WorldWideScience

Sample records for tensor network states

  1. Holographic spin networks from tensor network states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhwinder; McMahon, Nathan A.; Brennen, Gavin K.

    2018-01-01

    In the holographic correspondence of quantum gravity, a global on-site symmetry at the boundary generally translates to a local gauge symmetry in the bulk. We describe one way how the global boundary on-site symmetries can be gauged within the formalism of the multiscale renormalization ansatz (MERA), in light of the ongoing discussion between tensor networks and holography. We describe how to "lift" the MERA representation of the ground state of a generic one dimensional (1D) local Hamiltonian, which has a global on-site symmetry, to a dual quantum state of a 2D "bulk" lattice on which the symmetry appears gauged. The 2D bulk state decomposes in terms of spin network states, which label a basis in the gauge-invariant sector of the bulk lattice. This decomposition is instrumental to obtain expectation values of gauge-invariant observables in the bulk, and also reveals that the bulk state is generally entangled between the gauge and the remaining ("gravitational") bulk degrees of freedom that are not fixed by the symmetry. We present numerical results for ground states of several 1D critical spin chains to illustrate that the bulk entanglement potentially depends on the central charge of the underlying conformal field theory. We also discuss the possibility of emergent topological order in the bulk using a simple example, and also of emergent symmetries in the nongauge (gravitational) sector in the bulk. More broadly, our holographic model translates the MERA, a tensor network state, to a superposition of spin network states, as they appear in lattice gauge theories in one higher dimension.

  2. Tensor network state correspondence and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhwinder

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, tensor network states have emerged as a very useful conceptual and simulation framework to study quantum many-body systems at low energies. In this paper, we describe a particular way in which any given tensor network can be viewed as a representation of two different quantum many-body states. The two quantum many-body states are said to correspond to each other by means of the tensor network. We apply this "tensor network state correspondence"—a correspondence between quantum many-body states mediated by tensor networks as we describe—to the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA) representation of ground states of one dimensional (1D) quantum many-body systems. Since the MERA is a 2D hyperbolic tensor network (the extra dimension is identified as the length scale of the 1D system), the two quantum many-body states obtained from the MERA, via tensor network state correspondence, are seen to live in the bulk and on the boundary of a discrete hyperbolic geometry. The bulk state so obtained from a MERA exhibits interesting features, some of which caricature known features of the holographic correspondence of String theory. We show how (i) the bulk state admits a description in terms of "holographic screens", (ii) the conformal field theory data associated with a critical ground state can be obtained from the corresponding bulk state, in particular, how pointlike boundary operators are identified with extended bulk operators. (iii) We also present numerical results to illustrate that bulk states, dual to ground states of several critical spin chains, have exponentially decaying correlations, and that the bulk correlation length generally decreases with increase in central charge for these spin chains.

  3. Fermionic topological quantum states as tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, C.; Buerschaper, O.; Eisert, J.

    2017-06-01

    Tensor network states, and in particular projected entangled pair states, play an important role in the description of strongly correlated quantum lattice systems. They do not only serve as variational states in numerical simulation methods, but also provide a framework for classifying phases of quantum matter and capture notions of topological order in a stringent and rigorous language. The rapid development in this field for spin models and bosonic systems has not yet been mirrored by an analogous development for fermionic models. In this work, we introduce a tensor network formalism capable of capturing notions of topological order for quantum systems with fermionic components. At the heart of the formalism are axioms of fermionic matrix-product operator injectivity, stable under concatenation. Building upon that, we formulate a Grassmann number tensor network ansatz for the ground state of fermionic twisted quantum double models. A specific focus is put on the paradigmatic example of the fermionic toric code. This work shows that the program of describing topologically ordered systems using tensor networks carries over to fermionic models.

  4. Holographic coherent states from random tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Yang, Zhao; You, Yi-Zhuang

    2017-08-01

    Random tensor networks provide useful models that incorporate various important features of holographic duality. A tensor network is usually defined for a fixed graph geometry specified by the connection of tensors. In this paper, we generalize the random tensor network approach to allow quantum superposition of different spatial geometries. We setup a framework in which all possible bulk spatial geometries, characterized by weighted adjacient matrices of all possible graphs, are mapped to the boundary Hilbert space and form an overcomplete basis of the boundary. We name such an overcomplete basis as holographic coherent states. A generic boundary state can be expanded in this basis, which describes the state as a superposition of different spatial geometries in the bulk. We discuss how to define distinct classical geometries and small fluctuations around them. We show that small fluctuations around classical geometries define "code subspaces" which are mapped to the boundary Hilbert space isometrically with quantum error correction properties. In addition, we also show that the overlap between different geometries is suppressed exponentially as a function of the geometrical difference between the two geometries. The geometrical difference is measured in an area law fashion, which is a manifestation of the holographic nature of the states considered.

  5. Symmetric Topological Phases and Tensor Network States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenghan

    Classification and simulation of quantum phases are one of main themes in condensed matter physics. Quantum phases can be distinguished by their symmetrical and topological properties. The interplay between symmetry and topology in condensed matter physics often leads to exotic quantum phases and rich phase diagrams. Famous examples include quantum Hall phases, spin liquids and topological insulators. In this thesis, I present our works toward a more systematically understanding of symmetric topological quantum phases in bosonic systems. In the absence of global symmetries, gapped quantum phases are characterized by topological orders. Topological orders in 2+1D are well studied, while a systematically understanding of topological orders in 3+1D is still lacking. By studying a family of exact solvable models, we find at least some topological orders in 3+1D can be distinguished by braiding phases of loop excitations. In the presence of both global symmetries and topological orders, the interplay between them leads to new phases termed as symmetry enriched topological (SET) phases. We develop a framework to classify a large class of SET phases using tensor networks. For each tensor class, we can write down generic variational wavefunctions. We apply our method to study gapped spin liquids on the kagome lattice, which can be viewed as SET phases of on-site symmetries as well as lattice symmetries. In the absence of topological order, symmetry could protect different topological phases, which are often referred to as symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases. We present systematic constructions of tensor network wavefunctions for bosonic symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases respecting both onsite and spatial symmetries.

  6. A practical introduction to tensor networks: Matrix product states and projected entangled pair states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orús, Román, E-mail: roman.orus@uni-mainz.de

    2014-10-15

    This is a partly non-technical introduction to selected topics on tensor network methods, based on several lectures and introductory seminars given on the subject. It should be a good place for newcomers to get familiarized with some of the key ideas in the field, specially regarding the numerics. After a very general introduction we motivate the concept of tensor network and provide several examples. We then move on to explain some basics about Matrix Product States (MPS) and Projected Entangled Pair States (PEPS). Selected details on some of the associated numerical methods for 1d and 2d quantum lattice systems are also discussed. - Highlights: • A practical introduction to selected aspects of tensor network methods is presented. • We provide analytical examples of MPS and 2d PEPS. • We provide basic aspects on several numerical methods for MPS and 2d PEPS. • We discuss a number of applications of tensor network methods from a broad perspective.

  7. Equivalence of restricted Boltzmann machines and tensor network states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Cheng, Song; Xie, Haidong; Wang, Lei; Xiang, Tao

    2018-02-01

    The restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM) is one of the fundamental building blocks of deep learning. RBM finds wide applications in dimensional reduction, feature extraction, and recommender systems via modeling the probability distributions of a variety of input data including natural images, speech signals, and customer ratings, etc. We build a bridge between RBM and tensor network states (TNS) widely used in quantum many-body physics research. We devise efficient algorithms to translate an RBM into the commonly used TNS. Conversely, we give sufficient and necessary conditions to determine whether a TNS can be transformed into an RBM of given architectures. Revealing these general and constructive connections can cross fertilize both deep learning and quantum many-body physics. Notably, by exploiting the entanglement entropy bound of TNS, we can rigorously quantify the expressive power of RBM on complex data sets. Insights into TNS and its entanglement capacity can guide the design of more powerful deep learning architectures. On the other hand, RBM can represent quantum many-body states with fewer parameters compared to TNS, which may allow more efficient classical simulations.

  8. Tensor deep stacking networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Brian; Deng, Li; Yu, Dong

    2013-08-01

    A novel deep architecture, the tensor deep stacking network (T-DSN), is presented. The T-DSN consists of multiple, stacked blocks, where each block contains a bilinear mapping from two hidden layers to the output layer, using a weight tensor to incorporate higher order statistics of the hidden binary (½0; 1) features. A learning algorithm for the T-DSN’s weight matrices and tensors is developed and described in which the main parameter estimation burden is shifted to a convex subproblem with a closed-form solution. Using an efficient and scalable parallel implementation for CPU clusters, we train sets of T-DSNs in three popular tasks in increasing order of the data size: handwritten digit recognition using MNIST (60k), isolated state/phone classification and continuous phone recognition using TIMIT (1.1 m), and isolated phone classification using WSJ0 (5.2 m). Experimental results in all three tasks demonstrate the effectiveness of the T-DSN and the associated learning methods in a consistent manner. In particular, a sufficient depth of the T-DSN, a symmetry in the two hidden layers structure in each T-DSN block, our model parameter learning algorithm, and a softmax layer on top of T-DSN are shown to have all contributed to the low error rates observed in the experiments for all three tasks.

  9. Hyperinvariant Tensor Networks and Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenbly, Glen

    2017-10-01

    We propose a new class of tensor network state as a model for the AdS /CFT correspondence and holography. This class is demonstrated to retain key features of the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA), in that they describe quantum states with algebraic correlation functions, have free variational parameters, and are efficiently contractible. Yet, unlike the MERA, they are built according to a uniform tiling of hyperbolic space, without inherent directionality or preferred locations in the holographic bulk, and thus circumvent key arguments made against the MERA as a model for AdS /CFT . Novel holographic features of this tensor network class are examined, such as an equivalence between the causal cones C (R ) and the entanglement wedges E (R ) of connected boundary regions R .

  10. The tensor network theory library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Assam, S.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.

    2017-09-01

    In this technical paper we introduce the tensor network theory (TNT) library—an open-source software project aimed at providing a platform for rapidly developing robust, easy to use and highly optimised code for TNT calculations. The objectives of this paper are (i) to give an overview of the structure of TNT library, and (ii) to help scientists decide whether to use the TNT library in their research. We show how to employ the TNT routines by giving examples of ground-state and dynamical calculations of one-dimensional bosonic lattice system. We also discuss different options for gaining access to the software available at www.tensornetworktheory.org.

  11. Tensor network models of multiboundary wormholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Alex; Ross, Simon F.

    2017-05-01

    We study the entanglement structure of states dual to multiboundary wormhole geometries using tensor network models. Perfect and random tensor networks tiling the hyperbolic plane have been shown to provide good models of the entanglement structure in holography. We extend this by quotienting the plane by discrete isometries to obtain models of the multiboundary states. We show that there are networks where the entanglement structure is purely bipartite, extending results obtained in the large temperature limit. We analyse the entanglement structure in a range of examples.

  12. Tensor Network Contractions for #SAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biamonte, Jacob D.; Morton, Jason; Turner, Jacob

    2015-09-01

    The computational cost of counting the number of solutions satisfying a Boolean formula, which is a problem instance of #SAT, has proven subtle to quantify. Even when finding individual satisfying solutions is computationally easy (e.g. 2-SAT, which is in ), determining the number of solutions can be #-hard. Recently, computational methods simulating quantum systems experienced advancements due to the development of tensor network algorithms and associated quantum physics-inspired techniques. By these methods, we give an algorithm using an axiomatic tensor contraction language for n-variable #SAT instances with complexity where c is the number of COPY-tensors, g is the number of gates, and d is the maximal degree of any COPY-tensor. Thus, n-variable counting problems can be solved efficiently when their tensor network expression has at most COPY-tensors and polynomial fan-out. This framework also admits an intuitive proof of a variant of the Tovey conjecture (the r,1-SAT instance of the Dubois-Tovey theorem). This study increases the theory, expressiveness and application of tensor based algorithmic tools and provides an alternative insight on these problems which have a long history in statistical physics and computer science.

  13. Probabilistic low-rank factorization accelerates tensor network simulations of critical quantum many-body ground states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Lucas; Tschirsich, Ferdinand; Keck, Maximilian; Plenio, Martin B.; Tamascelli, Dario; Montangero, Simone

    2018-01-01

    We provide evidence that randomized low-rank factorization is a powerful tool for the determination of the ground-state properties of low-dimensional lattice Hamiltonians through tensor network techniques. In particular, we show that randomized matrix factorization outperforms truncated singular value decomposition based on state-of-the-art deterministic routines in time-evolving block decimation (TEBD)- and density matrix renormalization group (DMRG)-style simulations, even when the system under study gets close to a phase transition: We report linear speedups in the bond or local dimension of up to 24 times in quasi-two-dimensional cylindrical systems.

  14. Exact tensor network ansatz for strongly interacting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaletel, Michael P.

    It appears that the tensor network ansatz, while not quite complete, is an efficient coordinate system for the tiny subset of a many-body Hilbert space which can be realized as a low energy state of a local Hamiltonian. However, we don't fully understand precisely which phases are captured by the tensor network ansatz, how to compute their physical observables (even numerically), or how to compute a tensor network representation for a ground state given a microscopic Hamiltonian. These questions are algorithmic in nature, but their resolution is intimately related to understanding the nature of quantum entanglement in many-body systems. For this reason it is useful to compute the tensor network representation of various `model' wavefunctions representative of different phases of matter; this allows us to understand how the entanglement properties of each phase are expressed in the tensor network ansatz, and can serve as test cases for algorithm development. Condensed matter physics has many illuminating model wavefunctions, such as Laughlin's celebrated wave function for the fractional quantum Hall effect, the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer wave function for superconductivity, and Anderson's resonating valence bond ansatz for spin liquids. This thesis presents some results on exact tensor network representations of these model wavefunctions. In addition, a tensor network representation is given for the time evolution operator of a long-range one-dimensional Hamiltonian, which allows one to numerically simulate the time evolution of power-law interacting spin chains as well as two-dimensional strips and cylinders.

  15. Tensor Fusion Network for Multimodal Sentiment Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zadeh, Amir; Chen, Minghai; Poria, Soujanya; Cambria, Erik; Morency, Louis-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Multimodal sentiment analysis is an increasingly popular research area, which extends the conventional language-based definition of sentiment analysis to a multimodal setup where other relevant modalities accompany language. In this paper, we pose the problem of multimodal sentiment analysis as modeling intra-modality and inter-modality dynamics. We introduce a novel model, termed Tensor Fusion Network, which learns both such dynamics end-to-end. The proposed approach is tailored for the vola...

  16. Holographic duality from random tensor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Patrick; Nezami, Sepehr; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Thomas, Nathaniel; Walter, Michael; Yang, Zhao [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,382 Via Pueblo, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-11-02

    Tensor networks provide a natural framework for exploring holographic duality because they obey entanglement area laws. They have been used to construct explicit toy models realizing many of the interesting structural features of the AdS/CFT correspondence, including the non-uniqueness of bulk operator reconstruction in the boundary theory. In this article, we explore the holographic properties of networks of random tensors. We find that our models naturally incorporate many features that are analogous to those of the AdS/CFT correspondence. When the bond dimension of the tensors is large, we show that the entanglement entropy of all boundary regions, whether connected or not, obey the Ryu-Takayanagi entropy formula, a fact closely related to known properties of the multipartite entanglement of assistance. We also discuss the behavior of Rényi entropies in our models and contrast it with AdS/CFT. Moreover, we find that each boundary region faithfully encodes the physics of the entire bulk entanglement wedge, i.e., the bulk region enclosed by the boundary region and the minimal surface. Our method is to interpret the average over random tensors as the partition function of a classical ferromagnetic Ising model, so that the minimal surfaces of Ryu-Takayanagi appear as domain walls. Upon including the analog of a bulk field, we find that our model reproduces the expected corrections to the Ryu-Takayanagi formula: the bulk minimal surface is displaced and the entropy is augmented by the entanglement of the bulk field. Increasing the entanglement of the bulk field ultimately changes the minimal surface behavior topologically, in a way similar to the effect of creating a black hole. Extrapolating bulk correlation functions to the boundary permits the calculation of the scaling dimensions of boundary operators, which exhibit a large gap between a small number of low-dimension operators and the rest. While we are primarily motivated by the AdS/CFT duality, the main

  17. Hand-waving and interpretive dance: an introductory course on tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Jacob C.; Chubb, Christopher T.

    2017-06-01

    The curse of dimensionality associated with the Hilbert space of spin systems provides a significant obstruction to the study of condensed matter systems. Tensor networks have proven an important tool in attempting to overcome this difficulty in both the numerical and analytic regimes. These notes form the basis for a seven lecture course, introducing the basics of a range of common tensor networks and algorithms. In particular, we cover: introductory tensor network notation, applications to quantum information, basic properties of matrix product states, a classification of quantum phases using tensor networks, algorithms for finding matrix product states, basic properties of projected entangled pair states, and multiscale entanglement renormalisation ansatz states. The lectures are intended to be generally accessible, although the relevance of many of the examples may be lost on students without a background in many-body physics/quantum information. For each lecture, several problems are given, with worked solutions in an ancillary file.

  18. Exploring the tensor networks/AdS correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Arpan [Department of Physics and Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China); Centre For High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,560012 Bangalore (India); Gao, Zhe-Shen [Department of Physics and Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China); Hung, Ling-Yan [Department of Physics and Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University,Nanjing, 210093 (China); Liu, Si-Nong [Department of Physics and Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China)

    2016-08-11

    In this paper we study the recently proposed tensor networks/AdS correspondence. We found that the Coxeter group is a useful tool to describe tensor networks in a negatively curved space. Studying generic tensor network populated by perfect tensors, we find that the physical wave function generically do not admit any connected correlation functions of local operators. To remedy the problem, we assume that wavefunctions admitting such semi-classical gravitational interpretation are composed of tensors close to, but not exactly perfect tensors. Computing corrections to the connected two point correlation functions, we find that the leading contribution is given by structures related to geodesics connecting the operators inserted at the boundary physical dofs. Such considerations admit generalizations at least to three point functions. This is highly suggestive of the emergence of the analogues of Witten diagrams in the tensor network. The perturbations alone however do not give the right entanglement spectrum. Using the Coxeter construction, we also constructed the tensor network counterpart of the BTZ black hole, by orbifolding the discrete lattice on which the network resides. We found that the construction naturally reproduces some of the salient features of the BTZ black hole, such as the appearance of RT surfaces that could wrap the horizon, depending on the size of the entanglement region A.

  19. Detecting brain dynamics during resting state: a tensor based evolutionary clustering approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-sharoa, Esraa; Al-khassaweneh, Mahmood; Aviyente, Selin

    2017-08-01

    Human brain is a complex network with connections across different regions. Understanding the functional connectivity (FC) of the brain is important both during resting state and task; as disruptions in connectivity patterns are indicators of different psychopathological and neurological diseases. In this work, we study the resting state functional connectivity networks (FCNs) of the brain from fMRI BOLD signals. Recent studies have shown that FCNs are dynamic even during resting state and understanding the temporal dynamics of FCNs is important for differentiating between different conditions. Therefore, it is important to develop algorithms to track the dynamic formation and dissociation of FCNs of the brain during resting state. In this paper, we propose a two step tensor based community detection algorithm to identify and track the brain network community structure across time. First, we introduce an information-theoretic function to reduce the dynamic FCN and identify the time points that are similar topologically to combine them into a tensor. These time points will be used to identify the different FC states. Second, a tensor based spectral clustering approach is developed to identify the community structure of the constructed tensors. The proposed algorithm applies Tucker decomposition to the constructed tensors and extract the orthogonal factor matrices along the connectivity mode to determine the common subspace within each FC state. The detected community structure is summarized and described as FC states. The results illustrate the dynamic structure of resting state networks (RSNs), including the default mode network, somatomotor network, subcortical network and visual network.

  20. Tensor Networks for Lattice Gauge Theories with Continuous Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tagliacozzo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how to formulate lattice gauge theories in the tensor-network language. In this way, we obtain both a consistent-truncation scheme of the Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theories and a tensor-network variational ansatz for gauge-invariant states that can be used in actual numerical computations. Our construction is also applied to the simplest realization of the quantum link models or gauge magnets and provides a clear way to understand their microscopic relation with the Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theories. We also introduce a new set of gauge-invariant operators that modify continuously Rokhsar-Kivelson wave functions and can be used to extend the phase diagrams of known models. As an example, we characterize the transition between the deconfined phase of the Z_{2} lattice gauge theory and the Rokhsar-Kivelson point of the U(1 gauge magnet in 2D in terms of entanglement entropy. The topological entropy serves as an order parameter for the transition but not the Schmidt gap.

  1. Towards overcoming the Monte Carlo sign problem with tensor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuls, Mari Carmen; Cirac, J. Ignacio; Kuehn, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (MPQ), Garching (Germany); Cichy, Krzysztof [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Adam Mickiewicz Univ., Poznan (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Saito, Hana [AISIN AW Co., Ltd., Aichi (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    The study of lattice gauge theories with Monte Carlo simulations is hindered by the infamous sign problem that appears under certain circumstances, in particular at non-zero chemical potential. So far, there is no universal method to overcome this problem. However, recent years brought a new class of non-perturbative Hamiltonian techniques named tensor networks, where the sign problem is absent. In previous work, we have demonstrated that this approach, in particular matrix product states in 1+1 dimensions, can be used to perform precise calculations in a lattice gauge theory, the massless and massive Schwinger model. We have computed the mass spectrum of this theory, its thermal properties and real-time dynamics. In this work, we review these results and we extend our calculations to the case of two flavours and non-zero chemical potential. We are able to reliably reproduce known analytical results for this model, thus demonstrating that tensor networks can tackle the sign problem of a lattice gauge theory at finite density.

  2. TensorLy: Tensor Learning in Python

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kossaifi, Jean; Panagakis, Yannis; Pantic, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Tensor methods are gaining increasing traction in machine learning. However, there are scant to no resources available to perform tensor learning and decomposition in Python. To answer this need we developed TensorLy. TensorLy is a state of the art general purpose library for tensor learning.

  3. Tensor Spectral Clustering for Partitioning Higher-order Network Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Austin R; Gleich, David F; Leskovec, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Spectral graph theory-based methods represent an important class of tools for studying the structure of networks. Spectral methods are based on a first-order Markov chain derived from a random walk on the graph and thus they cannot take advantage of important higher-order network substructures such as triangles, cycles, and feed-forward loops. Here we propose a Tensor Spectral Clustering (TSC) algorithm that allows for modeling higher-order network structures in a graph partitioning framework. Our TSC algorithm allows the user to specify which higher-order network structures (cycles, feed-forward loops, etc.) should be preserved by the network clustering. Higher-order network structures of interest are represented using a tensor, which we then partition by developing a multilinear spectral method. Our framework can be applied to discovering layered flows in networks as well as graph anomaly detection, which we illustrate on synthetic networks. In directed networks, a higher-order structure of particular interest is the directed 3-cycle, which captures feedback loops in networks. We demonstrate that our TSC algorithm produces large partitions that cut fewer directed 3-cycles than standard spectral clustering algorithms.

  4. Identifying key nodes in multilayer networks based on tensor decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingjie; Wang, Haitao; Zou, Xiufen

    2017-06-01

    The identification of essential agents in multilayer networks characterized by different types of interactions is a crucial and challenging topic, one that is essential for understanding the topological structure and dynamic processes of multilayer networks. In this paper, we use the fourth-order tensor to represent multilayer networks and propose a novel method to identify essential nodes based on CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP) tensor decomposition, referred to as the EDCPTD centrality. This method is based on the perspective of multilayer networked structures, which integrate the information of edges among nodes and links between different layers to quantify the importance of nodes in multilayer networks. Three real-world multilayer biological networks are used to evaluate the performance of the EDCPTD centrality. The bar chart and ROC curves of these multilayer networks indicate that the proposed approach is a good alternative index to identify real important nodes. Meanwhile, by comparing the behavior of both the proposed method and the aggregated single-layer methods, we demonstrate that neglecting the multiple relationships between nodes may lead to incorrect identification of the most versatile nodes. Furthermore, the Gene Ontology functional annotation demonstrates that the identified top nodes based on the proposed approach play a significant role in many vital biological processes. Finally, we have implemented many centrality methods of multilayer networks (including our method and the published methods) and created a visual software based on the MATLAB GUI, called ENMNFinder, which can be used by other researchers.

  5. Kitaev honeycomb tensor networks: Exact unitary circuits and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoll, Philipp; Orús, Román

    2017-01-01

    The Kitaev honeycomb model is a paradigm of exactly solvable models, showing nontrivial physical properties such as topological quantum order, Abelian and non-Abelian anyons, and chirality. Its solution is one of the most beautiful examples of the interplay of different mathematical techniques in condensed matter physics. In this paper, we show how to derive a tensor network (TN) description of the eigenstates of this spin-1/2 model in the thermodynamic limit, and in particular for its ground state. In our setting, eigenstates are naturally encoded by an exact 3d TN structure made of fermionic unitary operators, corresponding to the unitary quantum circuit building up the many-body quantum state. In our derivation we review how the different "solution ingredients" of the Kitaev honeycomb model can be accounted for in the TN language, namely, Jordan-Wigner transformation, braidings of Majorana modes, fermionic Fourier transformation, and Bogoliubov transformation. The TN built in this way allows for a clear understanding of several properties of the model. In particular, we show how the fidelity diagram is straightforward both at zero temperature and at finite temperature in the vortex-free sector. We also show how the properties of two-point correlation functions follow easily. Finally, we also discuss the pros and cons of contracting of our 3d TN down to a 2d projected entangled pair state (PEPS) with finite bond dimension. The results in this paper can be extended to generalizations of the Kitaev model, e.g., to other lattices, spins, and dimensions.

  6. Tensor fields on orbits of quantum states and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkert, Georg Friedrich

    2010-07-19

    On classical Lie groups, which act by means of a unitary representation on finite dimensional Hilbert spaces H, we identify two classes of tensor field constructions. First, as pull-back tensor fields of order two from modified Hermitian tensor fields, constructed on Hilbert spaces by means of the property of having the vertical distributions of the C{sub 0}-principal bundle H{sub 0} {yields} P(H) over the projective Hilbert space P(H) in the kernel. And second, directly constructed on the Lie group, as left-invariant representation-dependent operator-valued tensor fields (LIROVTs) of arbitrary order being evaluated on a quantum state. Within the NP-hard problem of deciding whether a given state in a n-level bi-partite quantum system is entangled or separable (Gurvits, 2003), we show that both tensor field constructions admit a geometric approach to this problem, which evades the traditional ambiguity on defining metrical structures on the convex set of mixed states. In particular by considering manifolds associated to orbits passing through a selected state when acted upon by the local unitary group U(n) x U(n) of Schmidt coefficient decomposition inducing transformations, we find the following results: In the case of pure states we show that Schmidt-equivalence classes which are Lagrangian submanifolds define maximal entangled states. This implies a stronger statement as the one proposed by Bengtsson (2007). Moreover, Riemannian pull-back tensor fields split on orbits of separable states and provide a quantitative characterization of entanglement which recover the entanglement measure proposed by Schlienz and Mahler (1995). In the case of mixed states we highlight a relation between LIROVTs of order two and a class of computable separability criteria based on the Bloch-representation (de Vicente, 2007). (orig.)

  7. Automated Moment Tensor Solution for the Southern California Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, J. F.; Hauksson, E.; Solanki, K.

    2004-12-01

    Automatically generated moment tensor solutions have recently been added to the suite of real-time products produced by the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN/CISN). The moment magnitude, Mw, and the moment tensor are available within minutes for all regional earthquakes that trigger the network with Ml>4.0, and in special cases for events between Ml 3.5-4.0. The method uses the 1-D Time-Domain INVerse Code (TDMT_INVC) software package developed by Doug Dreger, which is routinely used in real-time by the UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory. Green's Functions are determined for various velocity profiles in Southern California, which are used in the inversion of observed three component broadband waveforms (10s-100s) for a number of stations. The duty seismologists will review the automatically generated solution before distribution. A web-interface has been developed to evaluate the quality of the automatic solution, and determine whether it meets the minimum requirements for an immediate distribution. Simple modifications to the stations selected for the inversion are possible, and the inversion can be re-run to optimise the solution. The Mw determined with this method will be the official SCSN/CISN Mw solution for the event. Comparisons of the moment tensors determined using this 1-D model are made with 3-D models generated for larger earthquakes in the Southern California to facilitate calibration of the automated algorithm.

  8. Finite-Size Geometric Entanglement from Tensor Network Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Qian-Qian; Orus, Roman; Fjaerestad, John Ove; Zhou, Huan-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    The global geometric entanglement is studied in the context of newly-developed tensor network algorithms for finite systems. For one-dimensional quantum spin systems it is found that, at criticality, the leading finite-size correction to the global geometric entanglement per site behaves as $b/n$, where $n$ is the size of the system and $b$ a given coefficient. Our conclusion is based on the computation of the geometric entanglement per spin for the quantum Ising model in a transverse magneti...

  9. Tensor Renormalization of Quantum Many-Body Systems Using Projected Entangled Simplex States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Y. Xie

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new class of tensor-network states, which we name projected entangled simplex states (PESS, for studying the ground-state properties of quantum lattice models. These states extend the pair-correlation basis of projected entangled pair states to a simplex. PESS are exact representations of the simplex solid states, and they provide an efficient trial wave function that satisfies the area law of entanglement entropy. We introduce a simple update method for evaluating the PESS wave function based on imaginary-time evolution and the higher-order singular-value decomposition of tensors. By applying this method to the spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the kagome lattice, we obtain accurate and systematic results for the ground-state energy, which approach the lowest upper bounds yet estimated for this quantity.

  10. Quantum-chemical insights from deep tensor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Kristof T.; Arbabzadah, Farhad; Chmiela, Stefan; Müller, Klaus R.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Learning from data has led to paradigm shifts in a multitude of disciplines, including web, text and image search, speech recognition, as well as bioinformatics. Can machine learning enable similar breakthroughs in understanding quantum many-body systems? Here we develop an efficient deep learning approach that enables spatially and chemically resolved insights into quantum-mechanical observables of molecular systems. We unify concepts from many-body Hamiltonians with purpose-designed deep tensor neural networks, which leads to size-extensive and uniformly accurate (1 kcal mol-1) predictions in compositional and configurational chemical space for molecules of intermediate size. As an example of chemical relevance, the model reveals a classification of aromatic rings with respect to their stability. Further applications of our model for predicting atomic energies and local chemical potentials in molecules, reliable isomer energies, and molecules with peculiar electronic structure demonstrate the potential of machine learning for revealing insights into complex quantum-chemical systems.

  11. Quantum-Chemical Insights from Deep Tensor Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Schütt, Kristof T; Chmiela, Stefan; Müller, Klaus R; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Learning from data has led to paradigm shifts in a multitude of disciplines, including web, text, and image search, speech recognition, as well as bioinformatics. Can machine learning enable similar breakthroughs in understanding quantum many-body systems? Here we develop an efficient deep learning approach that enables spatially and chemically resolved insights into quantum-mechanical observables of molecular systems. We unify concepts from many-body Hamiltonians with purpose-designed deep tensor neural networks (DTNN), which leads to size-extensive and uniformly accurate (1 kcal/mol) predictions in compositional and configurational chemical space for molecules of intermediate size. As an example of chemical relevance, the DTNN model reveals a classification of aromatic rings with respect to their stability -- a useful property that is not contained as such in the training dataset. Further applications of DTNN for predicting atomic energies and local chemical potentials in molecules, reliable isomer energies...

  12. de Sitter space as a tensor network: Cosmic no-hair, complementarity, and complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ning; Cao, ChunJun; Carroll, Sean M.; Chatwin-Davies, Aidan

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the proposed connection between de Sitter spacetime and the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA) tensor network, and ask what can be learned via such a construction. We show that the quantum state obeys a cosmic no-hair theorem: the reduced density operator describing a causal patch of the MERA asymptotes to a fixed point of a quantum channel, just as spacetimes with a positive cosmological constant asymptote to de Sitter space. The MERA is potentially compatible with a weak form of complementarity (local physics only describes single patches at a time, but the overall Hilbert space is infinite dimensional) or, with certain specific modifications to the tensor structure, a strong form (the entire theory describes only a single patch plus its horizon, in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space). We also suggest that de Sitter evolution has an interpretation in terms of circuit complexity, as has been conjectured for anti-de Sitter space.

  13. Liouville action as path-integral complexity: from continuous tensor networks to AdS/CFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputa, Pawel; Kundu, Nilay; Miyaji, Masamichi; Takayanagi, Tadashi; Watanabe, Kento

    2017-11-01

    We propose an optimization procedure for Euclidean path-integrals that evaluate CFT wave functionals in arbitrary dimensions. The optimization is performed by minimizing certain functional, which can be interpreted as a measure of computational complexity, with respect to background metrics for the path-integrals. In two dimensional CFTs, this functional is given by the Liouville action. We also formulate the optimization for higher dimensional CFTs and, in various examples, find that the optimized hyperbolic metrics coincide with the time slices of expected gravity duals. Moreover, if we optimize a reduced density matrix, the geometry becomes two copies of the entanglement wedge and reproduces the holographic entanglement entropy. Our approach resembles a continuous tensor network renormalization and provides a concrete realization of the proposed interpretation of AdS/CFT as tensor networks. The present paper is an extended version of our earlier report arXiv:1703.00456 and includes many new results such as evaluations of complexity functionals, energy stress tensor, higher dimensional extensions and time evolutions of thermofield double states.

  14. Implementing the sine transform of fermionic modes as a tensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epple, Hannes; Fries, Pascal; Hinrichsen, Haye

    2017-09-01

    Based on the algebraic theory of signal processing, we recursively decompose the discrete sine transform of the first kind (DST-I) into small orthogonal block operations. Using a diagrammatic language, we then second-quantize this decomposition to construct a tensor network implementing the DST-I for fermionic modes on a lattice. The complexity of the resulting network is shown to scale as 5/4 n logn (not considering swap gates), where n is the number of lattice sites. Our method provides a systematic approach of generalizing Ferris' spectral tensor network for nontrivial boundary conditions.

  15. Triangular Alignment (TAME). A Tensor-based Approach for Higher-order Network Alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Shahin [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Gleich, David F. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kolda, Tamara G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Grama, Ananth [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Network alignment is an important tool with extensive applications in comparative interactomics. Traditional approaches aim to simultaneously maximize the number of conserved edges and the underlying similarity of aligned entities. We propose a novel formulation of the network alignment problem that extends topological similarity to higher-order structures and provide a new objective function that maximizes the number of aligned substructures. This objective function corresponds to an integer programming problem, which is NP-hard. Consequently, we approximate this objective function as a surrogate function whose maximization results in a tensor eigenvalue problem. Based on this formulation, we present an algorithm called Triangular AlignMEnt (TAME), which attempts to maximize the number of aligned triangles across networks. We focus on alignment of triangles because of their enrichment in complex networks; however, our formulation and resulting algorithms can be applied to general motifs. Using a case study on the NAPABench dataset, we show that TAME is capable of producing alignments with up to 99% accuracy in terms of aligned nodes. We further evaluate our method by aligning yeast and human interactomes. Our results indicate that TAME outperforms the state-of-art alignment methods both in terms of biological and topological quality of the alignments.

  16. Flavour fields in steady state: stress tensor and free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Avik; Kundu, Arnab [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics,1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata- 700064 (India); Kundu, Sandipan [Department of Physics, Cornell University,Ithaca, New York, 14853 (United States)

    2016-02-16

    The dynamics of a probe brane in a given gravitational background is governed by the Dirac-Born-Infeld action. The corresponding open string metric arises naturally in studying the fluctuations on the probe. In Gauge-String duality, it is known that in the presence of a constant electric field on the worldvolume of the probe, the open string metric acquires an event horizon and therefore the fluctuation modes on the probe experience an effective temperature. In this article, we bring together various properties of such a system to a formal definition and a subsequent narration of the effective thermodynamics and the stress tensor of the corresponding flavour fields, also including a non-vanishing chemical potential. In doing so, we point out a potentially infinitely-degenerate scheme-dependence of regularizing the free energy, which nevertheless yields a universal contribution in certain cases. This universal piece appears as the coefficient of a log-divergence in free energy when a space-filling probe brane is embedded in AdS{sub d+1}-background, for d=2,4, and is related to conformal anomaly. For the special case of d=2, the universal factor has a striking resemblance to the well-known heat current formula in (1+1)-dimensional conformal field theory in steady-state, which endows a plausible physical interpretation to it. Interestingly, we observe a vanishing conformal anomaly in d=6.

  17. Variational Monte Carlo method for fermionic models combined with tensor networks and applications to the hole-doped two-dimensional Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui-Hai; Ido, Kota; Morita, Satoshi; Imada, Masatoshi

    2017-08-01

    The conventional tensor-network states employ real-space product states as reference wave functions. Here, we propose a many-variable variational Monte Carlo (mVMC) method combined with tensor networks by taking advantages of both to study fermionic models. The variational wave function is composed of a pair product wave function operated by real-space correlation factors and tensor networks. Moreover, we can apply quantum number projections, such as spin, momentum, and lattice symmetry projections, to recover the symmetry of the wave function to further improve the accuracy. We benchmark our method for one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models, which show significant improvement over the results obtained individually either by mVMC or by tensor network. We have applied the present method to a hole-doped Hubbard model on the square lattice, which indicates the stripe charge/spin order coexisting with a weak d -wave superconducting order in the ground state for the doping concentration of less than 0.3, where the stripe oscillation period gets longer with increasing hole concentration. The charge homogeneous and highly superconducting state also exists as a metastable excited state for the doping concentration less than 0.25.

  18. Analysis and control of Boolean networks a semi-tensor product approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Daizhan; Li, Zhiqiang

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a new approach to the investigation of Boolean control networks, using the semi-tensor product (STP), which can express a logical function as a conventional discrete-time linear system. This makes it possible to analyze basic control problems.

  19. Fractional quantum Hall effect in the interacting Hofstadter model via tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerster, M.; Rizzi, M.; Silvi, P.; Dalmonte, M.; Montangero, S.

    2017-11-01

    We show via tensor network methods that the Harper-Hofstadter Hamiltonian for hard-core bosons on a square geometry supports a topological phase realizing the ν =1/2 fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect on the lattice. We address the robustness of the ground-state degeneracy and of the energy gap, measure the many-body Chern number, and characterize the system using Green functions, showing that they decay algebraically at the edges of open geometries, indicating the presence of gapless edge modes. Moreover, we estimate the topological entanglement entropy by taking a combination of lattice bipartitions that reproduces the topological structure of the original proposals by Kitaev and Preskill [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 110404 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.110404] and Levin and Wen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 110405 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.110405]. The numerical results show that the topological contribution is compatible with the expected value γ =1/2 . Our results provide extensive evidence that FQH states are within reach of state-of-the-art cold-atom experiments.

  20. Neural-Network Quantum States, String-Bond States, and Chiral Topological States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Ivan; Pancotti, Nicola; August, Moritz; Rodriguez, Ivan D.; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2018-01-01

    Neural-network quantum states have recently been introduced as an Ansatz for describing the wave function of quantum many-body systems. We show that there are strong connections between neural-network quantum states in the form of restricted Boltzmann machines and some classes of tensor-network states in arbitrary dimensions. In particular, we demonstrate that short-range restricted Boltzmann machines are entangled plaquette states, while fully connected restricted Boltzmann machines are string-bond states with a nonlocal geometry and low bond dimension. These results shed light on the underlying architecture of restricted Boltzmann machines and their efficiency at representing many-body quantum states. String-bond states also provide a generic way of enhancing the power of neural-network quantum states and a natural generalization to systems with larger local Hilbert space. We compare the advantages and drawbacks of these different classes of states and present a method to combine them together. This allows us to benefit from both the entanglement structure of tensor networks and the efficiency of neural-network quantum states into a single Ansatz capable of targeting the wave function of strongly correlated systems. While it remains a challenge to describe states with chiral topological order using traditional tensor networks, we show that, because of their nonlocal geometry, neural-network quantum states and their string-bond-state extension can describe a lattice fractional quantum Hall state exactly. In addition, we provide numerical evidence that neural-network quantum states can approximate a chiral spin liquid with better accuracy than entangled plaquette states and local string-bond states. Our results demonstrate the efficiency of neural networks to describe complex quantum wave functions and pave the way towards the use of string-bond states as a tool in more traditional machine-learning applications.

  1. Neural-Network Quantum States, String-Bond States, and Chiral Topological States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Glasser

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural-network quantum states have recently been introduced as an Ansatz for describing the wave function of quantum many-body systems. We show that there are strong connections between neural-network quantum states in the form of restricted Boltzmann machines and some classes of tensor-network states in arbitrary dimensions. In particular, we demonstrate that short-range restricted Boltzmann machines are entangled plaquette states, while fully connected restricted Boltzmann machines are string-bond states with a nonlocal geometry and low bond dimension. These results shed light on the underlying architecture of restricted Boltzmann machines and their efficiency at representing many-body quantum states. String-bond states also provide a generic way of enhancing the power of neural-network quantum states and a natural generalization to systems with larger local Hilbert space. We compare the advantages and drawbacks of these different classes of states and present a method to combine them together. This allows us to benefit from both the entanglement structure of tensor networks and the efficiency of neural-network quantum states into a single Ansatz capable of targeting the wave function of strongly correlated systems. While it remains a challenge to describe states with chiral topological order using traditional tensor networks, we show that, because of their nonlocal geometry, neural-network quantum states and their string-bond-state extension can describe a lattice fractional quantum Hall state exactly. In addition, we provide numerical evidence that neural-network quantum states can approximate a chiral spin liquid with better accuracy than entangled plaquette states and local string-bond states. Our results demonstrate the efficiency of neural networks to describe complex quantum wave functions and pave the way towards the use of string-bond states as a tool in more traditional machine-learning applications.

  2. Few-body systems capture many-body physics: Tensor network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Shi-Ju; Piga, Angelo; Peng, Cheng; Su, Gang; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2017-10-01

    Due to the presence of strong correlations, theoretical or experimental investigations of quantum many-body systems belong to the most challenging tasks in modern physics. Stimulated by tensor networks, we propose a scheme of constructing the few-body models that can be easily accessed by theoretical or experimental means, to accurately capture the ground-state properties of infinite many-body systems in higher dimensions. The general idea is to embed a small bulk of the infinite model in an "entanglement bath" so that the many-body effects can be faithfully mimicked. The approach we propose is efficient, simple, flexible, sign-problem free, and it directly accesses the thermodynamic limit. The numerical results of the spin models on honeycomb and simple cubic lattices show that the ground-state properties including quantum phase transitions and the critical behaviors are accurately captured by only O (10 ) physical and bath sites. Moreover, since the few-body Hamiltonian only contains local interactions among a handful of sites, our work provides different ways of studying the many-body phenomena in the infinite strongly correlated systems by mimicking them in the few-body experiments using cold atoms/ions, or developing quantum devices by utilizing the many-body features.

  3. Real-Time Dynamics in U(1 Lattice Gauge Theories with Tensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pichler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tensor network algorithms provide a suitable route for tackling real-time-dependent problems in lattice gauge theories, enabling the investigation of out-of-equilibrium dynamics. We analyze a U(1 lattice gauge theory in (1+1 dimensions in the presence of dynamical matter for different mass and electric-field couplings, a theory akin to quantum electrodynamics in one dimension, which displays string breaking: The confining string between charges can spontaneously break during quench experiments, giving rise to charge-anticharge pairs according to the Schwinger mechanism. We study the real-time spreading of excitations in the system by means of electric-field and particle fluctuations. We determine a dynamical state diagram for string breaking and quantitatively evaluate the time scales for mass production. We also show that the time evolution of the quantum correlations can be detected via bipartite von Neumann entropies, thus demonstrating that the Schwinger mechanism is tightly linked to entanglement spreading. To present a variety of possible applications of this simulation platform, we show how one could follow the real-time scattering processes between mesons and the creation of entanglement during scattering processes. Finally, we test the quality of quantum simulations of these dynamics, quantifying the role of possible imperfections in cold atoms, trapped ions, and superconducting circuit systems. Our results demonstrate how entanglement properties can be used to deepen our understanding of basic phenomena in the real-time dynamics of gauge theories such as string breaking and collisions.

  4. Griffiths singularities in the random quantum Ising antiferromagnet: A tree tensor network renormalization group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ping; Kao, Ying-Jer; Chen, Pochung; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    The antiferromagnetic Ising chain in both transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields is one of the paradigmatic models of a quantum phase transition. The antiferromagnetic system exhibits a zero-temperature critical line separating an antiferromagnetic phase and a paramagnetic phase; the critical line connects an integrable quantum critical point at zero longitudinal field and a classical first-order transition point at zero transverse field. Using a strong-disorder renormalization group method formulated as a tree tensor network, we study the zero-temperature phase of the quantum Ising chain with bond randomness. We introduce a new matrix product operator representation of high-order moments, which provides an efficient and accurate tool for determining quantum phase transitions via the Binder cumulant of the order parameter. Our results demonstrate an infinite-randomness quantum critical point in zero longitudinal field accompanied by pronounced quantum Griffiths singularities, arising from rare ordered regions with anomalously slow fluctuations inside the paramagnetic phase. The strong Griffiths effects are signaled by a large dynamical exponent z >1 , which characterizes a power-law density of low-energy states of the localized rare regions and becomes infinite at the quantum critical point. Upon application of a longitudinal field, the quantum phase transition between the paramagnetic phase and the antiferromagnetic phase is completely destroyed. Furthermore, quantum Griffiths effects are suppressed, showing z <1 , when the dynamics of the rare regions is hampered by the longitudinal field.

  5. Tensor network simulation of QED on infinite lattices: Learning from (1 +1 ) d , and prospects for (2 +1 ) d

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapp, Kai; Orús, Román

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of lattice gauge theories with tensor network (TN) methods is becoming increasingly fruitful. The vision is that such methods will, eventually, be used to simulate theories in (3 +1 ) dimensions in regimes difficult for other methods. So far, however, TN methods have mostly simulated lattice gauge theories in (1 +1 ) dimensions. The aim of this paper is to explore the simulation of quantum electrodynamics (QED) on infinite lattices with TNs, i.e., fermionic matter fields coupled to a U (1 ) gauge field, directly in the thermodynamic limit. With this idea in mind we first consider a gauge-invariant infinite density matrix renormalization group simulation of the Schwinger model—i.e., QED in (1 +1 ) d . After giving a precise description of the numerical method, we benchmark our simulations by computing the subtracted chiral condensate in the continuum, in good agreement with other approaches. Our simulations of the Schwinger model allow us to build intuition about how a simulation should proceed in (2 +1 ) dimensions. Based on this, we propose a variational ansatz using infinite projected entangled pair states (PEPS) to describe the ground state of (2 +1 ) d QED. The ansatz includes U (1 ) gauge symmetry at the level of the tensors, as well as fermionic (matter) and bosonic (gauge) degrees of freedom both at the physical and virtual levels. We argue that all the necessary ingredients for the simulation of (2 +1 ) d QED are, a priori, already in place, paving the way for future upcoming results.

  6. Altered anatomical network in early blindness revealed by diffusion tensor tractography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Shu

    Full Text Available The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. Diffusion MRI studies have revealed the efficient small-world properties and modular structure of the anatomical network in normal subjects. However, no previous study has used diffusion MRI to reveal changes in the brain anatomical network in early blindness. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 17 early blind subjects and 17 age- and gender-matched sighted controls. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and sub-cortical regions using deterministic tractography. Compared with controls, early blind subjects showed a decreased degree of connectivity, a reduced global efficiency, and an increased characteristic path length in their brain anatomical network, especially in the visual cortex. Moreover, we revealed some regions with motor or somatosensory function have increased connections with other brain regions in the early blind, which suggested experience-dependent compensatory plasticity. This study is the first to show alterations in the topological properties of the anatomical network in early blindness. From the results, we suggest that analyzing the brain's anatomical network obtained using diffusion MRI data provides new insights into the understanding of the brain's re-organization in the specific population with early visual deprivation.

  7. Altered anatomical network in early blindness revealed by diffusion tensor tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yong; Li, Jun; Li, Yonghui; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2009-09-28

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. Diffusion MRI studies have revealed the efficient small-world properties and modular structure of the anatomical network in normal subjects. However, no previous study has used diffusion MRI to reveal changes in the brain anatomical network in early blindness. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 17 early blind subjects and 17 age- and gender-matched sighted controls. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and sub-cortical regions using deterministic tractography. Compared with controls, early blind subjects showed a decreased degree of connectivity, a reduced global efficiency, and an increased characteristic path length in their brain anatomical network, especially in the visual cortex. Moreover, we revealed some regions with motor or somatosensory function have increased connections with other brain regions in the early blind, which suggested experience-dependent compensatory plasticity. This study is the first to show alterations in the topological properties of the anatomical network in early blindness. From the results, we suggest that analyzing the brain's anatomical network obtained using diffusion MRI data provides new insights into the understanding of the brain's re-organization in the specific population with early visual deprivation.

  8. Bosonic and fermionic Weinberg-Joos (j,0) + (0,j) states of arbitrary spins as Lorentz tensors or tensor-spinors and second-order theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado Acosta, E.G.; Banda Guzman, V.M.; Kirchbach, M. [UASLP, Instituto de Fisica, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2015-03-01

    We propose a general method for the description of arbitrary single spin-j states transforming according to (j, 0) + (0, j) carrier spaces of the Lorentz algebra in terms of Lorentz tensors for bosons, and tensor-spinors for fermions, and by means of second-order Lagrangians. The method allows to avoid the cumbersome matrix calculus and higher ∂{sup 2j} order wave equations inherent to the Weinberg-Joos approach. We start with reducible Lorentz tensor (tensor-spinor) representation spaces hosting one sole (j, 0) + (0, j) irreducible sector and design there a representation reduction algorithm based on one of the Casimir invariants of the Lorentz algebra. This algorithm allows us to separate neatly the pure spin-j sector of interest from the rest, while preserving the separate Lorentz and Dirac indexes. However, the Lorentz invariants are momentum independent and do not provide wave equations. Genuine wave equations are obtained by conditioning the Lorentz tensors under consideration to satisfy the Klein-Gordon equation. In so doing, one always ends up with wave equations and associated Lagrangians that are of second order in the momenta. Specifically, a spin-3/2 particle transforming as (3/2, 0) + (0, 3/2) is comfortably described by a second-order Lagrangian in the basis of the totally anti-symmetric Lorentz tensor-spinor of second rank, Ψ {sub [μν]}. Moreover, the particle is shown to propagate causally within an electromagnetic background. In our study of (3/2, 0) + (0, 3/2) as part of Ψ {sub [μν]} we reproduce the electromagnetic multipole moments known from the Weinberg-Joos theory. We also find a Compton differential cross-section that satisfies unitarity in forward direction. The suggested tensor calculus presents itself very computer friendly with respect to the symbolic software FeynCalc. (orig.)

  9. Bosonic and fermionic Weinberg-Joos (j,0) ⊕ (0,j) states of arbitrary spins as Lorentz tensors or tensor-spinors and second-order theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Acosta, E. G.; Banda Guzmán, V. M.; Kirchbach, M.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a general method for the description of arbitrary single spin- j states transforming according to ( j, 0) ⊕ (0, j) carrier spaces of the Lorentz algebra in terms of Lorentz tensors for bosons, and tensor-spinors for fermions, and by means of second-order Lagrangians. The method allows to avoid the cumbersome matrix calculus and higher ∂2 j order wave equations inherent to the Weinberg-Joos approach. We start with reducible Lorentz tensor (tensor-spinor) representation spaces hosting one sole ( j, 0) ⊕ (0, j) irreducible sector and design there a representation reduction algorithm based on one of the Casimir invariants of the Lorentz algebra. This algorithm allows us to separate neatly the pure spin- j sector of interest from the rest, while preserving the separate Lorentz and Dirac indexes. However, the Lorentz invariants are momentum independent and do not provide wave equations. Genuine wave equations are obtained by conditioning the Lorentz tensors under consideration to satisfy the Klein-Gordon equation. In so doing, one always ends up with wave equations and associated Lagrangians that are of second order in the momenta. Specifically, a spin-3/2 particle transforming as (3/2, 0) ⊕ (0, 3/2) is comfortably described by a second-order Lagrangian in the basis of the totally anti-symmetric Lorentz tensor-spinor of second rank, Ψ [ μν]. Moreover, the particle is shown to propagate causally within an electromagnetic background. In our study of (3/2, 0) ⊕ (0, 3/2) as part of Ψ [ μν] we reproduce the electromagnetic multipole moments known from the Weinberg-Joos theory. We also find a Compton differential cross-section that satisfies unitarity in forward direction. The suggested tensor calculus presents itself very computer friendly with respect to the symbolic software FeynCalc.

  10. Combination of diffusion tensor and functional magnetic resonance imaging during recovery from the vegetative state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Espejo Davinia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of recovery from the vegetative state (VS is low. Currently, little is known of the mechanisms and cerebral changes that accompany those relatively rare cases of good recovery. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to study the evolution of one VS patient at one month post-ictus and again twelve months later when he had recovered consciousness. Methods fMRI was used to investigate cortical responses to passive language stimulation as well as task-induced deactivations related to the default-mode network. DTI was used to assess the integrity of the global white matter and the arcuate fasciculus. We also performed a neuropsychological assessment at the time of the second MRI examination in order to characterize the profile of cognitive deficits. Results fMRI analysis revealed anatomically appropriate activation to speech in both the first and the second scans but a reduced pattern of task-induced deactivations in the first scan. In the second scan, following the recovery of consciousness, this pattern became more similar to that classically described for the default-mode network. DTI analysis revealed relative preservation of the arcuate fasciculus and of the global normal-appearing white matter at both time points. The neuropsychological assessment revealed recovery of receptive linguistic functioning by 12-months post-ictus. Conclusions These results suggest that the combination of different structural and functional imaging modalities may provide a powerful means for assessing the mechanisms involved in the recovery from the VS.

  11. Combination of diffusion tensor and functional magnetic resonance imaging during recovery from the vegetative state

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The rate of recovery from the vegetative state (VS) is low. Currently, little is known of the mechanisms and cerebral changes that accompany those relatively rare cases of good recovery. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to study the evolution of one VS patient at one month post-ictus and again twelve months later when he had recovered consciousness. Methods fMRI was used to investigate cortical responses to passive language stimulation as well as task-induced deactivations related to the default-mode network. DTI was used to assess the integrity of the global white matter and the arcuate fasciculus. We also performed a neuropsychological assessment at the time of the second MRI examination in order to characterize the profile of cognitive deficits. Results fMRI analysis revealed anatomically appropriate activation to speech in both the first and the second scans but a reduced pattern of task-induced deactivations in the first scan. In the second scan, following the recovery of consciousness, this pattern became more similar to that classically described for the default-mode network. DTI analysis revealed relative preservation of the arcuate fasciculus and of the global normal-appearing white matter at both time points. The neuropsychological assessment revealed recovery of receptive linguistic functioning by 12-months post-ictus. Conclusions These results suggest that the combination of different structural and functional imaging modalities may provide a powerful means for assessing the mechanisms involved in the recovery from the VS. PMID:20815871

  12. Investigating Quantum Phase Transitions in Spin-2 AKLT Systems with Tensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomata, Nicholas; Huang, Ching-Yu; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    The spin-2 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) state on the square lattice, a valence-bond solid (VBS) state, has nontrivial symmetry-protected topological order when translation and rotation invariance are imposed. Niggemann, Klümper, and Zittartz previously studied a two-parameter deformation of this state from the AKLT point, which exhibits a second-order phase transition from a disordered VBS phase to a Neel-ordered phase. We re-examine the deformed AKLT model using tensor renormalization methods. In addition to recovering the VBS-Neel transition, we find new transitions into XY-like and product-state phases, which we can characterize using local order parameters and modular matrices.

  13. Full-State Controls of Terahertz Waves Using Tensor Coding Metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Quan Long; Xu, Quan; Gu, Jianqiang; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Han, Jiaguang; Cheng, Qiang; Zhang, Weili; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-06-28

    Coding metasurfaces allow us to study metamaterials from a fully digital perspective, enabling many exotic functionalities, such as anomalous reflections, broadband diffusions, and polarization conversion. Here, we propose a tensor coding metasurface at terahertz (THz) frequency that could take full-state controls of an electromagnetic wave in terms of its polarization state, phase and amplitude distributions, and wave-vector mode. Owing to the off-diagonal elements that dominant in the reflection matrix, each coding particle could reflect the normally incident wave to its cross-polarization with controllable phases, resulting in different coding digits. A 3-bit tensor coding metasurface with three coding sequences is taken as an example to show its full-state controls in reflecting a normally incident THz beam to anomalous directions with cross-polarizations and making a spatially propagating wave (PW) to surface wave (SW) conversion at the THz frequency. We show that the proposed PW-SW convertor based on the tensor coding metasurface supports both x- and y-polarized normal incidences, producing cross-polarized transverse-magnetic and transverse-electric modes of THz SWs, respectively.

  14. Application of Self-Organizing Artificial Neural Networks on Simulated Diffusion Tensor Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Göksel-Duru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTMRI as a noninvasive modality providing in vivo anatomical information allows determination of fiber connections which leads to brain mapping. The success of DTMRI is very much algorithm dependent, and its verification is of great importance due to limited availability of a gold standard in the literature. In this study, unsupervised artificial neural network class, namely, self-organizing maps, is employed to discover the underlying fiber tracts. A common artificial diffusion tensor resource, named “phantom images for simulating tractography errors” (PISTE, is used for the accuracy verification and acceptability of the proposed approach. Four different tract geometries with varying SNRs and fractional anisotropy are investigated. The proposed method, SOFMAT, is able to define the predetermined fiber paths successfully with a standard deviation of (0.8–1.9 × 10−3 depending on the trajectory and the SNR value selected. The results illustrate the capability of SOFMAT to reconstruct complex fiber tract configurations. The ability of SOFMAT to detect fiber paths in low anisotropy regions, which physiologically may correspond to either grey matter or pathology (abnormality and uncertainty areas in real data, is an advantage of the method for future studies.

  15. Multidimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics: spurious states for the tensor sector two Hamiltonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Kouri, Donald J

    2013-04-25

    We show that there exist spurious states for the sector two tensor Hamiltonian in multidimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics. For one-dimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics on an infinite domain, the sector one and two Hamiltonians have identical spectra with the exception of the ground state of the sector one. For tensorial multidimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics, there exist normalizable spurious states for the sector two Hamiltonian with energy equal to the ground state energy of the sector one. These spurious states are annihilated by the adjoint charge operator, and hence, they do not correspond to physical states for the original Hamiltonian. The Hermitian property of the sector two Hamiltonian implies the orthogonality between spurious and physical states. In addition, we develop a method for construction of a specific form of the spurious states for any quantum system and also generate several spurious states for a two-dimensional anharmonic oscillator system and for the hydrogen atom.

  16. Efficient Representation of Fully Many-Body Localized Systems Using Tensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Thorsten B.; Pal, Arijeet; Simon, Steven H.

