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Sample records for tensile strain upregulates

  1. Stability of germanene under tensile strain

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-09-01

    The stability of germanene under biaxial tensile strain and the accompanying modifications of the electronic properties are studied by density functional theory. The phonon spectrum shows that up to 16% strain the germanene lattice is stable, where the Dirac cone shifts towards higher energy and hole-doped Dirac states are achieved. The latter is due to weakening of the Ge-Ge bonds and reduction of the s-p hybridization. Our calculated Grüneisen parameter shows a similar dependence on the strain as reported for silicene (which is different from that of graphene). © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Three-dimensional development of tensile pre-strained annulus fibrosus cells for tissue regeneration: An in-vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuah, Yon Jin [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Lee, Wu Chean [University Hospital Conventry & Warwickshire NHS Trust, Clifford Bridge Road, West Midlands CV2, 2DX (United Kingdom); Wong, Hee Kit [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, National University Health System, NUHS Tower Block Level 11, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Kang, Yuejun, E-mail: yuejun.kang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Hee, Hwan Tak, E-mail: HTHee@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Pinnacle Spine & Scoliosis Centre, 3 Mount Elizabeth, Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre, #04-07, Singapore 228510 (Singapore); School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637459 (Singapore)

    2015-02-01

    Prior research has investigated the immediate response after application of tensile strain on annulus fibrosus (AF) cells for the past decade. Although mechanical strain can produce either catabolic or anabolic consequences to the cell monolayer, little is known on how to translate these findings into further tissue engineering applications. Till to date, the application and effect of tensile pre-strained cells to construct a three-dimensional (3D) AF tissue remains unknown. This study aims to investigate the effect of tensile pre-strained exposure of 1 to 24 h on the development of AF pellet culture for 3 weeks. Equibiaxial cyclic tensile strain was applied on AF monolayer cells over a period of 24 h, which was subsequently developed into a cell pellet. Investigation on cellular proliferation, phenotypic gene expression, and histological changes revealed that tensile pre-strain for 24 h had significant and lasting effect on the AF tissue development, with enhanced cell proliferation, and up-regulation of collagen type I, II, and aggrecan expression. Our results demonstrated the regenerative ability of AF cell pellets subjected to 24 h tensile pre-straining. Knowledge on the effects of tensile pre-strain exposure is necessary to optimize AF development for tissue reconstruction. Moreover, the tensile pre-strained cells may further be utilized in either cell therapy to treat mild disc degeneration disease, or the development of a disc construct for total disc replacement. - Highlights: • Establishment of tensile pre-strained cell line population for annulus development. • Tensile strain limits collagen gene expression declination in monolayer culture. • Tensile pre-strained cells up-regulate their matrix protein in 3D pellet culture.

  3. Mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons under uniaxial tensile strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Kazufumi; Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2018-03-01

    Based on the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation, we investigated the mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons in terms of their edge shape under a uniaxial tensile strain. The nanoribbons with armchair and zigzag edges retain their structure under a large tensile strain, while the nanoribbons with chiral edges are fragile against the tensile strain compared with those with armchair and zigzag edges. The fracture started at the cove region, which corresponds to the border between the zigzag and armchair edges for the nanoribbons with chiral edges. For the nanoribbons with armchair edges, the fracture started at one of the cove regions at the edges. In contrast, the fracture started at the inner region of the nanoribbons with zigzag edges. The bond elongation under the tensile strain depends on the mutual arrangement of covalent bonds with respect to the strain direction.

  4. Tensile response of elastoplastic lattices at finite strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankasala, H. C.; Deshpande, V. S.; Fleck, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    The finite strain, uniaxial tensile response of two-dimensional (2D) elastoplastic lattices is investigated using finite element simulations and analytical models, taking into full account the macroscopic stiffening due to cell wall alignment. Four morphologies of 2D lattice are considered: triangular, Kagome, hexagonal, and diamond. The cell walls are treated as Timoshenko beams made from an elastoplastic solid with a strain hardening characteristic that resembles Ramberg-Osgood at low strains and exponential hardening at large strains. This description captures the response of metallic lattices at small strain and selected polymeric lattices at large strain. The use of beam theory is validated by additional continuum element simulations. The dependence of macroscopic ductility and tensile strength of each lattice is determined as a function of relative density, cell wall rupture strain and cell wall strain-hardening. Two failure criteria are invoked: (i) maximum value of local tensile strain anywhere in the lattice attains a pre-defined failure strain, or (ii) maximum value of average tensile strain across any section of the lattice attains the failure strain. The sensitivity of macroscopic ductility and ultimate tensile strength to geometric imperfection is explored by considering: (i) random topologies in which the joints are randomly perturbed in position, and (ii) a finite crack formed by an array of broken cell walls. The notion of a transition flaw size for the lattices is validated by means of a notch sensitivity analysis, and the significance of crack-tip blunting by cell wall alignment is highlighted for the hexagonal honeycomb.

  5. Electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of silicane under tensile strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamdagni, Pooja, E-mail: j.poojaa1228@gmail.com; Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Physics Department, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India 171005 (India); Kumar, Ashok [Physics Department, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India, 160014 (India); Thakur, Anil [Physics Department, Govt. Collage Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India,173212 (India)

    2015-05-15

    The electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of fully hydrogenated silicene i.e. silicane in stable configuration are studied by means of density functional theory based calculations. The band gap of silicane monolayer can be flexibly reduced to zero when subjected to bi-axial tensile strain, leading to semi-conducting to metallic transition, whereas the static dielectric constant for in-plane polarization increases monotonically with increasing strain. Also the EEL function show the red shift in resonance peak with tensile strain. Our results offer useful insight for the application of silicane monolayer in nano-optical and electronics devices.

  6. Electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of silicane under tensile strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamdagni, Pooja; Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Kumar, Ashok; Thakur, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of fully hydrogenated silicene i.e. silicane in stable configuration are studied by means of density functional theory based calculations. The band gap of silicane monolayer can be flexibly reduced to zero when subjected to bi-axial tensile strain, leading to semi-conducting to metallic transition, whereas the static dielectric constant for in-plane polarization increases monotonically with increasing strain. Also the EEL function show the red shift in resonance peak with tensile strain. Our results offer useful insight for the application of silicane monolayer in nano-optical and electronics devices

  7. Strain distribution during tensile deformation of nanostructured aluminum samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidmose, Jacob; Lu, L.; Winther, Grethe

    2012-01-01

    distribution over the tensile sample gage length were obtained in situ using a commercial ARAMIS system. Significant improvements in total elongation from 6 to 13.3 % and in post-UTS uniform elongation from zero to 4.4 % were observed when introducing a post-process deformation step and the observations were...... underpinned by the in situ observations of the evolution of strain distribution in the sample during tensile straining. The mechanisms responsible for the enhancement were discussed based on strain rate sensitivity measurements and microstructural observations....

  8. Hole doped Dirac states in silicene by biaxial tensile strain

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-03-11

    The effects of biaxial tensile strain on the structure, electronic states, and mechanical properties of silicene are studied by ab-initio calculations. Our results show that up to 5% strain the Dirac cone remains essentially at the Fermi level, while higher strain induces hole doped Dirac states because of weakened Si–Si bonds. We demonstrate that the silicene lattice is stable up to 17% strain. It is noted that the buckling first decreases with the strain (up to 10%) and then increases again, which is accompanied by a band gap variation. We also calculate the Grüneisen parameter and demonstrate a strain dependence similar to that of graphene.

  9. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhead, S. D., E-mail: S.Rhead@warwick.ac.uk; Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Shah, V. A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reparaz, J. S. [ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Sotomayor Torres, C. M. [ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2014-04-28

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge.

  10. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhead, S. D.; Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R.; Shah, V. A.; Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Reparaz, J. S.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge

  11. Formation of Tensilely Strained Germanium-on-Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Yusuke; Sawano, Kentarou; Hamaya, Kohei; Miyao, Masanobu; Shiraki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate a high-quality germanium-on-insulator (GOI) with tensile strain by combining the wafer bonding of a strained Ge grown on a Si substrate and an oxidized Si substrate and the selective etching of Si. The obtained 300-nm-thick strained GOI shows a smooth surface with RMS roughness of 0.15 nm and no dislocation is detected by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). The tensile strain of 0.19% induced in the GOI is found to be maintained throughout the fabrication process. This suggests that the fabricated strained GOI has a high potential as an essential platform for high-performance electronic and optical devices.

  12. Determination of Tensile Properties of Polymers at High Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the field of high rate testing of polymers the measured properties are highly dependent on the applied methodology. Hence, the test setup as whole but in particular also the geometrical type of specimen plays a decisive role. The widely used standard for the determination of tensile properties of polymers (ISO527-2 was extended by a novel standard (ISO18872:2007, which is targeted on the determination of tensile properties at high strain rates. In this standard also a novel specimen shape is proposed. Hand in hand with the introduction of new specimen geometry the question of comparability arises. To point out the differences in stress-strain response of the ISO18872 specimen and the ISO527-2 multipurpose specimen tensile tests over a wide loading rate range were conducted in this paper. A digital image correlation system in combination with a high speed camera was used to characterize the local material behaviour. Different parameters like nominal stress, true stress, nominal strain, true strain as well as volumetric strain were determined and used to compare the two specimen geometries.

  13. Cyclic Tensile Strain Enhances Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis in Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Osteoporotic Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenpanich, Adisri; Wall, Michelle E.; Tucker, Charles J.; Andrews, Danica M.K.; Lalush, David S.; Dirschl, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that the uniaxial cyclic tensile strain of magnitude 10% promotes and enhances osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) from normal, nonosteoporotic donors. In the present study, MSC from osteoporotic donors were analyzed for changes in mRNA expression in response to 10% uniaxial tensile strain to identify potential mechanisms underlying the use of this mechanical loading paradigm for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Human MSC isolated from three female, postmenopausal osteoporotic donors were analyzed for their responses to mechanical loading using microarray analysis of over 47,000 gene probes. Human MSC were seeded in three-dimensional collagen type I constructs to mimic the organic extracellular matrix of bone and 10% uniaxial cyclic tensile strain was applied to promote osteogenesis. Seventy-nine genes were shown to be regulated within hMSC from osteoporotic donors in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. Upregulation of six genes were further confirmed with real-time RT-PCR: jun D proto-oncogene (JUND) and plasminogen activator, urokinase receptor (PLAUR), two genes identified as potential key molecules from network analysis; phosphoinositide-3-kinase, catalytic, delta polypeptide (PIK3CD) and wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5B (WNT5B), two genes with known importance in bone biology; and, PDZ and LIM domain 4 (PDLIM4) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), two genes that we have previously shown are significantly regulated in hASC in response to this mechanical stimulus. Function analysis indicated that 10% cyclic tensile strain induced expression of genes associated with cell movement, cell proliferation, and tissue development, including development in musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Our results demonstrate that hMSC from aged, osteoporotic donors are capable of enhanced osteogenic differentiation in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain

  14. Stabilization of magnetic skyrmions by uniaxial tensile strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, S.; Okamura, Y.; Shibata, K.; Takagi, R.; Khanh, N. D.; Kagawa, F.; Arima, T.; Tokura, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic skyrmions with a topological particle nature have recently attracted attention as a potential information carrier for novel magnetic storage devices. For single-phase bulk crystals, skyrmions usually appear for a very narrow temperature region just below the magnetic ordering temperature Tc, and the stabilization of skyrmions for a wider temperature range remains an important challenge. Here, by investigating the impact of uniaxial tensile stress for a chiral magnet Cu2OSeO3 , we demonstrate that only less than 0.2% of uniaxial elongation can dramatically stabilize skyrmions for an entire temperature range from Tc to the lowest temperature. The stability of skyrmions essentially depends on the geometrical relationship among the directions of strain, magnetic field, and crystallographic axes, which is consistently explained in terms of the anisotropic modulation of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Our finding may provide a good strategy for materials design to enhance the stability of skyrmions.

  15. Uni axial tensile graphite creep capsules with continuous strain registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, H.; Loelgen, R.; Cundy, M.

    1977-01-01

    Two irradiation devices are described for the in pile measurement of tensile irradiation creep of graphite. In each machine a single sample is maintained under a controlled load by a pneumatic bellows system. Irradiation creep is measured relative to unstressed reference shells which surround the stressed sample. This differential strain is detected by linear displacement transducers, and recorded automatically by the out of pile installation. Irradiation temperatures are in the 800 to 1100 0 C range, and the stresses up to 60% of the U.T.S. One machine has been specifically designed for a flux change experiment, other irradiation parameters remaining fixed. Temperature control is achieved through varying gas mixtures in control gas gaps. The paper details the design principles of the machines and gives an account of the cold and hot commissioning tests, with particular reference to the accuracy of the in pile measuring system. Finally, the early irradiation experience is evaluated

  16. Tensile strain and temperature characterization of FBGs in preannealed Polymer Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Andresen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Our thermal and tensile strain experiments show that fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in preannealed polymer optical fibers (POFs) can offer more stable performance and extend the operating temperature and strain range without hysteresis.......Our thermal and tensile strain experiments show that fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in preannealed polymer optical fibers (POFs) can offer more stable performance and extend the operating temperature and strain range without hysteresis....

  17. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Yan Ma; Muxin Yang; Ping Jiang; Fuping Yuan; Xiaolei Wu

    2017-01-01

    The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS) with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been ...

  18. Strain-rate-dependent non-linear tensile properties of the superficial zone of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsanizadeh, Sahand; Li, LePing

    2015-11-01

    The tensile properties of articular cartilage play an important role in the compressive behavior and integrity of the tissue. The stress-strain relationship of cartilage in compression was observed previously to depend on the strain-rate. This strain-rate dependence has been thought to originate mainly from fluid pressurization. However, it was not clear to what extent the tensile properties of cartilage contribute to the strain-rate dependence in compressive behavior of cartilage. The aim of the present study was to quantify the strain-rate dependent stress-strain relationship and hysteresis of articular cartilage in tension. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed to examine the strain-rate dependent non-linear tensile properties of the superficial zone of bovine knee cartilage. Tensile specimens were oriented in the fiber direction indicated by the India ink method. Seven strain-rates were used in the measurement ranging from 0.1 to 80%/s, which corresponded to nearly static to impact joint loadings. The experimental data showed substantial strain-rate and strain-magnitude dependent load response: for a given strain-magnitude, the tensile stress could vary by a factor of 1.95 while the modulus by a factor of 1.58 with strain-rate; for a given strain-rate, the modulus at 15% strain could be over four times the initial modulus at no strain. The energy loss in cartilage tension upon unloading exhibited a complex variation with the strain-rate. The strain-rate dependence of cartilage in tension observed from the present study is relatively weaker than that in compression observed previously, but is considerable to contribute to the strain-rate dependent load response in compression.

  19. The Influence of Partial Knee Replacement Designs on Tensile Strain at Implant-Bone Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial knee replacement (PKR results in fast recovery and good knee mechanics and is ideal to treat medial knee osteoarthritis. Cementless PKR depends on bone growing into the implant surface for long-term fixation. Implant loosening may occur due to high tensile strain resulted from large mechanical loads during rehab exercises. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether external fixations such as superior screw and frontal flange could reduce the tensile strain at the implant-bone interface. Three medial PKRs were designed. The first PKR had no external fixations. A superior screw and a frontal flange were then added to the first PKR to form the second and third PKR designs, respectively. Finite element analysis was performed to examine the tensile strain at the implant-bone interface during weight-bearing exercises. The PKR with no external fixations exhibited high tensile strain at the anterior implant-bone interface. Both the screwed and flanged PKRs effectively reduced the tensile strain at the anterior implant-bone interface. Furthermore, the flanged PKR resulted in a more uniform reduction of the tensile strain than the screwed PKR. In conclusion, external fixations are necessary to alleviate tensile strain at the implant-bone interface during knee rehab exercises.

  20. Direct assessment of tensile stress-crack opening behavior of Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2012-01-01

    The process of designing Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC) is driven by the need to achieve certain performance parameters in tension. These are typically the pseudo-strain hardening behavior and the ability to develop multiple cracks. The assessment of the tensile load-deformation ......The process of designing Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC) is driven by the need to achieve certain performance parameters in tension. These are typically the pseudo-strain hardening behavior and the ability to develop multiple cracks. The assessment of the tensile load......-deformation behavior of these materials is therefore of great importance and is frequently carried out by characterizing the material tensile stress–strain behavior. In this paper an alternative approach to evaluate the tensile performance of SHCC is investigated. The behavior of the material in tension is studied...... at the level of a single crack. The derived tensile stress-crack opening behavior is utilized to analyze and compare the influence of various composite parameters on the resulting tensile behavior. The deformations occurring during tensile loading are furthermore examined using a digital image...

  1. Effect of Strain-Induced Martensite on Tensile Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement of 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Suk; Bak, Sang Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Room temperature tensile tests have been conducted at different strain rates ranging from 2 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-2/s on hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 stainless steel (SS). Using a ferritescope and neutron diffraction, the amount of strain-induced martensite (SIM) has been in situ measured at the center region of the gage section of the tensile specimens or ex situ measured on the fractured tensile specimens. The ductility, tensile stress, hardness, and the amount of SIM increase with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and decrease in hydrogen-charged one. Specifically, SIM that forms during tensile tests is beneficial in increasing the ductility, strain hardening, and tensile stress of 304 SS, irrespective of the presence of hydrogen. A correlation of the tensile properties of hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 SS and the amount of SIM shows that hydrogen suppresses the formation of SIM in hydrogen-charged 304 SS, leading to a ductility loss and localized brittle fracture. Consequently, we demonstrate that hydrogen embrittlement of 304 SS is related to hydrogen-suppressed formation of SIM, corresponding to the disordered phase, according to our proposition. Compelling evidence is provided by the observations of the increased lattice expansion of martensite with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and its lattice contraction in hydrogen-charged one.

  2. Method for independent strain and temperature measurement in polymeric tensile test specimen using embedded FBG sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; McGugan, Malcolm; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    to calculate independently the strain and temperature are presented in the article, together with a measurement resolution study. This multi-parameter measurement method was applied to an epoxy tensile specimen, tested in a unidirectional tensile test machine with a temperature controlled cabinet. A full......A novel method to obtain independent strain and temperature measurements using embedded Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) in polymeric tensile test specimens is presented in this paper. The FBG strain and temperature cross-sensitivity was decoupled using two single mode FBG sensors, which were embedded...... of temperature, from 40 C to -10 C. The consistency of the expected theoretical results with the calibration procedure and the experimental validation shows that this proposed method is applicable to measure accurate strain and temperature in polymers during static or fatigue tensile testing. Two different...

  3. Evolution of cleared channels in neutron-irradiated pure copper as a function of tensile strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, D.J.; Singh, B.N.

    2004-01-01

    % of the macroscopic yield, at 1.5% and 5% elongation, and near the ultimate tensile strength at 14.5% elongation, with the 5th specimen tested to failure (e(T) = 22%). SEM and TEM characterization of the deformed specimens revealed that the plastic strain was confined primarily to the 'cleared' channels only......Tensile specimens of pure copper were neutron irradiated at similar to323 K to a displacement dose of 0.3 dpa (displacement per atom). Five irradiated specimens were tensile tested at 300 K, but four of the specimens were stopped at specific strains -just before the yield point at similar to90...

  4. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness.

  5. Tuning quantum dot luminescence below the bulk band gap using tensile strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Paul J; Yerino, Christopher D; Sun, Meng; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana L; Dorogan, Vitaliy G; Mazur, Yuriy; Salamo, Gregory; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2013-06-25

    Self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) grown under biaxial tension could enable novel devices by taking advantage of the strong band gap reduction induced by tensile strain. Tensile SAQDs with low optical transition energies could find application in the technologically important area of mid-infrared optoelectronics. In the case of Ge, biaxial tension can even cause a highly desirable crossover from an indirect- to a direct-gap band structure. However, the inability to grow tensile SAQDs without dislocations has impeded progress in these directions. In this article, we demonstrate a method to grow dislocation-free, tensile SAQDs by employing the unique strain relief mechanisms of (110)-oriented surfaces. As a model system, we show that tensile GaAs SAQDs form spontaneously, controllably, and without dislocations on InAlAs(110) surfaces. The tensile strain reduces the band gap in GaAs SAQDs by ~40%, leading to robust type-I quantum confinement and photoluminescence at energies lower than that of bulk GaAs. This method can be extended to other zinc blende and diamond cubic materials to form novel optoelectronic devices based on tensile SAQDs.

  6. Elastic strains of cementite in a pearlite steel during tensile deformation measured by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanie, A.; Tomota, Y.; Torii, S.; Kamiyama, T.

    2004-01-01

    Lattice plane strain, i.e., elastic strain, in cementite plates embedded in the ferrite matrix was measured by in situ neutron diffraction during tensile deformation for a hypereutectoid pearlite steel. The employment of time-of-flight method and microstructure control enable us to measure the shift of cementite peaks along tensile and transverse directions at the applied stress up to 1.6 GPa. The highest elastic strains of cementite determined was approximately 0.015. Heterogeneous plastic deformation between ferrite and cementite as well as among ferrite blocks are discussed. (author)

  7. Analysis of the tensile behaviour of zircaloy-4 in the region of dynamic strain aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellaretti Filho, O.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the tensile behavior of Zircaloy 4, centering around the influence of dynamic strain aging and strain rate history, is presented. This analysis is based on techniques introduced by Jaoul-Crussard and Reed-Hill. An attempt is also made to assess the experimental errors that influence these methods. (author)

  8. High-strain-rate tensile mechanical response of a polyurethane elastomeric material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic tensile mechanical response of a soft polymer material (Clear Flex 75) is investigated using a split Hopkinson tension bar (SHTB). Stress-strain relations are derived to reveal the mechanical properties at moderate and high strain rates. These relations appear to be rate dependent. Under

  9. High strain rate tensile testing of sheet materials using three Hopkinson pressure bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary G.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to circumvent the inherent problems associated with Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar (SHTB systems, a new experimental technique is proposed for the high strain rate tensile testing of sheet specimens in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB systems. Existing solutions employ a multiple gage section hat-shaped specimen to transform the incoming pulse from compression into tension at the specimen level. However, multiple gage section specimens are not suitable for studying the post-necking behavior of materials as the required symmetry of the mechanical system is no longer guaranteed in the post-necking range. Here, we present a new load-inversion device that is used in conjunction with three Hopkinson pressure bars for the tensile loading of single gage section sheet specimen. The device is designed to transform the compression load applied at its boundaries into a tensile loading of the specimen. Two output bars are used to measure the total force applied on the specimen boundaries, while Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to determine the strain histories on the specimen surface based on photographs acquired at a frequency of about 100 kHz. In addition to uniaxial tensile experiments on TRIP780 steel sheet specimens at strain rates ranging from 200/s to 1000/s, results are presented on the dynamic fracture testing of notched tensile specimens.

  10. Dependency of tensile strength of ductile cast iron on strain rate and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Tomohiro; Umetani, Takuo; Kai, Nobuhiro; Ogi, Keisaku; Noda, Nao-Aki; Sano, Yoshikazu

    2017-05-01

    The dependency of the tensile strength {σ }{{B}}{smooth} and the notch strength {σ }{{B}}{notch} on strain rate and temperature were investigated for conventional ferrite-pearlite type ductile cast iron (JIS-FCD500) to make clear the applicability of ductile cast iron to components for welded steel structures. High speed tensile tests were conducted on notched and smooth specimens with varying strain rate and temperature. Charpy absorbed energy was also evaluated on notched specimen with varying temperature. It is found that the tensile strength is in a good relationship with strain rate-temperature parameter R for the wide range of strain rate and temperature. With decreasing R parameter, both {σ }{{B}}{smooth} and {σ }{{B}}{notch} increase even when Charpy absorbed energy starts decreasing. It should be noted that the notch strength {σ }{{B}}{notch} is always larger than the tensile strength at room temperature {σ }{{B}, {RT}}{smooth} in the range of R parameter required for the welded structures. Therefore, the tensile strength {σ }{{B}, {RT}}{{smooth}} is confirmed to be useful for the structural design.

  11. Hot tensile properties and strain hardening behaviour of Super 304HCu stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vinoth Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Super 304HCu austenitic stainless steel containing 2.3–3 (wt.% of Cu is mainly used in superheaters and reheaters tubing of ultra super critical boilers which operates over 600 °C of steam temperature. Tensile tests were carried out on Super 304HCu, using nominal strain rate of 1 × 10−3 s−1, at room temperature, 550 °C, 600 °C and 650 °C. The tensile strength and elongation were found to decrease with increase in test temperature. The stress strain curves were fitted using Hollomon equation to determine the strain hardening exponent value. Differential Crussard–Jaoul (C–J analysis of the tensile curve is used to determine the variation in strain hardening exponent. Kocks–Mecking (K–M type plots were used to determine the stages of strain hardening during tensile loading of the specimen. The strain hardening capacity of the Super 304HCu is found to decrease with increase in test temperature.

  12. Mechanical failure of zigzag graphene nanoribbons under tensile strain induced by edge reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2012-10-01

    The structural and mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) under uniaxial tensile strain are studied by density functional theory. The ideal strength of a zigzag GNR (120 GPa) is close to that of pristine graphene. However, for a GNR with both edges reconstructed to pentagon–heptagon pairs (from hexagon–hexagon pairs) it decreases to 94 GPa and the maximum tensile strain is reduced to 15%. Our results constitute a comprehensive picture of the edge structure effect on the mechanical properties of GNRs.

