching a side-arm to the main body of a classical gas-lift loop fermentor. This side-arm increases the liquid circulation, mass transfer, and gas distribution, reducing the amount of oxygen in the inlet gas necessary to perform the fermentation of xylose under microaerobic conditions (K{sub L}a{approx_equal} 16 h{sup {minus}1}). The continuous stripping of ethanol from the fermentation broth in this new bioreactor system allowed the consumption of higher xylose concentrations than using Erlenmeyer shaker flasks, improved significantly the process productivity and provided a clean ethanol solution by using an ice-cooled condenser system. Finally, a fed-batch fermentation was carried out with a K{sub L}a = 15.8 h{sup {minus}1}. Starting with 248.2 g of xylose, 237.6 g of xylose was consumed to produce 88.1 g of ethanol which represents 72.6% of the theoretical yield.

  3. Man o' War Mutation in UDP-α-D-Xylose Synthase Favors the Abortive Catalytic Cycle and Uncovers a Latent Potential for Hexamer Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Jr., Richard M.; Polizzi, Samuel J.; Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Howard, Wesley W.; Wood, Zachary A. [Georgia

    2015-03-17

    The man o’ war (mow) phenotype in zebrafish is characterized by severe craniofacial defects due to a missense mutation in UDP-α-D-xylose synthase (UXS), an essential enzyme in proteoglycan biosynthesis. The mow mutation is located in the UXS dimer interface ~16 Å away from the active site, suggesting an indirect effect on the enzyme mechanism. We have examined the structural and catalytic consequences of the mow mutation (R236H) in the soluble fragment of human UXS (hUXS), which shares 93% sequence identity with the zebrafish enzyme. In solution, hUXS dimers undergo a concentration-dependent association to form a tetramer. Sedimentation velocity studies show that the R236H substitution induces the formation of a new hexameric species. Using two new crystal structures of the hexamer, we show that R236H and R236A substitutions cause a local unfolding of the active site that allows for a rotation of the dimer interface necessary to form the hexamer. The disordered active sites in the R236H and R236A mutant constructs displace Y231, the essential acid/base catalyst in the UXS reaction mechanism. The loss of Y231 favors an abortive catalytic cycle in which the reaction intermediate, UDP-α-D-4-keto-xylose, is not reduced to the final product, UDP-α-D-xylose. Surprisingly, the mow-induced hexamer is almost identical to the hexamers formed by the deeply divergent UXS homologues from Staphylococcus aureus and Helicobacter pylori (21% and 16% sequence identity, respectively). The persistence of a latent hexamer-building interface in the human enzyme suggests that the ancestral UXS may have been a hexamer.

  4. Man o' war mutation in UDP-α-D-xylose synthase favors the abortive catalytic cycle and uncovers a latent potential for hexamer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Richard M; Polizzi, Samuel J; Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Howard, Wesley W; Wood, Zachary A

    2015-01-27

    The man o' war (mow) phenotype in zebrafish is characterized by severe craniofacial defects due to a missense mutation in UDP-α-d-xylose synthase (UXS), an essential enzyme in proteoglycan biosynthesis. The mow mutation is located in the UXS dimer interface ∼16 Å away from the active site, suggesting an indirect effect on the enzyme mechanism. We have examined the structural and catalytic consequences of the mow mutation (R236H) in the soluble fragment of human UXS (hUXS), which shares 93% sequence identity with the zebrafish enzyme. In solution, hUXS dimers undergo a concentration-dependent association to form a tetramer. Sedimentation velocity studies show that the R236H substitution induces the formation of a new hexameric species. Using two new crystal structures of the hexamer, we show that R236H and R236A substitutions cause a local unfolding of the active site that allows for a rotation of the dimer interface necessary to form the hexamer. The disordered active sites in the R236H and R236A mutant constructs displace Y231, the essential acid/base catalyst in the UXS reaction mechanism. The loss of Y231 favors an abortive catalytic cycle in which the reaction intermediate, UDP-α-d-4-keto-xylose, is not reduced to the final product, UDP-α-d-xylose. Surprisingly, the mow-induced hexamer is almost identical to the hexamers formed by the deeply divergent UXS homologues from Staphylococcus aureus and Helicobacter pylori (21% and 16% sequence identity, respectively). The persistence of a latent hexamer-building interface in the human enzyme suggests that the ancestral UXS may have been a hexamer.