    2017-04-01

    We propose a tensor network encoding the set of all eigenstates of a fully many-body localized system in one dimension. Our construction, conceptually based on the ansatz introduced in Phys. Rev. B 94, 041116(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.041116, is built from two layers of unitary matrices which act on blocks of ℓ contiguous sites. We argue that this yields an exponential reduction in computational time and memory requirement as compared to all previous approaches for finding a representation of the complete eigenspectrum of large many-body localized systems with a given accuracy. Concretely, we optimize the unitaries by minimizing the magnitude of the commutator of the approximate integrals of motion and the Hamiltonian, which can be done in a local fashion. This further reduces the computational complexity of the tensor networks arising in the minimization process compared to previous work. We test the accuracy of our method by comparing the approximate energy spectrum to exact diagonalization results for the random-field Heisenberg model on 16 sites. We find that the technique is highly accurate deep in the localized regime and maintains a surprising degree of accuracy in predicting certain local quantities even in the vicinity of the predicted dynamical phase transition. To demonstrate the power of our technique, we study a system of 72 sites, and we are able to see clear signatures of the phase transition. Our work opens a new avenue to study properties of the many-body localization transition in large systems.

  17. Systematic construction of spin liquids on the square lattice from tensor networks with SU(2) symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Mambrini, Matthieu; Poilblanc, Didier

    2016-01-01

    We elaborate a simple classification scheme of all rank-5 SU(2)-spin rotational symmetric tensors according to i) the on-site physical spin-$S$, (ii) the local Hilbert space $V^{\\otimes 4}$ of the four virtual (composite) spins attached to each site and (iii) the irreducible representations of the $C_{4v}$ point group of the square lattice. We apply our scheme to draw a complete list of all SU(2)-symmetric translationally and rotationally-invariant Projected Entangled Pair States (PEPS) with bond dimension $D\\leqslant 6$. All known SU(2)-symmetric PEPS on the square lattice are recovered and simple generalizations are provided in some cases. More generally, to each of our symmetry class can be associated a $({\\cal D}-1)$-dimensional manifold of spin liquids (potentially) preserving lattice symmetries and defined in terms of ${\\cal D}$ independent tensors of a given bond dimension $D$. In addition, generic (low-dimensional) families of PEPS explicitly breaking either (i) particular point-group lattice symmetri...

  18. Progressive gender differences of structural brain networks in healthy adults: a longitudinal, diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Sun

    Full Text Available Sexual dimorphism in the brain maturation during childhood and adolescence has been repeatedly documented, which may underlie the differences in behaviors and cognitive performance. However, our understanding of how gender modulates the development of structural connectome in healthy adults is still not entirely clear. Here we utilized graph theoretical analysis of longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging data over a five-year period to investigate the progressive gender differences of brain network topology. The brain networks of both genders showed prominent economical "small-world" architecture (high local clustering and short paths between nodes. Additional analysis revealed a more economical "small-world" architecture in females as well as a greater global efficiency in males regardless of scan time point. At the regional level, both increased and decreased efficiency were found across the cerebral cortex for both males and females, indicating a compensation mechanism of cortical network reorganization over time. Furthermore, we found that weighted clustering coefficient exhibited significant gender-time interactions, implying different development trends between males and females. Moreover, several specific brain regions (e.g., insula, superior temporal gyrus, cuneus, putamen, and parahippocampal gyrus exhibited different development trajectories between males and females. Our findings further prove the presence of sexual dimorphism in brain structures that may underlie gender differences in behavioral and cognitive functioning. The sex-specific progress trajectories in brain connectome revealed in this work provide an important foundation to delineate the gender related pathophysiological mechanisms in various neuropsychiatric disorders, which may potentially guide the development of sex-specific treatments for these devastating brain disorders.

  19. Progressive gender differences of structural brain networks in healthy adults: a longitudinal, diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Lee, Renick; Chen, Yu; Collinson, Simon; Thakor, Nitish; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Sim, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in the brain maturation during childhood and adolescence has been repeatedly documented, which may underlie the differences in behaviors and cognitive performance. However, our understanding of how gender modulates the development of structural connectome in healthy adults is still not entirely clear. Here we utilized graph theoretical analysis of longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging data over a five-year period to investigate the progressive gender differences of brain network topology. The brain networks of both genders showed prominent economical "small-world" architecture (high local clustering and short paths between nodes). Additional analysis revealed a more economical "small-world" architecture in females as well as a greater global efficiency in males regardless of scan time point. At the regional level, both increased and decreased efficiency were found across the cerebral cortex for both males and females, indicating a compensation mechanism of cortical network reorganization over time. Furthermore, we found that weighted clustering coefficient exhibited significant gender-time interactions, implying different development trends between males and females. Moreover, several specific brain regions (e.g., insula, superior temporal gyrus, cuneus, putamen, and parahippocampal gyrus) exhibited different development trajectories between males and females. Our findings further prove the presence of sexual dimorphism in brain structures that may underlie gender differences in behavioral and cognitive functioning. The sex-specific progress trajectories in brain connectome revealed in this work provide an important foundation to delineate the gender related pathophysiological mechanisms in various neuropsychiatric disorders, which may potentially guide the development of sex-specific treatments for these devastating brain disorders.

  20. Priors on the effective dark energy equation of state in scalar-tensor theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveri, Marco; Bull, Philip; Silvestri, Alessandra; Pogosian, Levon

    2017-10-01

    Constraining the dark energy (DE) equation of state, wDE, is one of the primary science goals of ongoing and future cosmological surveys. In practice, with imperfect data and incomplete redshift coverage, this requires making assumptions about the evolution of wDE with redshift z . These assumptions can be manifested in a choice of a specific parametric form, which can potentially bias the outcome, or else one can reconstruct wDE(z ) nonparametrically, by specifying a prior covariance matrix that correlates values of wDE at different redshifts. In this work, we derive the theoretical prior covariance for the effective DE equation of state predicted by general scalar-tensor theories with second order equations of motion (Horndeski theories). This is achieved by generating a large ensemble of possible scalar-tensor theories using a Monte Carlo methodology, including the application of physical viability conditions. We also separately consider the special subcase of the minimally coupled scalar field, or quintessence. The prior shows a preference for tracking behaviors in the most general case. Given the covariance matrix, theoretical priors on parameters of any specific parametrization of wDE(z ) can also be readily derived by projection.

  1. Tensor Rank

    OpenAIRE

    Erdtman, Elias; Jönsson, Carl

    2012-01-01

    This master's thesis addresses numerical methods of computing the typical ranks of tensors over the real numbers and explores some properties of tensors over finite fields. We present three numerical methods to compute typical tensor rank. Two of these have already been published and can be used to calculate the lowest typical ranks of tensors and an approximate percentage of how many tensors have the lowest typical ranks (for some tensor formats), respectively. The third method was developed...

  2. Stress-free states of continuum dislocation fields : Rotations, grain boundaries, and the Nye dislocation density tensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limkumnerd, Surachate; Sethna, James P.

    We derive general relations between grain boundaries, rotational deformations, and stress-free states for the mesoscale continuum Nye dislocation density tensor. Dislocations generally are associated with long-range stress fields. We provide the general form for dislocation density fields whose

  3. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  4. Random Tensor Theory: Extending Random Matrix Theory to Mixtures of Random Product States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambainis, Andris; Harrow, Aram W.; Hastings, Matthew B.

    2012-02-01

    We consider a problem in random matrix theory that is inspired by quantum information theory: determining the largest eigenvalue of a sum of p random product states in {(mathbb {C}^d)^{⊗ k}}, where k and p/ d k are fixed while d → ∞. When k = 1, the Marčenko-Pastur law determines (up to small corrections) not only the largest eigenvalue ({(1+sqrt{p/d^k})^2}) but the smallest eigenvalue {(min(0,1-sqrt{p/d^k})^2)} and the spectral density in between. We use the method of moments to show that for k > 1 the largest eigenvalue is still approximately {(1+sqrt{p/d^k})^2} and the spectral density approaches that of the Marčenko-Pastur law, generalizing the random matrix theory result to the random tensor case. Our bound on the largest eigenvalue has implications both for sampling from a particular heavy-tailed distribution and for a recently proposed quantum data-hiding and correlation-locking scheme due to Leung and Winter. Since the matrices we consider have neither independent entries nor unitary invariance, we need to develop new techniques for their analysis. The main contribution of this paper is to give three different methods for analyzing mixtures of random product states: a diagrammatic approach based on Gaussian integrals, a combinatorial method that looks at the cycle decompositions of permutations and a recursive method that uses a variant of the Schwinger-Dyson equations.

  5. Role of final-state interactions in the calculation of the hadronic tensor of nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celenza, L.S.; Shakin, C.M.; Wang, H. (Department of Physics and Center for Nuclear Theory, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York (USA))

    1991-10-01

    We develop methods for the calculation of the hadronic tensor that describes the response of nuclear matter to an electromagnetic probe and study the role of final-state interactions, making use of the theory of Horikawa, Lenz, and Mukhopadhyay. Recently, extensive calculations of such final-state interaction effects in quasielastic ({ital e},{ital e}{prime}) reactions have been performed by Chinn, Picklesimer, and Van Orden for finite nuclei. Our nuclear matter calculations reproduce the qualitative features found by those authors, including a significant quenching'' of the longitudinal response, if one uses a relativistic description of the process. While we are able to achieve an improved fit to a body of experimental data for the longitudinal response using this formalism, definitive conclusions cannot be drawn without performing a gauge-invariant calculation. We also find quenching of the transverse response in the region of the quasielastic peak; however, it is unclear as to whether that creates a problem for the theory, since the transverse response is known to have contributions from the excitation of the delta resonance and various multinucleon processes. As part of our study, we provide a spectral representation of the Green's function of a nucleon propagating in relativistic nuclear matter.

  6. Multiscale entropy analysis of resting-state magnetoencephalogram with tensor factorisations in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escudero, Javier; Evrim, Acar Ataman; Fernández, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Tensor factorisations have proven useful to model amplitude and spectral information of brain recordings. Here, we assess the usefulness of tensor factorisations in the multiway analysis of other brain signal features in the context of complexity measures recently proposed to inspect multiscale......'s disease and 26 control subjects. Instead of traditional simple visual examinations, we organise the entropy profiles as a three-way tensor to inspect relationships across temporal and spatial scales and subjects with multiway data analysis techniques based on PARAFAC and PARAFAC2 factorisations. A PARAFAC...

  7. Stress-free states of continuum dislocation fields: Rotations, grain boundaries, and the Nye dislocation density tensor

    OpenAIRE

    Limkumnerd, Surachate; Sethna, James P.

    2006-01-01

    We derive general relations between grain boundaries, rotational deformations, and stress-free states for the mesoscale continuum Nye dislocation density tensor. Dislocations generally are associated with long-range stress fields. We provide the general form for dislocation density fields whose stress fields vanish. We explain that a grain boundary (a dislocation wall satisfying Frank's formula) has vanishing stress in the continuum limit. We show that the general stress-free state can be wri...

  8. Clustering of resting state networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan H Lee

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to demonstrate a hierarchical structure of resting state activity in the healthy brain using a data-driven clustering algorithm.The fuzzy-c-means clustering algorithm was applied to resting state fMRI data in cortical and subcortical gray matter from two groups acquired separately, one of 17 healthy individuals and the second of 21 healthy individuals. Different numbers of clusters and different starting conditions were used. A cluster dispersion measure determined the optimal numbers of clusters. An inner product metric provided a measure of similarity between different clusters. The two cluster result found the task-negative and task-positive systems. The cluster dispersion measure was minimized with seven and eleven clusters. Each of the clusters in the seven and eleven cluster result was associated with either the task-negative or task-positive system. Applying the algorithm to find seven clusters recovered previously described resting state networks, including the default mode network, frontoparietal control network, ventral and dorsal attention networks, somatomotor, visual, and language networks. The language and ventral attention networks had significant subcortical involvement. This parcellation was consistently found in a large majority of algorithm runs under different conditions and was robust to different methods of initialization.The clustering of resting state activity using different optimal numbers of clusters identified resting state networks comparable to previously obtained results. This work reinforces the observation that resting state networks are hierarchically organized.

  9. Training brain networks and states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Yuan; Posner, Michael I

    2014-07-01

    Brain training refers to practices that alter the brain in a way that improves cognition, and performance in domains beyond those involved in the training. We argue that brain training includes network training through repetitive practice that exercises specific brain networks and state training, which changes the brain state in a way that influences many networks. This opinion article considers two widely used methods - working memory training (WMT) and meditation training (MT) - to demonstrate the similarities and differences between network and state training. These two forms of training involve different areas of the brain and different forms of generalization. We propose a distinction between network and state training methods to improve understanding of the most effective brain training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. De Sitter ground state of scalar-tensor gravity and its primordial perturbation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hongsheng

    2010-01-01

    We find an exact de Sitter solution of scalar-tensor gravity, in which the non-minimal coupling scalar is rolling along a non-constant potential. We investigated its primordial quantum perturbation around the adiabatic vacuum. We put forward for the first time that exact de Sitter generates non-exactly scale invariant perturbations. In the conformal coupling case, this model predicts that the tensor mode of the perturbation (gravity wave) is strongly depressed.

  11. Charmless Hadronic B Decays into Vector, Axial Vector and Tensor Final States at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandini, Paolo; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-06

    We present experimental measurements of branching fraction and longitudinal polarization fraction in charmless hadronic B decays into vector, axial vector and tensor final states with the final dataset of BABAR. Measurements of such kind of decays are a powerful tool both to test the Standard Model and search possible sources of new physics. In this document we present a short review of the last experimental results at BABAR concerning charmless quasi two-body decays in final states containing particles with spin 1 or spin 2 and different parities. This kind of decays has received considerable theoretical interest in the last few years and this particular attention has led to interesting experimental results at the current b-factories. In fact, the study of longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} in charmless B decays to vector vector (VV), vector axial-vector (VA) and axial-vector axial-vector (AA) mesons provides information on the underlying helicity structure of the decay mechanism. Naive helicity conservation arguments predict a dominant longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} {approx} 1 for both tree and penguin dominated decays and this pattern seems to be confirmed by tree-dominated B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B{sup +} {yields} {Omega}{rho}{sup +} decays. Other penguin dominated decays, instead, show a different behavior: the measured value of f{sub L} {approx} 0.5 in B {yields} {phi}K* decays is in contrast with naive Standard Model (SM) calculations. Several solutions have been proposed such as the introduction of non-factorizable terms and penguin-annihilation amplitudes, while other explanations invoke new physics. New modes have been investigated to shed more light on the problem.

  12. Altered brain anatomical networks and disturbed connection density in brain tumor patients revealed by diffusion tensor tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhou; Tao, Ling; Qian, Zhiyu; Wu, Jiangfen; Liu, Hongyi; Yu, Yun; Song, Jiantai; Wang, Shaobo; Sun, Jinyang

    2016-11-01

    Brain tumor patients are usually accompanied by impairments in cognitive functions, and these dysfunctions arise from the altered diffusion tensor of water molecules and disrupted neuronal conduction in white matter. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a powerful noninvasive imaging technique that can reflect diffusion anisotropy of water and brain white matter neural connectivity in vivo. This study was aimed to analyze the topological properties and connection densities of the brain anatomical networks in brain tumor patients based on DTI and provide new insights into the investigation of the structural plasticity and compensatory mechanism of tumor patient's brain. In this study, the brain anatomical networks of tumor patients and healthy controls were constructed using the tracking of white matter fiber bundles based on DTI and the topological properties of these networks were described quantitatively. The statistical comparisons were performed between two groups with six DTI parameters: degree, regional efficiency, local efficiency, clustering coefficient, vulnerability, and betweenness centrality. In order to localize changes in structural connectivity to specific brain regions, a network-based statistic approach was utilized. By comparing the edge connection density of brain network between two groups, the edges with greater difference in connection density were associated with three functional systems. Compared with controls, tumor patients show a significant increase in small-world feature of cerebral structural network. Two-sample two-tailed t test indicates that the regional properties are altered in 17 regions ([Formula: see text]). Study reveals that the positive and negative changes in vulnerability take place in the 14 brain areas. In addition, tumor patients lose 3 hub regions and add 2 new hubs when compared to normal controls. Eleven edges show much significantly greater connection density in the patients than in the controls. Most of the edges with

  13. Tensor network methods for the simulation of open quantum dynamics in multichromophore systems: Application to singlet fission in novel pentacene dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Alex

    Singlet fission (SF) is an ultrafast process in which a singlet exciton spontaneously converts into a pair of entangled triplet excitons on neighbouring organic molecules. As a mechanism of multiple exciton generation, it has been suggested as a way to increase the efficiency of organic photovoltaic devices, and its underlying photophysics across a wide range of molecules and materials has attracted significant theoretical attention. Recently, a number of studies using ultrafast nonlinear optics have underscored the importance of intramolecular vibrational dynamics in efficient SF systems, prompting a need for methods capable of simulating open quantum dynamics in the presence of highly structured and strongly coupled environments. Here, a combination of ab initio electronic structure techniques and a new tensor-network methodology for simulating open vibronic dynamics is presented and applied to a recently synthesised dimer of pentacene (DP-Mes). We show that ultrafast (300 fs) SF in this system is driven entirely by symmetry breaking vibrations, and our many-body approach enables the real-time identification and tracking of the ''functional' vibrational dynamics and the role of the ''bath''-like parts of the environment. Deeper analysis of the emerging wave functions points to interesting links between the time at which parts of the environment become relevant to the SF process and the optimal topology of the tensor networks, highlighting the additional insight provided by moving the problem into the natural language of correlated quantum states and how this could lead to simulations of much larger multichromophore systems Supported by The Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability.

  14. Investigation of Quantum Phase Transitions of Spin-3/2 AKLT Systems On the Hexagonal Lattice via the Tensor-Network Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Huang, Ching-Yu

    The spin-3/2 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) state on the hexagonal lattice is an example of valence-bond solid state (VBS), which is recently shown to provide resource for quantum computation and is also a nontrivial symmetry protected topologically ordered state if the translation invariance is imposed in addition to the rotation symmetry. Niggemann et al. previously studied a deformation of the AKLT model and derived a one-parameter family of ground states (parametrized by a) that are deformed from the AKLT point (a =√{ 3}). By mapping to a free-fermion eight-vertex model, they identified a VBS to Néel transition at ac 2 2 . 5425 . We employ the tensor-network method to directly compute the Néel order parameter and obtain results that agree with theirs. We also study the regime where the deformation parameter a decreases close to zero. We find that there is a transition at ac 1 0 . 58 to an XY phase, which is characterized by algebraically decaying correlations, rotation invariance of spins in the x-y plane and the induced magnetization being aligned with the direction of the extend field. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  15. Increased cortical-limbic anatomical network connectivity in major depression revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Fang

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported significant functional and structural differences between depressed patients and controls. Little attention has been given, however, to the abnormalities in anatomical connectivity in depressed patients. In the present study, we aim to investigate the alterations in connectivity of whole-brain anatomical networks in those suffering from major depression by using machine learning approaches. Brain anatomical networks were extracted from diffusion magnetic resonance images obtained from both 22 first-episode, treatment-naive adults with major depressive disorder and 26 matched healthy controls. Using machine learning approaches, we differentiated depressed patients from healthy controls based on their whole-brain anatomical connectivity patterns and identified the most discriminating features that represent between-group differences. Classification results showed that 91.7% (patients=86.4%, controls=96.2%; permutation test, p<0.0001 of subjects were correctly classified via leave-one-out cross-validation. Moreover, the strengths of all the most discriminating connections were increased in depressed patients relative to the controls, and these connections were primarily located within the cortical-limbic network, especially the frontal-limbic network. These results not only provide initial steps toward the development of neurobiological diagnostic markers for major depressive disorder, but also suggest that abnormal cortical-limbic anatomical networks may contribute to the anatomical basis of emotional dysregulation and cognitive impairments associated with this disease.

  16. POWER, STATE AND NETWORK SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to study the main changes that the classic conception of State suffered in the last century, with special focus in the three original constituent elements: sovereignty, population and territory. This paper addresses the conceptions of power and its contemporary journey, especially in the 20th century, using the works of Foucault, Agamben, Giddens and Galbraith. Then, the thoughts of Spanish sociologist Manuel Castells, who address new technologies and network society, are elucidated. Lastly, it is shown a great concern with a possible state control using new information technologies in the 21th century.

  17. Minimum complexity echo state network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodan, Ali; Tino, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Reservoir computing (RC) refers to a new class of state-space models with a fixed state transition structure (the reservoir) and an adaptable readout form the state space. The reservoir is supposed to be sufficiently complex so as to capture a large number of features of the input stream that can be exploited by the reservoir-to-output readout mapping. The field of RC has been growing rapidly with many successful applications. However, RC has been criticized for not being principled enough. Reservoir construction is largely driven by a series of randomized model-building stages, with both researchers and practitioners having to rely on a series of trials and errors. To initialize a systematic study of the field, we concentrate on one of the most popular classes of RC methods, namely echo state network, and ask: What is the minimal complexity of reservoir construction for obtaining competitive models and what is the memory capacity (MC) of such simplified reservoirs? On a number of widely used time series benchmarks of different origin and characteristics, as well as by conducting a theoretical analysis we show that a simple deterministically constructed cycle reservoir is comparable to the standard echo state network methodology. The (short-term) MC of linear cyclic reservoirs can be made arbitrarily close to the proved optimal value.

  18. Moment tensors, state of stress and their relation to faulting processes in Gujarat, western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sandeep Kumar; Khan, Prosanta Kumar; Mohanty, Sarada Prasad; Roumelioti, Zafeiria

    2016-10-01

    Time domain moment tensor analysis of 145 earthquakes (Mw 3.2 to 5.1), occurring during the period 2006-2014 in Gujarat region, has been performed. The events are mainly confined in the Kachchh area demarcated by the Island belt and Kachchh Mainland faults to its north and south, and two transverse faults to its east and west. Libraries of Green's functions were established using the 1D velocity model of Kachchh, Saurashtra and Mainland Gujarat. Green's functions and broadband displacement waveforms filtered at low frequency (0.5-0.8 Hz) were inverted to determine the moment tensor solutions. The estimated solutions were rigorously tested through number of iterations at different source depths for finding reliable source locations. The identified heterogeneous nature of the stress fields in the Kachchh area allowed us to divide this into four Zones 1-4. The stress inversion results indicate that the Zone 1 is dominated with radial compression, Zone 2 with strike-slip compression, and Zones 3 and 4 with strike-slip extensions. The analysis further shows that the epicentral region of 2001 MW 7.7 Bhuj mainshock, located at the junction of Zones 2, 3 and 4, was associated with predominant compressional stress and strike-slip motion along ∼ NNE-SSW striking fault on the western margin of the Wagad uplift. Other tectonically active parts of Gujarat (e.g. Jamnagar, Talala and Mainland) show earthquake activities are dominantly associated with strike-slip extension/compression faulting. Stress inversion analysis shows that the maximum compressive stress axes (σ1) are vertical for both the Jamnagar and Talala regions and horizontal for the Mainland Gujarat. These stress regimes are distinctly different from those of the Kachchh region.

  19. Tensor network techniques for the computation of dynamical observables in one-dimensional quantum spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hermes, Alexander; Cirac, J. Ignacio; Bañuls, Mari Carmen

    2012-07-01

    We analyze the recently developed folding algorithm (Bañuls et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 240603) for simulating the dynamics of infinite quantum spin chains and we relate its performance to the kind of entanglement produced under the evolution of product states. We benchmark the accomplishments of this technique with respect to alternative strategies using Ising Hamiltonians with transverse and parallel fields, as well as XY models. Also, we evaluate its capability of finding ground and thermal equilibrium states.

  20. Tensor Factorization for Low-Rank Tensor Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pan; Lu, Canyi; Lin, Zhouchen; Zhang, Chao

    2018-03-01

    Recently, a tensor nuclear norm (TNN) based method was proposed to solve the tensor completion problem, which has achieved state-of-the-art performance on image and video inpainting tasks. However, it requires computing tensor singular value decomposition (t-SVD), which costs much computation and thus cannot efficiently handle tensor data, due to its natural large scale. Motivated by TNN, we propose a novel low-rank tensor factorization method for efficiently solving the 3-way tensor completion problem. Our method preserves the low-rank structure of a tensor by factorizing it into the product of two tensors of smaller sizes. In the optimization process, our method only needs to update two smaller tensors, which can be more efficiently conducted than computing t-SVD. Furthermore, we prove that the proposed alternating minimization algorithm can converge to a Karush-Kuhn-Tucker point. Experimental results on the synthetic data recovery, image and video inpainting tasks clearly demonstrate the superior performance and efficiency of our developed method over state-of-the-arts including the TNN and matricization methods.

  1. Finite-representation approximation of lattice gauge theories at the continuum limit with tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyens, Boye; Montangero, Simone; Haegeman, Jutho; Verstraete, Frank; Van Acoleyen, Karel

    2017-05-01

    It has been established that matrix product states can be used to compute the ground state and single-particle excitations and their properties of lattice gauge theories at the continuum limit. However, by construction, in this formalism the Hilbert space of the gauge fields is truncated to a finite number of irreducible representations of the gauge group. We investigate quantitatively the influence of the truncation of the infinite number of representations in the Schwinger model, one-flavor QED2 , with a uniform electric background field. We compute the two-site reduced density matrix of the ground state and the weight of each of the representations. We find that this weight decays exponentially with the quadratic Casimir invariant of the representation which justifies the approach of truncating the Hilbert space of the gauge fields. Finally, we compute the single-particle spectrum of the model as a function of the electric background field.

  2. Electromagnetic game modeling through Tensor Analysis of Networks and Game Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Olivier; Reineix, Alain; Lalléchère, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    A complex system involves events coming from natural behaviors. Whatever is the complicated face of machines, they are still far from the complexity of natural systems. Currently, economy is one of the rare science trying to find out some ways to model human behavior. These attempts involve game theory and psychology. Our purpose is to develop a formalism able to take in charge both game and hardware modeling. We first present the Tensorial Analysis of Networks, used for the material part of the system. Then, we detail the mathematical objects defined in order to describe the evolution of the system and its gaming side. To illustrate the discussion we consider the case of a drone whose electronic can be disturbed by a radar field, but this drone must fly as near as possible close to this radar.

  3. Tensor categories

    CERN Document Server

    Etingof, Pavel; Nikshych, Dmitri; Ostrik, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Is there a vector space whose dimension is the golden ratio? Of course not-the golden ratio is not an integer! But this can happen for generalizations of vector spaces-objects of a tensor category. The theory of tensor categories is a relatively new field of mathematics that generalizes the theory of group representations. It has deep connections with many other fields, including representation theory, Hopf algebras, operator algebras, low-dimensional topology (in particular, knot theory), homotopy theory, quantum mechanics and field theory, quantum computation, theory of motives, etc. This bo

  4. Group-Level Progressive Alterations in Brain Connectivity Patterns Revealed by Diffusion-Tensor Brain Networks across Severity Stages in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasero, Javier; Alonso-Montes, Carmen; Diez, Ibai; Olabarrieta-Landa, Laiene; Remaki, Lakhdar; Escudero, Iñaki; Mateos, Beatriz; Bonifazi, Paolo; Fernandez, Manuel; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Cortes, Jesus M

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronically progressive neurodegenerative disease highly correlated to aging. Whether AD originates by targeting a localized brain area and propagates to the rest of the brain across disease-severity progression is a question with an unknown answer. Here, we aim to provide an answer to this question at the group-level by looking at differences in diffusion-tensor brain networks. In particular, making use of data from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), four different groups were defined (all of them matched by age, sex and education level): G1 (N1 = 36, healthy control subjects, Control), G2 (N2 = 36, early mild cognitive impairment, EMCI), G3 (N3 = 36, late mild cognitive impairment, LMCI) and G4 (N4 = 36, AD). Diffusion-tensor brain networks were compared across three disease stages: stage I (Control vs. EMCI), stage II (Control vs. LMCI) and stage III (Control vs. AD). The group comparison was performed using the multivariate distance matrix regression analysis, a technique that was born in genomics and was recently proposed to handle brain functional networks, but here applied to diffusion-tensor data. The results were threefold: First, no significant differences were found in stage I. Second, significant differences were found in stage II in the connectivity pattern of a subnetwork strongly associated to memory function (including part of the hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, fusiform gyrus, inferior and middle temporal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus and temporal pole). Third, a widespread disconnection across the entire AD brain was found in stage III, affecting more strongly the same memory subnetwork appearing in stage II, plus the other new subnetworks, including the default mode network, medial visual network, frontoparietal regions and striatum. Our results are consistent with a scenario where progressive alterations of connectivity arise as the disease severity increases and provide the brain areas

  5. Phases with modular ground states for symmetry breaking by rank 3 and rank 2 antisymmetric tensor scalars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Adler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Working with explicit examples given by the 56 representation in SU(8, and the 10 representation in SU(5, we show that symmetry breaking of a group G⊃G1×G2 by a scalar in a rank three or two antisymmetric tensor representation leads to a number of distinct modular ground states. For these broken symmetry phases, the ground state is periodic in an integer divisor p of N, where N>0 is the absolute value of the nonzero U(1 generator of the scalar component Φ that is a singlet under the simple subgroups G1 and G2. Ground state expectations of fractional powers Φp/N provide order parameters that distinguish the different phases. For the case of period p=1, this reduces to the usual Higgs mechanism, but for divisors N≥p>1 of N it leads to a modular ground state with periodicity p, implementing a discrete Abelian symmetry group U(1/Zp. This observation may allow new approaches to grand unification and family unification.

  6. Tensors, relativity, and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dalarsson, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Tensors, Relativity, and Cosmology, Second Edition, combines relativity, astrophysics, and cosmology in a single volume, providing a simplified introduction to each subject that is followed by detailed mathematical derivations. The book includes a section on general relativity that gives the case for a curved space-time, presents the mathematical background (tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry), discusses the Einstein equation and its solutions (including black holes and Penrose processes), and considers the energy-momentum tensor for various solutions. In addition, a section on relativistic astrophysics discusses stellar contraction and collapse, neutron stars and their equations of state, black holes, and accretion onto collapsed objects, with a final section on cosmology discussing cosmological models, observational tests, and scenarios for the early universe. This fully revised and updated second edition includes new material on relativistic effects, such as the behavior of clocks and measuring rods in m...

  7. Abnormal topological organization in white matter structural networks revealed by diffusion tensor tractography in unmedicated patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhaoxi; Zhao, Tengda; Luo, Jia; Guo, Zhihua; Guo, Meng; Li, Ping; Sun, Jing; He, Yong; Li, Zhanjiang

    2014-06-03

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder defined by recurrent thoughts, intrusive and distressing impulses, or images and ritualistic behaviors. Although focal diverse regional abnormalities white matter integrity in specific brain regions have been widely studied in populations with OCD, alterations in the structural connectivities among them remain poorly understood. The aim was to investigate the abnormalities in the topological efficiency of the white matter networks and the correlation between the network metrics and Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale scores in unmedicated OCD patients, using diffusion tensor tractography and graph theoretical approaches. This study used diffusion tensor imaging and deterministic tractography to map the white matter structural networks in 26 OCD patients and 39 age- and gender-matched healthy controls; and then applied graph theoretical methods to investigate abnormalities in the global and regional properties of the white matter network in these patients. The patients and control participants both showed small-world organization of the white matter networks. However, the OCD patients exhibited significant abnormal global topology, including decreases in global efficiency (t = -2.32, p = 0.02) and increases in shortest path length, Lp (t = 2.30, p = 0.02), the normalized weighted shortest path length, λ (t = 2.08, p=0.04), and the normalized clustering coefficient, γ (t = 2.26, p = 0.03), of their white matter structural networks compared with healthy controls. Further, the OCD patients showed a reduction in nodal efficiency predominately in the frontal regions, the parietal regions and caudate nucleus. The normalized weighted shortest path length of the network metrics was significantly negatively correlated with obsessive subscale of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (r = -0.57, p = 0.0058). These findings demonstrate the abnormal topological efficiency in the white matter networks

  8. The simplicial Ricci tensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsing, Paul M; McDonald, Jonathan R [Information Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome, NY 13441 (United States); Miller, Warner A, E-mail: jonathan.mcdonald.ctr@rl.af.mil [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States)

    2011-08-07

    The Ricci tensor (Ric) is fundamental to Einstein's geometric theory of gravitation. The three-dimensional Ric of a spacelike surface vanishes at the moment of time symmetry for vacuum spacetimes. The four-dimensional Ric is the Einstein tensor for such spacetimes. More recently, the Ric was used by Hamilton to define a nonlinear, diffusive Ricci flow (RF) that was fundamental to Perelman's proof of the Poincare conjecture. Analytic applications of RF can be found in many fields including general relativity and mathematics. Numerically it has been applied broadly to communication networks, medical physics, computer design and more. In this paper, we use Regge calculus (RC) to provide the first geometric discretization of the Ric. This result is fundamental for higher dimensional generalizations of discrete RF. We construct this tensor on both the simplicial lattice and its dual and prove their equivalence. We show that the Ric is an edge-based weighted average of deficit divided by an edge-based weighted average of dual area-an expression similar to the vertex-based weighted average of the scalar curvature reported recently. We use this Ric in a third and independent geometric derivation of the RC Einstein tensor in arbitrary dimensions.

  9. State machine replication for wide area networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Yanhua

    2010-01-01

    State machine replication is the most general approach for providing highly available services with strong consistency guarantees. This dissertation studies protocols for implementing replicated state machines for wide area networks. First it demonstrates the challenges by comparing two protocols designed for local area networks in a cluster-based wide-area setting and shows that existing protocols designed for local area networks do not perform well in wide-area settings. A generic rotating ...

  10. Structural and Functional Brain Remodeling during Pregnancy with Diffusion Tensor MRI and Resting-State Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Russell W.; Ho, Leon C.; Zhou, Iris Y.; Gao, Patrick P.; Chan, Kevin C.; Wu, Ed X.

    2015-01-01

    Although pregnancy-induced hormonal changes have been shown to alter the brain at the neuronal level, the exact effects of pregnancy on brain at the tissue level remain unclear. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) were employed to investigate and document the effects of pregnancy on the structure and function of the brain tissues. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley female rats were longitudinally studied at three days before mating (baseline) and seventeen days after mating (G17). G17 is equivalent to the early stage of the third trimester in humans. Seven age-matched nulliparous female rats served as non-pregnant controls and were scanned at the same time-points. For DTI, diffusivity was found to generally increase in the whole brain during pregnancy, indicating structural changes at microscopic levels that facilitated water molecular movement. Regionally, mean diffusivity increased more pronouncedly in the dorsal hippocampus while fractional anisotropy in the dorsal dentate gyrus increased significantly during pregnancy. For rsfMRI, bilateral functional connectivity in the hippocampus increased significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, fractional anisotropy increase in the dentate gyrus appeared to correlate with the bilateral functional connectivity increase in the hippocampus. These findings revealed tissue structural modifications in the whole brain during pregnancy, and that the hippocampus was structurally and functionally remodeled in a more marked manner. PMID:26658306

  11. Structural and Functional Brain Remodeling during Pregnancy with Diffusion Tensor MRI and Resting-State Functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell W Chan

    Full Text Available Although pregnancy-induced hormonal changes have been shown to alter the brain at the neuronal level, the exact effects of pregnancy on brain at the tissue level remain unclear. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI were employed to investigate and document the effects of pregnancy on the structure and function of the brain tissues. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley female rats were longitudinally studied at three days before mating (baseline and seventeen days after mating (G17. G17 is equivalent to the early stage of the third trimester in humans. Seven age-matched nulliparous female rats served as non-pregnant controls and were scanned at the same time-points. For DTI, diffusivity was found to generally increase in the whole brain during pregnancy, indicating structural changes at microscopic levels that facilitated water molecular movement. Regionally, mean diffusivity increased more pronouncedly in the dorsal hippocampus while fractional anisotropy in the dorsal dentate gyrus increased significantly during pregnancy. For rsfMRI, bilateral functional connectivity in the hippocampus increased significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, fractional anisotropy increase in the dentate gyrus appeared to correlate with the bilateral functional connectivity increase in the hippocampus. These findings revealed tissue structural modifications in the whole brain during pregnancy, and that the hippocampus was structurally and functionally remodeled in a more marked manner.

  12. Group-Level Progressive Alterations in Brain Connectivity Patterns Revealed by Diffusion-Tensor Brain Networks across Severity Stages in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rasero

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a chronically progressive neurodegenerative disease highly correlated to aging. Whether AD originates by targeting a localized brain area and propagates to the rest of the brain across disease-severity progression is a question with an unknown answer. Here, we aim to provide an answer to this question at the group-level by looking at differences in diffusion-tensor brain networks. In particular, making use of data from Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI, four different groups were defined (all of them matched by age, sex and education level: G1 (N1 = 36, healthy control subjects, Control, G2 (N2 = 36, early mild cognitive impairment, EMCI, G3 (N3 = 36, late mild cognitive impairment, LMCI and G4 (N4 = 36, AD. Diffusion-tensor brain networks were compared across three disease stages: stage I (Control vs. EMCI, stage II (Control vs. LMCI and stage III (Control vs. AD. The group comparison was performed using the multivariate distance matrix regression analysis, a technique that was born in genomics and was recently proposed to handle brain functional networks, but here applied to diffusion-tensor data. The results were threefold: First, no significant differences were found in stage I. Second, significant differences were found in stage II in the connectivity pattern of a subnetwork strongly associated to memory function (including part of the hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, fusiform gyrus, inferior and middle temporal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus and temporal pole. Third, a widespread disconnection across the entire AD brain was found in stage III, affecting more strongly the same memory subnetwork appearing in stage II, plus the other new subnetworks, including the default mode network, medial visual network, frontoparietal regions and striatum. Our results are consistent with a scenario where progressive alterations of connectivity arise as the disease severity increases and provide the

  13. Functional and white matter abnormalities in the language network in patients with schizophrenia: a combined study with diffusion tensor imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Elise; Delcroix, Nicolas; Alary, Mathieu; Razafimandimby, Annick; Brazo, Perrine; Delamillieure, Pascal; Dollfus, Sonia

    2013-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder characterized by functional abnormalities in the language network. Anatomical white matter (WM) abnormalities (volume and integrity) have also been reported for this pathology. Nevertheless, few studies have investigated anatomo-functional relationships in schizophrenia, and none has focused on the language comprehension network in relation to various diffusion parameters. We hypothesized that the WM abnormalities that are reflected by several diffusion parameters underlie functional deficits in the language network. Eighteen DSM-IV patients with schizophrenia and 18 healthy controls without any significant differences in sex, age, or level of education were included. First, functional brain activation within the language network was estimated. Then, using diffusion tensor imaging, fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD) values were extracted within WM regions adjacent to this network and their anatomo-functional relationships were investigated. Compared with healthy participants, both functional and diffusion deficits were observed in patients with schizophrenia. Primarily, an altered diffusion-functional relationship was observed in patients in the left middle temporal region: functional activations were positively correlated with FA, but were negatively correlated with RD. Our findings indicate a close relationship between diffusion and functional deficits in patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that WM integrity disturbance might be one cause of functional alterations in the language network in patients with schizophrenia. Thus, the present multimodal study improves our understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Simplicial Ricci Tensor

    CERN Document Server

    Alsing, Paul M; Miller, Warner A; 10.1088/0264-9381/28/15/155007

    2011-01-01

    The Ricci tensor (Ric) is fundamental to Einstein's geometric theory of gravitation. The 3-dimensional Ric of a spacelike surface vanishes at the moment of time symmetry for vacuum spacetimes. The 4-dimensional Ric is the Einstein tensor for such spacetimes. More recently the Ric was used by Hamilton to define a non-linear, diffusive Ricci flow (RF) that was fundamental to Perelman's proof of the Poincare conjecture. Analytic applications of RF can be found in many fields including general relativity and mathematics. Numerically it has been applied broadly to communication networks, medical physics, computer design and more. In this paper, we use Regge calculus (RC) to provide the first geometric discretization of the Ric. This result is fundamental for higher-dimensional generalizations of discrete RF. We construct this tensor on both the simplicial lattice and its dual and prove their equivalence. We show that the Ric is an edge-based weighted average of deficit divided by an edge-based weighted average of ...

  15. Markov State Models of gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Brian K; Tse, Margaret J; Sato, Royce R; Read, Elizabeth L

    2017-02-06

    Gene regulatory networks with dynamics characterized by multiple stable states underlie cell fate-decisions. Quantitative models that can link molecular-level knowledge of gene regulation to a global understanding of network dynamics have the potential to guide cell-reprogramming strategies. Networks are often modeled by the stochastic Chemical Master Equation, but methods for systematic identification of key properties of the global dynamics are currently lacking. The method identifies the number, phenotypes, and lifetimes of long-lived states for a set of common gene regulatory network models. Application of transition path theory to the constructed Markov State Model decomposes global dynamics into a set of dominant transition paths and associated relative probabilities for stochastic state-switching. In this proof-of-concept study, we found that the Markov State Model provides a general framework for analyzing and visualizing stochastic multistability and state-transitions in gene networks. Our results suggest that this framework-adopted from the field of atomistic Molecular Dynamics-can be a useful tool for quantitative Systems Biology at the network scale.

  16. Storing quantum states in bosonic dissipative networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Ponte, M A; Mizrahi, S S [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Caixa Postal 676, Sao Carlos, 13565-905, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Moussa, M H Y [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-590 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-11-14

    By considering a network of dissipative quantum harmonic oscillators, we deduce and analyse the optimum topologies which are able to store quantum superposition states, protecting them from decoherence, for the longest period of time. The storage is made dynamically, in that the states to be protected evolve through the network before being retrieved back in the oscillator where they were prepared. The decoherence time during the dynamic storage process is computed and we demonstrate that it is proportional to the number of oscillators in the network for a particular regime of parameters.

  17. Peeking Network States with Clustered Patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinoh [Texas A & M Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sim, Alex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Network traffic monitoring has long been a core element for effec- tive network management and security. However, it is still a chal- lenging task with a high degree of complexity for comprehensive analysis when considering multiple variables and ever-increasing traffic volumes to monitor. For example, one of the widely con- sidered approaches is to scrutinize probabilistic distributions, but it poses a scalability concern and multivariate analysis is not gen- erally supported due to the exponential increase of the complexity. In this work, we propose a novel method for network traffic moni- toring based on clustering, one of the powerful deep-learning tech- niques. We show that the new approach enables us to recognize clustered results as patterns representing the network states, which can then be utilized to evaluate “similarity” of network states over time. In addition, we define a new quantitative measure for the similarity between two compared network states observed in dif- ferent time windows, as a supportive means for intuitive analysis. Finally, we demonstrate the clustering-based network monitoring with public traffic traces, and show that the proposed approach us- ing the clustering method has a great opportunity for feasible, cost- effective network monitoring.

  18. Random tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2017-01-01

    Written by the creator of the modern theory of random tensors, this book is the first self-contained introductory text to this rapidly developing theory. Starting from notions familiar to the average researcher or PhD student in mathematical or theoretical physics, the book presents in detail the theory and its applications to physics. The recent detections of the Higgs boson at the LHC and gravitational waves at LIGO mark new milestones in Physics confirming long standing predictions of Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity. These two experimental results only reinforce today the need to find an underlying common framework of the two: the elusive theory of Quantum Gravity. Over the past thirty years, several alternatives have been proposed as theories of Quantum Gravity, chief among them String Theory. While these theories are yet to be tested experimentally, key lessons have already been learned. Whatever the theory of Quantum Gravity may be, it must incorporate random geometry in one form or another....

  19. Tensors for physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the science of tensors in a didactic way. The various types and ranks of tensors and the physical basis is presented. Cartesian Tensors are needed for the description of directional phenomena in many branches of physics and for the characterization the anisotropy of material properties. The first sections of the book provide an introduction to the vector and tensor algebra and analysis, with applications to physics,  at undergraduate level. Second rank tensors, in particular their symmetries, are discussed in detail. Differentiation and integration of fields, including generalizations of the Stokes law and the Gauss theorem, are treated. The physics relevant for the applications in mechanics, quantum mechanics, electrodynamics and hydrodynamics is presented. The second part of the book is devoted to  tensors of any rank, at graduate level.  Special topics are irreducible, i.e. symmetric traceless tensors, isotropic tensors, multipole potential tensors, spin tensors, integration and spin-...

  20. Bipartite quantum states and random complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Giorda, Paolo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a mapping between graphs and pure quantum bipartite states and show that the associated entanglement entropy conveys non-trivial information about the structure of the graph. Our primary goal is to investigate the family of random graphs known as complex networks. In the case of classical random graphs, we derive an analytic expression for the averaged entanglement entropy \\bar S while for general complex networks we rely on numerics. For a large number of nodes n we find a scaling \\bar {S} \\sim c log n +g_{ {e}} where both the prefactor c and the sub-leading O(1) term ge are characteristic of the different classes of complex networks. In particular, ge encodes topological features of the graphs and is named network topological entropy. Our results suggest that quantum entanglement may provide a powerful tool for the analysis of large complex networks with non-trivial topological properties.

  1. Tensor rank is not multiplicative under the tensor product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christandl, Matthias; Jensen, Asger Kjærulff; Zuiddam, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    The tensor rank of a tensor t is the smallest number r such that t can be decomposed as a sum of r simple tensors. Let s be a k-tensor and let t be an ℓ-tensor. The tensor product of s and t is a (k+ℓ)-tensor. Tensor rank is sub-multiplicative under the tensor product. We revisit the connection b...

  2. Distribution and Network of Basal Temporal Language Areas: A Study of the Combination of Electric Cortical Stimulation and Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enatsu, Rei; Kanno, Aya; Ookawa, Satoshi; Ochi, Satoko; Ishiai, Sumio; Nagamine, Takashi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2017-10-01

    The basal temporal language area (BTLA) is considered to have several functions in language processing; however, its brain network is still unknown. This study investigated the distribution and networks of the BTLA using a combination of electric cortical stimulation and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). 10 patients with intractable focal epilepsy who underwent presurgical evaluation with subdural electrodes were enrolled in this study (language dominant side: 6 patients, language nondominant side: 4 patients). Electric stimulation at 50 Hz was applied to the electrodes during Japanese sentence reading, morphograms (kanji) reading, and syllabograms (kana) reading tasks to identify the BTLA. DTI was used to identify the subcortical fibers originating from the BTLA found by electric stimulation. The BTLA was found in 6 patients who underwent implantation of the subdural electrodes in the dominant hemisphere. The BTLA was located anywhere between 20 mm and 56 mm posterior to the temporal tips. In 3 patients, electric stimulation of some or all areas within the BTLA induced disturbance in reading of kanji words only. DTI detected the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) in all patients and the uncinate fasciculus (UF) in 1 patient, originating from the BTLA. ILF was detected from both kanji-specific areas and kanji-nonspecific areas. This study indicates that the network of the BTLA is a part of a ventral stream and is mainly composed of the ILF, which acts as a critical structure for lexical retrieval. ILF is also associated with the specific processing of kanji words. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantum state transfer and network engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M

    2013-01-01

    Faithful communication is a necessary precondition for large-scale quantum information processing and networking, irrespective of the physical platform. Thus, the problems of quantum-state transfer and quantum-network engineering have attracted enormous interest over the last years, and constitute one of the most active areas of research in quantum information processing. The present volume introduces the reader to fundamental concepts and various aspects of this exciting research area, including links to other related areas and problems. The implementation of state-transfer schemes and the en

  4. Stress Impact on Resting State Brain Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, José Miguel; Sampaio, Adriana; Ferreira, Luís Miguel; Santos, Nadine Correia; Marques, Paulo; Marques, Fernanda; Palha, Joana Almeida; Cerqueira, João José; Sousa, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Resting state brain networks (RSNs) are spatially distributed large-scale networks, evidenced by resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Importantly, RSNs are implicated in several relevant brain functions and present abnormal functional patterns in many neuropsychiatric disorders, for which stress exposure is an established risk factor. Yet, so far, little is known about the effect of stress in the architecture of RSNs, both in resting state conditions or during shift to task performance. Herein we assessed the architecture of the RSNs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a cohort of participants exposed to prolonged stress (participants that had just finished their long period of preparation for the medical residence selection exam), and respective gender- and age-matched controls (medical students under normal academic activities). Analysis focused on the pattern of activity in resting state conditions and after deactivation. A volumetric estimation of the RSNs was also performed. Data shows that stressed participants displayed greater activation of the default mode (DMN), dorsal attention (DAN), ventral attention (VAN), sensorimotor (SMN), and primary visual (VN) networks than controls. Importantly, stressed participants also evidenced impairments in the deactivation of resting state-networks when compared to controls. These functional changes are paralleled by a constriction of the DMN that is in line with the pattern of brain atrophy observed after stress exposure. These results reveal that stress impacts on activation-deactivation pattern of RSNs, a finding that may underlie stress-induced changes in several dimensions of brain activity.

  5. Quantum state transfer and network engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (Greece); Jex, Igor (ed.) [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering

    2014-03-01

    Presents the basics of large-scale quantum information processing and networking. Covers most aspects of the problems of state transfer and quantum network engineering. Reflects the interdisciplinary nature of the field. Presents various theoretical approaches as well as possible implementations and related experiments. Faithful communication is a necessary precondition for large-scale quantum information processing and networking, irrespective of the physical platform. Thus, the problems of quantum-state transfer and quantum-network engineering have attracted enormous interest over the last years, and constitute one of the most active areas of research in quantum information processing. The present volume introduces the reader to fundamental concepts and various aspects of this exciting research area, including links to other related areas and problems. The implementation of state-transfer schemes and the engineering of quantum networks are discussed in the framework of various quantum optical and condensed matter systems, emphasizing the interdisciplinary character of the research area. Each chapter is a review of theoretical or experimental achievements on a particular topic, written by leading scientists in the field. The volume aims at both newcomers as well as experienced researchers.

  6. 47 CFR 11.20 - State Relay Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State Relay Network. 11.20 Section 11.20... Network. This network is composed of State Relay (SR) sources, leased common carrier communications facilities or any other available communication facilities. The network distributes State EAS messages...

  7. Quantum Entanglement in Neural Network States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong-Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-04-01

    Machine learning, one of today's most rapidly growing interdisciplinary fields, promises an unprecedented perspective for solving intricate quantum many-body problems. Understanding the physical aspects of the representative artificial neural-network states has recently become highly desirable in the applications of machine-learning techniques to quantum many-body physics. In this paper, we explore the data structures that encode the physical features in the network states by studying the quantum entanglement properties, with a focus on the restricted-Boltzmann-machine (RBM) architecture. We prove that the entanglement entropy of all short-range RBM states satisfies an area law for arbitrary dimensions and bipartition geometry. For long-range RBM states, we show by using an exact construction that such states could exhibit volume-law entanglement, implying a notable capability of RBM in representing quantum states with massive entanglement. Strikingly, the neural-network representation for these states is remarkably efficient, in the sense that the number of nonzero parameters scales only linearly with the system size. We further examine the entanglement properties of generic RBM states by randomly sampling the weight parameters of the RBM. We find that their averaged entanglement entropy obeys volume-law scaling, and the meantime strongly deviates from the Page entropy of the completely random pure states. We show that their entanglement spectrum has no universal part associated with random matrix theory and bears a Poisson-type level statistics. Using reinforcement learning, we demonstrate that RBM is capable of finding the ground state (with power-law entanglement) of a model Hamiltonian with a long-range interaction. In addition, we show, through a concrete example of the one-dimensional symmetry-protected topological cluster states, that the RBM representation may also be used as a tool to analytically compute the entanglement spectrum. Our results uncover the

  8. Quantum Entanglement in Neural Network States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ling Deng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning, one of today’s most rapidly growing interdisciplinary fields, promises an unprecedented perspective for solving intricate quantum many-body problems. Understanding the physical aspects of the representative artificial neural-network states has recently become highly desirable in the applications of machine-learning techniques to quantum many-body physics. In this paper, we explore the data structures that encode the physical features in the network states by studying the quantum entanglement properties, with a focus on the restricted-Boltzmann-machine (RBM architecture. We prove that the entanglement entropy of all short-range RBM states satisfies an area law for arbitrary dimensions and bipartition geometry. For long-range RBM states, we show by using an exact construction that such states could exhibit volume-law entanglement, implying a notable capability of RBM in representing quantum states with massive entanglement. Strikingly, the neural-network representation for these states is remarkably efficient, in the sense that the number of nonzero parameters scales only linearly with the system size. We further examine the entanglement properties of generic RBM states by randomly sampling the weight parameters of the RBM. We find that their averaged entanglement entropy obeys volume-law scaling, and the meantime strongly deviates from the Page entropy of the completely random pure states. We show that their entanglement spectrum has no universal part associated with random matrix theory and bears a Poisson-type level statistics. Using reinforcement learning, we demonstrate that RBM is capable of finding the ground state (with power-law entanglement of a model Hamiltonian with a long-range interaction. In addition, we show, through a concrete example of the one-dimensional symmetry-protected topological cluster states, that the RBM representation may also be used as a tool to analytically compute the entanglement spectrum. Our

  9. Entangled scalar and tensor fluctuations during inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Hael; Vardanyan, Tereza [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University,5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-11-29

    We show how the choice of an inflationary state that entangles scalar and tensor fluctuations affects the angular two-point correlation functions of the T, E, and B modes of the cosmic microwave background. The propagators for a state starting with some general quadratic entanglement are solved exactly, leading to predictions for the primordial scalar-scalar, tensor-tensor, and scalar-tensor power spectra. These power spectra are expressed in terms of general functions that describe the entangling structure of the initial state relative to the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum. We illustrate how such a state would modify the angular correlations in the CMB with a simple example where the initial state is a small perturbation away from the Bunch-Davies state. Because the state breaks some of the rotational symmetries, the angular power spectra no longer need be strictly diagonal.

  10. Monograph On Tensor Notations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirlin, Samuel W.

    1993-01-01

    Eight-page report describes systems of notation used most commonly to represent tensors of various ranks, with emphasis on tensors in Cartesian coordinate systems. Serves as introductory or refresher text for scientists, engineers, and others familiar with basic concepts of coordinate systems, vectors, and partial derivatives. Indicial tensor, vector, dyadic, and matrix notations, and relationships among them described.

  11. Application of tensor analysis

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Albert Joseph

    1957-01-01

    Standard work applies tensorial methods to subjects within realm of advanced college mathematics. Text explains fundamental ideas and notation of tensor theory; covers geometrical treatment of tensor algebra; introduces theory of differentiation of tensors; and applies mathematics to dynamics, electricity, elasticity and hydrodynamics. 685 exercises, most with answers.

  12. Octupolar tensors for liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yannan; Qi, Liqun; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2018-01-01

    A third-rank three-dimensional symmetric traceless tensor, called the octupolar tensor, has been introduced to study tetrahedratic nematic phases in liquid crystals. The octupolar potential, a scalar-valued function generated on the unit sphere by that tensor, should ideally have four maxima (on the vertices of a tetrahedron), but it was recently found to possess an equally generic variant with three maxima instead of four. It was also shown that the irreducible admissible region for the octupolar tensor in a three-dimensional parameter space is bounded by a dome-shaped surface, beneath which is a separatrix surface connecting the two generic octupolar states. The latter surface, which was obtained through numerical continuation, may be physically interpreted as marking a possible intra-octupolar transition. In this paper, by using the resultant theory of algebraic geometry and the E-characteristic polynomial of spectral theory of tensors, we give a closed-form, algebraic expression for both the dome-shaped surface and the separatrix surface. This turns the envisaged intra-octupolar transition into a quantitative, possibly observable prediction.

  13. Stress Impact on Resting State Brain Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Soares

    Full Text Available Resting state brain networks (RSNs are spatially distributed large-scale networks, evidenced by resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies. Importantly, RSNs are implicated in several relevant brain functions and present abnormal functional patterns in many neuropsychiatric disorders, for which stress exposure is an established risk factor. Yet, so far, little is known about the effect of stress in the architecture of RSNs, both in resting state conditions or during shift to task performance. Herein we assessed the architecture of the RSNs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in a cohort of participants exposed to prolonged stress (participants that had just finished their long period of preparation for the medical residence selection exam, and respective gender- and age-matched controls (medical students under normal academic activities. Analysis focused on the pattern of activity in resting state conditions and after deactivation. A volumetric estimation of the RSNs was also performed. Data shows that stressed participants displayed greater activation of the default mode (DMN, dorsal attention (DAN, ventral attention (VAN, sensorimotor (SMN, and primary visual (VN networks than controls. Importantly, stressed participants also evidenced impairments in the deactivation of resting state-networks when compared to controls. These functional changes are paralleled by a constriction of the DMN that is in line with the pattern of brain atrophy observed after stress exposure. These results reveal that stress impacts on activation-deactivation pattern of RSNs, a finding that may underlie stress-induced changes in several dimensions of brain activity.

  14. Russian State Leveling Network (present and future)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurova, Elena; Kopeikin, Sergei; Karpik, Aleksander

    2017-04-01

    In August 2016 the sixth session of the United Nations Committee of Experts of Global Geospatial Information Management (UN-GGIM) endorsed the roadmap for the development of a Global Geodetic Reference Frame (GGRF) and urged countries to join efforts for its creation. In response to the UN appeal in this article describes the current state of the high-precision Leveling Network in Russia and prospects of its development. In this paper, we consider projects related to the construction of new high-precision leveling lines by the classical methods, as well as issues of creating high-precision leveling network, associated with the development and implementation of a fundamentally new method of determining heights in geodesy - chronometric leveling based on the application of quantum metrology of time and the fundamental laws of general relativity. Keywords: leveling network, chronometric leveling, quantum metrology of time, the general theory of relativity.

  15. Abnormal functional network connectivity among resting-state networks in children with frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, E; Zamyadi, M; Raybaud, C; Snead, O C; Smith, M L

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is considered a disorder of neural networks. The aims of this study were to assess functional connectivity within resting-state networks and functional network connectivity across resting-state networks by use of resting-state fMRI in children with frontal lobe epilepsy and to relate changes in resting-state networks with neuropsychological function. Fifteen patients with frontal lobe epilepsy and normal MR imaging and 14 healthy control subjects were recruited. Spatial independent component analysis was used to identify the resting-state networks, including frontal, attention, default mode network, sensorimotor, visual, and auditory networks. The Z-maps of resting-state networks were compared between patients and control subjects. The relation between abnormal connectivity and neuropsychological function was assessed. Correlations from all pair-wise combinations of independent components were performed for each group and compared between groups. The frontal network was the only network that showed reduced connectivity in patients relative to control subjects. The remaining 5 networks demonstrated both reduced and increased functional connectivity within resting-state networks in patients. There was a weak association between connectivity in frontal network and executive function (P = .029) and a significant association between sensorimotor network and fine motor function (P = .004). Control subjects had 79 pair-wise independent components that showed significant temporal coherence across all resting-state networks except for default mode network-auditory network. Patients had 66 pairs of independent components that showed significant temporal coherence across all resting-state networks. Group comparison showed reduced functional network connectivity between default mode network-attention, frontal-sensorimotor, and frontal-visual networks and increased functional network connectivity between frontal-attention, default mode network-sensorimotor, and frontal

  16. Applications of neural network prediction of conformational states for small peptides from spectra and of fold classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Røgen, Peter; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic structures of small peptides were calculated 'ab initio' with the help of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics that rendered a set of conformational states of the peptides. For the structures of these states it was possible to derive atomic polar tensors that allowed us...... but already at this stage they could be compared with reasonable agreements to experiments. The neural networks are shown to be good in distinguishing the different conformers of the small alanine peptides. especially when in the gas phase. Also the task of predicting protein fold-classes, defined from line...