  13. Strain sensing systems tailored for tensile measurement of fragile wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyilas, Arman

    2005-12-01

    Fundamental stress versus strain measurements were completed on superconducting Nb3Sn wires within the framework of IEC/TC90 and VAMAS/TWA16. A key task was the assessment of sensing systems regarding resolution, accuracy, and precision when measuring Young's modulus. Prior to actual Nb3Sn wire measurements metallic wires, consisting of copper and stainless steel having diameters similar to the Nb3Sn wire, were extensively investigated with respect to their elastic line properties using different types of extensometers. After these calibration tests Nb3Sn wire measurements of different companies resulted in several important facts with respect to total size and weight of the used extensometers. The size could be correlated to the initial stage of stress versus strain behaviour. In fact, the effect of wire curls resulting from the production line had a profound effect on Young's modulus measurements. Within this context, the possibility of determining Young's modulus from unloading compliance lines in the plastic regime of the stress-strain curve was considered. The data obtained using this test methodology were discussed under consideration of the composite nature of Nb3Sn wire. In addition, a non-contacting sensing system based on a double-beam laser extensometer was used to investigate the potential of this new sensing system.

  14. Strain sensing systems tailored for tensile measurement of fragile wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyilas, Arman

    2005-01-01

    Fundamental stress versus strain measurements were completed on superconducting Nb 3 Sn wires within the framework of IEC/TC90 and VAMAS/TWA16. A key task was the assessment of sensing systems regarding resolution, accuracy, and precision when measuring Young's modulus. Prior to actual Nb 3 Sn wire measurements metallic wires, consisting of copper and stainless steel having diameters similar to the Nb 3 Sn wire, were extensively investigated with respect to their elastic line properties using different types of extensometers. After these calibration tests Nb 3 Sn wire measurements of different companies resulted in several important facts with respect to total size and weight of the used extensometers. The size could be correlated to the initial stage of stress versus strain behaviour. In fact, the effect of wire curls resulting from the production line had a profound effect on Young's modulus measurements. Within this context, the possibility of determining Young's modulus from unloading compliance lines in the plastic regime of the stress-strain curve was considered. The data obtained using this test methodology were discussed under consideration of the composite nature of Nb 3 Sn wire. In addition, a non-contacting sensing system based on a double-beam laser extensometer was used to investigate the potential of this new sensing system

  15. Influence of Dynamic Strain Aging on Tensile Deformation Behavior of Alloy 617

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M.W. Ekaputra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the dynamic strain aging (DSA behavior of Alloy 617, high-temperature tensile tests were carried out with strain rates variations of 10−3/s, 10−4/s, and 10−5/s from 24°C to 950°C. Five flow relationships, Hollomon, Ludwik, Swift, Ludwigson, and Voce, were applied to describe the tensile true stress–strain curves, and the DSA region was defined. In describing the tensile curves, Ludwigson's equation was superior to the other equations, and the DSA region was adequately defined by this equation as plateaus at intermediate temperatures from 200°C to 700°C. It was identified that Alloy 617 is dominated by three types of serrations, known as Types D, A+B, and C. The activation energy values for each serration type were obtained by the Arrhenius equation. By using the obtained activation energy values, the serrated yielding map and the DSA mechanism were drawn and manifested. In addition, the relationship between the tensile strength and strain rate at higher temperatures above 700°C was found to be closely related to the amounts of slip lines. In the scanning electron microscope (SEM fractographs, there was a significant difference at the low, intermediate, and high temperatures, but almost the same to the three strain rates.

  16. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000{degrees} for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 {mu}m. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}3} to 5 x 10{sup {minus}1}/s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700{degrees}C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} torr (<10{sup {minus}3} Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system.

  17. Dynamic tensile behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy at ultra-high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Changjian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The samples having {0001} parallel to extruding direction (ED present a typical true stress–true strain curve with concave-down shape under tension at low strain rate. Ultra-rapid tensile tests were conducted at room temperature on a textured AZ31B magnesium alloy. The dynamic tensile behavior was investigated. The results show that at ultra-high strain rates of 1.93 × 102 s−1 and 1.70 × 103 s−1, the alloy behaves with a linear stress–strain response in most strain range and exhibits a brittle fracture. In this case, {10-12}  extension twinning is basic deformation mode. The brittleness is due to the macroscopic viscosity at ultra-high strain rate, for which the external critical shear stress rapidly gets high to result in a cleavage fracture before large amounts of dislocations are activated. Because {10-12} tension twinning, {10-11} compressive twinning, basal slip, prismatic slip and pyramidal slip have different critical shear stresses (CRSS, their contributions to the degree of deformation are very differential. In addition, Schmid factor plays an important role in the activity of various deformation modes and it is the key factor for the samples with different strain rates exhibit various mechanical behavior under dynamic tensile loading.

  18. High strain rate tensile behavior of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Paman, Ashish; Madhu, V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to perform quasi static and high strain rate tensile tests on Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy under different strain rates ranging from 0.01–3500/s and also at temperatures of 25,100, 200 and 300 °C. The combined effect of strain rate, temperature and stress triaxiality on the material behavior is studied by testing both smooth and notched specimens. Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive and fracture models are established based on high strain rate tensile data obtained from Split hopkinson tension bar (SHTB) and quasi-static tests. By modifying the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms in the Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive model, a new J–C constitutive model of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook constitutive model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive and fracture models, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different conditions for Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy were conducted. Numerical simulations are performed using a non-linear explicit finite element code autodyn. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical simulation results and the experiment results. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested under various strain rates and temperatures were studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  19. Tensile behaviour of aluminium 7017 alloy at various temperatures and strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranadh Bobbili

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to carry out high strain rate tensile tests on 7017 aluminium alloy under different strain rates ranging from 0.01, 500, 1000 and 1500 s−1 and at temperatures of 25, 100, 200 and 300 °C. Quasi-Static tensile stress–strain curves were generated using INSTRON 8500 machine. Johnson-Cook (J-C constitutive model was developed for 7017 aluminium alloy based on high strain rate tensile data generated from split Hopkinson tension bar (SHTB at various temperatures. This study evidently showed an improvement in dynamic strength as the strain rate increases. The predictions of J-C model are observed to be in consistence with the experimental data for all strain rates and temperatures. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested were studied under SEM. The change in fracture mode has been observed at different strain rates. The shear mode of fracture is dominant at lower strain rates (0.01 and 500 s−1; whereas cup- and cone-like surface representing dimple structure is found at the higher strain rates (1000 and 1500 s−1. The numbers of dimples at high strain rates are more than the quasi-static and intermediate strain rates. It is also observed that the flow stress decreases with increase in temperature. The 7017 aluminium alloy demonstrates thermal softening at higher temperatures. So when the temperature is more than 200 °C at these strain rates, thermal softening is predominant mode of deformation mechanism. It is found that when the temperature increases to 200 °C, the number of dimples rises and the dimple size of 7017 aluminium alloy is larger than at lower temperatures.

  20. Tensile strained germanium nanowires measured by photocurrent spectroscopy and X-ray microdiffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloy, Kevin; Pauc, Nicolas; Gassenq, Alban; Gentile, Pascal; Tardif, Samuel; Rieutord, François; Calvo, Vincent

    2015-04-08

    Applying tensile strain in a single germanium crystal is a very promising way to tune its bandstructure and turn it into a direct band gap semiconductor. In this work, we stress vapor-liquid-solid grown germanium nanowires along their [111] axis thanks to the strain tranfer from a silicon nitride thin film by a microfabrication process. We measure the Γ-LH direct band gap transition by photocurrent spectrometry and quantify associated strain by X-ray Laue microdiffraction on beamline BM32 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Nanowires exhibit up to 1.48% strain and an absorption threshold down to 0.73 eV, which is in good agreement with theoretical computations for the Γ-LH transition, showing that the nanowire geometry is an efficient way of applying tensile uniaxial stress along the [111] axis of a germanium crystal.

  1. Electrical Transport and Magnetoresistance Properties of Tensile-Strained CaMnO3 Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Dustin; Lawson, Bridget; Zimmerman, William; Neubauer, Samuel; Chaudhry, Adeel; Hart, Cacie; Yong, Grace; Smolyaninova, Vera; Kolagani, Rajeswari

    We will present our studies of the electrical transport and magnetoresistance properties of tensile strained CaMnO3 thin films. We observe that the resistivity decreases significantly as the film thickness decreases which is opposite to what is observed in thin films of hole doped manganites. The decrease in resistivity is more pronounced in the films on (100) SrTiO3, with resistivity of the thinnest films being about 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of bulk CaMnO3. Structural changes accompanying resistivity changes cannot be fully explained as due to tensile strain, and indicate the presence of oxygen vacancies. These results also suggest a coupling between tensile strain and oxygen deficiency, consistent with predictions from models based on density functional theory calculations. We observe a change in resistance under the application of moderate magnetic field. Experiments are underway to understand the origin of the magnetoresistance and its possible relation to the tensile strain effects. We acknowledge support from: Towson Office of University Undergraduate Research, Fisher Endowment Grant and Undergraduate Research Grants from the Fisher College of Science and Mathematics, and Seed Funding Grant from the School of Emerging technologies.

  2. Strain Rate Sensitivity of Epoxy Resin in Tensile and Shear Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat, Amos; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of E-862 and PR-520 resins is investigated in tensile and shear loadings. At both types of loading the resins are tested at strain rates of about 5x10(exp 5), 2, and 450 to 700 /s. In addition, dynamic shear modulus tests are carried out at various frequencies and temperatures, and tensile stress relaxation tests are conducted at room temperature. The results show that the toughened PR-520 resin can carry higher stresses than the untoughened E-862 resin. Strain rate has a significant effect on the response of both resins. In shear both resins show a ductile response with maximum stress that is increasing with strain rate. In tension a ductile response is observed at low strain rate (approx. 5x10(exp 5) /s), and brittle response is observed at the medium and high strain rates (2, and 700 /s). The hydrostatic component of the stress in the tensile tests causes premature failure in the E-862 resin. Localized deformation develops in the PR-520 resin when loaded in shear. An internal state variable constitutive model is proposed for modeling the response of the resins. The model includes a state variable that accounts for the effect of the hydrostatic component of the stress on the deformation.

  3. Radiative and non-radiative recombinations in tensile strained Ge microstrips: Photoluminescence experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgilio, M., E-mail: virgilio@df.unipi.it [Dip. di Fisica “E. Fermi,” Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, P.za San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Schroeder, T.; Yamamoto, Y. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Capellini, G. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Dip. di scienze, Università Roma Tre, viale G. Marconi 446, 00146 Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-21

    Tensile germanium microstrips are candidate as gain material in Si-based light emitting devices due to the beneficial effect of the strain field on the radiative recombination rate. In this work, we thoroughly investigate their radiative recombination spectra by means of micro-photoluminescence experiments at different temperatures and excitation powers carried out on samples featuring different tensile strain values. For sake of comparison, bulk Ge(001) photoluminescence is also discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in light of a numerical modeling based on a multi-valley effective mass approach, taking in to account the depth dependence of the photo-induced carrier density and of the self-absorption effect. The theoretical modeling allowed us to quantitatively describe the observed increase of the photoluminescence intensity for increasing values of strain, excitation power, and temperature. The temperature dependence of the non-radiative recombination time in this material has been inferred thanks to the model calibration procedure.

  4. Dynamic tensile stress–strain characteristics of carbon/epoxy laminated composites in through-thickness direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakai Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of strain rate up to approximately ε̇ = 102/s on the tensile stress–strain properties of unidirectional and cross-ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites in the through-thickness direction is investigated. Waisted cylindrical specimens machined out of the laminated composites in the through-thickness direction are used in both static and dynamic tests. The dynamic tensile stress–strain curves up to fracture are determined using the split Hopkinson bar (SHB. The low and intermediate strain-rate tensile stress–strain relations up to fracture are measured on an Instron 5500R testing machine. It is demonstrated that the ultimate tensile strength and absorbed energy up to fracture increase significantly, while the fracture strain decreases slightly with increasing strain rate. Macro- and micro-scopic examinations reveal a marked difference in the fracture surfaces between the static and dynamic tension specimens.

  5. Simultaneous measurement of the strain tensor of 10 individual grains embedded in an Al tensile sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, R.V.; Margulies, L.; Schmidt, Søren

    2004-01-01

    in transmission geometry. After each load step diffraction patterns are collected with a large-area X-ray detector system for a series of different angular and lateral sample positions. An automated indexing routine was used to assign sets of diffraction spots to individual grains. The strain tensor components...... as well as the individual grain position within the sample were then fitted from the diffraction spot positions. A maximum tensile load of 48 MPa was applied. Deviations in strain of up to 600 × 10−6 are observed between respective strain components of individual grains....

  6. Integrin-β1, not integrin-β5, mediates osteoblastic differentiation and ECM formation promoted by mechanical tensile strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangcheng Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mechanical strain plays a great role in growth and differentiation of osteoblast. A previous study indicated that integrin-β (β1, β5 mediated osteoblast proliferation promoted by mechanical tensile strain. However, the involvement of integrin-β in osteoblastic differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM formation induced by mechanical tensile strain, remains unclear. RESULTS: After transfection with integrin-β1 siRNA or integrin-β5 siRNA, mouse MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts were cultured in cell culture dishes and stimulated with mechanical tensile strain of 2500 microstrain (µε at 0.5 Hz applied once a day for 1 h over 3 or 5 consecutive days. The cyclic tensile strain promoted osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Transfection with integrin-β1 siRNA attenuated the osteoblastic diffenentiation induced by the tensile strain. By contrast, transfection with integrin-β5 siRNA had little effect on the osteoblastic differentiation induced by thestrain. At thesametime, theresultofECM formation promoted by the strain, was similar to the osteoblastic differentiation. CONCLUSION: Integrin-β1 mediates osteoblast differentiation and osteoblastic ECM formation promoted by cyclic tensile strain, and integrin-β5 is not involved in the osteoblasts response to the tensile strain.

  7. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Flow Behavior and Anisotropy of a Medium-Manganese TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturk, Rakan; Hector, Louis G.; Matthew Enloe, C.; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-04-01

    The dependence of the plastic anisotropy on the nominal strain rate for a medium-manganese (10 wt.% Mn) transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with initial austenite volume fraction of 66% (balance ferrite) has been investigated. The material exhibited yield point elongation, propagative instabilities during hardening, and austenite transformation to α'-martensite either directly or through ɛ-martensite. Uniaxial strain rates within the range of 0.005-500 s-1 along the 0°, 45°, and 90° orientations were selected based upon their relevance to automotive applications. The plastic anisotropy (r) and normal anisotropy (r n) indices corresponding to each direction and strain rate were determined using strain fields obtained from stereo digital image correlation systems that enabled both quasistatic and dynamic measurements. The results provide evidence of significant, orientation-dependent strain rate effects on both the flow stress and the evolution of r and r n with strain. This has implications not only for material performance during forming but also for the development of future strain-rate-dependent anisotropic yield criteria. Since tensile data alone for the subject medium-manganese TRIP steel do not satisfactorily determine the microstructural mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic-scale behavior observed on tensile testing, additional tests that must supplement the mechanical test results presented herein are discussed.

  8. Tensile characterisation of the aorta across quasi-static to blast loading strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Danyal; Proud, William; Haller, Antoine; Jouffroy, Apolline

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic tensile failure mechanisms of the aorta during Traumatic Aortic Injury (TAI) are poorly understood. In automotive incidents, where the aorta may be under strains of the order of 100/s, TAI is the second largest cause of mortality. In these studies, the proximal descending aorta is the most common site where rupture is observed. In particular, the transverse direction is most commonly affected due to the circumferential orientation of elastin, and hence the literature generally concentrates upon axial samples. This project extends these dynamic studies to the blast loading regime where strain-rates are of the order of 1000/s. A campaign of uniaxial tensile experiments are conducted at quasi-static, intermediate (drop-weight) and high (tensile Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar) strain rates. In each case, murine and porcine aorta models are considered and the extent of damage assessed post-loading using histology. Experimental data will be compared against current viscoelastic models of the aorta under axial stress. Their applicability across strain rates will be discussed. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, the conditions applied to the samples replicate in vivo conditions, employing a blood simulant-filled tubular specimen surrounded by a physiological solution.

  9. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-28

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 10 3 to 10 4  s -1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzar, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s−1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual–Forquin–Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates’. PMID:27956504

  11. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s-1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  12. Tensile strained gray tin: Dirac semimetal for observing negative magnetoresistance with Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huaqing; Liu, Feng

    2017-05-01

    The extremely stringent requirement on material quality has hindered the investigation and potential applications of exotic chiral magnetic effect in Dirac semimetals. Here, we propose that gray tin is a perfect candidate for observing the chiral anomaly effect and Shubnikov-de-Haas (SdH) oscillation at relatively low magnetic field. Based on effective k .p analysis and first-principles calculations, we discover that gray tin becomes a Dirac semimetal under tensile uniaxial strain, in contrast to a topological insulator under compressive uniaxial strain as known before. In this newly found Dirac semimetal state, two Dirac points which are tunable by tensile [001] strains lie in the kz axis and Fermi arcs appear in the (010) surface. Due to the low carrier concentration and high mobility of gray tin, a large chiral anomaly induced negative magnetoresistance and a strong SdH oscillation are anticipated in this half of the strain spectrum. Comparing to other Dirac semimetals, the proposed Dirac semimetal state in the nontoxic elemental gray tin can be more easily manipulated and accurately controlled. We envision that gray tin provides a perfect platform for strain engineering of chiral magnetic effects by sweeping through the strain spectrum from positive to negative and vice versa.

  13. Volume strain measurements by optical extensometry: application to the tensile behaviour of RT-PMMA

    OpenAIRE

    François, P.; Gloaguen, J.; Hue, B.; Lefebvre, J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer assisted optical extensometer has been set-up in order to record volume strain evolution during the tensile testing of polymer materials. Such a technique provides fruitful information on the sequences of events contributing to the non elastic deformation of ductile polymers. It is of special interest in the case of rubbertoughened systems in which cavitational modes (crazing, rubber cavitation) as well as fairly constant volume modes (shear banding) may contribute in various amoun...

  14. Effect of the Strain Rate on the Tensile Properties of the AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Seunghun; Park, Jiyoun; Choi, Ildong; Park, Sung Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the strain rate at a range of 10‒4 ⁓ 3 × 10 2 s - 1 on the tensile characteristics of a rolled AZ31 magnesium alloy was studied. The normal tensile specimens were tested using a high rate hydraulic testing machine. Specimens were machined from four sheets with different thicknesses, 1, 1.5, 2 and 3 mm, along three directions, 0°, 45°, and 90° to the rolling direction. The results revealed that all the specimens had a positive strain rate sensitivity of strength, that is, the strength increased with increasing strain rate. This is the same tendency as other automotive steels have. Our results suggest that the AZ31 magnesium alloy has better collision characteristics at high strain rates because of improved strength with an increasing strain rate. Ductility decreased with an increasing strain rate with a strain rate under 1 s - 1, but it increased with an increasing strain rate over 1 s - 1. The mechanical properties of the AZ31 magnesium alloy depend on the different microstructures according to the thickness. Two and 3 mm thickness specimens with a coarse and non-uniform grain structure exhibited worse mechanical properties while the 1.5 mm thickness specimens with a fine and uniform grain structure had better mechanical properties. Specimens machined at 0° and 45° to the rolling direction had higher absorbed energy than that of the 90° specimen. Thus, we demonstrate it is necessary to choose materials with proper thickness and machining direction for use in automotive applications.

  15. Electro-mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes: Effect of Small Tensile and Torsional Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantram, M. P.; Yang, Liu; Han, Jie; Liu, J. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present a simple picture to calculate the bandgap ($E_g$) of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in the presence of uniform torsional and tensile strain ($\\sigma$). We find that under tensile strain, $ absolute value of dE_g/d\\sigma$ of zig-zag tubes is approximately equal to $3t_0$, where $t_0$ is the hopping parameter. Further, $ absolute value of dE_g/d\\sigma$ decreases as the chirality changes to armchair, where it takes the value zero. The sign of $dE_g/d\\sigma$ follows the $(N_x-N_y) *mod 3$(equal to - 1, 0 and +1) rule. In contrast to the above, we show that under torsional strain, $absolute value of dE_g/d\\sigma$ of armchair tubes is approximately equal to $3t_0$ and continually decreases as the chirality changes to zig-zag, where is takes a small value. The sign of $dE_g/d\\sigma$ again follows the $(N_x-N_y)*mod 3$ rule. Finally, we predict a change in the sign of $dE_g/d\\sigma$ as function of strain, corresponding to a change in the value of $q$ that corresponds to the bandgap minimum.

  16. In-situ measurement of the strain distribution in a tensile specimen by using a digital speckle pattern interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Cha, Hyung-Ki; Kim, Young-Suk; Cheong, Yong-Moo

    2010-01-01

    Less sensitivity to environmental vibrations is essential for industrial applications of a digital speckle pattern interferometer (DSPI) to measure micro deformations. In this paper, a robust DSPI using single fringe to mechanical vibrations is designed for measuring the strain distribution of a tensile specimen. This system adopts a noise-immune signal processing algorithm to acquire a 3D strain distribution image. To acquire an accurate strain distribution for a tensile-specimen, locally-averaged and directionally-oriented filters operating in the frequency domain are used. This system uses a path-independent least-squares phase-unwrapping algorithm to acquire the 3D shape of the strain distribution. As for the initial experiments to measure the strain distribution of a tensile specimen in a vibration field, this system demonstrated a feasibility for industrial applications by providing reliable strain data.

  17. Strain measurement technique for elevated temperature tensile and creep testing of foil-gage metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a strain measurement technique suitable for elevated-temperature tensile and creep testing of foil-gage metals, using a modified commonly available mechanical extensometer in conjunction with a displacement transducer. The extensometer was modified by attaching to it a counterbalance (to reduce the effect of the extensometer weight on the total maximum test load) and by incorporating a conical tip/flat-edge design (to minimize induced stresses in the specimen resulting from extensometer attachment). Creep tests were performed on 0.102-mm-thick specimens of Ti-6Al-4V at temperatures of 427 and 538 C, at nominal applied stresses of 310.3 and 172.4 MPa, respectively. Examination of the resulting creep curves suggested that the strain measurement system provided actual creep strain values with good accuracy.

  18. Tensile strain effect in ferroelectric perovskite oxide thin films on spinel magnesium aluminum oxide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolan

    Ferroelectrics are used in FeRAM (Ferroelectric random-access memory). Currently (Pb,Zr)TiO3 is the most common ferroelectric material. To get lead-free and high performance ferroelectric material, we investigated perovskite ferroelectric oxides (Ba,Sr)TiO3 and BiFeO3 films with strain. Compressive strain has been investigated intensively, but the effects of tensile strain on the perovskite films have yet to be explored. We have deposited (Ba,Sr)TiO3, BiFeO3 and related films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and analyzed the films by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), etc. To obtain inherently fully strained films, the selection of the appropriate substrates is crucial. MgAl2O4 matches best with good quality and size, yet the spinel structure has an intrinsic incompatibility to that of perovskite. We introduced a rock-salt structure material (Ni 1-xAlxO1+delta) as a buffer layer to mediate the structural mismatch for (Ba,Sr)TiO3 films. With buffer layer Ni1-xAlxO1+delta, we show that the BST films have high quality crystallization and are coherently epitaxial. AFM images show that the films have smoother surfaces when including the buffer layer, indicating an inherent compatibility between BST-NAO and NAO-MAO. In-plane Ferroelectricity measurement shows double hysteresis loops, indicating an antiferroelectric-like behavior: pinned ferroelectric domains with antiparallel alignments of polarization. The Curie temperatures of the coherent fully strained BST films are also measured. It is higher than 900°C, at least 800°C higher than that of bulk. The improved Curie temperature makes the use of BST as FeRAM feasible. We found that the special behaviors of ferroelectricity including hysteresis loop and Curie temperature are due to inherent fully tensile strain. This might be a clue of physics inside ferroelectric stain engineering. An out-of-plane ferroelectricity measurement would provide a full whole story of the tensile strain. However, a

  19. Tuning whispering gallery lasing modes from polymer fibers under tensile strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linslal, C L; Kailasnath, M; Mathew, S; Nideep, T K; Radhakrishnan, P; Nampoori, V P N; Vallabhan, C P G

    2016-02-01

    Wavelength tuning of whispering gallery lasing modes has been observed from Rhodamine-B-doped polymer fibers under tensile strain. Good quality whispering gallery lasing modes are produced from both solid and hollow fibers by transverse optical pumping. The lasing modes are shifted linearly toward the shorter wavelength side when the fiber is elongated in the axial direction. Compared with solid fiber, the lasing modes of hollow fiber can be tuned over the entire gain spectrum with a tuning range of ∼5  nm. It is found that the tuning of the lasing modes of hollow fiber is reversible.

  20. Topological Insulator State in Thin Bismuth Films Subjected to Plane Tensile Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, E. V.; Grabov, V. M.; Komarov, V. A.; Kablukova, N. S.; Krushel'nitskii, A. N.

    2018-03-01

    The results of experimental examination of galvanomagnetic properties of thin bismuth films subjected to plane tensile strain resulting from the difference in thermal expansion coefficients of the substrate material and bismuth are presented. The resistivity, the magnetoresistance, and the Hall coefficient were studied at temperatures ranging from 5 to 300 K in magnetic fields as strong as 0.65 T. Carrier densities were calculated. A considerable increase in carrier density in films thinner than 30 nm was observed. This suggests that surface states are more prominent in thin bismuth films on mica substrates, while the films themselves may exhibit the properties of a topological insulator.