  5. Establishment of a tobacco BY2 cell line devoid of plant-specific xylose and fucose as a platform for the production of biotherapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanania, Uri; Ariel, Tami; Tekoah, Yoram; Fux, Liat; Sheva, Maor; Gubbay, Yehuda; Weiss, Mara; Oz, Dina; Azulay, Yaniv; Turbovski, Albina; Forster, Yehava; Shaaltiel, Yoseph

    2017-09-01

    Plant-produced glycoproteins contain N-linked glycans with plant-specific residues of β(1,2)-xylose and core α(1,3)-fucose, which do not exist in mammalian-derived proteins. Although our experience with two enzymes that are used for enzyme replacement therapy does not indicate that the plant sugar residues have deleterious effects, we made a conscious decision to eliminate these moieties from plant-expressed proteins. We knocked out the β(1,2)-xylosyltranferase (XylT) and the α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT) genes, using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing, in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow 2 (BY2) cell suspension. In total, we knocked out 14 loci. The knocked-out lines were stable, viable and exhibited a typical BY2 growing rate. Glycan analysis of the endogenous proteins of these lines exhibited N-linked glycans lacking β(1,2)-xylose and/or α(1,3)-fucose. The knocked-out lines were further transformed successfully with recombinant DNaseI. The expression level and the activity of the recombinant protein were similar to that of the protein produced in the wild-type BY2 cells. The recombinant DNaseI was shown to be totally free from any xylose and/or fucose residues. The glyco-engineered BY2 lines provide a valuable platform for producing potent biopharmaceutical products. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the power of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology for multiplex gene editing in BY2 cells. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. aguA, the Gene Encoding an Extracellular α-Glucuronidase from Aspergillus tubingensis, Is Specifically Induced on Xylose and Not on Glucuronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Ronald P.; Poulsen, Charlotte H.; Madrid, Susan; Visser, Jaap

    1998-01-01

    An extracellular α-glucuronidase was purified and characterized from a commercial Aspergillus preparation and from culture filtrate of Aspergillus tubingensis. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 107 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 112 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry, has a determined pI just below 5.2, and is stable at pH 6.0 for prolonged times. The pH optimum for the enzyme is between 4.5 and 6.0, and the temperature optimum is 70°C. The α-glucuronidase is active mainly on small substituted xylo-oligomers but is also able to release a small amount of 4-O-methylglucuronic acid from birchwood xylan. The enzyme acts synergistically with endoxylanases and β-xylosidase in the hydrolysis of xylan. The enzyme is N glycosylated and contains 14 putative N-glycosylation sites. The gene encoding this α-glucuronidase (aguA) was cloned from A. tubingensis. It consists of an open reading frame of 2,523 bp and contains no introns. The gene codes for a protein of 841 amino acids, containing a eukaryotic signal sequence of 20 amino acids. The mature protein has a predicted molecular mass of 91,790 Da and a calculated pI of 5.13. Multiple copies of the gene were introduced in A. tubingensis, and expression was studied in a highly overproducing transformant. The aguA gene was expressed on xylose, xylobiose, and xylan, similarly to genes encoding endoxylanases, suggesting a coordinate regulation of expression of xylanases and α-glucuronidase. Glucuronic acid did not induce the expression of aguA and also did not modulate the expression on xylose. Addition of glucose prevented expression of aguA on xylan but only reduced the expression on xylose. PMID:9440512

  7. aguA, the gene encoding an extracellular alpha-glucuronidase from Aspergillus tubingensis, is specifically induced on xylose and not on glucuronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R P; Poulsen, C H; Madrid, S; Visser, J

    1998-01-01

    An extracellular alpha-glucuronidase was purified and characterized from a commercial Aspergillus preparation and from culture filtrate of Aspergillus tubingensis. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 107 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 112 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry, has a determined pI just below 5.2, and is stable at pH 6.0 for prolonged times. The pH optimum for the enzyme is between 4.5 and 6.0, and the temperature optimum is 70 degrees C. The alpha-glucuronidase is active mainly on small substituted xylo-oligomers but is also able to release a small amount of 4-O-methylglucuronic acid from birchwood xylan. The enzyme acts synergistically with endoxylanases and beta-xylosidase in the hydrolysis of xylan. The enzyme is N glycosylated and contains 14 putative N-glycosylation sites. The gene encoding this alpha-glucuronidase (aguA) was cloned from A. tubingensis. It consists of an open reading frame of 2,523 bp and contains no introns. The gene codes for a protein of 841 amino acids, containing a eukaryotic signal sequence of 20 amino acids. The mature protein has a predicted molecular mass of 91,790 Da and a calculated pI of 5.13. Multiple copies of the gene were introduced in A. tubingensis, and expression was studied in a highly overproducing transformant. The aguA gene was expressed on xylose, xylobiose, and xylan, similarly to genes encoding endoxylanases, suggesting a coordinate regulation of expression of xylanases and alpha-glucuronidase. Glucuronic acid did not induce the expression of aguA and also did not modulate the expression on xylose. Addition of glucose prevented expression of aguA on xylan but only reduced the expression on xylose.