  17. A Model of Mental State Transition Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Hua; Jiang, Peilin; Xiao, Shuang; Ren, Fuji; Kuroiwa, Shingo

    Emotion is one of the most essential and basic attributes of human intelligence. Current AI (Artificial Intelligence) research is concentrating on physical components of emotion, rarely is it carried out from the view of psychology directly(1). Study on the model of artificial psychology is the first step in the development of human-computer interaction. As affective computing remains unpredictable, creating a reasonable mental model becomes the primary task for building a hybrid system. A pragmatic mental model is also the fundament of some key topics such as recognition and synthesis of emotions. In this paper a Mental State Transition Network Model(2) is proposed to detect human emotions. By a series of psychological experiments, we present a new way to predict coming human's emotions depending on the various current emotional states under various stimuli. Besides, people in different genders and characters are taken into consideration in our investigation. According to the psychological experiments data derived from 200 questionnaires, a Mental State Transition Network Model for describing the transitions in distribution among the emotions and relationships between internal mental situations and external are concluded. Further more the coefficients of the mental transition network model were achieved. Comparing seven relative evaluating experiments, an average precision rate of 0.843 is achieved using a set of samples for the proposed model.

  18. Glassy States of Aging Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroogh Hassanibesheli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Individuals often develop reluctance to change their social relations, called “secondary homebody”, even though their interactions with their environment evolve with time. Some memory effect is loosely present deforcing changes. In other words, in the presence of memory, relations do not change easily. In order to investigate some history or memory effect on social networks, we introduce a temporal kernel function into the Heider conventional balance theory, allowing for the “quality” of past relations to contribute to the evolution of the system. This memory effect is shown to lead to the emergence of aged networks, thereby perfectly describing—and what is more, measuring—the aging process of links (“social relations”. It is shown that such a memory does not change the dynamical attractors of the system, but does prolong the time necessary to reach the “balanced states”. The general trend goes toward obtaining either global (“paradise” or “bipolar” or local (“jammed” balanced states, but is profoundly affected by aged relations. The resistance of elder links against changes decelerates the evolution of the system and traps it into so named glassy states. In contrast to balance configurations which live on stable states, such long-lived glassy states can survive in unstable states.

  19. Alternative steady states in ecological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Yael; Shnerb, Nadav M.; Kessler, David A.

    2017-07-01

    In many natural situations, one observes a local system with many competing species that is coupled by weak immigration to a regional species pool. The dynamics of such a system is dominated by its stable and uninvadable (SU) states. When the competition matrix is random, the number of SUs depends on the average value and variance of its entries. Here we consider the problem in the limit of weak competition and large variance. Using a yes-no interaction model, we show that the number of SUs corresponds to the number of maximum cliques in an Erdös-Rényi network. The number of SUs grows exponentially with the number of species in this limit, unless the network is completely asymmetric. In the asymmetric limit, the number of SUs is O (1 ) . Numerical simulations suggest that these results are valid for models with a continuous distribution of competition terms.

  20. Relationship of Topology, Multiscale Phase Synchronization, and State Transitions in Human Brain Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkyung Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available How the brain reconstitutes consciousness and cognition after a major perturbation like general anesthesia is an important question with significant neuroscientific and clinical implications. Recent empirical studies in animals and humans suggest that the recovery of consciousness after anesthesia is not random but ordered. Emergence patterns have been classified as progressive and abrupt transitions from anesthesia to consciousness, with associated differences in duration and electroencephalogram (EEG properties. We hypothesized that the progressive and abrupt emergence patterns from the unconscious state are associated with, respectively, continuous and discontinuous synchronization transitions in functional brain networks. The discontinuous transition is explainable with the concept of explosive synchronization, which has been studied almost exclusively in network science. We used the Kuramato model, a simple oscillatory network model, to simulate progressive and abrupt transitions in anatomical human brain networks acquired from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI of 82 brain regions. To facilitate explosive synchronization, distinct frequencies for hub nodes with a large frequency disassortativity (i.e., higher frequency nodes linking with lower frequency nodes, or vice versa were applied to the brain network. In this simulation study, we demonstrated that both progressive and abrupt transitions follow distinct synchronization processes at the individual node, cluster, and global network levels. The characteristic synchronization patterns of brain regions that are “progressive and earlier” or “abrupt but delayed” account for previously reported behavioral responses of gradual and abrupt emergence from the unconscious state. The characteristic network synchronization processes observed at different scales provide new insights into how regional brain functions are reconstituted during progressive and abrupt emergence from the unconscious

  1. Abnormal Connectivity Within Executive Resting-State Network in Migraine With Aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessitore, Alessandro; Russo, Antonio; Conte, Francesca; Giordano, Alfonso; De Stefano, Manuela; Lavorgna, Luigi; Corbo, Daniele; Caiazzo, Giuseppina; Esposito, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the executive control network connectivity integrity in patients with migraine with aura, in the interictal period, in comparison to patients with migraine without aura and healthy controls. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared executive control network functional connectivity in 20 patients with migraine with aura vs 20 sex and age-matched patients with migraine without aura and 20 healthy controls, and assessed the correlation between executive control network functional connectivity and clinical features of patients with migraine. We used voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging to investigate potential structural or microstructural changes. Neuropsychological data revealed no significant executive dysfunction in patients with migraine. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging showed significant group differences in right middle frontal gyrus (Talairach coordinates x, y, z: +26, +2, +48) and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (Talairach coordinates x, y, z: +6, +13, +49), indicating that these areas had a decreased component activity in both patients with migraine with and without aura when compared with healthy controls. Conversely, there were no significant differences in the executive control network functional connectivity between patients with migraine with and without aura (P aura, in the interictal period. Although this functional phenomenon is present in the absence of clinically relevant executive deficits, it may reflect a vulnerability to executive high-demanding conditions of daily living activities in patients with migraine. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  2. Cartesian tensors an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Temple, G

    2004-01-01

    This undergraduate text provides an introduction to the theory of Cartesian tensors, defining tensors as multilinear functions of direction, and simplifying many theorems in a manner that lends unity to the subject. The author notes the importance of the analysis of the structure of tensors in terms of spectral sets of projection operators as part of the very substance of quantum theory. He therefore provides an elementary discussion of the subject, in addition to a view of isotropic tensors and spinor analysis within the confines of Euclidean space. The text concludes with an examination of t

  3. Progress Towards Near-Realtime Seismic Moment Tensors at the Alaska Earthquake Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratchkovski, N.; Hansen, R.

    2004-12-01

    A near-realtime seismic moment tensor inversion routine has been operational at the Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC) in a test mode for over a year. The AEIC real-time earthquake detection system, based on the Antelope software package, triggers the automatic moment-tensor inversion routine. It is based on a software package developed at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory and performs a time domain inversion of three-component seismic data for the seismic moment tensor. We use a library of precalculated Green's functions for a suite of regional velocity models and a range of source depths (from 5 to 200 km with 5 km interval) to compute synthetic seismograms. The resulting moment tensor inversion information is distributed via the web. The Alaska seismic network in its current configuration includes 45 broad-band sites. Stable inversion results can be obtained for events with magnitude 4.0 and greater in the network core area (southern and central Alaska) and 4.5 and greater in the rest of the state including the Aleutian Islands. We will present a catalog of nearly 200 regional moment tensor solutions for Alaska and Aleutian Islands starting from October, 2002 through the present including, the 2002 Denali Fault earthquake sequence.

  4. Application of radial basis neural network for state estimation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    An original application of radial basis function (RBF) neural network for power system state estimation is proposed in this paper. The property of massive parallelism of neural networks is employed for this. The application of RBF neural network for state estimation is investigated by testing its applicability on a IEEE 14 bus ...

  5. 47 CFR 54.519 - State telecommunications networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State telecommunications networks. 54.519 Section 54.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... telecommunications networks. (a) Telecommunications services. State telecommunications networks may secure discounts...

  6. 75 FR 63253 - State-56, Network User Account Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ..., Network User Account Records SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Department of State proposes to create a system of records, Network User Account Records, State-56, pursuant to the provisions of the.... It is proposed that the new system will be named ``Network User Account Records.'' It is also...

  7. A tensor product state approach to spin-1/2 square J1-J2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model: evidence for deconfined quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Verstraete, Frank; Wen, Xiang-Gang

    We study this model using the cluster update algorithm for tensor product states (TPSs). We find that the ground state energies at finite sizes and in the thermodynamic limit are in good agreement with the exact diagonalization study. At the largest bond dimension available D = 9 and through finite size scaling of the magnetization order near the transition point, we accurately determine the critical point J2c1 = 0 . 53 (1) J1 and the critical exponents β = 0 . 50 (4) . In the intermediate region we find a paramagnetic ground state without any static valence bond solid (VBS) order, supported by an exponentially decaying spin-spin correlation while a power law decaying dimer-dimer correlation. By fitting a universal scaling function for the spin-spin correlation we find the critical exponents ν = 0 . 68 (3) and ηs = 0 . 34 (6) , which is very close to the observed critical exponents for deconfined quantum critical point (DQCP) in other systems. Thus our numerical results strongly suggest a Landau forbidden phase transition from Neel order to VBS order at J2c1 = 0 . 53 (1) J1 . This project is supported by the EU Strep project QUEVADIS, the ERC Grant QUERG, and the FWF SFB Grants FoQuS and ViCoM; and the Institute for Quantum Information and Matter.

  8. Quaternion-valued echo state networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yili; Jahanchahi, Cyrus; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-04-01

    Quaternion-valued echo state networks (QESNs) are introduced to cater for 3-D and 4-D processes, such as those observed in the context of renewable energy (3-D wind modeling) and human centered computing (3-D inertial body sensors). The introduction of QESNs is made possible by the recent emergence of quaternion nonlinear activation functions with local analytic properties, required by nonlinear gradient descent training algorithms. To make QENSs second-order optimal for the generality of quaternion signals (both circular and noncircular), we employ augmented quaternion statistics to introduce widely linear QESNs. To that end, the standard widely linear model is modified so as to suit the properties of dynamical reservoir, typically realized by recurrent neural networks. This allows for a full exploitation of second-order information in the data, contained both in the covariance and pseudocovariances, and a rigorous account of second-order noncircularity (improperness), and the corresponding power mismatch and coupling between the data components. Simulations in the prediction setting on both benchmark circular and noncircular signals and on noncircular real-world 3-D body motion data support the analysis.

  9. Deep Echo State Network (DeepESN): A Brief Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gallicchio, Claudio; Micheli, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    The study of deep recurrent neural networks (RNNs) and, in particular, of deep Reservoir Computing (RC) is gaining an increasing research attention in the neural networks community. The recently introduced deep Echo State Network (deepESN) model opened the way to an extremely efficient approach for designing deep neural networks for temporal data. At the same time, the study of deepESNs allowed to shed light on the intrinsic properties of state dynamics developed by hierarchical compositions ...

  10. Changes in cognitive state alter human functional brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaak Nasser Moussa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of the brain as a whole system can be accomplished using network theory principles. Research has shown that human functional brain networks during a resting state exhibit small-world properties and high degree nodes, or hubs, localized to brain areas consistent with the default mode network (DMN. However, the study of brain networks across different tasks and or cognitive states has been inconclusive. Research in this field is important because the underpinnings of behavioral output are inherently dependent on whether or not brain networks are dynamic. This is the first comprehensive study to evaluate multiple network metrics at a voxel-wise resolution in the human brain at both the whole brain and regional level under various conditions: resting state, visual stimulation, and multisensory (auditory and visual stimulation. Our results show that despite global network stability, functional brain networks exhibit considerable task-induced changes in connectivity, efficiency, and community structure at the regional level.

  11. Acute Effects of Modafinil on Brain Resting State Networks in Young Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieramico, Valentina; Ferretti, Antonio; Macchia, Antonella; Tommasi, Marco; Saggino, Aristide; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Manna, Antonietta; Navarra, Riccardo; Cieri, Filippo; Stuppia, Liborio; Tartaro, Armando; Sensi, Stefano L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing debate on the use of drugs that promote cognitive enhancement. Amphetamine-like drugs have been employed as cognitive enhancers, but they show important side effects and induce addiction. In this study, we investigated the use of modafinil which appears to have less side effects compared to other amphetamine-like drugs. We analyzed effects on cognitive performances and brain resting state network activity of 26 healthy young subjects. Methodology A single dose (100 mg) of modafinil was administered in a double-blind and placebo-controlled study. Both groups were tested for neuropsychological performances with the Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices II set (APM) before and three hours after administration of drug or placebo. Resting state functional magnetic resonance (rs-FMRI) was also used, before and after three hours, to investigate changes in the activity of resting state brain networks. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was employed to evaluate differences in structural connectivity between the two groups. Protocol ID: Modrest_2011; NCT01684306; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306. Principal Findings Results indicate that a single dose of modafinil improves cognitive performance as assessed by APM. Rs-fMRI showed that the drug produces a statistically significant increased activation of Frontal Parietal Control (FPC; pmodafinil has cognitive enhancing properties and provide functional connectivity data to support these effects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684306 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306. PMID:23935959

  12. Quantum theory with bold operator tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Lucien

    2015-08-06

    In this paper, we present a formulation of quantum theory in terms of bold operator tensors. A circuit is built up of operations where an operation corresponds to a use of an apparatus. We associate collections of operator tensors (which together comprise a bold operator) with these apparatus uses. We give rules for combining bold operator tensors such that, for a circuit, they give a probability distribution over the possible outcomes. If we impose certain physicality constraints on the bold operator tensors, then we get exactly the quantum formalism. We provide both symbolic and diagrammatic ways to represent these calculations. This approach is manifestly covariant in that it does not require us to foliate the circuit into time steps and then evolve a state. Thus, the approach forms a natural starting point for an operational approach to quantum field theory. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Networking Projects around the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinck, Nancy A., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews networking projects that have been developed by educational institutions and computer companies. Highlights include minicomputers that network personal computer workstations; voice mail messages; data processing systems; linking university databases; the National Science Foundation Network (NSFNET); a computer link between a high school…

  14. Adiabatic ground state preparation in an expanding lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazit, Snir; Olund, Chris; Yao, Norman

    2017-04-01

    We numerically investigate the newly proposed s-source framework for constructing ground state wave functions of gapped Hamiltonians. The key idea is to utilize the adiabatic principle to build a tensor network representation that smoothly interpolates between the ground state of system sizes L and 2L via an interleaved set of ancillary degrees of freedom. Repeatedly applying this procedure reproduces the thermodynamic limit. The scheme should be contrasted with conventional tensor network methods that rely on the variational principle to target the ground state by iteratively improving a variational energy. We introduce a simple yet flexible tensor network structure and an optimization protocol borrowing techniques from quantum control theory. We anticipate that this approach can, in principle, allow access to problems beyond current tensor network technology and even serve as an experimental scheme for ground state preparation in quantum engineered systems.

  15. Modeling the evolution of lithium-ion particle contact distributions using a fabric tensor approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stershic, Andrew [Duke University; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Nanda, Jagjit [ORNL

    2015-08-25

    Electrode microstructure and processing can strongly influence lithium-ion battery performance such as capacity retention, power, and rate. Battery electrodes are multi-phase composite structures wherein conductive diluents and binder bond active material to a current collector. The structure and response of this composite network during repeated electrochemical cycling directly affects battery performance characteristics. We propose the fabric tensor formalism for describing the structure and evolution of the electrode microstructure. Fabric tensors are directional measures of particulate assemblies based on inter-particle connectivity, relating to the structural and transport properties of the electrode. Fabric tensor analysis is applied to experimental data-sets for positive electrode made of lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide, captured by X-ray tomography for several compositions and consolidation pressures. We show that fabric tensors capture the evolution of inter-particle contact distribution and are therefore good measures for the internal state of and electronic transport within the electrode. The fabric tensor analysis is also applied to Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of electrode microstructures using spherical particles with size distributions from the tomography. Furthermore, these results do not follow the experimental trends, which indicates that the particle size distribution alone is not a sufficient measure for the electrode microstructures in DEM simulations.

  16. Tensors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Nazrul

    2006-01-01

    About the Book: The book is written is in easy-to-read style with corresponding examples. The main aim of this book is to precisely explain the fundamentals of Tensors and their applications to Mechanics, Elasticity, Theory of Relativity, Electromagnetic, Riemannian Geometry and many other disciplines of science and engineering, in a lucid manner. The text has been explained section wise, every concept has been narrated in the form of definition, examples and questions related to the concept taught. The overall package of the book is highly useful and interesting for the people associated with the field. Contents: Preliminaries Tensor Algebra Metric Tensor and Riemannian Metric Christoffel`s Symbols and Covariant Differentiation Riemann-Christoffel Tensor The e-Systems and the Generalized Krönecker Deltas Geometry Analytical Mechanics Curvature of a Curve, Geodesic Parallelism of Vectors Ricci`s Coefficients of Rotation and Congruence Hyper Surfaces

  17. Orthogonal tensor decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamara G. Kolda

    2000-03-01

    The authors explore the orthogonal decomposition of tensors (also known as multi-dimensional arrays or n-way arrays) using two different definitions of orthogonality. They present numerous examples to illustrate the difficulties in understanding such decompositions. They conclude with a counterexample to a tensor extension of the Eckart-Young SVD approximation theorem by Leibovici and Sabatier [Linear Algebra Appl. 269(1998):307--329].

  18. Investigation of cognitive circuits using steady-state cerebral blood volume and diffusion tensor imaging in patients with mild cognitive impairment following electrical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang-hyun [Catholic University of Korea, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Cheong Hoon; Joo, So Young [Hallym University College of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Myung Hun [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Dongan-gu Anyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Soyeon; Lee, Ho Young; Ohn, Suk Hoon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dongan-gu Anyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    We utilized cerebral blood volume (CBV) magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate changes in cognitive networks in patients experiencing cognitive dysfunction following electrical injury. Cognitive function was assessed across various domains, including attention, verbal memory, executive function, and language. Depressive symptoms were also evaluated. CBV maps and DTI measures were obtained from 24 patients (age, 41.8 ± 5.8 years; education, 13.3 ± 1.9 years) and 24 healthy controls (age, 42.3 ± 2.7 years; education, 14.3 ± 1.9 years). CBV maps and DTI measures were compared between patients and controls, and correlations between these measures and each cognitive assessment score were examined. Patients exhibited lower attention, verbal memory, and executive function scores than controls (all p < 0.01). Patients also exhibited higher depression scores than controls (p < 0.01), as well as a predominant increase in CBV in the cerebellar vermis relative to that of controls (height p < uncorrected 0.001, extent p < corrected 0.05). Correlation analyses revealed a strong association between executive function scores and CBV in the bilateral posterior cingulate cortex and left mammillary body in patients (height p < uncorrected 0.001, extent p < corrected 0.05). There were no significant differences in DTI measures between patients and controls. The CBV maps showed hypermetabolism in the cerebello-limbic system; DTI did not find any microstructural changes. Our results suggest that patients experiencing cognitive dysfunction following electrical injury may possess a cognitive reserve that protects against deteriorating conditions such as dementia. (orig.)

  19. Information Flow Between Resting-State Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Ibai; Erramuzpe, Asier; Escudero, Iñaki; Mateos, Beatriz; Cabrera, Alberto; Marinazzo, Daniele; Sanz-Arigita, Ernesto J; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Cortes Diaz, Jesus M

    2015-11-01

    The resting brain dynamics self-organize into a finite number of correlated patterns known as resting-state networks (RSNs). It is well known that techniques such as independent component analysis can separate the brain activity at rest to provide such RSNs, but the specific pattern of interaction between RSNs is not yet fully understood. To this aim, we propose here a novel method to compute the information flow (IF) between different RSNs from resting-state magnetic resonance imaging. After hemodynamic response function blind deconvolution of all voxel signals, and under the hypothesis that RSNs define regions of interest, our method first uses principal component analysis to reduce dimensionality in each RSN to next compute IF (estimated here in terms of transfer entropy) between the different RSNs by systematically increasing k (the number of principal components used in the calculation). When k=1, this method is equivalent to computing IF using the average of all voxel activities in each RSN. For k≥1, our method calculates the k multivariate IF between the different RSNs. We find that the average IF among RSNs is dimension dependent, increasing from k=1 (i.e., the average voxel activity) up to a maximum occurring at k=5 and to finally decay to zero for k≥10. This suggests that a small number of components (close to five) is sufficient to describe the IF pattern between RSNs. Our method--addressing differences in IF between RSNs for any generic data--can be used for group comparison in health or disease. To illustrate this, we have calculated the inter-RSN IF in a data set of Alzheimer's disease (AD) to find that the most significant differences between AD and controls occurred for k=2, in addition to AD showing increased IF w.r.t. The spatial localization of the k=2 component, within RSNs, allows the characterization of IF differences between AD and controls.

  20. The research on user behavior evaluation method for network state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengyuan; Xu, Haishui

    2017-08-01

    Based on the correlation between user behavior and network running state, this paper proposes a method of user behavior evaluation based on network state. Based on the analysis and evaluation methods in other fields of study, we introduce the theory and tools of data mining. Based on the network status information provided by the trusted network view, the user behavior data and the network state data are analysed. Finally, we construct the user behavior evaluation index and weight, and on this basis, we can accurately quantify the influence degree of the specific behavior of different users on the change of network running state, so as to provide the basis for user behavior control decision.

  1. Resting state networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cataldi, Mauro; Avoli, Massimo; Villers‐Sidani, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy ( TLE ) is typically described as a neurologic disorder affecting a cerebral network comprising the hippocampus proper and several anatomically related extrahippocampal regions...

  2. State Observer Design for Delayed Genetic Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ping Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic regulatory networks are dynamic systems which describe the interactions among gene products (mRNAs and proteins. The internal states of a genetic regulatory network consist of the concentrations of mRNA and proteins involved in it, which are very helpful in understanding its dynamic behaviors. However, because of some limitations such as experiment techniques, not all internal states of genetic regulatory network can be effectively measured. Therefore it becomes an important issue to estimate the unmeasured states via the available measurements. In this study, we design a state observer to estimate the states of genetic regulatory networks with time delays from available measurements. Furthermore, based on linear matrix inequality (LMI approach, a criterion is established to guarantee that the dynamic of estimation error is globally asymptotically stable. A gene repressillatory network is employed to illustrate the effectiveness of our design approach.

  3. Resting-state brain organization revealed by functional covariance networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain network studies using techniques of intrinsic connectivity network based on fMRI time series (TS-ICN and structural covariance network (SCN have mapped out functional and structural organization of human brain at respective time scales. However, there lacks a meso-time-scale network to bridge the ICN and SCN and get insights of brain functional organization. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We proposed a functional covariance network (FCN method by measuring the covariance of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF in BOLD signals across subjects, and compared the patterns of ALFF-FCNs with the TS-ICNs and SCNs by mapping the brain networks of default network, task-positive network and sensory networks. We demonstrated large overlap among FCNs, ICNs and SCNs and modular nature in FCNs and ICNs by using conjunctional analysis. Most interestingly, FCN analysis showed a network dichotomy consisting of anti-correlated high-level cognitive system and low-level perceptive system, which is a novel finding different from the ICN dichotomy consisting of the default-mode network and the task-positive network. CONCLUSION: The current study proposed an ALFF-FCN approach to measure the interregional correlation of brain activity responding to short periods of state, and revealed novel organization patterns of resting-state brain activity from an intermediate time scale.

  4. Tensor analysis for physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, J A

    1989-01-01

    This brilliant study by a famed mathematical scholar and former professor of mathematics at the University of Amsterdam integrates a concise exposition of the mathematical basis of tensor analysis with admirably chosen physical examples of the theory. The first five chapters incisively set out the mathematical theory underlying the use of tensors. The tensor algebra in EN and RN is developed in Chapters I and II. Chapter II introduces a sub-group of the affine group, then deals with the identification of quantities in EN. The tensor analysis in XN is developed in Chapter IV. In chapters VI through IX, Professor Schouten presents applications of the theory that are both intrinsically interesting and good examples of the use and advantages of the calculus. Chapter VI, intimately connected with Chapter III, shows that the dimensions of physical quantities depend upon the choice of the underlying group, and that tensor calculus is the best instrument for dealing with the properties of anisotropic media. In Chapte...

  5. Acute effects of modafinil on brain resting state networks in young healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Esposito

    Full Text Available There is growing debate on the use of drugs that promote cognitive enhancement. Amphetamine-like drugs have been employed as cognitive enhancers, but they show important side effects and induce addiction. In this study, we investigated the use of modafinil which appears to have less side effects compared to other amphetamine-like drugs. We analyzed effects on cognitive performances and brain resting state network activity of 26 healthy young subjects.A single dose (100 mg of modafinil was administered in a double-blind and placebo-controlled study. Both groups were tested for neuropsychological performances with the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices II set (APM before and three hours after administration of drug or placebo. Resting state functional magnetic resonance (rs-FMRI was also used, before and after three hours, to investigate changes in the activity of resting state brain networks. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI was employed to evaluate differences in structural connectivity between the two groups. Protocol ID: Modrest_2011; NCT01684306; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306.Results indicate that a single dose of modafinil improves cognitive performance as assessed by APM. Rs-fMRI showed that the drug produces a statistically significant increased activation of Frontal Parietal Control (FPC; p<0.04 and Dorsal Attention (DAN; p<0.04 networks. No modifications in structural connectivity were observed.Overall, our findings support the notion that modafinil has cognitive enhancing properties and provide functional connectivity data to support these effects.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684306 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306.

  6. Assessing state-level active living promotion using network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchthal, Opal Vanessa; Taniguchi, Nicole; Iskandar, Livia; Maddock, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a growing problem in the United States, one that is being addressed through the development of active living communities. However, active living promotion requires collaboration among organizations that may not have previously shared goals. A network analysis was conducted to assess Hawaii's active living promotion network. Twenty-six organizations playing a significant role in promoting active living in Hawaii were identified and surveyed about their frequency of contact, level of collaboration, and funding flow with other agencies. A communication network was identified linking all agencies. This network had many long pathways, impeding information flow. The Department of Health (DOH) and the State Nutrition and Physical Activity Coalition (NPAC) were central nodes, but DOH connected state agencies while NPAC linked county and voluntary organizations. Within the network, information sharing was common, but collaboration and formal partnership were low. Linkages between county and state agencies, between counties, and between state agencies with different core agendas were particularly low. Results suggest that in the early stages of development, active living networks may be divided by geography and core missions, requiring work to bridge these divides. Network mapping appears helpful in identifying areas for network development.

  7. Symmetric Tensor Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brachat, Jerome; Comon, Pierre; Mourrain, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for decomposing a symmetric tensor, of dimension n and order d, as a sum of rank-1 symmetric tensors, extending the algorithm of Sylvester devised in 1886 for binary forms. We recall the correspondence between the decomposition of a homogeneous polynomial in n variables....... Exploiting this duality, we propose necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such a decomposition of a given rank, using the properties of Hankel (and quasi-Hankel) matrices, derived from multivariate polynomials and normal form computations. This leads to the resolution of systems...

  8. Cosmic no-hair conjecture in scalar–tensor theories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In fact, during inflation there is no difference between scalar–tensor theories, Lyra's manifold and general relativity (GR). Keywords. Scalar–tensor theories; cosmic no-hair. PACS Nos 04.20.jb; 98.80.Hw. 1. Introduction. With regard to the question whether the Universe evolves to a homogeneous and isotropic state during ...

  9. Regional, Local, and In-mine Moment Tensors for the 2013 Rudna Mine collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whidden, K. M.; Rudzinski, L.; Lizurek, G.; Pankow, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    and time windows of 5 seconds, including P and S waves, also indicates an implosion source. However, a moment tensor calculated using an in-mine network of 26 short-period vertical seismometers with distances from 100 m to 8 km and first amplitude strategy to moment tensor solution, indicates a predominantly double-couple mechanism. Careful selection of time windows and moment tensor inversion method may be necessary to capture the full source for discrimination between tectonic and non-double-couple sources. Finally we compare the Rudna collapse to two other room-and-pillar mine collapses in the western United States. Their sources are similar although there are clear differences in Love wave amplitudes. Future work will investigate the relationship between seismic source, velocity structure, and shear wave generation for isotropic sources.

  10. Evaluation of bayesian tensor estimation using tensor coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Jin; Kim, In-Young; Jeong, Seok-Oh; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2009-06-21

    Fiber tractography, a unique and non-invasive method to estimate axonal fibers within white matter, constructs the putative streamlines from diffusion tensor MRI by interconnecting voxels according to the propagation direction defined by the diffusion tensor. This direction has uncertainties due to the properties of underlying fiber bundles, neighboring structures and image noise. Therefore, robust estimation of the diffusion direction is essential to reconstruct reliable fiber pathways. For this purpose, we propose a tensor estimation method using a Bayesian framework, which includes an a priori probability distribution based on tensor coherence indices, to utilize both the neighborhood direction information and the inertia moment as regularization terms. The reliability of the proposed tensor estimation was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations in terms of accuracy and precision with four synthetic tensor fields at various SNRs and in vivo human data of brain and calf muscle. Proposed Bayesian estimation demonstrated the relative robustness to noise and the higher reliability compared to the simple tensor regression.

  11. Evaluation of Bayesian tensor estimation using tensor coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Jin; Kim, In-Young; Jeong, Seok-Oh; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2009-06-01

    Fiber tractography, a unique and non-invasive method to estimate axonal fibers within white matter, constructs the putative streamlines from diffusion tensor MRI by interconnecting voxels according to the propagation direction defined by the diffusion tensor. This direction has uncertainties due to the properties of underlying fiber bundles, neighboring structures and image noise. Therefore, robust estimation of the diffusion direction is essential to reconstruct reliable fiber pathways. For this purpose, we propose a tensor estimation method using a Bayesian framework, which includes an a priori probability distribution based on tensor coherence indices, to utilize both the neighborhood direction information and the inertia moment as regularization terms. The reliability of the proposed tensor estimation was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations in terms of accuracy and precision with four synthetic tensor fields at various SNRs and in vivo human data of brain and calf muscle. Proposed Bayesian estimation demonstrated the relative robustness to noise and the higher reliability compared to the simple tensor regression.

  12. Pseudo paths towards minimum energy states in network dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatifar, L.; Hassanibesheli, F.; Shirazi, A. H.; Vasheghani Farahani, S.; Jafari, G. R.

    2017-10-01

    The dynamics of networks forming on Heider balance theory moves towards lower tension states. The condition derived from this theory enforces agents to reevaluate and modify their interactions to achieve equilibrium. These possible changes in network's topology can be considered as various paths that guide systems to minimum energy states. Based on this theory the final destination of a system could reside on a local minimum energy, ;jammed state;, or the global minimum energy, balanced states. The question we would like to address is whether jammed states just appear by chance? Or there exist some pseudo paths that bound a system towards a jammed state. We introduce an indicator to suspect the location of a jammed state based on the Inverse Participation Ratio method (IPR). We provide a margin before a local minimum where the number of possible paths dramatically drastically decreases. This is a condition that proves adequate for ending up on a jammed states.

  13. Classification of schizophrenia patients based on resting-state functional network connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Arbabshirani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in automatic classification of mental disorders based on neuroimaging data. Small training data sets (subjects and very large amount of high dimensional data make it a challenging task to design robust and accurate classifiers for heterogeneous disorders such as schizophrenia. Most previous studies considered structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and task-based fMRI for this purpose. However, resting-state data has been rarely used in discrimination of schizophrenia patients from healthy controls. Resting data are of great interest, since they are relatively easy to collect, and not confounded by behavioral performance on a task. Several linear and non-linear classification methods were trained using a training dataset and evaluate with a separate testing dataset. Results show that classification with high accuracy is achievable using simple non-linear discriminative methods such as k-nearest neighbors which is very promising. We compare and report detailed results of each classifier as well as statistical analysis and evaluation of each single feature. To our knowledge our effects represent the first use of resting-state functional network connectivity features to classify schizophrenia.

  14. Quantum Critical Scaling of the Geometric Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2007-08-01

    Berry phases and the quantum-information theoretic notion of fidelity have been recently used to analyze quantum phase transitions from a geometrical perspective. In this Letter we unify these two approaches showing that the underlying mechanism is the critical singular behavior of a complex tensor over the Hamiltonian parameter space. This is achieved by performing a scaling analysis of this quantum geometric tensor in the vicinity of the critical points. In this way most of the previous results are understood on general grounds and new ones are found. We show that criticality is not a sufficient condition to ensure superextensive divergence of the geometric tensor, and state the conditions under which this is possible. The validity of this analysis is further checked by exact diagonalization of the spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg chain.

  15. Extending stability through hierarchical clusters in Echo State Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jarvis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Echo State Networks (ESN are reservoir networks that satisfy well-established criteria for stability when constructed as feedforward networks. Recent evidence suggests that stability criteria are altered in the presence of reservoir substructures, such as clusters. Understanding how the reservoir architecture affects stability is thus important for the appropriate design of any ESN. To quantitatively determine the influence of the most relevant network parameters, we analysed the impact of reservoir substructures on stability in hierarchically clustered ESNs (HESN, as they allow a smooth transition from highly structured to increasingly homogeneous reservoirs. Previous studies used the largest eigenvalue of the reservoir connectivity matrix (spectral radius as a predictor for stable network dynamics. Here, we evaluate the impact of clusters, hierarchy and intercluster connectivity on the predictive power of the spectral radius for stability. Both hierarchy and low relative cluster sizes extend the range of spectral radius values, leading to stable networks, while increasing intercluster connectivity decreased maximal spectral radius.

  16. Optimizing information processing in neuronal networks beyond critical states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Mariana Sacrini Ayres; Melo-Silva, Hiago Lucas Cardeal; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Critical dynamics have been postulated as an ideal regime for neuronal networks in the brain, considering optimal dynamic range and information processing. Herein, we focused on how information entropy encoded in spatiotemporal activity patterns may vary in critical networks. We employed branching process based models to investigate how entropy can be embedded in spatiotemporal patterns. We determined that the information capacity of critical networks may vary depending on the manipulation of microscopic parameters. Specifically, the mean number of connections governed the number of spatiotemporal patterns in the networks. These findings are compatible with those of the real neuronal networks observed in specific brain circuitries, where critical behavior is necessary for the optimal dynamic range response but the uncertainty provided by high entropy as coded by spatiotemporal patterns is not required. With this, we were able to reveal that information processing can be optimized in neuronal networks beyond critical states.

  17. Optimizing information processing in neuronal networks beyond critical states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Sacrini Ayres Ferraz

    Full Text Available Critical dynamics have been postulated as an ideal regime for neuronal networks in the brain, considering optimal dynamic range and information processing. Herein, we focused on how information entropy encoded in spatiotemporal activity patterns may vary in critical networks. We employed branching process based models to investigate how entropy can be embedded in spatiotemporal patterns. We determined that the information capacity of critical networks may vary depending on the manipulation of microscopic parameters. Specifically, the mean number of connections governed the number of spatiotemporal patterns in the networks. These findings are compatible with those of the real neuronal networks observed in specific brain circuitries, where critical behavior is necessary for the optimal dynamic range response but the uncertainty provided by high entropy as coded by spatiotemporal patterns is not required. With this, we were able to reveal that information processing can be optimized in neuronal networks beyond critical states.

  18. Entanglement distillation between solid-state quantum network nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, N; Reiserer, A A; Humphreys, P C; Bakermans, J J W; Kamerling, S J; Nickerson, N H; Benjamin, S C; Twitchen, D J; Markham, M; Hanson, R

    2017-06-02

    The impact of future quantum networks hinges on high-quality quantum entanglement shared between network nodes. Unavoidable imperfections necessitate a means to improve remote entanglement by local quantum operations. We realize entanglement distillation on a quantum network primitive of distant electron-nuclear two-qubit nodes. The heralded generation of two copies of a remote entangled state is demonstrated through single-photon-mediated entangling of the electrons and robust storage in the nuclear spins. After applying local two-qubit gates, single-shot measurements herald the distillation of an entangled state with increased fidelity that is available for further use. The key combination of generating, storing, and processing entangled states should enable the exploration of multiparticle entanglement on an extended quantum network. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Entanglement distillation between solid-state quantum network nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, N.; Reiserer, A. A.; Humphreys, P. C.; Bakermans, J. J. W.; Kamerling, S. J.; Nickerson, N. H.; Benjamin, S. C.; Twitchen, D. J.; Markham, M.; Hanson, R.

    2017-06-01

    The impact of future quantum networks hinges on high-quality quantum entanglement shared between network nodes. Unavoidable imperfections necessitate a means to improve remote entanglement by local quantum operations. We realize entanglement distillation on a quantum network primitive of distant electron-nuclear two-qubit nodes. The heralded generation of two copies of a remote entangled state is demonstrated through single-photon-mediated entangling of the electrons and robust storage in the nuclear spins. After applying local two-qubit gates, single-shot measurements herald the distillation of an entangled state with increased fidelity that is available for further use. The key combination of generating, storing, and processing entangled states should enable the exploration of multiparticle entanglement on an extended quantum network.

  20. Gogny interactions with tensor terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A.M.; Bernard, R.N. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Granada (Spain); Co' , G. [INFN, Lecce (Italy); De Donno, V. [Universita del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica ' ' E. De Giorgi' ' , Lecce (Italy); Grasso, M. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay (France)

    2016-07-15

    We present a perturbative approach to include tensor terms in the Gogny interaction. We do not change the values of the usual parameterisations, with the only exception of the spin-orbit term, and we add tensor terms whose only free parameters are the strengths of the interactions. We identify observables sensitive to the presence of the tensor force in Hartree-Fock, Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and random phase approximation calculations. We show the need of including two tensor contributions, at least: a pure tensor term and a tensor-isospin term. We show results relevant for the inclusion of the tensor term for single-particle energies, charge-conserving magnetic excitations and Gamow-Teller excitations. (orig.)

  1. Extracting Entanglement Geometry from Quantum States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Katharine; Garrison, James R.; Bauer, Bela

    2017-10-01

    Tensor networks impose a notion of geometry on the entanglement of a quantum system. In some cases, this geometry is found to reproduce key properties of holographic dualities, and subsequently much work has focused on using tensor networks as tractable models for holographic dualities. Conventionally, the structure of the network—and hence the geometry—is largely fixed a priori by the choice of the tensor network ansatz. Here, we evade this restriction and describe an unbiased approach that allows us to extract the appropriate geometry from a given quantum state. We develop an algorithm that iteratively finds a unitary circuit that transforms a given quantum state into an unentangled product state. We then analyze the structure of the resulting unitary circuits. In the case of noninteracting, critical systems in one dimension, we recover signatures of scale invariance in the unitary network, and we show that appropriately defined geodesic paths between physical degrees of freedom exhibit known properties of a hyperbolic geometry.

  2. Population spikes in cortical networks during different functional states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley eMark

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain computational challenges vary between behavioral states. Engaged animals react according to incoming sensory information, while in relaxed and sleeping states consolidation of the learned information is believed to take place. Different states are characterized by different forms of cortical activity. We study a possible neuronal mechanism for generating these diverse dynamics and suggest their possible functional significance. Previous studies demonstrated that brief synchronized increase in a neural firing (Population Spikes can be generated in homogenous recurrent neural networks with short-term synaptic depression. Here we consider more realistic networks with clustered architecture. We show that the level of synchronization in neural activity can be controlled smoothly by network parameters. The network shifts from asynchronous activity to a regime in which clusters synchronized separately, then, the synchronization between the clusters increases gradually to fully synchronized state. We examine the effects of different synchrony levels on the transmission of information by the network. We find that the regime of intermediate synchronization is preferential for the flow of information between sparsely connected areas. Based on these results, we suggest that the regime of intermediate synchronization corresponds to engaged behavioral state of the animal, while global synchronization is exhibited during relaxed and sleeping states.

  3. Artificial Neural Network Based State Estimators Integrated into Kalmtool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayramoglu, Enis; Ravn, Ole; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a toolbox enabling easy evaluation and comparison of dierent ltering algorithms. The toolbox is called Kalmtool and is a set of MATLAB tools for state estimation of nonlinear systems. The toolbox now contains functions for Articial Neural Network Based State Estimation...

  4. Recurrent Artificial Neural Networks and Finite State Natural Language Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisl, Hermann

    It is argued that pessimistic assessments of the adequacy of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for natural language processing (NLP) on the grounds that they have a finite state architecture are unjustified, and that their adequacy in this regard is an empirical issue. First, arguments that counter standard objections to finite state NLP on the…

  5. Characterizing the sustainable forestry issue network in thc United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steverson O. Moffat; Frederick W. Cubbage; Thomas P. Holmes; Elizabethann O' Sullivan

    2001-01-01

    Issue network analysis techniques were applied to the issue sustainable forestry in the United States to identify potential public and private outcomes for the issue. A quantitative approach based on work by Laumann and Knoke [(The Organizational State (1987)] was utilized in conjunction with the Delphi method. Results suggest that the parity in the distribution of...

  6. A baseline for the multivariate comparison of resting state networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A Allen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available As the size of functional and structural MRI datasets expands, it becomes increasingly important to establish a baseline from which diagnostic relevance may be determined, a processing strategy that efficiently prepares data for analysis, and a statistical approach that identifies important effects in a manner that is both robust and reproducible. In this paper, we introduce a multivariate analytic approach that optimizes sensitivity and reduces unnecessary testing. We demonstrate the utility of this mega-analytic approach by identifying the effects of age and gender on the resting state networks of 603 healthy adolescents and adults (mean age: 23.4 years, range: 12 to 71 years. Data were collected on the same scanner, preprocessed using an automated analysis pipeline based in SPM, and studied using group independent component analysis. Resting state networks were identified and evaluated in terms of three primary outcome measures: time course spectral power, spatial map intensity, and functional network connectivity. Results revealed robust effects of age on all three outcome measures, largely indicating decreases in network coherence and connectivity with increasing age. Gender effects were of smaller magnitude but suggested stronger intra-network connectivity in females and more inter-network connectivity in males, particularly with regard to sensorimotor networks. These findings, along with the analysis approach and statistical framework described here, provide a useful baseline for future investigations of brain networks in health and disease.

  7. Causal interactions in resting-state networks predict perceived loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yin; Yang, Li; Chen, Sifan; Guo, Daqing; Ding, Zechao; Tam, Kin Yip; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    Loneliness is broadly described as a negative emotional response resulting from the differences between the actual and desired social relations of an individual, which is related to the neural responses in connection with social and emotional stimuli. Prior research has discovered that some neural regions play a role in loneliness. However, little is known about the differences among individuals in loneliness and the relationship of those differences to differences in neural networks. The current study aimed to investigate individual differences in perceived loneliness related to the causal interactions between resting-state networks (RSNs), including the dorsal attentional network (DAN), the ventral attentional network (VAN), the affective network (AfN) and the visual network (VN). Using conditional granger causal analysis of resting-state fMRI data, we revealed that the weaker causal flow from DAN to VAN is related to higher loneliness scores, and the decreased causal flow from AfN to VN is also related to higher loneliness scores. Our results clearly support the hypothesis that there is a connection between loneliness and neural networks. It is envisaged that neural network features could play a key role in characterizing the loneliness of an individual.

  8. Applied tensor stereology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegel, Johanna; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Jensen, Eva B. Vedel

    In the present paper, statistical procedures for estimating shape and orientation of arbitrary three-dimensional particles are developed. The focus of this work is on the case where the particles cannot be observed directly, but only via sections. Volume tensors are used for describing particle...... shape and orientation, and stereological estimators of the tensors are derived. It is shown that these estimators can be combined to provide consistent estimators of the moments of the so-called particle cover density. The covariance structure associated with the particle cover density depends...... on the orientation and shape of the particles. For instance, if the distribution of the typical particle is invariant under all rotations, then the covariance matrix is proportional to the identity matrix. A non-parametric test for such isotropy is developed. A flexible L\\'evy-based particle model is proposed, which...

  9. An Alternative to Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric

    2008-10-01

    Some of the most beautiful and complex theories in physics are formulated in the language of tensors. While powerful, these methods are sometimes daunting to the uninitiated. I will introduce the use of Clifford Algebra as a practical alternative to the use of tensors. Many physical quantities can be represented in an indexless form. The boundary between the classical and the quantum worlds becomes a little more transparent. I will review some key concepts, and then talk about some of the things that I am doing with this interesting and powerful tool. Of note to some will be the development of rigid body dynamics for a game engine. Others may be interested in expressing the connection on a spin bundle. My intent is to prove to the audience that there exists an accessible mathematical tool that can be employed to probe the most difficult of topics in physics.

  10. Network-based Arbitrated Quantum Signature Scheme with Graph State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongling; Li, Fei; Mao, Ningyi; Wang, Yijun; Guo, Ying

    2017-08-01

    Implementing an arbitrated quantum signature(QAS) through complex networks is an interesting cryptography technology in the literature. In this paper, we propose an arbitrated quantum signature for the multi-user-involved networks, whose topological structures are established by the encoded graph state. The determinative transmission of the shared keys, is enabled by the appropriate stabilizers performed on the graph state. The implementation of this scheme depends on the deterministic distribution of the multi-user-shared graph state on which the encoded message can be processed in signing and verifying phases. There are four parties involved, the signatory Alice, the verifier Bob, the arbitrator Trent and Dealer who assists the legal participants in the signature generation and verification. The security is guaranteed by the entanglement of the encoded graph state which is cooperatively prepared by legal participants in complex quantum networks.

  11. Sparse tensor discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhihui; Xu, Yong; Yang, Jian; Tang, Jinhui; Zhang, David

    2013-10-01

    The classical linear discriminant analysis has undergone great development and has recently been extended to different cases. In this paper, a novel discriminant subspace learning method called sparse tensor discriminant analysis (STDA) is proposed, which further extends the recently presented multilinear discriminant analysis to a sparse case. Through introducing the L1 and L2 norms into the objective function of STDA, we can obtain multiple interrelated sparse discriminant subspaces for feature extraction. As there are no closed-form solutions, k-mode optimization technique and the L1 norm sparse regression are combined to iteratively learn the optimal sparse discriminant subspace along different modes of the tensors. Moreover, each non-zero element in each subspace is selected from the most important variables/factors, and thus STDA has the potential to perform better than other discriminant subspace methods. Extensive experiments on face databases (Yale, FERET, and CMU PIE face databases) and the Weizmann action database show that the proposed STDA algorithm demonstrates the most competitive performance against the compared tensor-based methods, particularly in small sample sizes.

  12. Excitonically Coupled States in Crystalline Coordination Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Ritesh; Mazel, Antoine; Joseph, Reetu; Adams, Michael; Howard, Ian A; Richards, Bryce S; Tsotsalas, Manuel; Redel, Engelbert; Diring, Stéphane; Odobel, Fabrice; Wöll, Christof

    2017-10-12

    When chromophores are brought into close proximity, noncovalent interactions (π-π/CH-π) can lead to the formation of excitonically coupled states, which bestow new photophysical properties upon the aggregates. Because the properties of the new states not only depend on the strength of intermolecular interactions, but also on the relative orientation, supramolecular assemblies, where these parameters can be varied in a deliberate fashion, provide novel possibilities for the control of photophysical properties. This work reports that core-substituted naphthalene diimides (cNDIs) can be incorporated into surface-mounted metal- organic structures/frameworks (SURMOFs) to yield optical properties strikingly different from conventional aggregates of such molecules, for example, formed in solution or by crystallization. Organic linkers are used, based on cNDIs, well-known organic chromophores with numerous applications in different optoelectronic devices, to fabricate MOF thin films on transparent substrates. A thorough characterization of the properties of these highly ordered chromophoric assemblies reveals the presence of non-emissive excited states in the crystalline material. Structural modulations provide further insights into the nature of the coupling that gives rise to an excited-state energy level in the periodic structure. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Mathematical model of transmission network static state estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the characteristics and capabilities of the power transmission network static state estimator are presented. The solving process of the mathematical model containing the measurement errors and their processing is developed. To evaluate difference between the general model of state estimation and the fast decoupled state estimation model, the both models are applied to an example, and so derived results are compared.

  14. Interplay between tensor force and deformation in even–even nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Rémi N., E-mail: rbernard@ugr.es; Anguiano, Marta

    2016-09-15

    In this work we study the effect of the nuclear tensor force on properties related with deformation. We focus on isotopes in the Mg, Si, S, Ar, Sr and Zr chains within the Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov theory using the D1ST2a Gogny interaction. Contributions to the tensor energy in terms of saturated and unsaturated subshells are analyzed. Like–particle and proton–neutron parts of the tensor term are independently examinated. We found that the tensor term may considerably modify the potential energy landscapes and change the ground state shape. We analyze too how the pairing characteristics of the ground state change when the tensor force is included.

  15. Dark energy in scalar-tensor theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, J.

    2007-12-15

    We investigate several aspects of dynamical dark energy in the framework of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. We provide a classification of scalar-tensor coupling functions admitting cosmological scaling solutions. In particular, we recover that Brans-Dicke theory with inverse power-law potential allows for a sequence of background dominated scaling regime and scalar field dominated, accelerated expansion. Furthermore, we compare minimally and non-minimally coupled models, with respect to the small redshift evolution of the dark energy equation of state. We discuss the possibility to discriminate between different models by a reconstruction of the equation-of-state parameter from available observational data. The non-minimal coupling characterizing scalar-tensor models can - in specific cases - alleviate fine tuning problems, which appear if (minimally coupled) quintessence is required to mimic a cosmological constant. Finally, we perform a phase-space analysis of a family of biscalar-tensor models characterized by a specific type of {sigma}-model metric, including two examples from recent literature. In particular, we generalize an axion-dilaton model of Sonner and Townsend, incorporating a perfect fluid background consisting of (dark) matter and radiation. (orig.)

  16. Spatially distributed effects of mental exhaustion on resting-state FMRI networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Fabrizio; Otto, Tobias; Zijlstra, Fred R H; Goebel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Brain activity during rest is spatially coherent over functional connectivity networks called resting-state networks. In resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, independent component analysis yields spatially distributed network representations reflecting distinct mental processes, such

  17. Chimera states in mechanical oscillator networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Thutupalli, Shashi; Fourrière, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    of whether chimeras are indeed characteristic of natural systems. This calls for a palpable realization of chimera states without any fine-tuning, from which physical mechanisms underlying their emergence can be uncovered. Here, we devise a simple experiment with mechanical oscillators coupled...... in our experiments is controlled by elementary dynamical equations from mechanics that are ubiquitous in many natural and technological systems. The symmetry-breaking mechanism revealed by our experiments may thus be prevalent in systems exhibiting collective behavior, such as power grids, optomechanical...

  18. Energy landscapes of resting-state brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamitsu eWatanabe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available During rest, the human brain performs essential functions such as memory maintenance, which are associated with resting-state brain networks (RSNs including the default-mode network (DMN and frontoparietal network (FPN. Previous studies based on spiking-neuron network models and their reduced models, as well as those based on imaging data, suggest that resting-state network activity can be captured as attractor dynamics, i.e., dynamics of the brain state toward an attractive state and transitions between different attractors. Here, we analyze the energy landscapes of the RSNs by applying the maximum entropy model, or equivalently the Ising spin model, to human RSN data. We use the previously estimated parameter values to define the energy landscape, and the disconnectivity graph method to estimate the number of local energy minima (equivalent to attractors in attractor dynamics, the basin size, and hierarchical relationships among the different local minima. In both of the DMN and FPN, low-energy local minima tended to have large basins. A majority of the network states belonged to a basin of one of a few local minima. Therefore, a small number of local minima constituted the backbone of each RSN. In the DMN, the energy landscape consisted of two groups of low-energy local minima that are separated by a relatively high energy barrier. Within each group, the activity patterns of the local minima were similar, and different minima were connected by relatively low energy barriers. In the FPN, all dominant energy were separated by relatively low energy barriers such that they formed a single coarse-grained global minimum. Our results indicate that multistable attractor dynamics may underlie the DMN, but not the FPN, and assist memory maintenance with different memory states.

  19. The geomagnetic field gradient tensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Olsen, Nils

    2012-01-01

    of the magnetic gradient tensor and provide explicit expressions of its elements in terms of spherical harmonics. Finally we discuss the benefit of using gradient measurements for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space, in particular the advantage of the various tensor elements for a better determination......We develop the general mathematical basis for space magnetic gradiometry in spherical coordinates. The magnetic gradient tensor is a second rank tensor consisting of 3 × 3 = 9 spatial derivatives. Since the geomagnetic field vector B is always solenoidal (∇ · B = 0) there are only eight independent...

  20. Tensor norms and operator ideals

    CERN Document Server

    Defant, A; Floret, K

    1992-01-01

    The three chapters of this book are entitled Basic Concepts, Tensor Norms, and Special Topics. The first may serve as part of an introductory course in Functional Analysis since it shows the powerful use of the projective and injective tensor norms, as well as the basics of the theory of operator ideals. The second chapter is the main part of the book: it presents the theory of tensor norms as designed by Grothendieck in the Resumé and deals with the relation between tensor norms and operator ideals. The last chapter deals with special questions. Each section is accompanied by a series of exer

  1. Altered resting-state network connectivity in congenital blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Qin, Wen; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yunting; Jiang, Tianzi; Yu, Chunshui

    2014-06-01

    The brain of congenital blind (CB) has experienced a series of structural and functional alterations, either undesirable outcomes such as atrophy of the visual pathway due to sight loss from birth, or compensatory plasticity to interact efficiently with the environment. However, little is known, so far, about alterations in the functional architecture of resting-state networks (RSNs) in CB. This study aimed to investigate intra- and internetwork connectivity differences between CB and sighted controls (SC), using independent component analysis (ICA) on resting state functional MRI data. Compared with SC, CB showed significantly increased network connectivity within the salience network (SN) and the occipital cortex. Moreover, CB exhibited enhanced internetwork connectivity between the SN and the frontoparietal network (FPN) and between the FPN and the occipital cortex; however, they showed decreased internetwork connectivity between the occipital cortex and the sensorimotor network. These findings suggest that CB experience large scale reorganization at the level of the functional network. More importantly, the enhanced intra- and internetwork connectivity of the SN, FPN, and occipital cortex in CB may improve their abilities to identify salient stimuli, to initiate the executive function, and to top-down control of attention, which are critical for the CB to guide appropriate behavior and to better adaption to the environment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Resting-state networks distinguish locked-in from vegetative state patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Roquet

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This study reinforces previous reports on the preservation of the default mode network in locked-in syndrome in contrast to vegetative state but extends them by suggesting that other networks might be relevant to the diagnosis of locked-in syndrome. The aforementioned analysis of fMRI brain activity at rest might be a step in the development of a diagnostic biomarker to distinguish locked-in syndrome from vegetative state.

  3. Resting state brain networks and their implications in neurodegenerative disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, William S.; Yoo, Kwangsun; Kim, Jinho; Jeong, Yong

    2012-10-01

    Neurons are the basic units of the brain, and form network by connecting via synapses. So far, there have been limited ways to measure the brain networks. Recently, various imaging modalities are widely used for this purpose. In this paper, brain network mapping using resting state fMRI will be introduced with several applications including neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Parkinson's disease. The resting functional connectivity using intrinsic functional connectivity in mouse is useful since we can take advantage of perturbation or stimulation of certain nodes of the network. The study of brain connectivity will open a new era in understanding of brain and diseases thus will be an essential foundation for future research.

  4. Asymptotic tensor rank of graph tensors: beyond matrix multiplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Christandl (Matthias); P. Vrana (Péter); J. Zuiddam (Jeroen)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe present an upper bound on the exponent of the asymptotic behaviour of the tensor rank of a family of tensors defined by the complete graph on $k$ vertices. For $k\\geq4$, we show that the exponent per edge is at most 0.77, outperforming the best known upper bound on the exponent per

  5. Non-Markovian State-Dependent Networks in Critical Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-04

    detail in Section 5.) State-dependent features are present in congestion control protocols in communication networks, such as TCP (see Refs...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. Colorado State University - Ft...Puhalskii FIGURE 1 The tandem queue. the workload and investigate the effect of controlling the arrival rate. We will adopt a similar model. We

  6. Monte Carlo Volcano Seismic Moment Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, G. P.; Brill, K. A.; Lanza, F.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modeling of volcano seismic sources can provide insight into the geometry and dynamics of volcanic conduits. But given the logistical challenges of working on an active volcano, seismic networks are typically deficient in spatial and temporal coverage; this potentially leads to large errors in source models. In addition, uncertainties in the centroid location and moment-tensor components, including volumetric components, are difficult to constrain from the linear inversion results, which leads to a poor understanding of the model space. In this study, we employ a nonlinear inversion using a Monte Carlo scheme with the objective of defining robustly resolved elements of model space. The model space is randomized by centroid location and moment tensor eigenvectors. Point sources densely sample the summit area and moment tensors are constrained to a randomly chosen geometry within the inversion; Green's functions for the random moment tensors are all calculated from modeled single forces, making the nonlinear inversion computationally reasonable. We apply this method to very-long-period (VLP) seismic events that accompany minor eruptions at Fuego volcano, Guatemala. The library of single force Green's functions is computed with a 3D finite-difference modeling algorithm through a homogeneous velocity-density model that includes topography, for a 3D grid of nodes, spaced 40 m apart, within the summit region. The homogenous velocity and density model is justified by long wavelength of VLP data. The nonlinear inversion reveals well resolved model features and informs the interpretation through a better understanding of the possible models. This approach can also be used to evaluate possible station geometries in order to optimize networks prior to deployment.

  7. Application of radial basis neural network for state estimation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    states, and j e is the measurement error, which is assumed to have zero mean and variance 2 j σ . There are m ... and with equality and inequality constraints, minimize. ∑. = −. = m ... constant factor unlike sum of product of the inputs and respective synaptic weights as in case of feed forward network. The RBF unit or transfer ...