  1. Metastable state in a tensile-strained Cu Σ 5 grain boundary: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan-Shun; Liu, Yong-Li; Zhang, Hui; Li, Jiu-Hui; Zhao, Xing; Qi, Yang

    2018-02-01

    The Cu Σ 5 grain boundary (GB) fracture process has been simulated by the first-principles computational tensile test. An additional metastable state has been discovered during tensile tests. The energy of ideal mirror-symmetric GBs continuously changes with tensile strains. However, at high strains, more stable structures with lower energy are found when some atoms on GBs are artificially relocated. Thus the structures obtained on ideal GBs are not stable and will not occur under actual tensile experiments, which is the exact reason for the occurrence of these unstable structures, which may be considered as additional metastable states. Finally, a large amount of calculations have also been performed to search underlying, more stable GB structures and arrived at almost identical previous results. These results indicate that structures of symmetric GBs under tensile tests should be very carefully optimized by introducing small perturbations even if the energy of the system increases smoothly with increasing tensile strain. In addition, the exclusion of metastable states usually plays a major role in investigating the mechanical properties under tensile test.

  2. Dynamic Strain Aging Phenomena and Tensile Response of Medium-Mn TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Daniel M.; Van Aken, David C.

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic strain aging (DSA) and rapid work hardening are typical behaviors observed in medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel. Three alloys with manganese ranging from 10.2 to 13.8 wt pct with calculated room temperature stacking fault energies varying from - 2.1 to 0.7 mJ/m2 were investigated. Significant serrations were observed in the stress-strain behavior for two of the steels and the addition of 4.6 wt pct chromium was effective in significantly reducing the occurrence of DSA. Addition of chromium to the alloy reduced DSA by precipitation of M23(C,N)6 during batch annealing at 873 K (600 °C) for 20 hours. Three distinct DSA mechanisms were identified: one related to manganese ordering in stacking faults associated with ɛ-martensite and austenite interface, with activation energies for the onset and termination of DSA being 145 and 277 kJ/mol. A second mechanism was associated with carbon diffusion in γ-austenite where Mn-C bonding added to the total binding energy, and activation energies of 88 and 155 kJ/mol were measured for the onset and termination of DSA. A third mechanism was attributed to dislocation pinning and unpinning by nitrogen in α-ferrite with activation energies of 64 and 123 kJ/mol being identified. Tensile behaviors of the three medium manganese steels were studied in both the hot band and batch annealed after cold working conditions. Ultimate tensile strengths ranged from 1310 to 1404 MPa with total elongation of 24.1 to 34.1 pct. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine the transformation response of the steels using interrupted tensile tests at room temperature. All three of the processed steels showed evidence of two-stage TRIP where γ-austenite first transformed to ɛ-martensite, and subsequently transformed to α-martensite.

  3. Dynamic Strain Aging Phenomena and Tensile Response of Medium-Mn TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Daniel M.; Van Aken, David C.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic strain aging (DSA) and rapid work hardening are typical behaviors observed in medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel. Three alloys with manganese ranging from 10.2 to 13.8 wt pct with calculated room temperature stacking fault energies varying from - 2.1 to 0.7 mJ/m2 were investigated. Significant serrations were observed in the stress-strain behavior for two of the steels and the addition of 4.6 wt pct chromium was effective in significantly reducing the occurrence of DSA. Addition of chromium to the alloy reduced DSA by precipitation of M23(C,N)6 during batch annealing at 873 K (600 °C) for 20 hours. Three distinct DSA mechanisms were identified: one related to manganese ordering in stacking faults associated with ɛ-martensite and austenite interface, with activation energies for the onset and termination of DSA being 145 and 277 kJ/mol. A second mechanism was associated with carbon diffusion in γ-austenite where Mn-C bonding added to the total binding energy, and activation energies of 88 and 155 kJ/mol were measured for the onset and termination of DSA. A third mechanism was attributed to dislocation pinning and unpinning by nitrogen in α-ferrite with activation energies of 64 and 123 kJ/mol being identified. Tensile behaviors of the three medium manganese steels were studied in both the hot band and batch annealed after cold working conditions. Ultimate tensile strengths ranged from 1310 to 1404 MPa with total elongation of 24.1 to 34.1 pct. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine the transformation response of the steels using interrupted tensile tests at room temperature. All three of the processed steels showed evidence of two-stage TRIP where γ-austenite first transformed to ɛ-martensite, and subsequently transformed to α-martensite.

  4. The Effect of Tensile Strain on Optical Anisotropy and Exciton of m-Plane ZnO

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H. H.

    2015-03-20

    The near band edge emission of the tensile-strained m-plane ZnO film grown on (112)LaAlO3 substrates shows abnormal low polarization degree (ρ = 0.1). The temperature dependency of polarization degree clarifies the origins of different emission peaks. In tensile-strained m-plane ZnO, the [0001] polarized state is upper shifted and is overlapping with the [112̅0] polarized state. This phenomenon causes the abnormal low polarization degree and reveals the effect of strain on the emission anisotropy of m-plane ZnO.

  5. Impact of tensile strain on the thermal transport of zigzag hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbon: An equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Ishtiaque Ahmed; Intisar Khan, Asir; Subrina, Samia

    2018-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of single layer strained hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbon (h-BNNR) has been computed using the Green—Kubo formulation of Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (EMD) simulation. We have investigated the impact of strain on thermal transport of h-BNNR by varying the applied tensile strain from 1% upto 5% through uniaxial loading. The thermal conductivity of h-BNNR decreases monotonically with the increase of uniaxial tensile strain keeping the sample size and temperature constant. The thermal conductivity can be reduced upto 86% for an applied uniaxial tensile strain of 5%. The impact of temperature and width variation on the thermal conductivity of h-BNNR has also been studied under different uniaxial tensile strain conditions. With the increase in temperature, the thermal conductivity of strained h-BNNR exhibits a decaying characteristics whereas it shows an opposite pattern with the increasing width. Such study would provide a good insight on the strain tunable thermal transport for the potential device application of boron nitride nanostructures.

  6. Effects of Low Temperature and High Strain Rate on the Tensile Behaviors of High-Performance Energetic Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhe Jun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To further study the effects of low temperature and high strain rate on the tensile behaviors of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB propellant, an INSTRON testing machine was applied for carrying out the uniaxial tensile tests at low temperatures and room temperature after storage at low temperatures. The strain rates are in the range of 0.40 to 85.71 s−1. Scanning electron microscope (SEM was used for examining the failure mechanisms of HTPB propellant under the test conditions. The results reveal that HTPB propellant is still capable of large deformation at lower strain rates and low temperatures in the glass transition and glass state. The characteristics of stress-strain curves at room temperature after storage at low temperatures are the same with that directly obtained at room temperature. The effect of strain rate on the elastic modulus E at various temperatures is almost the same. However, the effect of strain rate on the maximum tensile stress σm becomes weak with decreasing temperature. Furthermore, the strain εm is nearly independence of the strain rate at higher strain rates and the lowest test temperature in glass state. Continuously decreasing temperature can more easily cause the extensive brittle fracture of AP particles, even at lower strain rates. The temperature changes from room temperature to low temperature and then from low temperature to room temperature in a short time cannot influence the failure mechanism of HTPB propellant at room temperature and high strain rate.

  7. Band structure calculations for dilute nitride quantum wells under compressive or tensile strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrere, H; Marie, X; Barrau, J; Amand, T; Bouzid, S Ben; Sallet, V; Harmand, J-C

    2004-01-01

    We have calculated the band structure of InGaAsN/GaAs(N)/GaAs compressively strained quantum wells (QW) emitting at 1.3 μm using the band anticrossing model and an eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The calculated interband optical transition energies have been compared to the experimental ones deduced from photocurrent, photoluminescence and excitation of photoluminescence spectroscopy experiments and measured laser characteristics extracted from the recent literature. Because of the high compressive strain in the QW, strain-compensated structures may be required in order to grow stable multiple QWs; in view of this we have studied the band structure of InGaAsN/GaAsP/GaAs QWs emitting at 1.3 μm. Dilute nitride structures also offer the possibility of growing tensile strained QW lasers on InP substrate emitting in the 1.55 μm emission wavelength range. In order to evaluate the potentialities of such structures we have determined the band characteristics of InGaAsN/InGaAsP/InP heterostructures with a TM polarized fundamental transition

  8. Effect of compressive and tensile strain on misfit dislocation injection in SiGe epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegscheider, W. [Walter Schottky Institut, Garching (Germany); Cerva, H. [Siemens AG, Research Lab., Muenchen (Germany)

    1993-05-01

    The relaxation behavior of short-period Si/Ge superlattices and Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} alloy layers under compressive and tensile strain field is compared experimentally by means of transmission electron microscopy as well as theoretically on ethebasis of a half-loop dislocation nucleation mode. It was found that misfit dislocations in tensily strained layers grown on Ge(001) substrates are imperfect and of the 90{degrees} Shockley type provided some critical misfit f{sub c} is exceeded. Subsequent nucleation and glide of these partial dislocations on adjacent (111) glide planes leads to the formation of stacking faults and microtwins. In the low misfit regime (fstrain field within the (001) growth plane are generally of the 60{degrees} type. In this case the critical thickness for coherent growth is found to be substantially enlarged with respect to the inverse strain situation where microtwin formation occurs. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  9. In-situ observation of strain evolution in CP-Ti during uniaxial tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettles, C. J.; Gibson, M. A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Tomus, D.; Lynch, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    First results are presented for in-situ tensile loading experiments performed on the Powder Diffraction beamline at the Australian Synchrotron facility. For direct measurement of strain evolution, the beamline was fitted with a uniaxial tensile stage and a high-resolution CCD detector. Precise calibration of the experimental diffraction geometry, taking into account slight misalignment of the detector (pitch, roll, yaw), was achieved by simulation of the ring patterns recorded from the standard reference material LaB 6 (660). The material examined was a commercially pure titanium strip, which from prior electron microscopy studies, was found to have an average grain size of ˜20-30 μm. Tensile specimens conformed to ASTM E8, with a gauge length of 25 mm. To probe the bulk material properties all experiments were performed at 20 keV. In these preliminary experiments, measurement of the relative change in the interplanar lattice spacing was used to monitor the elastic response in seven crystallographic orientations during the loading cycle. To overcome problems encountered with grain size and associated discontinuous Debye-Scherrer ring patterns, two strategies were implemented to measure the Bragg peak (2 θB) positions. In cases where the radial integration routine provided inconsistent results for peak determination, a new approach based on determining the averaged sum of 2 θB positions from individual spots making up the ring pattern was utilised. Results obtained for the diffraction elastic modulus were found to be in agreement with predictions based on the single-crystal and Neerfield-Hill crystal coupling models.

  10. In-situ observation of strain evolution in CP-Ti during uniaxial tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettles, C.J. [Monash University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Gibson, M.A.; Stevenson, A.W. [CSIRO Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Tomus, D. [Monash University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Materials Engineering, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Lynch, P.A., E-mail: Peter.Lynch@csiro.a [CSIRO Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    2010-07-21

    First results are presented for in-situ tensile loading experiments performed on the Powder Diffraction beamline at the Australian Synchrotron facility. For direct measurement of strain evolution, the beamline was fitted with a uniaxial tensile stage and a high-resolution CCD detector. Precise calibration of the experimental diffraction geometry, taking into account slight misalignment of the detector (pitch, roll, yaw), was achieved by simulation of the ring patterns recorded from the standard reference material LaB{sub 6} (660). The material examined was a commercially pure titanium strip, which from prior electron microscopy studies, was found to have an average grain size of {approx}20-30 {mu}m. Tensile specimens conformed to ASTM E8, with a gauge length of 25 mm. To probe the bulk material properties all experiments were performed at 20 keV. In these preliminary experiments, measurement of the relative change in the interplanar lattice spacing was used to monitor the elastic response in seven crystallographic orientations during the loading cycle. To overcome problems encountered with grain size and associated discontinuous Debye-Scherrer ring patterns, two strategies were implemented to measure the Bragg peak (2{theta}{sub B}) positions. In cases where the radial integration routine provided inconsistent results for peak determination, a new approach based on determining the averaged sum of 2{theta}{sub B} positions from individual spots making up the ring pattern was utilised. Results obtained for the diffraction elastic modulus were found to be in agreement with predictions based on the single-crystal and Neerfield-Hill crystal coupling models.

  11. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to at least 1093 C (2000F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work is to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite's potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests are conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests are performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating test specimens up to 1093 C (2000 F). Tensile stress-strain data are obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  12. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, Costantino; Asprone, Domenico; Forni, Daniele; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Bozza, Anna; Prota, Andrea; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  13. Theoretical Conversions of Different Hardness and Tensile Strength for Ductile Materials Based on Stress-Strain Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Cai, Li-Xun

    2018-04-01

    Based on the power-law stress-strain relation and equivalent energy principle, theoretical equations for converting between Brinell hardness (HB), Rockwell hardness (HR), and Vickers hardness (HV) were established. Combining the pre-existing relation between the tensile strength ( σ b ) and Hollomon parameters ( K, N), theoretical conversions between hardness (HB/HR/HV) and tensile strength ( σ b ) were obtained as well. In addition, to confirm the pre-existing σ b -( K, N) relation, a large number of uniaxial tensile tests were conducted in various ductile materials. Finally, to verify the theoretical conversions, plenty of statistical data listed in ASTM and ISO standards were adopted to test the robustness of the converting equations with various hardness and tensile strength. The results show that both hardness conversions and hardness-strength conversions calculated from the theoretical equations accord well with the standard data.

  14. Size and strain rate effects in tensile strength of penta-twinned Ag nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huajian

    2017-08-01

    Penta-twinned Ag nanowires (pt-AgNWs) have recently attracted much attention due to their interesting mechanical and physical properties. Here we perform large-scale atomistic simulations to investigate the influence of sample size and strain rate on the tensile strength of pt-AgNWs. The simulation results show an apparent size effect in that the nanowire strength (defined as the critical stress for dislocation nucleation) increases with decreasing wire diameter. To account for such size effect, a theoretical model involving the interaction between an emerging dislocation and the twin boundary has been developed for the surface nucleation of dislocations. It is shown that the model predictions are in quantitative agreement with the results from atomistic simulations and previous experimental studies in the literatures. The simulations also reveal that nanowire strength is strain-rate dependent, which predicts an activation volume for dislocation nucleation in the range of 1-10b3, where b is the magnitude of the Burgers vector for a full dislocation.

  15. Effects of grain size from micro scale to nanoscales on the yield strain of brass under compressive and tensile stresses using a Kelvin probing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.Y.; Wang, L.; Li, W.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of grain size on the yield strain of brass (70-30), respectively, under tensile and compressive stresses were investigated using a Kelvin probe, a highly sensitive instrument for measuring the electron work function (EWF) of materials. The average grain size under study varied from 20 nm to 80 μm. The nanocrystalline structure was generated by sandblasting followed by recovery treatment. Results of the EWF measurement demonstrated that the yield strain differed as applied stress changed from tensile to compressive. The magnitude of compressive yield strain is larger than that of tensile yield strain. It was observed that with a decrease in grain size, the difference in magnitude between the compressive yield strain and the tensile yield strain decreased. The mechanism responsible for the difference in yield strain and the effect of grain size on the yield strain are discussed

  16. Aluminum-thin-film packaged fiber Bragg grating probes for monitoring the maximum tensile strain of composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jooeun; Kim, Mihyun; Choi, Ki-Sun; Hwang, Tae-Kyung; Kwon, Il-Bum

    2014-06-10

    In this paper, new fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor probes are designed to intermittently detect the maximum tensile strain of composite materials, so as to evaluate the structural health status. This probe is fabricated by two thin Al films bonded to an FBG optical fiber and two supporting brackets, which are fixed on the surface of composite materials. The residual strain of the Al packaged FBG sensor probe is induced by the strain of composite materials. This residual strain can indicate the maximum strain of composite materials. Two types of sensor probes are prepared-one is an FBG with 18 μm thick Al films, and the other is an FBG with 36 μm thick Al films-to compare the thickness effect on the detection sensitivity. These sensor probes are bonded on the surfaces of carbon fiber reinforced plastics composite specimens. In order to determine the strain sensitivity between the residual strain of the FBG sensor probe and the maximum strain of the composite specimen, tensile tests are performed by universal testing machine, under the loading-unloading test condition. The strain sensitivities of the probes, which have the Al thicknesses of 18 and 36 μm, are determined as 0.13 and 0.23, respectively.

  17. The Effect of Grain Size and Strain on the Tensile Flow Stress of Aluminium at Room Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    1977-01-01

    Tensile-stress-strain data over a strain range from 0.2 to 30% were obtained at room temperature for 99.999 and 99.5% aluminium as a function of grain size. The yield stress-grain size relationship can be expressed by a Petch-Hall relation with approximately the same slope for the two materials....... The flow stress-grain size relationship can adequately be expressed by a modified Petch-Hall relation; for 99.999% aluminium material the slope increases with strain through a maximum around 15–20%, whereas for 99.5% aluminium the slope decreases with the strain to zero at strains about 10%. The flow...... stress-grain size relationship was analyzed in terms of matrix strengthening and grain boundary strengthening according to the dislocation concept of Ashby. At intermediate strains this approach gives a good description of the effect of strain, grain size and purity on the flow stress....

  18. High strain rate mechanical response of buttress-grooved tensile specimens which have undergone environmental exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirick, L.J.

    1976-07-01

    The purpose of the corrosion compatibility program was to identify the effect of corrosion on the mechanical performance of the buttress-grooved section of the 105-mm penetrator, a section which must sustain a load during launch. It is important that the environment not deteriorate the mechanical integrity of these grooves during long-term storage. Both coated and uncoated test specimens which simulate both geometrical shape and residual stress patterns were exposed to corrosive environments of moist air, distilled water, and salt water. Some of these tests also incorporated the galvanic coupling caused by the aluminum sabot. After exposure to the corrosive environments, the specimens were pulled on a high strain rate tensile machine which simulated launch conditions. Results show that the galvanic coupling due to the aluminum sabot caused no deterioration of mechanical properties. Results do indicate that the coating applied caused a significant reduction in the fracture load. There was a dichotomy in the results as affected by the environment. Uncoated test specimens showed no change in fracture load with increasing severity of corrosion environment, whereas the coated specimens indicated a trend of decreasing load-bearing ability with increasing corrosion

  19. Self-consistent modelling of lattice strains during the in-situ tensile loading of twinning induced plasticity steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Pereloma, Elena V.; Clausen, Bjørn; Brown, Donald W.; Tomé, Carlos N.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of lattice strains in a fully recrystallised Fe–24Mn–3Al–2Si–1Ni–0.06C TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steel subjected to uniaxial tensile loading up to a true strain of ∼35% was investigated via in-situ neutron diffraction. Typical of fcc elastic and plastic anisotropy, the {111} and {200} grain families record the lowest and highest lattice strains, respectively. Using modelling cases with and without latent hardening, the recently extended Elasto-Plastic Self-Consistent model successfully predicted the macroscopic stress–strain response, the evolution of lattice strains and the development of crystallographic texture. Compared to the isotropic hardening case, latent hardening did not have a significant effect on lattice strains and returned a relatively faster development of a stronger 〈111〉 and a weaker 〈100〉 double fibre parallel to the tensile axis. Close correspondence between the experimental lattice strains and those predicted using particular orientations embedded within a random aggregate was obtained. The result suggests that the exact orientations of the surrounding aggregate have a weak influence on the lattice strain evolution

  20. A simple-beam diameter transducer for tensile testing of round specimens at constant true strain rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrie, J.N.

    1977-06-01

    A simple-beam diameter transducer was developed for tensile testing of round specimens at constant true strain rates. The design adopted consists of a pair of thin beams of spring steel bent across the specimen mid-point and hinged at their extremities. A strain gauge is bonded to the outer surface at the mid-length of one of the beams. If the hinge points and vertical centre line of the specimen lie in the same plane, the strain measured on the beam will vary linearly with the diameter of the specimen. In practice, this geometric requirement is satisfied by the method of construction, and linearity was confirmed by experiment. (author)

  1. Tensile strain-induced magnetism transition in multilayer graphene with excess electrons: Stability of the edge-quantum well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability of edge-quantum well-induced strong magnetism of multilayer armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR with excess electrons was investigated under applied tensile strain by density functional theory (DFT calculations. The results indicated that: (1 The strain along the armchair edge direction led to a transition of the multilayer AGNRs from ferromagnetic state to nonmagnetic state when the strain increased to a critical value; (2 The strain induced bond length changes reduced the stability of the edge-quantum well in terms of the reduction of the electrons capturing capacity; and (3 The spin splitting of the energy bands near the Fermi level reduced with the increase of the strain, resulting in the decrease of the spin moment. This finding suggests that the magnetic properties of graphene have strong dependence on its strain states, which is crucial to the design of graphene-based magnetic devices.

  2. Enhanced Electron Mobility in Nonplanar Tensile Strained Si Epitaxially Grown on SixGe1-xNanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2018-01-10

    We report the growth and characterization of epitaxial, coherently strained Si x Ge 1-x -Si core-shell nanowire heterostructure through vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism for the Si x Ge 1-x core, followed by an in situ ultrahigh-vacuum chemical vapor deposition for the Si shell. Raman spectra acquired from individual nanowire reveal the Si-Si, Si-Ge, and Ge-Ge modes of the Si x Ge 1-x core and the Si-Si mode of the shell. Because of the compressive (tensile) strain induced by lattice mismatch, the core (shell) Raman modes are blue (red) shifted compared to those of unstrained bare Si x Ge 1-x (Si) nanowires, in good agreement with values calculated using continuum elasticity model coupled with lattice dynamic theory. A large tensile strain of up to 2.3% is achieved in the Si shell, which is expected to provide quantum confinement for electrons due to a positive core-to-shell conduction band offset. We demonstrate n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors using Si x Ge 1-x -Si core-shell nanowires as channel and observe a 40% enhancement of the average electron mobility compared to control devices using Si nanowires due to an increased electron mobility in the tensile-strained Si shell.

  3. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the tensile behaviour of uranium 2 w/o molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, J.; Boyd, G.A.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the uniaxial tensile behaviour of uranium 2 w/o molybdenum alloy over a wide range of temperature and strain rate. Specimen blanks taken from co-reduced and extruded U 2 w/o Mo rods were given one of two heat treatments. Longitudinal tensile test pieces, taken from these blanks at near surface locations were tested in the temperature range -150 deg C to +100 deg C at strain rates from quasistatic (10 -4 s -1 ) to 10 3 s -1 . To achieve this range of testing rates three machines were required: an Instron screw driven machine for rates up to 0.1 s -1 , a second specially constructed hydraulic machine for the range 0.1 s -1 to 50 s -1 and a drop weight machine for the highest strain rates. The ways in which the mechanical properties - elongation to fracture, flow stresses and ultimate tensile stress - vary with both temperature and strain rate are presented and discussed for material in both heat treatment conditions. (author)

  4. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the tensile behaviour of uranium - 2sup(w)/o molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, J.; Boyd, G.A.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the uniaxial tensile behaviour of uranium 2 w/o molybdenum alloy over a wide range of temperature and strain rate. Specimen blanks taken from co-reduced and extruded U2 w/o Mo rods were given one of two heat treatments. Longitudinal tensile test pieces, taken from these blanks at near surface locations were tested in the temperature range -150 deg C to +100 deg C at strain rates from quasistatic (10 -4 s -1 ) to 10 3 s -1 . To achieve this range of testing rates three machines were required: an Instron screw driven machine for rates up to 0.1 s -1 , a second specially constructed hydraulic machine for the range 0.1 s -1 to 50 s -1 and a drop weight machine for the highest strain rates. The ways in which the mechanical properties - elongation to fracture, flow stresses and ultimate tensile stress - vary with both temperature and strain rate are presented and discussed for material in both heat treatment conditions. (author)

  5. Induction of IL-6 and MMP-8 in human periodontal fibroblasts by static tensile strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Collin; Walter, Christian; Ziebart, Thomas; Grimm, Sarah; Meila, Dan; Krieger, Elena; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical loading is a potential activator of inflammation and able to stimulate factors for periodontal and alveolar bone destruction. Aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory response and synthesis of proteinases by human periodontal ligament fibroblast (HPdLF) dependent on different strengths of static tensile strain (STS). HPdLFs were loaded with different STS strengths (1, 5, and 10 %) in vitro. Gene expressions of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and interleukin (IL)-6 were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Production of IL-6, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8, and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa ligand (RANKL) synthesis was detected by immunocytochemical staining. Ten percent STS led to an increased gene expression of IL-6 and COX-2 (34.4-fold) in HPdLF, and 1 and 5 % STS slightly reduced the gene expression of IL-6. Synthesis of IL-6 was significantly reduced by 1 % STS and stimulated by 10 % STS. Ten percent STS significantly induced PGE2 production. RANKL was not detectable at any strength of STS. MMP-8 synthesis showed significantly higher values only at 10 % STS, but TIMP-1 was stimulated by 5 and 10 % STS, resulting into highest TIMP-1/MMP-8 ratio at 5 % STS. High-strength STS is a potent inducer of periodontal inflammation and MMP-8, whereas low-strength STS shows an anti-inflammatory effect. Moderate-strength STS causes the highest TIMP-1/MMP-8 ratio, leading to appropriate conditions for reformation of the extracellular matrix. Furthermore, this study points out that the strength of force plays a pivotal role to achieve orthodontic tooth movement without inducing periodontal inflammation and to activate extracellular matrix regeneration.