  8. High level expression of a novel family 3 neutral β-xylosidase from Humicola insolens Y1 with high tolerance to D-xylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xia

    Full Text Available A novel β-xylosidase gene of glycosyl hydrolase (GH family 3, xyl3A, was identified from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens Y1, which is an innocuous and non-toxic fungus that produces a wide variety of GHs. The cDNA of xyl3A, 2334 bp in length, encodes a 777-residue polypeptide containing a putative signal peptide of 19 residues. The gene fragment without the signal peptide-coding sequence was cloned and overexpressed in Pichia pastoris GS115 at a high level of 100 mg/L in 1-L Erlenmeyer flasks without fermentation optimization. Recombinant Xyl3A showed both β-xylosidase and α-arabinfuranosidase activities, but had no hydrolysis capacity towards polysaccharides. It was optimally active at pH 6.0 and 60°C with a specific activity of 11.6 U/mg. It exhibited good stability over pH 4.0-9.0 (incubated at 37°C for 1 h and at temperatures of 60°C and below, retaining over 80% maximum activity. The enzyme had stronger tolerance to xylose than most fungal GH3 β-xylosidases with a high Ki value of 29 mM, which makes Xyl3A more efficient to produce xylose in fermentation process. Sequential combination of Xyl3A following endoxylanase Xyn11A of the same microbial source showed significant synergistic effects on the degradation of various xylans and deconstructed xylo-oligosaccharides to xylose with high efficiency. Moreover, using pNPX as both the donor and acceptor, Xyl3A exhibited a transxylosylation activity to synthesize pNPX2. All these favorable properties suggest that Xyl3A has good potential applications in the bioconversion of hemicelluloses to biofuels.

  9. Survival and psychomotor development with early betaine treatment in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, E.F.; Koning, T.J. de; Verhoeven-Duif, N.M.; Rovers, M.M.; Hasselt, P.M. van

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  10. The 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase gene from Taxus media: Cloning, characterization and functional identification. Y Sun, M Chen, J Tang, W Liu, C Yang, Y Yang, X Lan, M Hsieh, Z Liao ...

  11. Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase alleles and pyrimethamine use in pregnant Ghanaian women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mockenhaupt, F. P.; Eggelte, T. A.; Böhme, T.; Thompson, W. N.; Bienzle, U.

    2001-01-01

    Drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum affects prevention of malaria in pregnancy. In a cross-sectional study of 530 pregnant Ghanaian women, P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene mutations linked with pyrimethamine resistance were assessed and associations with pyrimethamine intake

  12. Survival and Psychomotor Development With Early Betaine Treatment in Patients With Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, Eugene F.; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; van Hasselt, Peter M.

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  13. Xylitol production from waste xylose mother liquor containing miscellaneous sugars and inhibitors: one-pot biotransformation by Candida tropicalis and recombinant Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hengwei; Li, Lijuan; Zhang, Lebin; An, Jin; Cheng, Hairong; Deng, Zixin

    2016-05-16

    The process of industrial xylitol production is a massive source of organic pollutants, such as waste xylose mother liquor (WXML), a viscous reddish-brown liquid. Currently, WXML is difficult to reuse due to its miscellaneous low-cost sugars, high content of inhibitors and complex composition. WXML, as an organic pollutant of hemicellulosic hydrolysates, accumulates and has become an issue of industrial concern in China. Previous studies have focused only on the catalysis of xylose in the hydrolysates into xylitol using one strain, without considering the removal of other miscellaneous sugars, thus creating an obstacle to subsequent large-scale purification. In the present study, we aimed to develop a simple one-pot biotransformation to produce high-purity xylitol from WXML to improve its economic value. In the present study, we developed a procedure to produce xylitol from WXML, which combines detoxification, biotransformation and removal of by-product sugars (purification) in one bioreactor using two complementary strains, Candida tropicalis X828 and Bacillus subtilis Bs12. At the first stage of micro-aerobic biotransformation, the yeast cells were allowed to grow and metabolized glucose and the inhibitors furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF), and converted xylose into xylitol. At the second stage of aerobic biotransformation, B. subtilis Bs12 was activated and depleted the by-product sugars. The one-pot process was successfully scaled up from shake flasks to 5, 150 L and 30 m(3) bioreactors. Approximately 95 g/L of pure xylitol could be obtained from the medium containing 400 g/L of WXML at a yield of 0.75 g/g xylose consumed, and the by-product sugars glucose, L-arabinose and galactose were depleted simultaneously. Our results demonstrate that the one-pot procedure is a viable option for the industrial application of WXML to produce value-added chemicals. The integration of complementary strains in the biotransformation of hemicellulosic hydrolysates is