  8. Characterizing disease states from topological properties of transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluger Harriet M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput gene expression experiments yield large amounts of data that can augment our understanding of disease processes, in addition to classifying samples. Here we present new paradigms of data Separation based on construction of transcriptional regulatory networks for normal and abnormal cells using sequence predictions, literature based data and gene expression studies. We analyzed expression datasets from a number of diseased and normal cells, including different types of acute leukemia, and breast cancer with variable clinical outcome. Results We constructed sample-specific regulatory networks to identify links between transcription factors (TFs and regulated genes that differentiate between healthy and diseased states. This approach carries the advantage of identifying key transcription factor-gene pairs with differential activity between healthy and diseased states rather than merely using gene expression profiles, thus alluding to processes that may be involved in gene deregulation. We then generalized this approach by studying simultaneous changes in functionality of multiple regulatory links pointing to a regulated gene or emanating from one TF (or changes in gene centrality defined by its in-degree or out-degree measures, respectively. We found that samples can often be separated based on these measures of gene centrality more robustly than using individual links. We examined distributions of distances (the number of links needed to traverse the path between each pair of genes in the transcriptional networks for gene subsets whose collective expression profiles could best separate each dataset into predefined groups. We found that genes that optimally classify samples are concentrated in neighborhoods in the gene regulatory networks. This suggests that genes that are deregulated in diseased states exhibit a remarkable degree of connectivity. Conclusion Transcription factor-regulated gene links and

  9. A Squeezed Artificial Neural Network for the Symbolic Network Reliability Functions of Binary-State Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Wei-Chang

    Network reliability is an important index to the provision of useful information for decision support in the modern world. There is always a need to calculate symbolic network reliability functions (SNRFs) due to dynamic and rapid changes in network parameters. In this brief, the proposed squeezed artificial neural network (SqANN) approach uses the Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the corresponding reliability of a given designed matrix from the Box-Behnken design, and then the Taguchi method is implemented to find the appropriate number of neurons and activation functions of the hidden layer and the output layer in ANN to evaluate SNRFs. According to the experimental results of the benchmark networks, the comparison appears to support the superiority of the proposed SqANN method over the traditional ANN-based approach with at least 16.6% improvement in the median absolute deviation in the cost of extra 2 s on average for all experiments.Network reliability is an important index to the provision of useful information for decision support in the modern world. There is always a need to calculate symbolic network reliability functions (SNRFs) due to dynamic and rapid changes in network parameters. In this brief, the proposed squeezed artificial neural network (SqANN) approach uses the Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the corresponding reliability of a given designed matrix from the Box-Behnken design, and then the Taguchi method is implemented to find the appropriate number of neurons and activation functions of the hidden layer and the output layer in ANN to evaluate SNRFs. According to the experimental results of the benchmark networks, the comparison appears to support the superiority of the proposed SqANN method over the traditional ANN-based approach with at least 16.6% improvement in the median absolute deviation in the cost of extra 2 s on average for all experiments.

  10. Complexity and state-transitions in social dependence networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Pistolesi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Computation of complexity in Social Dependence Networks is an interesting research domain to understand evolution processes and group exchange dynamics in natural and artificial intelligent Multi-Agent Systems. We perform an agent-based simulation by NET-PLEX (Conte and Pistolesi, 2000, a new software system able both to build interdependence networks tipically emerging in Multi-Agent System scenarios and to investigate complexity phenomena, i.e., unstability and state-transitions like Hopf bifurcation (Nowak and Lewenstein, 1994, and to describe social self organization phenomena emerging in these artificial social systems by means of complexity measures similar to those introduced by Hubermann and Hogg (1986. By performing analysis of complexity in these kind of artificial societies we observed interesting phenomena in emerging organizations that suggest state-transitions induced by critical configurations of parameters describing the social system similar to those observed in many studies on state-transitions in bifurcation chaos (Schuster, 1988; Ruelle, 1989.

  11. Plasticity of resting state brain networks in recovery from stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, José M.; Sampaio, Adriana; Marques, Paulo; Ferreira, Luís M.; Santos, Nadine C.; Marques, Fernanda; Palha, Joana A.; Cerqueira, João J.; Sousa, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Chronic stress has been widely reported to have deleterious impact in multiple biological systems. Specifically, structural and functional remodeling of several brain regions following prolonged stress exposure have been described; importantly, some of these changes are eventually reversible. Recently, we showed the impact of stress on resting state networks (RSNs), but nothing is known about the plasticity of RSNs after recovery from stress. Herein, we examined the “plasticity” of RSNs, both at functional and structural levels, by comparing the same individuals before and after recovery from the exposure to chronic stress; results were also contrasted with a control group. Here we show that the stressed individuals after recovery displayed a decreased resting functional connectivity in the default mode network (DMN), ventral attention network (VAN), and sensorimotor network (SMN) when compared to themselves immediately after stress; however, this functional plastic recovery was only partial as when compared with the control group, as there were still areas of increased connectivity in dorsal attention network (DAN), SMN and primary visual network (VN) in participants recovered from stress. Data also shows that participants after recovery from stress displayed increased deactivations in DMN, SMN, and auditory network (AN), to levels similar to those of controls, showing a normalization of the deactivation pattern in RSNs after recovery from stress. In contrast, structural changes (volumetry) of the brain areas involving these networks are absent after the recovery period. These results reveal plastic phenomena in specific RSNs and a functional remodeling of the activation-deactivation pattern following recovery from chronic-stress, which is not accompanied by significant structural plasticity. PMID:24416009

  12. Resting state networks' corticotopy: the dual intertwined rings architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Mesmoudi

    Full Text Available How does the brain integrate multiple sources of information to support normal sensorimotor and cognitive functions? To investigate this question we present an overall brain architecture (called "the dual intertwined rings architecture" that relates the functional specialization of cortical networks to their spatial distribution over the cerebral cortex (or "corticotopy". Recent results suggest that the resting state networks (RSNs are organized into two large families: 1 a sensorimotor family that includes visual, somatic, and auditory areas and 2 a large association family that comprises parietal, temporal, and frontal regions and also includes the default mode network. We used two large databases of resting state fMRI data, from which we extracted 32 robust RSNs. We estimated: (1 the RSN functional roles by using a projection of the results on task based networks (TBNs as referenced in large databases of fMRI activation studies; and (2 relationship of the RSNs with the Brodmann Areas. In both classifications, the 32 RSNs are organized into a remarkable architecture of two intertwined rings per hemisphere and so four rings linked by homotopic connections. The first ring forms a continuous ensemble and includes visual, somatic, and auditory cortices, with interspersed bimodal cortices (auditory-visual, visual-somatic and auditory-somatic, abbreviated as VSA ring. The second ring integrates distant parietal, temporal and frontal regions (PTF ring through a network of association fiber tracts which closes the ring anatomically and ensures a functional continuity within the ring. The PTF ring relates association cortices specialized in attention, language and working memory, to the networks involved in motivation and biological regulation and rhythms. This "dual intertwined architecture" suggests a dual integrative process: the VSA ring performs fast real-time multimodal integration of sensorimotor information whereas the PTF ring performs multi

  13. Metabolic resting-state brain networks in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetsieris, Phoebe G; Ko, Ji Hyun; Tang, Chris C; Nazem, Amir; Sako, Wataru; Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-02-24

    The delineation of resting state networks (RSNs) in the human brain relies on the analysis of temporal fluctuations in functional MRI signal, representing a small fraction of total neuronal activity. Here, we used metabolic PET, which maps nonfluctuating signals related to total activity, to identify and validate reproducible RSN topographies in healthy and disease populations. In healthy subjects, the dominant (first component) metabolic RSN was topographically similar to the default mode network (DMN). In contrast, in Parkinson's disease (PD), this RSN was subordinated to an independent disease-related pattern. Network functionality was assessed by quantifying metabolic RSN expression in cerebral blood flow PET scans acquired at rest and during task performance. Consistent task-related deactivation of the "DMN-like" dominant metabolic RSN was observed in healthy subjects and early PD patients; in contrast, the subordinate RSNs were activated during task performance. Network deactivation was reduced in advanced PD; this abnormality was partially corrected by dopaminergic therapy. Time-course comparisons of DMN loss in longitudinal resting metabolic scans from PD and Alzheimer's disease subjects illustrated that significant reductions appeared later for PD, in parallel with the development of cognitive dysfunction. In contrast, in Alzheimer's disease significant reductions in network expression were already present at diagnosis, progressing over time. Metabolic imaging can directly provide useful information regarding the resting organization of the brain in health and disease.

  14. Rescue of endemic states in interconnected networks with adaptive coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, F; Miguel, M San

    2015-01-01

    We study the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible model of epidemic spreading on two layers of networks interconnected by adaptive links, which are rewired at random to avoid contacts between infected and susceptible nodes at the interlayer. We find that the rewiring reduces the effective connectivity for the transmission of the disease between layers, and may even totally decouple the networks. Weak endemic states, in which the epidemics spreads only if the two layers are interconnected, show a transition from the endemic to the healthy phase when the rewiring overcomes a threshold value that depends on the infection rate, the strength of the coupling and the mean connectivity of the networks. In the strong endemic scenario, in which the epidemics is able to spread on each separate network, the prevalence in each layer decreases when increasing the rewiring, arriving to single network values only in the limit of infinitely fast rewiring. We also find that finite-size effects are amplified by the rewiring, as the...

  15. Dynamical networks with topological self-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    2001-01-01

    Coupled evolution of state and topology of dynamical networks is introduced. Due to the well organized tensor structure, the governing equations are presented in a canonical form, and required attractors as well as their basins can be easily implanted and controlled.

  16. Scalable tensor factorizations for incomplete data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acar, Evrim; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; KOlda, Tamara G.

    2011-01-01

    experiments, our algorithm is shown to successfully factorize tensors with noise and up to 99% missing data. A unique aspect of our approach is that it scales to sparse large-scale data, e.g., 1000 × 1000 × 1000 with five million known entries (0.5% dense). We further demonstrate the usefulness of CP......-WOPT on two real-world applications: a novel EEG (electroencephalogram) application where missing data is frequently encountered due to disconnections of electrodes and the problem of modeling computer network traffic where data may be absent due to the expense of the data collection process....

  17. Non-classical state engineering for quantum networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, Christina E.

    2014-01-24

    The wide field of quantum information processing and quantum networks has developed very fast in the last two decades. Besides the regime of discrete variables, which was developed first, the regime of continuous variables represents an alternative approach to realize many quantum applications. Non-classical states of light, like squeezed or entangled states, are a fundamental resource for quantum applications like quantum repeaters, quantum memories, quantum key distribution, quantum spectroscopy, and quantum metrology. These states can be generated successfully in the infrared wavelength regime. However, for some tasks other wavelengths, especially in the visible wavelength regime, are desirable. To generate non-classical states of light in this wavelength regime frequency up-conversion can be used, since all quantum properties are maintained in this process. The first part of this thesis deals with the experimental frequency up-conversion of quantum states. Squeezed vacuum states of light at 1550 nm were up-converted to 532 nm and a noise reduction of -1.5 dB at 532 nm was achieved. These states can be used for increasing the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors or spectroscopic measurements. Furthermore, one part of an entangled state at 1550 nm was up-converted to 532 nm and, thus, entanglement between these two wavelengths was generated and characterized to -1.4 dB following Duan et al. With such a quantum link it is possible to establish a quantum network, which takes advantage of the low optical loss at 1550 nm for information transmission and of atomic transitions around 532 nm for a quantum memory in a quantum repeater. For quantum networks the distribution of entanglement and especially of a quantum key is essential. In the second part of this thesis the experimental distribution of entanglement by separable states is demonstrated. The underlying protocol requires a special three-mode state, which is separable in two of the three splittings. With

  18. Automatic speech recognition using a predictive echo state network classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, Mark D; Harris, John G

    2007-04-01

    We have combined an echo state network (ESN) with a competitive state machine framework to create a classification engine called the predictive ESN classifier. We derive the expressions for training the predictive ESN classifier and show that the model was significantly more noise robust compared to a hidden Markov model in noisy speech classification experiments by 8+/-1 dB signal-to-noise ratio. The simple training algorithm and noise robustness of the predictive ESN classifier make it an attractive classification engine for automatic speech recognition.

  19. Traffic Speed Data Imputation Method Based on Tensor Completion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Ran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic speed data plays a key role in Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS; however, missing traffic data would affect the performance of ITS as well as Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS. In this paper, we handle this issue by a novel tensor-based imputation approach. Specifically, tensor pattern is adopted for modeling traffic speed data and then High accurate Low Rank Tensor Completion (HaLRTC, an efficient tensor completion method, is employed to estimate the missing traffic speed data. This proposed method is able to recover missing entries from given entries, which may be noisy, considering severe fluctuation of traffic speed data compared with traffic volume. The proposed method is evaluated on Performance Measurement System (PeMS database, and the experimental results show the superiority of the proposed approach over state-of-the-art baseline approaches.

  20. State network approach to characteristics of financial crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lu; Gu, Changgui; Xiao, Qin; Yang, Huijie; Wu, Guolin

    2018-02-01

    Extensive works have reported that a financial crisis can induce significant changes to topological structure of a stock network constructed with cross-correlations between stocks. But there are still some problems to be answered, such as what is the relationship between different crises in history and how to classify them? In the present work, we propose a new network-based solution to extract and display the relationships between the crises. The Dow Jones stock market is investigated as a typical example. The cross-correlation matrix between stocks is used to measure the state of stock market, called state matrix. All the states cluster into six sub-categories. A state network is constructed further to display the relationships between all the states, which contains a total of nine communities. It is found that three crises C , D and E (refer to the Lehman's bankruptcy in 2008, the Euro-zone and International Monetary Fund decide the first bailout for Greece in 2010, and the European sovereign debt crisis in 2011, respectively) belong to a specific sub-category and cluster in a single community. The mid-stage of C is closely linked with E, while the other stages with D. The other two crises A and B (refer to the financial crisis in Asia in 1997, and the burst of "dot-com bubble" in 2002, respectively) belong to another sub-category and gather in a corner of another single community. A and B are linked directly with C and D by two edges. By this way, we give a clear picture of the relationships between the crises.

  1. Colored Tensor Models - a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan Gurau

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Colored tensor models have recently burst onto the scene as a promising conceptual and computational tool in the investigation of problems of random geometry in dimension three and higher. We present a snapshot of the cutting edge in this rapidly expanding research field. Colored tensor models have been shown to share many of the properties of their direct ancestor, matrix models, which encode a theory of fluctuating two-dimensional surfaces. These features include the possession of Feynman graphs encoding topological spaces, a 1/N expansion of graph amplitudes, embedded matrix models inside the tensor structure, a resumable leading order with critical behavior and a continuum large volume limit, Schwinger-Dyson equations satisfying a Lie algebra (akin to the Virasoro algebra in two dimensions, non-trivial classical solutions and so on. In this review, we give a detailed introduction of colored tensor models and pointers to current and future research directions.

  2. Nearest-neighbor interaction systems in the tensor-train format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelß, Patrick; Klus, Stefan; Matera, Sebastian; Schütte, Christof

    2017-07-01

    Low-rank tensor approximation approaches have become an important tool in the scientific computing community. The aim is to enable the simulation and analysis of high-dimensional problems which cannot be solved using conventional methods anymore due to the so-called curse of dimensionality. This requires techniques to handle linear operators defined on extremely large state spaces and to solve the resulting systems of linear equations or eigenvalue problems. In this paper, we present a systematic tensor-train decomposition for nearest-neighbor interaction systems which is applicable to a host of different problems. With the aid of this decomposition, it is possible to reduce the memory consumption as well as the computational costs significantly. Furthermore, it can be shown that in some cases the rank of the tensor decomposition does not depend on the network size. The format is thus feasible even for high-dimensional systems. We will illustrate the results with several guiding examples such as the Ising model, a system of coupled oscillators, and a CO oxidation model.

  3. Generalized Slow Roll for Tensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    The recent BICEP2 detection of degree scale CMB B-mode polarization, coupled with a deficit of observed power in large angle temperature anisotropy, suggest that the slow-roll parameter $\\epsilon_H$, the fractional variation in the Hubble rate per efold, is both relatively large and may evolve from an even larger value on scales greater than the horizon at recombination. The relatively large tensor contribution implied also requires finite matching features in the tensor power spectrum for an...

  4. Positivity and conservation of superenergy tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pozo, J M

    2002-01-01

    Two essential properties of energy-momentum tensors T submu subnu are their positivity and conservation. This is mathematically formalized by, respectively, an energy condition, as the dominant energy condition, and the vanishing of their divergence nabla supmu T submu subnu = 0. The classical Bel and Bel-Robinson superenergy tensors, generated from the Riemann and Weyl tensors, respectively, are rank-4 tensors. But they share these two properties with energy-momentum tensors: the dominant property (DP) and the divergence-free property in the absence of sources (vacuum). Senovilla defined a universal algebraic construction which generates a basic superenergy tensor T left brace A right brace from any arbitrary tensor A. In this construction, the seed tensor A is structured as an r-fold multivector, which can always be done. The most important feature of the basic superenergy tensors is that they satisfy automatically the DP, independently of the generating tensor A. We presented a more compact definition of T...

  5. Fermionic projected entangled-pair states and topological phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultinck, Nick; Williamson, Dominic J.; Haegeman, Jutho; Verstraete, Frank

    2018-01-01

    We study fermionic matrix product operator algebras and identify the associated algebraic data. Using this algebraic data we construct fermionic tensor network states in two dimensions that have non-trivial symmetry-protected or intrinsic topological order. The tensor network states allow us to relate physical properties of the topological phases to the underlying algebraic data. We illustrate this by calculating defect properties and modular matrices of supercohomology phases. Our formalism also captures Majorana defects as we show explicitly for a class of {Z}2 symmetry-protected and intrinsic topological phases. The tensor networks states presented here are well-suited for numerical applications and hence open up new possibilities for studying interacting fermionic topological phases.

  6. Steady-State Analysis of Genetic Regulatory Networks Modelled by Probabilistic Boolean Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs have recently been introduced as a promising class of models of genetic regulatory networks. The dynamic behaviour of PBNs can be analysed in the context of Markov chains. A key goal is the determination of the steady-state (long-run behaviour of a PBN by analysing the corresponding Markov chain. This allows one to compute the long-term influence of a gene on another gene or determine the long-term joint probabilistic behaviour of a few selected genes. Because matrix-based methods quickly become prohibitive for large sizes of networks, we propose the use of Monte Carlo methods. However, the rate of convergence to the stationary distribution becomes a central issue. We discuss several approaches for determining the number of iterations necessary to achieve convergence of the Markov chain corresponding to a PBN. Using a recently introduced method based on the theory of two-state Markov chains, we illustrate the approach on a sub-network designed from human glioma gene expression data and determine the joint steadystate probabilities for several groups of genes.

  7. Resting-state functional brain networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, Hugo C; Segura, Bàrbara; Junque, Carme

    2015-10-01

    The network approach is increasingly being applied to the investigation of normal brain function and its impairment. In the present review, we introduce the main methodological approaches employed for the analysis of resting-state neuroimaging data in Parkinson's disease studies. We then summarize the results of recent studies that used a functional network perspective to evaluate the changes underlying different manifestations of Parkinson's disease, with an emphasis on its cognitive symptoms. Despite the variability reported by many studies, these methods show promise as tools for shedding light on the pathophysiological substrates of different aspects of Parkinson's disease, as well as for differential diagnosis, treatment monitoring and establishment of imaging biomarkers for more severe clinical outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The intrinsic resting state voice network in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Anneliese B; Robin, Donald A; Parkinson, Amy L; Eickhoff, Claudia R; Reetz, Kathrin; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Mathys, Christian; Sudmeyer, Martin; Grefkes, Christian; Larson, Charles R; Ramig, Loraine O; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2015-05-01

    Over 90 percent of patients with Parkinson's disease experience speech-motor impairment, namely, hypokinetic dysarthria characterized by reduced pitch and loudness. Resting-state functional connectivity analysis of blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging is a useful measure of intrinsic neural functioning. We utilized resting-state functional connectivity modeling to analyze the intrinsic connectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease within a vocalization network defined by a previous meta-analysis of speech (Brown et al., 2009). Functional connectivity of this network was assessed in 56 patients with Parkinson's disease and 56 gender-, age-, and movement-matched healthy controls. We also had item 5 and 18 of the UPDRS, and the PDQ-39 Communication subscale available for correlation with the voice network connectivity strength in patients. The within-group analyses of connectivity patterns demonstrated a lack of subcortical-cortical connectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease. At the cortical level, we found robust (homotopic) interhemispheric connectivity but only inconsistent evidence for many intrahemispheric connections. When directly contrasted to the control group, we found a significant reduction of connections between the left thalamus and putamen, and cortical motor areas, as well as reduced right superior temporal gyrus connectivity. Furthermore, most symptom measures correlated with right putamen, left cerebellum, left superior temporal gyrus, right premotor, and left Rolandic operculum connectivity in the voice network. The results reflect the importance of (right) subcortical nodes and the superior temporal gyrus in Parkinson's disease, enhancing our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of vocalization impairment in Parkinson's disease. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Development of the Tensoral Computer Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferziger, Joel; Dresselhaus, Eliot

    1996-01-01

    The research scientist or engineer wishing to perform large scale simulations or to extract useful information from existing databases is required to have expertise in the details of the particular database, the numerical methods and the computer architecture to be used. This poses a significant practical barrier to the use of simulation data. The goal of this research was to develop a high-level computer language called Tensoral, designed to remove this barrier. The Tensoral language provides a framework in which efficient generic data manipulations can be easily coded and implemented. First of all, Tensoral is general. The fundamental objects in Tensoral represent tensor fields and the operators that act on them. The numerical implementation of these tensors and operators is completely and flexibly programmable. New mathematical constructs and operators can be easily added to the Tensoral system. Tensoral is compatible with existing languages. Tensoral tensor operations co-exist in a natural way with a host language, which may be any sufficiently powerful computer language such as Fortran, C, or Vectoral. Tensoral is very-high-level. Tensor operations in Tensoral typically act on entire databases (i.e., arrays) at one time and may, therefore, correspond to many lines of code in a conventional language. Tensoral is efficient. Tensoral is a compiled language. Database manipulations are simplified optimized and scheduled by the compiler eventually resulting in efficient machine code to implement them.

  10. Tensor renormalization group analysis of CP(N-1) model

    CERN Document Server

    Kawauchi, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    We apply the higher order tensor renormalization group to lattice CP($N-1$) model in two dimensions. A tensor network representation of the CP($N-1$) model in the presence of the $\\theta$-term is derived. We confirm that the numerical results of the CP(1) model without the $\\theta$-term using this method are consistent with that of the O(3) model which is analyzed by the same method in the region $\\beta \\gg 1$ and that obtained by Monte Carlo simulation in a wider range of $\\beta$. The numerical computation including the $\\theta$-term is left for future challenges.

  11. Bifurcation in Ground-state Fidelity and Quantum Criticality in Two-leg Potts Ladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hao LI

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated an intriguing connection between bifurcations, reduced fidelity per lattice site, local order parameter, universal order parameter, entropy and quantum phase transitions in the ground state for quantum three-state Potts model with two coupled infinite-size ladder system, in the context of the tensor network algorithm. The tensor network algorithm produces degenerate symmetry-breaking ground-state wave functions arising from the Z3 symmetry breaking, each of results from a randomly chosen initial state. We expect that our approach might provide further insights into critical phenomena in quantum many-body infinite lattice systems in condensed matter physics.

  12. A numerical study of equilibrium states in tidal network morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Coco, Giovanni; Zhou, Zeng; Tao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Changkuan

    2017-09-01

    The long-term morphodynamic evolution of tidal networks on tidal flats is investigated using a two-dimensional numerical model. We explore the physical processes related to the development of the morphology and the presence of equilibrium configurations. Tidal networks are simulated over a rectangular domain representing a tidal platform, a different setting compared to estuaries (subject to riverine influence) and lagoons (offshore bars constricting the flow). In the early and middle phases of the tidal network evolution, large sediment patches with rhombus-like shape form and gradually migrate in the flood direction, even though the overall sediment flux is ebb-directed. A cross-section-averaged "equilibrium" state is asymptotically approached after about 500 years. The area and peak discharge of the lower flat cross-sections at year 500 approximately show a 1:1 relationship, which is in agreement with field observations. We also show that model results are consistent with the Q-A relationship (peak discharge Q versus cross-sectional area A), which is obtained under the assumption of a constant Chézy friction.

  13. A numerical study of equilibrium states in tidal network morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Coco, Giovanni; Zhou, Zeng; Tao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Changkuan

    2017-12-01

    The long-term morphodynamic evolution of tidal networks on tidal flats is investigated using a two-dimensional numerical model. We explore the physical processes related to the development of the morphology and the presence of equilibrium configurations. Tidal networks are simulated over a rectangular domain representing a tidal platform, a different setting compared to estuaries (subject to riverine influence) and lagoons (offshore bars constricting the flow). In the early and middle phases of the tidal network evolution, large sediment patches with rhombus-like shape form and gradually migrate in the flood direction, even though the overall sediment flux is ebb-directed. A cross-section-averaged "equilibrium" state is asymptotically approached after about 500 years. The area and peak discharge of the lower flat cross-sections at year 500 approximately show a 1:1 relationship, which is in agreement with field observations. We also show that model results are consistent with the Q-A relationship (peak discharge Q versus cross-sectional area A), which is obtained under the assumption of a constant Chézy friction.

  14. Robust state estimation for stochastic genetic regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinling; Lam, James

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the state estimation problem is investigated for genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) with parameter uncertainties and stochastic disturbances. To account for the unavoidable modelling errors and parameter fluctuations, the network parameters are assumed to be time-varying but norm-bounded. Furthermore, scalar multiplicative white noises are introduced into both the translation process and the feedback regulation process in order to reflect the inherent intracellular and extracellular noise perturbations. The purpose of the addressed problem is to design a linear state estimator that can estimate the true concentration of the mRNA and the protein of the uncertain GRNs. By resorting to the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional method combined with the linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique, sufficient conditions are first established for ensuring the stochastic stability of the dynamics of the estimation error, and the estimator gains are then designed in terms of the solutions to some LMIs that can be easily solved by using the standard numerical software. A three-node GRN is presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed design procedures.

  15. Internal-state analysis in layered artificial neural network trained to categorize lung sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, M

    2002-01-01

    In regular use of artificial neural networks, only input and output states of the network are known to the user. Weight and bias values can be extracted but are difficult to interpret. We analyzed internal states of networks trained to map asthmatic lung sound spectra onto lung function parameters.

  16. Spatially distributed effects of mental exhaustion on resting-state FMRI networks

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio Esposito; Tobias Otto; Zijlstra, Fred R. H.; Rainer Goebel

    2014-01-01

    Brain activity during rest is spatially coherent over functional connectivity networks called resting-state networks. In resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, independent component analysis yields spatially distributed network representations reflecting distinct mental processes, such as intrinsic (default) or extrinsic (executive) attention, and sensory inhibition or excitation. These aspects can be related to different treatments or subjective experiences. Among these, exhaus...

  17. Social networks and power in the Brazilian State: learning from urban policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Marques

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results of two researches on urban policies in different Brazilian metropolises using network analysis. Policy network studies have explored the consequences of networks over policies, but have underestimated the consequences of the structure of the network itself. The institutional and personal networks that structure state organizations internally and insert them in broader political scenarios organize a mid-level structure I call State fabric. This introduces more stability and predictability than usually considered and gives access to a specific power resource, which I call positional power, associated with the positions political actors occupy in the State fabric, influencing politics inside and around the State.

  18. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    .e., the “cores”) comprising the functional TT decomposition. This result motivates an approximation scheme employing polynomial approximations of the cores. For functions with appropriate regularity, the resulting spectral tensor-train decomposition combines the favorable dimension-scaling of the TT......The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT...

  19. Learning to decode human emotions with Echo State Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhkov, Lachezar; Koprinkova-Hristova, Petia; Georgieva, Petia

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the common neural signatures based on which the positive and negative valence of human emotions across multiple subjects can be reliably discriminated. The brain activity is observed via Event Related Potentials (ERPs). ERPs are transient components in the Electroencephalography (EEG) generated in response to a stimulus. ERPs were collected while subjects were viewing images with positive or negative emotional content. Building inter-subject discrimination models is a challenging problem due to the high ERPs variability between individuals. We propose to solve this problem with the aid of the Echo State Networks (ESN) as a general framework for extracting the most relevant discriminative features between multiple subjects. The original feature vector is mapped into the reservoir feature space defined by the number of the reservoir equilibrium states. The dominant features are extracted iteratively from low dimensional combinations of reservoir states. The relevance of the new feature space was validated by experiments with standard supervised and unsupervised machine learning techniques. From one side this proof of concept application enhances the usability context of the reservoir computing for high dimensional static data representations by low-dimensional feature transformation as functions of the reservoir states. From other side, the proposed solution for emotion valence detection across subjects is suitable for brain studies as a complement to statistical methods. This problem is important because such decision making systems constitute "virtual sensors" of hidden emotional states, which are useful in psychology science research and clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tensor calculus for physics a concise guide

    CERN Document Server

    Neuenschwander, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding tensors is essential for any physics student dealing with phenomena where causes and effects have different directions. A horizontal electric field producing vertical polarization in dielectrics; an unbalanced car wheel wobbling in the vertical plane while spinning about a horizontal axis; an electrostatic field on Earth observed to be a magnetic field by orbiting astronauts—these are some situations where physicists employ tensors. But the true beauty of tensors lies in this fact: When coordinates are transformed from one system to another, tensors change according to the same rules as the coordinates. Tensors, therefore, allow for the convenience of coordinates while also transcending them. This makes tensors the gold standard for expressing physical relationships in physics and geometry. Undergraduate physics majors are typically introduced to tensors in special-case applications. For example, in a classical mechanics course, they meet the "inertia tensor," and in electricity and magnetism...

  1. Network Intelligence Based on Network State Information for Connected Vehicles Utilizing Fog Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongjin Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to take advantage of fog computing and SDN in the connected vehicle environment, where communication channels are unstable and the topology changes frequently. A controller knows the current state of the network by maintaining the most recent network topology. Of all the information collected by the controller in the mobile environment, node mobility information is particularly important. Thus, we divide nodes into three classes according to their mobility types and use their related attributes to efficiently manage the mobile connections. Our approach utilizes mobility information to reduce control message overhead by adjusting the period of beacon messages and to support efficient failure recovery. One is to recover the connection failures using only mobility information, and the other is to suggest a real-time scheduling algorithm to recover the services for the vehicles that lost connection in the case of a fog server failure. A real-time scheduling method is first described and then evaluated. The results show that our scheme is effective in the connected vehicle environment. We then demonstrate the reduction of control overhead and the connection recovery by using a network simulator. The simulation results show that control message overhead and failure recovery time are decreased by approximately 55% and 5%, respectively.

  2. A Deep Generative Adversarial Architecture for Network-Wide Spatial-Temporal Traffic State Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Yunyi; Cui, Zhiyong; Tian, Yu; Chen, Huimiao; Wang, Yinhai

    2018-01-01

    This study proposes a deep generative adversarial architecture (GAA) for network-wide spatial-temporal traffic state estimation. The GAA is able to combine traffic flow theory with neural networks and thus improve the accuracy of traffic state estimation. It consists of two Long Short-Term Memory Neural Networks (LSTM NNs) which capture correlation in time and space among traffic flow and traffic density. One of the LSTM NNs, called a discriminative network, aims to maximize the probability o...

  3. Vector and tensor analysis with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Borisenko, A I; Silverman, Richard A

    1979-01-01

    Concise and readable, this text ranges from definition of vectors and discussion of algebraic operations on vectors to the concept of tensor and algebraic operations on tensors. It also includes a systematic study of the differential and integral calculus of vector and tensor functions of space and time. Worked-out problems and solutions. 1968 edition.

  4. Multiple Resting-State Networks Are Associated With Tremors and Cognitive Features in Essential Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Weidong; Chen, Huiyue; Wang, Hansheng; Zhang, Han; Liu, Mengqi; Puneet, Munankami; Lv, Fajin; Cheng, Oumei; Wang, Xuefeng; Lu, Xiurong; Luo, Tianyou

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous clinical features of essential tremor indicate that the dysfunctions of this syndrome are not confined to motor networks, but extend to nonmotor networks. Currently, these neural network dysfunctions in essential tremor remain unclear. In this study, independent component analysis of resting-state functional MRI was used to study these neural network mechanisms. Thirty-five essential tremor patients and 35 matched healthy controls with clinical and neuropsychological tests were included, and eight resting-state networks were identified. After considering the structure and head-motion factors and testing the reliability of the selected resting-state networks, we assessed the functional connectivity changes within or between resting-state networks. Finally, image-behavior correlation analysis was performed. Compared to healthy controls, essential tremor patients displayed increased functional connectivity in the sensorimotor and salience networks and decreased functional connectivity in the cerebellum network. Additionally, increased functional network connectivity was observed between anterior and posterior default mode networks, and a decreased functional network connectivity was noted between the cerebellum network and the sensorimotor and posterior default mode networks. Importantly, the functional connectivity changes within and between these resting-state networks were correlated with the tremor severity and total cognitive scores of essential tremor patients. The findings of this study provide the first evidence that functional connectivity changes within and between multiple resting-state networks are associated with tremors and cognitive features of essential tremor, and this work demonstrates a potential approach for identifying the underlying neural network mechanisms of this syndrome. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Fourth meeting entitled “Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data”

    CERN Document Server

    Vilanova, Anna; Burgeth, Bernhard; Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data

    2014-01-01

    Arising from the fourth Dagstuhl conference entitled Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data (2011), this book offers a broad and vivid view of current work in this emerging field. Topics covered range from applications of the analysis of tensor fields to research on their mathematical and analytical properties. Part I, Tensor Data Visualization, surveys techniques for visualization of tensors and tensor fields in engineering, discusses the current state of the art and challenges, and examines tensor invariants and glyph design, including an overview of common glyphs. The second Part, Representation and Processing of Higher-order Descriptors, describes a matrix representation of local phase, outlines mathematical morphological operations techniques, extended for use in vector images, and generalizes erosion to the space of diffusion weighted MRI. Part III, Higher Order Tensors and Riemannian-Finsler Geometry, offers powerful mathematical language to model and...

  6. Organizational network analysis for two networks in the Washington State Department of Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Organizational network analysis (ONA) consists of gathering data on information sharing and : connectivity in a group, calculating network measures, creating network maps, and using this : information to analyze and improve the functionality of the g...

  7. Complete stress tensor determination by microearthquake analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slunga, R.

    2010-12-01

    Jones 1984 found that half of the shallow strike-slip EQ in California had at least one M>2 foreshock. By the Gutenberg law this means at least 3-20 M>0 (low b-value 0.4-0.8). deformations within the crust. This was confirmed by observations in Iceland after 1990 when anew seismic network in Iceland operated by IMO started. Like the Parkfield project in California the SIL network in Iceland was established in an area predicted (Einarsson et al 1981, Stefansson and Halldorsson 1988) to be struck by major EQs within decades of years. The area of main interest have a detection threshold of M=0. A physical approach was chosen to the earthquake warning problem (Stefansson et al 1993) and therefore all microearthquakes were analyzed for FPS by the spectral amplitude method (Slunga 1981). As the shear slip is caused by the in situ stress it is logical to investigate what bounds the FPS puts on the stress tensor. McKenzie 1969 assumed that the earthquake takes place in a crust containing only one fracture, the fault plane. He found that in s uch a case only very weak constraints could be put on the stress. This was widely accepted t o be valid also for microearthquakes in the real crust and lead to methods (Angelier 1978, G ephart and Forsythe 1984 etc) to put four constraints on the stress tensor by assuming that the same stress tensor is causing the slip on four or more different fractures. Another and more realistic approach is to assume that the crust have frequent fractures with almost all orientations. In such a case one can rely on Coulomb's failure criterion for isotropic mat erial (gives four constraints) instead of the weaker Bolt's criterion (giving only one const raint). One obvious fifth constraint is to require the vertical stress to equal the lithosta tic pressure. A sixth constraint is achieved by requiring that the deviatoric elastic energy is minimized. The water pressure is also needed for the fourth constraint by Coulomb (CFS=0 ). It can be related to

  8. Predicting Electrocardiogram and Arterial Blood Pressure Waveforms with Different Echo State Network Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Predicting Electrocardiogram and Arterial Blood Pressure Waveforms with Different Echo State Network Architectures Allan Fong, MS1,3, Ranjeev...the medical staff in Intensive Care Units. The ability to predict electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure waveforms can potentially help the...type of neural network for mining, understanding, and predicting electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure waveforms. Several network

  9. Surgery in colored tensor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Carlos I.

    2017-10-01

    Rooted in group field theory and matrix models, random tensor models are a recent background-invariant approach to quantum gravity in arbitrary dimensions. Colored tensor models (CTM) generate random triangulated orientable (pseudo)-manifolds. We analyze, in low dimensions, which known spaces are triangulated by specific CTM interactions. As a tool, we develop the graph-encoded surgery that is compatible with the quantum-field-theory-structure and use it to prove that a single model, the complex φ4-interaction in rank- 2, generates all orientable 2-bordisms, thus, in particular, also all orientable, closed surfaces. We show that certain quartic rank- 3 CTM, the φ34 -theory, has as boundary sector all closed, possibly disconnected, orientable surfaces. Hence all closed orientable surfaces are cobordant via manifolds generated by the φ34 -theory.

  10. Diffusion tensor optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2018-01-01

    In situ measurements of diffusive particle transport provide insight into tissue architecture, drug delivery, and cellular function. Analogous to diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), where the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules is mapped on the millimeter scale to elucidate the fibrous structure of tissue, here we propose diffusion-tensor optical coherence tomography (DT-OCT) for measuring directional diffusivity and flow of optically scattering particles within tissue. Because DT-OCT is sensitive to the sub-resolution motion of Brownian particles as they are constrained by tissue macromolecules, it has the potential to quantify nanoporous anisotropic tissue structure at micrometer resolution as relevant to extracellular matrices, neurons, and capillaries. Here we derive the principles of DT-OCT, relating the detected optical signal from a minimum of six probe beams with the six unique diffusion tensor and three flow vector components. The optimal geometry of the probe beams is determined given a finite numerical aperture, and a high-speed hardware implementation is proposed. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations are employed to assess the ability of the proposed DT-OCT system to quantify anisotropic diffusion of nanoparticles in a collagen matrix, an extracellular constituent that is known to become highly aligned during tumor development.

  11. Updated population metadata for United States historical climatology network stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.W.; Gallo, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Historical Climatology Network (HCN) serial temperature dataset is comprised of 1221 high-quality, long-term climate observing stations. The HCN dataset is available in several versions, one of which includes population-based temperature modifications to adjust urban temperatures for the "heat-island" effect. Unfortunately, the decennial population metadata file is not complete as missing values are present for 17.6% of the 12 210 population values associated with the 1221 individual stations during the 1900-90 interval. Retrospective grid-based populations. Within a fixed distance of an HCN station, were estimated through the use of a gridded population density dataset and historically available U.S. Census county data. The grid-based populations for the HCN stations provide values derived from a consistent methodology compared to the current HCN populations that can vary as definitions of the area associated with a city change over time. The use of grid-based populations may minimally be appropriate to augment populations for HCN climate stations that lack any population data, and are recommended when consistent and complete population data are required. The recommended urban temperature adjustments based on the HCN and grid-based methods of estimating station population can be significantly different for individual stations within the HCN dataset.

  12. Steady state analysis of Boolean molecular network models via model reduction and computational algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliz-Cuba, Alan; Aguilar, Boris; Hinkelmann, Franziska; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2014-06-26

    A key problem in the analysis of mathematical models of molecular networks is the determination of their steady states. The present paper addresses this problem for Boolean network models, an increasingly popular modeling paradigm for networks lacking detailed kinetic information. For small models, the problem can be solved by exhaustive enumeration of all state transitions. But for larger models this is not feasible, since the size of the phase space grows exponentially with the dimension of the network. The dimension of published models is growing to over 100, so that efficient methods for steady state determination are essential. Several methods have been proposed for large networks, some of them heuristic. While these methods represent a substantial improvement in scalability over exhaustive enumeration, the problem for large networks is still unsolved in general. This paper presents an algorithm that consists of two main parts. The first is a graph theoretic reduction of the wiring diagram of the network, while preserving all information about steady states. The second part formulates the determination of all steady states of a Boolean network as a problem of finding all solutions to a system of polynomial equations over the finite number system with two elements. This problem can be solved with existing computer algebra software. This algorithm compares favorably with several existing algorithms for steady state determination. One advantage is that it is not heuristic or reliant on sampling, but rather determines algorithmically and exactly all steady states of a Boolean network. The code for the algorithm, as well as the test suite of benchmark networks, is available upon request from the corresponding author. The algorithm presented in this paper reliably determines all steady states of sparse Boolean networks with up to 1000 nodes. The algorithm is effective at analyzing virtually all published models even those of moderate connectivity. The problem for

  13. Form and function in gene regulatory networks: the structure of network motifs determines fundamental properties of their dynamical state space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, S E; Fink, T M A

    2016-07-01

    Network motifs have been studied extensively over the past decade, and certain motifs, such as the feed-forward loop, play an important role in regulatory networks. Recent studies have used Boolean network motifs to explore the link between form and function in gene regulatory networks and have found that the structure of a motif does not strongly determine its function, if this is defined in terms of the gene expression patterns the motif can produce. Here, we offer a different, higher-level definition of the 'function' of a motif, in terms of two fundamental properties of its dynamical state space as a Boolean network. One is the basin entropy, which is a complexity measure of the dynamics of Boolean networks. The other is the diversity of cyclic attractor lengths that a given motif can produce. Using these two measures, we examine all 104 topologically distinct three-node motifs and show that the structural properties of a motif, such as the presence of feedback loops and feed-forward loops, predict fundamental characteristics of its dynamical state space, which in turn determine aspects of its functional versatility. We also show that these higher-level properties have a direct bearing on real regulatory networks, as both basin entropy and cycle length diversity show a close correspondence with the prevalence, in neural and genetic regulatory networks, of the 13 connected motifs without self-interactions that have been studied extensively in the literature. © 2016 The Authors.

  14. Shape anisotropy: tensor distance to anisotropy measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; El-Hilo, Saba; Atkins, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    Fractional anisotropy, defined as the distance of a diffusion tensor from its closest isotropic tensor, has been extensively studied as quantitative anisotropy measure for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images (DT-MRI). It has been used to reveal the white matter profile of brain images, as guiding feature for seeding and stopping in fiber tractography and for the diagnosis and assessment of degenerative brain diseases. Despite its extensive use in DT-MRI community, however, not much attention has been given to the mathematical correctness of its derivation from diffusion tensors which is achieved using Euclidean dot product in 9D space. But, recent progress in DT-MRI has shown that the space of diffusion tensors does not form a Euclidean vector space and thus Euclidean dot product is not appropriate for tensors. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust rotationally invariant diffusion anisotropy measure derived using the recently proposed Log-Euclidean and J-divergence tensor distance measures. An interesting finding of our work is that given a diffusion tensor, its closest isotropic tensor is different for different tensor distance metrics used. We demonstrate qualitatively that our new anisotropy measure reveals superior white matter profile of DT-MR brain images and analytically show that it has a higher signal to noise ratio than fractional anisotropy.

  15. Vulnerability of state-interdependent networks under malware spreading

    OpenAIRE

    Vida, Rafael; Galeano, Javier; Cuenda, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Computer viruses are evolving by developing spreading mechanisms based on the use of multiple vectors of propagation. The use of the social network as an extra vector of attack to penetrate the security measures in IP networks is improving the effectiveness of malware, and have therefore been used by the most aggressive viruses, like Conficker and Stuxnet. In this work we use interdependent networks to model the propagation of these kind of viruses. In particular, we study the propagation of ...

  16. State of the art applications of social network analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Can, Fazli; Polat, Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Social network analysis increasingly bridges the discovery of patterns in diverse areas of study as more data becomes available and complex. Yet the construction of huge networks from large data often requires entirely different approaches for analysis including; graph theory, statistics, machine learning and data mining. This work covers frontier studies on social network analysis and mining from different perspectives such as social network sites, financial data, e-mails, forums, academic research funds, XML technology, blog content, community detection and clique finding, prediction of user

  17. Tensor SOM and tensor GTM: Nonlinear tensor analysis by topographic mappings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tohru; Furukawa, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose nonlinear tensor analysis methods: the tensor self-organizing map (TSOM) and the tensor generative topographic mapping (TGTM). TSOM is a straightforward extension of the self-organizing map from high-dimensional data to tensorial data, and TGTM is an extension of the generative topographic map, which provides a theoretical background for TSOM using a probabilistic generative model. These methods are useful tools for analyzing and visualizing tensorial data, especially multimodal relational data. For given n-mode relational data, TSOM and TGTM can simultaneously organize a set of n-topographic maps. Furthermore, they can be used to explore the tensorial data space by interactively visualizing the relationships between modes. We present the TSOM algorithm and a theoretical description from the viewpoint of TGTM. Various TSOM variations and visualization techniques are also described, along with some applications to real relational datasets. Additionally, we attempt to build a comprehensive description of the TSOM family by adapting various data structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamics in steady state in vitro acto-myosin networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonn-Segev, Adar; Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne; Roichman, Yael

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that many biochemical processes in the cell such as gene regulation, growth signals and activation of ion channels, rely on mechanical stimuli. However, the mechanism by which mechanical signals propagate through cells is not as well understood. In this review we focus on stress propagation in a minimal model for cell elasticity, actomyosin networks, which are comprised of a sub-family of cytoskeleton proteins. After giving an overview of th actomyosin network components, structure and evolution we review stress propagation in these materials as measured through the correlated motion of tracer beads. We also discuss the possibility to extract structural features of these networks from the same experiments. We show that stress transmission through these networks has two pathways, a quickly dissipative one through the bulk, and a long ranged weakly dissipative one through the pre-stressed actin network.

  19. Northeast Solid-State Lighting Strategic Information Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Ed

    2010-05-06

    This report summarizes results of a survey developed and issued by Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP) to “assess the reach and impact of NEEP’s SSL information dissemination” undertaken as part of its Technical Information Network for Solid State Lighting (TINSSL) project1. Survey results will be used to develop recommendations to optimize project effectiveness, both for NEEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Furthermore, completion of the 2008 and 2009 surveys fulfills the requirements of the funding agreement supporting the NEEP TINSSL project. Since this is the second of two surveys, comparisons from year to year are presented. The NEEP TINSSL Stakeholder Survey was developed using Surveymonkey and it was distributed via email on May 19, 2009 and May 26, 2009. It was also distributed at a kiosk via internet at the NEEP Summit on May 29, 2009 and was closed that evening. Response to the survey increased by 35 percent this year. Eighty-six respondents completed the survey, and 104 responded overall. In an effort to increase response, this year respondents were invited to participate in a raffle for an SSL lighting product. The survey was distributed to the NEEP TINSSL distribution list, which includes a diverse set of contacts that overlaps significantly with NEEP’s general distribution list. The report presents 2009 findings and comparisons with 2008, where appropriate, on respondents’ awareness and understanding of SSL technology as well as their awareness of NEEP, DOE and other information resources.2 This includes NEEP’s many, varied outreach venues that communicate about SSL as part of TINSSL. In addition, it presents findings from questions addressing information needed by program planners. In addition to the summary findings reported below, a spreadsheet with a question-by-question tabulation of survey responses and a full listing of verbatim responses is included as an attachment to this report.

  20. Addressing the Influence of Hidden State on Wireless Network Optimizations using Performance Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard-Hansen, Kim; Madsen, Tatiana Kozlova; Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Performance of wireless connectivity for network client devices is location dependent. It has been shown that it can be beneficial to collect network performance metrics along with location information to generate maps of the location dependent network performance. These performance maps can...... be used to optimize the use of the wireless net- work by predicting future network performance and scheduling the net- work communication for certain applications on mobile devices. However, other important factors influence the performance of the wireless communication such as changes in the propagation...... environment and resource sharing. In this work we extend the framework of performance maps for wireless networks by introducing network state as an abstraction for all other factors than location that influence the performance. Since network state might not always be directly observable the framework...

  1. Link prediction via generalized coupled tensor factorisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermiş, Beyza; Evrim, Acar Ataman; Taylan Cemgil, A.

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with the missing link prediction problem: the problem of predicting the existence of missing connections between entities of interest. We address link prediction using coupled analysis of relational datasets represented as heterogeneous data, i.e., datasets in the form of matrices...... and higher-order tensors. We propose to use an approach based on probabilistic interpretation of tensor factorisation models, i.e., Generalised Coupled Tensor Factorisation, which can simultaneously fit a large class of tensor models to higher-order tensors/matrices with com- mon latent factors using...... different loss functions. Numerical experiments demonstrate that joint analysis of data from multiple sources via coupled factorisation improves the link prediction performance and the selection of right loss function and tensor model is crucial for accurately predicting missing links....

  2. Tweeting Earthquakes using TensorFlow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarotti, E.; Comunello, F.; Magnoni, F.

    2016-12-01

    The use of social media is emerging as a powerful tool for disseminating trusted information about earthquakes. Since 2009, the Twitter account @INGVterremoti provides constant and timely details about M2+ seismic events detected by the Italian National Seismic Network, directly connected with the seismologists on duty at Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV). Currently, it updates more than 150,000 followers. Nevertheless, since it provides only the manual revision of seismic parameters, the timing (approximately between 10 and 20 minutes after an event) has started to be under evaluation. Undeniably, mobile internet, social network sites and Twitter in particular require a more rapid and "real-time" reaction. During the last 36 months, INGV tested the tweeting of the automatic detection of M3+ earthquakes, studying the reliability of the information both in term of seismological accuracy that from the point of view of communication and social research. A set of quality parameters (i.e. number of seismic stations, gap, relative error of the location) has been recognized to reduce false alarms and the uncertainty of the automatic detection. We present an experiment to further improve the reliability of this process using TensorFlow™ (an open source software library originally developed by researchers and engineers working on the Google Brain Team within Google's Machine Intelligence research organization).

  3. Is functional integration of resting state brain networks an unspecific biomarker for working memory performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavash, Mohsen; Doebler, Philipp; Holling, Heinz; Thiel, Christiane M; Gießing, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    Is there one optimal topology of functional brain networks at rest from which our cognitive performance would profit? Previous studies suggest that functional integration of resting state brain networks is an important biomarker for cognitive performance. However, it is still unknown whether higher network integration is an unspecific predictor for good cognitive performance or, alternatively, whether specific network organization during rest predicts only specific cognitive abilities. Here, we investigated the relationship between network integration at rest and cognitive performance using two tasks that measured different aspects of working memory; one task assessed visual-spatial and the other numerical working memory. Network clustering, modularity and efficiency were computed to capture network integration on different levels of network organization, and to statistically compare their correlations with the performance in each working memory test. The results revealed that each working memory aspect profits from a different resting state topology, and the tests showed significantly different correlations with each of the measures of network integration. While higher global network integration and modularity predicted significantly better performance in visual-spatial working memory, both measures showed no significant correlation with numerical working memory performance. In contrast, numerical working memory was superior in subjects with highly clustered brain networks, predominantly in the intraparietal sulcus, a core brain region of the working memory network. Our findings suggest that a specific balance between local and global functional integration of resting state brain networks facilitates special aspects of cognitive performance. In the context of working memory, while visual-spatial performance is facilitated by globally integrated functional resting state brain networks, numerical working memory profits from increased capacities for local processing

  4. The Topology of Symmetric Tensor Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Yingmei; Batra, Rajesh; Hesselink, Lambertus; Levy, Yuval

    1997-01-01

    Combinatorial topology, also known as "rubber sheet geometry", has extensive applications in geometry and analysis, many of which result from connections with the theory of differential equations. A link between topology and differential equations is vector fields. Recent developments in scientific visualization have shown that vector fields also play an important role in the analysis of second-order tensor fields. A second-order tensor field can be transformed into its eigensystem, namely, eigenvalues and their associated eigenvectors without loss of information content. Eigenvectors behave in a similar fashion to ordinary vectors with even simpler topological structures due to their sign indeterminacy. Incorporating information about eigenvectors and eigenvalues in a display technique known as hyperstreamlines reveals the structure of a tensor field. The simplify and often complex tensor field and to capture its important features, the tensor is decomposed into an isotopic tensor and a deviator. A tensor field and its deviator share the same set of eigenvectors, and therefore they have a similar topological structure. A a deviator determines the properties of a tensor field, while the isotopic part provides a uniform bias. Degenerate points are basic constituents of tensor fields. In 2-D tensor fields, there are only two types of degenerate points; while in 3-D, the degenerate points can be characterized in a Q'-R' plane. Compressible and incompressible flows share similar topological feature due to the similarity of their deviators. In the case of the deformation tensor, the singularities of its deviator represent the area of vortex core in the field. In turbulent flows, the similarities and differences of the topology of the deformation and the Reynolds stress tensors reveal that the basic addie-viscosity assuptions have their validity in turbulence modeling under certain conditions.

  5. Identifying influential directors in the United States corporate governance network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuqing; Vodenska, Irena; Wang, Fengzhong; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2011-10-01

    The influence of directors has been one of the most engaging topics recently, but surprisingly little research has been done to quantitatively evaluate the influence and power of directors. We analyze the structure of the US corporate governance network for the 11-year period 1996-2006 based on director data from the Investor Responsibility Research Center director database, and we develop a centrality measure named the influence factor to estimate the influence of directors quantitatively. The US corporate governance network is a network of directors with nodes representing directors and links between two directors representing their service on common company boards. We assume that information flows in the network through information-sharing processes among linked directors. The influence factor assigned to a director is based on the level of information that a director obtains from the entire network. We find that, contrary to commonly accepted belief that directors of large companies, measured by market capitalization, are the most powerful, in some instances, the directors who are influential do not necessarily serve on boards of large companies. By applying our influence factor method to identify the influential people contained in the lists created by popular magazines such as Fortune, Networking World, and Treasury and Risk Management, we find that the influence factor method is consistently either the best or one of the two best methods in identifying powerful people compared to other general centrality measures that are used to denote the significance of a node in complex network theory.

  6. Altered resting state brain networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Göttlich

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra leading to dysfunctional cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical loops. In addition to the characteristic motor symptoms, PD patients often show cognitive impairments, affective changes and other non-motor symptoms, suggesting system-wide effects on brain function. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and graph-theory based analysis methods to investigate altered whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity in PD patients (n = 37 compared to healthy controls (n = 20. Global network properties indicated less efficient processing in PD. Analysis of brain network modules pointed to increased connectivity within the sensorimotor network, but decreased interaction of the visual network with other brain modules. We found lower connectivity mainly between the cuneus and the ventral caudate, medial orbitofrontal cortex and the temporal lobe. To identify regions of altered connectivity, we mapped the degree of intrinsic functional connectivity both on ROI- and on voxel-level across the brain. Compared to healthy controls, PD patients showed lower connectedness in the medial and middle orbitofrontal cortex. The degree of connectivity was also decreased in the occipital lobe (cuneus and calcarine, but increased in the superior parietal cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, supramarginal gyrus and supplementary motor area. Our results on global network and module properties indicated that PD manifests as a disconnection syndrome. This was most apparent in the visual network module. The higher connectedness within the sensorimotor module in PD patients may be related to compensation mechanism in order to overcome the functional deficit of the striato-cortical motor loops or to loss of mutual inhibition between brain networks. Abnormal connectivity in the visual network may be related to adaptation and compensation processes as a consequence

  7. Temporal reliability and lateralization of the resting-state language network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Zhu

    Full Text Available The neural processing loop of language is complex but highly associated with Broca's and Wernicke's areas. The left dominance of these two areas was the earliest observation of brain asymmetry. It was demonstrated that the language network and its functional asymmetry during resting state were reproducible across institutions. However, the temporal reliability of resting-state language network and its functional asymmetry are still short of knowledge. In this study, we established a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis of language network with seed regions located at Broca's and Wernicke's areas, and investigated temporal reliability of language network and its functional asymmetry. The language network was found to be temporally reliable in both short- and long-term. In the aspect of functional asymmetry, the Broca's area was found to be left lateralized, while the Wernicke's area is mainly right lateralized. Functional asymmetry of these two areas revealed high short- and long-term reliability as well. In addition, the impact of global signal regression (GSR on reliability of the resting-state language network was investigated, and our results demonstrated that GSR had negligible effect on the temporal reliability of the resting-state language network. Our study provided methodology basis for future cross-culture and clinical researches of resting-state language network and suggested priority of adopting seed-based functional connectivity for its high reliability.

  8. Tensor power spectrum and disformal transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Fumagalli, Jacopo; Postma, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    In a general effective theory description of inflation a disformal transformation can be used to set the tensor sound speed to one. After the transformation, the tensor power spectrum then automatically only depends on the Hubble parameter. We show that this disformal transformation, however, is nothing else than a change of units. It is a very useful tool for simplifying and interpreting computations, but it cannot change any physics. While the apparent parametrical dependence of the tensor power spectrum does change under a disformal transformation, the physics described is frame invariant. We further illustrate the frame invariance of the tensor power spectrum by writing it exclusively in terms of separately invariant quantities.

  9. Diffusion Tensor Estimation by Maximizing Rician Likelihood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Bennett; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Prince, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is widely used to characterize white matter in health and disease. Previous approaches to the estimation of diffusion tensors have either been statistically suboptimal or have used Gaussian approximations of the underlying noise structure, which is Rician in reality. This can cause quantities derived from these tensors - e.g., fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient - to diverge from their true values, potentially leading to artifactual changes that confound clinically significant ones. This paper presents a novel maximum likelihood approach to tensor estimation, denoted Diffusion Tensor Estimation by Maximizing Rician Likelihood (DTEMRL). In contrast to previous approaches, DTEMRL considers the joint distribution of all observed data in the context of an augmented tensor model to account for variable levels of Rician noise. To improve numeric stability and prevent non-physical solutions, DTEMRL incorporates a robust characterization of positive definite tensors and a new estimator of underlying noise variance. In simulated and clinical data, mean squared error metrics show consistent and significant improvements from low clinical SNR to high SNR. DTEMRL may be readily supplemented with spatial regularization or a priori tensor distributions for Bayesian tensor estimation.

  10. Optimal Meter Placement for Distribution Network State Estimation: A Circuit Representation Based MILP Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lin, Jin; Wan, Can

    2016-01-01

    State estimation (SE) in distribution networks is not as accurate as that in transmission networks. Traditionally, distribution networks (DNs) are lack of direct measurements due to the limitations of investments and the difficulties of maintenance. Therefore, it is critical to improve the accuracy...... of SE in distribution networks by placing additional physical meters. For state-of-the-art SE models, it is difficult to clearly quantify measurements' influences on SE errors, so the problems of optimal meter placement for reducing SE errors are mostly solved by heuristic or suboptimal algorithms...

  11. State feedback controller design for the synchronization of Boolean networks with time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangfei; Li, Jianning; Shen, Lijuan

    2018-01-01

    State feedback control design to make the response Boolean network synchronize with the drive Boolean network is far from being solved in the literature. Motivated by this, this paper studies the feedback control design for the complete synchronization of two coupled Boolean networks with time delays. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller is derived first. Then the feedback control design procedure for the complete synchronization of two coupled Boolean networks is provided based on the necessary condition. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the proposed design procedure.

  12. Policy based network management : state of the industry and desired functionality for the enterprise network: security policy / testing technology evaluation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Christine A.; Ernest, Martha J.; Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Klaus, Edward J.; MacAlpine, Timothy L.; Rios, Michael A.; Keliiaa, Curtis M.; Taylor, Jeffrey L.

    2005-02-01

    Policy-based network management (PBNM) uses policy-driven automation to manage complex enterprise and service provider networks. Such management is strongly supported by industry standards, state of the art technologies and vendor product offerings. We present a case for the use of PBNM and related technologies for end-to-end service delivery. We provide a definition of PBNM terms, a discussion of how such management should function and the current state of the industry. We include recommendations for continued work that would allow for PBNM to be put in place over the next five years in the unclassified environment.