  6. Tensile strain induced changes in the optical spectra of SrTiO.sub.3./sub. epitaxial thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejneka, Alexandr; Tyunina, M.; Narkilahti, J.; Levoska, J.; Chvostová, Dagmar; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Trepakov, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 10 (2010), 2082-2089 ISSN 1063-7834 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/1009; GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : SrTiO 3 epitaxial thin films * effect of biaxial tensile strains on optical spectra Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.727, year: 2010

  7. MD simulations to evaluate effects of applied tensile strain on irradiation-induced defect production at various PKA energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashiro, S.; Fujita, S.; Okita, T.; Okuda, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Strain effects on defect formation were evaluated at various PKA energies by MD. ► Radiation-induced defects were increased numerically by external strain. ► Enhanced formation of larger clusters causes the numerical increase of defects. ► Strain influence on the number of defects was greatest at about 20 keV PKA. ► Cluster size, which is mostly affected by strain, was greater with higher PKA energy. - Abstract: Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to investigate the influence of applied tensile strain on defect production during cascade damages at various Primary Knock-on Atom (PKA) energies of 1–30 keV. When 1% strain was applied, the number of surviving defects increased at PKA energies higher than 5 keV, although they did not increase at 1 keV. The rate of increase by strain application was higher with higher PKA energy, and attained the maximum at 20 keV PKA energy with a subsequent gradual decrease at 30 keV PKA energy The cluster size, mostly affected by strain, was larger with higher PKA energy, although clusters with fewer than seven interstitials did not increase in number at any PKA energy.

  8. High strain rate and quasi-static tensile behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V after cyclic damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verleysen P.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is common that energy absorbing structural elements are subjected to a number of loading cycles before a crash event. Several studies have shown that previous fatigue can significantly influence the tensile properties of some materials, and hence the behaviour of structural elements made of them. However, when the capacity of absorbing energy of engineering materials is determined, fresh material without any fatigue damage is most often used. This study investigates the effect of fatigue damage on the dynamic tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V in thin-sheet form. Results are completed with tests at quasi-static strain rates and observations of the fracture surfaces, and compared with results obtained from other alloys and steel grades. The experiments show that the dynamic properties of Ti-6Al-4V are not affected by a number of fatigue loading cycles high enough to significantly reduce the energy absorbing capabilities of EDM machined samples.

  9. Non-linear tensile creep of polypropylene: time-strain superposition and creep prediction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolařík, Jan; Pegoretti, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 1 (2006), s. 346-356 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/1051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polypropylene * tensile creep * free volume Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.773, year: 2006

  10. High strain rate tensile curves of hyperquenched Z03 CN18-10 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrillon, B.

    1978-01-01

    Tensile tests are presented at constant decreasing speeds, made at room temperature. This type of test can give a better evaluation of the structure behaviour in shock or burst loadings, because in that case the elongation speeds varies from high values to zero [fr

  11. Partial transformation of austenite in Al-Mn-Si TRIP steel upon tensile straining: an in situ EBSD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Nybo; Adachi, Y.; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos

    2013-01-01

    of the stability of austenite grains against strain-induced transformation, with particular focus on the grain size and the location of the austenite grains. The findings confirm that size and location of austenite grains are significant parameters for their stability. Small austenite grains were observed......The transformation of austenite to martensite in an Al–Mn–Si transformation-induced plasticity steel was investigated with in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements under tensile straining. The visualisation of the microstructure upon straining allows for an investigation...... to be more stable than large grains, while austenite grains located beside bainitic ferrite are the most stable. Moreover, it is demonstrated that austenite grains transform gradually...

  12. Strain localization during tensile Hopkinson bar testing of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moćko Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the analysis was to determine the strain localization for various specimen shapes (type A and type B according to PN-EN ISO 26203-1 standard and different loading conditions, i.e. quasi- static and dynamic. Commercially pure titanium (Grade 2 and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Grade 5 were selected for the tests. Tensile loadings were applied out using servo-hydraulic testing machine and tensile Hopkinson bar with pre-tension. The results were recorded using ARAMIS system cameras and fast camera Phantom V1210, respectively at quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Further, specimens outline was determined on the basis of video data using TEMA MOTION software. The strain distribution on the specimen surface was estimated using digital image correlation method. The larger radius present in the specimen of type B in comparison to specimen of type A, results in slight increase of the elongation for commercially pure titanium at both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. However this effect disappears for Ti6Al4V alloy. The increase of the elongation corresponds to the stronger necking effect. Material softening due to increase of temperature induced by plastic work was observed at dynamic loading conditions. Moreover lower elongation at fracture point was found at high strain rates for both materials.

  13. Evolution of internal stresses in the plain ferritic steel studied by neutron diffraction in situ upon tensile straining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V; Lukáš, P; Strunz, P; Kužel, R

    2009-03-04

    The present in situ neutron diffraction study aims to investigate the response of selected lattice planes in the polycrystalline material upon tensile loading. For this purpose, the 0.1C-0.4Mn construction steel was selected as a simple model material. The tensile deformation test was performed in the incremental mode in which each individual deformation step was followed by unloading. The neutron diffraction spectra were collected both upon loading and unloading and the behavior of the diffraction profiles in the elastic as well as in the plastic region of the deformation curve was examined in detail. Whereas the behavior of the lattice strains during straining and the evolution of the residual intergranular strains have already been described in other papers, the present work is focused mainly on profile broadening effects measured in the same deformation regime. The estimate of microstrain evolution was done by using the single-line profile analysis method. Comparison of microstrain values in the loaded/unloaded state and in the elastic and plastic regions offers an interesting possibility to estimate the contribution of the type II and type III microstrains.

  14. Control of Induced and Residual Crystal-Scale Strains on Tensile Failure in Pure Quartzite and Marble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtlaender, A.; Leith, K.; Mueller, B.; Scheffzuek, C.; Schilling, F. R.; Krautblatter, M.

    2016-12-01

    Near surface fracture development in rocks is controlled by a) mineralogical composition, b) applied external loads and environmental chemistry and c) pre-existing microstructure e.g. crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and locked-in residual strains. To better understand how some of these factors influence brittle failure of rocks, we undertake staged Brazilian tests under unique in situ conditions at the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) strain diffractometer EPSILON, at the IBR-2M, Dubna, Russia. We measure elastic strains by high resolution TOF diffraction within three cylindrical samples (Ø= 30 mm, l= 22 mm) of pure quartzite (> 98 vol% SiO2, Dalsland quartzite) and two samples of pure marble (> 98 vol% CaCO3, Carrara marble), brought to failure under staged indirect tensile loading. Initial states are measured without load to determine the load-free lattice parameters. Load is increased in three to four stages of approximately 15%, 33%, 66%, and 75-80% of the ultimate intact rock strength, and maintained during diffraction measurements ( 12 hours each). Each load step is ensued by a load-free state. Deviatoric strain in both σ1 and σ3, as well as residual strain, with reference to a strain-free state of powdered samples are calculated for whole diffraction patterns and single Bragg diffraction peaks. Our results provide insight into the mechanical behavior and intra-crystalline strain state of two metamorphic rocks under indirect tensile loading. Both the pre-test quartzite and marble exhibit residual lattice strains of several MPa, reflecting the regional stress field during their formation and exhumation. Superposition of residual strain is already observed following the first load stage in both materials. During subsequent loading stages, inelastic strains accumulate due to grain boundary glides, micro-plasticity and eventually microcracks, promoting the progressive failure of the rock. These results provide insight into the behaviour of rock during

  15. Formation and coalescence of strain localized regions in ferrite phase of DP600 steels under uniaxial tensile deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaie, A., E-mail: amir_alaie@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kadkhodapour, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Materials Testing, Materials Science and Strength of Materials (IMWF), University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Ziaei Rad, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asadi Asadabad, M. [Materials Research School, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Schmauder, S. [Institute for Materials Testing, Materials Science and Strength of Materials (IMWF), University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-01-19

    In this study the key factors in the creation and coalescence of strain localization regions in dual-phase steels were investigated. An in-situ tensile setup was used to follow the microscopic deformation of ferrite phase inside the microstructure of DP600 steel. The test was continued until the specimen was very close to final failure. The captured scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs enabled us to directly observe the evolution of deformation bands as a contour of strain distribution in the ferrite matrix. The image processing method was used to quantify the ferrite microscopic strains; the obtained strain maps were superimposed onto the SEM micrographs. The results revealed important deformational characteristics of the microstructure at the microscopic level. It was observed that despite the formation of slip bands inside the large grains during the early stages of deformation, the large ferrite grains did not contribute to the formation of high-strain bands until the final stages of severe necking. The behavior of voids and initial defects inside the localization bands was also studied. In the final stages of deformation, cracks were observed to preferentially propagate in the direction of local deformation bands and to coalescence with each other to form the final failure lines in the microstructure. It was observed that in the final stages of deformation, the defects or voids outside the deformation bands do not contribute to the final failure mechanisms and could be considered to be of minor importance.

  16. Ductility and failure behaviour of both unirradiated and irradiated zircaloy-4 cladding using plane strain tensile specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carassou, S.; Le Saux, M.; Pizzanelli, J.P.; Rabouille, O.; Averty, X.; Poussard, C.; Cazalis, B.; Desquines, J.; Bernaudat, C.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, eight PST (Plan Strain Tensile) tests machined from a Zircaloy-4 (Zy-4) cladding irradiated up to 5 annual cycles have been performed at 280, 350 and 480 Celsius degrees. The specimen displacements during the tests were filmed and digitally recorded to allow the use of a Digital Image Correlation (DIC) analysis technique to experimentally determine the local strains on the outer surface of the specimens. The plane strain conditions have been verified and prevail over a wide area between the notches of the specimen, as expected from full 3D FE numerical analysis performed in support of the tests. For the first time, the location of the onset of fracture for this geometry on irradiated material has been experimentally observed: at 280 C.degrees, crack initiates in the vicinity of the notches, in an area where plane strain conditions are not fulfilled, and for a local circumferential strain value of about 5%. At 350 C. degrees and 480 C. degrees, cracks initiate at a location where plane strain conditions prevail, for circumferential strain values respectively close to 10% and greater than 50%. These results have been compared to results obtained previously by similar test on fresh and hydrided material, as well as tests performed as support to the study. At 350 C. degrees, the homogeneous 700 ppm hydrided Zy-4 and the Zy-4 irradiated during 5 annual cycles exhibit similar fracture behaviour, for both fracture hoop strain values (10%) and fracture mode (through-wall slant fracture). For the irradiated material, it has clearly been established that at 350 C. degrees, a brittle fracture occurs at the outer surface in the hydride rim. The crack propagates subsequently toward the inner surface and the notches, where final fracture occurs

  17. Tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaoka, Takeshi, E-mail: inaoka@phys.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Furukawa, Takuro; Toma, Ryo; Yanagisawa, Susumu [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2015-09-14

    By means of a hybrid density-functional method, we investigate the tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge. We consider [001], [111], and [110] uniaxial tensility and (001), (111), and (110) biaxial tensility. Under the condition of no normal stress, we determine both normal compression and internal strain, namely, relative displacement of two atoms in the primitive unit cell, by minimizing the total energy. We identify those strain types which can induce the band-gap transition, and evaluate the critical strain coefficient where the gap transition occurs. Either normal compression or internal strain operates unfavorably to induce the gap transition, which raises the critical strain coefficient or even blocks the transition. We also examine how each type of tensile strain decreases the band-gap energy, depending on its orientation. Our analysis clearly shows that synergistic operation of strain orientation and band anisotropy has a great influence on the gap transition and the gap energy.

  18. Valence band structure and density of states effective mass model of biaxial tensile strained silicon based on k · p theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Qian-Wei; Liu Hong-Xia; Wang Shu-Long; Qin Shan-Shan; Wang Zhi-Lin

    2011-01-01

    After constructing a stress and strain model, the valence bands of in-plane biaxial tensile strained Si is calculated by k · p method. In the paper we calculate the accurate anisotropy valance bands and the splitting energy between light and heavy hole bands. The results show that the valance bands are highly distorted, and the anisotropy is more obvious. To obtain the density of states (DOS) effective mass, which is a very important parameter for device modeling, a DOS effective mass model of biaxial tensile strained Si is constructed based on the valance band calculation. This model can be directly used in the device model of metal—oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). It also a provides valuable reference for biaxial tensile strained silicon MOSFET design. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Effect of strain rate and notch geometry on tensile properties and fracture mechanism of creep strength enhanced ferritic P91 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chandan; Mahapatra, M. M.; Kumar, Pradeep; Saini, N.

    2018-01-01

    Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) P91 steel were subjected to room temperature tensile test for quasi-static (less than 10-1/s) strain rate by using the Instron Vertical Tensile Testing Machine. Effect of different type of notch geometry, notch depth and angle on mechanical properties were also considered for different strain rate. In quasi-static rates, the P91 steel showed a positive strain rate sensitivity. On the basis of tensile data, fracture toughness of P91 steel was also calculated numerically. For 1 mm notch depth (constant strain rate), notch strength and fracture toughness were found to be increased with increase in notch angle from 45° to 60° while the maximum value attained in U-type notch. Notch angle and notch depth has found a minute effect on P91 steel strength and fracture toughness. The fracture surface morphology was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM).

  20. Local strain distributions in partially recrystallized copper determined by in situ tensile investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fengxiang; Ubhi, H.S.; Zhang, Yubin

    2015-01-01

    A partially recrystallized copper sample produced by cold-rolling and annealing was deformed in situ by uniaxial tension in a scanning electron microscope, and electron backscatter diffraction data were collected before and after deformation to certain strains. The local strain distributions are ...

  1. Electrical characterization of Ω-gated uniaxial tensile strained Si nanowire-array metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors with - and channel orientations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habicht, Stefan; Feste, Sebastian; Zhao, Qing-Tai; Buca, Dan; Mantl, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Nanowire-array metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) were fabricated along and crystal directions on (001) un-/strained silicon-on-insulator substrates. Lateral strain relaxation through patterning was employed to transform biaxial tensile strain into uniaxial tensile strain along the nanowire. Devices feature ideal subthreshold swings and maximum on-current/off-current ratios of 10 11 for n and p-type transistors on both substrates. Electron and hole mobilities were extracted by split C–V method. For p-MOSFETs an increased mobility is observed for channel direction devices compared to devices. The n-MOSFETs showed a 45% increased electron mobility compared to devices. The comparison of strained and unstrained n-MOSFETs along and clearly demonstrates improved electron mobilities for strained channels of both channel orientations.

  2. Tensile-strained nanoscale Ge/In0.16Ga0.84As heterostructure for tunnel field-effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Maurya, Deepam; Priya, Shashank; Hudait, Mantu K

    2014-04-09

    Tensile strained Ge/In0.16Ga0.84As heterostructure was grown in situ by molecular beam epitaxy using two separated growth chambers for Ge and III-V materials. Controlled growth conditions led to the presence of 0.75% in-plane tensile strain within Ge layer. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed pseudomorphic Ge with high crystalline quality and a sharp Ge/In0.16Ga0.84As heterointerface. Atomic force microscopy revealed a uniform two-dimensional cross-hatch surface morphology with a root-mean-square roughness of 1.26 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated reduced tunneling-barrier-height compared with Ge/GaAs heterostructure. The superior structural properties suggest tensile strained Ge/In0.16Ga0.84As heterostructure would be a promising candidate for high-performance and energy-efficient tunnel field-effect transistor applications.

  3. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Raha, S.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  4. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India); Raha, S. [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Computational and Data Sciences (India); Mahapatra, D. Roy, E-mail: droymahapatra@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India)

    2017-02-15

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  5. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes integrated in microcantilevers for application of tensile strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Søren; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Madsen, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    variations in the response. Using a simple resistor model we estimate the expected conductance-strain response for a multi-walled carbon nanotube, and compare to our results on multi-walled carbon nanotubes as well as measurements by others on single-walled carbon nanotubes. Integration of nanotubes...

  6. Effects of surface cracks and strain rate on the tensile behavior of Balmoral Red granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardoukhi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental procedure for studying the effects of surface cracks on the mechanical behavior of Balmoral Red granite under dynamic and quasi-static loading. Three different thermal shocks were applied on the surface of the Brazilian Disc test samples by keeping a flame torch at a fixed distance from the sample surface for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Microscopy clearly shows that the number of the surface cracks increases with the duration of the thermal shock. After the thermal shock, the Brazilian Disc tests were performed using a servohydraulic materials testing machine and a compression Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB device. The results show that the tensile strength of the rock decreases and the rate sensitivity of the rock increases as more cracks are introduced to the structure. The DIC analysis of the Brazilian disc tests shows that the fracture of the sample initiates at the center of the samples or slightly closer to the incident bar contact point. This is followed by crushing of the samples at both contact points with the stress bars.

  7. Cardiomyogenesis of periodontal ligament-derived stem cells by dynamic tensile strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaez, Daniel; Acosta Torres, Zenith; Ng, Tsz Kin; Choy, Kwong Wai; Pang, Chi Pui; Cheung, Herman S

    2017-02-01

    Cellular therapies for the treatment of myocardial infarction have proven to be an invaluable tool in recent years and provide encouraging evidence for the possibility to restore normal heart function. However, questions still remain as to the optimal cell source, pre-conditioning methods and delivery techniques for such an application. This study explores the use of a population of stem cells arising from the neural crest and isolated from adult human periodontal ligament along with short-term mechanical strain as an inducer of cardiomyogenesis and possibly pre-conditioning stimulus for cellular cardiomyoplasty. Cells were subjected to a short-term dynamic mechanical tension in our custom-built bioreactor and analyzed for cardiomyogenic commitment. Mechanical strain elicited a cardiomyogenic response from the cells following just 2 h of stimulation. Mechanical strain activated and translocated cardiac-specific transcription factors GATA4, MEF2C and Nkx2.5, and induced expression of the sarcomeric actin and cardiac troponin T proteins. Mechanical strain induced production of significantly higher levels of nitric oxide when compared to static controls. Elimination of elevated ROS levels by free radical scavengers completely abolished the cardiomyogenic response of the cells. MicroRNA profile changes in stretched cells were detected for 39 miRNAs with 16 of the differentially expressed miRNAs related to heart development. The use of stem cells in combination with mechanical strain prior to their delivery in vivo may pose a valuable alternative for the treatment of myocardial infarction and merits further exploration for its capacity to augment the already observed beneficial effects of cellular therapies.

  8. Cyclic Tensile Strain Can Play a Role in Directing both Intramembranous and Endochondral Ossification of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon F. Carroll

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Successfully regenerating damaged or diseased bone and other joint tissues will require a detailed understanding of how joint specific environmental cues regulate the fate of progenitor cells that are recruited or delivered to the site of injury. The goal of this study was to explore the role of cyclic tensile strain (CTS in regulating the initiation of mesenchymal stem cell/multipotent stromal cell (MSC differentiation, and specifically their progression along the endochondral pathway. To this end, we first explored the influence of CTS on the differentiation of MSCs in the absence of any specific growth factor, and secondly, we examined the influence of the long-term application of this mechanical stimulus on markers of endochondral ossification in MSCs maintained in chondrogenic culture conditions. A custom bioreactor was developed to apply uniaxial tensile deformation to bone marrow-derived MSCs encapsulated within physiological relevant 3D fibrin hydrogels. Mechanical loading, applied in the absence of soluble differentiation factors, was found to enhance the expression of both tenogenic (COL1A1 and osteogenic markers (BMP2, RUNX2, and ALPL, while suppressing markers of adipogenesis. No evidence of chondrogenesis was observed, suggesting that CTS can play a role in initiating direct intramembranous ossification. During long-term culture in the presence of a chondrogenic growth factor, CTS was shown to induce MSC re-organization and alignment, increase proteoglycan and collagen production, and to enhance the expression of markers associated with endochondral ossification (BMP2, RUNX2, ALPL, OPN, and COL10A1 in a strain magnitude-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings indicate that tensile loading may play a key role in promoting both intramembranous and endochondral ossification of MSCs in a context-dependent manner. In both cases, this loading-induced promotion of osteogenesis was correlated with an increase in the expression of

  9. Influence of phosphorus on the tensile stress strain curves in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandström, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Copper canisters are planned to be used for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The canisters will be exposed to slow plastic straining over extensive periods of time. To be able to predict the mechanical properties a range of basic models have previously been developed for copper with and without phosphorus (Cu-OFP, Cu-OF). Already with the small amount of phosphorus added in the canisters (60 wt. ppm) dramatic improvements in the measured creep strength and the creep ductility are found. The basic models are further developed in the present paper. The influence of phosphorus on slow strain rate tests is analysed. It is shown that the main effect of phosphorus is that it prevents brittle rupture, which is modelled by taking creep cavitation into account.

  10. Quantitative strain and slope evaluation on a double lap joint tensile test using ESPSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molimard, J.; Bounda, D.; Vautrin, A.

    2006-08-01

    The present study is based on the use of electronical speckle pattern shearing interferometry (ESPSI) on a double lap joint, the joined parts being two steel blocks and two composite plates. ESPSI is used to investigate de strain maps close to the end of the bonding in the center part of the specimen. The ESPSI set-up allows to get the full field strain and slope maps of a given surface. Its architecture is based on optical fibres which gives a portable assembly that can be used in a civil/mechanical engineering laboratory. This presentation emphases the advantages of such a method and its performances. Last some results are given and compared to an analytical approach.

  11. Neutron Bragg-edge-imaging for strain mapping under in situ tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woracek, R.; Penumadu, D.; Kardjilov, N.; Hilger, A.; Strobl, M.; Wimpory, R. C.; Manke, I.; Banhart, J.

    2011-01-01

    Wavelength selective neutron radiography at a cold neutron reactor source was used to measure strain and determine (residual) stresses in a steel sample under plane stress conditions. We present a new technique that uses an energy-resolved neutron imaging system based on a double crystal monochromator and is equipped with a specially developed (in situ) biaxial load frame to perform Bragg edge based transmission imaging. The neutron imaging technique provides a viewing area of 7 cm by 7 cm with a spatial resolution on the order of ∼ 100 μm. The stress-induced shifts of the Bragg edge corresponding to the (110) lattice plane were resolved spatially for a ferritic steel alloy A36 (ASTM international) sample. Furthermore it is demonstrated that results agree with comparative data obtained using neutron diffraction and resistance based strain-gauge rosettes.

  12. In situ neutron diffraction during tensile straining of fine grained ferrite-pearlite steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ono, T.; Tomota, Y.; Lukáš, Petr; Lugovyy, Dmytro; Neov, Dimitar; Tsuchida, N.; Nagai, K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2004), s. 121-125 ISSN 0267-0836 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048107; GA ČR GA202/03/0891 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : neutron diffraction in situ * strain distribution * low carbon Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.639, year: 2004

  13. Effects of Temperature and Strain Rate on Tensile Deformation Behavior of 9Cr-0.5Mo-1.8W-VNb Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Weng, Xiaoxiang; Jiang, Yong; Gong, Jianming

    2017-09-01

    A series of uniaxial tensile tests were carried out at different strain rate and different temperatures to investigate the effects of temperature and strain rate on tensile deformation behavior of P92 steel. In the temperature range of 30-700 °C, the variations of flow stress, average work-hardening rate, tensile strength and ductility with temperature all show three temperature regimes. At intermediate temperature, the material exhibited the serrated flow behavior, the peak in flow stress, the maximum in average work-hardening rate, and the abnormal variations in tensile strength and ductility indicates the occurrence of DSA, whereas the sharp decrease in flow stress, average work-hardening rate as well as strength values, and the remarkable increase in ductility values with increasing temperature from 450 to 700 °C imply that dynamic recovery plays a dominant role in this regime. Additionally, for the temperature ranging from 550 to 650 °C, a significant decrease in flow stress values is observed with decreasing in strain rate. This phenomenon suggests the strain rate has a strong influence on flow stress. Based on the experimental results above, an Arrhenius-type constitutive equation is proposed to predict the flow stress.

  14. Experiments and FE modeling of stress-strain state in ReBCO tape under tensile, torsional and transverse load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilin, K.; Yagotintsev, K. A.; Zhou, C.; Gao, P.; Kosse, J.; Otten, S. J.; Wessel, W. A. J.; Haugan, T. J.; van der Laan, D. C.; Nijhuis, A.

    2015-05-01

    For high current superconductors in high magnet fields with currents in the order of 50 kA, single ReBCO coated conductors must be assembled in a cable. The geometry of such a cable is mostly such that combined torsion, axial and transverse loading states are anticipated in the tapes and tape joints. The resulting strain distribution, caused by different thermal contraction and electromagnetic forces, will affect the critical current of the tapes. Tape performance when subjected to torsion, tensile and transverse loading is the key to understanding limitations for the composite cable performance. The individual tape material components can be deformed, not only elastically but also plastically under these loads. A set of experimental setups, as well as a convenient and accurate method of stress-strain state modeling based on the finite element method have been developed. Systematic measurements on single ReBCO tapes are carried out combining axial tension and torsion as well as transverse loading. Then the behavior of a single tape subjected to the various applied loads is simulated in the model. This paper presents the results of experimental tests and detailed FE modeling of the 3D stress-strain state in a single ReBCO tape under different loads, taking into account the temperature dependence and the elastic-plastic properties of the tape materials, starting from the initial tape processing conditions during its manufacture up to magnet operating conditions. Furthermore a comparison of the simulations with experiments is presented with special attention for the critical force, the threshold where the tape performance becomes irreversibly degraded. We verified the influence of tape surface profile non-uniformity and copper stabilizer thickness on the critical force. The FE models appear to describe the tape experiments adequately and can thus be used as a solid basis for optimization of various cabling concepts.