  14. Towards a Microbial Production of Fatty Acids as Precursors of Biokerosene from Glucose and Xylose Vers une production microbienne d’acides gras en vue de l’application biokérosène à partir de glucose et xylose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babau M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aviation industry considers the development of sustainable biofuels as one of the biggest challenges of the next ten years. The aim is to lower the environmental impact of the steadily increasing use of fossil fuels on climate change, yielding greater energy independence and fuel security. Thus, the development of a new route for the production of lipids from renewable non-food resources is now being promoted with the recent ASTM certification of hydrotreated oils. Our study focuses on the potential of growth of the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis using glucose and xylose which can come from renewable lignocellulosic substrates and of lipid accumulation using glucose as substrate. Experiments were carried out in fed-batch mode which allowed feed flux management. Carbon fluxes were controlled with modifying xylose/glucose ratios to quantify metabolism in optimal growth condition. Besides, the management of carbon and nitrogen fluxes allowed characterizing lipid accumulation. Thus, it has been shown that the yeast Rhodotorula glutinis can simultaneously consume glucose and xylose. When the ratio xylose/glucose increased, the growth rate and the carbon conversion yield into biomass decreased: it was of 0.36 h-1 and 0.64 Cmol x*.Cmol glu-1 for pure glucose, it was of 0.15 h-1 and 0.56 Cmol.Cmol-1 for 10% xylose and it was of 0.037 h-1 and 0.18 Cmol.Cmol-1 for pure xylose. The necessity to maintain residual growth and to manage carbon fluxes to optimize lipid accumulation performance was revealed. Lipid accumulation on glucose engendered a final biomass concentration of 150 gCDW.L-1, microbial production (72% of lipids and maximal productivity over 1.48 glip.L-1.h-1. The culture temperature is an important parameter to modulate the lipid profile. The results were encouraging. Lipid accumulation using lignocellulosic feedstock was shown to be a highly promising route. Le développement de filières de production de molécules

  15. The Importance of Homozygous Polymorphisms of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Gene in Romanian Patients with Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Hotoleanu, Cristina; Trifa, Adrian; Popp, Radu; Fodor, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Background: Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms have recently raised the interest as a possible thrombophilic factors. Aims: We aimed to assess the frequency of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in a Romanian population and the associated risk of VTE. Study Design: We performed a case-control transversal study including 90 patients diagnosed with VTE and 75 sex- an...

  16. Aldo-keto Reductase Family 1 B10 as a Novel Target for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    aldo-keto reductase family protein AKR1B10 is highly correlated with smokers ’ non -small cell lung carcinomas. Clin Cancer Res 11: 1776-1785. Gallego...reductase family 1 B10 protein detoxifies dietary and lipid -derived alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls at physiological levels . Biochem Biophys Res...AKR1B10 expression in breast cancer, define the role of AKR1B10 in lipid metabolism, proliferation, and tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells using

  17. Tissue thioredoxin reductase-1 expression in astrocytomas of different grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Hasan; Erdi, Fatih; Kaya, Bulent; Feyzioglu, Bahadır; Keskin, Fatih; Demir, Lutfi Saltuk