  13. Automatic selection of resting-state networks with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Francesca eStorti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a resting-state condition can reveal the co-activation of specific brain regions in distributed networks, called resting-state networks, which are selected by independent component analysis (ICA of the fMRI data. One of the major difficulties with component analysis is the automatic selection of the ICA features related to brain activity. In this study we describe a method designed to automatically select networks of potential functional relevance, specifically, those regions known to be involved in motor function, visual processing, executive functioning, auditory processing, memory, and the default-mode network. To do this, image analysis was based on probabilistic ICA as implemented in FSL software. After decomposition, the optimal number of components was selected by applying a novel algorithm which takes into account, for each component, Pearson's median coefficient of skewness of the spatial maps generated by FSL, followed by clustering, segmentation, and spectral analysis. To evaluate the performance of the approach, we investigated the resting-state networks in 25 subjects. For each subject, three resting-state scans were obtained with a Siemens Allegra 3 T scanner (NYU data set. Comparison of the visually and the automatically identified neuronal networks showed that the algorithm had high accuracy (first scan: 95%, second scan: 95%, third scan: 93% and precision (90%, 90%, 84%. The reproducibility of the networks for visual and automatic selection was very close: it was highly consistent in each subject for the default-mode network (≥ 92% and the occipital network, which includes the medial visual cortical areas (≥ 94%, and consistent for the attention network (≥ 80%, the right and/or left lateralized frontoparietal attention networks, and the temporal-motor network (≥ 80%. The automatic selection method may be used to detect neural networks and reduce subjectivity in ICA

  14. Resting-State Temporal Synchronization Networks Emerge from Connectivity Topology and Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Deco, Gustavo; Hagmann, Patric; Romani, Gian Luca; Mantini, Dante; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Spatial patterns of coherent activity across different brain areas have been identified during the resting-state fluctuations of the brain. However, recent studies indicate that resting-state activity is not stationary, but shows complex temporal dynamics. We were interested in the spatiotemporal dynamics of the phase interactions among resting-state fMRI BOLD signals from human subjects. We found that the global phase synchrony of the BOLD signals evolves on a characteristic ultra-slow (synchronized brain regions. Synchronized communities reoccurred intermittently in time and across scanning sessions. We found that the synchronization communities relate to previously defined functional networks known to be engaged in sensory-motor or cognitive function, called resting-state networks (RSNs), including the default mode network, the somato-motor network, the visual network, the auditory network, the cognitive control networks, the self-referential network, and combinations of these and other RSNs. We studied the mechanism originating the observed spatiotemporal synchronization dynamics by using a network model of phase oscillators connected through the brain’s anatomical connectivity estimated using diffusion imaging human data. The model consistently approximates the temporal and spatial synchronization patterns of the empirical data, and reveals that multiple clusters that transiently synchronize and desynchronize emerge from the complex topology of anatomical connections, provided that oscillators are heterogeneous. PMID:25692996

  15. All-at-once Optimization for Coupled Matrix and Tensor Factorizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evrim, Acar Ataman; Kolda, Tamara G.; Dunlavy, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Joint analysis of data from multiple sources has the potential to improve our understanding of the underlying structures in complex data sets. For instance, in restaurant recommendation systems, recommendations can be based on rating histories of customers. In addition to rating histories.......g., the person by person social network matrix or the restaurant by category matrix, and higher-order tensors, e.g., the "ratings" tensor of the form restaurant by meal by person. In this paper, we are particularly interested in fusing data sets with the goal of capturing their underlying latent structures. We...... formulate this problem as a coupled matrix and tensor factorization (CMTF) problem where heterogeneous data sets are modeled by fitting outer-product models to higher-order tensors and matrices in a coupled manner. Unlike traditional approaches solving this problem using alternating algorithms, we propose...

  16. Experimental observation of chimera and cluster states in a minimal globally coupled network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Joseph D. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Bansal, Kanika [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo, SUNY Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Murphy, Thomas E. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Roy, Rajarshi [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A “chimera state” is a dynamical pattern that occurs in a network of coupled identical oscillators when the symmetry of the oscillator population is broken into synchronous and asynchronous parts. We report the experimental observation of chimera and cluster states in a network of four globally coupled chaotic opto-electronic oscillators. This is the minimal network that can support chimera states, and our study provides new insight into the fundamental mechanisms underlying their formation. We use a unified approach to determine the stability of all the observed partially synchronous patterns, highlighting the close relationship between chimera and cluster states as belonging to the broader phenomenon of partial synchronization. Our approach is general in terms of network size and connectivity. We also find that chimera states often appear in regions of multistability between global, cluster, and desynchronized states.

  17. Extracting Entanglement Geometry from Quantum States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Katharine; Garrison, James R; Bauer, Bela

    2017-10-06

    Tensor networks impose a notion of geometry on the entanglement of a quantum system. In some cases, this geometry is found to reproduce key properties of holographic dualities, and subsequently much work has focused on using tensor networks as tractable models for holographic dualities. Conventionally, the structure of the network-and hence the geometry-is largely fixed a priori by the choice of the tensor network ansatz. Here, we evade this restriction and describe an unbiased approach that allows us to extract the appropriate geometry from a given quantum state. We develop an algorithm that iteratively finds a unitary circuit that transforms a given quantum state into an unentangled product state. We then analyze the structure of the resulting unitary circuits. In the case of noninteracting, critical systems in one dimension, we recover signatures of scale invariance in the unitary network, and we show that appropriately defined geodesic paths between physical degrees of freedom exhibit known properties of a hyperbolic geometry.

  18. Node Identification Using Inter-Regional Correlation Analysis for Mapping Detailed Connections in Resting State Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jeong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain function is often characterized by the connections and interactions between highly interconnected brain regions. Pathological disruptions in these networks often result in brain dysfunction, which manifests as brain disease. Typical analysis investigates disruptions in network connectivity based correlations between large brain regions. To obtain a more detailed description of disruptions in network connectivity, we propose a new method where functional nodes are identified in each region based on their maximum connectivity to another brain region in a given network. Since this method provides a unique approach to identifying functionally relevant nodes in a given network, we can provide a more detailed map of brain connectivity and determine new measures of network connectivity. We applied this method to resting state fMRI of Alzheimer's disease patients to validate our method and found decreased connectivity within the default mode network. In addition, new measure of network connectivity revealed a more detailed description of how the network connections deteriorate with disease progression. This suggests that analysis using key relative network hub regions based on regional correlation can be used to detect detailed changes in resting state network connectivity.

  19. 3D reconstruction of tensors and vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defrise, Michel; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2005-02-17

    Here we have developed formulations for the reconstruction of 3D tensor fields from planar (Radon) and line-integral (X-ray) projections of 3D vector and tensor fields. Much of the motivation for this work is the potential application of MRI to perform diffusion tensor tomography. The goal is to develop a theory for the reconstruction of both Radon planar and X-ray or line-integral projections because of the flexibility of MRI to obtain both of these type of projections in 3D. The development presented here for the linear tensor tomography problem provides insight into the structure of the nonlinear MRI diffusion tensor inverse problem. A particular application of tensor imaging in MRI is the potential application of cardiac diffusion tensor tomography for determining in vivo cardiac fiber structure. One difficulty in the cardiac application is the motion of the heart. This presents a need for developing future theory for tensor tomography in a motion field. This means developing a better understanding of the MRI signal for diffusion processes in a deforming media. The techniques developed may allow the application of MRI tensor tomography for the study of structure of fiber tracts in the brain, atherosclerotic plaque, and spine in addition to fiber structure in the heart. However, the relations presented are also applicable to other fields in medical imaging such as diffraction tomography using ultrasound. The mathematics presented can also be extended to exponential Radon transform of tensor fields and to other geometric acquisitions such as cone beam tomography of tensor fields.

  20. Disrupted resting-state brain network properties in obesity: decreased global and putaminal cortico-striatal network efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, K; Morris, L S; Kundu, P; Voon, V

    2017-03-01

    The efficient organization and communication of brain networks underlie cognitive processing and their disruption can lead to pathological behaviours. Few studies have focused on whole-brain networks in obesity and binge eating disorder (BED). Here we used multi-echo resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) along with a data-driven graph theory approach to assess brain network characteristics in obesity and BED. Multi-echo rsfMRI scans were collected from 40 obese subjects (including 20 BED patients) and 40 healthy controls and denoised using multi-echo independent component analysis (ME-ICA). We constructed a whole-brain functional connectivity matrix with normalized correlation coefficients between regional mean blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals from 90 brain regions in the Automated Anatomical Labeling atlas. We computed global and regional network properties in the binarized connectivity matrices with an edge density of 5%-25%. We also verified our findings using a separate parcellation, the Harvard-Oxford atlas parcellated into 470 regions. Obese subjects exhibited significantly reduced global and local network efficiency as well as decreased modularity compared with healthy controls, showing disruption in small-world and modular network structures. In regional metrics, the putamen, pallidum and thalamus exhibited significantly decreased nodal degree and efficiency in obese subjects. Obese subjects also showed decreased connectivity of cortico-striatal/cortico-thalamic networks associated with putaminal and cortical motor regions. These findings were significant with ME-ICA with limited group differences observed with conventional denoising or single-echo analysis. Using this data-driven analysis of multi-echo rsfMRI data, we found disruption in global network properties and motor cortico-striatal networks in obesity consistent with habit formation theories. Our findings highlight the role of network properties in

  1. Quantum synchronization and quantum state sharing in an irregular complex network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the quantum synchronization phenomenon of the complex network constituted by coupled optomechanical systems and prove that the unknown identical quantum states can be shared or distributed in the quantum network even though the topology is varying. Considering a channel constructed by quantum correlation, we show that quantum synchronization can sustain and maintain high levels in Markovian dissipation for a long time. We also analyze the state-sharing process between two typical complex networks, and the results predict that linked nodes can be directly synchronized, but the whole network will be synchronized only if some specific synchronization conditions are satisfied. Furthermore, we give the synchronization conditions analytically through analyzing network dynamics. This proposal paves the way for studying multi-interaction synchronization and achieving effective quantum information processing in a complex network.

  2. Topological defects in quantum field theory with matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Edward; Rajantie, Arttu

    2017-11-01

    Topological defects (kinks) in a relativistic ϕ4 scalar field theory in D =(1 +1 ) are studied using the matrix product state tensor network. The one kink state is approximated as a matrix product state and the kink mass is calculated. The approach used is quite general and can be applied to a variety of theories and tensor networks. Additionally, the contribution of kink-antikink excitations to the ground state is examined and a general method to estimate the scalar mass from equal time ground state observables is provided. The scalar and kink mass are compared at strong coupling and behave as expected from universality arguments. This suggests that the matrix product state can adequately capture the physics of defect-antidefect excitations and thus provides a promising technique to study challenging nonequilibrium physics such as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism of defect formation.

  3. A solution for tensor reduction of one-loop N-point functions with N{>=}6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, J. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Riemann, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Collisions at the LHC produce many-particle final states, and for precise predictions the one-loop N-point corrections are needed. We study here the tensor reduction for Feynman integrals with N{>=}6. A general, recursive solution by Binoth et al. expresses N-point Feynman integrals of rank R in terms of (N-1)-point Feynman integrals of rank (R-1) (for N{>=}6). We show that the coefficients can be obtained analytically from suitable representations of the metric tensor. Contractions of the tensor integrals with external momenta can be efficiently expressed as well. We consider our approach particularly well suited for automatization. (orig.)

  4. Simulation, State Estimation and Control of Nonlinear Superheater Attemporator using Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Sørensen, O.

    2000-01-01

    This paper considers the use of neural networks for nonlinear state estimation, system identification and control. As a case study we use data taken from a nonlinear injection valve for a superheater attemporator at a power plant. One neural network is trained as a nonlinear simulation model......-by-sample linearizations and state estimates provided by the observer network. Simulation studies show that the nonlinear observer-based control loop performs better than a similar control loop based on a linear observer....... of the process, then another network is trained to act as a combined state and parameter estimator for the process. The observer network incorporates smoothing of the parameter estimates in the form of regularization. A pole placement controller is designed which takes advantage of the sample...

  5. Simulation, State Estimation and Control of Nonlinear Superheater Attemporator using Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Sørensen, O.

    1999-01-01

    This paper considers the use of neural networks for nonlinear state estimation, system identification and control. As a case study we use data taken from a nonlinear injection valve for a superheater attemporator at a power plant. One neural network is trained as a nonlinear simulation model......-by-sample linearizations and state estimates provided by the observer network. Simulation studies show that the nonlinear observer-based control loop performs better than a similar control loop based on a linear observer....... of the process, then another network is trained to act as a combined state and parameter estimator for the process. The observer network incorporates smoothing of the parameter estimates in the form of regularization. A pole placement controller is designed which takes advantage of the sample...

  6. Diffusion Tensor Tractography Reveals Disrupted Structural Connectivity during Brain Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan; Tian, Miao; Wang, Qi; Wu, Shuicai

    2017-10-01

    Brain aging is one of the most crucial biological processes that entail many physical, biological, chemical, and psychological changes, and also a major risk factor for most common neurodegenerative diseases. To improve the quality of life for the elderly, it is important to understand how the brain is changed during the normal aging process. We compared diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based brain networks in a cohort of 75 healthy old subjects by using graph theory metrics to describe the anatomical networks and connectivity patterns, and network-based statistic (NBS) analysis was used to identify pairs of regions with altered structural connectivity. The NBS analysis revealed a significant network comprising nine distinct fiber bundles linking 10 different brain regions showed altered white matter structures in young-old group compare with middle-aged group (p < .05, family-wise error-corrected). Our results might guide future studies and help to gain a better understanding of brain aging.

  7. A Computational Approach to Extinction Events in Chemical Reaction Networks with Discrete State Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work of M.D. Johnston et al. has produced sufficient conditions on the structure of a chemical reaction network which guarantee that the corresponding discrete state space system exhibits an extinction event. The conditions consist of a series of systems of equalities and inequalities on the edges of a modified reaction network called a domination-expanded reaction network. In this paper, we present a computational implementation of these conditions written in Python and apply the prog...

  8. State of the Art and Recent Research Advances in Software Defined Networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taimur Bakhshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging network services and subsequent growth in the networking infrastructure have gained tremendous momentum in recent years. Application performance requiring rapid real-time network provisioning, optimized traffic management, and virtualization of shared resources has induced the conceptualization and adoption of new networking models. Software defined networking (SDN, one of the predominant and relatively new networking paradigms, seeks to simplify network management by decoupling network control logic from the underlying hardware and introduces real-time network programmability enabling innovation. The present work reviews the state of the art in software defined networking providing a historical perspective on complementary technologies in network programmability and the inherent shortcomings which paved the way for SDN. The SDN architecture is discussed along with popular protocols, platforms, and existing simulation and debugging solutions. Furthermore, a detailed analysis is presented around recent SDN development and deployment avenues ranging from mobile communications and data centers to campus networks and residential environments. The review concludes by highlighting implementation challenges and subsequent research directions being pursued in academia and industry to address issues related to application performance, control plane scalability and design, security, and interdomain connectivity in the context of SDN.

  9. Rainfall monitoring with microwave link networks -state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Lotte; Overeem, Aart; Ríos Gaona, Manuel; van Leth, Tommy; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2017-04-01

    For the purpose of hydrological applications, meteorology, climate monitoring and agriculture, accurate high resolution rainfall monitoring is highly desirable. Often used techniques to measure rainfall include rain gauge networks and radar. However, accurate rainfall information is lacking in large areas in the world, and the number of rain gauges is even severely declining in Europe, South-America and Africa. The investments required for the installation and maintenance of dense sensor networks can form a large obstacle. Over the past decade, various investigations have shown that microwave links from cellular communication networks may be used for rainfall monitoring. These commercial networks are installed for the purpose of cellular communication. These consist of antennas that transmit microwave link signals through the atmosphere over a path of typically several kilometers. Microwave signals are sensitive to rainfall at the frequencies that are typically used. The loss of signal (attenuation) over the link-path, which is logged in real-time by cellular communication companies for quality monitoring, can therefore be interpreted as a rainfall measurement. In recent years, various techniques have been developed to quantitatively determine rainfall from these microwave link attenuations. An overview of error sources in this process, quantitative rainfall determination techniques, as well as the results of various validation studies are provided. These studies show that there is considerable potential in using commercial microwave link networks for rainfall monitoring. This is a promising development, as these networks cover 20% of the land surface of the earth and have high density, especially in urban areas where there is generally a lack of in situ ground measurements.

  10. Stability of whole brain and regional network topology within and between resting and cognitive states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna K Rzucidlo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graph-theory based analyses of resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI data have been used to map the network organization of the brain. While numerous analyses of resting state brain organization exist, many questions remain unexplored. The present study examines the stability of findings based on this approach over repeated resting state and working memory state sessions within the same individuals. This allows assessment of stability of network topology within the same state for both rest and working memory, and between rest and working memory as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: fMRI scans were performed on five participants while at rest and while performing the 2-back working memory task five times each, with task state alternating while they were in the scanner. Voxel-based whole brain network analyses were performed on the resulting data along with analyses of functional connectivity in regions associated with resting state and working memory. Network topology was fairly stable across repeated sessions of the same task, but varied significantly between rest and working memory. In the whole brain analysis, local efficiency, Eloc, differed significantly between rest and working memory. Analyses of network statistics for the precuneus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex revealed significant differences in degree as a function of task state for both regions and in local efficiency for the precuneus. Conversely, no significant differences were observed across repeated sessions of the same state. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that network topology is fairly stable within individuals across time for the same state, but also fluid between states. Whole brain voxel-based network analyses may prove to be a valuable tool for exploring how functional connectivity changes in response to task demands.

  11. Stability of whole brain and regional network topology within and between resting and cognitive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzucidlo, Justyna K; Roseman, Paige L; Laurienti, Paul J; Dagenbach, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Graph-theory based analyses of resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data have been used to map the network organization of the brain. While numerous analyses of resting state brain organization exist, many questions remain unexplored. The present study examines the stability of findings based on this approach over repeated resting state and working memory state sessions within the same individuals. This allows assessment of stability of network topology within the same state for both rest and working memory, and between rest and working memory as well. fMRI scans were performed on five participants while at rest and while performing the 2-back working memory task five times each, with task state alternating while they were in the scanner. Voxel-based whole brain network analyses were performed on the resulting data along with analyses of functional connectivity in regions associated with resting state and working memory. Network topology was fairly stable across repeated sessions of the same task, but varied significantly between rest and working memory. In the whole brain analysis, local efficiency, Eloc, differed significantly between rest and working memory. Analyses of network statistics for the precuneus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex revealed significant differences in degree as a function of task state for both regions and in local efficiency for the precuneus. Conversely, no significant differences were observed across repeated sessions of the same state. These findings suggest that network topology is fairly stable within individuals across time for the same state, but also fluid between states. Whole brain voxel-based network analyses may prove to be a valuable tool for exploring how functional connectivity changes in response to task demands.

  12. A few cosmological implications of tensor nonlocalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Pedro G.; Maroto, Antonio L.

    2013-12-01

    We consider nonlocal gravity theories that include tensor nonlocalities. We show that in the cosmological context, the tensor nonlocalities, unlike scalar ones, generically give rise to growing modes. An explicit example with quadratic curvature terms is studied in detail. Possible consequences for recent nonlocal cosmological models proposed in the literature are also discussed.

  13. A metamaterial having a frequency dependent elasticity tensor and a zero effective mass density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, Graeme [Department of Mathematics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Seppecher, Pierre [Institut de Mathematiques de Toulon, Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France)

    2012-07-15

    Within the context of linear elasticity we show that a two-terminal network of springs and masses, can respond exactly the same as a normal spring, but with a frequency dependent spring constant. A network of such springs can have a frequency dependent effective elasticity tensor but zero effective mass density. The internal masses influence the elasticity tensor, but do not contribute to the effective mass density. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Practical Application of Neural Networks in State Space Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    theoretic notions followed by a detailed description of the topology, neuron functions and learning rules of the two types of neural networks treated in the thesis, the multilayer perceptron and the neurofuzzy networks. In both cases, a Least Squares second-order gradient method is used to train....... Then the controller is shown to work on a simulation example. We also address the potential problem of too rapidly fluctuating parameters by including regularization in the learning rule. Next we develop a direct adaptive certainty-equivalence controller based on neurofuzzy models. The control loop is proven...

  15. Critical thresholds and dynamical network states in a neural architecture for cognitive tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive tasks are represented in a network, in which: - Nodes correspond to cell-assemblies with a critical threshold, which enables explanation of various psychological phenomena, like priming. - Dynamical network states (excitation loops) can propagate in specific, task-dependent ways ranging

  16. Comment on "Network analysis of the state space of discrete dynamical systems"

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chengqing; Shu, Shi

    2016-01-01

    This paper comments the letter entitled "Network analysis of the state space of discrete dynamical systems" by A. Shreim et al. [Physical Review Letters, 98, 198701 (2007)]. We found that some theoretical analyses are wrong and the proposed indicators based on parameters of phase network can not discriminate dynamical complexity of the discrete dynamical systems composed by 1-D Cellular Automata.

  17. Graph analytic characterization of resting state networks in post-stroke aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Kiran

    2014-04-01

    Relative to controls, these results indicate inefficiencies in the post-stroke resting-state network, with greater shifts in network hubs in PWA dependent on the site and size of lesion. Such graph analytic results may prove informative in advancing individual-specific therapies.

  18. Universal data-based method for reconstructing complex networks with binary-state dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwen; Shen, Zhesi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Grebogi, Celso; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    To understand, predict, and control complex networked systems, a prerequisite is to reconstruct the network structure from observable data. Despite recent progress in network reconstruction, binary-state dynamics that are ubiquitous in nature, technology, and society still present an outstanding challenge in this field. Here we offer a framework for reconstructing complex networks with binary-state dynamics by developing a universal data-based linearization approach that is applicable to systems with linear, nonlinear, discontinuous, or stochastic dynamics governed by monotonic functions. The linearization procedure enables us to convert the network reconstruction into a sparse signal reconstruction problem that can be resolved through convex optimization. We demonstrate generally high reconstruction accuracy for a number of complex networks associated with distinct binary-state dynamics from using binary data contaminated by noise and missing data. Our framework is completely data driven, efficient, and robust, and does not require any a priori knowledge about the detailed dynamical process on the network. The framework represents a general paradigm for reconstructing, understanding, and exploiting complex networked systems with binary-state dynamics.

  19. Network complexity as a measure of information processing across resting-state networks: Evidence from the Human Connectome Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Mcdonough

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An emerging field of research focused on fluctuations in brain signals has provided evidence that the complexity of those signals, as measured by entropy, conveys important information about network dynamics (e.g., local and distributed processing. While much research has focused on how neural complexity differs in populations with different age groups or clinical disorders, substantially less research has focused on the basic understanding of neural complexity in populations with young and healthy brain states. The present study used resting-state fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project (Van Essen et al., 2013 to test the extent that neural complexity in the BOLD signal, as measured by multiscale entropy 1 would differ from random noise, 2 would differ between four major resting-state networks previously associated with higher-order cognition, and 3 would be associated with the strength and extent of functional connectivity—a complementary method of estimating information processing. We found that complexity in the BOLD signal exhibited different patterns of complexity from white, pink, and red noise and that neural complexity was differentially expressed between resting-state networks, including the default mode, cingulo-opercular, left and right frontoparietal networks. Lastly, neural complexity across all networks was negatively associated with functional connectivity at fine scales, but was positively associated with functional connectivity at coarse scales. The present study is the first to characterize neural complexity in BOLD signals at a high temporal resolution and across different networks and might help clarify the inconsistencies between neural complexity and functional connectivity, thus informing the mechanisms underlying neural complexity.

  20. The total position-spread tensor: Spin partition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Khatib, Muammar, E-mail: elkhatib@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Evangelisti, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Leininger, Thierry, E-mail: Thierry.Leininger@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantiques - LCPQ/IRSAMC, Université de Toulouse (UPS) et CNRS (UMR-5626), 118, Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Brea, Oriana, E-mail: oriana.brea@uam.es [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantiques - LCPQ/IRSAMC, Université de Toulouse (UPS) et CNRS (UMR-5626), 118, Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias, Módulo 13, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fertitta, Edoardo [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie - Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Bendazzoli, Gian Luigi, E-mail: gianluigi.bendazzoli@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale “Toso Montanari”, Università di Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I–40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2015-03-07

    The Total Position Spread (TPS) tensor, defined as the second moment cumulant of the position operator, is a key quantity to describe the mobility of electrons in a molecule or an extended system. In the present investigation, the partition of the TPS tensor according to spin variables is derived and discussed. It is shown that, while the spin-summed TPS gives information on charge mobility, the spin-partitioned TPS tensor becomes a powerful tool that provides information about spin fluctuations. The case of the hydrogen molecule is treated, both analytically, by using a 1s Slater-type orbital, and numerically, at Full Configuration Interaction (FCI) level with a V6Z basis set. It is found that, for very large inter-nuclear distances, the partitioned tensor growths quadratically with the distance in some of the low-lying electronic states. This fact is related to the presence of entanglement in the wave function. Non-dimerized open chains described by a model Hubbard Hamiltonian and linear hydrogen chains H{sub n} (n ≥ 2), composed of equally spaced atoms, are also studied at FCI level. The hydrogen systems show the presence of marked maxima for the spin-summed TPS (corresponding to a high charge mobility) when the inter-nuclear distance is about 2 bohrs. This fact can be associated to the presence of a Mott transition occurring in this region. The spin-partitioned TPS tensor, on the other hand, has a quadratical growth at long distances, a fact that corresponds to the high spin mobility in a magnetic system.

  1. Fabric Tensor Characterization of Tensor-Valued Directional Data: Solution, Accuracy, and Symmetrization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-dai Leng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabric tensor has proved to be an effective tool statistically characterizing directional data in a smooth and frame-indifferent form. Directional data arising from microscopic physics and mechanics can be summed up as tensor-valued orientation distribution functions (ODFs. Two characterizations of the tensor-valued ODFs are proposed, using the asymmetric and symmetric fabric tensors respectively. The later proves to be nonconvergent and less accurate but still an available solution for where fabric tensors are required in full symmetry. Analytic solutions of the two types of fabric tensors characterizing centrosymmetric and anticentrosymmetric tensor-valued ODFs are presented in terms of orthogonal irreducible decompositions in both two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D spaces. Accuracy analysis is performed on normally distributed random ODFs to evaluate the approximation quality of the two characterizations, where fabric tensors of higher orders are employed. It is shown that the fitness is dominated by the dispersion degree of the original ODFs rather than the orders of fabric tensors. One application of tensor-valued ODF and fabric tensor in continuum damage mechanics is presented.

  2. Modelling the Steady State of Sewage Networks as a Support Tool for Their Planning and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Petriczek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental questions connected with the modelling of communal sewage networks have been considered and formulas used to model the functioning of the basic network have been analyzed. The problem described concerns gravitational sewage networks divided by nodes into branches and sectors. Simulation of the steady state functioning of sewage networks is commonly carried out on the basis of nomograms in the form of charts, in which the relations between network parameters like channel diameters, flow rates, hydraulic slopes and flow velocities are described. In traditional design, the values of such parameters are simply read from such nomogram chart tables. Another way of simulating the functioning of a network is the use of professional software, like SWMM, that models sewage flows along the channels by means of differential equations de-scribing the movement of fluids. In both approaches, the user is a mechanical operator of a "black box" procedure. In this paper, another way of simulating the functioning of sewage net-works has been presented. Numerical solutions of nonlinear equations describing the physical phenomena of sewage flows are applied and explained. The presented algorithms were developed to model the steady state of a sewage network enabling a quick analysis of the network parameters and the possibility of fast, simple and comprehensible network modeling and design. (original abstract

  3. Elasticity $\\mathscr{M}$-tensors and the Strong Ellipticity Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Weiyang; Liu, Jinjie; Qi, Liqun; Yan, Hong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a class of tensors satisfying the strong ellipticity condition. The elasticity $\\mathscr{M}$-tensor is defined with respect to the M-eigenvalues of elasticity tensors. We prove that any nonsingular elasticity $\\mathscr{M}$-tensor satisfies the strong ellipticity condition by employing a Perron-Frobenius-type theorem for M-spectral radii of nonnegative elasticity tensors. We also establish other equivalent definitions of nonsingular elasticity $\\mathscr{M}$-tensors.

  4. Is the United States still dominant in the global pharmaceutical innovation network?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjia Hu

    Full Text Available The dramatic growth of research and development activities in the pharmaceutical sector in emerging economies raises the question of whether the United States still keeps its dominant role in the global pharmaceutical innovation landscape. This paper focuses on investigating the role of the United States in global pharmaceutical innovation, and differs from previous studies by shifting attention to a network analytic perspective to track the global distribution of pharmaceutical inventions. Our sample is composed of key patents covering all new drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration between 1996 and 2010. The results show that the United States still dominates in the global pharmaceutical innovation network, especially when it comes to essential core inventions. However, the United States shows a slightly decreasing prominence in the networks of either total new drugs or New Molecular Entity (NME drugs in the time period 2006-2010 as compared to previous time periods, revealed by subtle traces of network centralities.

  5. Opportunities and methodological challenges in EEG and MEG resting state functional brain network research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diessen, E; Numan, T; van Dellen, E; van der Kooi, A W; Boersma, M; Hofman, D; van Lutterveld, R; van Dijk, B W; van Straaten, E C W; Hillebrand, A; Stam, C J

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram (MEG) recordings during resting state are increasingly used to study functional connectivity and network topology. Moreover, the number of different analysis approaches is expanding along with the rising interest in this research area. The

  6. Macroscopic description of complex adaptive networks co-evolving with dynamic node states

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedermann, Marc; Heitzig, Jobst; Lucht, Wolfgang; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    In many real-world complex systems, the time-evolution of the network's structure and the dynamic state of its nodes are closely entangled. Here, we study opinion formation and imitation on an adaptive complex network which is dependent on the individual dynamic state of each node and vice versa to model the co-evolution of renewable resources with the dynamics of harvesting agents on a social network. The adaptive voter model is coupled to a set of identical logistic growth models and we show that in such systems, the rate of interactions between nodes as well as the adaptive rewiring probability play a crucial role for the sustainability of the system's equilibrium state. We derive a macroscopic description of the system which provides a general framework to model and quantify the influence of single node dynamics on the macroscopic state of the network and is applicable to many fields of study, such as epidemic spreading or social modeling.

  7. Ising Spin Network States for Loop Quantum Gravity: a Toy Model for Phase Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Feller, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Non-perturbative approaches to quantum gravity call for a deep understanding of the emergence of geometry and locality from the quantum state of the gravitational field. Without background geometry, the notion of distance should entirely emerge from the correlations between the gravity fluctuations. In the context of loop quantum gravity, quantum states of geometry are defined as spin networks. These are graphs decorated with spin and intertwiners, which represent quantized excitations of areas and volumes of the space geometry. Here, we develop the condensed matter point of view on extracting the physical and geometrical information out of spin network states: we introduce new Ising spin network states, both in 2d on a square lattice and in 3d on a hexagonal lattice, whose correlations map onto the usual Ising model in statistical physics. We construct these states from the basic holonomy operators of loop gravity and derive a set of local Hamiltonian constraints which entirely characterize our states. We di...

  8. Spectral Diversity in Default Mode Network Connectivity Reflects Behavioral State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Michael M; Manktelow, Anne E; Sahakian, Barbara J; Menon, David K; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A

    2017-12-06

    Default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity is thought to occur primarily in low frequencies (<0.1 Hz), resulting in most studies removing high frequencies during data preprocessing. In contrast, subtractive task analyses include high frequencies, as these are thought to be task relevant. An emerging line of research explores resting fMRI data at higher-frequency bands, examining the possibility that functional connectivity is a multiband phenomenon. Furthermore, recent studies suggest DMN involvement in cognitive processing; however, without a systematic investigation of DMN connectivity during tasks, its functional contribution to cognition cannot be fully understood. We bridged these concurrent lines of research by examining the contribution of high frequencies in the relationship between DMN and dorsal attention network at rest and during task execution. Our findings revealed that the inclusion of high frequencies alters between network connectivity, resulting in reduced anticorrelation and increased positive connectivity between DMN and dorsal attention network. Critically, increased positive connectivity was observed only during tasks, suggesting an important role for high-frequency fluctuations in functional integration. Moreover, within-DMN connectivity during task execution correlated with RT only when high frequencies were included. These results show that DMN does not simply deactivate during task execution and suggest active recruitment while performing cognitively demanding paradigms.

  9. Network estimation in State Space Models with L1-regularization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microarray technologies and related methods coupled with appropriate mathematical and statistical models have made it possible to identify dynamic regulatory networks by measuring time course expression levels of many genes simultaneously. However one of the challenges is the high-dimensional nature of such data ...

  10. A comprehensive assessment of resting state networks: bidirectional modification of functional integrity in cerebro-cerebellar networks in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Gloria; Palesi, Fulvia; Casali, Stefano; Vitali, Paolo; Sinforiani, Elena; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    In resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI), only functional connectivity (FC) reductions in the default mode network (DMN) are normally reported as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this investigation we have developed a comprehensive strategy to characterize the FC changes occurring in multiple networks and applied it in a pilot study of subjects with AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), compared to healthy controls (HC). Resting state networks (RSNs) were studied in 14 AD (70 ± 6 years), 12 MCI (74 ± 6 years), and 16 HC (69 ± 5 years). RSN alterations were present in almost all the 15 recognized RSNs; overall, 474 voxels presented a reduced FC in MCI and 1244 in AD while 1627 voxels showed an increased FC in MCI and 1711 in AD. The RSNs were then ranked according to the magnitude and extension of FC changes (gFC), putting in evidence 6 RSNs with prominent changes: DMN, frontal cortical network (FCN), lateral visual network (LVN), basal ganglia network (BGN), cerebellar network (CBLN), and the anterior insula network (AIN). Nodes, or hubs, showing alterations common to more than one RSN were mostly localized within the prefrontal cortex and the mesial-temporal cortex. The cerebellum showed a unique behavior where voxels of decreased gFC were only found in AD while a significant gFC increase was only found in MCI. The gFC alterations showed strong correlations (p < 0.001) with psychological scores, in particular Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and attention/memory tasks. In conclusion, this analysis revealed that the DMN was affected by remarkable FC increases, that FC alterations extended over several RSNs, that derangement of functional relationships between multiple areas occurred already in the early stages of dementia. These results warrant future work to verify whether these represent compensatory mechanisms that exploit a pre-existing neural reserve through plasticity, which evolve in a state of lack of connectivity between different networks with

  11. An Efficient Steady-State Analysis Method for Large Boolean Networks with High Maximum Node Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Changki; Hwang, Jeewon; Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Shin, Insik

    2015-01-01

    Boolean networks have been widely used to model biological processes lacking detailed kinetic information. Despite their simplicity, Boolean network dynamics can still capture some important features of biological systems such as stable cell phenotypes represented by steady states. For small models, steady states can be determined through exhaustive enumeration of all state transitions. As the number of nodes increases, however, the state space grows exponentially thus making it difficult to find steady states. Over the last several decades, many studies have addressed how to handle such a state space explosion. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to a satisfiability solving algorithm due to its potential scalability to handle large networks. Meanwhile, there still lies a problem in the case of large models with high maximum node connectivity where the satisfiability solving algorithm is known to be computationally intractable. To address the problem, this paper presents a new partitioning-based method that breaks down a given network into smaller subnetworks. Steady states of each subnetworks are identified by independently applying the satisfiability solving algorithm. Then, they are combined to construct the steady states of the overall network. To efficiently apply the satisfiability solving algorithm to each subnetwork, it is crucial to find the best partition of the network. In this paper, we propose a method that divides each subnetwork to be smallest in size and lowest in maximum node connectivity. This minimizes the total cost of finding all steady states in entire subnetworks. The proposed algorithm is compared with others for steady states identification through a number of simulations on both published small models and randomly generated large models with differing maximum node connectivities. The simulation results show that our method can scale up to several hundreds of nodes even for Boolean networks with high maximum node connectivity. The

  12. Some properties of asymmetric Hopfield neural networks with finite time of transition between states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimenov, Ibragim; Mun, Grigoriy; Panchenko, Sergey; Pak, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    There were implemented samples of asymmetric Hopfield neural networks which have finite time of transition from one state to another. It was shown that in such systems, various oscillation modes could occur. It was revealed that the oscillation of the output signal of certain neuron could be treated as extra logical variable, which describes the state of the neuron. Asymmetric Hopfield neural networks are described in terms of ternary logic. Such logic may be employed in image recognition procedure.

  13. Moment tensor inversions using strong motion waveforms of Taiwan TSMIP data, 1993–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kaiwen; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Gung, Yuancheng; Dreger, Douglas; Lee, William H K.; Chiu, Hung-Chie

    2011-01-01

    Earthquake source parameters are important for earthquake studies and seismic hazard assessment. Moment tensors are among the most important earthquake source parameters, and are now routinely derived using modern broadband seismic networks around the world. Similar waveform inversion techniques can also apply to other available data, including strong-motion seismograms. Strong-motion waveforms are also broadband, and recorded in many regions since the 1980s. Thus, strong-motion data can be used to augment moment tensor catalogs with a much larger dataset than that available from the high-gain, broadband seismic networks. However, a systematic comparison between the moment tensors derived from strong motion waveforms and high-gain broadband waveforms has not been available. In this study, we inverted the source mechanisms of Taiwan earthquakes between 1993 and 2009 by using the regional moment tensor inversion method using digital data from several hundred stations in the Taiwan Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP). By testing different velocity models and filter passbands, we were able to successfully derive moment tensor solutions for 107 earthquakes of Mw >= 4.8. The solutions for large events agree well with other available moment tensor catalogs derived from local and global broadband networks. However, for Mw = 5.0 or smaller events, we consistently over estimated the moment magnitudes by 0.5 to 1.0. We have tested accelerograms, and velocity waveforms integrated from accelerograms for the inversions, and found the results are similar. In addition, we used part of the catalogs to study important seismogenic structures in the area near Meishan Taiwan which was the site of a very damaging earthquake a century ago, and found that the structures were dominated by events with complex right-lateral strike-slip faulting during the recent decade. The procedures developed from this study may be applied to other strong-motion datasets to compliment or fill

  14. Tri-Clustered Tensor Completion for Social-Aware Image Tag Refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinhui; Shu, Xiangbo; Qi, Guo-Jun; Li, Zechao; Wang, Meng; Yan, Shuicheng; Jain, Ramesh

    2017-08-01

    Social image tag refinement, which aims to improve tag quality by automatically completing the missing tags and rectifying the noise-corrupted ones, is an essential component for social image search. Conventional approaches mainly focus on exploring the visual and tag information, without considering the user information, which often reveals important hints on the (in)correct tags of social images. Towards this end, we propose a novel tri-clustered tensor completion framework to collaboratively explore these three kinds of information to improve the performance of social image tag refinement. Specifically, the inter-relations among users, images and tags are modeled by a tensor, and the intra-relations between users, images and tags are explored by three regularizations respectively. To address the challenges of the super-sparse and large-scale tensor factorization that demands expensive computing and memory cost, we propose a novel tri-clustering method to divide the tensor into a certain number of sub-tensors by simultaneously clustering users, images and tags into a bunch of tri-clusters. And then we investigate two strategies to complete these sub-tensors by considering (in)dependence between the sub-tensors. Experimental results on a real-world social image database demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method compared with the state-of-the-art methods.

  15. X-ray tensor tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  16. Depth inpainting by tensor voting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Mandar; Rajagopalan, Ambasamudram N

    2013-06-01

    Depth maps captured by range scanning devices or by using optical cameras often suffer from missing regions due to occlusions, reflectivity, limited scanning area, sensor imperfections, etc. In this paper, we propose a fast and reliable algorithm for depth map inpainting using the tensor voting (TV) framework. For less complex missing regions, local edge and depth information is utilized for synthesizing missing values. The depth variations are modeled by local planes using 3D TV, and missing values are estimated using plane equations. For large and complex missing regions, we collect and evaluate depth estimates from self-similar (training) datasets. We align the depth maps of the training set with the target (defective) depth map and evaluate the goodness of depth estimates among candidate values using 3D TV. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches on real as well as synthetic data.

  17. Smartphone dependence classification using tensor factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jingyun; Rho, Mi Jung; Kim, Yejin; Yook, In Hye; Yu, Hwanjo; Kim, Dai-Jin; Choi, In Young

    2017-01-01

    Excessive smartphone use causes personal and social problems. To address this issue, we sought to derive usage patterns that were directly correlated with smartphone dependence based on usage data. This study attempted to classify smartphone dependence using a data-driven prediction algorithm. We developed a mobile application to collect smartphone usage data. A total of 41,683 logs of 48 smartphone users were collected from March 8, 2015, to January 8, 2016. The participants were classified into the control group (SUC) or the addiction group (SUD) using the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale for Adults (S-Scale) and a face-to-face offline interview by a psychiatrist and a clinical psychologist (SUC = 23 and SUD = 25). We derived usage patterns using tensor factorization and found the following six optimal usage patterns: 1) social networking services (SNS) during daytime, 2) web surfing, 3) SNS at night, 4) mobile shopping, 5) entertainment, and 6) gaming at night. The membership vectors of the six patterns obtained a significantly better prediction performance than the raw data. For all patterns, the usage times of the SUD were much longer than those of the SUC. From our findings, we concluded that usage patterns and membership vectors were effective tools to assess and predict smartphone dependence and could provide an intervention guideline to predict and treat smartphone dependence based on usage data.

  18. Smartphone dependence classification using tensor factorization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyun Choi

    Full Text Available Excessive smartphone use causes personal and social problems. To address this issue, we sought to derive usage patterns that were directly correlated with smartphone dependence based on usage data. This study attempted to classify smartphone dependence using a data-driven prediction algorithm. We developed a mobile application to collect smartphone usage data. A total of 41,683 logs of 48 smartphone users were collected from March 8, 2015, to January 8, 2016. The participants were classified into the control group (SUC or the addiction group (SUD using the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale for Adults (S-Scale and a face-to-face offline interview by a psychiatrist and a clinical psychologist (SUC = 23 and SUD = 25. We derived usage patterns using tensor factorization and found the following six optimal usage patterns: 1 social networking services (SNS during daytime, 2 web surfing, 3 SNS at night, 4 mobile shopping, 5 entertainment, and 6 gaming at night. The membership vectors of the six patterns obtained a significantly better prediction performance than the raw data. For all patterns, the usage times of the SUD were much longer than those of the SUC. From our findings, we concluded that usage patterns and membership vectors were effective tools to assess and predict smartphone dependence and could provide an intervention guideline to predict and treat smartphone dependence based on usage data.

  19. Smartphone dependence classification using tensor factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yejin; Yook, In Hye; Yu, Hwanjo; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Excessive smartphone use causes personal and social problems. To address this issue, we sought to derive usage patterns that were directly correlated with smartphone dependence based on usage data. This study attempted to classify smartphone dependence using a data-driven prediction algorithm. We developed a mobile application to collect smartphone usage data. A total of 41,683 logs of 48 smartphone users were collected from March 8, 2015, to January 8, 2016. The participants were classified into the control group (SUC) or the addiction group (SUD) using the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale for Adults (S-Scale) and a face-to-face offline interview by a psychiatrist and a clinical psychologist (SUC = 23 and SUD = 25). We derived usage patterns using tensor factorization and found the following six optimal usage patterns: 1) social networking services (SNS) during daytime, 2) web surfing, 3) SNS at night, 4) mobile shopping, 5) entertainment, and 6) gaming at night. The membership vectors of the six patterns obtained a significantly better prediction performance than the raw data. For all patterns, the usage times of the SUD were much longer than those of the SUC. From our findings, we concluded that usage patterns and membership vectors were effective tools to assess and predict smartphone dependence and could provide an intervention guideline to predict and treat smartphone dependence based on usage data. PMID:28636614

  20. Meal Replacement: Calming the Hot-State Brain Network of Appetite

    OpenAIRE

    Brielle ePaolini; Laurienti, Paul J.; James eNorris; W. Jack eRejeski

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing awareness in the field of neuroscience that the self-regulation of eating behavior is driven by complex networks within the brain. These networks may be vulnerable to hot states which people can move into and out of dynamically throughout the course of a day as a function of changes in affect or visceral cues. The goal of the current study was to identify and determine differences in the Hot-state Brain Network of Appetite (HBN-A) that exists after a brief period of food re...

  1. A comprehensive assessment of resting state networks: bidirectional modification of functional integrity in cerebro-cerebellar networks in dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria eCastellazzi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI, only functional connectivity (FC reductions in the default mode network (DMN are normally reported as a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD. In this investigation we have developed a comprehensive strategy to characterize the FC changes occurring in multiple networks and applied it in a pilot study of subjects with AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI, compared to healthy controls (HC. Resting state networks (RSNs were studied in 14 AD (70±6 years, 12 MCI (74±6 years and 16 HC (69±5 years. RSN alterations were present in almost all the 15 recognized RSNs; overall, 474 voxels presented a reduced FC in MCI and 1244 in AD while 1627 voxels showed an increased FC in MCI and 1711 in AD. The RSNs were then ranked according to the magnitude and extension of FC changes (gFC, putting in evidence 6 RSNs with prominent changes: DMN, frontal cortical network (FCN, lateral visual network (LVN, basal ganglia network (BGN, cerebellar network (CBLN, and the anterior insula network (AIN. Nodes, or hubs, showing alterations common to more than one RSN were mostly localized within the prefrontal cortex and the mesial-temporal cortex. The cerebellum showed a unique behavior where voxels of decreased gFC were only found in AD while a significant gFC increase was only found in MCI. The gFC alterations showed strong correlations (p< 0.001 with psychological scores, in particular MMSE and attention/memory tasks. In conclusion, this analysis revealed that the DMN was affected by remarkable FC increases, that FC alterations extended over several RSNs, that derangement of functional relationships between multiple areas occurred already in the early stages of dementia. These results warrant future work to verify whether these represent compensatory mechanisms that exploit a pre-existing neural reserve through plasticity, which evolve in a state of lack of connectivity between different networks with the worsening of the pathology.

  2. Brain Network Reconfiguration and Perceptual Decoupling During an Absorptive State of Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hove, Michael J; Stelzer, Johannes; Nierhaus, Till; Thiel, Sabrina D; Gundlach, Christopher; Margulies, Daniel S; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Turner, Robert; Keller, Peter E; Merker, Björn

    2016-07-01

    Trance is an absorptive state of consciousness characterized by narrowed awareness of external surroundings and has long been used-for example, by shamans-to gain insight. Shamans across cultures often induce trance by listening to rhythmic drumming. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined the brain-network configuration associated with trance. Experienced shamanic practitioners (n = 15) listened to rhythmic drumming, and either entered a trance state or remained in a nontrance state during 8-min scans. We analyzed changes in network connectivity. Trance was associated with higher eigenvector centrality (i.e., stronger hubs) in 3 regions: posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), and left insula/operculum. Seed-based analysis revealed increased coactivation of the PCC (a default network hub involved in internally oriented cognitive states) with the dACC and insula (control-network regions involved in maintaining relevant neural streams). This coactivation suggests that an internally oriented neural stream was amplified by the modulatory control network. Additionally, during trance, seeds within the auditory pathway were less connected, possibly indicating perceptual decoupling and suppression of the repetitive auditory stimuli. In sum, trance involved coactive default and control networks, and decoupled sensory processing. This network reconfiguration may promote an extended internal train of thought wherein integration and insight can occur. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Conformal field theories and tensor categories. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Chengming [Nankai Univ., Tianjin (China). Chern Institute of Mathematics; Fuchs, Juergen [Karlstad Univ. (Sweden). Theoretical Physics; Huang, Yi-Zhi [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Kong, Liang [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. for Advanced Study; Runkel, Ingo; Schweigert, Christoph (eds.) [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Mathematics

    2014-08-01

    First book devoted completely to the mathematics of conformal field theories, tensor categories and their applications. Contributors include both mathematicians and physicists. Some long expository articles are especially suitable for beginners. The present volume is a collection of seven papers that are either based on the talks presented at the workshop ''Conformal field theories and tensor categories'' held June 13 to June 17, 2011 at the Beijing International Center for Mathematical Research, Peking University, or are extensions of the material presented in the talks at the workshop. These papers present new developments beyond rational conformal field theories and modular tensor categories and new applications in mathematics and physics. The topics covered include tensor categories from representation categories of Hopf algebras, applications of conformal field theories and tensor categories to topological phases and gapped systems, logarithmic conformal field theories and the corresponding non-semisimple tensor categories, and new developments in the representation theory of vertex operator algebras. Some of the papers contain detailed introductory material that is helpful for graduate students and researchers looking for an introduction to these research directions. The papers also discuss exciting recent developments in the area of conformal field theories, tensor categories and their applications and will be extremely useful for researchers working in these areas.

  4. Dynamic State Transitions in the Nervous System: From Ion Channels to Neurons to Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Århem, Peter; Braun, Hans A.; Huber, Martin T.; Liljenström, Hans

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Ion channels: The microscopic scale * The variety of ion channels * Channel kinetics * Neurons: The mesoscopic scale * The feedback loops between membrane potential and ion currents * Neuron models: Concepts and examples * Impulse pattern modulation by ion channel densities * Oscillatory patterns * Irregular patterns * Impulse pattern modulation by subthreshold oscillations * The cold receptor model * Deterministic patterns and noise induced state-transitions on temperature scaling * Neuronal networks: The oscopic scale * Random channel events cause network state transitions * A hippocampal neural network model * Simulating noise-induced state transitions * Functional significance of oscopic neurodynamics * Conclusions * Appendix A: Computation of the neuron models * Hippocampal neuron model * The cold receptor model * Appendix B: Neural network model * References

  5. Heath Sector Network Governance and State-building in South Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwimana, Aembe

    2017-12-01

    Longstanding patterns of interaction exist between state and non-state actors seeking to improve public health in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). DRC is a weak state, and, in many cases, private actors have stepped in to fill the void created by the lack of state health care provision. However, the role of these interactions in creating a governance network in the health sector has been underexplored. Using data from 18 months of qualitative field research, this study aimed to explore governance networks in DRC's health sector, examining how multiple stakeholders work to manage the health system and how the resulting governance network has been relevant for the state-building process. The findings demonstrate that the health sector in South Kivu is emerging as an arena of networked governance based on active partnerships between state institutions and non-state actors. Interactions between state and non-state actors account for the persistence of the health sector in a setting characterized by state weakness. However, networked governance does not function optimally, because, although non-state interventions fill the void where the state falls short, the DRC state has faced the challenge of interacting with partners with fragmented and horizontally competing agendas. Although weak, the shadow of state authority is present in the arena of stakeholders' interactions, as the state plays a determining role by providing a regulatory framework. Overall, the findings show that the interactive engagement of non-state actors contributes to improving institutional capacity through these actors' engagement with state institutions for health system management and institutional development. However, although networked health sector governance does contribute to state capacity, it is difficult to assess the real influence of these interactions on the state-building process in a context of critical fragility, where coordination and alignment have been problematic. © The

  6. Plasticity of brain wave network interactions and evolution across physiologic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Lin, Aijing; Mantegna, Rosario N.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Neural plasticity transcends a range of spatio-temporal scales and serves as the basis of various brain activities and physiologic functions. At the microscopic level, it enables the emergence of brain waves with complex temporal dynamics. At the macroscopic level, presence and dominance of specific brain waves is associated with important brain functions. The role of neural plasticity at different levels in generating distinct brain rhythms and how brain rhythms communicate with each other across brain areas to generate physiologic states and functions remains not understood. Here we perform an empirical exploration of neural plasticity at the level of brain wave network interactions representing dynamical communications within and between different brain areas in the frequency domain. We introduce the concept of time delay stability (TDS) to quantify coordinated bursts in the activity of brain waves, and we employ a system-wide Network Physiology integrative approach to probe the network of coordinated brain wave activations and its evolution across physiologic states. We find an association between network structure and physiologic states. We uncover a hierarchical reorganization in the brain wave networks in response to changes in physiologic state, indicating new aspects of neural plasticity at the integrated level. Globally, we find that the entire brain network undergoes a pronounced transition from low connectivity in Deep Sleep and REM to high connectivity in Light Sleep and Wake. In contrast, we find that locally, different brain areas exhibit different network dynamics of brain wave interactions to achieve differentiation in function during different sleep stages. Moreover, our analyses indicate that plasticity also emerges in frequency-specific networks, which represent interactions across brain locations mediated through a specific frequency band. Comparing frequency-specific networks within the same physiologic state we find very different degree of

  7. Plasticity of brain wave network interactions and evolution across physiologic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang K L; Bartsch, Ronny P; Lin, Aijing; Mantegna, Rosario N; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    Neural plasticity transcends a range of spatio-temporal scales and serves as the basis of various brain activities and physiologic functions. At the microscopic level, it enables the emergence of brain waves with complex temporal dynamics. At the macroscopic level, presence and dominance of specific brain waves is associated with important brain functions. The role of neural plasticity at different levels in generating distinct brain rhythms and how brain rhythms communicate with each other across brain areas to generate physiologic states and functions remains not understood. Here we perform an empirical exploration of neural plasticity at the level of brain wave network interactions representing dynamical communications within and between different brain areas in the frequency domain. We introduce the concept of time delay stability (TDS) to quantify coordinated bursts in the activity of brain waves, and we employ a system-wide Network Physiology integrative approach to probe the network of coordinated brain wave activations and its evolution across physiologic states. We find an association between network structure and physiologic states. We uncover a hierarchical reorganization in the brain wave networks in response to changes in physiologic state, indicating new aspects of neural plasticity at the integrated level. Globally, we find that the entire brain network undergoes a pronounced transition from low connectivity in Deep Sleep and REM to high connectivity in Light Sleep and Wake. In contrast, we find that locally, different brain areas exhibit different network dynamics of brain wave interactions to achieve differentiation in function during different sleep stages. Moreover, our analyses indicate that plasticity also emerges in frequency-specific networks, which represent interactions across brain locations mediated through a specific frequency band. Comparing frequency-specific networks within the same physiologic state we find very different degree of

  8. Altered affective, executive and sensorimotor resting state networks in patients with pediatric mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minjie; Lu, Lisa H; Passarotti, Alessandra M; Wegbreit, Ezra; Fitzgerald, Jacklynn; Pavuluri, Mani N

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to map the pathophysiology of resting state functional connectivity accompanying structural and functional abnormalities in children with bipolar disorder. Children with bipolar disorder and demographically matched healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. A model-free independent component analysis was performed to identify intrinsically interconnected networks. We included 34 children with bipolar disorder and 40 controls in our analysis. Three distinct resting state networks corresponding to affective, executive and sensorimotor functions emerged as being significantly different between the pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) and control groups. All 3 networks showed hyperconnectivity in the PBD relative to the control group. Specifically, the connectivity of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) differentiated the PBD from the control group in both the affective and the executive networks. Exploratory analysis suggests that greater connectivity of the right amygdala within the affective network is associated with better executive function in children with bipolar disorder, but not in controls. Unique clinical characteristics of the study sample allowed us to evaluate the pathophysiology of resting state connectivity at an early state of PBD, which led to the lack of generalizability in terms of comorbid disorders existing in a typical PBD population. Abnormally engaged resting state affective, executive and sensorimotor networks observed in children with bipolar disorder may reflect a biological context in which abnormal task-based brain activity can occur. Dual engagement of the dorsal ACC in affective and executive networks supports the neuroanatomical interface of these networks, and the amygdala's engagement in moderating executive function illustrates the intricate interplay of these neural operations at rest.

  9. Local Tensor Radiation Conditions For Elastic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2001-01-01

    A local boundary condition is formulated, representing radiation of elastic waves from an arbitrary point source. The boundary condition takes the form of a tensor relation between the stress at a point on an arbitrarily oriented section and the velocity and displacement vectors at the point....... The tensor relation generalizes the traditional normal incidence impedance condition by accounting for the angle between wave propagation and the surface normal and by including a generalized stiffness term due to spreading of the waves. The effectiveness of the local tensor radiation condition...

  10. Structure of tensor operators in SU3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Flath, D.E.

    1984-03-01

    A global algebraic formulation of SU3 tensor operator structure is achieved. A single irreducible unitary representation (irrep), V, of kappa(6, 2) is constructed which contains every SU3 irrep precisely once. An algebra of polynomial differential operators A acting on V is given. The algebra A is shown to consist of linear combinations of all SU3 tensor operators with polynomial invariant operators as coefficients. By carrying out an analysis of A, the multiplicity problem for SU3 tensor operators is resolved.

  11. Tensor-Dictionary Learning with Deep Kruskal-Factor Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Pu, Yunchen; Sun, Yannan; Spell, Gregory; Carin, Lawrence

    2017-04-20

    We introduce new dictionary learning methods for tensor-variate data of any order. We represent each data item as a sum of Kruskal decomposed dictionary atoms within the framework of beta-process factor analysis (BPFA). Our model is nonparametric and can infer the tensor-rank of each dictionary atom. This Kruskal-Factor Analysis (KFA) is a natural generalization of BPFA. We also extend KFA to a deep convolutional setting and develop online learning methods. We test our approach on image processing and classification tasks achieving state of the art results for 2D & 3D inpainting and Caltech 101. The experiments also show that atom-rank impacts both overcompleteness and sparsity.

  12. Network structures as a model of interaction between state and non-state actors in EU foreign policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinegubov Alexey Leonidovich

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the role of network structures in EU foreign policy. The role of networks in functioning of EU is analyzed as the model of interaction between state and non-state actors in contemporary world politics. Some studies, including the project of National Intelligence Council of USA, demonstrate that there is a tendency of growing influence of non-state actors. The model of interaction that has developed in EU can be considered as a model of the future. That’s why the type of force used by EU is called “post-modern”. This model is conductive to wide use of “soft power” and some of its variants including “normative” and “network” power. Quasi-federal character of EU’s structure, whiсh is characterized by many intersecting and delegated sovereign functions, is a reason of appearance of the analyzed model. Network practices and network technologies are widely used in the process of developing and realization of EU’s policy on three levels: 1 development and realization of EU’s general policy; 2 the policy of EU’s enlargement and deeper integration of the newcomers into Europe’s life; 3 the neighborhood policy and “Europeanization” of neighboring to EU states that cannot become EU members. The last dimension of EU policy causes a conflict with Russia, which makes this analysis politically relevant.