  15. Effects of drawing strain and post-annealing conditions on microstructural evolution and tensile properties of medium- and high-carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Hyuk; Lee, Taekyung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Chong Soo

    2017-11-01

    Variation in the microstructure and tensile properties with the warm drawing strain and subsequent annealing of 0.45 wt% C (45C) medium-carbon steel and 0.82 wt% C (82C) high-carbon steel was investigated. The morphology and size of ferrite and pearlite changed considerably with applied strain during drawing and with annealing temperature and time, which made the tensile properties of the drawn steels vary considerably. With increasing drawing strain to 2.5, the yield strength increased significantly from 393 to 1332 MPa for the 45C steel and from 673 to 1876 MPa for the 82C steel; this was attributed mainly to the strain hardening caused by severely deformed ferrite and/or enhanced particle hardening caused by cementite segmentation. During annealing of heavily drawn steels, ferrite grain growth and coarsening of broken cementite particles occurred simultaneously, which caused effective recovery of the ductility of severely drawn steels. These results demonstrate that the tensile strength and elongation of medium- and high-carbon steel wires can be tuned considerably by controlling the extents of drawing and annealing, thereby widening their applicability and facilitating their manufacture to match their mechanical properties to each application.

  16. Tensile strain induced narrowed bandgap of TiO{sub 2} films: Utilizing the two-way shape memory effect of TiNiNb substrate and in-situ mechanical bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Minshu, E-mail: dms1223@126.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum at Beijing, Beijing, 102249 (China); Center for Electrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States); Cui, Lishan; Wan, Qiong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum at Beijing, Beijing, 102249 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Imposed tensile strain to anatase TiO{sub 2} nanofilm by using the two-way shape memory effect of NiTiNb substrate. • Imposed tensile strain to rutile TiO{sub 2} thin film by in-situ mechanical bending. • Tauc plot based on the PEC-tested auction spectrum was utilized to precisely determine the bandgap of TiO{sub 2}. • Tensile strain narrowed the bandgap of anatase TiO{sub 2} by 60 meV and rutile TiO{sub 2} by 70 meV. • Tensile strain contributes to a 1.5 times larger photocurrent for the water oxidation reaction. - Abstract: Elastic strain is one of the methods to alter the band gap of semiconductors. However, relevant experimental work is limited due to the difficulty in imposing strain. Two new methods for imposing tensile strain to TiO{sub 2} film were introduced here. One is by utilizing the two-way shape memory effect of NiTiNb substrate, and the other method is in-situ mechanical bending. The former method succeeded in imposing 0.4% tensile strain to anatase TiO{sub 2} nanofilm, and strain narrowed the bandgap of TiO{sub 2} by 60 meV. The latter method enabled rutile TiO{sub 2} thin film under the 0.5% biaxially tensile-strained state, which contributes to a narrowed bandgap with ΔE{sub g} of 70 meV. Also, photocurrents of both strained TiO{sub 2} films increased by 1.5 times compared to the strain-free films, which indirectly verified the previous DFT prediction proposed by Thulin and Guerra in 2008 that tensile strain could improve the mobility and separation of photo-excite carriers.

  17. Tensile Strain Effects on the Magneto-transport in Calcium Manganese Oxide Thin Films: Comparison with its Hole-doped Counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Bridget; Neubauer, Samuel; Chaudhry, Adeel; Hart, Cacie; Ferrone, Natalie; Houston, David; Yong, Grace; Kolagani, Rajeswari

    Magnetoresistance properties of the epitaxial thin films of doped rare earth manganites are known to be influenced by the effect of bi-axial strain induced by lattice mismatch with the substrate. In hole-doped manganites, the effect of both compressive and tensile strain is qualitatively consistent with the expected changes in unit cell symmetry from cubic to tetragonal, leading to Jahn-Teller strain fields that affect the energy levels of Mn3 + energy levels. Recent work in our laboratory on CaMnO3 thin films has pointed out that tetragonal distortions introduced by tensile lattice mismatch strain may also have the effect of modulating the oxygen content of the films in agreement with theoretical models that propose such coupling between strain and oxygen content. Our research focuses on comparing the magneto-transport properties of hole-doped manganite LaCaMnO3 thin films with that of its electron doped counter parts, in an effort to delineate the effects of oxygen stoichiometry changes on magneto-transport from the effects of Jahn-Teller type strain. Towson University Office of Undergraduate Research, Fisher Endowment Grant and Undergraduate Research Grant from the Fisher College of Science and Mathematics, Seed Funding Grant from the School of Emerging technologies and the NSF Grant ECCS 112856.

  18. Tensile properties and strain-hardening behavior of double-sided arc welded and friction stir welded AZ31B magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, S.M.; Chen, D.L.; Bhole, S.D.; Cao, X.; Powidajko, E.; Weckman, D.C.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Microstructures, tensile properties and work hardening behavior of double-sided arc welded (DSAWed) and friction stir welded (FSWed) AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloy sheet were studied at different strain rates. While the yield strength was higher, both the ultimate tensile strength and ductility were lower in the FSWed samples than in the DSAWed samples due to welding defects present at the bottom surface in the FSWed samples. Strain-hardening exponents were evaluated using the Hollomon relationship, the Ludwik equation and a modified equation. After welding, the strain-hardening exponents were nearly twice that of the base metal. The DSAWed samples exhibited stronger strain-hardening capacity due to the larger grain size coupled with the divorced eutectic structure containing β-Mg 17 Al 12 particles in the fusion zone, compared to the FSWed samples and base metal. Kocks-Mecking type plots were used to show strain-hardening stages. Stage III hardening occurred after yielding in both the base metal and the welded samples. At lower strains a higher strain-hardening rate was observed in the base metal, but it decreased rapidly with increasing net flow stress. At higher strains the strain-hardening rate of the welded samples became higher, because the recrystallized grains in the FSWed and the larger re-solidified grains coupled with β particles in the DSAWed provided more space to accommodate dislocation multiplication during plastic deformation. The strain-rate sensitivity evaluated via Lindholm's approach was observed to be higher in the base metal than in the welded samples.

  19. Potential of recent rubber-elasticity theories for describing the tensile stress-strain dependences of two-phase polymer networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meissner, Bohumil; Špírková, Milena

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 181, - (2002), s. 289-301 ISSN 1022-1360. [Austrian Polymer Meeting /5./. Leoben, 12.09.2001-14.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/00/1311 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : rubber-elasticity theories * tensile stress-strain dependeces * two-phase polymer networks Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.758, year: 2002

  20. Phase volume fractions and strain measurements in an ultrafine-grained NiTi shape-memory alloy during tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.L.; Wagner, M.F.-X.; Frenzel, J.; Schmahl, W.W.; Eggeler, G.

    2010-01-01

    An ultrafine-grained pseudoelastic NiTi shape-memory alloy wire with 50.9 at.% Ni was examined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction during in situ uniaxial tensile loading (up to 1 GPa) and unloading. Both macroscopic stress-strain measurements and volume-averaged lattice strains are reported and discussed. The loading behavior is described in terms of elasto-plastic deformation of austenite, emergence of R phase, stress-induced martensitic transformation, and elasto-plastic deformation, grain reorientation and detwinning of martensite. The unloading behavior is described in terms of stress relaxation and reverse plasticity of martensite, reverse transformation of martensite to austenite due to stress relaxation, and stress relaxation of austenite. Microscopically, lattice strains in various crystallographic directions in the austenitic B2, martensitic R, and martensitic B19' phases are examined during loading and unloading. It is shown that the phase transformation occurs in a localized manner along the gage length at the plateau stress. Phase volume fractions and lattice strains in various crystallographic reflections in the austenite and martensite phases are examined over two transition regions between austenite and martensite, which have a width on the order of the wire diameter. Anisotropic effects observed in various crystallographic reflections of the austenitic phase are also discussed. The results contribute to a better understanding of the tensile loading behavior, both macroscopically and microscopically, of NiTi shape-memory alloys.

  1. Glass interface effect on high-strain-rate tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The glass interface effect on dynamic tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material has been investigated by subjecting a glass-polymer system of this polymer material matrix embedded a single 3 mm-diameter glass particle to impact loading in a split Hopkinson tension bar

  2. Mechanical Stimulation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Functional Tissue Engineering of the Musculoskeletal System via Cyclic Hydrostatic Pressure, Simulated Microgravity, and Cyclic Tensile Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Rachel C; Bodle, Josie C; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2018-01-01

    It is critical that human adipose stem cell (hASC) tissue-engineering therapies possess appropriate mechanical properties in order to restore function of the load bearing tissues of the musculoskeletal system. In an effort to elucidate the hASC response to mechanical stimulation and develop mechanically robust tissue engineered constructs, recent research has utilized a variety of mechanical loading paradigms including cyclic tensile strain, cyclic hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical unloading in simulated microgravity. This chapter describes methods for applying these mechanical stimuli to hASC to direct differentiation for functional tissue engineering of the musculoskeletal system.

  3. Release of tensile strain on engineered human tendon tissue disturbs cell adhesions, changes matrix architecture, and induces an inflammatory phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tendon cells results in an upregulation of mechanotransduction signaling pathways, cell-matrix adhesion and collagen synthesis, but whether unloading removes these responses is unclear. We investigated the response to tension release, with regard to matrix proteins, pro...... were upregulated. Stimulation with the cytokine TGF-β1 had distinct effects on some tendon-related genes in both tensioned and de-tensioned tissue. These findings indicate an important role of mechanical loading for cellular and matrix responses in tendon, including that loss of tension leads...

  4. Tensile testing

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  5. Tensile properties and strengthening mechanisms of a TWIP steel at high strain rate: Hall-Petch relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas, F. de las; Ferraiuolo, A.; Pentti Karjalainen, L.; Gil Sevillano, J.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of strain rate and grain size on the mechanical properties of a 22% Mn, 0.6% C (mass %) austenitic TWIP steel has been studied. A typical quasi-linear stress-strain behaviour of TWIP steels that deform by twinning has been observed at strain rates of 9.4 s-1 and 265 s-1 and room temperature. At high strain rates, the constant work - hardening rate region typically observed in TWIP steel clearly shortens. In addition, the Hall-Petch relationship has been obtained for each strain rate. The Hall-Petch slope KHP increases as a function of strain in all cases. The dependence of the KHP on the strain rate could be adiabatic heating. (Author)

  6. Room Temperature Electroluminescence from Tensile-Strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge Multiple Quantum Wells on a Ge Virtual Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyang Lin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct band electroluminescence (EL from tensile-strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge multiple quantum wells (MQWs on a Ge virtual substrate (VS at room temperature is reported herein. Due to the competitive result of quantum confinement Stark effect and bandgap narrowing induced by tensile strain in Ge wells, electroluminescence from Γ1-HH1 transition in 12-nm Ge wells was observed at around 1550 nm. As injection current density increases, additional emission shoulders from Γ2-HH2 transition in Ge wells and Ge VS appeared at around 1300–1400 nm and 1600–1700 nm, respectively. The peak energy of EL shifted to the lower energy side superquadratically with an increase of injection current density as a result of the Joule heating effect. During the elevation of environmental temperature, EL intensity increased due to a reduction of energy between L and Γ valleys of Ge. Empirical fitting of the relationship between the integrated intensity of EL (L and injection current density (J with L~Jm shows that the m factor increased with injection current density, suggesting higher light emitting efficiency of the diode at larger injection current densities, which can be attributed to larger carrier occupations in the Γ valley and the heavy hole (HH valance band at higher temperatures.

  7. Biaxial direct tensile tests in a large range of strain rates. Results on a ferritic nuclear steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertini, C.; Labibes, K.; Montagnani, M.; Pizzinato, E.V.; Solomos, G.; Viaccoz, B. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre

    2000-09-01

    Constitutive equations are usually calibrated only trough the experimental results obtained by means of unixial tests because of the lack of adequate biaxial experimental data especially at high strain rate conditions. These data are however important for the validation of analytical models and also for the predictions of mechanical behaviour of real structures subjected to multiaxial loading by numerical simulations. In this paper some developments are shown concerning biaxial cruciform specimens and different experimental machines allowing biaxial tests in a large range of strain rates. This experimental campaign has also allowed study of the influence of changing the strain paths. Diagrams of equivalent stress versus straining direction and also equivalent plastic fracture strain versus straining direction are shown. (orig.)

  8. Biomimetic fetal rotation bioreactor for engineering bone tissues-Effect of cyclic strains on upregulation of osteogenic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Akhilandeshwari; Wen, Feng; Lim, Jing; Chong, Mark Seow Khoon; Chan, Jerry K Y; Teoh, Swee-Hin

    2018-01-03

    Cells respond to physiological mechanical stresses especially during early fetal development. Adopting a biomimetic approach, it is necessary to develop bioreactor systems to explore the effects of physiologically relevant mechanical strains and shear stresses for functional tissue growth and development. This study introduces a multimodal bioreactor system that allows application of cyclic compressive strains on premature bone grafts that are cultured under biaxial rotation (chamber rotation about 2 axes) conditions for bone tissue engineering. The bioreactor is integrated with sensors for dissolved oxygen levels and pH that allow real-time, non-invasive monitoring of the culture parameters. Mesenchymal stem cells-seeded polycaprolactone-β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds were cultured in this bioreactor over 2 weeks in 4 different modes-static, cyclic compression, biaxial rotation, and multimodal (combination of cyclic compression and biaxial rotation). The multimodal culture resulted in 1.8-fold higher cellular proliferation in comparison with the static controls within the first week. Two weeks of culture in the multimodal bioreactor utilizing the combined effects of optimal fluid flow conditions and cyclic compression led to the upregulation of osteogenic genes alkaline phosphatase (3.2-fold), osteonectin (2.4-fold), osteocalcin (10-fold), and collagen type 1 α1 (2-fold) in comparison with static cultures. We report for the first time, the independent and combined effects of mechanical stimulation and biaxial rotation for bone tissue engineering using a bioreactor platform with non-invasive sensing modalities. The demonstrated results show leaning towards the futuristic vision of using a physiologically relevant bioreactor system for generation of autologous bone grafts for clinical implantation. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Modulations in structural and ferroelectric properties due to tensile strain in BiFeO{sub 3} films on MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} substrates induced by thermal-expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Xiaolan; Miao Ludi; Stern, Ilan; Silwal, Punam [Department of Physics and Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Kim, Dae Ho, E-mail: kimdh@tulane.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have grown epitaxial films of ferroelectric BiFeO{sub 3} on spinel MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0 0 1) substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films show monoclinic structure deviated from bulk due to the tensile strain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tensile strain is induced by the difference of thermal expansion coefficients between the perovskite film and the spinel substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Poisson ratio of BiFeO{sub 3} is obtained from the variation of lattices at different temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ferroelectric polarization of the BiFeO{sub 3} film is reduced due to the tensile strain as well as the poor crystalline quality induced form the intrinsic incompatible interface between perovskite and spinel. - Abstract: The effect of tensile strain on structural and ferroelectric properties of BiFeO{sub 3} epitaxial films was investigated. The films grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0 0 1) substrates revealed monoclinic structure deviated from the bulk rhombohedral structure due to a tensile strain along the in-plane direction. The strain is induced by the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the film and the substrate. A Poisson ratio is calculated from the in-plain and out-of-plain lattice constants at different temperatures measured by reciprocal space maps of X-ray diffraction. The small Poisson ratio compared to the bulk suggests a weaker elastic response at high temperature. The ferroelectric polarization of the tensile-strained film along the (0 0 1) is also decreased from the bulk value.

  10. Quantification of deformation microstructure at ultra-low tensile strain in pure Al prepared by spark plasma sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, C. L.; Zhang, Y. B.; Wul, G. L.

    2017-01-01

    A sample of Al with grain size of 5.1 mu m, prepared by spark plasma sintering, was deformed to a nominal strain of 0.35% under exposure to X-ray synchrotron radiation, allowing spatially resolved orientation measurements to be made during loading by use of a micro-diffraction technique. A signif...

  11. Mechanical Properties of Weakly Segregated Block Copolymers. 3. Influence of Strain Rate and Temperature on Tensile Properties of Poly(styrene-b-butyl methacrylate) Diblock Copolymers with Different Morphologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weidisch, R.; Stamm, M.; Michler, G.H.; Fischer, H.R.; Jérôme, R.

    1999-01-01

    Poly(styrene-b-butyl methacrylate) diblock copolymers, PS-6-PBMA, with different morphologies are investigated with respect to the influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties. In the first part the mechanical properties of bicontinuous and perforated lamellar structure are

  12. Study of the effect of varying core diameter, shell thickness and strain velocity on the tensile properties of single crystals of Cu-Ag core-shell nanowire using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Jit; Das, D. K.

    2018-01-01

    Core-shell type nanostructures show exceptional properties due to their unique structure having a central solid core of one type and an outer thin shell of another type which draw immense attention among researchers. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are carried out on single crystals of copper-silver core-shell nanowires having wire diameter ranging from 9 to 30 nm with varying core diameter, shell thickness, and strain velocity. The tensile properties like yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and Young's modulus are studied and correlated by varying one parameter at a time and keeping the other two parameters constant. The results obtained for a fixed wire size and different strain velocities were extrapolated to calculate the tensile properties like yield strength and Young's modulus at standard strain rate of 1 mm/min. The results show ultra-high tensile properties of copper-silver core-shell nanowires, several times than that of bulk copper and silver. These copper-silver core-shell nanowires can be used as a reinforcing agent in bulk metal matrix for developing ultra-high strength nanocomposites.

  13. Some elevated temperature tensile and strain-controlled fatigue properties for a 9%Cr1Mo steel heat treated to simulate thick section material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, S.J.; Jacques, S.

    Current interest has been expressed in the usage of thick section 9%Cr1%Mo steel, particularly for UK Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) steam generator tubeplates. This paper presents the results of some preliminary mechanical property test work on a single cast of the steel, heat treated to simulate heavy ruling sections encompassing thicknesses likely to be met in the CDFR context. The microstructures of the simulated thick section material were found to remain predominantly as tempered martensite even at the slowest transformation cooling rates used (50 deg. C/h). The effect of microstructure is reflected in the elevated temperature proof stress, tensile strength and strain-controlled fatigue endurance which were found to be comparable with the properties established for thin section normalised and tempered 9%Cr1%Mo steel. These results are extremely encouraging and, taken in conjunction with the results from other simulation work on this material, further demonstrate the potential of thick section 9%Cr1%Mo steel. (author)

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament strain and tensile forces for weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing exercises: a guide to exercise selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Macleod, Toran D; Wilk, Kevin E; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-03-01

    There is a growing body of evidence documenting loads applied to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) for weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing exercises. ACL loading has been quantified by inverse dynamics techniques that measure anterior shear force at the tibiofemoral joint (net force primarily restrained by the ACL), ACL strain (defined as change in ACL length with respect to original length and expressed as a percentage) measured directly in vivo, and ACL tensile force estimated through mathematical modeling and computer optimization techniques. A review of the biomechanical literature indicates the following: ACL loading is generally greater with non-weight-bearing compared to weight-bearing exercises; with both types of exercises, the ACL is loaded to a greater extent between 10° to 50° of knee flexion (generally peaking between 10° and 30°) compared to 50° to 100° of knee flexion; and loads on the ACL change according to exercise technique (such as trunk position). Squatting with excessive forward movement of the knees beyond the toes and with the heels off the ground tends to increase ACL loading. Squatting and lunging with a forward trunk tilt tend to decrease ACL loading, likely due to increased hamstrings activity. During seated knee extension, ACL force decreases when the resistance pad is positioned more proximal on the anterior aspect of the lower leg, away from the ankle. The evidence reviewed as part of this manuscript provides objective data by which to rank exercises based on loading applied to the ACL. The biggest challenge in exercise selection post-ACL reconstruction is the limited knowledge of the optimal amount of stress that should be applied to the ACL graft as it goes through its initial incorporation and eventual maturation process. Clinicians may utilize this review as a guide to exercise selection and rehabilitation progression for patients post-ACL reconstruction.

  15. The influence of damage on the adiabatic stress-strain curve of aluminium alloy AA7075 under impact-tensile-loading; Der Einfluss von Schaedigung auf die adiabatische Fliesskurve der Aluminiumlegierung AA7075 unter Schlagzugbeanspruchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Magd, E.; Brodmann, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Lehr- und Forschungsgebiet Werkstoffkunde

    1999-09-01

    The flow behaviour of the aluminium wrought alloy AA7075 is studied in impact tension tests with strain rates between 1000 s{sup -1} and 4000 s{sup -1} on smooth tensile bars. The neck formation is discussed on the basis of the theory of imperfections under consideration of the increased strain rate sensitivity of the material and the adiabatic character of the deformation process at high strain rates. The experimentally determined stress-strain curves show that the flow stress starts to decrease seriously after reaching a strain value between 0.05 and 0.15. This reduction of the flow stress is found to be too high to be explained only by the influence of the adiabatic character of the deformation process. Metallographical investigations show successive damage within the material due to the nucleation of voids and micro-cracks at precipitation particles. Two different heat treatment conditions are investigated in order to determine the influence of particle size, volume fraction and distribution on the damage process. The evolution of damage is found to follow the Avrami-function. Taking the influence of strain rate and damage into consideration a material law is formulated which allows an adequate description of the material behaviour in the range of high strain rates. (orig.)

  16. Behaviour of eggshell membranes at tensile loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnková, M.J.; Nedomová, Š.; Trnka, Jan; Buchar, J.; Kumbár, V.

    46 B, December (2014), s. 44-48 ISSN 0324-1130 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : eggshell membrane * tensile loading * loading rate * stress * strain strength Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 0.201, year: 2014

  17. T-cell factor-4 and MHC upregulation in pigs receiving a live attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccine strain with interferon-gamma adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y-H; Lin, Y-L; Hwang, Y-C; Yang, H-C; Chiu, H-C; Chiou, S-H; Jong, M-H; Chow, K-C; Lin, C-C

    2016-10-01

    The effect of co-administration of interferon (IFN)-γ in pigs undergoing vaccination with an attenuated strain (LPC) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) was investigated. Unvaccinated pigs demonstrated pyrexia and died 7-9 days after challenge with virulent CSFV. Pigs receiving the attenuated vaccine remained healthy after virus challenge, except for mild, transient pyrexia, whereas pigs receiving IFN-γ simultaneously with the vaccine demonstrated normal body temperatures after virus challenge. Examination by nested RT-PCR revealed greater viral load in the spleens of the pigs vaccinated with the attenuated CSFV, compared with those that had additionally received IFN-γ. Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and MHC class II molecules was upregulated in the spleens of the IFN-γ treated vaccinated pigs, demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. Based on Western blot analysis, anti-CSFV IgG2 antibodies were elevated in vaccinated pigs by co-administration of IFN-γ (IFN-γ(Hi): P pigs that had received IFN-γ. This study suggests involvement of Tcf-4 in IFN-γ-mediated immune regulation following CSFV vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fracture behavior of nuclear graphites under tensile impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugachi, Hirokazu; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni

    1994-01-01

    Impact tensile strength test was performed with two kinds of HTTR graphites, fine grained isotropic graphite, IG-11 and coarse grained near isotropic graphite, PGX and deformation and fracture behavior under the strain rate of over 100s -1 was measured and the following results were derived: (1) Tensile strength for IG-11 graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but over 1 s -1 , tensile strength for IG-11 graphite increase larger than that measured under 1 s -1 . At the strain rate more than 100 s -1 , remarkable decrease of tensile strength for IG-11 graphite was found. Tensile strength of PGX graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but beyond this value, the sharp tensile strength decrease occurs. (2) Under 100 s -1 , fracture strain for both graphites increase with increase of strain rate and over 100 s -1 , drastic increase of fracture strain for IG-11 graphite was found. (3) At the part of gage length, volume of specimen increase with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (4) Poisson's ratio for both graphites decrease with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (5) Remarkable change of stress-strain curve for both graphites under 100 s -1 was not found, but over 100 s -1 , the slope of these curve for IG-11 graphite decrease drastically. (author)

  19. Deformation features of aluminium in tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, N.F. de.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented a method to analyse stress-strain curves. Plastic and elastic strains were studied. The strains were done by tensile tests in four types of materials: highly pure aluminium, pure aluminium, commercially pure aluminium and aluminium - uranium. The chemical compositions were obtained by spectroscopy analysis and neutron activation analysis. Tensile tests were carried out at three strain rates, at room temperature, 100,200, 300 and 400 0 C, with knives extensometer and strain-gages to studied the elastic strain region. A multiple spring model based on two springs model to analyse elastic strain caused by tests without extensometers, taking in account moduli of elasticity and, an interactive analysis system with graphic capability were developed. It was suggested a qualitative model to explain the quantized multielasticity of Bell. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Damage-induced tensile instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hult, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a unified description of ductile and brittle rupture phenomena in structural components under tensile loading with particular emphasis on creep rupture. Two structural elements are analyzed in detail: 1) the uniform tensile bar subject to a Heaviside history of tensile force and superimposed such loadings, i.e. staircase histories, and 2) the thinwalled spherical pressure vessel subject to a Heaviside history of internal pressure. For both these structures the conditions for instantaneous as well as delayed rupture are analysed. It is shown that a state of mechanical instability will be reached at a certain load or after a certain time. The cases of purely ductile rupture and purely brittle fracture are identified as two limiting cases of this general instability phenomenon. The Kachanov-Rabotnov damage law implies that a structural component will fail in tension only when it has reached a state of complete damage, i.e. zero load carrying capacity. The extended law predicts failure at an earlier stage of the deterioration process and is therefore more compatible with experimental observation. Further experimental support is offered by predictions for staircase loading histories, both step-up and step-down type. The presented damage theory here predicts strain histories which are in closer agreement with test data than predictions based on other phenomenological theories

  1. Experimental Analysis of Tensile Mechanical Properties of Sprayed FRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the tensile mechanical properties of sprayed FRP, 13 groups of specimens were tested through uniaxial tensile experiments, being analyzed about stress-strain curve, tensile strength, elastic modulus, breaking elongation, and other mechanical properties. Influencing factors on tensile mechanical properties of sprayed FRP such as fiber type, resin type, fiber volume ratio, fiber length, and composite thickness were studied in the paper too. The results show that both fiber type and resin type have an obvious influence on tensile mechanical properties of sprayed FRP. There will be a specific fiber volume ratio for sprayed FRP to obtain the best tensile mechanical property. The increase of fiber length can lead to better tensile performance, while that of composite thickness results in property degradation. The study can provide reference to popularization and application of sprayed FRP material used in structure reinforcement.