    2015-02-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a redox active protein that regulates several physiological and biochemical functions, such as growth, apoptosis and cellular defense. The function of Trx itself is regulated by thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Studies performed in a variety of human primary tumors have shown that thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) is overexpressed in tumoral tissues compared with corresponding normal tissues. This study was designed to determine the expression of TrxR1 in astrocytoma tissues of different World Health Organization (WHO) grades (grade I-IV). The proliferative (Ki-67) and apoptotic indices of the specimens were also investigated for correlation analysis. Astrocytoma tissues were extracted from the histopathological specimens of 40 patients. These samples included seven histologically normal brain tissues that served as a control group and ten tumoral samples for each grade of astrocytoma (grade I-IV). The histologically normal brain tissues were obtained from the non-tumoral portions of the pathological specimens of grade I (2 cases), grade II (2 cases), grade III (2 cases) and grade IV (1 case) astrocytomas. TrxR1 expression was evaluated using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunostaining. The proliferative and apoptotic indices of the specimens were investigated by Ki-67 immunostaining and TUNEL assay, respectively. TrxR1 expression, as assessed by qRT-PCR, increased significantly with astrocytoma grade (p = 0.01). The immunostaining intensity of TrxR1 in grade IV astrocytomas was significantly greater than that in the control tissue and all other astrocytoma grades (p grade III astrocytomas was significantly greater than that in the control group and grade I astrocytomas (p grades, but the differences between grade I and the control, grade II and the control, grades II and I, grades III and II were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Ki-67 index values increased significant in accordance with grade

  18. Physiological roles for two periplasmic nitrate reductases in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 (ATCC 17025).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsock, Angela; Shapleigh, James P

    2011-12-01

    The metabolically versatile purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 is a denitrifier whose genome contains two periplasmic nitrate reductase-encoding gene clusters. This work demonstrates nonredundant physiological roles for these two enzymes. One cluster is expressed aerobically and repressed under low oxygen while the second is maximally expressed under low oxygen. Insertional inactivation of the aerobically expressed nitrate reductase eliminated aerobic nitrate reduction, but cells of this strain could still respire nitrate anaerobically. In contrast, when the anaerobic nitrate reductase was absent, aerobic nitrate reduction was detectable, but anaerobic nitrate reduction was impaired. The aerobic nitrate reductase was expressed but not utilized in liquid culture but was utilized during growth on solid medium. Growth on a variety of carbon sources, with the exception of malate, the most oxidized substrate used, resulted in nitrite production on solid medium. This is consistent with a role for the aerobic nitrate reductase in redox homeostasis. These results show that one of the nitrate reductases is specific for respiration and denitrification while the other likely plays a role in redox homeostasis during aerobic growth.

  19. Androgen regulation of 5α-reductase isoenzymes in prostate cancer: implications for prostate cancer prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    Full Text Available The enzyme 5α-reductase, which converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT, performs key functions in the androgen receptor (AR signaling pathway. The three isoenzymes of 5α-reductase identified to date are encoded by different genes: SRD5A1, SRD5A2, and SRD5A3. In this study, we investigated mechanisms underlying androgen regulation of 5α-reductase isoenzyme expression in human prostate cells. We found that androgen regulates the mRNA level of 5α-reductase isoenzymes in a cell type-specific manner, that such regulation occurs at the transcriptional level, and that AR is necessary for this regulation. In addition, our results suggest that AR is recruited to a negative androgen response element (nARE on the promoter of SRD5A3 in vivo and directly binds to the nARE in vitro. The different expression levels of 5α-reductase isoenzymes may confer response or resistance to 5α-reductase inhibitors and thus may have importance in prostate cancer prevention.

  20. Purification and characterization of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase from filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makovec, T; Breskvar, K

    1998-09-15

    We report here the isolation and partial characterization of a flavoprotein, NADPH-cytochrome P450 (cytochrome c) reductase. The enzyme is a part of steroid 11 alpha-hydroxylating system and is associated with the microsomal fraction of the fungus Rhizopus nigricans. Fungal reductase was solubilized from microsomal membranes with Triton X-100 and purified to apparent homogeneity by affinity and high-performance ion-exchange chromatography. A 350-fold purification of the enzyme with specific activity of 37 mumol cytochrome c reduced/min/mg protein was achieved. A single protein band was obtained on SDS-PAGE analysis with an apparent molecular weight of 79 kDa. Purified reductase contained approximately equimolar quantities of flavin adenine dinucleotide and flavin mononucleotide per mole of the enzyme. Upon induction of the steroid hydroxylating system with progesterone the activity of microsomal NADPH-cytochrome c (P450) reductase increased 10-fold. This is in good correlation with the increase in content of fungal cytochrome P450. Purified fungal flavoprotein was active in a reconstituted system with cytochrome P450 C21 from adrenal gland but could not replace adrenodoxin reductase in the mitochondrial steroid 11 beta-hydroxylating system. We were able to confirm the role of the enzyme by reconstituting steroid 11 alpha-hydroxylating activity from the separated components NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome P450, partly purified from fungal microsomes.