  13. States of mind: Emotions, body feelings, and thoughts share distributed neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterwijk, Suzanne; Lindquist, Kristen A.; Anderson, Eric; Dautoff, Rebecca; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2012-01-01

    Scientists have traditionally assumed that different kinds of mental states (e.g., fear, disgust, love, memory, planning, concentration, etc.) correspond to different psychological faculties that have domain-specific correlates in the brain. Yet, growing evidence points to the constructionist hypothesis that mental states emerge from the combination of domain-general psychological processes that map to large-scale distributed brain networks. In this paper, we report a novel study testing a constructionist model of the mind in which participants generated three kinds of mental states (emotions, body feelings, or thoughts) while we measured activity within large-scale distributed brain networks using fMRI. We examined the similarity and differences in the pattern of network activity across these three classes of mental states. Consistent with a constructionist hypothesis, a combination of large-scale distributed networks contributed to emotions, thoughts, and body feelings, although these mental states differed in the relative contribution of those networks. Implications for a constructionist functional architecture of diverse mental states are discussed. PMID:22677148

  14. States of mind: emotions, body feelings, and thoughts share distributed neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterwijk, Suzanne; Lindquist, Kristen A; Anderson, Eric; Dautoff, Rebecca; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2012-09-01

    Scientists have traditionally assumed that different kinds of mental states (e.g., fear, disgust, love, memory, planning, concentration, etc.) correspond to different psychological faculties that have domain-specific correlates in the brain. Yet, growing evidence points to the constructionist hypothesis that mental states emerge from the combination of domain-general psychological processes that map to large-scale distributed brain networks. In this paper, we report a novel study testing a constructionist model of the mind in which participants generated three kinds of mental states (emotions, body feelings, or thoughts) while we measured activity within large-scale distributed brain networks using fMRI. We examined the similarity and differences in the pattern of network activity across these three classes of mental states. Consistent with a constructionist hypothesis, a combination of large-scale distributed networks contributed to emotions, thoughts, and body feelings, although these mental states differed in the relative contribution of those networks. Implications for a constructionist functional architecture of diverse mental states are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chromatin states modify network motifs contributing to cell-specific functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Pang, Lin; Yu, Fulong; Fan, Huihui; Ping, Yanyan; Wang, Li; Xu, Chaohan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modification can affect many important biological processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. It can alter chromatin conformation and contribute to gene regulation. To investigate how chromatin states associated with network motifs, we assembled chromatin state-modified regulatory networks by combining 269 ChIP-seq data and chromatin states in four cell types. We found that many chromatin states were significantly associated with network motifs, especially for feedforward loops (FFLs). These distinct chromatin state compositions contribute to different expression levels and translational control of targets in FFLs. Strikingly, the chromatin state-modified FFLs were highly cell-specific and, to a large extent, determined cell-selective functions, such as the embryonic stem cell-specific bivalent modification-related FFL with an important role in poising developmentally important genes for expression. Besides, comparisons of chromatin state-modified FFLs between cancerous/stem and primary cell lines revealed specific type of chromatin state alterations that may act together with motif structural changes cooperatively contribute to cell-to-cell functional differences. Combination of these alterations could be helpful in prioritizing candidate genes. Together, this work highlights that a dynamic epigenetic dimension can help network motifs to control cell-specific functions. PMID:26169043

  16. A high performance data parallel tensor contraction framework: Application to coupled electro-mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poya, Roman; Gil, Antonio J.; Ortigosa, Rogelio

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents aspects of implementation of a new high performance tensor contraction framework for the numerical analysis of coupled and multi-physics problems on streaming architectures. In addition to explicit SIMD instructions and smart expression templates, the framework introduces domain specific constructs for the tensor cross product and its associated algebra recently rediscovered by Bonet et al. (2015, 2016) in the context of solid mechanics. The two key ingredients of the presented expression template engine are as follows. First, the capability to mathematically transform complex chains of operations to simpler equivalent expressions, while potentially avoiding routes with higher levels of computational complexity and, second, to perform a compile time depth-first or breadth-first search to find the optimal contraction indices of a large tensor network in order to minimise the number of floating point operations. For optimisations of tensor contraction such as loop transformation, loop fusion and data locality optimisations, the framework relies heavily on compile time technologies rather than source-to-source translation or JIT techniques. Every aspect of the framework is examined through relevant performance benchmarks, including the impact of data parallelism on the performance of isomorphic and nonisomorphic tensor products, the FLOP and memory I/O optimality in the evaluation of tensor networks, the compilation cost and memory footprint of the framework and the performance of tensor cross product kernels. The framework is then applied to finite element analysis of coupled electro-mechanical problems to assess the speed-ups achieved in kernel-based numerical integration of complex electroelastic energy functionals. In this context, domain-aware expression templates combined with SIMD instructions are shown to provide a significant speed-up over the classical low-level style programming techniques.

  17. Unitary networks from the exact renormalization of wave functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliss, Jackson R.; Leigh, Robert G.; Parrikar, Onkar

    2017-06-01

    The exact renormalization group (ERG) for O (N ) vector models (at large N ) on flat Euclidean space can be interpreted as the bulk dynamics corresponding to a holographically dual higher spin gauge theory on AdSd +1. This was established in the sense that at large N the generating functional of correlation functions of single-trace operators is reproduced by the on-shell action of the bulk higher spin theory, which is most simply presented in a first-order (phase space) formalism. In this paper, we extend the ERG formalism to the wave functionals of arbitrary states of the O (N ) vector model at the free fixed point. We find that the ERG flow of the ground state and a specific class of excited states is implemented by the action of unitary operators which can be chosen to be local. Consequently, the ERG equations provide a continuum notion of a tensor network. We compare this tensor network with the entanglement renormalization networks, MERA, and its continuum version, cMERA, which have appeared recently in holographic contexts. In particular, the ERG tensor network appears to share the general structure of cMERA but differs in important ways. We comment on possible holographic implications.

  18. Network connectivity in epilepsy: Resting state-fMRI and EEG-fMRI contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eCenteno

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence pointing towards large scale networks underlying the core phenomena in epilepsy, from seizure generation to cognitive dysfunction or response to treatment. The investigation of networks in epilepsy has become a key concept to unlock a deeper understanding of the disease. Functional imaging can provide valuable information to characterise network dysfunction; in particular resting state fMRI (RS-fMRI which is increasingly being applied to study brain networks in a number of diseases. In patients with epilepsy, network connectivity derived from RS- fMRI has found connectivity abnormalities in a number of networks; these include the epileptogenic, cognitive and sensory processing networks. However, in majority of these studies, the effect of epileptic transients in the connectivity of networks has been neglected.EEG-fMRI has frequently shown networks related to epileptic transients that in many cases are concordant with the abnormalities shown in RS studies. This points towards a relevant role of epileptic transients in the network abnormalities detected in RS-fMRI studies.In this review, we summarize the network abnormalities reported by these two techniques side by side, provide evidence of their overlapping findings, and discuss their significance in the context of the methodology of each technique.A number of clinically relevant factors that have been associated with connectivity changes are in turn associated with changes in the frequency of epileptic transients. These factors include different aspects of epilepsy ranging from treatment effects, cognitive processes or transition between different alertness states (i.e. awake-sleep transition.For RS-fMRI to become a more effective tool to investigate clinically relevant aspects of epilepsy it is necessary to understand connectivity changes associated with epileptic transients, those associated with other clinically relevant factors and the interaction between

  19. Poincare Algebra Extension with Tensor Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Soroka, Dmitrij V.; Soroka, Vyacheslav A.

    2005-01-01

    A tensor extension of the Poincar\\'e algebra is proposed for the arbitrary dimensions. Casimir operators of the extension are constructed. A possible supersymmetric generalization of this extension is also found in the dimensions $D=2,3,4$.

  20. Seamless warping of diffusion tensor fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Dongrong; Hao, Xuejun; Bansal, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    To warp diffusion tensor fields accurately, tensors must be reoriented in the space to which the tensors are warped based on both the local deformation field and the orientation of the underlying fibers in the original image. Existing algorithms for warping tensors typically use forward mapping...... deformations in an attempt to ensure that the local deformations in the warped image remains true to the orientation of the underlying fibers; forward mapping, however, can also create "seams" or gaps and consequently artifacts in the warped image by failing to define accurately the voxels in the template...... space where the magnitude of the deformation is large (e.g., |Jacobian| > 1). Backward mapping, in contrast, defines voxels in the template space by mapping them back to locations in the original imaging space. Backward mapping allows every voxel in the template space to be defined without the creation...

  1. An introduction to linear algebra and tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Akivis, M A; Silverman, Richard A

    1978-01-01

    Eminently readable, completely elementary treatment begins with linear spaces and ends with analytic geometry, covering multilinear forms, tensors, linear transformation, and more. 250 problems, most with hints and answers. 1972 edition.

  2. Tensor Field Visualization in Geomechanics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, I.; Feng, L.; Hamann, B.; Joy, K.; Manaker, D.; Billen, M. I.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2004-12-01

    Scalar and vector fields, and especially tensor fields like stress and strain tensor fields, play an important role in the study of geophysics, including earthquakes. For example, time-varying tensor data result from modeling the behavior of bending plates. Application areas we focus on are concerned with a better understanding of bending phenomena in rocks, in the Earth's lithosphere, and in subducting slabs. The associated mathematical models and numerical simulations generate stress and strain data that are tensors. Tensors contain so much information and related components in each point that it is not easy to capture and visualize all information. Typically, researchers plot cross-sections or maps of individual components, which do not allow a view of all the information included in models or observational data. Therefore, it is important to provide scientists with an overview of an entire tensor field. We have developed a tensor field visualization method tailored specifically to the class of tensor fields exhibiting properties similar to stress and strain tensors, which are commonly encountered in geophysics/geomechanics. These tensor fields are characterized by the property that they have positive and negative eigenvalues. The sign of the eigenvalues indicates regions of expansion and compression. To understand field behavior visually, it is important to express these features in an intuitive way. Our technique is a global method providing an overview of an entire tensor field by using a continuous representation. The main idea it to represent a tensor field as a ``texture-deforming operator,'' which resembles deforming a piece of fabric to express the characteristic properties of a tensor field. The texture is stretched or compressed and bended according to the physical meaning of the tensor field. Large positive eigenvalues, which indicate tension, are illustrated by a texture with low density or a stretched piece of fabric. For negative eigenvalues

  3. Correlators in tensor models from character calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2017-11-01

    We explain how the calculations of [20], which provided the first evidence for non-trivial structures of Gaussian correlators in tensor models, are efficiently performed with the help of the (Hurwitz) character calculus. This emphasizes a close similarity between technical methods in matrix and tensor models and supports a hope to understand the emerging structures in very similar terms. We claim that the 2m-fold Gaussian correlators of rank r tensors are given by r-linear combinations of dimensions with the Young diagrams of size m. The coefficients are made from the characters of the symmetric group Sm and their exact form depends on the choice of the correlator and on the symmetries of the model. As the simplest application of this new knowledge, we provide simple expressions for correlators in the Aristotelian tensor model as tri-linear combinations of dimensions.

  4. Correlators in tensor models from character calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mironov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We explain how the calculations of [20], which provided the first evidence for non-trivial structures of Gaussian correlators in tensor models, are efficiently performed with the help of the (Hurwitz character calculus. This emphasizes a close similarity between technical methods in matrix and tensor models and supports a hope to understand the emerging structures in very similar terms. We claim that the 2m-fold Gaussian correlators of rank r tensors are given by r-linear combinations of dimensions with the Young diagrams of size m. The coefficients are made from the characters of the symmetric group Sm and their exact form depends on the choice of the correlator and on the symmetries of the model. As the simplest application of this new knowledge, we provide simple expressions for correlators in the Aristotelian tensor model as tri-linear combinations of dimensions.

  5. Calculus of tensors and differential forms

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Rajnikant

    2014-01-01

    Calculus of tensors and differential forms is an introductory-level textbook. Through this book, students will familiarize themselves with tools they need in order to use for further study on general relativity and research, such as affine tensors, tensor calculus on manifolds, relative tensors, Lie derivatives, wedge products, differential forms, and Stokes' theorem. The treatment is concrete and in detail, so that abstract concepts do not deter even physics and engineering students. This self contained book requires undergraduate-level calculus of several variables and linear algebra as prerequisite. Fubini's theorem in real analysis, to be used in Stokes' theorem, has been proved earlier than Stokes' theorem so that students don't have to search elsewhere.

  6. Tensor extension of the Poincare algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soroka, Dmitrij V. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)]. E-mail: dsoroka@kipt.kharkov.ua; Soroka, Vyacheslav A. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)]. E-mail: vsoroka@kipt.kharkov.ua

    2005-02-10

    A tensor extension of the Poincare algebra is proposed for the arbitrary dimensions. Casimir operators of the extension are constructed. A possible supersymmetric generalization of this extension is also found in the dimensions D=2,3,4.

  7. The energy–momentum tensor(s) in classical gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaschke, Daniel N., E-mail: dblaschke@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gieres, François, E-mail: gieres@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, Bat. P. Dirac, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Reboud, Méril, E-mail: meril.reboud@ens-lyon.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and CNRS/IN2P3, Bat. P. Dirac, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 allée d' Italie, F-69364 Lyon CEDEX 07 (France); Schweda, Manfred, E-mail: mschweda@tph.tuwien.ac.at [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-11-15

    We give an introduction to, and review of, the energy–momentum tensors in classical gauge field theories in Minkowski space, and to some extent also in curved space–time. For the canonical energy–momentum tensor of non-Abelian gauge fields and of matter fields coupled to such fields, we present a new and simple improvement procedure based on gauge invariance for constructing a gauge invariant, symmetric energy–momentum tensor. The relationship with the Einstein–Hilbert tensor following from the coupling to a gravitational field is also discussed.

  8. The energy–momentum tensor(s in classical gauge theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel N. Blaschke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We give an introduction to, and review of, the energy–momentum tensors in classical gauge field theories in Minkowski space, and to some extent also in curved space–time. For the canonical energy–momentum tensor of non-Abelian gauge fields and of matter fields coupled to such fields, we present a new and simple improvement procedure based on gauge invariance for constructing a gauge invariant, symmetric energy–momentum tensor. The relationship with the Einstein–Hilbert tensor following from the coupling to a gravitational field is also discussed.

  9. State-dependent importance sampling for a Jackson tandem network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miretskiy, D.I.; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2010-01-01

    This article considers importance sampling as a tool for rare-event simulation. The focus is on estimating the probability of overflow in the downstream queue of a Jacksonian two-node tandem queue; it is known that in this setting “traditional‿ state-independent importance-sampling distributions

  10. State-dependent importance sampling for a Jackson tandem network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miretskiy, D.; Scheinhardt, W.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    This article considers importance sampling as a tool for rare-event simulation. The focus is on estimating the probability of overflow in the downstream queue of a Jacksonian two-node tandem queue; it is known that in this setting "traditional" state-independent importance-sampling distributions

  11. Application of radial basis neural network for state estimation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    MultiCraft. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2010, pp. 19-28. INTERNATIONAL. JOURNAL OF. ENGINEERING,. SCIENCE AND. TECHNOLOGY ... state estimation is investigated by testing its applicability on a IEEE 14 bus system. The proposed estimator is compared with.

  12. Sleep: A synchrony of cell activity-driven small network states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, James M.; Huang, Yanhua; Rector, David M.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We posit a bottom-up sleep regulatory paradigm in which state changes are initiated within small networks as a consequence of local cell activity. Bottom-up regulatory mechanisms are prevalent throughout nature, occurring in vastly different systems and levels of organization. Synchronization of state without top-down regulation is a fundamental property of large collections of small semi-autonomous entities. We posit that such synchronization mechanisms are sufficient and necessary for whole organism sleep onset. Within brain we posit that small networks of highly interconnected neurons and glia, e.g. cortical columns, are semi-autonomous units oscillating between sleep-like and wake-like states. We review evidence showing that cells, small networks, and regional areas of brain share sleep-like properties with whole animal sleep. A testable hypothesis focused on how sleep is initiated within local networks is presented. We posit that the release of cell activity-dependent molecules, such as ATP and nitric oxide, into the extracellular space initiates state changes within the local networks where they are produced. We review mechanisms of ATP induction of sleep regulatory substances (SRS) and their actions on receptor trafficking. Finally, we provide an example of how such local metabolic and state changes provide mechanistic explanations for clinical conditions such as insomnia. PMID:23651209

  13. Synaptic Dynamics and Neuronal Network Connectivity are reflected in the Distribution of Times in Up states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh eDao Duc

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of neuronal networks connected by synaptic dynamics can sustain long periods of depolarization that can last for hundreds of milliseconds such as Up states recorded during sleep or anesthesia. Yet the underlying mechanism driving these periods remain unclear. We show here within a mean-field model that the residence times of the neuronal membrane potential in cortical Up states does not follow a Poissonian law, but presents several peaks. Furthermore, the present modeling approach allows extracting some information about the neuronal network connectivity from the time distribution histogram. Based on a synaptic-depression model, we find that these peaks, that can be observed in histograms of patch-clamp recordings are not artifacts of electrophysiological measurements, but rather are an inherent property of the network dynamics. Analysis of the equations reveals a stable focus located close to the unstable limit cycle, delimiting a region that defines the Up state. The model further shows that the peaks observed in the Up state time distribution are due to winding around the focus before escaping from the basin of attraction. Finally, we use in vivo recordings of intracellular membrane potential and we recover from the peak distribution, some information about the network connectivity. We conclude that it is possible to recover the network connectivity from the distribution of times that the neuronal membrane voltage spends in Up states.

  14. Social network theory applied to resting-state fMRI connectivity data in the identification of epilepsy networks with iterative feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Tokoglu, Fuyuze; Negishi, Michiro; Arora, Jagriti; Winstanley, Scott; Spencer, Dennis D; Constable, R Todd

    2011-07-15

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder usually associated with abnormal cortical and/or subcortical functional networks. Exploration of the abnormal network properties and localization of the brain regions involved in human epilepsy networks are critical for both the understanding of the epilepsy networks and planning therapeutic strategies. Currently, most localization of seizure networks come from ictal EEG observations. Functional MRI provides high spatial resolution together with more complete anatomical coverage compared with EEG and may have advantages if it can be used to identify the network(s) associated with seizure onset and propagation. Epilepsy networks are believed to be present with detectable abnormal signatures even during the interictal state. In this study, epilepsy networks were investigated using resting-state fMRI acquired with the subjects in the interictal state. We tested the hypothesis that social network theory applied to resting-state fMRI data could reveal abnormal network properties at the group level. Using network data as input to a classification algorithm allowed separation of medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients from normal control subjects indicating the potential value of such network analyses in epilepsy. Five local network properties obtained from 36 anatomically defined ROIs were input as features to the classifier. An iterative feature selection strategy based on the classification efficiency that can avoid 'over-fitting' is proposed to further improve the classification accuracy. An average sensitivity of 77.2% and specificity of 83.86% were achieved via 'leave one out' cross validation. This finding of significantly abnormal network properties in group level data confirmed our initial hypothesis and provides motivation for further investigation of the epilepsy process at the network level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonlinear neural network for hemodynamic model state and input estimation using fMRI data

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2014-11-01

    Originally inspired by biological neural networks, artificial neural networks (ANNs) are powerful mathematical tools that can solve complex nonlinear problems such as filtering, classification, prediction and more. This paper demonstrates the first successful implementation of ANN, specifically nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous input (NARX) networks, to estimate the hemodynamic states and neural activity from simulated and measured real blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals. Blocked and event-related BOLD data are used to test the algorithm on real experiments. The proposed method is accurate and robust even in the presence of signal noise and it does not depend on sampling interval. Moreover, the structure of the NARX networks is optimized to yield the best estimate with minimal network architecture. The results of the estimated neural activity are also discussed in terms of their potential use.

  16. Measuring Nematic Susceptibilities from the Elastoresistivity Tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, A. T.; Shapiro, M. C.; Hlobil, Patrick; Maharaj, Akash; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Fisher, Ian

    The elastoresistivity tensor mijkl relates changes in resistivity to the strain on a material. As a fourth-rank tensor, it contains considerably more information about the material than the simpler (second-rank) resistivity tensor; in particular, certain elastoresistivity coefficients can be related to thermodynamic susceptibilities and serve as a direct probe of symmetry breaking at a phase transition. The aim of this talk is twofold. First, we enumerate how symmetry both constrains the structure of the elastoresistivity tensor into an easy-to-understand form and connects tensor elements to thermodynamic susceptibilities. In the process, we generalize previous studies of elastoresistivity to include the effects of magnetic field. Second, we describe an approach to measuring quantities in the elastoresistivity tensor with a novel transverse measurement, which is immune to relative strain offsets. These techniques are then applied to BaFe2As2 in a proof of principle measurement. This work is supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  17. Spatially distributed effects of mental exhaustion on resting-state FMRI networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Esposito

    Full Text Available Brain activity during rest is spatially coherent over functional connectivity networks called resting-state networks. In resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, independent component analysis yields spatially distributed network representations reflecting distinct mental processes, such as intrinsic (default or extrinsic (executive attention, and sensory inhibition or excitation. These aspects can be related to different treatments or subjective experiences. Among these, exhaustion is a common psychological state induced by prolonged mental performance. Using repeated functional magnetic resonance imaging sessions and spatial independent component analysis, we explored the effect of several hours of sustained cognitive performances on the resting human brain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed on the same healthy volunteers in two days, with and without, and before, during and after, an intensive psychological treatment (skill training and sustained practice with a flight simulator. After each scan, subjects rated their level of exhaustion and performed an N-back task to evaluate eventual decrease in cognitive performance. Spatial maps of selected resting-state network components were statistically evaluated across time points to detect possible changes induced by the sustained mental performance. The intensive treatment had a significant effect on exhaustion and effort ratings, but no effects on N-back performances. Significant changes in the most exhausted state were observed in the early visual processing and the anterior default mode networks (enhancement and in the fronto-parietal executive networks (suppression, suggesting that mental exhaustion is associated with a more idling brain state and that internal attention processes are facilitated to the detriment of more extrinsic processes. The described application may inspire future indicators of the level of fatigue in the neural attention system.

  18. PHYSLIB: A C++ tensor class library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budge, K.G.

    1991-10-09

    C++ is the first object-oriented programming language which produces sufficiently efficient code for consideration in computation-intensive physics and engineering applications. In addition, the increasing availability of massively parallel architectures requires novel programming techniques which may prove to be relatively easy to implement in C++. For these reasons, Division 1541 at Sandia National Laboratories is devoting considerable resources to the development of C++ libraries. This document describes the first of these libraries to be released, PHYSLIB, which defines classes representing Cartesian vectors and (second-order) tensors. This library consists of the header file physlib.h, the inline code file physlib.inl, and the source file physlib.C. The library is applicable to both three-dimensional and two-dimensional problems; the user selects the 2-D version of the library by defining the symbol TWO D in the header file physlib.h and recompiling physlib.C and his own code. Alternately, system managers may wish to provide duplicate header and object modules of each dimensionality. This code was produced under the auspices of Sandia National Laboratories, a federally-funded research center administered for the United States Department of Energy on a non-profit basis by AT T. This code is available to US citizens, and institutions under research, government use and/or commercial license agreements.

  19. Income inequality: A complex network analysis of US states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogas, Periklis; Gupta, Rangan; Miller, Stephen M.; Papadimitriou, Theophilos; Sarantitis, Georgios Antonios

    2017-10-01

    This study performs a long-run, inter-temporal analysis of income inequality in the US spanning the period 1916-2012. We employ both descriptive analysis and the Threshold-Minimum Dominating Set methodology from Graph Theory, to examine the evolution of inequality through time. In doing so, we use two alternative measures of inequality: the Top 1% share of income and the Gini coefficient. This provides new insight on the literature of income inequality across the US states. Several empirical findings emerge. First, a heterogeneous evolution of inequality exists across the four focal sub-periods. Second, the results differ between the inequality measures examined. Finally, we identify groups of similarly behaving states in terms of inequality. The US authorities can use these findings to identify inequality trends and innovations and/or examples to investigate the causes of inequality within the US and implement appropriate policies.

  20. Explosive synchronization in clustered scale-free networks: Revealing the existence of chimera state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berec, V.

    2016-02-01

    The collective dynamics of Kuramoto oscillators with a positive correlation between the incoherent and fully coherent domains in clustered scale-free networks is studied. Emergence of chimera states for the onsets of explosive synchronization transition is observed during an intermediate coupling regime when degree-frequency correlation is established for the hubs with the highest degrees. Diagnostic of the abrupt synchronization is revealed by the intrinsic spectral properties of the network graph Laplacian encoded in the heterogeneous phase space manifold, through extensive analytical investigation, presenting realistic MC simulations of nonlocal interactions in discrete time dynamics evolving on the network.

  1. Output Regulation of Large-Scale Hydraulic Networks with Minimal Steady State Power Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tom Nørgaard; Wisniewski, Rafal; De Persis, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    An industrial case study involving a large-scale hydraulic network is examined. The hydraulic network underlies a district heating system, with an arbitrary number of end-users. The problem of output regulation is addressed along with a optimization criterion for the control. The fact...... that the system is overactuated is exploited for minimizing the steady state electrical power consumption of the pumps in the system, while output regulation is maintained. The proposed control actions are decentralized in order to make changes in the structure of the hydraulic network easy to implement....

  2. Meal replacement: calming the hot-state brain network of appetite

    OpenAIRE

    Paolini, Brielle M.; Laurienti, Paul J.; Norris, James; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing awareness in the field of neuroscience that the self-regulation of eating behavior is driven by complex networks within the brain. These networks may be vulnerable to “hot states” which people can move into and out of dynamically throughout the course of a day as a function of changes in affect or visceral cues. The goal of the current study was to identify and determine differences in the Hot-state Brain Network of Appetite (HBN-A) that exists after a brief period of food ...

  3. A Logic for Checking the Probabilistic Steady-State Properties of Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Vincent; Siegel, Anne; Bourdon, Jérémie

    2017-08-01

    Designing probabilistic reaction models and determining their stochastic kinetic parameters are major issues in systems biology. To assist in the construction of reaction network models, we introduce a logic that allows one to express asymptotic properties about the steady-state stochastic dynamics of a reaction network. Basically, the formulas can express properties on expectancies, variances, and covariances. If a formula encoding for experimental observations on the system is not satisfiable, then the reaction network model can be rejected. We demonstrate that deciding the satisfiability of a formula is NP-hard, but we provide a decision method based on solving systems of polynomial constraints. We illustrate our method on a toy example.

  4. PRODIGEN: visualizing the probability landscape of stochastic gene regulatory networks in state and time space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chihua; Luciani, Timothy; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie; Marai, G Elisabeta

    2017-02-15

    Visualizing the complex probability landscape of stochastic gene regulatory networks can further biologists' understanding of phenotypic behavior associated with specific genes. We present PRODIGEN (PRObability DIstribution of GEne Networks), a web-based visual analysis tool for the systematic exploration of probability distributions over simulation time and state space in such networks. PRODIGEN was designed in collaboration with bioinformaticians who research stochastic gene networks. The analysis tool combines in a novel way existing, expanded, and new visual encodings to capture the time-varying characteristics of probability distributions: spaghetti plots over one dimensional projection, heatmaps of distributions over 2D projections, enhanced with overlaid time curves to display temporal changes, and novel individual glyphs of state information corresponding to particular peaks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool through two case studies on the computed probabilistic landscape of a gene regulatory network and of a toggle-switch network. Domain expert feedback indicates that our visual approach can help biologists: 1) visualize probabilities of stable states, 2) explore the temporal probability distributions, and 3) discover small peaks in the probability landscape that have potential relation to specific diseases.

  5. Consistency of network modules in resting-state FMRI connectome data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaak N Moussa

    Full Text Available At rest, spontaneous brain activity measured by fMRI is summarized by a number of distinct resting state networks (RSNs following similar temporal time courses. Such networks have been consistently identified across subjects using spatial ICA (independent component analysis. Moreover, graph theory-based network analyses have also been applied to resting-state fMRI data, identifying similar RSNs, although typically at a coarser spatial resolution. In this work, we examined resting-state fMRI networks from 194 subjects at a voxel-level resolution, and examined the consistency of RSNs across subjects using a metric called scaled inclusivity (SI, which summarizes consistency of modular partitions across networks. Our SI analyses indicated that some RSNs are robust across subjects, comparable to the corresponding RSNs identified by ICA. We also found that some commonly reported RSNs are less consistent across subjects. This is the first direct comparison of RSNs between ICAs and graph-based network analyses at a comparable resolution.

  6. Distinction in coherent neural network between resting and working brain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The resting brain is not silent; rather, it is characterized by organized resting-state networks showing spontaneous and coherent neuronal activities, which can be mapped using the spatiotemporal correlation of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, it remains elusive whether the similar fMRI approach is able to image the coherent network in a working brain, and if yes, whether there is a distinction between the resting- and working-state coherent networks. This study aimed to address these questions in the human visual cortex with a desired activation paradigm using continuous, sustained visual stimuli. It was found that the resting-state coherent network covering the human visual cortex was spatially reorganized during the stimulation into two coherent networks with distinct temporal characteristics of BOLD fluctuations: one covering the activated visual cortical region and the other covering the remaining (nonactivated) visual cortex. The stimulus-specific reorganization of the coherent network observed in the present fMRI study in human is consistent with previous electrophysiological findings from animal studies, and may suggest an essential mechanism for brain functioning. Finally, a similar fMRI experiment was also conducted under brief, short stimulation to examine how the stimulation paradigm can affect the observations.

  7. Human action recognition based on point context tensor shape descriptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Mao, Xia; Chen, Lijiang; Wang, Lan

    2017-07-01

    Motion trajectory recognition is one of the most important means to determine the identity of a moving object. A compact and discriminative feature representation method can improve the trajectory recognition accuracy. This paper presents an efficient framework for action recognition using a three-dimensional skeleton kinematic joint model. First, we put forward a rotation-scale-translation-invariant shape descriptor based on point context (PC) and the normal vector of hypersurface to jointly characterize local motion and shape information. Meanwhile, an algorithm for extracting the key trajectory based on the confidence coefficient is proposed to reduce the randomness and computational complexity. Second, to decrease the eigenvalue decomposition time complexity, a tensor shape descriptor (TSD) based on PC that can globally capture the spatial layout and temporal order to preserve the spatial information of each frame is proposed. Then, a multilinear projection process is achieved by tensor dynamic time warping to map the TSD to a low-dimensional tensor subspace of the same size. Experimental results show that the proposed shape descriptor is effective and feasible, and the proposed approach obtains considerable performance improvement over the state-of-the-art approaches with respect to accuracy on a public action dataset.

  8. Controlling sign problems in spin models using tensor renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbleyker, Alan; Liu, Yuzhi; Meurice, Y.; Qin, M. P.; Xiang, T.; Xie, Z. Y.; Yu, J. F.; Zou, Haiyuan

    2014-01-01

    We consider the sign problem for classical spin models at complex β =1/g02 on L ×L lattices. We show that the tensor renormalization group method allows reliable calculations for larger Imβ than the reweighting Monte Carlo method. For the Ising model with complex β we compare our results with the exact Onsager-Kaufman solution at finite volume. The Fisher zeros can be determined precisely with the tensor renormalization group method. We check the convergence of the tensor renormalization group method for the O(2) model on L×L lattices when the number of states Ds increases. We show that the finite size scaling of the calculated Fisher zeros agrees very well with the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition assumption and predict the locations for larger volume. The location of these zeros agree with Monte Carlo reweighting calculation for small volume. The application of the method for the O(2) model with a chemical potential is briefly discussed.

  9. Modifications to cosmological power spectra from scalar-tensor entanglement and their observational consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolis, Nadia; Albrecht, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of California at Davis,One Shields Ave, Davis CA 95616 (United States); Holman, R. [Physics Department, Carnegie Mellon University,Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); College of Computational Sciences, Minerva University,1145 Market Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 (United States)

    2016-12-06

    We consider the effects of entanglement in the initial quantum state of scalar and tensor fluctuations during inflation. We allow the gauge-invariant scalar and tensor fluctuations to be entangled in the initial state and compute modifications to the various cosmological power spectra. We compute the angular power spectra (C{sub l}’s) for some specific cases of our entangled state and discuss what signals one might expect to find in CMB data. This entanglement also can break rotational invariance, allowing for the possibility that some of the large scale anomalies in the CMB power spectrum might be explained by this mechanism.

  10. Quantum communication for satellite-to-ground networks with partially entangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Na; Quan, Dong-Xiao; Pei, Chang-Xing; Yang-Hong

    2015-02-01

    To realize practical wide-area quantum communication, a satellite-to-ground network with partially entangled states is developed in this paper. For efficiency and security reasons, the existing method of quantum communication in distributed wireless quantum networks with partially entangled states cannot be applied directly to the proposed quantum network. Based on this point, an efficient and secure quantum communication scheme with partially entangled states is presented. In our scheme, the source node performs teleportation only after an end-to-end entangled state has been established by entanglement swapping with partially entangled states. Thus, the security of quantum communication is guaranteed. The destination node recovers the transmitted quantum bit with the help of an auxiliary quantum bit and specially defined unitary matrices. Detailed calculations and simulation analyses show that the probability of successfully transferring a quantum bit in the presented scheme is high. In addition, the auxiliary quantum bit provides a heralded mechanism for successful communication. Based on the critical components that are presented in this article an efficient, secure, and practical wide-area quantum communication can be achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61072067 and 61372076), the 111 Project (Grant No. B08038), the Fund from the State Key Laboratory of Integrated Services Networks (Grant No. ISN 1001004), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Grant Nos. K5051301059 and K5051201021).

  11. H∞state estimation of stochastic memristor-based neural networks with time-varying delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Haibo; Cao, Jinde; Kurths, Jürgen; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Ahmad, Bashir

    2018-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of H ∞ state estimation for a class of stochastic memristor-based neural networks with time-varying delays. Under the framework of Filippov solution, the stochastic memristor-based neural networks are transformed into systems with interval parameters. The present paper is the first to investigate the H ∞ state estimation problem for continuous-time Itô-type stochastic memristor-based neural networks. By means of Lyapunov functionals and some stochastic technique, sufficient conditions are derived to ensure that the estimation error system is asymptotically stable in the mean square with a prescribed H ∞ performance. An explicit expression of the state estimator gain is given in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Compared with other results, our results reduce control gain and control cost effectively. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Networked health sector governance and state-building legitimacy in conflict-affected fragile states

    OpenAIRE

    Aembe, Bwimana

    2017-01-01

    State fragility in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has impacted the state’s ability to provide public services, as well as and the population’s experiences and perceptions of the state. For public health and for social welfare more broadly, the contributions of the state are weak and contingent on the involvement of non-state service providers (NSPs). The population has become dependent on non-state actors for the provision of basic social services, and NSPs are especially ...

  13. Self-sustained asynchronous irregular states and Up-Down states in thalamic, cortical and thalamocortical networks of nonlinear integrate-and-fire neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destexhe, Alain

    2009-12-01

    Randomly-connected networks of integrate-and-fire (IF) neurons are known to display asynchronous irregular (AI) activity states, which resemble the discharge activity recorded in the cerebral cortex of awake animals. However, it is not clear whether such activity states are specific to simple IF models, or if they also exist in networks where neurons are endowed with complex intrinsic properties similar to electrophysiological measurements. Here, we investigate the occurrence of AI states in networks of nonlinear IF neurons, such as the adaptive exponential IF (Brette-Gerstner-Izhikevich) model. This model can display intrinsic properties such as low-threshold spike (LTS), regular spiking (RS) or fast-spiking (FS). We successively investigate the oscillatory and AI dynamics of thalamic, cortical and thalamocortical networks using such models. AI states can be found in each case, sometimes with surprisingly small network size of the order of a few tens of neurons. We show that the presence of LTS neurons in cortex or in thalamus, explains the robust emergence of AI states for relatively small network sizes. Finally, we investigate the role of spike-frequency adaptation (SFA). In cortical networks with strong SFA in RS cells, the AI state is transient, but when SFA is reduced, AI states can be self-sustained for long times. In thalamocortical networks, AI states are found when the cortex is itself in an AI state, but with strong SFA, the thalamocortical network displays Up and Down state transitions, similar to intracellular recordings during slow-wave sleep or anesthesia. Self-sustained Up and Down states could also be generated by two-layer cortical networks with LTS cells. These models suggest that intrinsic properties such as adaptation and low-threshold bursting activity are crucial for the genesis and control of AI states in thalamocortical networks.

  14. Soft Sensor of Vehicle State Estimation Based on the Kernel Principal Component and Improved Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haorui Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the car control systems, it is hard to measure some key vehicle states directly and accurately when running on the road and the cost of the measurement is high as well. To address these problems, a vehicle state estimation method based on the kernel principal component analysis and the improved Elman neural network is proposed. Combining with nonlinear vehicle model of three degrees of freedom (3 DOF, longitudinal, lateral, and yaw motion, this paper applies the method to the soft sensor of the vehicle states. The simulation results of the double lane change tested by Matlab/SIMULINK cosimulation prove the KPCA-IENN algorithm (kernel principal component algorithm and improved Elman neural network to be quick and precise when tracking the vehicle states within the nonlinear area. This algorithm method can meet the software performance requirements of the vehicle states estimation in precision, tracking speed, noise suppression, and other aspects.

  15. An approximation method for solving the steady-state probability distribution of probabilistic Boolean networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Wai-Ki; Zhang, Shuqin; Ng, Michael K; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2007-06-15

    Probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) have been proposed to model genetic regulatory interactions. The steady-state probability distribution of a PBN gives important information about the captured genetic network. The computation of the steady-state probability distribution usually includes construction of the transition probability matrix and computation of the steady-state probability distribution. The size of the transition probability matrix is 2(n)-by-2(n) where n is the number of genes in the genetic network. Therefore, the computational costs of these two steps are very expensive and it is essential to develop a fast approximation method. In this article, we propose an approximation method for computing the steady-state probability distribution of a PBN based on neglecting some Boolean networks (BNs) with very small probabilities during the construction of the transition probability matrix. An error analysis of this approximation method is given and theoretical result on the distribution of BNs in a PBN with at most two Boolean functions for one gene is also presented. These give a foundation and support for the approximation method. Numerical experiments based on a genetic network are given to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  16. Detection of nonstationary transition to synchronized states of a neural network using recurrence analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinski, R. C.; Boaretto, B. R. R.; Prado, T. L.; Lopes, S. R.

    2017-07-01

    We study the stability of asymptotic states displayed by a complex neural network. We focus on the loss of stability of a stationary state of networks using recurrence quantifiers as tools to diagnose local and global stabilities as well as the multistability of a coupled neural network. Numerical simulations of a neural network composed of 1024 neurons in a small-world connection scheme are performed using the model of Braun et al. [Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos 08, 881 (1998), 10.1142/S0218127498000681], which is a modified model from the Hodgkin-Huxley model [J. Phys. 117, 500 (1952)]. To validate the analyses, the results are compared with those produced by Kuramoto's order parameter [Chemical Oscillations, Waves, and Turbulence (Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, 1984)]. We show that recurrence tools making use of just integrated signals provided by the networks, such as local field potential (LFP) (LFP signals) or mean field values bring new results on the understanding of neural behavior occurring before the synchronization states. In particular we show the occurrence of different stationary and nonstationarity asymptotic states.

  17. Aberrant Resting-State Functional Connectivity in the Salience Network of Adolescent Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Anne Wortinger

    Full Text Available Neural network investigations are currently absent in adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. In this study, we examine whether the core intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs are altered in adolescent CFS patients. Eighteen adolescent patients with CFS and 18 aged matched healthy adolescent control subjects underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI. Data was analyzed using dual-regression independent components analysis, which is a data-driven approach for the identification of independent brain networks. Intrinsic connectivity was evaluated in the default mode network (DMN, salience network (SN, and central executive network (CEN. Associations between network characteristics and symptoms of CFS were also explored. Adolescent CFS patients displayed a significant decrease in SN functional connectivity to the right posterior insula compared to healthy comparison participants, which was related to fatigue symptoms. Additionally, there was an association between pain intensity and SN functional connectivity to the left middle insula and caudate that differed between adolescent patients and healthy comparison participants. Our findings of insula dysfunction and its association with fatigue severity and pain intensity in adolescent CFS demonstrate an aberration of the salience network which might play a role in CFS pathophysiology.

  18. Tensor renormalization group analysis of ${\\rm CP}(N-1)$ model in two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Kawauchi, Hikaru

    2015-01-01

    We apply the higher order tensor renormalization group to lattice CP($N-1$) model in two dimensions. A tensor network representation of CP($N-1$) model is derived. We confirm that the numerical results of the CP(1) model without the $\\theta$-term using this method are consistent with that of the O(3) model which is analyzed by the same method in the region $\\beta \\gg 1$ and that obtained by Monte Carlo simulation in a wider range of $\\beta$.

  19. Improved energy extrapolation with infinite projected entangled-pair states applied to the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corboz, P.

    2016-01-01

    An infinite projected entangled-pair state (iPEPS) is a variational tensor network ansatz for two-dimensional wave functions in the thermodynamic limit where the accuracy can be systematically controlled by the bond dimension D. We show that for the doped Hubbard model in the strongly correlated

  20. Influence of Resting-State Network on Lateralization of Functional Connectivity in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, L; An, J; Ma, Q; Qiu, S; Hu, D

    2015-08-01

    Although most studies on epilepsy have focused on the epileptogenic zone, epilepsy is a system-level disease characterized by aberrant neuronal synchronization among groups of neurons. Increasingly, studies have indicated that mesial temporal lobe epilepsy may be a network-level disease; however, few investigations have examined resting-state functional connectivity of the entire brain, particularly in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis. This study primarily investigated whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity abnormality in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and right hippocampal sclerosis during the interictal period. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity of 21 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with right hippocampal sclerosis and 21 neurologically healthy controls. A multivariate pattern analysis was used to identify the functional connections that most clearly differentiated patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with right hippocampal sclerosis from controls. Discriminative analysis of functional connections indicated that the patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with right hippocampal sclerosis exhibited decreased resting-state functional connectivity within the right hemisphere and increased resting-state functional connectivity within the left hemisphere. Resting-state network analysis suggested that the internetwork connections typically obey the hemispheric lateralization trend and most of the functional connections that disturb the lateralization trend are the intranetwork ones. The current findings suggest that weakening of the resting-state functional connectivity associated with the right hemisphere appears to strengthen resting-state functional connectivity on the contralateral side, which may be related to the seizure-induced damage and underlying compensatory mechanisms. Resting-state network-based analysis indicated that the compensatory mechanism among

  1. Temperature dependence of the partially localized state in a 2D molecular nanoporous network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio, E-mail: ipiquerozulaica@gmail.com [Centro de Física de Materiales (CSIC/UPV-EHU)—Materials Physics Center, Manuel Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Nowakowska, Sylwia [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Ortega, J. Enrique [Centro de Física de Materiales (CSIC/UPV-EHU)—Materials Physics Center, Manuel Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Manuel Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Departamento Física Aplicada I, Universidad del País Vasco, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Stöhr, Meike [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Gade, Lutz H. [Anorganisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 270, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Jung, Thomas A. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Lobo-Checa, Jorge, E-mail: jorge.lobo@csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A state of a 2D porous network is demonstrated to originate from the Shockley state. • The temperature evolution of both states is followed by means of ARPES. • Identical energy shifts are observed for both states, proving their common origin. - Abstract: Two-dimensional organic and metal-organic nanoporous networks can scatter surface electrons, leading to their partial localization. Such quantum states are related to intrinsic surface states of the substrate material. We further corroborate this relation by studying the thermally induced energy shifts of the electronic band stemming from coupled quantum states hosted in a metal-organic array formed by a perylene derivative on Cu(111). We observe by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), that both, the Shockley and the partially localized states, shift by the same amount to higher binding energies upon decreasing the sample temperature, providing evidence of their common origin. Our experimental approach and results further support the use of surface states for modelling these systems, which are expected to provide new insight into the physics concerning partially confined electronic states: scattering processes, potential barrier strengths, excited state lifetimes or the influence of guest molecules.

  2. Detection of EEG-resting state independent networks by eLORETA-ICA method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yasunori; Ishii, Ryouhei; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Canuet, Leonides; Ikeda, Shunichiro; Hata, Masahiro; Imajo, Kaoru; Matsuzaki, Haruyasu; Musha, Toshimitsu; Asada, Takashi; Iwase, Masao; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that functional networks can be extracted even from resting state data, the so called "Resting State independent Networks" (RS-independent-Ns) by applying independent component analysis (ICA). However, compared to fMRI, electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) have much higher temporal resolution and provide a direct estimation of cortical activity. To date, MEG studies have applied ICA for separate frequency bands only, disregarding cross-frequency couplings. In this study, we aimed to detect EEG-RS-independent-Ns and their interactions in all frequency bands. We applied exact low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography-ICA (eLORETA-ICA) to resting-state EEG data in 80 healthy subjects using five frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma band) and found five RS-independent-Ns in alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands. Next, taking into account previous neuroimaging findings, five RS-independent-Ns were identified: (1) the visual network in alpha frequency band, (2) dual-process of visual perception network, characterized by a negative correlation between the right ventral visual pathway (VVP) in alpha and beta frequency bands and left posterior dorsal visual pathway (DVP) in alpha frequency band, (3) self-referential processing network, characterized by a negative correlation between the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in beta frequency band and right temporoparietal junction (TPJ) in alpha frequency band, (4) dual-process of memory perception network, functionally related to a negative correlation between the left VVP and the precuneus in alpha frequency band; and (5) sensorimotor network in beta and gamma frequency bands. We selected eLORETA-ICA which has many advantages over the other network visualization methods and overall findings indicate that eLORETA-ICA with EEG data can identify five RS-independent-Ns in their intrinsic frequency bands, and correct

  3. Large-Scale Hypoconnectivity Between Resting-State Functional Networks in Unmedicated Adolescent Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchet, Matthew D; Ho, Tiffany C; Connolly, Colm G; Tymofiyeva, Olga; Lewinn, Kaja Z; Han, Laura Km; Blom, Eva H; Tapert, Susan F; Max, Jeffrey E; Frank, Guido Kw; Paulus, Martin P; Simmons, Alan N; Gotlib, Ian H; Yang, Tony T

    2016-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) often emerges during adolescence, a critical period of brain development. Recent resting-state fMRI studies of adults suggest that MDD is associated with abnormalities within and between resting-state networks (RSNs). Here we tested whether adolescent MDD is characterized by abnormalities in interactions among RSNs. Participants were 55 unmedicated adolescents diagnosed with MDD and 56 matched healthy controls. Functional connectivity was mapped using resting-state fMRI. We used the network-based statistic (NBS) to compare large-scale connectivity between groups and also compared the groups on graph metrics. We further assessed whether group differences identified using nodes defined from functionally defined RSNs were also evident when using anatomically defined nodes. In addition, we examined relations between network abnormalities and depression severity and duration. Finally, we compared intranetwork connectivity between groups and assessed the replication of previously reported MDD-related abnormalities in connectivity. The NBS indicated that, compared with controls, depressed adolescents exhibited reduced connectivity (pdepression was significantly correlated with reduced connectivity in this set of network interactions (p=0.020, corrected), specifically with reduced connectivity between components of the dorsal attention network. The dorsal attention network was also characterized by reduced intranetwork connectivity in the MDD group. Finally, we replicated previously reported abnormal connectivity in individuals with MDD. In summary, adolescents with MDD show hypoconnectivity between large-scale brain networks compared with healthy controls. Given that connectivity among these networks typically increases during adolescent neurodevelopment, these results suggest that adolescent depression is associated with abnormalities in neural systems that are still developing during this critical period.

  4. Altered causal connectivity of resting state brain networks in amnesic MCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peipeng; Li, Zhihao; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Wang, Zhiqun; Hu, Xiaoping; Li, Kuncheng

    2014-01-01

    Most neuroimaging studies of resting state networks in amnesic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) have concentrated on functional connectivity (FC) based on instantaneous correlation in a single network. The purpose of the current study was to investigate effective connectivity in aMCI patients based on Granger causality of four important networks at resting state derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging data--default mode network (DMN), hippocampal cortical memory network (HCMN), dorsal attention network (DAN) and fronto-parietal control network (FPCN). Structural and functional MRI data were collected from 16 aMCI patients and 16 age, gender-matched healthy controls. Correlation-purged Granger causality analysis was used, taking gray matter atrophy as covariates, to compare the group difference between aMCI patients and healthy controls. We found that the causal connectivity between networks in aMCI patients was significantly altered with both increases and decreases in the aMCI group as compared to healthy controls. Some alterations were significantly correlated with the disease severity as measured by mini-mental state examination (MMSE), and California verbal learning test (CVLT) scores. When the whole-brain signal averaged over the entire brain was used as a nuisance co-variate, the within-group maps were significantly altered while the between-group difference maps did not. These results suggest that the alterations in causal influences may be one of the possible underlying substrates of cognitive impairments in aMCI. The present study extends and complements previous FC studies and demonstrates the coexistence of causal disconnection and compensation in aMCI patients, and thus might provide insights into biological mechanism of the disease.

  5. Altered causal connectivity of resting state brain networks in amnesic MCI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipeng Liang

    Full Text Available Most neuroimaging studies of resting state networks in amnesic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI have concentrated on functional connectivity (FC based on instantaneous correlation in a single network. The purpose of the current study was to investigate effective connectivity in aMCI patients based on Granger causality of four important networks at resting state derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging data--default mode network (DMN, hippocampal cortical memory network (HCMN, dorsal attention network (DAN and fronto-parietal control network (FPCN. Structural and functional MRI data were collected from 16 aMCI patients and 16 age, gender-matched healthy controls. Correlation-purged Granger causality analysis was used, taking gray matter atrophy as covariates, to compare the group difference between aMCI patients and healthy controls. We found that the causal connectivity between networks in aMCI patients was significantly altered with both increases and decreases in the aMCI group as compared to healthy controls. Some alterations were significantly correlated with the disease severity as measured by mini-mental state examination (MMSE, and California verbal learning test (CVLT scores. When the whole-brain signal averaged over the entire brain was used as a nuisance co-variate, the within-group maps were significantly altered while the between-group difference maps did not. These results suggest that the alterations in causal influences may be one of the possible underlying substrates of cognitive impairments in aMCI. The present study extends and complements previous FC studies and demonstrates the coexistence of causal disconnection and compensation in aMCI patients, and thus might provide insights into biological mechanism of the disease.

  6. Large-scale directional connections among multi resting-state neural networks in human brain: a functional MRI and Bayesian network modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Chen, Kewei; Fleisher, Adam S; Reiman, Eric M; Yao, Li; Wu, Xia

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the large-scale connectivity among multiple resting-state networks (RSNs) in the human brain. Independent component analysis was first applied to the resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data acquired from 12 healthy young subjects for the separation of RSNs. Four sensory (lateral and medial visual, auditory, and sensory-motor) RSNs and four cognitive (default-mode, self-referential, dorsal and ventral attention) RSNs were identified. Gaussian Bayesian network (BN) learning approach was then used for the examination of the conditional dependencies among these RSNs and the construction of the network-to-network directional connectivity patterns. The BN based results demonstrated that sensory networks and cognitive networks were hierarchically organized. Specially, we found the sensory networks were highly intra-dependent and the cognitive networks were strongly intra-influenced. In addition, the results depicted dominant bottom-up connectivity from sensory networks to cognitive networks in which the self-referential and the default-mode networks might play respectively important roles in the process of resting-state information transfer and integration. The present study characterized the global connectivity relations among RSNs and delineated more characteristics of spontaneous activity dynamics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Automatic classification of schizophrenia using resting-state functional language network via an adaptive learning algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Maohu; Jie, Nanfeng; Jiang, Tianzi

    2014-03-01

    A reliable and precise classification of schizophrenia is significant for its diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel tool increasingly used in schizophrenia research. Recent advances in statistical learning theory have led to applying pattern classification algorithms to access the diagnostic value of functional brain networks, discovered from resting state fMRI data. The aim of this study was to propose an adaptive learning algorithm to distinguish schizophrenia patients from normal controls using resting-state functional language network. Furthermore, here the classification of schizophrenia was regarded as a sample selection problem where a sparse subset of samples was chosen from the labeled training set. Using these selected samples, which we call informative vectors, a classifier for the clinic diagnosis of schizophrenia was established. We experimentally demonstrated that the proposed algorithm incorporating resting-state functional language network achieved 83.6% leaveone- out accuracy on resting-state fMRI data of 27 schizophrenia patients and 28 normal controls. In contrast with KNearest- Neighbor (KNN), Support Vector Machine (SVM) and l1-norm, our method yielded better classification performance. Moreover, our results suggested that a dysfunction of resting-state functional language network plays an important role in the clinic diagnosis of schizophrenia.

  8. Bayesian ISOLA: new tool for automated centroid moment tensor inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vackář, Jiří; Burjánek, Jan; Gallovič, František; Zahradník, Jiří; Clinton, John

    2017-04-01

    Focal mechanisms are important for understanding seismotectonics of a region, and they serve as a basic input for seismic hazard assessment. Usually, the point source approximation and the moment tensor (MT) are used. We have developed a new, fully automated tool for the centroid moment tensor (CMT) inversion in a Bayesian framework. It includes automated data retrieval, data selection where station components with various instrumental disturbances and high signal-to-noise are rejected, and full-waveform inversion in a space-time grid around a provided hypocenter. The method is innovative in the following aspects: (i) The CMT inversion is fully automated, no user interaction is required, although the details of the process can be visually inspected latter on many figures which are automatically plotted.(ii) The automated process includes detection of disturbances based on MouseTrap code, so disturbed recordings do not affect inversion.(iii) A data covariance matrix calculated from pre-event noise yields an automated weighting of the station recordings according to their noise levels and also serves as an automated frequency filter suppressing noisy frequencies.(iv) Bayesian approach is used, so not only the best solution is obtained, but also the posterior probability density function.(v) A space-time grid search effectively combined with the least-squares inversion of moment tensor components speeds up the inversion and allows to obtain more accurate results compared to stochastic methods. The method has been tested on synthetic and observed data. It has been tested by comparison with manually processed moment tensors of all events greater than M≥3 in the Swiss catalogue over 16 years using data available at the Swiss data center (http://arclink.ethz.ch). The quality of the results of the presented automated process is comparable with careful manual processing of data. The software package programmed in Python has been designed to be as versatile as possible in

  9. Networked health sector governance and state-building legitimacy in conflict-affected fragile states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aembe, Bwimana

    2017-01-01

    State fragility in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has impacted the state’s ability to provide public services, as well as and the population’s experiences and perceptions of the state. For public health and for social welfare more broadly, the contributions of the state are weak

  10. Aberrant functional connectivity of resting state networks associated with trait anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Shilpi; Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Pawan; Khushu, Subash

    2015-10-30

    Trait anxiety, a personality dimension, has been characterized by functional consequences such as increased distractibility, attentional bias in favor of threat-related information and hyper-responsive amygdala. However, literature on the association between resting state brain functional connectivity, as studied using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI), and reported anxiety levels in the sub-clinical population is limited. In the present study, we employed rs-fMRI to investigate the possible alterations in the functional integrity of Resting State Networks (RSNs) associated with trait anxiety of the healthy subjects (15 high anxious and 14 low anxious). The rs-fMRI data was analyzed using independent component analysis and a dual regression approach that was applied on 12 RSNs that were identified using FSL. High anxious subjects showed significantly reduced functional connectivity in regions of the default mode network (posterior cingulate gyrus, middle and superior temporal gyrus, planum polare, supramarginal gyrus, temporal pole, angular gyrus and lateral occipital gyrus) which has been suggested to be involved in episodic memory, theory of mind, self-evaluation, and introspection, and perceptual systems including medial visual network, auditory network and another network involving temporal, parieto-occipital and frontal regions. Reduction in resting state connectivity in regions of the perceptual networks might underlie the perceptual, attentional and working memory deficits associated with trait anxiety. To our knowledge, this is the first study to relate trait anxiety to resting state connectivity using independent component analysis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. A One-Pass Real-Time Decoder Using Memory-Efficient State Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jian; Li, Ta; Zhang, Qingqing; Zhao, Qingwei; Yan, Yonghong

    This paper presents our developed decoder which adopts the idea of statically optimizing part of the knowledge sources while handling the others dynamically. The lexicon, phonetic contexts and acoustic model are statically integrated to form a memory-efficient state network, while the language model (LM) is dynamically incorporated on the fly by means of extended tokens. The novelties of our approach for constructing the state network are (1) introducing two layers of dummy nodes to cluster the cross-word (CW) context dependent fan-in and fan-out triphones, (2) introducing a so-called “WI layer” to store the word identities and putting the nodes of this layer in the non-shared mid-part of the network, (3) optimizing the network at state level by a sufficient forward and backward node-merge process. The state network is organized as a multi-layer structure for distinct token propagation at each layer. By exploiting the characteristics of the state network, several techniques including LM look-ahead, LM cache and beam pruning are specially designed for search efficiency. Especially in beam pruning, a layer-dependent pruning method is proposed to further reduce the search space. The layer-dependent pruning takes account of the neck-like characteristics of WI layer and the reduced variety of word endings, which enables tighter beam without introducing much search errors. In addition, other techniques including LM compression, lattice-based bookkeeping and lattice garbage collection are also employed to reduce the memory requirements. Experiments are carried out on a Mandarin spontaneous speech recognition task where the decoder involves a trigram LM and CW triphone models. A comparison with HDecode of HTK toolkits shows that, within 1% performance deviation, our decoder can run 5 times faster with half of the memory footprint.

  12. Consolidation in older adults depends upon competition between resting-state networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi IL Jacobs

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory encoding and retrieval problems are inherent to aging. To date, however, the effect of aging upon the neural correlates of forming memory traces remains poorly understood. Resting-state fMRI connectivity can be used to investigate initial consolidation. We compared within and between network connectivity differences between healthy young and older participants before encoding, after encoding and before retrieval by means of resting-state fMRI. Alterations over time in the between-network connectivity analyses correlated with retrieval performance, whereas within-network connectivity did not: a higher level of negative coupling or competition between the default mode and the executive networks during the after encoding condition was associated with increased retrieval performance in the older adults, but not in the young group. Data suggest that the effective formation of memory traces depends on an age-dependent, dynamic reorganization of the interaction between multiple, large-scale functional networks. Our findings demonstrate that a cross-network based approach can further the understanding of the neural underpinnings of aging- associated memory decline.

  13. Parallel ICA identifies sub-components of resting state networks that covary with behavioral indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Timothy B; Wildenberg, Joseph C; Liu, Jingyu; Chen, Jiayu; Calhoun, Vince D; Biswal, Bharat B; Meyerand, Mary E; Birn, Rasmus M; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    Parallel Independent Component Analysis (para-ICA) is a multivariate method that can identify complex relationships between different data modalities by simultaneously performing Independent Component Analysis on each data set while finding mutual information between the two data sets. We use para-ICA to test the hypothesis that spatial sub-components of common resting state networks (RSNs) covary with specific behavioral measures. Resting state scans and a battery of behavioral indices were collected from 24 younger adults. Group ICA was performed and common RSNs were identified by spatial correlation to publically available templates. Nine RSNs were identified and para-ICA was run on each network with a matrix of behavioral measures serving as the second data type. Five networks had spatial sub-components that significantly correlated with behavioral components. These included a sub-component of the temporo-parietal attention network that differentially covaried with different trial-types of a sustained attention task, sub-components of default mode networks that covaried with attention and working memory tasks, and a sub-component of the bilateral frontal network that split the left inferior frontal gyrus into three clusters according to its cytoarchitecture that differentially covaried with working memory performance. Additionally, we demonstrate the validity of para-ICA in cases with unbalanced dimensions using simulated data.