  2. Tensile Strength of the Eggshell Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnková, J.; Nedomová, Š.; Kumbár, V.; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2016), s. 159-164 ISSN 1211-8516 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : eggshell membrane * tesile test * loading rate * tensile strength * fracture strain Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing

  3. Effect of the strain-induced melt activation (SIMA) process on the tensile properties of a new developed super high strength aluminum alloy modified by Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghparast, Amin [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourimotlagh, Masoud [Young Researchers Club, Dareshahr Branch, Islamic Azad university (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alipour, Mohammad, E-mail: Alipourmo@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the effect of Al-5Ti-1B grain refiners and modified strain-induced melt activation process on an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied. The optimum level of Ti was found to be 0.1 wt.%. The specimens subjected to deformation ratio of 40% (at 300 Degree-Sign C) and various heat treatment times (10-40 min) and temperature (550-600 Degree-Sign C) regimes were characterized in this study. Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Microstructural examinations were conducted by optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry. The optimum temperature and time in strain-induced melt activation process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min, respectively. T6 heat treatment including quenching to room temperature and aging at 120 Degree-Sign C for 24 h was employed to reach to the maximum strength. Significant improvements in mechanical properties were obtained with the addition of grain refiner combined with T6 heat treatment. After the T6 heat treatment, the average tensile strength increased from 283 MPa to 587 and 332 MPa to 617 for samples refined with 2 wt.% Al-5Ti-1B before and after strain-induced melt activation process and extrusion process, respectively. Ultimate strength of Ti-refined specimens without SIMA process has a lower value than globular microstructure specimens after SIMA and extrusion process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Al-5Ti-1B on the aluminum alloy produced by SIMA process was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-5Ti-1B is an effective in reducing the grain and reagent fine microstructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum temperature and time in SIMA process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UTS of globular structure specimens have a more value than Ti-refined specimens.

  4. TheListeria monocytogenesBile Stimulon under Acidic Conditions Is Characterized by Strain-Specific Patterns and the Upregulation of Motility, Cell Wall Modification Functions, and the PrfA Regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guariglia-Oropeza, Veronica; Orsi, Renato H; Guldimann, Claudia; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2018-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes uses a variety of transcriptional regulation strategies to adapt to the extra-host environment, the gastrointestinal tract, and the intracellular host environment. While the alternative sigma factor SigB has been proposed to be a key transcriptional regulator that facilitates L. monocytogenes adaptation to the gastrointestinal environment, the L. monocytogenes ' transcriptional response to bile exposure is not well-understood. RNA-seq characterization of the bile stimulon was performed in two L. monocytogenes strains representing lineages I and II. Exposure to bile at pH 5.5 elicited a large transcriptomic response with ~16 and 23% of genes showing differential transcription in 10403S and H7858, respectively. The bile stimulon includes genes involved in motility and cell wall modification mechanisms, as well as genes in the PrfA regulon, which likely facilitate survival during the gastrointestinal stages of infection that follow bile exposure. The fact that bile exposure induced the PrfA regulon, but did not induce further upregulation of the SigB regulon (beyond that expected by exposure to pH 5.5), suggests a model where at the earlier stages of gastrointestinal infection (e.g., acid exposure in the stomach), SigB-dependent gene expression plays an important role. Subsequent exposure to bile induces the PrfA regulon, potentially priming L. monocytogenes for subsequent intracellular infection stages. Some members of the bile stimulon showed lineage- or strain-specific distribution when 27 Listeria genomes were analyzed. Even though sigB null mutants showed increased sensitivity to bile, the SigB regulon was not found to be upregulated in response to bile beyond levels expected by exposure to pH 5.5. Comparison of wildtype and corresponding Δ sigB strains newly identified 26 SigB-dependent genes, all with upstream putative SigB-dependent promoters.

  5. The host response to the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917: Specific up-regulation of the proinflammatory chemokine MCP-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ukena Sya N

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of live microorganisms to influence positively the course of intestinal disorders such as infectious diarrhea or chronic inflammatory conditions has recently gained increasing interest as a therapeutic alternative. In vitro and in vivo investigations have demonstrated that probiotic-host eukaryotic cell interactions evoke a large number of responses potentially responsible for the effects of probiotics. The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of the E. coli Nissle 1917-host interaction by analyzing the gene expression pattern initiated by this probiotic in human intestinal epithelial cells. Methods Gene expression profiles of Caco-2 cells treated with E. coli Nissle 1917 were analyzed with microarrays. A second human intestinal cell line and also pieces of small intestine from BALB/c mice were used to confirm regulatory data of selected genes by real-time RT-PCR and cytometric bead array (CBA to detect secretion of corresponding proteins. Results Whole genome expression analysis revealed 126 genes specifically regulated after treatment of confluent Caco-2 cells with E. coli Nissle 1917. Among others, expression of genes encoding the proinflammatory molecules monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 ligand 2 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 alpha (MIP-2α and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 beta (MIP-2β was increased up to 10 fold. Caco-2 cells cocultured with E. coli Nissle 1917 also secreted high amounts of MCP-1 protein. Elevated levels of MCP-1 and MIP-2α mRNA could be confirmed with Lovo cells. MCP-1 gene expression was also up-regulated in mouse intestinal tissue. Conclusion Thus, probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 specifically upregulates expression of proinflammatory genes and proteins in human and mouse intestinal epithelial cells.

  6. In Situ Radiography During Tensile Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory system for testing specimens of metal-, ceramic-, and intermetallic-matrix composite materials incorporates both electromechanical tensile-testing subsystem and either of two imaging subsystems that take x-ray photographs of specimens before, during, and after tensile tests. Used to test specimens of reaction-bonded silicon nitride reinforced with silicon carbide fibers (SiC/RBSN) considered for high-temperature service in advanced aircraft turbine engines. Provides data on effects of preexisting flaws (e.g., high-density impurities and local variations of density) on fracture behavior. Accumulated internal damage monitored during loading. X-ray source illuminates specimen in load frame while specimen is pulled. X-ray images on film correlated with stress-vs.-strain data from tensile test.

  7. Calculations for protection against time-dependent strain. Fatigue data from stress-strain controlled fatigue tests with compressive and tensile stress, or bending stress, on steels. 3rd technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herter, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    The calculations for the design of nuclear power plant components in accordance with nuclear standards (ASME-BPVC III or KTA) are required to include fatigue analyses taking into account calculated primary plus secondary stress, plus stress maxima. The number of possible stress cycles can then be derived from the incipient cracking and fatigue data available in the codes and standards. The effects of temperature, surface quality, welding and size of specimens have been investigated. It was found that the nominal safety defined in the codes frequently is not attained in reality. The curves hitherto available in the ASME or KTA codes may still be taken as a basis when proper and accurate measurement of strains and stresses is assured and the correct influencing parameters are taken into account, but for psychological reasons it seems advisable to rely on new curves using Ssub(L) = 10 and S = 1.5. (orig.) [de

  8. Exposure of a 23F Serotype Strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Cigarette Smoke Condensate Is Associated with Selective Upregulation of Genes Encoding the Two-Component Regulatory System 11 (TCS11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Jenny A.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Dickens, Caroline; Anderson, Ronald; Feldman, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in whole genome expression profiles following exposure of the pneumococcus (strain 172, serotype 23F) to cigarette smoke condensate (160 μg/mL) for 15 and 60 min have been determined using the TIGR4 DNA microarray chip. Exposure to CSC resulted in the significant (P < 0.014–0.0006) upregulation of the genes encoding the two-component regulatory system 11 (TCS11), consisting of the sensor kinase, hk11, and its cognate response regulator, rr11, in the setting of increased biofilm formation. These effects of cigarette smoke on the pneumococcus may contribute to colonization of the airways by this microbial pathogen. PMID:25013815

  9. Exposure of a 23F Serotype Strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Cigarette Smoke Condensate Is Associated with Selective Upregulation of Genes Encoding the Two-Component Regulatory System 11 (TCS11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riana Cockeran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in whole genome expression profiles following exposure of the pneumococcus (strain 172, serotype 23F to cigarette smoke condensate (160 μg/mL for 15 and 60 min have been determined using the TIGR4 DNA microarray chip. Exposure to CSC resulted in the significant (P<0.014–0.0006 upregulation of the genes encoding the two-component regulatory system 11 (TCS11, consisting of the sensor kinase, hk11, and its cognate response regulator, rr11, in the setting of increased biofilm formation. These effects of cigarette smoke on the pneumococcus may contribute to colonization of the airways by this microbial pathogen.

  10. Microstructural evolution during tensile deformation of polypropylenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasari, A.; Rohrmann, J.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2003-01-01

    Tensile deformation processes occurring at varying strain rates in high and low crystallinity polypropylenes and ethylene-propylene di-block copolymers have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy. This is examined for both long and short chain polymeric materials. The deformation processes in different polymeric materials show striking dissimilarities in spite of the common propylene matrix. Additionally, the deformation behavior of long and their respective short chain polymers was different. Deformation mechanisms include crazing/tearing, wedging, ductile ploughing, fibrillation, and brittle fracture. The different modes of deformation are depicted in the form of strain rate-strain diagrams. At a constant strain rate, the strain to fracture follows the sequence: high crystallinity polypropylenes< low crystallinity polypropylenes< ethylene-propylene di-block copolymers, indicative of the trend in resistance to plastic deformation

  11. Evaluation of tensile properties of 5052 type aluminum-magnesium alloy at warm temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    S. Kilic; S. Toros; F. Ozturk

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the tensile properties of 5052 type aluminum-manganese alloyin warm temperatures.Design/methodology/approach: In this research, uniaxial tensile deformation behavior of 5052-H32 typealuminum magnesium alloy was studied range between room to 300°C and in the strain rate range of 0.0083-0.16 s-1.Findings: It was observed that the uniaxial tensile elongation of the material increases with increasing temperaturesand decreases with increasing strain...

  12. Environment-tensile property relationship in AISI 1018 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivatsan, T.S.; Hanigofsky, M.; Auradkar, R.; Hoff, T.

    1990-01-01

    Environment-material interaction depends on several concurrent and mutually competitive variables ranging from nature of the environment to composition of the steel and including: the test temperature; the time of exposure of the material to the environment; the deformation rate; and intrinsic microstructural effects; The present work is a characterization of strain rate and environment influences on the tensile properties of a steel, AISI 1018, having a fully spheroidized microstructure. Tensile tests were performed at ambient temperature (300 K) in environments which are mildly aggressive (moist laboratory air-relative humidity 50%) and inert (dry gaseous nitrogen). The specimens were deformed to failure at strain rates of 10 -4 sec -1 and 10 -5 sec -1 . No appreciable increase in yield and tensile strengths was observed at the strain rate of 10 -4 sec -1 . However, the increase in both was of the order of 10 to 12% at the strain rate of 10 -5 sec -1 . Ductility showed no variation with strain rate, but increased in the inert environment at both strain rates. Both environment and strain rate were found to have little to no influence on reduction in area of the test specimens. The true fracture stress followed a similar trend to the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. (author)

  13. Approaches for Tensile Testing of Braided Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Martin, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    than the expected material strength because of premature edge-initiated failure. Full-field strain measured during transverse tensile tests clearly showed accumulation of edge damage prior to failure. In the current work, high speed video and testing of single layer specimens are used to investigate potential failure mechanisms in more detail. High speed video clearly shows the edge initiation in six layer transverse tensile test coupons. Specimens with the bowtie geometry and the notched geometry minimize this edge effect and yield significantly higher transverse tensile strength values compared to the straight-sided coupons. However, bowtie and notched specimens geometries are not ideal because of the non-uniform stress and strain fields in the region of failure. Testing of tubes using internal pressurization eliminates edge-initiated failure and provides a more uniform state of stress and strain. Preliminary results indicate that bowtie, notched, and tube specimens yield comparable values for transverse tensile strength and that these values are much higher than the strength measured using a straight-sided coupon.

  14. Tensile properties and strengthening mechanisms of a TWIP steel at high strain rate: Hall-Petch relationship; Propiedades mecanicas a traccion y mecanismos de endurecimiento de un acero TWIP a altas velocidades de deformacion: relacion de Hall-Petch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas, F. de las; Ferraiuolo, A.; Pentti Karjalainen, L.; Gil Sevillano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of strain rate and grain size on the mechanical properties of a 22% Mn, 0.6% C (mass %) austenitic TWIP steel has been studied. A typical quasi-linear stress-strain behaviour of TWIP steels that deform by twinning has been observed at strain rates of 9.4 s-1 and 265 s-1 and room temperature. At high strain rates, the constant work - hardening rate region typically observed in TWIP steel clearly shortens. In addition, the Hall-Petch relationship has been obtained for each strain rate. The Hall-Petch slope KHP increases as a function of strain in all cases. The dependence of the KHP on the strain rate could be adiabatic heating. (Author)

  15. Second Generation Models for Strain-Based Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    This project covers the development of tensile strain design models which form a key part of the strain-based design of pipelines. The strain-based design includes at least two limit states, tensile rupture, and compressive buckling. The tensile stra...

  16. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  17. Mechanical tensile properties of the anterolateral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zens, Martin; Feucht, Matthias J; Ruhhammer, Johannes; Bernstein, Anke; Mayr, Hermann O; Südkamp, Norbert P; Woias, Peter; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    In a noticeable percentage of patients anterolateral rotational instabilities (ALRI) remain after an isolated ACL reconstruction. Those instabilities may occur due to an insufficiently directed damage of anterolateral structures that is often associated with ACL ruptures. Recent publications describe an anatomical structure, termed the anterolateral ligament (ALL), and suggest that this ligament plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of ALRI of the knee joint. However, only limited knowledge about the biomechanical characteristics and tensile properties of the anterolateral ligament exists. The anterolateral ligament was dissected in four fresh-frozen human cadaveric specimens and all surrounding tissue removed. The initial length of the anterolateral ligament was measured using a digital caliper. Tensile tests with load to failure were performed using a materials testing machine. The explanted anterolateral ligaments were histologically examined to measure the cross-sectional area. The mean ultimate load to failure of the anterolateral ligament was 49.90 N (± 14.62 N) and the mean ultimate strain was 35.96% (± 4.47%). The mean length of the ligament was 33.08 mm (± 2.24) and the mean cross-sectional area was 1.54 m m (2) (± 0.48 m m (2)). Including the areal measurements the maximum tension was calculated to be 32.78 [Formula: see text] (± 4.04 [Formula: see text]). The anterolateral ligament is an anatomical structure with tensile properties that are considerably weaker compared to other peripheral structures of the knee. Knowledge of the anterolateral ligament's tensile strengths may help to better understand its function and with graft choices for reconstruction procedures.

  18. Status of automated tensile machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satou, M.; Hamilton, M.L.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop the Monbusho Automated Tensile machine (MATRON) and install and operate it at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The machine is designed to provide rapid, automated testing of irradiated miniature tensile specimen in a vacuum at elevated temperatures. The MATRON was successfully developed and shipped to PNL for installation in a hot facility. The original installation plan was modified to simplify the current and subsequent installations, and the installation was completed. Detailed procedures governing the operation of the system were written. Testing on irradiated miniature tensile specimen should begin in the near future

  19. Numerical simulation of tensile behaviour of nuclear fuel cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosbons, R.R.; Coleman, C.E.; Holt, R.A.

    1975-10-01

    We have developed an expression to describe the true-stress true-strain behaviour of irradiated Zircaloy, the usual fuel sheathing material. The expression includes strain rate sensitivity, work hardening, irradiation hardening and strain softening due to the annihilation of irradiation damage. A cylindrical specimen, containing a slight taper, was used to simulate the development of plastic instability. By combining the phenomenological expression with the model specimen, numerical calculation of tensile tests on irradiated Zircaloy accurately described load-elongation curves, true-stress true-strain behaviour during necking, the effect of irradiation on ductility, and stress relaxation. (author)

  20. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Cameron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  1. Prediction of tensile curves, at 673 K, of cold-worked and stress-relieved zircaloy-4 from creep data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povolo, F.; Buenos Aires Univ. Nacional; Marzocca, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    A constitutive creep equation, based on jog-drag cell-formation, is used to predict tensile curves from creep data obtained in the same material. The predicted tensile curve are compared with actual stress versus plastic strain data, obtained both in cold-work and stress-relieved specimens. Finally, it is shown that the general features of the tensile curves, at low strain rates, are described by the creep model. (orig.)

  2. Tensile properties of irradiated TZM and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steichen, J.M.

    1975-04-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the elevated temperature tensile properties of TZM and tungsten has been experimentally determined. Specimens were irradiated at a temperature of approximately 720 0 F to fluences of 0.4 and 0.9 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Test parameters for both control and irradiated specimens included strain rates from 3 x 10 -4 to 1 s -1 and temperatures from 72 to 1700 0 F. The results of these tests were correlated with a rate-temperature parameter (T ln A/epsilon) to provide a concise description of material behavior over the range of deformation conditions of this study. The yield strength of the subject materials was significantly increased by decreasing temperature, increasing strain rate, and increasing fluence. Ductility was significantly reduced at any temperature or strain rate by increasing fluence. Cleavage fractures occurred in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens when the yield strength was elevated to the effective cleavage stress by temperature and/or strain rate. Neutron irradiation for the conditions of this study increased the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of tungsten by approximately 300 0 F and TZM by approximately 420 0 F. (U.S.)

  3. In-plane anisotropy in tensile deformation and its influence on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    plane anisotropy in tensile properties and the effect of aging on the nature of deformation (strain hardening behaviour) and formability characteristics, especially the limit drawing ratio and forming limit diagram. Despite weak crystallographic texture ...

  4. A study on the tensile property of ring specimen having gauge length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Bong Kook; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we tried to establish the method of evaluating the tensile properties of the ring specimen of Arsene which have gauge length. In this result, we verified the availability of central piece. We made ring specimens and devices such as central piece, pins, and clevises. A proper tensile speed was determined by pre-test. The result of main test was calibrated and compared with the result of FEM. To obtain the tensile properties from the ring test result, we observed two relationship: one is strain-displacement and the other is load ratio-displacement. The tensile properties could be evaluated by using these relationships

  5. The tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite posterior to hydrostatic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of prehydrostatic loading on microstructural changes and tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite have been examined. Scanning electron micrographs show that formation of microcracks associated with delamination between basal planes occurs under hydrostatic loading. Hydrostatic loading on specimens results in the decrease in tensile strength and increase in residual strain generated by the applied tensile stress at various levels, indicating that the graphite material is weakened by hydrostatic loading. A relationship between residual strain and applied tensile stress for graphite hydrostatically-loaded at several pressure levels can be approximately expressed as element of= (AP + B) sigmasup(n) over a wide range hydrostatic pressure, where element of, P and sigma denote residual strain, hydrostatic pressure and applied tensile stress, respectively; A, B and n are constant. The effects of prehydrostatic loading on the tensile stress-strain behavior of the graphite were examined in more detail. The ratio of stress after hydrostatic loading to that before hydrostatic loading on the stress-strain relationship remains almost unchanged irrespective of strain. (orig.)

  6. Development of tensile test techniques for irradiated fuel cladding in hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. S.; Hong, G. P.; Joo, Y. S.; Ahn, S. B.; Jeong, Y. H.; Oh, W. H.; Baek, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the longitudinal and transverse tensile properties of fuel cladding in hot cell, existing tensile test techniques are reviewed. The specimen geometries have been optimized to determine the constitutive stress-strain properties of the cladding in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The dogbone tube specimen for the longitudinal tensile test is designed to have a uniform strain distribution at the gage section. The ring specimen design for the transverse tensile test is conducted to maximize uniformity of strain distribution in the uniaxial ring specimen and to assure plane strain conditions in the plane-strain ring specimen. Fuel pellets in the cladding are removed by using the mechanical(grinding or drilling) or chemical(dissolution) method. The specimens are machined by a traveling-wire electrical discharge machine in hot cell. The pin-loaded grip is used for the longitudinal tensile test of an irradiated specimen. The grip for the transverse tensile test is designed such that a constant specimen curvature is maintained during deformation, and the interface was lubricated to minimize the friction between the outer surface of the die insert and the inner surface of the cladding specimen. In order to determine the constitutive stress-strain response of the cladding specimens, the machine compliance should be considered. The essential data for fuel damage criteria used in regulation and the material properties used in safety analyses could be obtained

  7. A combined experimental and FE analysis procedure to evaluate tensile behavior of zircaloy pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samal, M.K.; Vaze, K.K.; Balakrishnan, K.S.; Anantharaman, S.

    2012-01-01

    Determination of transverse mechanical properties from the ring type of specimens directly machined from the nuclear reactor pressure tubes is not straightforward because of the presence of combined membrane as well as bending stresses arising in the loaded condition. In this work, we have performed ring-tensile tests on the un-irradiated ring tensile specimen using two split semi-cylindrical mandrels as the loading device. A 3-D finite element (FE) analysis was performed in order to determine the material true stress-strain curve by comparing experimental load-displacement data with those predicted by FE analysis. In order to validate the methodology, miniaturized tensile specimens were machined from these tubes and tested. It was observed that the stress-strain data as obtained from ring tensile specimen could describe the load displacement curve of the miniaturized flat tensile specimen very well. (author)

  8. Texture evolution during tensile necking of copper processed by equal channel angular extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Wolfgang; Richter, S.; Martin, S.

    2010-01-01

    Two copper samples, pre-deformed in tension to 5% plastic strain, are subjected to an in situ tensile deformation of 1% plastic strain while X-ray peak profiles from individual bulk grains are obtained. One sample is oriented with the in situ tensile axis parallel to the pre-deformation axis......, and peak profiles are obtained with the scattering vector parallel to this direction. The profiles show the expected asymmetry explained by the composite model as caused by intra-grain stresses. The other sample is oriented with the in situ tensile axis perpendicular to the pre-deformation axis, and peak...

  9. The influence of temperature on the tensile properties of a super duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girones, A.; Mateo, A.; Llanes, L.; Anglada, M

    2001-01-01

    Tensile tests, at temperatures ranging between 275 and 475 degree centigree were performed in a superduplex stainless steel EN 1.4410. The dependence of yield stress and ultimate tensile strength on temperature indicates the existence of dynamic strain aging (DSA). In order to evaluate the influence of strain rate on this phenomenon, tests were conducted at two different strain rates, both at 325 degree centigree, temperature at which DSA is maximum for this materials. The results shows that the flow stress has an inverse strain rate sensitivity which confirms the existence of DSA in the steel under study. (Author) 10 refs

  10. Work-hardening stages and deformation mechanism maps during tensile deformation of commercially pure titanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Hanka; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium was tensile tested at different strain rates between 2.2×10−4s−1 and 6.7×10−1s−1 to characterize the strain rate dependence of plastic deformation and the dominating deformation mechanisms. From true stress-true plastic strain curves, three distinct work-hardening stages......¯2}〈101¯1〉 tensile twinning. Based on the microstructural findings and the strain rate sensitivity, deformation mechanism maps are constructed....

  11. A modified Johnson–Cook model of dynamic tensile behaviors for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ding-Ni; Shangguan, Qian-Qian; Xie, Can-Jun; Liu, Fu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The dynamic mechanical behaviors at various strain rates were measured. • The strain rate hardening effect of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy is significant. • A new Johnson–Cook constitutive model of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy was obtained. • Numerical simulations of tensile tests at different rates were conducted. • Accuracy of the modified Johnson–Cook constitutive equation was proved. - Abstract: The dynamic mechanical behaviors of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy at various strain rates were measured by dynamic tensile tests using the electronic universal testing machine, high velocity testing system and split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB). Stress–strain curves at different rates were obtained. The results show that the strain rate hardening effect of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy is significant. By modifying the strain rate hardening term in the Johnson–Cook constitutive model, a new Johnson–Cook (JC) constitutive model of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive model, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different rates for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy were conducted. According to tensile loading and stress–strain relation of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy, calculation results were compared with experimental results. Accuracy of the modified Johnson–Cook constitutive equation was further proved

  12. Microarray analysis of expression of cell death-associated genes in rat spinal cord cells exposed to cyclic tensile stresses in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Sally

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of mechanical insults to the spinal cord results in profound cellular and molecular changes, including the induction of neuronal cell death and altered gene expression profiles. Previous studies have described alterations in gene expression following spinal cord injury, but the specificity of this response to mechanical stimuli is difficult to investigate in vivo. Therefore, we have investigated the effect of cyclic tensile stresses on cultured spinal cord cells from E15 Sprague-Dawley rats, using the FX3000® Flexercell Strain Unit. We examined cell morphology and viability over a 72 hour time course. Microarray analysis of gene expression was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip System®, where categorization of identified genes was performed using the Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG systems. Changes in expression of 12 genes were validated with quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results The application of cyclic tensile stress reduced the viability of cultured spinal cord cells significantly in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Increasing either the strain or the strain rate independently was associated with significant decreases in spinal cord cell survival. There was no clear evidence of additive effects of strain level with strain rate. GO analysis identified 44 candidate genes which were significantly related to "apoptosis" and 17 genes related to "response to stimulus". KEGG analysis identified changes in the expression levels of 12 genes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway, which were confirmed to be upregulated by RT-PCR analysis. Conclusions We have demonstrated that spinal cord cells undergo cell death in response to cyclic tensile stresses, which were dose- and time-dependent. In addition, we have identified the up regulation of various genes, in particular of the MAPK pathway, which

  13. Statistical data for the tensile properties of natural fibre composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Torres

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article features a large statistical database on the tensile properties of natural fibre reinforced composite laminates. The data presented here corresponds to a comprehensive experimental testing program of several composite systems including: different material constituents (epoxy and vinyl ester resins; flax, jute and carbon fibres, different fibre configurations (short-fibre mats, unidirectional, and plain, twill and satin woven fabrics and different fibre orientations (0°, 90°, and [0,90] angle plies. For each material, ~50 specimens were tested under uniaxial tensile loading. Here, we provide the complete set of stress–strain curves together with the statistical distributions of their calculated elastic modulus, strength and failure strain. The data is also provided as support material for the research article: “The mechanical properties of natural fibre composite laminates: A statistical study” [1].

  14. Orientation-dependent tensile deformation and damage of a T700 carbon fiber/epoxy composite: A synchrotron-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bie, B. X.; Huang, J. Y.; Fan, D.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Xiao, X. H.; Qi, M. L.; Luo, S. N.

    2017-09-01

    Uniaxial tensile experiments are conducted on a T700 carbon fiber/epoxy composite along various offaxis angles. Stressestrain curves are measured along with strain fields mapped via synchrotron x-ray digital image correlation, as well as computerized tomography. Elastic modulus and tensile strength decrease with increasing off-axis angles, while fracture strain exhibits a nonmonotonic trend as a combined result of tensile strength decrease and fracture mode transition. At high off-axis angles, strain field mapping demonstrates distinct tensile and shear strain localizations and deformation bands approximately along the fiber directions, while deformation is mainly achieved via continuous growth of tensile strain at low off-axis angles. Roughness of fracture planes decreases exponentially as the off-axis angle increases. The stressestrain curves, strain fields, tomography and fractographs show consistent features, and reveal a fracture mode transition from mainly tension (fiber fracture) to in-plane shear (interface debonding).

  15. Tensile and elastic properties of thermoplastic elastomers based on PTMO and tetra-amide units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijgsman, J.; Gaymans, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    The tensile and elastic properties of melt spun threads of segmented copolymers based on T6T6T-dimethyl (5–16 wt%) and PTMO1000/DMT of different lengths (3000–10,000 g/mol) are very good. Stress–strain measurements show that extruded threads of these polymers have high fracture strains (>1000%) and

  16. Tensile and superelastic fatigue characterization of NiTi shape memory cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Muhammad M.; Ozbulut, Osman E.

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the tensile response and functional fatigue characteristics of a NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) cable with an outer diameter of 5.5 mm. The cable composed of multiple strands arranged as one inner core and two outer layers. The results of the tensile tests revealed that the SMA cable exhibits good superelastic behavior up to 10% strain. Fatigue characteristics were investigated under strain amplitudes ranging from 3% to 7% and a minimum of 2500 loading cycles. The evolutions of maximum tensile stress, residual strains, energy dissipation, and equivalent viscous damping under a number of loading cycles were analyzed. The fracture surface of a specimen subjected to 5000 loading cycles and 7% strain was discussed. Functional fatigue test results indicated a very high superelastic fatigue life cycle for the tested NiTi SMA cable.

  17. The tensile effect on crack formation in single crystal silicon irradiated by intense pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guoying; Shen, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Xiaofu; Yu, Xiao; Le, Xiaoyun

    2017-10-01

    Improving antifatigue performance of silicon substrate is very important for the development of semiconductor industry. The cracking behavior of silicon under intense pulsed ion beam irradiation was studied by numerical simulation in order to understand the mechanism of induced surface peeling observed by experimental means. Using molecular dynamics simulation based on Stillinger Weber potential, tensile effect on crack growth and propagation in single crystal silicon was investigated. Simulation results reveal that stress-strain curves of single crystal silicon at a constant strain rate can be divided into three stages, which are not similar to metal stress-strain curves; different tensile load velocities induce difference of single silicon crack formation speed; the layered stress results in crack formation in single crystal silicon. It is concluded that the crack growth and propagation is more sensitive to strain rate, tensile load velocity, stress distribution in single crystal silicon.

  18. Evaluation of the tensile properties of fuel cladding at high temperatures using a ring specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Bong Kook; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the ring tensile test at high temperature was suggested to evaluate the hoop tensile properties of small tube such as the cladding in the nuclear reactor. Using the Arsene's ring model, the ring tensile test was performed and the test data were calibrated. From the result of the ring test with strain gauge and the numerical analysis with 1/8 model, LCRR(Load-displacement Conversion Relationship of Ring specimen) was determined. We could obtain the hoop tensile properties by means of applying the LCRR to the calibrated data of the ring tensile test. A few difference was observed in view of the shape of fractured surface and the fracture mechanism between at the high temperature and at the room temperature

  19. Utilization of ISO 6892:2009 testing standard for determining tensile properties of TM380 mild steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shoke, L

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available mild steel. To achieve this objective, we reviewed the ISO 6892:2009 tensile testing standard along with reported good practice guidelines. Tensile tests were conducted on a dog-bone shaped TM380 mild steel specimen with strain gauges attached on either...

  20. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo, E-mail: yongskim@hanyang.ac.kr

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 10{sup 13} to 1 × 10{sup 16} protons/cm{sup 2}. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples’ surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson–Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  1. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  2. Porosity Defect Remodeling and Tensile Analysis of Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties on ASTM A216 WCB cast steel with centerline porosity defect were studied with radiographic mapping and finite element remodeling technique. Non-linear elastic and plastic behaviors dependent on porosity were mathematically described by relevant equation sets. According to the ASTM E8 tensile test standard, matrix and defect specimens were machined into two categories by two types of height. After applying radiographic inspection, defect morphologies were mapped to the mid-sections of the finite element models and the porosity fraction fields had been generated with interpolation method. ABAQUS input parameters were confirmed by trial simulations to the matrix specimen and comparison with experimental outcomes. Fine agreements of the result curves between simulations and experiments could be observed, and predicted positions of the tensile fracture were found to be in accordance with the tests. Chord modulus was used to obtain the equivalent elastic stiffness because of the non-linear features. The results showed that elongation was the most influenced term to the defect cast steel, compared with elastic stiffness and yield stress. Additional visual explanations on the tensile fracture caused by void propagation were also given by the result contours at different mechanical stages, including distributions of Mises stress and plastic strain.

  3. Effect of Different Matrix Compositions and Micro Steel Fibers on Tensile Behavior of Textile Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, J.; Sharifi, I.; Andalibi, K.; Kasaei, J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents results of a research on uniaxial tensile behavior of textile reinforced concrete (TRC) prepared with different matrix compositions containing different contents of micro steel fibers. TRC exhibits very favorable stress-strain behavior, high Load-carrying capacity and a certain ductility which results in a strain-hardening behavior. At this paper, different Glass-TRCs were prepared using different commonly used normal and also innovative matrix compositions containing different volume fractions of micro steel fibers. Three commonly used matrices, a polymer-based composite and also a UHPC mixture were prepared containing different percentages of micro steel fibers. The direct tensile tests were applied on all specimens to study the tensile properties (first crack stress and ultimate tensile strength) and strain-hardening behavior. Considering the stress-strain curves of all specimens, it has been found that the tensile properties and strain-hardening behavior of Glass-TRC can be considerably improved by using steel micro fibers in an appropriate matrix composition.

  4. A silicon microwire under a three-dimensional anisotropic tensile stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Xiaoyu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Poilvert, Nicolas [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Liu, Wenjun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Xiong, Yihuang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Cheng, Hiu Yan [Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Badding, John V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Dabo, Ismaila [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Gopalan, Venkatraman [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA

    2017-02-27

    Three-dimensional tensile stress, or triaxial tensile stress, is difficult to achieve in a material. We present the investigation of an unusual three-dimensional anisotropic tensile stress field and its influence on the electronic properties of a single crystal silicon microwire. The microwire was created by laser heating an amorphous silicon wire deposited in a 1.7 μm silica glass capillary by high pressure chemical vapor deposition. Tensile strain arises due to the thermal expansion mismatch between silicon and silica. Synchrotron X-ray micro-beam Laue diffraction (μ-Laue) microscopy reveals that the three principal strain components are +0.47% (corresponding to a tensile stress of +0.7 GPa) along the fiber axis and nearly isotropic +0.02% (corresponding to a tensile stress of +0.3 GPa) in the cross-sectional plane. This effect was accompanied with a reduction of 30 meV in the band gap energy of silicon, as predicted by the density-functional theory calculations and in close agreement with energy-dependent photoconductivity measurements. While silicon has been explored under many stress states, this study explores a stress state where all three principal stress components are tensile. Given the technological importance of silicon, the influence of such an unusual stress state on its electronic properties is of fundamental interest.

  5. Effect of microstructure on tensile properties of austenite-ferrite welded joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bakić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex microstructure of austenite-ferrite welded joint has been investigated, focused on its influence on local tensile properties. Tensile properties (yield strength and hardening coefficient have been evaluated by using finite element method to simulate the strain distributions obtained experimentally. The three-dimensional model of V-joint specimen has been used with seven different materials, simulating two base metals, the weld metal and two sub-regions of two heat-affected zones - fine grain and coarse grain. In this way local tensile properties of the whole austenite-ferrite welded joint have been evaluated.

  6. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  7. Seismological Studies for Tensile Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwo-Bin Ou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A shear slip fault, an equivalence of a double couple source, has often been assumed to be a kinematic source model in ground motion simulation. Estimation of seismic moment based on the shear slip model indicates the size of an earthquake. However, if the dislocation of the hanging wall relative to the footwall includes not only a shear slip tangent to the fault plane but also expansion and compression normal to the fault plane, the radiating seismic waves will feature differences from those out of the shear slip fault. Taking account of the effects resulting from expansion and compression to a fault plane, we can resolve the tension and pressure axes as well as the fault plane solution more exactly from ground motions than previously, and can evaluate how far a fault zone opens or contracts during a developing rupture. In addition to a tensile angle and Poisson¡¦s ratio for the medium, a tensile fault with five degrees of freedom has been extended from the shear slip fault with only three degrees of freedom, strike, dip, and slip.

  8. The Tensile Behavior of High-Strength Carbon Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Tye

    2016-08-01

    Carbon fibers exhibit exceptional properties such as high stiffness and specific strength, making them excellent reinforcements for composite materials. However, it is difficult to directly measure their tensile properties and estimates are often obtained by tensioning fiber bundles or composites. While these macro scale tests are informative for composite design, their results differ from that of direct testing of individual fibers. Furthermore, carbon filament strength also depends on other variables, including the test length, actual fiber diameter, and material flaw distribution. Single fiber tensile testing was performed on high-strength carbon fibers to determine the load and strain at failure. Scanning electron microscopy was also conducted to evaluate the fiber surface morphology and precisely measure each fiber's diameter. Fiber strength was found to depend on the test gage length and in an effort to better understand the overall expected performance of these fibers at various lengths, statistical weak link scaling was performed. In addition, the true Young's modulus was also determined by taking the system compliance into account. It was found that all properties (tensile strength, strain to failure, and Young's modulus) matched very well with the manufacturers' reported values at 20 mm gage lengths, but deviated significantly at other lengths.

  9. Effects of liquid lead on 316l tensile properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, V.; Pitigoi, V.; Nitu, A.; Hororoi, M.; Voicu, F.; Cojocaru, V.

    2016-01-01

    The lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of the concepts of the Generation IV reactor systems. Compatibility of the candidate structural materials with the liquid lead is known to be one of the critical issues to allow development of the LFR reactors. In contact with the liquid metal, the mechanical integrity of the structural materials can be affected. The steel.s mechanical properties are assessed by tensile testing as a function of temperature in heavy liquid metal and in an air environment. RATEN ICN is involved in several European projects aimed to Generation IV research activities. In a first stage an Experimental Facility for Tensile Tests in Liquid Lead environment has been set up. This installation is adapted on the Instron testing machine, already existing in institute. 316L alloy is one of a candidate structural material for this type of reactor. This document presents the effect of liquid lead on tensile properties of 316L material tested in liquid lead (in static conditions) and in air environment at 500°C, without oxygen monitoring system. When solid metals are placed in contact to liquid metals and stress is applied, they may undergo abrupt brittle failure. Stress-strain curves of slow strain rate tests have been obtained in conformity with ASTM, E-8. Mechanical characteristics determined are in accordance with literature. (authors)

  10. Hoop Tensile Properties of Ceramic Matrix Composite Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, HeeMan; Barnett, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Tensile stress-strain properties in the hoop direction were obtained for 100-mm diameter SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite cylinders using ring specimens machined form the cylinder ends. The cylinders were fabricated from 2D balanced SiC fabric with several material variants, including wall thickness (6,8, and 12 plies), SiC fiber type (Sylramic, Sylramic-iBN, Hi-Nicalon, and Hi-Nicalon S), fiber sizing type, and matrix type (full CVI SiC, and partial CVI SiC plus slurry cast + melt-infiltrated SiC-Si). Fiber ply splices existed in all the hoops. Tensile hoop measurements are made at room temperature and 1200 C using hydrostatic ring test facilities. The failure mode of the hoops, determined through microstructural examination, is presented. The hoop properties are compared with in-plane data measured on flat panels using same material variants, but containing no splices.

  11. Tensile, creep and relaxation characteristics of zircaloy cladding at 3850C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, K.L.; McDonald, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Axial creep tests were carried out at stresses ranging form 30 ksi to 50 ksi. Steady-state creep rates were evaluated from stress change tests to minimize the number of samples. The secondary creep rate was related to the applied stress through a Sinh function. The functional dependence of the strain rate on the stress was also evaluated from load relaxation tests. It is demonstrated that the strain rates derived from load relaxation tests are identical to the creep data when the relaxation testing was carried out at the point of maximum load in a tensile test. In addition, the creep and relaxation results are identical to the true ultimate tensile stress versus applied strain-rate data derived from tensile tests. (orig./HP)

  12. Tensile properties of orthodontic elastomeric ligatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, F; Jalaly, T; Zebarjad, M

    2010-01-01

    Tensile properties of elastomeric ligatures become important when efficiency of orthodontic appliances is considered. The aim of this study was to compare tensile strength, extension to tensile strength, toughness and modulus of elasticity of elastomeric ligatures in both the as--received condition and after 28 days of immersion in the simulated oral environment. Furthermore, the changes that occurred in tensile properties of each brand of ligatures after 28 days were evaluated. Experimental-laboratory based. Elastomeric ligatures were obtained from different companies and their tensile properties were measured using Zwick testing machine in both the as-received condition and after 28 days of immersion in the simulated oral environment. The data were analyzed using independent sample t-tests, analysis of variance and Tukey tests. After 28 days, all the ligatures experienced a significant decrease in tensile strength, extension to tensile strength and toughness ( P tensile properties of different brands of ligatures in both conditions ( P tensile properties of different brands of ligatures, which should be considered during selection of these products.

  13. Direct bandgap silicon: tensile-strained silicon nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Hapala, Prokop; Valenta, J.; Jelínek, Pavel; Cibulka, Ondřej; Ondič, Lukáš; Pelant, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2014), "1300042-1"-"1300042-9" ISSN 2196-7350 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GPP204/12/P235; GA ČR GAP204/10/0952 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * badstructure * light emission * direct bandgap * surface capping Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  14. Structures of water molecular nanotube induced by axial tensile strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structures and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)], E-mail: lihuilmy@hotmail.com; Zhang, X.Q. [Physics Department, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Liew, K.M. [Department of Building and Constructions, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Liu, X.F. [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structures and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)

    2008-10-06

    Five well-ordered nano-ice structures embedded in carbon nanotubes are obtained in this study. These five nano-ice phases all exhibit single walled tubular morphologies, including the pentagon, hexagon ice nanotubes whose structures are quite different from bulk ice. Our simulation results indicate that water molecules tend to rearrange into surface ring structures to reduce the number of free OH groups. The structural behavior of these ice nanotubes inside CNTs subject to axial stress is also investigated. The ice nanotubes tend to be drawn to ice nanorings or ice nanospring during the mechanical stretching. The distribution function exhibits typical order-to-disorder transition of the water network confined in carbon nanotube during the stretching. By analysis, we suggest that it is unlikely that additional water molecules will enter the tubes because of the increased volume available if the tubes are stretched at contact with a water reservoir.

  15. The development of evaluating tensile property method used the single notched ring test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Bong Kook; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the single notched specimen which was proposed the previous study was used to evaluate of the transverse tensile property of zircaloy cladding. The single notched specimen has notches which give stress intensity effect, so both FEM and experiment are needed for the same time. Take a coincidence of tensile behavior about both FEM and experiment, then obtain stress and strain from FEM only. The influence of notch was estimated by comparing the result of experimental, FEM. Then the relationship between stress-strain and displacement was evaluated

  16. Magnetoactive elastomeric composites: Cure, tensile, electrical and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    150°C. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, modulus and elongation at break are evaluated using universal testing machine. Tensile test was carried out according to the ASTM D 412 standard. For measuring the magnetic impedance an indigenous experimental set up was used. The samples were kept between the ...

  17. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.

  18. Unexpectedly low tensile strength in concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, A.J.M.; Han, N.; Visser, J.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    During an extensive investigation of some 25 concrete bridges and other structures suffering from alkali-silica reaction it has been found that the uniaxial tensile strength of the concrete was extremely low in relation to both the compressive strength and the splitting tensile strength. It is known

  19. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  20. Tensile Properties of Poly (N-vinyl caprolactam) Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgret, Leslie D.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    N-vinyl caprolactam was copolymerized with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate using a free-radical initiator in alcohol/water solution. The resulting gels were thermally-responsive in water, undergoing an approximate fivefold reversible volume shrinkage between room temperature and ca. 50 C. Tensile testing showed that the stress-strain behavior was qualitatively different in the collapsed state above the temperature-induced transition. At the higher temperature, gels were stiffer, more ductile, and showed greater time dependence. Implications for the design of gel actuators are briefly discussed.

  1. Study on Tensile Damage Constitutive Model for Multiscale Polypropylene Fiber Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninghui Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene fibers perform well in roughness enhancement and corrosion resistance. They can dissipate energy when cracks occur in concrete. Furthermore, they can improve the concrete tensile properties by synergistic work with it. To study the tensile properties of the multiscale polypropylene concrete, uniaxial tensile strength of 18 fiber reinforced and 3 plain concrete specimens was experimentally tested using the paste steel method. The test results indicate that both the strength and the peak strain can be substantially improved. Based on the results, a tensile damage constitutive model was proposed and implemented into FLAC3D for numerical experimentation. The numerical results are consistent with the experimental observations in general and some discrepancies are discussed.

  2. Dynamic tensile response of alumina-Al composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atisivan, R.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2002-01-01

    Plate impact experiments were carried out to examine the high strain-rate tensile response of alumina-aluminum (Al) composites with tailored microstructures. A novel processing technique was used to fabricate interpenetrating phase alumina-aluminum composites with controlled microstructures. Fused deposition modeling (FDM), a commercially available rapid prototyping technique, was used to produce the controlled porosity mullite ceramic preforms. Alumina-Al composites were then processed via reactive metal infiltration of porous mullite ceramics. With this approach, both the micro as well as the macro structures can be designed via computer aided design (CAD) to tailor the properties of the composites. Two sets of dynamic tensile experiments were performed. In the first, the metal content was varied between 23 and 39 wt. percent. In the second, the microstructure was varied while holding the metal content nearly constant. Samples with higher metal content, as expected, displayed better spall resistance. For a given metal content, samples with finer metal diameter showed better spall resistance. Relationship of the microstructural parameters on the dynamic tensile response of the structured composites is discussed here

  3. Engineering piezoresistivity using biaxially strained silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Richter, Jacob; Brandbyge, Mads

    2008-01-01

    of the piezocoefficient on temperature and dopant density is altered qualitatively for strained silicon. In particular, we find that a vanishing temperature coefficient may result for silicon with grown-in biaxial tensile strain. These results suggest that strained silicon may be used to engineer the iezoresistivity...

  4. Induction Heating on Dynamic Tensile Tests in CEA Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averty, X.; Yvon, P.; Duguay, C.; Pizzanelli, J. P.; Basini, V.

    2001-01-01

    The LCMI (Laboratory for characterization of irradiated materials), located in CEA from Saclay, is in charge of the mechanical tests on irradiated materials. The dynamic tensile testing machine, in a hot cell equipped with two remote handling, has been first improved in 1995, to fulfill the French safety programs on Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA). One objective of this machine is to obtain mechanical property data on current Zircaloy cladding types needed to quality the cladding's response under RIA or LOCA transient loading and thermal conditions. For the RIA, this means testing at strain rates up to 5 s' and heating rates up to 200 degree centigree-s''-1, while for Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) testing at strain rates of 10''-3 s''-1 and heating rates of 20 degree centigree s''-1 would be appropriate. The tensile samples are machined with a spark erosion machine, directly from pieces of cladding previously de fueled. Two kinds of samples can be machined in the cladding. Axial samples in order to test axial mechanical characteristics Ring samples in order to test transverse mechanical characteristics, more representative of RIA conditions. On one hand, the axial tensile tests were performed using the Joule effect, and heating rates up to about 500 degree centigree .s''-1 were obtained. This enabled us to perform the axial tests in a satisfactory manner. On the other hand, the tensile ring were first performed in a vertical furnace with a heating rate about 0.2 degree centigree.s''-1 and a thermal stability about 1 degree centigree. For temperatures above 480 degree centigree, the mechanical characteristics showed a sharp drop which could be attributed to irradiation defect annealing. Therefore we have recently developed an induction heating system to reach heating rates high enough (200 degree centigree.s''-1) to prevent any significant annealing before performing the ring tensile tests. To apply a uniaxial tangential tension, two matching half

  5. Tensile cracks in creeping solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, H.; Rice, J.R.

    1979-02-01

    The loading parameter determining the stress and strain fields near a crack tip, and thereby the growth of the crack, under creep conditions is discussed. Relevant loading parameters considered are the stress intensity factor K/sub I/, the path-independent integral C*, and the net section stress sigma/sub net/. The material behavior is modelled as elastic-nonlinear viscous where the nonlinear term describes power law creep. At the time t = 0 load is applied to the cracked specimen, and in the first instant the stress distribution is elastic. Subsequently, creep deformation relaxes the initial stress concentration at the crack tip, and creep strains develop rapidly near the crack tip. These processes may be analytically described by self-similar solutions for short times t. Small scale yielding may be defined. In creep problems, this means that elastic strains dominate almost everywhere except in a small creep zone which grows around the crack tip. If crack growth ensues while the creep zone is still small compared with the crack length and the specimen size, the stress intensity factor governs crack growth behavior. If the calculated creep zone becomes larger than the specimen size, the stresses become finally time-independent and the elastic strain rates can be neglected. In this case, the stress field is the same as in the fully-plastic limit of power law hardening plasticity. The loading parameter which determines the near tip fields uniquely is then the path-independent integral C*.K/sub I/ and C* characterize opposite limiting cases. The case applied in a given situation is decided by comparing the creep zone size with the specimen size and the crack length. Besides several methods of estimating the creep zone size, a convenient expression for a characteristic time is derived, which characterizes the transition from small scale yielding to extensive creep of the whole specimen

  6. High-temperature tensile ductility in WC-Co cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.C. [Kyungpook National Univ., Taegusi (Korea, Republic of); Sakuma, T. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science

    1997-09-01

    High-temperature tensile deformation in WC-Co was investigated at temperatures between 1,150 C and 1,250 C. The flow stress is sensitive to temperature, strain rate, volume fraction of binder, and the addition of other carbides. The stress-strain rate relationship is divided into three regions at each temperature as in superplastic metals. A large tensile elongation over 100 pct was first obtained in WC-6Co and WC-13Co (wt pct) at temperatures of 1,200 C. Contrary to superplastic metals, the largest tensile elongation is not obtained in region II but on the border of regions I and II. The failure mode changes from necking in region I to sharp cracking in region II.

  7. Investigation on the tensile behavior of fiber metal laminates based on self-reinforced polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Eon; Park, Tom; Kim, Jeong; Kang, Beom-Soo; Song, Woo-Jin

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical tests have been carried out to accurately evaluate the tensile properties of fiber metal laminates (FMLs). The FMLs in this paper comprised of a layer of self-reinforced polypropylene (SRPP) sandwiched between two layers of aluminum alloy 5052-H34. In this study, nonlinear tensile and fracture behavior of FMLs under the in-plane loading conditions has been investigated with numerical simulations and theoretical analysis. The numerical simulation based on finite element modeling using the ABAQUS/Explicit and the theoretical constitutive model based on a volume fraction approach and a modified classical lamination theory, which incorporates the elastic-plastic behavior of the aluminum alloy are used to predict the mechanical properties such as stress-strain response and deformation behavior of FMLs. In addition, through comparing the numerical simulations and the theoretical analysis with experimental results, it was concluded that a numerical simulation model adopted describes with sufficient accuracy the overall tensile stress-strain curve.