  14. Altered resting state networks in epileptic patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengge; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhong, Yuan; Jiao, Qing; Zhang, Zongjun; Tan, Qifu; Tian, Lei; Chen, Guanghui; Liao, Wei; Li, Kai; Liu, Yijun

    2011-02-16

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated that the resting state networks (RSNs) are impaired in various neuropsychiatric disorders. However, little is known about the changes in the functional architecture of the RSNs in idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). Resting state fMRI data were acquired from 16 GTCS patients and 16 healthy subjects. The data were acquired during interictal without combined EEG confirmation. Functional connectivity among the RSNs was examined using individual-based independent component analysis. Six RSNs were identified in both the GTCS and control groups. Compared with the healthy subjects, decreased functional connectivity in the self-referential, somatosensory, visual, and auditory networks, and both the decreased and increased functional connectivities in the classic default-mode and dorsal attention networks were found in the GTCS patients. Furthermore, the present study revealed a negative correlation between the seizure duration and functional connectivity changes in the medial prefrontal cortex in the GTCS patients. These results indicate that there are impairments in the RSNs and possible reorganization of the default-mode network and dorsal attention network in patients with GTCS. Our findings may also suggest that the medial prefrontal cortex and its associated network play a role in the development of GTCS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. SIR model on a dynamical network and the endemic state of an infectious disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottori, M.; Fabricius, G.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we performed a numerical study of an epidemic model that mimics the endemic state of whooping cough in the pre-vaccine era. We considered a stochastic SIR model on dynamical networks that involve local and global contacts among individuals and analysed the influence of the network properties on the characterization of the quasi-stationary state. We computed probability density functions (PDF) for infected fraction of individuals and found that they are well fitted by gamma functions, excepted the tails of the distributions that are q-exponentials. We also computed the fluctuation power spectra of infective time series for different networks. We found that network effects can be partially absorbed by rescaling the rate of infective contacts of the model. An explicit relation between the effective transmission rate of the disease and the correlation of susceptible individuals with their infective nearest neighbours was obtained. This relation quantifies the known screening of infective individuals observed in these networks. We finally discuss the goodness and limitations of the SIR model with homogeneous mixing and parameters taken from epidemiological data to describe the dynamic behaviour observed in the networks studied.

  16. Resting state functional network disruptions in a kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravnoor Singh Gill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the graph topological properties of brain networks derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in a kainic acid induced model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE in rats. Functional connectivity was determined by temporal correlation of the resting-state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD signals between two brain regions during 1.5% and 2% isoflurane, and analyzed as networks in epileptic and control rats. Graph theoretical analysis revealed a significant increase in functional connectivity between brain areas in epileptic than control rats, and the connected brain areas could be categorized as a limbic network and a default mode network (DMN. The limbic network includes the hippocampus, amygdala, piriform cortex, nucleus accumbens, and mediodorsal thalamus, whereas DMN involves the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, auditory and temporal association cortex, and posterior parietal cortex. The TLE model manifested a higher clustering coefficient, increased global and local efficiency, and increased small-worldness as compared to controls, despite having a similar characteristic path length. These results suggest extensive disruptions in the functional brain networks, which may be the basis of altered cognitive, emotional and psychiatric symptoms in TLE.

  17. Resting state functional network disruptions in a kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ravnoor Singh; Mirsattari, Seyed M; Leung, L Stan

    2017-01-01

    We studied the graph topological properties of brain networks derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in a kainic acid induced model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in rats. Functional connectivity was determined by temporal correlation of the resting-state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signals between two brain regions during 1.5% and 2% isoflurane, and analyzed as networks in epileptic and control rats. Graph theoretical analysis revealed a significant increase in functional connectivity between brain areas in epileptic than control rats, and the connected brain areas could be categorized as a limbic network and a default mode network (DMN). The limbic network includes the hippocampus, amygdala, piriform cortex, nucleus accumbens, and mediodorsal thalamus, whereas DMN involves the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, auditory and temporal association cortex, and posterior parietal cortex. The TLE model manifested a higher clustering coefficient, increased global and local efficiency, and increased small-worldness as compared to controls, despite having a similar characteristic path length. These results suggest extensive disruptions in the functional brain networks, which may be the basis of altered cognitive, emotional and psychiatric symptoms in TLE.

  18. Altered resting-state functional connectivity of default-mode network and sensorimotor network in heavy metal music lovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Zhang, Congcong; Duan, Shuxia; Du, Xiaoxia; Calhoun, Vince D

    2017-09-18

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spontaneous neural activity and functional connectivity (FC) in heavy metal music lovers (HMML) compared with classical music lovers (CML) during resting state. Forty HMML and 31 CML underwent resting-state functional MRI scans. Fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) and seed-based resting-state FC were computed to explore regional activity and functional integration. A voxel-based two-sample t-test was used to test the differences between the two groups. Compared with CML, HMML showed functional alterations: higher fALFF in the right precentral gyrus, the bilateral paracentral lobule, and the left middle occipital gyrus, lower fALFF in the left medial superior frontal gyrus, an altered FC in the default-mode network, lower connectivity between the right precentral gyrus and the left cerebellum-6 and the right cerebellum-3, and an altered FC between the left paracentral lobule and the sensorimotor network, lower in the right paracentral lobule and the right inferior temporal gyrus FC. The results may partly explain the disorders of behavioral and emotional cognition in HMML compared with CML and are consistent with our predictions. These findings may help provide a basic understanding of the potential neural mechanism of HMML.

  19. Face Patch Resting State Networks Link Face Processing to Social Cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caspar M Schwiedrzik

    Full Text Available Faces transmit a wealth of social information. How this information is exchanged between face-processing centers and brain areas supporting social cognition remains largely unclear. Here we identify these routes using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in macaque monkeys. We find that face areas functionally connect to specific regions within frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices, as well as subcortical structures supporting emotive, mnemonic, and cognitive functions. This establishes the existence of an extended face-recognition system in the macaque. Furthermore, the face patch resting state networks and the default mode network in monkeys show a pattern of overlap akin to that between the social brain and the default mode network in humans: this overlap specifically includes the posterior superior temporal sulcus, medial parietal, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, areas supporting high-level social cognition in humans. Together, these results reveal the embedding of face areas into larger brain networks and suggest that the resting state networks of the face patch system offer a new, easily accessible venue into the functional organization of the social brain and into the evolution of possibly uniquely human social skills.

  20. Plastic modulation of PTSD resting-state networks by EEG neurofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluetsch, Rosemarie C.; Ros, Tomas; Théberge, Jean; Frewen, Paul A.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Schmahl, Christian; Jetly, Rakesh; Lanius, Ruth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electroencephalographic (EEG) neurofeedback training has been shown to produce plastic modulations in salience network and default mode network functional connectivity in healthy individuals. In this study, we investigated whether a single session of neurofeedback training aimed at the voluntary reduction of alpha rhythm (8–12 Hz) amplitude would be related to differences in EEG network oscillations, functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity, and subjective measures of state anxiety and arousal in a group of individuals with PTSD. Method 21 individuals with PTSD related to childhood abuse underwent 30 minutes of EEG neurofeedback training preceded and followed by a resting-state fMRI scan. Results Alpha desynchronizing neurofeedback was associated with decreased alpha amplitude during training, followed by a significant increase (‘rebound’) in resting-state alpha synchronization. This rebound was linked to increased calmness, greater salience network connectivity with the right insula, and enhanced default mode network connectivity with bilateral posterior cingulate, right middle frontal gyrus, and left medial prefrontal cortex. Conclusion Our study represents a first step in elucidating the potential neurobehavioral mechanisms mediating the effects of neurofeedback treatment on regulatory systems in PTSD. Moreover, it documents for the first time a spontaneous EEG ‘rebound’ after neurofeedback, pointing to homeostatic/compensatory mechanisms operating in the brain. PMID:24266644

  1. Plastic modulation of PTSD resting-state networks and subjective wellbeing by EEG neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluetsch, R C; Ros, T; Théberge, J; Frewen, P A; Calhoun, V D; Schmahl, C; Jetly, R; Lanius, R A

    2014-08-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) neurofeedback training has been shown to produce plastic modulations in salience network and default mode network functional connectivity in healthy individuals. In this study, we investigated whether a single session of neurofeedback training aimed at the voluntary reduction of alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz) amplitude would be related to differences in EEG network oscillations, functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity, and subjective measures of state anxiety and arousal in a group of individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Twenty-one individuals with PTSD related to childhood abuse underwent 30 min of EEG neurofeedback training preceded and followed by a resting-state fMRI scan. Alpha desynchronizing neurofeedback was associated with decreased alpha amplitude during training, followed by a significant increase ('rebound') in resting-state alpha synchronization. This rebound was linked to increased calmness, greater salience network connectivity with the right insula, and enhanced default mode network connectivity with bilateral posterior cingulate, right middle frontal gyrus, and left medial prefrontal cortex. Our study represents a first step in elucidating the potential neurobehavioural mechanisms mediating the effects of neurofeedback treatment on regulatory systems in PTSD. Moreover, it documents for the first time a spontaneous EEG 'rebound' after neurofeedback, pointing to homeostatic/compensatory mechanisms operating in the brain. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Face Patch Resting State Networks Link Face Processing to Social Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiedrzik, Caspar M.; Zarco, Wilbert; Everling, Stefan; Freiwald, Winrich A.

    2015-01-01

    Faces transmit a wealth of social information. How this information is exchanged between face-processing centers and brain areas supporting social cognition remains largely unclear. Here we identify these routes using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in macaque monkeys. We find that face areas functionally connect to specific regions within frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices, as well as subcortical structures supporting emotive, mnemonic, and cognitive functions. This establishes the existence of an extended face-recognition system in the macaque. Furthermore, the face patch resting state networks and the default mode network in monkeys show a pattern of overlap akin to that between the social brain and the default mode network in humans: this overlap specifically includes the posterior superior temporal sulcus, medial parietal, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, areas supporting high-level social cognition in humans. Together, these results reveal the embedding of face areas into larger brain networks and suggest that the resting state networks of the face patch system offer a new, easily accessible venue into the functional organization of the social brain and into the evolution of possibly uniquely human social skills. PMID:26348613

  3. Face Patch Resting State Networks Link Face Processing to Social Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiedrzik, Caspar M; Zarco, Wilbert; Everling, Stefan; Freiwald, Winrich A

    2015-01-01

    Faces transmit a wealth of social information. How this information is exchanged between face-processing centers and brain areas supporting social cognition remains largely unclear. Here we identify these routes using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in macaque monkeys. We find that face areas functionally connect to specific regions within frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices, as well as subcortical structures supporting emotive, mnemonic, and cognitive functions. This establishes the existence of an extended face-recognition system in the macaque. Furthermore, the face patch resting state networks and the default mode network in monkeys show a pattern of overlap akin to that between the social brain and the default mode network in humans: this overlap specifically includes the posterior superior temporal sulcus, medial parietal, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, areas supporting high-level social cognition in humans. Together, these results reveal the embedding of face areas into larger brain networks and suggest that the resting state networks of the face patch system offer a new, easily accessible venue into the functional organization of the social brain and into the evolution of possibly uniquely human social skills.

  4. Hybrid fuzzy charged system search algorithm based state estimation in distribution networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachidananda Prasad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new hybrid charged system search (CSS algorithm based state estimation in radial distribution networks in fuzzy framework. The objective of the optimization problem is to minimize the weighted square of the difference between the measured and the estimated quantity. The proposed method of state estimation considers bus voltage magnitude and phase angle as state variable along with some equality and inequality constraints for state estimation in distribution networks. A rule based fuzzy inference system has been designed to control the parameters of the CSS algorithm to achieve better balance between the exploration and exploitation capability of the algorithm. The efficiency of the proposed fuzzy adaptive charged system search (FACSS algorithm has been tested on standard IEEE 33-bus system and Indian 85-bus practical radial distribution system. The obtained results have been compared with the conventional CSS algorithm, weighted least square (WLS algorithm and particle swarm optimization (PSO for feasibility of the algorithm.

  5. Effective field theory approaches for tensor potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Maximilian

    2016-11-14

    Effective field theories are a widely used tool to study physical systems at low energies. We apply them to systematically analyze two and three particles interacting via tensor potentials. Two examples are addressed: pion interactions for anti D{sup 0}D{sup *0} scattering to dynamically generate the X(3872) and dipole interactions for two and three bosons at low energies. For the former, the one-pion exchange and for the latter, the long-range dipole force induce a tensor-like structure of the potential. We apply perturbative as well as non-perturbative methods to determine low-energy observables. The X(3872) is of major interest in modern high-energy physics. Its exotic characteristics require approaches outside the range of the quark model for baryons and mesons. Effective field theories represent such methods and provide access to its peculiar nature. We interpret the X(3872) as a hadronic molecule consisting of neutral D and D{sup *} mesons. It is possible to apply an effective field theory with perturbative pions. Within this framework, we address chiral as well as finite volume extrapolations for low-energy observables, such as the binding energy and the scattering length. We show that the two-point correlation function for the D{sup *0} meson has to be resummed to cure infrared divergences. Moreover, next-to-leading order coupling constants, which were introduced by power counting arguments, appear to be essential to renormalize the scattering amplitude. The binding energy as well as the scattering length display a moderate dependence on the light quark masses. The X(3872) is most likely deeper bound for large light quark masses. In a finite volume on the other hand, the binding energy significantly increases. The dependence on the light quark masses and the volume size can be simultaneously obtained. For bosonic dipoles we apply a non-perturbative, numerical approach. We solve the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the two-dipole system and the Faddeev

  6. Accelerated Gillespie Algorithm for Gas–Grain Reaction Network Simulations Using Quasi-steady-state Assumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qiang; Lu, Yang; Quan, Donghui

    2017-12-01

    Although the Gillespie algorithm is accurate in simulating gas–grain reaction networks, so far its computational cost is so expensive that it cannot be used to simulate chemical reaction networks that include molecular hydrogen accretion or the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks. We present an accelerated Gillespie algorithm that is based on a quasi-steady-state assumption with the further approximation that the population distribution of transient species depends only on the accretion and desorption processes. The new algorithm is tested against a few reaction networks that are simulated by the regular Gillespie algorithm. We found that the less likely it is that transient species are formed and destroyed on grain surfaces, the more accurate the new method is. We also apply the new method to simulate reaction networks that include molecular hydrogen accretion. The results show that surface chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen are not important for the production of surface species under standard physical conditions of dense molecular clouds.

  7. The use of Bayesian Networks in Detecting the States of Ventilation Mills in Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Vujnović

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to present a new method of predictive maintenance which can detect the states of coal grinding mills in thermal power plants using Bayesian networks. Several possible structures of Bayesian networks are proposed for solving this problem and one of them is implemented and tested on an actual system. This method uses acoustic signals and statistical signal pre-processing tools to compute the inputs of the Bayesian network. After that the network is trained and tested using signals measured in the vicinity of the mill in the period of 2 months. The goal of this algorithm is to increase the efficiency of the coal grinding process and reduce the maintenance cost by eliminating the unnecessary maintenance checks of the system.

  8. Passive Optical Access Networks: State of the Art and Future Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Muciaccia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the very last years, optical access networks are growing very rapidly, from both the network operators and the research interests points of view. Fiber To The Home (FTTH is already a reality in plenty of real contexts and there has been a further stimulus to the proposal of new solutions and the investigation of new possibilities, in order to optimize network performance and reduce capital and operational expenditure. A complete and systematic overview of passive optical access networks is presented in this paper, concerning both the hot research topics and the main operative issues about the design guidelines and the deployment of Passive Optical Networks (PON architectures, nowadays the most commonly implemented approach to realize optical fiber links in the access networks. A comparison of advantages and disadvantages of different multiplexing techniques is discussed, with specific reference to WDM-based networks, almost universally considered as the enabling technology for future proof bandwidth requirements. An exhaustive summary is also given about the-state-of-the-art of modulation and encoding techniques recently proposed by the scientific community, as well as the open challenges (such as colorless and coolerless ONUs for telecom companies and international standardization compliance.

  9. NIED seismic moment tensor catalogue for regional earthquakes around Japan: quality test and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Atsuki; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Kawai, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Ken'ichi

    2002-10-01

    We have examined the quality of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) seismic moment tensor (MT) catalogue obtained using a regional broadband seismic network (FREESIA). First, we examined using synthetic waveforms the robustness of the solutions with regard to data noise as well as to errors in the velocity structure and focal location. Then, to estimate the reliability, robustness and validity of the catalogue, we compared it with the Harvard centroid moment tensor (CMT) catalogue as well as the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) focal mechanism catalogue. We found out that the NIED catalogue is consistent with Harvard and JMA catalogues within the uncertainty of 0.1 in moment magnitude, 10 km in depth, and 15° in direction of the stress axes. The NIED MT catalogue succeeded in reducing to 3.5 the lower limit of moment magnitude above which the moment tensor could be reliably estimated. Finally, we estimated the stress tensors in several different regions by using the NIED MT catalogue. This enables us to elucidate the stress/deformation field in and around the Japanese islands to understand the mode of deformation and applied stress. Moreover, we identified a region of abnormal stress in a swarm area from stress tensor estimates.

  10. Echo state network prediction method and its application in flue gas turbine condition prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaohong; Chen, Tao; Xu, Xiaoli

    2010-12-01

    On the background of the complex production process of fluid catalytic cracking energy recovery system in large-scale petrochemical refineries, this paper introduced an improved echo state network (ESN) model prediction method which is used to address the condition trend prediction problem of the key power equipment--flue gas turbine. Singular value decomposition method was used to obtain the ESN output weight. Through selecting the appropriate parameters and discarding small singular value, this method overcame the defective solution problem in the prediction by using the linear regression algorithm, improved the prediction performance of echo state network, and gave the network prediction process. In order to solve the problem of noise contained in production data, the translation-invariant wavelet transform analysis method is combined to denoise the noisy time series before prediction. Condition trend prediction results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. PLACE AND FUNCTONS OF STATE LAND CADASTRE IN FORMING THE NATIONAL ECOLOGICAL NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. Козлова

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is determination of functions of the state land cadastre in forming thenational ecological network. In the article the importance of further development of the Ukrainiannational ecological network is justified by means of an analysis of trends in modern ecological stageof environment, its structural phenomena are represented, the dynamics of the area changes of thenatural reserve fund as its general element is analyzed. On this basis the prerequisites for increasingthe area of ecological network, which have been emerged in the process of reforming the economicrelations in the land utilization are defined and the priority functions of the state land cadastre forsolving the mentioned above range of problems are determined

  12. Selective impairments of resting-state networks in minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Qi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE is a neuro-cognitive dysfunction characterized by impairment in attention, vigilance and integrative functions, while the sensorimotor function was often unaffected. Little is known, so far, about the exact neuro-pathophysiological mechanisms of aberrant cognition function in this disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate how the brain function is changed in MHE, we applied a resting-state fMRI approach with independent component analysis (ICA to assess the differences of resting-state networks (RSNs between MHE patients and healthy controls. Fourteen MHE patients and 14 age-and sex-matched healthy subjects underwent resting-state fMRI scans. ICA was used to identify six RSNs [dorsal attention network (DAN, default mode network (DMN, visual network (VN, auditory network (AN, sensorimotor network (SMN, self-referential network (SRN] in each subject. Group maps of each RSN were compared between the MHE and healthy control groups. Pearson correlation analysis was performed between the RSNs functional connectivity (FC and venous blood ammonia levels, and neuropsychological tests scores for all patients. Compared with the healthy controls, MHE patients showed significantly decreased FC in DAN, both decreased and increased FC in DMN, AN and VN. No significant differences were found in SRN and SMN between two groups. A relationship between FC and blood ammonia levels/neuropsychological tests scores were found in specific regions of RSNs, including middle and medial frontal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, as well as anterior and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: MHE patients have selective impairments of RSNs intrinsic functional connectivity, with aberrant functional connectivity in DAN, DMN, VN, AN, and spared SMN and SRN. Our fMRI study might supply a novel way to understand the neuropathophysiological mechanism of cognition function changes in MHE.

  13. Observation of vector and tensor light shifts in 87Rb using near-resonant, stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing-Qing; Freier, Christian; Sun, Yuan; Leykauf, Bastian; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Yang, Jun; Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2018-01-01

    We present the derivation of the frequency-dependent scalar, vector, and tensor dynamical polarizabilities for the two hyperfine levels of the 87Rb atom 5 s ground state. Based on the characterization of the dynamical polarizabilities, we analyze and measure the differential vector and tensor light shift between the 5 s ground-state sublevels with near-resonant, stimulated Raman transitions. These results clarify that the tensor polarizabilities for the ground states of alkali atoms are absent when the light field is far detuned from the atomic resonance and the total electronic angular momentum J is a good quantum number. In the near-resonant case, the light shifts are nontrivial and the determination of the frequency-dependent vector and tensor dynamic polarizabilities will help to achieve higher fidelities for applications of neutral atoms in quantum information and precision measurements.

  14. Resting state brain network function in major depression - Depression symptomatology, antidepressant treatment effects, future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakowski, Janis; Spinelli, Simona; Dörig, Nadja; Bosch, Oliver Gero; Manoliu, Andrei; Holtforth, Martin Grosse; Seifritz, Erich

    2017-09-01

    The alterations of functional connectivity brain networks in major depressive disorder (MDD) have been subject of a large number of studies. Using different methodologies and focusing on diverse aspects of the disease, research shows heterogeneous results lacking integration. Disrupted network connectivity has been found in core MDD networks like the default mode network (DMN), the central executive network (CEN), and the salience network, but also in cerebellar and thalamic circuitries. Here we review literature published on resting state brain network function in MDD focusing on methodology, and clinical characteristics including symptomatology and antidepressant treatment related findings. There are relatively few investigations concerning the qualitative aspects of symptomatology of MDD, whereas most studies associate quantitative aspects with distinct resting state functional connectivity alterations. Such depression severity associated alterations are found in the DMN, frontal, cerebellar and thalamic brain regions as well as the insula and the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex. Similarly, different therapeutical options in MDD and their effects on brain function showed patchy results. Herein, pharmaceutical treatments reveal functional connectivity alterations throughout multiple brain regions notably the DMN, fronto-limbic, and parieto-temporal regions. Psychotherapeutical interventions show significant functional connectivity alterations in fronto-limbic networks, whereas electroconvulsive therapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation result in alterations of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, the DMN, the CEN and the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex. While it appears clear that functional connectivity alterations are associated with the pathophysiology and treatment of MDD, future research should also generate a common strategy for data acquisition and analysis, as a least common denominator, to set the basis for comparability across

  15. Real-time dynamic hydraulic model for water distribution networks: steady state modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osman, Mohammad S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available steady state hydraulic model that will be used within a real-time dynamic hydraulic model (DHM). The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) water distribution network (WDN) is used as a pilot study for this purpose. A hydraulic analysis...

  16. $\\mathcal{H}_{\\infty}$ almost output synchronization for heterogeneous networks without exchange of controller states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Meirong; Saberi, Ali; Grip, H°avard Fjær; Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij

    2015-01-01

    We consider the H∞ almost output synchronization and regulated output synchronization problem for heterogeneous directed networks with external disturbances where agents are introspective (i.e., agents have access to a part of their own states). A decentralized protocol is designed for each agent,

  17. Impact of trucking network flow on preferred biorefinery locations in the southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy M. Young; Lee D. Han; James H. Perdue; Stephanie R. Hargrove; Frank M. Guess; Xia Huang; Chung-Hao Chen

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the trucking transportation network flow was modeled for the southern United States. The study addresses a gap in existing research by applying a Bayesian logistic regression and Geographic Information System (GIS) geospatial analysis to predict biorefinery site locations. A one-way trucking cost assuming a 128.8 km (80-mile) haul distance was estimated...

  18. Cross-correlations in high-conductance states of a model cortical network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, John

    2010-01-01

    (dansk abstrakt findes ikke) Neuronal firing correlations are studied using simulations of a simple network model for a cortical column in a high-conductance state with dynamically balanced excitation and inhibition.  Although correlations between individual pairs of neurons exhibit considerable ...

  19. Buscando Trabajo: Social Networking among Immigrants from Mexico to the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The growth of the Latino population in the United States has placed a sharp focus on immigration. Previous research on immigration has taken for granted the existence of immigrant networks. This is a significant oversight given their importance in both conveying social capital and their contribution to the growth of immigrant communities. Using…

  20. Aberrant limbic and salience network resting-state functional connectivity in panic disorder without comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pannekoek, Justine Nienke; Veer, Ilya M.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; van der Werff, Steven J. A.; Demenescu, Liliana R.; Aleman, Andre; Veltman, Dick J.; Zitman, Frans G.; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; van der wee, Nic J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Panic disorder (PD) is a prevalent and debilitating disorder but its neurobiology is still poorly understood. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) in PD without comorbidity in three networks that have been linked to PD before. This could provide new insights in

  1. Negative mood-induction modulates default mode network resting-state functional connectivity in chronic depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renner, F.; Siep, N.; Arntz, A.; van de Ven, V.; Peeters, F.P.M.L.; Quaedflieg, C.W.E.M.; Huibers, M.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sad mood on default mode network (DMN) resting-state connectivity in persons with chronic major depressive disorder (cMDD). METHODS: Participants with a diagnosis of cMDD (n=18) and age, gender and education level matched

  2. TensorPack: a Maple-based software package for the manipulation of algebraic expressions of tensors in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huf, P. A.; Carminati, J.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we: (1) introduce TensorPack, a software package for the algebraic manipulation of tensors in covariant index format in Maple; (2) briefly demonstrate the use of the package with an orthonormal tensor proof of the shearfree conjecture for dust. TensorPack is based on the Riemann and Canon tensor software packages and uses their functions to express tensors in an indexed covariant format. TensorPack uses a string representation as input and provides functions for output in index form. It extends the functionality to basic algebra of tensors, substitution, covariant differentiation, contraction, raising/lowering indices, symmetry functions and other accessory functions. The output can be merged with text in the Maple environment to create a full working document with embedded dynamic functionality. The package offers potential for manipulation of indexed algebraic tensor expressions in a flexible software environment.

  3. The Racah-Wigner algebra and coherent tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, D. J.; Repka, J.

    1996-05-01

    We present a set of tensors which are shift tensors (Wigner tensors) in accordance with the definitions of Biedenharn and Louck and satisfy the coherence conditions of Flath and Towber. Our tensors are defined for all connected compact Lie groups and for finite-dimensional representations of connected reductive Lie groups. Thus, we have a realization of the coherent tensors in a rather general setting. Moreover, this realization enables us to confirm most of the conjectures of Flath and Towber concerning the properties of coherent tensors.

  4. Geodesic-loxodromes for diffusion tensor interpolation and difference measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindlmann, Gordon; Estépar, Raúl San José; Niethammer, Marc; Haker, Steven; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    In algorithms for processing diffusion tensor images, two common ingredients are interpolating tensors, and measuring the distance between them. We propose a new class of interpolation paths for tensors, termed geodesic-loxodromes, which explicitly preserve clinically important tensor attributes, such as mean diffusivity or fractional anisotropy, while using basic differential geometry to interpolate tensor orientation. This contrasts with previous Riemannian and Log-Euclidean methods that preserve the determinant. Path integrals of tangents of geodesic-loxodromes generate novel measures of over-all difference between two tensors, and of difference in shape and in orientation.

  5. Emergence of low noise frustrated states in E/I balanced neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio, I; Torres, J J

    2016-12-01

    We study emerging phenomena in binary neural networks where, with a probability c synaptic intensities are chosen according with a Hebbian prescription, and with probability (1-c) there is an extra random contribution to synaptic weights. This new term, randomly taken from a Gaussian bimodal distribution, balances the synaptic population in the network so that one has 80%-20% relation in E/I population ratio, mimicking the balance observed in mammals cortex. For some regions of the relevant parameters, our system depicts standard memory (at low temperature) and non-memory attractors (at high temperature). However, as c decreases and the level of the underlying noise also decreases below a certain temperature Tt, a kind of memory-frustrated state, which resembles spin-glass behavior, sharply emerges. Contrary to what occurs in Hopfield-like neural networks, the frustrated state appears here even in the limit of the loading parameter α→0. Moreover, we observed that the frustrated state in fact corresponds to two states of non-vanishing activity uncorrelated with stored memories, associated, respectively, to a high activity or Up state and to a low activity or Down state. Using a linear stability analysis, we found regions in the space of relevant parameters for locally stable steady states and demonstrated that frustrated states coexist with memory attractors below Tt. Then, multistability between memory and frustrated states is present for relatively small c, and metastability of memory attractors can emerge as c decreases even more. We studied our system using standard mean-field techniques and with Monte Carlo simulations, obtaining a perfect agreement between theory and simulations. Our study can be useful to explain the role of synapse heterogeneity on the emergence of stable Up and Down states not associated to memory attractors, and to explore the conditions to induce transitions among them, as in sleep-wake transitions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  6. Tensor tomography of stresses in cubic single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry D. Karov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of optical tomography applying to investigation of a two-dimensional and a three-dimensional stressed state in single cubic crystals has been studied. Stresses are determined within the framework of the Maxwell piezo-optic law (linear dependence of the permittivity tensor on stresses and weak optical anisotropy. It is shown that a complete reconstruction of stresses in a sample is impossible both by translucence it in the parallel planes system and by using of the elasticity theory equations. For overcoming these difficulties, it is offered to use a method of magnetophotoelasticity.

  7. Permittivity and permeability tensors for cloaking applications

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Balamati; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on derivations of analytical expressions for stealth and cloaking applications. An optimal version of electromagnetic (EM) stealth is the design of invisibility cloak of arbitrary shapes in which the EM waves can be controlled within the cloaking shell by introducing a prescribed spatial variation in the constitutive parameters. The promising challenge in design of invisibility cloaks lies in the determination of permittivity and permeability tensors for all the layers. This book provides the detailed derivation of analytical expressions of the permittivity and permeability tensors for various quadric surfaces within the eleven Eisenhart co-ordinate systems. These include the cylinders and the surfaces of revolutions. The analytical modeling and spatial metric for each of these surfaces are provided along with their tensors. This mathematical formulation will help the EM designers to analyze and design of various quadratics and their hybrids, which can eventually lead to design of cloakin...

  8. Spacetime Encodings III - Second Order Killing Tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher- order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require...

  9. Tensor calculus for engineers and physicists

    CERN Document Server

    de Souza Sánchez Filho, Emil

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides a rigorous approach to tensor manifolds in several aspects relevant for Engineers and Physicists working in industry or academia. With a thorough, comprehensive, and unified presentation, this book offers insights into several topics of tensor analysis, which covers all aspects of N dimensional spaces. The main purpose of this book is to give a self-contained yet simple, correct and comprehensive mathematical explanation of tensor calculus for undergraduate and graduate students and for professionals. In addition to many worked problems, this book features a selection of examples, solved step by step. Although no emphasis is placed on special and particular problems of Engineering or Physics, the text covers the fundamentals of these fields of science. The book makes a brief introduction into the basic concept of the tensorial formalism so as to allow the reader to make a quick and easy review of the essential topics that enable having the grounds for the subsequent themes, without need...

  10. The pressure tensor in tangential equilibria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mottez

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The tangential equilibria are characterized by a bulk plasma velocity and a magnetic field that are perpendicular to the gradient direction. Such equilibria can be spatially periodic (like waves, or they can separate two regions with asymptotic uniform conditions (like MHD tangential discontinuities. It is possible to compute the velocity moments of the particle distribution function. Even in very simple cases, the pressure tensor is not isotropic and not gyrotropic. The differences between a scalar pressure and the pressure tensor derived in the frame of the Maxwell-Vlasov theory are significant when the gradient scales are of the order of the Larmor radius; they concern mainly the ion pressure tensor.

  11. Spectral analysis of the full gravity tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, R.; van Gelderen, M.

    1992-10-01

    It is shown that, when the five independent components of the gravity tensor are grouped into (Gamma-zz), (Gamma-xz, Gamma-yz), and (Gamma-xx - Gamma-yy, 2Gamma-xy) sets and expanded into an infinite series of pure-spin spherical harmonic tensors, it is possible to derive simple eigenvalue connections between these three sets and the spherical harmonic expansion of the gravity potential. The three eigenvalues are (n + 1)(n + 2), -(n + 2) sq rt of n(n + 1), and sq rt of (n - 1)n(n + 1)(n + 2). The joint ESA and NASA Aristoteles mission is designed to measure with high precision the tensor components Gamma-zz, Gamma-yz, and Gamma-yy, which will make it possible to determine the global gravity field in six months time with a high precision.

  12. Improving Tensor Based Recommenders with Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leginus, Martin; Dolog, Peter; Zemaitis, Valdas

    2012-01-01

    Social tagging systems (STS) model three types of entities (i.e. tag-user-item) and relationships between them are encoded into a 3-order tensor. Latent relationships and patterns can be discovered by applying tensor factorization techniques like Higher Order Singular Value Decomposition (HOSVD),...... of the recommendations and execution time are improved and memory requirements are decreased. The clustering is motivated by the fact that many tags in a tag space are semantically similar thus the tags can be grouped. Finally, promising experimental results are presented...

  13. Blue running of the primordial tensor spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk, E-mail: jinn-ouk.gong@apctp.org [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We examine the possibility of positive spectral index of the power spectrum of the primordial tensor perturbation produced during inflation in the light of the detection of the B-mode polarization by the BICEP2 collaboration. We find a blue tilt is in general possible when the slow-roll parameter decays rapidly. We present two known examples in which a positive spectral index for the tensor power spectrum can be obtained. We also briefly discuss other consistency tests for further studies on inflationary dynamics.

  14. Reconstruction of convex bodies from surface tensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Astrid; Kiderlen, Markus

    We present two algorithms for reconstruction of the shape of convex bodies in the two-dimensional Euclidean space. The first reconstruction algorithm requires knowledge of the exact surface tensors of a convex body up to rank s for some natural number s. The second algorithm uses harmonic intrinsic...... volumes which are certain values of the surface tensors and allows for noisy measurements. From a generalized version of Wirtinger's inequality, we derive stability results that are utilized to ensure consistency of both reconstruction procedures. Consistency of the reconstruction procedure based...

  15. FRESH FISH TRADE NETWORKS IN THE STREET MARKETS OF PALMAS, TOCANTINS STATE, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Bessa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on fresh fish trade networks found in the street markets of Palmas, capital of Tocantins state, Brazil, so as to identify the economic agents involved and the various geographical spaces which interact as a result of these networks. Fresh fish trade in Palmas takes place in distributor warehouses, grocery stores, supermarkets and hypermarkets, fish shops, and fishing communities, but it is street markets that constitute the most popular sale venues. Market sellers establish upstream supply networks with sectors in the fish food system (suppliers in primary and secondary production, distribution, and retail, whose interactions generate connections in Palmas (fishermen, distributors, retailers on a local scale, as well as connections with locations in Tocantins and Pará states (fishermen, fisheries, cold storage companies on a regional scale. Sellers also establish downstream trade networks with the end consumer at markets and with establishments in the food and small retail sectors, whose interactions produce mostly local connections, in Palmas and in the Luzimangues district (close to Palmas. Such connections are marked by consumption processes in these urban areas. Key-words: network, fresh fish trade, street markets.

  16. Linear Approach for Synchronous State Stability in Fully Connected PLL Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz H. A. Monteiro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization is an essential feature for the use of digital systems in telecommunication networks, integrated circuits, and manufacturing automation. Formerly, master-slave (MS architectures, with precise master clock generators sending signals to phase-locked loops (PLLs working as slave oscillators, were considered the best solution. Nowadays, the development of wireless networks with dynamical connectivity and the increase of the size and the operation frequency of integrated circuits suggest that the distribution of clock signals could be more efficient if distributed solutions with fully connected oscillators are used. Here, fully connected networks with second-order PLLs as nodes are considered. In previous work, how the synchronous state frequency for this type of network depends on the node parameters and delays was studied and an expression for the long-term frequency was derived (Piqueira, 2006. Here, by taking the first term of the Taylor series expansion for the dynamical system description, it is shown that for a generic network with N nodes, the synchronous state is locally asymptotically stable.

  17. An Autonomous Connectivity Restoration Algorithm Based on Finite State Machine for Wireless Sensor-Actor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Hao, Guan

    2018-01-08

    With the development of autonomous unmanned intelligent systems, such as the unmanned boats, unmanned planes and autonomous underwater vehicles, studies on Wireless Sensor-Actor Networks (WSANs) have attracted more attention. Network connectivity algorithms play an important role in data exchange, collaborative detection and information fusion. Due to the harsh application environment, abnormal nodes often appear, and the network connectivity will be prone to be lost. Network self-healing mechanisms have become critical for these systems. In order to decrease the movement overhead of the sensor-actor nodes, an autonomous connectivity restoration algorithm based on finite state machine is proposed. The idea is to identify whether a node is a critical node by using a finite state machine, and update the connected dominating set in a timely way. If an abnormal node is a critical node, the nearest non-critical node will be relocated to replace the abnormal node. In the case of multiple node abnormality, a regional network restoration algorithm is introduced. It is designed to reduce the overhead of node movements while restoration happens. Simulation results indicate the proposed algorithm has better performance on the total moving distance and the number of total relocated nodes compared with some other representative restoration algorithms.

  18. UP-DOWN cortical dynamics reflect state transitions in a bistable network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxin, Alex; Barthó, Peter; Luczak, Artur

    2017-01-01

    In the idling brain, neuronal circuits transition between periods of sustained firing (UP state) and quiescence (DOWN state), a pattern the mechanisms of which remain unclear. Here we analyzed spontaneous cortical population activity from anesthetized rats and found that UP and DOWN durations were highly variable and that population rates showed no significant decay during UP periods. We built a network rate model with excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) populations exhibiting a novel bistable regime between a quiescent and an inhibition-stabilized state of arbitrarily low rate. Fluctuations triggered state transitions, while adaptation in E cells paradoxically caused a marginal decay of E-rate but a marked decay of I-rate in UP periods, a prediction that we validated experimentally. A spiking network implementation further predicted that DOWN-to-UP transitions must be caused by synchronous high-amplitude events. Our findings provide evidence of bistable cortical networks that exhibit non-rhythmic state transitions when the brain rests. PMID:28826485

  19. Directionality of large-scale resting-state brain networks during eyes open and eyes closed conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delong eZhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined directional connections in the brain among resting-state networks (RSNs when the participant had their eyes open (EO or had their eyes closed (EC. The resting-state fMRI data were collected from 20 healthy participants (11 males, 20.17 ± 2.74 years under the EO and EC states. Independent component analysis (ICA was applied to identify the separated RSNs (i.e., the primary/high-level visual, primary sensory-motor, ventral motor, salience/dorsal attention, and anterior/posterior default-mode networks, and the Gaussian Bayesian network (BN learning approach was then used to explore the conditional dependencies among these RSNs. The network-to-network directional connections related to EO and EC were depicted, and a support vector machine (SVM was further employed to identify the directional connection patterns that could effectively discriminate between the two states. The results indicated that the connections among RSNs are directionally connected within a BN during the EO and EC states. The directional connections from the salient attention network to the anterior/posterior default-mode networks and the high-level to primary-level visual network were the obvious characteristics of both the EO and EC resting-state BNs. Of the directional connections in BN, the attention (salient and dorsal-related directional connections were observed to be discriminative between the EO and EC states. In particular, we noted that the properties of the salient and dorsal attention networks were in opposite directions. Overall, the present study described the directional connections of RSNs using a BN learning approach during the EO and EC states, and the results suggested that the attention system (the salient and the dorsal attention network might have important roles in resting-state brain networks and the neural substrate underpinning of switching between the EO and EC states.

  20. Expanded functional coupling of subcortical nuclei with the motor resting-state network in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Siebner, Hartwig R; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) impairs signal transmission along cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connections, affecting functional integration within the motor network. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during motor tasks has revealed altered functional connectivity in MS...... controls underwent a 20-minute resting-state fMRI session at 3 Tesla. Independent component analysis was applied to the fMRI data to identify disease-related changes in motor resting-state connectivity. RESULTS: Patients with MS showed a spatial expansion of motor resting-state connectivity in deep...... subcortical nuclei but not at the cortical level. The anterior and middle parts of the putamen, adjacent globus pallidus, anterior and posterior thalamus and the subthalamic region showed stronger functional connectivity with the motor network in the MS group compared with controls. CONCLUSION: MS...

  1. THE DEVELOPMENT OF NETWORK INTERACTIONS BETWEEN PUBLIC AND STATE STRUCTURES IN SECONDARY EDUCATION MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr V. Pastovenskyi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The developmental tendencies of secondary education management system are considered in the article. It was established, that an effective management of the educational systems can be attained on the basis of delegation of administrative functions from state to self-governmental, educational and public structures. The conclusion was made that the network interactions of the community management structures with vertical state structures being constructed from top to bottom, and the vertical of self-governing bodies being built from the bottom to the top, will provide the educational system with stability as well as the opportunities for effective development. It was emphasized, that modern cloud technology output network interactions of state, self-governmental, educational and public structures in the secondary education management to a new level.

  2. Understanding Farmers Information Network Implication For Effective Extension Delivery In Akwa Ibom State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odoemelam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Appropriateness of information is a critical factor needed to stimulate the right knowledge and attitude of farmers towards sustainable transformation of agriculture. The study investigated the information network that exists among rural communities in Akwa-Ibom States and its implication for effective extension delivery. Even though AKADEPAkwa-Ibom State Agricultural Development Programmes are highly involved in the dissemination process it is important to analyze the information networks of the farmers to improve exchange of information with the following specific objectives identify the different wealth groups in the study area ascertain the information networks that exists in the area analyze the different information types and assess the strength and weakness of the information sources. Data were generated through Focus Group Discussion and Participatory Observation employing different methodologies like wealth ranking information diagram and linkage matrix analysis using Likerts scale type. Data generated were analyzed with simple descriptive statistics and means. Major results show that in wealth ranking two groups of respondents were identified the female households with mean score between 1.9 and male headed household with mean score of 2.00 2.99. on information network farmer to farmer with 21 market 14 church 15 were highest source of their information network. On perceived weakness and strength of the information network the information quality frequency of use timeliness of information flow and link up of information were adequate while reliability of information was not adequate. The results show that intra community information flow was suitable and accessible to rich farmers while inaccessible and often irrelevant to poor farmers. Therefore in the face of threat to food insecurity prevalent in the country it is important to put in place a platform that will afford farmers to ask questions and get substantive responses

  3. Graph-based network analysis of resting-state functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI measures of brain activity have attracted considerable attention. Based on changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent signal, R-fMRI offers a novel way to assess the brain’s spontaneous or intrinsic (i.e., task-free activity with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. The properties of both the intra- and inter-regional connectivity of resting-state brain activity have been well documented, promoting our understanding of the brain as a complex network. Specifically, the topological organization of brain networks has been recently studied with graph theory. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in graph-based brain network analyses of R-fMRI signals, both in typical and atypical populations. Application of these approaches to R-fMRI data has demonstrated non-trivial topological properties of functional networks in the human brain. Among these is the knowledge that the brain’s intrinsic activity is organized as a small-world, highly efficient network, with significant modularity and highly connected hub regions. These network properties have also been found to change throughout normal development, aging and in various pathological conditions. The literature reviewed here suggests that graph-based network analyses are capable of uncovering system-level changes associated with different processes in the resting brain, which could provide novel insights into the understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms of brain function. We also highlight several potential research topics in the future.

  4. Energy efficiency for cloud-radio access networks with imperfect channel state information

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Oquibi, Bayan

    2016-12-24

    The advent of smartphones and tablets over the past several years has resulted in a drastic increase of global carbon footprint, due to the explosive growth of data traffic. Improving energy efficiency (EE) becomes, therefore, a crucial design metric in next generation wireless systems (5G). Cloud radio access network (C-RAN), a promising 5G network architecture, provides an efficient framework for improving the EE performance, by means of coordinating the transmission across the network. This paper considers a C-RAN system formed by several clusters of remote radio heads (RRHs), each serving a predetermined set of mobile users (MUs), and assumes imperfect channel state information (CSI). The network performance becomes therefore a function of the intra-cluster and inter-cluster interference, as well as the channel estimation error. The paper optimizes the transmit power of each RRH in order to maximize the network global EE subject to MU service rate requirements and RRHs maximum power constraints. The paper proposes solving the optimization problem using a heuristic algorithm based on techniques from optimization theory via a two-stage iterative solution. Simulation results show that the proposed power allocation algorithm provides an appreciable performance improvement as compared to the conventional systems with maximum power transmission strategy. They further highlight the convergence of the proposed algorithm for different networks scenarios.

  5. CITY TRANSPORT SYSTEM ECOLOGICAL STATE FORECASTING WITH THE USE OF NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Lyamzin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop an effective model for city transport system ecological state assessment using neural networks general concept. Methods: The proposed model is based on two neural networks work, taking into account the traffic density effect and the transit capacity level on urban areas. Results: Based on the synthesis of the fuzzy sets theory and neural networks basic principles, the city transport system ecological state assessing model is developed. The graphical representation of the model is given. A forecast reliability high degree is provided even at low learning rates and high dynamics of changing statistical data in the city transit traffic conditions. Conclusions: The use of fuzzy neural networks makes it possible to state a complete correspondence between fuzzy inference procedure mathematical representation and the urban transport system structure. The proposed model allows to formulate well-defined environmental guidelines when making decisions in the transit traffic field, taking into account the interests of enterprises, transport and the urban population, with the subsequent distribution of traffic flows in time and geographical space of the city industrial areas.

  6. Formation and Stability of a Memory State in the Immune Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Takashi

    1992-04-01

    The immune system is investigated as a complex adaptive network. A nonlinear dynamical model is proposed to study roles of lymphocyte and antibody in the regulation of the immune response. Three kinds of lymphocytes; B cell, TH cell, and TS cell, interact and compose a functional unit. Furthermore this unit interacts with other units through antibodies. These two types of interactions cooperatively work and regulate the immune response. The model can explain how the memory state is formed and stabilized in the immune network. Behaviors of the model are verified by the computer simulations.

  7. Wireless Sensor Network Security Enhancement Using Directional Antennas: State of the Art and Research Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiac, Daniel-Ioan

    2016-04-07

    Being often deployed in remote or hostile environments, wireless sensor networks are vulnerable to various types of security attacks. A possible solution to reduce the security risks is to use directional antennas instead of omnidirectional ones or in conjunction with them. Due to their increased complexity, higher costs and larger sizes, directional antennas are not traditionally used in wireless sensor networks, but recent technology trends may support this method. This paper surveys existing state of the art approaches in the field, offering a broad perspective of the future use of directional antennas in mitigating security risks, together with new challenges and open research issues.

  8. Wireless Sensor Network Security Enhancement Using Directional Antennas: State of the Art and Research Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel-Ioan Curiac

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Being often deployed in remote or hostile environments, wireless sensor networks are vulnerable to various types of security attacks. A possible solution to reduce the security risks is to use directional antennas instead of omnidirectional ones or in conjunction with them. Due to their increased complexity, higher costs and larger sizes, directional antennas are not traditionally used in wireless sensor networks, but recent technology trends may support this method. This paper surveys existing state of the art approaches in the field, offering a broad perspective of the future use of directional antennas in mitigating security risks, together with new challenges and open research issues.

  9. Brain Organization into Resting State Networks Emerges at Criticality on a Model of the Human Connectome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimovici, Ariel; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Balenzuela, Pablo; Chialvo, Dante R.

    2013-04-01

    The relation between large-scale brain structure and function is an outstanding open problem in neuroscience. We approach this problem by studying the dynamical regime under which realistic spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity emerge from the empirically derived network of human brain neuroanatomical connections. The results show that critical dynamics unfolding on the structural connectivity of the human brain allow the recovery of many key experimental findings obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging, such as divergence of the correlation length, the anomalous scaling of correlation fluctuations, and the emergence of large-scale resting state networks.

  10. Functional connectivity associated with social networks in older adults: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillemer, Sarah; Holtzer, Roee; Blumen, Helena M

    2017-06-01

    Poor social networks and decreased levels of social support are associated with worse mood, health, and cognition in younger and older adults. Yet, we know very little about the brain substrates associated with social networks and social support, particularly in older adults. This study examined functional brain substrates associated with social networks using the Social Network Index (SNI) and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Resting-state fMRI data from 28 non-demented older adults were analyzed with independent components analyses. As expected, four established resting-state networks-previously linked to motor, vision, speech, and other language functions-correlated with the quality (SNI-1: total number of high-contact roles of a respondent) and quantity (SNI-2: total number of individuals in a respondent's social network) of social networks: a sensorimotor, a visual, a vestibular/insular, and a left frontoparietal network. Moreover, SNI-1 was associated with greater functional connectivity in the lateral prefrontal regions of the left frontoparietal network, while SNI-2 was associated with greater functional connectivity in the medial prefrontal regions of this network. Thus, lateral prefrontal regions may be particularly linked to the quality of social networks while medial prefrontal regions may be particularly linked to the quantity of social networks.

  11. Observations About the Projective Tensor Product of Banach Spaces

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , 46B, 46E, 47B. Keywords: tensor, Banach, banach space, tensor product, projective norm, greatest crossnorm, semi-embedding, Radon-Nikodym property, absolutely p-summable sequence, strongly p-summable sequence, topological linear ...

  12. State dependent properties of epileptic brain networks: comparative graph-theoretical analyses of simultaneously recorded EEG and MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Marie-Therese; Bialonski, Stephan; Noennig, Nina; Mai, Heinke; Prusseit, Jens; Wellmer, Jörg; Hinrichs, Hermann; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    To investigate whether functional brain networks of epilepsy patients treated with antiepileptic medication differ from networks of healthy controls even during the seizure-free interval. We applied different rules to construct binary and weighted networks from EEG and MEG data recorded under a resting-state eyes-open and eyes-closed condition from 21 epilepsy patients and 23 healthy controls. The average shortest path length and the clustering coefficient served as global statistical network characteristics. Independent on the behavioral condition, epileptic brains exhibited a more regular functional network structure. Similarly, the eyes-closed condition was characterized by a more regular functional network structure in both groups. The amount of network reorganization due to behavioral state changes was similar in both groups. Consistent findings could be achieved for networks derived from EEG but hardly from MEG recordings, and network construction rules had a rather strong impact on our findings. Despite the locality of the investigated processes epileptic brain networks differ in their global characteristics from non-epileptic brain networks. Further methodological developments are necessary to improve the characterization of disturbed and normal functional networks. An increased regularity and a diminished modulation capability appear characteristic of epileptic brain networks. Copyright (c) 2009 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tensor completion for PDEs with uncertain coefficients and Bayesian Update

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2017-03-05

    In this work, we tried to show connections between Bayesian update and tensor completion techniques. Usually, only a small/sparse vector/tensor of measurements is available. The typical measurement is a function of the solution. The solution of a stochastic PDE is a tensor, the measurement as well. The idea is to use completion techniques to compute all "missing" values of the measurement tensor and only then apply the Bayesian technique.

  14. Evidence of tensor interactions in 16O observed via (p,d reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong H. J.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We measured the differential cross sections of the 16O(p,d reaction populating the ground state and several low-lying excited states in 15O using 198-, 295- and 392-MeV proton beams at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP, Osaka University, to study the effect of the tensor interactions in 16O. Dividing the cross sections for each excited state by the one for the ground state and comparing the ratios over a wide range of momentum transfer, we found a marked enhancement of the ratio for the positive-parity state(s. The observation is consistent with large components of high-momentum neutrons in the ground-state configurations of 16O due possibly to the tensor interactions.

  15. Probing effect of tensor interactions in {sup 16}O via (p, d) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, H.J., E-mail: onghjin@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Tanihata, I. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Tamii, A. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Myo, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); General Education, Faculty of Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Ogata, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Fukuda, M. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Hirota, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ikeda, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishikawa, D. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Matsubara, H. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Matsuta, K.; Mihara, M. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Naito, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nishimura, D. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ogawa, Y.; Okamura, H. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ozawa, A. [Institute of Physics, Tsukuba University, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Pang, D.Y. [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Sakaguchi, H. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); and others

    2013-10-01

    We have measured the {sup 16}O(p, d) reaction using 198-, 295- and 392-MeV proton beams to search for a direct evidence on an effect of the tensor interactions in light nucleus. Differential cross sections of the one-neutron transfer reaction populating the ground states and several low-lying excited states in {sup 15}O were measured. Comparing the ratios of the cross sections for each excited state to the one for the ground state over a wide range of momentum transfer, we found a marked enhancement of the ratio for the positive-parity state(s). The observation is consistent with large components of high-momentum neutrons in the initial ground-state configurations due to the tensor interactions.

  16. Gravitational Metric Tensor Exterior to Rotating Homogeneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... ω is constructed. The constructed metric tensors in this gravitational field have seven non-zero distinct components.The Lagrangian for this gravitational field is constructed. It is used to derive Einstein's planetary equation of motion and photon equation of motion in the vicinity of the rotating homogeneous spherical mass.

  17. Scalable Tensor Factorizations with Missing Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acar, Evrim; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Kolda, Tamara G.

    2010-01-01

    is shown to successfully factor tensors with noise and up to 70% missing data. Moreover, our approach is significantly faster than the leading alternative and scales to larger problems. To show the real-world usefulness of CP-WOPT, we illustrate its applicability on a novel EEG (electroencephalogram...

  18. Families of twisted tensor product codes

    OpenAIRE

    Giuzzi, Luca; Pepe, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Using geometric properties of the variety $\\cV_{r,t}$, the image under the Grassmannian map of a Desarguesian $(t-1)$-spread of $\\PG(rt-1,q)$, we introduce error correcting codes related to the twisted tensor product construction, producing several families of constacyclic codes. We exactly determine the parameters of these codes and characterise the words of minimum weight.

  19. Tensors in image processing and computer vision

    CERN Document Server

    De Luis García, Rodrigo; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2009-01-01

    Tensor signal processing is an emerging field with important applications to computer vision and image processing. This book presents the developments in this branch of signal processing, offering research and discussions by experts in the area. It is suitable for advanced students working in the area of computer vision and image processing.

  20. Visualization and processing of tensor fields

    CERN Document Server

    Weickert, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Presents information on the visualization and processing of tensor fields. This book serves as an overview for the inquiring scientist, as a basic foundation for developers and practitioners, and as a textbook for specialized classes and seminars for graduate and doctoral students.

  1. Magnetotelluric impedance tensor analysis for identification of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present the results of magnetotelluric (MT) impedance tensors analyses of 18 sites located along a profile cutting various faults in the uplifted Wagad block of the Kachchh basin. The MT time series of 4–5 days recording duration have been processed and the earth response functions are estimated in broad frequency ...

  2. Radiation Forces and Torques without Stress (Tensors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2011-01-01

    To understand radiation forces and torques or to calculate them does not require invoking photon or electromagnetic field momentum transfer or stress tensors. According to continuum electromagnetic theory, forces and torques exerted by radiation are a consequence of electric and magnetic fields acting on charges and currents that the fields induce…

  3. Introduction to vector and tensor analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wrede, Robert C

    1972-01-01

    A broad introductory treatment, this volume examines general Cartesian coordinates, the cross product, Einstein's special theory of relativity, bases in general coordinate systems, maxima and minima of functions of two variables, line integrals, integral theorems, fundamental notions in n-space, Riemannian geometry, algebraic properties of the curvature tensor, and more. 1963 edition.

  4. Tensor B mode and stochastic Faraday mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the Faraday effect as a different source of B mode polarization. The E mode polarization is Faraday rotated provided a stochastic large-scale magnetic field is present prior to photon decoupling. In the first part of the paper we discuss the case where the tensor modes of the geometry are absent and we argue that the B mode recently detected by the Bicep2 collaboration cannot be explained by a large-scale magnetic field rotating, through the Faraday effect, the well established E mode polarization. In this case, the observed temperature autocorrelations would be excessively distorted by the magnetic field. In the second part of the paper the formation of Faraday rotation is treated as a stationary, random and Markovian process with the aim of generalizing a set of scaling laws originally derived in the absence of the tensor modes of the geometry. We show that the scalar, vector and tensor modes of the brightness perturbations can all be Faraday rotated even if the vector and tensor par...

  5. A computational approach to extinction events in chemical reaction networks with discrete state spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2017-12-01

    Recent work of Johnston et al. has produced sufficient conditions on the structure of a chemical reaction network which guarantee that the corresponding discrete state space system exhibits an extinction event. The conditions consist of a series of systems of equalities and inequalities on the edges of a modified reaction network called a domination-expanded reaction network. In this paper, we present a computational implementation of these conditions written in Python and apply the program on examples drawn from the biochemical literature. We also run the program on 458 models from the European Bioinformatics Institute's BioModels Database and report our results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. State of the art on defenses against wormhole attacks in wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Neeli R.; Giannetsos, T.; Dimitriou, T.

    2009-01-01

    describe the wormhole attack, a severe routing attack against sensor networks that is particularly challenging to defend against. We detail its characteristics and study its effects on the successful operation of a sensor network. We present state-of-the-art research for addressing wormhole related...... the possibility of using more sophisticated methods, like intrusion detection systems, to achieve a more complete and autonomic defense mechanism against wormhole attackers. We present our work on intrusion detection and introduce a lightweight IDS framework, called LIDeA, designed for wireless sensor networks....... LIDeA is based on a distributed architecture, in which nodes overhear their neighboring nodes and collaborate with each other in order to successfully detect an intrusion. We conclude by highlighting how such a system can be used for defending against wormhole attackers....

  7. Untangling complex networks: risk minimization in financial markets through accessible spin glass ground states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisewski, Andreas Martin; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2010-08-15

    Recurrent international financial crises inflict significant damage to societies and stress the need for mechanisms or strategies to control risk and tamper market uncertainties. Unfortunately, the complex network of market interactions often confounds rational approaches to optimize financial risks. Here we show that investors can overcome this complexity and globally minimize risk in portfolio models for any given expected return, provided the relative margin requirement remains below a critical, empirically measurable value. In practice, for markets with centrally regulated margin requirements, a rational stabilization strategy would be keeping margins small enough. This result follows from ground states of the random field spin glass Ising model that can be calculated exactly through convex optimization when relative spin coupling is limited by the norm of the network's Laplacian matrix. In that regime, this novel approach is robust to noise in empirical data and may be also broadly relevant to complex networks with frustrated interactions that are studied throughout scientific fields.

  8. Autonomous Orbit Determination for Lagrangian Navigation Satellite Based on Neural Network Based State Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youtao Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the accuracy of the dynamical model used in the orbit determination of the Lagrangian navigation satellites, the nonlinear perturbations acting on Lagrangian navigation satellites are estimated by a neural network. A neural network based state observer is applied to autonomously determine the orbits of Lagrangian navigation satellites using only satellite-to-satellite range. This autonomous orbit determination method does not require linearizing the dynamical mode. There is no need to calculate the transition matrix. It is proved that three satellite-to-satellite ranges are needed using this method; therefore, the navigation constellation should include four Lagrangian navigation satellites at least. Four satellites orbiting on the collinear libration orbits are chosen to construct a constellation which is used to demonstrate the utility of this method. Simulation results illustrate that the stable error of autonomous orbit determination is about 10 m. The perturbation can be estimated by the neural network.

  9. Efficient MATLAB computations with sparse and factored tensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Brett William; Kolda, Tamara Gibson (Sandia National Lab, Livermore, CA)

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, the term tensor refers simply to a multidimensional or N-way array, and we consider how specially structured tensors allow for efficient storage and computation. First, we study sparse tensors, which have the property that the vast majority of the elements are zero. We propose storing sparse tensors using coordinate format and describe the computational efficiency of this scheme for various mathematical operations, including those typical to tensor decomposition algorithms. Second, we study factored tensors, which have the property that they can be assembled from more basic components. We consider two specific types: a Tucker tensor can be expressed as the product of a core tensor (which itself may be dense, sparse, or factored) and a matrix along each mode, and a Kruskal tensor can be expressed as the sum of rank-1 tensors. We are interested in the case where the storage of the components is less than the storage of the full tensor, and we demonstrate that many elementary operations can be computed using only the components. All of the efficiencies described in this paper are implemented in the Tensor Toolbox for MATLAB.

  10. Opinion Dynamics on Networks with Inference of Unobservable States of Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, Ryo

    In most opinion formation models which have been proposed, the agents decide their states (i.e. opinions) by referring to the states of others. However, the referred states of others are not necessarily observable and may be inferred. To investigate the effect of an inference of the states of others on opinion dynamics, I propose an extended voter model on networks where observable and referable node sets are different. These sets for a node defined as the nearest to the mo-th neighbors for observable nodes and the nearest to the mr-th neighbors for referable nodes. The state of referable but unobservable node which is the m-th neighbor (mo pagerank'' is conserved. This conserved quantity coincides with the fixation probability. On the other hand, in the case of mo =mr = 1 , the model comes down to the standard voter model on networks and the conserved quantity is a degree-weighted superposition of the states. Thus, the introduction of the inference changes the important opinion spreaders from the high-degree nodes to the high-betweenness pagerank nodes. This work is supported by the Collaboration Research Program of IDEAS, Chubu University IDEAS2016233.

  11. Efficient calculation of steady state probability distribution for stochastic biochemical reaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Shahriar; Buzzard, Gregery T; Umulis, David M

    2012-01-01

    The Steady State (SS) probability distribution is an important quantity needed to characterize the steady state behavior of many stochastic biochemical networks. In this paper, we propose an efficient and accurate approach to calculating an approximate SS probability distribution from solution of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) under the assumption of the existence of a unique deterministic SS of the system. To find the approximate solution to the CME, a truncated state-space representation is used to reduce the state-space of the system and translate it to a finite dimension. The subsequent ill-posed eigenvalue problem of a linear system for the finite state-space can be converted to a well-posed system of linear equations and solved. The proposed strategy yields efficient and accurate estimation of noise in stochastic biochemical systems. To demonstrate the approach, we applied the method to characterize the noise behavior of a set of biochemical networks of ligand-receptor interactions for Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling. We found that recruitment of type II receptors during the receptor oligomerization by itself doesn't not tend to lower noise in receptor signaling, but regulation by a secreted co-factor may provide a substantial improvement in signaling relative to noise. The steady state probability approximation method shortened the time necessary to calculate the probability distributions compared to earlier approaches, such as Gillespie's Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) while maintaining high accuracy.

  12. Spin-Tensor-Momentum-Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Sun, Kuei; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2017-11-01

    The recent experimental realization of spin-orbit coupling for ultracold atomic gases provides a powerful platform for exploring many interesting quantum phenomena. In these studies, spin represents the spin vector (spin 1 /2 or spin 1) and orbit represents the linear momentum. Here we propose a scheme to realize a new type of spin-tensor-momentum coupling (STMC) in spin-1 ultracold atomic gases. We study the ground state properties of interacting Bose-Einstein condensates with STMC and find interesting new types of stripe superfluid phases and multicritical points for phase transitions. Furthermore, STMC makes it possible to study quantum states with dynamical stripe orders that display density modulation with a long tunable period and high visibility, paving the way for the direct experimental observation of a new dynamical supersolidlike state. Our scheme for generating STMC can be generalized to other systems and may open the door for exploring novel quantum physics and device applications.

  13. The operator tensor formulation of quantum theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Lucien

    2012-07-28

    In this paper, we provide what might be regarded as a manifestly covariant presentation of discrete quantum theory. A typical quantum experiment has a bunch of apparatuses placed so that quantum systems can pass between them. We regard each use of an apparatus, along with some given outcome on the apparatus (a certain detector click or a certain meter reading for example), as an operation. An operation (e.g. B(b(2)a(3))(a(1))) can have zero or more quantum systems inputted into it and zero or more quantum systems outputted from it. The operation B(b(2)a(3))(a(1)) has one system of type a inputted, and one system of type b and one system of type a outputted. We can wire together operations to form circuits, for example, A(a(1))B(b(2)a(3))(a(1))C(b(2)a(3)). Each repeated integer label here denotes a wire connecting an output to an input of the same type. As each operation in a circuit has an outcome associated with it, a circuit represents a set of outcomes that can happen in a run of the experiment. In the operator tensor formulation of quantum theory, each operation corresponds to an operator tensor. For example, the operation B(b(2)a(3))(a(1)) corresponds to the operator tensor B(b(2)a(3))(a(1)). Further, the probability for a general circuit is given by replacing operations with corresponding operator tensors as in Prob(A(a(1))B(b(2)a(3))(a(1))C(b(2)a(3))) = Â(a(1))B(b(2)a(3))(a(1))C(b(2)a(3)). Repeated integer labels indicate that we multiply in the associated subspace and then take the partial trace over that subspace. Operator tensors must be physical (namely, they must have positive input transpose and satisfy a certain normalization condition).

  14. Multidimensional seismic data reconstruction using tensor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, Nadia

    Exploration seismology utilizes the seismic wavefield for prospecting oil and gas. The seismic reflection experiment consists on deploying sources and receivers in the surface of an area of interest. When the sources are activated, the receivers measure the wavefield that is reflected from different subsurface interfaces and store the information as time-series called traces or seismograms. The seismic data depend on two source coordinates, two receiver coordinates and time (a 5D volume). Obstacles in the field, logistical and economical factors constrain seismic data acquisition. Therefore, the wavefield sampling is incomplete in the four spatial dimensions. Seismic data undergoes different processes. In particular, the reconstruction process is responsible for correcting sampling irregularities of the seismic wavefield. This thesis focuses on the development of new methodologies for the reconstruction of multidimensional seismic data. This thesis examines techniques based on tensor algebra and proposes three methods that exploit the tensor nature of the seismic data. The fully sampled volume is low-rank in the frequency-space domain. The rank increases when we have missing traces and/or noise. The methods proposed perform rank reduction on frequency slices of the 4D spatial volume. The first method employs the Higher-Order Singular Value Decomposition (HOSVD) immersed in an iterative algorithm that reinserts weighted observations. The second method uses a sequential truncated SVD on the unfoldings of the tensor slices (SEQ-SVD). The third method formulates the rank reduction problem as a convex optimization problem. The measure of the rank is replaced by the nuclear norm of the tensor and the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) minimizes the cost function. All three methods have the interesting property that they are robust to curvature of the reflections, unlike many reconstruction methods. Finally, we present a comparison between the methods

  15. Network-specific resting-state connectivity changes in the premotor-parietal axis in writer's cramp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantel, Tobias; Meindl, Tobias; Li, Yong; Jochim, Angela; Gora-Stahlberg, Gina; Kräenbring, Jona; Berndt, Maria; Dresel, Christian; Haslinger, Bernhard

    2018-01-01

    Writer's cramp is a task-specific dystonia impairing writing and sometimes other fine motor tasks. Neuroimaging studies using manifold designs have shown varying results regarding the nature of changes in the disease. To clarify and extend the knowledge of underlying changes by investigating functional connectivity (FC) in intrinsic connectivity networks with putative sensorimotor function at rest in an increased number of study subjects. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging with independent component analysis was performed in 26/27 writer's cramp patients/healthy controls, and FC within and between resting state networks with putative sensorimotor function was compared. Additionally, voxel-based morphometry was carried out on the subjects' structural images. Patients displayed increased left- and reduced right-hemispheric primary sensorimotor FC in the premotor-parietal network. Mostly bilaterally altered dorsal/ventral premotor FC, as well as altered parietal FC were observed within multiple sensorimotor networks and showed differing network-dependent directionality. Beyond within-network FC changes and reduced right cerebellar grey matter volume in the structural analysis, the positive between-network FC of the cerebellar network and the basal ganglia network was reduced. Abnormal resting-state FC in multiple networks with putative sensorimotor function may act as basis of preexisting observations made during task-related neuroimaging. Further, altered connectivity between the cerebellar and basal ganglia network underlines the important role of these structures in the disease.

  16. Distributed Input and State Estimation Using Local Information in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzung Tran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new distributed input and state estimation architecture is introduced and analyzed for heterogeneous sensor networks. Specifically, nodes of a given sensor network are allowed to have heterogeneous information roles in the sense that a subset of nodes can be active (that is, subject to observations of a process of interest and the rest can be passive (that is, subject to no observation. Both fixed and varying active and passive roles of sensor nodes in the network are investigated. In addition, these nodes are allowed to have non-identical sensor modalities under the common underlying assumption that they have complimentary properties distributed over the sensor network to achieve collective observability. The key feature of our framework is that it utilizes local information not only during the execution of the proposed distributed input and state estimation architecture but also in its design in that global uniform ultimate boundedness of error dynamics is guaranteed once each node satisfies given local stability conditions independent from the graph topology and neighboring information of these nodes. As a special case (e.g., when all nodes are active and a positive real condition is satisfied, the asymptotic stability can be achieved with our algorithm. Several illustrative numerical examples are further provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed architecture.

  17. Dialysis Facility and Network Factors Associated With Low Kidney Transplantation Rates Among United States Dialysis Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, R. E.; Plantinga, L.; Krisher, J.; Pastan, S. O.

    2014-01-01

    Variability in transplant rates between different dialysis units has been noted, yet little is known about facility-level factors associated with low standardized transplant ratios (STRs) across the United States End-stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network regions. We analyzed Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Dialysis Facility Report data from 2007 to 2010 to examine facility-level factors associated with low STRs using multivariable mixed models. Among 4098 dialysis facilities treating 305 698 patients, there was wide variability in facility-level STRs across the 18 ESRD Networks. Four-year average STRs ranged from 0.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.64–0.73) in Network 6 (Southeastern Kidney Council) to 1.61 (95% CI: 1.47–1.76) in Network 1 (New England). Factors significantly associated with a lower STR (p dialysis were associated with higher STRs. The lowest performing dialysis facilities were in the Southeastern United States. Understanding the modifiable facility-level factors associated with low transplant rates may inform interventions to improve access to transplantation. PMID:24891272

  18. Impulsivity and the modular organization of resting-state neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F Caroline; Knodt, Annchen R; Sporns, Olaf; Lahey, Benjamin B; Zald, David H; Brigidi, Bart D; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2013-06-01

    Impulsivity is a complex trait associated with a range of maladaptive behaviors, including many forms of psychopathology. Previous research has implicated multiple neural circuits and neurotransmitter systems in impulsive behavior, but the relationship between impulsivity and organization of whole-brain networks has not yet been explored. Using graph theory analyses, we characterized the relationship between impulsivity and the functional segregation ("modularity") of the whole-brain network architecture derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. These analyses revealed remarkable differences in network organization across the impulsivity spectrum. Specifically, in highly impulsive individuals, regulatory structures including medial and lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex were isolated from subcortical structures associated with appetitive drive, whereas these brain areas clustered together within the same module in less impulsive individuals. Further exploration of the modular organization of whole-brain networks revealed novel shifts in the functional connectivity between visual, sensorimotor, cortical, and subcortical structures across the impulsivity spectrum. The current findings highlight the utility of graph theory analyses of resting-state fMRI data in furthering our understanding of the neurobiological architecture of complex behaviors.

  19. Impulsivity and the Modular Organization of Resting-State Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F. Caroline; Knodt, Annchen R.; Sporns, Olaf; Lahey, Benjamin B.; Zald, David H.; Brigidi, Bart D.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex trait associated with a range of maladaptive behaviors, including many forms of psychopathology. Previous research has implicated multiple neural circuits and neurotransmitter systems in impulsive behavior, but the relationship between impulsivity and organization of whole-brain networks has not yet been explored. Using graph theory analyses, we characterized the relationship between impulsivity and the functional segregation (“modularity”) of the whole-brain network architecture derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. These analyses revealed remarkable differences in network organization across the impulsivity spectrum. Specifically, in highly impulsive individuals, regulatory structures including medial and lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex were isolated from subcortical structures associated with appetitive drive, whereas these brain areas clustered together within the same module in less impulsive individuals. Further exploration of the modular organization of whole-brain networks revealed novel shifts in the functional connectivity between visual, sensorimotor, cortical, and subcortical structures across the impulsivity spectrum. The current findings highlight the utility of graph theory analyses of resting-state fMRI data in furthering our understanding of the neurobiological architecture of complex behaviors. PMID:22645253

  20. Cortical networks for working memory and executive functions sustain the conscious resting state in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazoyer, B; Zago, L; Mellet, E; Bricogne, S; Etard, O; Houdé, O; Crivello, F; Joliot, M; Petit, L; Tzourio-Mazoyer, N

    2001-02-01

    The cortical anatomy of the conscious resting state (REST) was investigated using a meta-analysis of nine positron emission tomography (PET) activation protocols that dealt with different cognitive tasks but shared REST as a common control state. During REST, subjects were in darkness and silence, and were instructed to relax, refrain from moving, and avoid systematic thoughts. Each protocol contrasted REST to a different cognitive task consisting either of language, mental imagery, mental calculation, reasoning, finger movement, or spatial working memory, using either auditory, visual or no stimulus delivery, and requiring either vocal, motor or no output. A total of 63 subjects and 370 spatially normalized PET scans were entered in the meta-analysis. Conjunction analysis revealed a network of brain areas jointly activated during conscious REST as compared to the nine cognitive tasks, including the bilateral angular gyrus, the left anterior precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex, the left medial frontal and anterior cingulate cortex, the left superior and medial frontal sulcus, and the left inferior frontal cortex. These results suggest that brain activity during conscious REST is sustained by a large scale network of heteromodal associative parietal and frontal cortical areas, that can be further hierarchically organized in an episodic working memory parieto-frontal network, driven in part by emotions, working under the supervision of an executive left prefrontal network.

  1. Dysregulated daily rhythmicity of neuronal resting-state networks in MCI patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blautzik, Janusch; Vetter, Céline; Schneider, Annalisa; Gutyrchik, Evgeny; Reinisch, Veronika; Keeser, Daniel; Paolini, Marco; Pöppel, Ernst; Bao, Yan; Reiser, Maximilian; Roenneberg, Till; Meindl, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    In young healthy participants, the degree of daily rhythmicity largely varies across different neuronal resting-state networks (RSNs), while it is to date unknown whether this temporal pattern of activity is conserved in healthy and pathological aging. Twelve healthy elderly (mean age=65.1±5.7 years) and 12 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI; mean age=69.6±6.2 years) underwent four resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans at fixed 2.5 h intervals throughout a day. Time courses of a RSN were extracted by a connectivity strength and a spatial extent approach performed individually for each participant. Highly rhythmic RSNs included a sensorimotor, a cerebellar and a visual network in healthy elderly; the least rhythmic RSNs in this group included a network associated with executive control and an orbitofrontal network. The degree of daily rhythmicity in aMCI patients was reduced and dysregulated. For healthy elderly, the findings are in accordance with results reported for young healthy participants suggesting a comparable distribution of daily rhythmicity across RSNs during healthy aging. In contrast, the reduction and dysregulation of daily rhythmicity observed in aMCI patients is presumably indicative of underlying neurodegenerative processes in this group.

  2. A Family of Algorithms for Computing Consensus about Node State from Network Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, Eleanor R.; Krakauer, David C.; Flack, Jessica C.

    2013-01-01

    Biological and social networks are composed of heterogeneous nodes that contribute differentially to network structure and function. A number of algorithms have been developed to measure this variation. These algorithms have proven useful for applications that require assigning scores to individual nodes–from ranking websites to determining critical species in ecosystems–yet the mechanistic basis for why they produce good rankings remains poorly understood. We show that a unifying property of these algorithms is that they quantify consensus in the network about a node's state or capacity to perform a function. The algorithms capture consensus by either taking into account the number of a target node's direct connections, and, when the edges are weighted, the uniformity of its weighted in-degree distribution (breadth), or by measuring net flow into a target node (depth). Using data from communication, social, and biological networks we find that that how an algorithm measures consensus–through breadth or depth– impacts its ability to correctly score nodes. We also observe variation in sensitivity to source biases in interaction/adjacency matrices: errors arising from systematic error at the node level or direct manipulation of network connectivity by nodes. Our results indicate that the breadth algorithms, which are derived from information theory, correctly score nodes (assessed using independent data) and are robust to errors. However, in cases where nodes “form opinions” about other nodes using indirect information, like reputation, depth algorithms, like Eigenvector Centrality, are required. One caveat is that Eigenvector Centrality is not robust to error unless the network is transitive or assortative. In these cases the network structure allows the depth algorithms to effectively capture breadth as well as depth. Finally, we discuss the algorithms' cognitive and computational demands. This is an important consideration in systems in which

  3. A family of algorithms for computing consensus about node state from network data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor R Brush

    Full Text Available Biological and social networks are composed of heterogeneous nodes that contribute differentially to network structure and function. A number of algorithms have been developed to measure this variation. These algorithms have proven useful for applications that require assigning scores to individual nodes-from ranking websites to determining critical species in ecosystems-yet the mechanistic basis for why they produce good rankings remains poorly understood. We show that a unifying property of these algorithms is that they quantify consensus in the network about a node's state or capacity to perform a function. The algorithms capture consensus by either taking into account the number of a target node's direct connections, and, when the edges are weighted, the uniformity of its weighted in-degree distribution (breadth, or by measuring net flow into a target node (depth. Using data from communication, social, and biological networks we find that that how an algorithm measures consensus-through breadth or depth- impacts its ability to correctly score nodes. We also observe variation in sensitivity to source biases in interaction/adjacency matrices: errors arising from systematic error at the node level or direct manipulation of network connectivity by nodes. Our results indicate that the breadth algorithms, which are derived from information theory, correctly score nodes (assessed using independent data and are robust to errors. However, in cases where nodes "form opinions" about other nodes using indirect information, like reputation, depth algorithms, like Eigenvector Centrality, are required. One caveat is that Eigenvector Centrality is not robust to error unless the network is transitive or assortative. In these cases the network structure allows the depth algorithms to effectively capture breadth as well as depth. Finally, we discuss the algorithms' cognitive and computational demands. This is an important consideration in systems in which

  4. Emotional intelligence is associated with connectivity within and between resting state networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D S; Smith, Ryan; Olson, Elizabeth A; Weber, Mareen; Rauch, Scott L; Nickerson, Lisa D

    2017-10-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is defined as an individual's capacity to accurately perceive, understand, reason about, and regulate emotions, and to apply that information to facilitate thought and achieve goals. Although EI plays an important role in mental health and success in academic, professional and social realms, the neurocircuitry underlying this capacity remains poorly characterized, and no study to date has yet examined the relationship between EI and intrinsic neural network function. Here, in a sample of 54 healthy individuals (28 women, 26 men), we apply independent components analysis (ICA) with dual regression to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired while subjects were resting in the scanner to investigate brain circuits (intrinsic resting state networks) whose activity is associated with greater self-reported (i.e. Trait) and objectively measured (i.e. Ability) EI. We show that higher Ability EI, but not Trait EI, is associated with stronger negatively correlated spontaneous fMRI signals between the basal ganglia/limbic network (BGN) and posterior default mode network (DMN), and regions involved in emotional processing and regulation. Importantly, these findings suggest that the functional connectivity within and between intrinsic networks associated with mentation, affective regulation, emotion processing, and reward are strongly related to ability EI. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Decreased resting-state connectivity between neurocognitive networks in treatment resistant depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart P. De Kwaasteniet

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one third of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD do not achieve remission after various treatment options and develop treatment resistant depression (TRD. So far little is known about the pathophysiology of TRD. Studies in MDD patients showed aberrant functional connectivity (FC of three ‘core’ neurocognitive networks: the salience network (SN, cognitive control network (CCN and default mode network (DMN. We used a cross-sectional design and performed resting state functional connectivity MRI to assess connectivity of the SN, CCN and both anterior and posterior DMN in 17 severe TRD, 18 non-TRD and 18 healthy control (HC subjects. Relative to both non-TRD and HC subjects, TRD patients showed decreased FC between the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and angular gyrus which suggests reduced FC between the CCN and DMN, and reduced FC between the medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus/cuneus which suggests reduced FC between the anterior and posterior DMN. No significant differences in SN FC were observed. Our results suggest that TRD is characterized by a disturbance in neurocognitive networks relative to non-TRD and HC.

  6. Biological network extraction from scientific literature: state of the art and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Liakata, Maria; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2014-09-01

    Networks of molecular interactions explain complex biological processes, and all known information on molecular events is contained in a number of public repositories including the scientific literature. Metabolic and signalling pathways are often viewed separately, even though both types are composed of interactions involving proteins and other chemical entities. It is necessary to be able to combine data from all available resources to judge the functionality, complexity and completeness of any given network overall, but especially the full integration of relevant information from the scientific literature is still an ongoing and complex task. Currently, the text-mining research community is steadily moving towards processing the full body of the scientific literature by making use of rich linguistic features such as full text parsing, to extract biological interactions. The next step will be to combine these with information from scientific databases to support hypothesis generation for the discovery of new knowledge and the extension of biological networks. The generation of comprehensive networks requires technologies such as entity grounding, coordination resolution and co-reference resolution, which are not fully solved and are required to further improve the quality of results. Here, we analyse the state of the art for the extraction of network information from the scientific literature and the evaluation of extraction methods against reference corpora, discuss challenges involved and identify directions for future research. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A hitchhiker’s guide to Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose eSoares

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI studies are increasingly popular among clinicians and researchers as they provide unique insights into brain network connectivity. However, in order to optimize the use of DTI, several technical and methodological aspects must be factored in. These include decisions on: acquisition protocol, artifact handling, data quality control, reconstruction algorithm and visualization approaches, and quantitative analysis methodology. Furthermore, the researcher and/or clinician also needs to take into account and decide on the most suited software tool(s for each stage of the DTI analysis pipeline. Herein, we provide a straightforward hitchhiker’s guide, covering all of the workflow’s major stages. Ultimately, this guide will help newcomers navigate the most critical roadblocks in the analysis and further encourage the use of DTI.

  8. Moment Tensor Solutions for the Amatrice 2016 Seismic Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimbeni, S.; Pondrelli, S.

    2016-12-01

    On August 24, 2016 a ML 6.0 earthquake struck central Italy region, nearly completely destroying some small ancient towns as Amatrice, Accumoli, Arquata and Pescara del Tronto. In the following days thousands of aftershocks have been recorded by the INGV National Seismometric Network, 16 of them with a magnitude greater than 4.0. A Quick RCMT solution has been rapidly computed for all of them and made available on the web. Within a few weeks a definitive RCMT solution is ready for all of them, plus one. For major events (and not only) of the Amatrice seismic sequence, several rapid moment tensor solutions have been produced by various groups, using different methods and dataset. Comparing QRCMTs with other similar products, it is evident a great similarity of focal mechanisms while on the contrary, the Mw have a clear variability. We discuss this difference.

  9. Perturbed cooperative-state feedback strategy for model predictive networked control of interconnected systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tri; Ha, Q P

    2018-01-01

    A perturbed cooperative-state feedback (PSF) strategy is presented for the control of interconnected systems in this paper. The subsystems of an interconnected system can exchange data via the communication network that has multiple connection topologies. The PSF strategy can resolve both issues, the sensor data losses and the communication network breaks, thanks to the two components of the control including a cooperative-state feedback and a perturbation variable, e.g., u i =K ij x j +w i . The PSF is implemented in a decentralized model predictive control scheme with a stability constraint and a non-monotonic storage function (ΔV(x(k))≥0), derived from the dissipative systems theory. Numerical simulation for the automatic generation control problem in power systems is studied to illustrate the effectiveness of the presented PSF strategy. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tensor Factorization for Precision Medicine in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Ahmad, Faraz S; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2017-06-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome that may benefit from improved subtyping in order to better characterize its pathophysiology and to develop novel targeted therapies. The United States Precision Medicine Initiative comes amid the rapid growth in quantity and modality of clinical data for HFpEF patients ranging from deep phenotypic to trans-omic data. Tensor factorization, a form of machine learning, allows for the integration of multiple data modalities to derive clinically relevant HFpEF subtypes that may have significant differences in underlying pathophysiology and differential response to therapies. Tensor factorization also allows for better interpretability by supporting dimensionality reduction and identifying latent groups of data for meaningful summarization of both features and disease outcomes. In this narrative review, we analyze the modest literature on the application of tensor factorization to related biomedical fields including genotyping and phenotyping. Based on the cited work including work of our own, we suggest multiple tensor factorization formulations capable of integrating the deep phenotypic and trans-omic modalities of data for HFpEF, or accounting for interactions between genetic variants at different omic hierarchies. We encourage extensive experimental studies to tackle challenges in applying tensor factorization for precision medicine in HFpEF, including effectively incorporating existing medical knowledge, properly accounting for uncertainty, and efficiently enforcing sparsity for better interpretability.

  11. Tensor Analyzing Powers for Quasi-Elastic Electron Scattering from Deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Z L; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Passchier, E; Alarcon, R; Anghinolfi, M; Arenhövel, H; Van Bommel, R; Botto, T; Van den Brand, J F J; Bulten, H J; Choi, S; Comfort, J; Dolfini, S M; Ent, R; Gaulard, C; Higinbotham, D W; De Jager, C W; Konstantinov, E S; Lang, J; Leidemann, W; De Lange, D J; Miller, M A; Lenko, D N; Papadakis, N H; Passchier, I; Poolman, H R; Popov, S G; Rachek, Igor A; Ripani, M; Six, E; Steijger, J J M; Taiuti, M; Unal, O; Vodinas, N P; De Vries, H

    1999-01-01

    We report on a first measurement of tensor analyzing powers in quasi-elastic electron-deuteron scattering at an average three-momentum transfer of 1.7 fm$^{-1}$. Data sensitive to the spin-dependent nucleon density in the deuteron were obtained for missing momenta up to 150 MeV/$c$ with a tensor polarized $^2$H target internal to an electron storage ring. The data are well described by a calculation that includes the effects of final-state interaction, meson-exchange and isobar currents, and leading-order relativistic contributions.

  12. Spin and Pseudospin Symmetries with Trigonometric Pöschl-Teller Potential including Tensor Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamzavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study approximate analytical solutions of the Dirac equation with the trigonometric Pöschl-Teller (tPT potential and a Coulomb-like tensor potential for arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number κ under the presence of exact spin and pseudospin ( p -spin symmetries. The bound state energy eigenvalues and the corresponding two-component wave functions of the Dirac particle are obtained using the parametric generalization of the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU method. We show that tensor interaction removes degeneracies between spin and pseudospin doublets. The case of nonrelativistic limit is studied too.

  13. Chimera states and collective chaos in pulse-coupled neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Olmi Simona; Politi Antonio; Torcini Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the collective motion of networks of oscillators is crucial in many contexts, starting from neuronal circuits [1]. So far, most of the efforts have been devoted to the characterization of strong forms of synchronization. However, more subtle phenomena, like the onset of coherent oscillations in an ensemble of neurons can also play a relevant role for information coding. A peculiar coherent state, termed Chimera, appears in two symmetrically coupled populations of oscillators, wh...

  14. Bayesian state space models for dynamic genetic network construction across multiple tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yulan; Kelemen, Arpad

    2016-08-01

    Construction of gene-gene interaction networks and potential pathways is a challenging and important problem in genomic research for complex diseases while estimating the dynamic changes of the temporal correlations and non-stationarity are the keys in this process. In this paper, we develop dynamic state space models with hierarchical Bayesian settings to tackle this challenge for inferring the dynamic profiles and genetic networks associated with disease treatments. We treat both the stochastic transition matrix and the observation matrix time-variant and include temporal correlation structures in the covariance matrix estimations in the multivariate Bayesian state space models. The unevenly spaced short time courses with unseen time points are treated as hidden state variables. Hierarchical Bayesian approaches with various prior and hyper-prior models with Monte Carlo Markov Chain and Gibbs sampling algorithms are used to estimate the model parameters and the hidden state variables. We apply the proposed Hierarchical Bayesian state space models to multiple tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, and kidney) Affymetrix time course data sets following corticosteroid (CS) drug administration. Both simulation and real data analysis results show that the genomic changes over time and gene-gene interaction in response to CS treatment can be well captured by the proposed models. The proposed dynamic Hierarchical Bayesian state space modeling approaches could be expanded and applied to other large scale genomic data, such as next generation sequence (NGS) combined with real time and time varying electronic health record (EHR) for more comprehensive and robust systematic and network based analysis in order to transform big biomedical data into predictions and diagnostics for precision medicine and personalized healthcare with better decision making and patient outcomes.

  15. Distinctive Resting State Network Disruptions Among Alzheimer's Disease, Subcortical Vascular Dementia, and Mixed Dementia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Cha, Jungho; Lee, Jong-Min; Shin, Ji Soo; Jung, Na-Yeon; Kim, Yeo Jin; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Jae Seung; Lee, Jae Hong; Na, Duk L; Seo, Sang Won

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in resting-state functional MRI have revealed altered functional networks in Alzheimer's disease (AD), especially those of the default mode network (DMN) and central executive network (CEN). However, few studies have evaluated whether small vessel disease (SVD) or combined amyloid and SVD burdens affect the DMN or CEN. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SVD or combined amyloid and SVD burdens affect the DMN or CEN. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the resting-state functional connectivity within DMN and CEN in 37 Pittsburgh compound-B (PiB)(+) AD, 37 PiB(-) subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD), 13 mixed dementia patients, and 65 normal controls. When the resting-state DMN of PiB(+) AD and PiB(-) SVaD patients were compared, the PiB(+) AD patients displayed lower functional connectivity in the inferior parietal lobule while the PiB(-) SVaD patients displayed lower functional connectivity in the medial frontal and superior frontal gyri. Compared to the PiB(-) SVaD or PiB(+) AD, the mixed dementia patients displayed lower functional connectivity within the DMN in the posterior cingulate gyrus. When the resting-state CEN connectivity of PiB(+) AD and PiB(-) SVaD patients were compared, the PiB(-) SVaD patients displayed lower functional connectivity in the anterior insular region. Compared to the PiB(-) SVaD or PiB(+) AD, the mixed dementia patients displayed lower functional connectivity within the CEN in the inferior frontal gyrus. Our findings suggest that in PiB(+) AD and PiB(-) SVaD, there is divergent disruptions in resting-state DMN and CEN. Furthermore, patients with combined amyloid and SVD burdens exhibited more disrupted resting-state DMN and CEN than patients with only amyloid or SVD burden.

  16. Stability of the Einstein static Universe in the scalar-tensor theory of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Haitao; Wu, Puxun; Yu, Hongwei

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the viability of a singularity-free emergent scenario in the scalar-tensor theory of gravity by analyzing the stability of the Einstein static (ES) Universe. In order to obtain analytical results, we assume the perfect fluid which fills our Universe to be radiation or pressureless matter. We find that there are no stable ES solutions when scalar perturbations and tensor ones are considered together. Thus, in the scalar-tensor theory of gravity with a normal perfect fluid, such as radiation or pressureless matter, the emergent mechanism cannot be used to avoid the big bang singularity as the Universe cannot stay at the ES state past-eternally.

  17. A quantum logic network for implementing optimal symmetric universal and phase-covariant telecloning of a bipartite entangled state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Fanyu; Zhu Aidong [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China)], E-mail: adzhu@ybu.edu.cn

    2008-10-28

    A quantum logic network to implement quantum telecloning is presented in this paper. The network includes two parts: the first part is used to create the telecloning channel and the second part to teleport the state. It can be used not only to implement universal telecloning for a bipartite entangled state which is completely unknown, but also to implement the phase-covariant telecloning for one that is partially known. Furthermore, the network can also be used to construct a tele-triplicator. It can easily be implemented in experiment because only single- and two-qubit operations are used in the network.

  18. Increased resting state functional connectivity in the default mode network in recovered anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdrey, Felicity A; Filippini, Nicola; Park, Rebecca J; Smith, Stephen M; McCabe, Ciara

    2014-02-01

    Functional brain imaging studies have shown abnormal neural activity in individuals recovered from anorexia nervosa (AN) during both cognitive and emotional task paradigms. It has been suggested that this abnormal activity which persists into recovery might underpin the neurobiology of the disorder and constitute a neural biomarker for AN. However, no study to date has assessed functional changes in neural networks in the absence of task-induced activity in those recovered from AN. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whole brain resting state functional connectivity in nonmedicated women recovered from anorexia nervosa. Functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained from 16 nonmedicated participants recovered from anorexia nervosa and 15 healthy control participants. Independent component analysis revealed functionally relevant resting state networks. Dual regression analysis revealed increased temporal correlation (coherence) in the default mode network (DMN) which is thought to be involved in self-referential processing. Specifically, compared to healthy control participants the recovered anorexia nervosa participants showed increased temporal coherence between the DMN and the precuneus and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex/inferior frontal gyrus. The findings support the view that dysfunction in resting state functional connectivity in regions involved in self-referential processing and cognitive control might be a vulnerability marker for the development of anorexia nervosa. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN): Enhancing Microbial Genomics Research through Living Microbe Culture Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Hess, Matthias; Bennett, A Rick; Ryan, Matthew; Kang, Seogchan; Nobles, David; Eisen, Jonathan A; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Torok, Tamas; Brown, Daniel R; Cho, Juliana; Wertz, John E; Mukherjee, Supratim; Cady, Sherry L; McCluskey, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    The mission of the United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN; http://usccn.org) is "to facilitate the safe and responsible utilization of microbial resources for research, education, industry, medicine, and agriculture for the betterment of human kind." Microbial culture collections are a key component of life science research, biotechnology, and emerging global biobased economies. Representatives and users of several microbial culture collections from the United States and Europe gathered at the University of California, Davis, to discuss how collections of microorganisms can better serve users and stakeholders and to showcase existing resources available in public culture collections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. The United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN): Enhancing Microbial Genomics Research through Living Microbe Culture Collections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boundy-Mills, K.; Hess, Matthias; Bennett, A. R.; Ryan, Matthew; Kang, Seogchan; Nobles, David; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Torok, Tamas; Brown, Daniel R; Cho, Juliana; Wertz, John E.; Mukherjee, Supratim; Cady, Sherry L.; McCluskey, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    The mission of the United States Culture Collection Network (USCCN; http://usccn.org) is "to facilitate the safe and responsible utilization of microbial resources for research, education, industry, medicine, and agriculture for the betterment of human kind." Microbial culture collections are a key component of life science research, biotechnology, and emerging global biobased economies. Representatives and users of several microbial culture collections from the United States and Europe gathered at the University of California, Davis, to discuss how collections of microorganisms can better serve users and stakeholders and to showcase existing resources available in public culture collections.

  1. Expanded functional coupling of subcortical nuclei with the motor resting-state network in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Siebner, Hartwig R; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Wu, Xingchen; Biswal, Bharat; Paulson, Olaf B; Dyrby, Tim B; Skimminge, Arnold; Blinkenberg, Morten; Madsen, Kristoffer H

    2013-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) impairs signal transmission along cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connections, affecting functional integration within the motor network. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during motor tasks has revealed altered functional connectivity in MS, but it is unclear how much motor disability contributed to these abnormal functional interaction patterns. To avoid any influence of impaired task performance, we examined disease-related changes in functional motor connectivity in MS at rest. A total of 42 patients with MS and 30 matched controls underwent a 20-minute resting-state fMRI session at 3 Tesla. Independent component analysis was applied to the fMRI data to identify disease-related changes in motor resting-state connectivity. Patients with MS showed a spatial expansion of motor resting-state connectivity in deep subcortical nuclei but not at the cortical level. The anterior and middle parts of the putamen, adjacent globus pallidus, anterior and posterior thalamus and the subthalamic region showed stronger functional connectivity with the motor network in the MS group compared with controls. MS is characterised by more widespread motor connectivity in the basal ganglia while cortical motor resting-state connectivity is preserved. The expansion of subcortical motor resting-state connectivity in MS indicates less efficient funnelling of neural processing in the executive motor cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops.

  2. Cross correlation in real-time for data reduction, data control, and solution convergence in regional moment-tensor inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convers, Jaime A.; Custodio, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Proper seismic information that takes advantage of the faster acquired regional seismic data is becoming increasingly achievable and pertinent. Timely and reliable solutions nowadays can be inferred due to low latency, high reliability of regional data transmission, and increasing computing capabilities at local networks. Seismic products such as regional moment-tensor solutions are now more than ever achievable and valuable for hazard mitigation entities. High-quality moment-tensor solutions rely on high-quality data that are evenly distributed around the epicenter. However, this is seldom the case for coastal areas close to offshore seismic sources. Due to geographical constraints, in these regions the azimuthal gap is large, a feature that cannot be mitigated by dense onshore instrumentation . This characteristic often has a negative impact on the confidence of results and on the increase of the latency of rapid moment-tensor solutions at regional scales. As part of the adaptation of regional moment-tensor inversion of earthquakes offshore southwest Iberia, using the KIWI moment-tensor inversion tools, we examine the use of cross-correlation between neighbor stations as an automated tool for data reduction, quality control and as an advantageous tool for faster converging moment-tensor inversion solutions. We examine intermediate size earthquakes and use cross-correlations between stations to produce an automated first-order data quality assessment aiming at avoiding problematic stations and reducing redundant information. We used synthetic distributions of cross-correlations to obtain guidelines and benchmarks for the classification of data , thus benefitting subsequent regional moment-tensor calculations. We also examine the impact of this method on the convergence and reliability of solutions. We apply the developed method to SouthWest Europe, offshore Chile and the Pacific Northwest. For these settings, we review the different outcomes of the moment-tensor

  3. Spiny Neurons of Amygdala, Striatum and Cortex Use Dendritic Plateau Potentials to Detect Network UP States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina D Oikonomou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spiny neurons of amygdala, striatum, and cerebral cortex share four interesting features: [1] they are the most abundant cell type within their respective brain area, [2] covered by thousands of thorny protrusions (dendritic spines, [3] possess high levels of dendritic NMDA conductances, and [4] experience sustained somatic depolarizations in vivo and in vitro (UP states. In all spiny neurons of the forebrain, adequate glutamatergic inputs generate dendritic plateau potentials (dendritic UP states characterized by (i fast rise, (ii plateau phase lasting several hundred milliseconds and (iii abrupt decline at the end of the plateau phase. The dendritic plateau potential propagates towards the cell body decrementally to induce a long-lasting (longer than 100 ms, most often 200 – 800 ms steady depolarization (~20 mV amplitude, which resembles a neuronal UP state. Based on voltage-sensitive dye imaging, the plateau depolarization in the soma is precisely time-locked to the regenerative plateau potential taking place in the dendrite. The somatic plateau rises after the onset of the dendritic voltage transient and collapses with the breakdown of the dendritic plateau depolarization. We hypothesize that neuronal UP states in vivo reflect the occurrence of dendritic plateau potentials (dendritic UP states. We propose that the somatic voltage waveform during a neuronal UP state is determined by dendritic plateau potentials. A mammalian spiny neuron uses dendritic plateau potentials to detect and transform coherent network activity into a ubiquitous neuronal UP state. The biophysical properties of dendritic plateau potentials allow neurons to quickly attune to the ongoing network activity, as well as secure the stable amplitudes of successive UP states.

  4. Association between resting-state brain network topological organization and creative ability: Evidence from a multiple linear regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Bingqing; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Aiying; Liang, Bishan; Wang, Zengjian; Li, Junchao; Cai, Yuxuan; Gao, Mengxia; Gao, Zhenni; Chang, Song; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have indicated a tight linkage between resting-state functional connectivity of the human brain and creative ability. This study aimed to further investigate the association between the topological organization of resting-state brain networks and creativity. Therefore, we acquired resting-state fMRI data from 22 high-creativity participants and 22 low-creativity participants (as determined by their Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking scores). We then constructed functional brain networks for each participant and assessed group differences in network topological properties before exploring the relationships between respective network topological properties and creative ability. We identified an optimized organization of intrinsic brain networks in both groups. However, compared with low-creativity participants, high-creativity participants exhibited increased global efficiency and substantially decreased path length, suggesting increased efficiency of information transmission across brain networks in creative individuals. Using a multiple linear regression model, we further demonstrated that regional functional integration properties (i.e., the betweenness centrality and global efficiency) of brain networks, particularly the default mode network (DMN) and sensorimotor network (SMN), significantly predicted the individual differences in creative ability. Furthermore, the associations between network regional properties and creative performance were creativity-level dependent, where the difference in the resource control component may be important in explaining individual difference in creative performance. These findings provide novel insights into the neural substrate of creativity and may facilitate objective identification of creative ability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased Modularity of Resting State Networks Supports Improved Narrative Production in Aphasia Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, E Susan; Small, Steven L

    2016-09-01

    The networks that emerge in the analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data are believed to reflect the intrinsic organization of the brain. One key property of such complex biological networks is modularity, a measure of community structure. This topological characteristic changes in neurological disease and recovery. Nineteen subjects with language disorders after stroke (aphasia) underwent neuroimaging and behavioral assessment at multiple time points before (baseline) and after an imitation-based therapy. Language was assessed with a narrative production task. Group independent component analysis was performed on the rsfMRI data to identify resting state networks (RSNs). For each participant and each rsfMRI acquisition, we constructed a graph comprising all RSNs. We assigned nodal community based on a region's RSN membership, calculated the modularity score, and then correlated changes in modularity and therapeutic gains on the narrative task. We repeated this comparison controlling for pretherapy performance and using a community structure not based on RSN membership. Increased RSN modularity was positively correlated with improvement on the narrative task immediately post-therapy. This finding remained significant when controlling for pretherapy performance. There were no significant findings for network modularity and behavior when nodal community was assigned without consideration of RSN membership. We interpret these findings as support for the adaptive role of network segregation in behavioral improvement in aphasia therapy. This has important clinical implications for the targeting of noninvasive brain stimulation in poststroke remediation and suggests potential for further insight into the processes underlying such changes through computational modeling.

  6. Mutual connectivity analysis (MCA) using generalized radial basis function neural networks for nonlinear functional connectivity network recovery in resting-state functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Zainul; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the applicability of a computational framework, called mutual connectivity analysis (MCA), for directed functional connectivity analysis in both synthetic and resting-state functional MRI data. This framework comprises of first evaluating non-linear cross-predictability between every pair of time series prior to recovering the underlying network structure using community detection algorithms. We obtain the non-linear cross-prediction score between time series using Generalized Radial Basis Functions (GRBF) neural networks. These cross-prediction scores characterize the underlying functionally connected networks within the resting brain, which can be extracted using non-metric clustering approaches, such as the Louvain method. We first test our approach on synthetic models with known directional influence and network structure. Our method is able to capture the directional relationships between time series (with an area under the ROC curve = 0.92 +/- 0.037) as well as the underlying network structure (Rand index = 0.87 +/- 0.063) with high accuracy. Furthermore, we test this method for network recovery on resting-state fMRI data, where results are compared to the motor cortex network recovered from a motor stimulation sequence, resulting in a strong agreement between the two (Dice coefficient = 0.45). We conclude that our MCA approach is effective in analyzing non-linear directed functional connectivity and in revealing underlying functional network structure in complex systems.

  7. Hyperspectral Image Denoising Based on Tensor Group Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Zhongmei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel algorithm for hyperspectral image (HSI denoising is proposed based on tensor group sparse representation. A HSI is considering as 3 order tensor. First, a HSI is divided into small tensor blocks. Second, similar blocks are gathered into clusters, and then a tensor group sparse representation model is constructed based on every cluster. Through exploiting HSI spectral correlation and nonlocal similarity over space, the model constrained tensor group sparse representation can be decomposed into a series of unconstrained low-rank tensor approximation problems, which can be solved using the tensor decomposition technique. The experiment results on the synthetic and real hyperspectral remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  8. Algebraic and computational aspects of real tensor ranks

    CERN Document Server

    Sakata, Toshio; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive summaries of theoretical (algebraic) and computational aspects of tensor ranks, maximal ranks, and typical ranks, over the real number field. Although tensor ranks have been often argued in the complex number field, it should be emphasized that this book treats real tensor ranks, which have direct applications in statistics. The book provides several interesting ideas, including determinant polynomials, determinantal ideals, absolutely nonsingular tensors, absolutely full column rank tensors, and their connection to bilinear maps and Hurwitz-Radon numbers. In addition to reviews of methods to determine real tensor ranks in details, global theories such as the Jacobian method are also reviewed in details. The book includes as well an accessible and comprehensive introduction of mathematical backgrounds, with basics of positive polynomials and calculations by using the Groebner basis. Furthermore, this book provides insights into numerical methods of finding tensor ranks through...

  9. Frequency-specific electrophysiologic correlates of resting state fMRI networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Carl D; Snyder, Abraham Z; Pahwa, Mrinal; Corbetta, Maurizio; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2017-04-01

    Resting state functional MRI (R-fMRI) studies have shown that slow (<0.1Hz), intrinsic fluctuations of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal are temporally correlated within hierarchically organized functional systems known as resting state networks (RSNs) (Doucet et al., 2011). Most broadly, this hierarchy exhibits a dichotomy between two opposed systems (Fox et al., 2005). One system engages with the environment and includes the visual, auditory, and sensorimotor (SMN) networks as well as the dorsal attention network (DAN), which controls spatial attention. The other system includes the default mode network (DMN) and the fronto-parietal control system (FPC), RSNs that instantiate episodic memory and executive control, respectively. Here, we test the hypothesis, based on the spectral specificity of electrophysiologic responses to perceptual vs. memory tasks (Klimesch, 1999; Pfurtscheller and Lopes da Silva, 1999), that these two large-scale neural systems also manifest frequency specificity in the resting state. We measured the spatial correspondence between electrocorticographic (ECoG) band-limited power (BLP) and R-fMRI correlation patterns in awake, resting, human subjects. Our results show that, while gamma BLP correspondence was common throughout the brain, theta (4-8Hz) BLP correspondence was stronger in the DMN and FPC, whereas alpha (8-12Hz) correspondence was stronger in the SMN and DAN. Thus, the human brain, at rest, exhibits frequency specific electrophysiology, respecting both the spectral structure of task responses and the hierarchical organization of RSNs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Meal Replacement: Calming the Hot-State Brain Network of Appetite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brielle ePaolini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing awareness in the field of neuroscience that the self-regulation of eating behavior is driven by complex networks within the brain. These networks may be vulnerable to hot states which people can move into and out of dynamically throughout the course of a day as a function of changes in affect or visceral cues. The goal of the current study was to identify and determine differences in the Hot-state Brain Network of Appetite (HBN-A that exists after a brief period of food restraint followed either by the consumption of a meal replacement (MR or water. Fourteen overweight/obese adults came to our laboratory on two different occasions. Both times they consumed a controlled breakfast meal and then were restricted from eating for 2.5 hours prior to an MRI scan. On one visit, they consumed a meal replacement (MR liquid meal after this period of food restriction; on the other visit they consumed an equal amount of water. After these manipulations, the participants underwent a resting fMRI scan. Our first study aim employed an exploratory, data-driven approach to identify hubs relevant to the HBN-A. Using data from the water condition, five regions were found to be the hubs or nodes of the HBN-A: insula, anterior cingulated cortex, the superior temporal pole, the amygdala, and the hippocampus. We then demonstrated that the consumption of a liquid MR dampened interconnectivity between the nodes of the HBN-A as compared to water. Importantly and consistent with these network data, the consumption of a MR beverage also lowered state cravings and hunger.

  11. Bayesian ISOLA: new tool for automated centroid moment tensor inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vackář, Jiří; Burjánek, Jan; Gallovič, František; Zahradník, Jiří; Clinton, John

    2017-08-01

    We have developed a new, fully automated tool for the centroid moment tensor (CMT) inversion in a Bayesian framework. It includes automated data retrieval, data selection where station components with various instrumental disturbances are rejected and full-waveform inversion in a space-time grid around a provided hypocentre. A data covariance matrix calculated from pre-event noise yields an automated weighting of the station recordings according to their noise levels and also serves as an automated frequency filter suppressing noisy frequency ranges. The method is tested on synthetic and observed data. It is applied on a data set from the Swiss seismic network and the results are compared with the existing high-quality MT catalogue. The software package programmed in Python is designed to be as versatile as possible in order to be applicable in various networks ranging from local to regional. The method can be applied either to the everyday network data flow, or to process large pre-existing earthquake catalogues and data sets.

  12. Structure-adaptive sparse denoising for diffusion-tensor MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lijun; Robini, Marc; Liu, Wanyu; Zhu, Yuemin

    2013-05-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is becoming a prospective imaging technique in clinical applications because of its potential for in vivo and non-invasive characterization of tissue organization. However, the acquisition of diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) is often corrupted by noise and artifacts, and the intensity of diffusion-weighted signals is weaker than that of classical magnetic resonance signals. In this paper, we propose a new denoising method for DT-MRI, called structure-adaptive sparse denoising (SASD), which exploits self-similarity in DWIs. We define a similarity measure based on the local mean and on a modified structure-similarity index to find sets of similar patches that are arranged into three-dimensional arrays, and we propose a simple and efficient structure-adaptive window pursuit method to achieve sparse representation of these arrays. The noise component of the resulting structure-adaptive arrays is attenuated by Wiener shrinkage in a transform domain defined by two-dimensional principal component decomposition and Haar transformation. Experiments on both synthetic and real cardiac DT-MRI data show that the proposed SASD algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art methods for denoising images with structural redundancy. Moreover, SASD achieves a good trade-off between image contrast and image smoothness, and our experiments on synthetic data demonstrate that it produces more accurate tensor fields from which biologically relevant metrics can then be computed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Minimal moment equations for stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks with partially finite state space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Jakob

    2015-12-28

    Many stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks contain some chemical species for which the number of molecules that are present in the system can only be finite (for instance due to conservation laws), but also other species that can be present in arbitrarily large amounts. The prime example of such networks are models of gene expression, which typically contain a small and finite number of possible states for the promoter but an infinite number of possible states for the amount of mRNA and protein. One of the main approaches to analyze such models is through the use of equations for the time evolution of moments of the chemical species. Recently, a new approach based on conditional moments of the species with infinite state space given all the different possible states of the finite species has been proposed. It was argued that this approach allows one to capture more details about the full underlying probability distribution with a smaller number of equations. Here, I show that the result that less moments provide more information can only stem from an unnecessarily complicated description of the system in the classical formulation. The foundation of this argument will be the derivation of moment equations that describe the complete probability distribution over the finite state space but only low-order moments over the infinite state space. I will show that the number of equations that is needed is always less than what was previously claimed and always less than the number of conditional moment equations up to the same order. To support these arguments, a symbolic algorithm is provided that can be used to derive minimal systems of unconditional moment equations for models with partially finite state space.

  14. Minimal moment equations for stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks with partially finite state space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Jakob

    2015-12-01

    Many stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks contain some chemical species for which the number of molecules that are present in the system can only be finite (for instance due to conservation laws), but also other species that can be present in arbitrarily large amounts. The prime example of such networks are models of gene expression, which typically contain a small and finite number of possible states for the promoter but an infinite number of possible states for the amount of mRNA and protein. One of the main approaches to analyze such models is through the use of equations for the time evolution of moments of the chemical species. Recently, a new approach based on conditional moments of the species with infinite state space given all the different possible states of the finite species has been proposed. It was argued that this approach allows one to capture more details about the full underlying probability distribution with a smaller number of equations. Here, I show that the result that less moments provide more information can only stem from an unnecessarily complicated description of the system in the classical formulation. The foundation of this argument will be the derivation of moment equations that describe the complete probability distribution over the finite state space but only low-order moments over the infinite state space. I will show that the number of equations that is needed is always less than what was previously claimed and always less than the number of conditional moment equations up to the same order. To support these arguments, a symbolic algorithm is provided that can be used to derive minimal systems of unconditional moment equations for models with partially finite state space.

  15. Investigation on trophic state index by artificial neural networks (case study: Dez Dam of Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghi, H.; Karimi, L.; Javid, A. H.

    2015-06-01

    Dam construction and surface runoff control is one of the most common approaches for water-needs supply of human societies. However, the increasing development of social activities and hence the subsequent increase in environmental pollutants leads to deterioration of water quality in dam reservoirs and eutrophication process could be intensified. So, the water quality of reservoirs is now one of the key factors in operation and water quality management of reservoirs. Hence, maintaining the quality of the stored water and identification and examination of changes along time has been a constant concern of humans that involves the water authorities. Traditionally, empirical trophic state indices of dam reservoirs often defined based on changes in concentration of effective factors (nutrients) and its consequences (increase in chlorophyll a), have been used as an efficient tool in the definition of dam reservoirs quality. In recent years, modeling techniques such as artificial neural networks have enhanced the prediction capability and the accuracy of these studies. In this study, artificial neural networks have been applied to analyze eutrophication process in the Dez Dam reservoir in Iran. In this paper, feed forward neural network with one input layer, one hidden layer and one output layer was applied using MATLAB neural network toolbox for trophic state index (TSI) analysis in the Dez Dam reservoir. The input data of this network are effective parameters in the eutrophication: nitrogen cycle parameters and phosphorous cycle parameters and parameters that will be changed by eutrophication: Chl a, SD, DO and the output data is TSI. Based on the results from estimation of modified Carlson trophic state index, Dez Dam reservoir is considered to be eutrophic in the early July to mid-November and would be mesotrophic with decrease in temperature. Therefore, a decrease in water quality of the dam reservoir during the warm seasons is expectable. The results indicated that

  16. A study of structural and functional connectivity in early Alzheimer's disease using rest fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandar, R; John, J P; Saini, J; Kumar, K J; Joshi, H; Sadanand, S; Aiyappan, S; Sivakumar, P T; Loganathan, S; Varghese, M; Bharath, S

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition where in early diagnosis and interventions are key policy priorities in dementia services and research. We studied the functional and structural connectivity in mild AD to determine the nature of connectivity changes that coexist with neurocognitive deficits in the early stages of AD. Fifteen mild AD subjects and 15 cognitively healthy controls (CHc) matched for age and gender, underwent detailed neurocognitive assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Rest fMRI was analyzed using dual regression approach and DTI by voxel wise statistics. Patients with mild AD had significantly lower functional connectivity (FC) within the default mode network and increased FC within the executive network. The mild AD group scored significantly lower in all domains of cognition compared with CHc. But fractional anisotropy did not significantly (p Resting state functional connectivity alterations are noted during initial stages of cognitive decline in AD, even when there are no significant white matter microstructural changes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Selective Activation of Resting-State Networks following Focal Stimulation in a Connectome-Based Network Model of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegler, Andreas; Hansen, Enrique C A; Bernard, Christophe; McIntosh, Anthony R; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2016-01-01

    When the brain is stimulated, for example, by sensory inputs or goal-oriented tasks, the brain initially responds with activities in specific areas. The subsequent pattern formation of functional networks is constrained by the structural connectivity (SC) of the brain. The extent to which information is processed over short- or long-range SC is unclear. Whole-brain models based on long-range axonal connections, for example, can partly describe measured functional connectivity dynamics at rest. Here, we study the effect of SC on the network response to stimulation. We use a human whole-brain network model comprising long- and short-range connections. We systematically activate each cortical or thalamic area, and investigate the network response as a function of its short- and long-range SC. We show that when the brain is operating at the edge of criticality, stimulation causes a cascade of network recruitments, collapsing onto a smaller space that is partly constrained by SC. We found both short- and long-range SC essential to reproduce experimental results. In particular, the stimulation of specific areas results in the activation of one or more resting-state networks. We suggest that the stimulus-induced brain activity, which may indicate information and cognitive processing, follows specific routes imposed by structural networks explaining the emergence of functional networks. We provide a lookup table linking stimulation targets and functional network activations, which potentially can be useful in diagnostics and treatments with brain stimulation.

  18. Tensor modes on the string theory landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphal, Alexander

    2012-06-15

    We attempt an estimate for the distribution of the tensor mode fraction r over the landscape of vacua in string theory. The dynamics of eternal inflation and quantum tunneling lead to a kind of democracy on the landscape, providing no bias towards large-field or small-field inflation regardless of the class of measure. The tensor mode fraction then follows the number frequency distributions of inflationary mechanisms of string theory over the landscape. We show that an estimate of the relative number frequencies for small-field vs large-field inflation, while unattainable on the whole landscape, may be within reach as a regional answer for warped Calabi-Yau flux compactifications of type IIB string theory.

  19. Exploring the alpha desynchronization hypothesis in resting state networks with intracranial electroencephalography and wiring cost estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ramírez, Jaime; Freedman, Shelagh; Mateos, Diego; Pérez Velázquez, José Luis; Valiante, Taufik

    2017-11-15

    This paper addresses a fundamental question, are eyes closed and eyes open resting states equivalent baseline conditions, or do they have consistently different electrophysiological signatures? We compare the functional connectivity patterns in an eyes closed resting state with an eyes open resting state to investigate the alpha desynchronization hypothesis. The change in functional connectivity from eyes closed to eyes open, is here, for the first time, studied with intracranial recordings. We perform network connectivity analysis in iEEG and we find that phase-based connectivity is sensitive to the transition from eyes closed to eyes open only in interhemispheral and frontal electrodes. Power based connectivity, on the other hand, consistently discriminates between the two conditions in temporal and interhemispheral electrodes. Additionally, we provide a calculation for the wiring cost, defined in terms of the connectivity between electrodes weighted by distance. We find that the wiring cost variation from eyes closed to eyes open is sensitive to the eyes closed and eyes open conditions. We extend the standard network-based approach using the filtration method from algebraic topology which does not rely on the threshold selection problem. Both the wiring cost measure defined here and this novel methodology provide a new avenue for understanding the electrophysiology of resting state.

  20. Resting state fMRI in Alzheimer's disease: beyond the default mode network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Pievani, Michela; Geroldi, Cristina; Copetti, Massimiliano; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Filippi, Massimo

    2012-08-01

    Using resting state (RS) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the connectivity patterns of the default mode (DMN), frontoparietal, executive, and salience networks were explored in 13 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, 12 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients, and 13 healthy controls. Compared with controls and aMCI, AD was associated with opposing connectivity effects in the DMN (decreased) and frontal networks (enhanced). The only RS abnormality found in aMCI patients compared with controls was a precuneus connectivity reduction in the DMN. RS fMRI group differences were only partly related to gray matter atrophy. In AD patients, the mean executive network connectivity was positively associated with frontal-executive and language neuropsychological scores. These results suggest that AD is associated with an alteration of large-scale functional brain networks, which extends well beyond the DMN. In AD, the limited resources of the DMN may be paralleled, in an attempt to maintain cognitive efficiency, by an increased prefrontal connectivity. A medial parietal RS fMRI signal change seems to be present since the early phase of AD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.