  8. Tensile loading induced phase transition and rippling in single-layer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hongwei; Huang, Yuhong; Yang, Zhi; Miao, Yaping; Chu, Paul K.; Xu, Kewei; Ma, Fei

    2017-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed to study the structural evolution of single-layer MoS2 nanosheets under tensile loading and a phase transition from hexagonal structure to quadrilateral one is observed at a large strain when loaded along the zigzag direction but not along the armchair direction. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation illustrates that the newly generated quadrilateral phase is metallic. Further loading along the zigzag direction promotes an inhomogeneous distribution of lateral and shear stress around the phase boundaries due to local mechanical mismatch. As a result, periodic rippling parallel to the loading direction emerges and the wavelength and wave height change with strain according to λ∼ε-1/4 and h∼ε1/4. Accordingly, a graded distribution of strain can be produced or modulated by a simple tensile loading and the strategy might be utilized to enhance the photoelectrical properties of 2D materials and design strain-tunable nanodevices.

  9. Mechanical Behavior of Red Sandstone under Incremental Uniaxial Cyclical Compressive and Tensile Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyun Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniaxial experiments were carried out on red sandstone specimens to investigate their short-term and creep mechanical behavior under incremental cyclic compressive and tensile loading. First, based on the results of short-term uniaxial incremental cyclic compressive and tensile loading experiments, deformation characteristics and energy dissipation were analyzed. The results show that the stress-strain curve of red sandstone has an obvious memory effect in the compressive and tensile loading stages. The strains at peak stresses and residual strains increase with the cycle number. Energy dissipation, defined as the area of the hysteresis loop in the stress-strain curves, increases nearly in a power function with the cycle number. Creep test of the red sandstone was also conducted. Results show that the creep curve under each compressive or tensile stress level can be divided into decay and steady stages, which cannot be described by the conventional Burgers model. Therefore, an improved Burgers creep model of rock material is constructed through viscoplastic mechanics, which agrees very well with the experimental results and can describe the creep behavior of red sandstone better than the Burgers creep model.

  10. In-plane anisotropy in tensile deformation and its influence on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    decrease gradually. On the other hand, the ductility and the uniform strain increase from 0 to. 60. ◦ and then decrease from 60. ◦ to 90. ◦ . The variation in the work hardening characteristics, in terms of the work hardening exponent (n) and the ratio of ultimate tensile to yield strength val- ues, are included in figures 8 and 9.

  11. Quantitative correlation between slip patterning and microstructure during tensile elongation in 6xxx series aluminum alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghodrat, S.; Pirgazi, H.; Kestens, L.A.I.

    2015-01-01

    To the purpose of evaluating the effect of deformation on the microstructure, aluminum structures were analyzed on tensile strained samples extended to 25% elongation. In the substructure of these deformed samples linear slip patterns were observed, generally confined to the bulk of the grain. In

  12. Incipient and Progressive Damage in Polyethylene Under Extreme Tensile Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furmanski, Jevan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Daniel Tito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, George T. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    The Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) test was developed at LANL by Gray and coworkers to probe the tensile response of materials at large strains (>1) and high strain-rates (>1000/s) by firing projectiles through a conical die at 300-700 m/s. This technique has recently been applied to various polymers, such as the fluoropolymers PTFE (Teflon) and the chemically similar PCTFE, which respectively exhibited catastrophic fragmentation and distributed dynamic necking. This work details investigations of the Dyn-Ten-Ext response of high density polyethylene, both to failure and sub-critical conditions. At large extrusion ratios ({approx}7.4) and high velocities, such as those previously employed, HDPE catastrophically fragmented in a craze-like manner in the extruded jet. At more modest extrusion ratios and high velocities the specimen extruded a stable jet that ruptured cleanly, and at lower velocities was recovered intact after sustaining substantial internal damage. Thermomechanical finite element simulations showed that the damage corresponded to a locus of shear stress in the presence of hydrostatic tension. X-ray computed tomography corroborated the prediction of a shear damage mechanism by finding the region of partially damaged material to consist of macroscopic shear-mode cracks nearly aligned with the extrusion axis, originating from the location of damage inception.

  13. Nylon-6/rubber blends: 6. Notched tensile impact testing of nylon-6(ethylene-propylene rubber) blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Krijn; Dijkstra, K.; ter Laak, J.A.; ter Laak, J.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The deformation and fracture behaviour of nylon-6/EPR (ethylene-propylene rubber) blends is studied as a function of strain rate and rubber content. Therefore, tensile experiments are conducted on notched specimens over a broad range of draw speeds (including strain rates as encountered in normal

  14. Effect of heat treatment on tensile behaviour of Ti–6Al–5Zr–0⋅5Mo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    intermediate temperatures from 623 to 723 K. Tensile tests at 673 K over a wide range of strain rate from. 0⋅052 to 5⋅60 ( × 10–2) s–1 showed negative strain rate sensitivity. Thus, occurrence of DSA was confirmed. It was established from the measured activation energy for DSA that it was essentially controlled by diffusion ...

  15. Tensile Properties of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 409, - (2009), s. 168-175 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramics /3./. Stará Lesná, 07.09.2008-10.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0724; GA ČR GD106/05/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : tensile test * ceramics foam * open porosity * tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  16. Tensile properties of unirradiated path A PCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braski, D.N.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The tensile properties of PCA in the Al (solution annealed), A3 (25%-cold worked), and B2 (aged, cold worked, and reaged) conditions were determined from room temperature to 600 0 C. The tensile behavior of PCA-A1 and -A3 was generally similar to that of titanium-modified type 316 stainless steel with similar microstructures. The PCA-B2 was weaker than PCA-A3, especially above 500 0 C, but demonstrated slightly better ducility

  17. Tensile Behaviour of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehořek, Lukáš; Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2009), s. 237-241 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821; GA ČR GD106/09/H035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Tensile test * Ceramics foam * Open porosity * Tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.649, year: 2009

  18. The Effect of Grain Size on the Strain Hardening Behavior for Extruded ZK61 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Wencong; Chen, Wenzhen; Duan, Junpeng; Wang, Wenke; Wang, Erde

    2017-12-01

    The effects of grain size on the tensile and compressive strain hardening behaviors for extruded ZK61 alloys have been investigated by uniaxial tensile and compressive tests along the extrusion directions. Cylindrical tension and compression specimens of extruded ZK61 alloys with various sized grain were fabricated by annealing treatments. Tensile and compressive tests at ambient temperature were conducted at a strain rate of 0.5 × 10-3 s-1. The results indicate that both tensile strain hardening and compressive strain hardening of ZK61 alloys with different grain sizes have an athermal regime of dislocation accumulation in early deformation. The threshold stress value caused dynamic recovery is predominantly related to grain size in tensile strain hardening, but the threshold stress values for different grain sizes are almost identical in compressive strain hardening. There are obvious transition points on the tensile strain hardening curves which indicate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX). The tensile strain hardening rate of the coarse-grained alloy obviously decreases faster than that of fine-grained alloys before DRX and the tensile strain hardening curves of different grain sizes basically tend to parallel after DRX. The compressive strain hardening rate of the fine-grained alloy obviously increases faster than that of coarse-grained alloy for twin-induced strain hardening, but compressive strain hardening curves also tend to parallel after twinning is exhausted.

  19. Effects of mechanical heterogeneity on the tensile and fatigue behaviours in a laser-arc hybrid welded aluminium alloy joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Chao; Huang, Chongxiang; Liu, Yongjie; Li, Jiukai; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Full field strain evolution was characterized using DIC method in fatigue test. • The differences of fatigue failure mechanism between HAZ and FZ were discussed. • Porosity in FZ significantly influenced high cycle fatigue behaviours of the weld. - Abstract: The effects of mechanical heterogeneity on the tensile and high cycle fatigue (10 4 –10 7 cycles) properties were investigated for laser-arc hybrid welded aluminium alloy joints. Tensile–tensile cyclic loading with a stress ratio of 0.1 was applied in a direction perpendicular to the weld direction for up to 10 7 cycles. The local mechanical properties in the tensile test and the accumulated plastic strain in the fatigue test throughout the weld’s different regions were characterized using a digital image correlation technique. The tensile results indicated heterogeneous tensile properties throughout the different regions of the aluminium welded joint, and the heat affected zone was the weakest region in which the strain localized. In the fatigue test, the accumulated plastic strain evolutions in different subzones of the weld were analyzed, and slip bands could be clearly observed in the heat affected zone. A transition of fatigue failure locations from the heat affected zone caused by accumulated plastic strain to the fusion zone induced by fatigue crack at pores could be observed under different cyclic stress levels. The welding porosity in the fusion zone significantly influences the high cycle fatigue behaviour

  20. Oxford International Conference on the Mechanical Properties of Materials at High Rates of Strain (4th) Held in Oxford, United Kingdom on 19-22 March 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-22

    strain-curve cannot be modelled. Therefore the dynamic calibration curves are calculated with the finite-element-code ABAQUS and dynamic stress-strain...strain/strain-rate analysis has been dune for a number of proportional strain-rate controlled paths using th2 computer code ABAQU . The finite elements...bending data in low rate tests at RT.) (ot; the tensile strength in tensile test, (j);; the tensile strength by Brazilian test.) - _ 40 Refractory Porous

  1. A Tensile Origin for Pulverized Fault Zone Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Julien, R. C.; Griffith, W. A.; Ghaffari, H. O.

    2017-12-01

    The origin of highly fragmented, but lightly strained rocks distributed asymmetrically across major strike slip faults has been enigmatic since their first recognition, yet the explanation has major implications for earthquake physics. These so called "pulverized" rocks are found up to 100m away from the principal slip zone of the San Andreas fault and other strike slip faults around the world. Experiments suggest that rock pulverization occurs at strain rates on the order of 102 s-1, pointing to a coseismic origin; however, strain rates during sub-Rayleigh earthquake rupture propagation 100m from faults is expected to be at least two orders of magnitude smaller than this, leading some to suggest that pulverization occurs during supershear earthquake rupture. Numerical solutions suggest that states of isotropic tension occur in more compliant sides of the fault, and at distances as great as 100m from the fault, as a sub-Rayleigh rupture propagates. We develop a novel modification to the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus wherein an axial compressive pulse produces isotropic radial tension in a disk-shaped rock specimen. We show that under isotropic tension, fragmentation of Westerly Granite occurs at strain rates on the order of 100 s-1, and fragment size scales inversely with strain rate in close agreement with energy-based fragmentation models. Similar experiments on thermally pre-treated Westerly granite specimens demonstrate how pre-existing damage can further reduce strain rates and tensile stresses required for intense fragmentation. Our results solve the strain rate-distance scaling problem between laboratory and field observations of pulverized rocks and also explains the asymmetric distribution of fault rocks. Furthermore, this implies long-term preferred earthquake rupture directivity along major faults where pulverized rocks are found.

  2. Measurements of the tensile and compressive properties of micro-concrete used in the Winfrith missile impact experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.A.

    1982-10-01

    Tests to determine the tensile and compressive properties of a micro-concrete mix are described. The material is a nominally 40MPa ultimate compressive strength concrete used in impact tests with scale models in the prediction of responses in prototype concrete structures. Compressive tests were intended to give complete stress-strain relationships beyond initial failure. Tensile properties were measured by the Brazilian splitting technique and direct tension dog-bone specimens for comparison reasons. (U.K.)

  3. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  4. Tensile Behavior Analysis on Different Structures of 3D Glass Woven Perform for Fibre Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Hussain Peerzada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three common 3D (Three Dimensional Glass woven structures were studied to analyze the tensile behavior. Each type of strand (Warp, weft and binder of 3D woven structure was studied in detail. Crimp percentage of those strands was measured by crimp meter. Standard size samples of each 3D woven structure were cut in warp and weft direction and were stretched by Instron Tensile testing computerized machine. Results reveal that hybrid possesses lowest crimp in core strands and higher strength in warp as well as weft direction. Layer to layer woven structure appeared with lower strength and higher strain value due to highest crimp percentage in core strands.

  5. Tensile properties of commercially pure vanadium from room temperature to 1200 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshall, G.A.; Torres, S.G.

    1993-12-01

    The tensile properties of vanadium are sensitive to interstitial impurity content, on grain size and strain rate. Thus, it is problematic to use published tensile data for materials potentially varying in these quantities. This investigation was undertaken to fully characterize the tensile properties of the commercially pure vanadium used at Lawrence Livermore. Both sheet and rod stock were tested in vacuum from ambient temperature to 1200C at strain rates 6.67 x 10 -5 to 6.67 x 10 -2 s -1 . The results of these experiments show that vanadium behaves in a manner typical of many bcc metals containing interstitial impurities. Local peaks in yield stress and ultimate tensile stress vs temperature curves are observed at intermediate temperatures. Serrated yielding also is observed in some temperature ranges. Changes in strain rate within the quasi-static regime have a relatively small, predictable effect. The rod and sheet stock have similar properties, except that the lower yield stress of the rod is less than that of the sheet over most of the temperature range studied. No plateau in yield strength vs temperature curve was observed for the rod. In both forms, and for all temperatures, vanadium is ductile. The elongation to failure reaches a minimum of approximately 35% at a temperature of 500C and a maximum of approximately 140% at 1200C

  6. Stress Wave Attenuation in Aluminum Alloy and Mild Steel Specimens Under SHPB Tensile Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothnis, J. R.; Ravikumar, G.; Arya, H.; Yerramalli, Chandra S.; Naik, N. K.

    2018-02-01

    Investigations on the effect of intensity of incident pressure wave applied through the striker bar on the specimen force histories and stress wave attenuation during split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tensile testing are presented. Details of the tensile SHPB along with Lagrangian x- t diagram of the setup are included. Studies were carried out on aluminum alloy 7075 T651 and IS 2062 mild steel. While testing specimens using the tensile SHPB setup, it was observed that the force calculated from the transmitter bar strain gauge was smaller than the force obtained from the incident bar strain gauge. This mismatch between the forces in the incident bar and the transmitter bar is explained on the basis of stress wave attenuation in the specimens. A methodology to obtain force histories using the strain gauges on the specimen during SHPB tensile testing is also presented. Further, scanning electron microscope images and photomicrographs are given. Correlation between the microstructure and mechanical properties is explained. Further, uncertainty analysis was conducted to ascertain the accuracy of the results.

  7. Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on tensile properties of ultradrawn polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Shozo; Sakami, Hiroshi

    1977-01-01

    The deformation of ultradrawn polyethylene was previously shown that crystalline chains were pulled out by the tension applied to tie chains which connected crystal blocks. This paper deals with the effects of γ-ray irradiation on crosslinking which prevent crystalline chains being pulled out and to improve the tensile properties. The tensile strength of high density polyethylene, drawn by a factor of 40, increased from 73 to 113 kg/mm 2 at 20 0 C and from 13 to 42 kg/mm 2 at 80 0 C with increasing irradiation dose from zero to 100 Mrad. The tensile elongation, the residual strain measured by cyclic strain test, and the rate of stress decrease by the stress relaxation measurement diminished with increasing irradiation dose. These facts showed the existence of preventive effects by crosslinks on pulling. The stress-strain relation of crosslinked polymer was calculated thermodynamically from the melting of crystalline chains accompanied by the sliding of chains, assuming that the sliding of crystalline chains was brought about by an unbalance of the tension applied to tie chains with which both sides of crystalline chains were connected. The equation of stress was derived; stress increased with increasing strain and was proportional to the Gibbs' free energy of fusion. The observed stress-strain relations obeyed the above mentioned equation. (auth.)

  8. Combined spectrophotometry and tensile measurements of human connective tissues: potentials and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstberger, Markus; Sichting, Freddy; Baselt, Tobias; Hartmann, Peter; Aust, Gabriela; Hammer, Niels

    2013-06-01

    Strain-dependent transmission data of nine iliotibial tract specimens are determined using a custom-built optical setup with a halogen light source and an industrial norm material testing machine. Polarized light microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin staining indicated that lateral contraction of collagen structures is responsible for total intensity variations during a 20-cycle preconditioning and a 5-cycle tensile test. Tensile force progress is opposite to total transmission progress. Due to dehydration, wavelength-specific radiation intensity shifting is determined during the test, primarily noticeable in a water absorption band between 1400 and 1500 nm. The results show the capability of integrating spectrophotometry technology into biomechanics for determining structural alterations of human collagen due to applied strain. Being more sensitive to drying, spectrophotometry may likely serve as a quality control in stress-strain testing of biological structures.

  9. Crystal plasticity extend FEM implementation of thermal-tensile aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-level approach has been used to simulate the thermal deformation of aluminium alloy at different temperature and strain rate. The crystal plasticity model is extended in the finite element method and the thermal behaviour is integrated in the constitutive equations. Moreover, the damage evolution is also reflected in the simulation using continuum damage mechanics model. Thus, the void evolution and thermal effect could both be shown in the simulation. A new shear strain rate model is constructed with the thermal activated mechanism to describe the rate dependent behaviours during tensile test. The thermal parameters are determined in a fitting test of representative volume element to compare with the experimental data. The results prove that the mechanical tensile behaviour of 5052 aluminium alloy could be well described at different temperatures. The damage evolution process is expressed by the stress concentration and strain concentration in the finite element simulation, which are also confirmed by the experiments.

  10. Microstructure evolution of titanium after tensile test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronski, S.; Wierzbanowski, K.; Jędrychowski, M.; Tarasiuk, J; Wronski, M.; Baczmanski, A.; Bacroix, B.

    2016-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative behavior of titanium T40 during tensile loading with a special emphasis on the presence of deformation twins in the observed microstructures is described. The samples for tensile tests were cut out from the rolled titanium sheet along the rolling and transverse directions. Several microstructure maps were determined using Electron Backscatter Diffraction technique (EBSD). These data were used to obtain crystallographic textures, misorientation distributions, grain size, twin boundary length, grain orientation spread, low and high angle boundary fractions and Schmid and Taylor factors. The deformation mechanisms and microstructure characteristics are different in the samples stretched along rolling and transverse directions. A strong appearance of tensile twins was observed in the samples deformed along transverse direction. On the other hand, more frequent subgrain formation and higher orientation spread was observed in the sample deformed along rolling direction, which caused’‘orientation blurring’ leading to an increase of grain size with deformation, as determined from OIM analysis.

  11. Effect of ethnicity and treatments on in situ tensile response and morphological changes of human hair characterized by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, Indira P.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-01-01

    Human hair fibers experience tensile forces during grooming and styling processes. The tensile response of hair is hence of considerable interest to the cosmetics industry. In this study, in situ tensile characterization studies have been carried out in an atomic force microscope (AFM) on different hair under different conditions. A custom-built AFM sample stage allows hair fibers to be loaded in tension. A technique to locate and image the same control area at different strains has been developed to study the changes in morphology that occur with deformation. Virgin Caucasian, Asian and African hair were studied to understand the differences between different ethnic hair types. Also, the tensile response and morphological changes of virgin, chemically damaged and conditioner-treated Caucasian hair after soaking were compared against the corresponding dry tensile response. Finally, virgin, damaged and treated Caucasian hair fibers were subjected to fatigue cycling to simulate combing/detangling, and their tensile response studied

  12. Unexpectedly low tensile strength in concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    Siemes, A.J.M.; Han, N.; Visser, J.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    During an extensive investigation of some 25 concrete bridges and other structures suffering from alkali-silica reaction it has been found that the uniaxial tensile strength of the concrete was extremely low in relation to both the compressive strength and the splitting tensile strength. It is known that concrete with damage due to ASR has reduced mechanical properties. The literature indicates that with an expansion of 1 0/00 a reduction of 30 % may occur. The reduction found in some of the ...

  13. Distinct Tensile Response of Model Semi-flexible Elastomer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Mercado, Bernardo M.; Cohen, Claude; Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2011-03-01

    Through coarse-grained molecular modeling, we study how the elastic response strongly depends upon nanostructural heterogeneities in model networks made of semi-flexible chains exhibiting both regular and realistic connectivity. Idealized regular polymer networks have been shown to display a peculiar elastic response similar to that of super-tough natural materials (e.g., organic adhesives inside abalone shells). We investigate the impact of chain stiffness, and the effect of including tri-block copolymer chains, on the network's topology and elastic response. We find in some systems a dual tensile response: a liquid-like behavior at small deformations, and a distinct saw-tooth shaped stress-strain curve at moderate to large deformations. Additionally, stiffer regular networks exhibit a marked hysteresis over loading-unloading cycles that can be deleted by heating-cooling cycles or by performing deformations along different axes. Furthermore, small variations of chain stiffness may entirely change the nature of the network's tensile response from an entropic to an enthalpic elastic regime, and micro-phase separation of different blocks within elastomer networks may significantly enhance their mechanical strength. This work was supported by the American Chemical Society.

  14. Tensile behavior of containment wall considering liner plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namso Cho; Namsik Kim; Youngsun Choun

    2005-01-01

    General design works in containment building would ignore a structural contribution of liner plate, which has been just taken for a functional member to finally prevent the radioactive leakage against an ultimate internal pressure due to unexpected accidents. However, since the sectional area of liner actually occupies a quite portion of concrete containment wall, and horizontal and vertical stiffeners may help the bondage of liner to concrete, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of liner on concrete tensile behavior. In this study, full-scale test specimens well-reflecting an existing containment wall were fabricated, and tensile failure tests had been carried out to investigate the cracking behavior and stress-strain relationship of concrete as considering liner. The experimental results had been analyzed for two critical cases, which represented the lower and upper bound as the composite extent of liner. One of the cases was assumed that liner could show a fully composite behavior with concrete, and in the other case liner was assumed to be no bond with concrete. (authors)

  15. A Tensile Constitutive Relationship and a Finite Element Model of Electrospun Nanofibrous Mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlei Yin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to establish a numerical model for a certain structure of electrospun nanofibrous mats, due to their high porosity and non-linear characteristics, that can fully consider these characteristics and describe their mechanical behaviors. In this paper, an analytical method of meso-mechanics was adopted to establish the tensile constitutive relationship between a single fiber and mats from fiber-web microstructures. Meanwhile, a macroscopic finite element model was developed and verified through uniaxial tensile stress-strain experimental data of silk fibroin (SF/polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibrous mats. The compared results show that the constitutive relation and finite element model could satisfactorily express elastic-plastic tensile mechanical behaviors of the polymer. This model helps regulate the microstructure of nanofibrous mats to meet the mechanical requirements in engineering applications.

  16. A Tensile Constitutive Relationship and a Finite Element Model of Electrospun Nanofibrous Mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yunlei; Pan, Zhongxiang; Xiong, Jie

    2018-01-08

    It is difficult to establish a numerical model for a certain structure of electrospun nanofibrous mats, due to their high porosity and non-linear characteristics, that can fully consider these characteristics and describe their mechanical behaviors. In this paper, an analytical method of meso-mechanics was adopted to establish the tensile constitutive relationship between a single fiber and mats from fiber-web microstructures. Meanwhile, a macroscopic finite element model was developed and verified through uniaxial tensile stress-strain experimental data of silk fibroin (SF)/polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous mats. The compared results show that the constitutive relation and finite element model could satisfactorily express elastic-plastic tensile mechanical behaviors of the polymer. This model helps regulate the microstructure of nanofibrous mats to meet the mechanical requirements in engineering applications.

  17. Derivation of tensile flow characteristics for austenitic materials from instrumented indentation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K-W; Kim, K-H; Kim, J-Y; Kwon, D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a method for deriving the tensile flow characteristics of austenitic materials from an instrumented indentation technique is presented along with its experimental verification. We proposed a modified algorithm for austenitic materials that takes their hardening behaviour into account. First, the true strain based on sine function instead of tangent function was adapted. It was proved that the sine function shows constant degrees of hardening which is a main characteristic of the hardening of austenitic materials. Second, a simple and linear constitutive equation was newly suggested to optimize indentation flow curves. The modified approach was experimentally verified by comparing tensile properties of five austenitic materials from uniaxial tensile test and instrumented indentation tests

  18. The influence of temperature on the tensile properties of a super duplex stainless steel; Influencia de la temperature en las propiedades a traccion de un acero inoxidablesuperduplex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girones, A.; Mateo, A.; Llanes, L.; Anglada, M

    2001-07-01

    Tensile tests, at temperatures ranging between 275 and 475 degree centigree were performed in a superduplex stainless steel EN 1.4410. The dependence of yield stress and ultimate tensile strength on temperature indicates the existence of dynamic strain aging (DSA). In order to evaluate the influence of strain rate on this phenomenon, tests were conducted at two different strain rates, both at 325 degree centigree, temperature at which DSA is maximum for this materials. The results shows that the flow stress has an inverse strain rate sensitivity which confirms the existence of DSA in the steel under study. (Author) 10 refs.

  19. Characterization of fiber optic cables under large tensile loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogle, J.W.; Looney, L.D.; Peterson, R.T.

    1984-01-01

    Fiber optic cables designed for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have to withstand an unusually harsh environment. Cables have been manufactured under a 6 year old DOE specification that has been slightly modified as the cable requirements are better understood. In order to better understand the cable properties a unique capability has been established at the NTS. Instrumentation has been developed to characterize the transmission properties of 1 km of fiber optic cable placed under a controlled tensile load up to 1500 lbs. The properties measured are cable tension, cable elongation, induced attenuation, attenuation vs. location, fiber strain, bandwidth, and ambient temperature. Preforming these measurements on cables from the two qualified NTS fiber optic cable manufacturers, Siecor and Andrew Corp., led to a new set of specifications

  20. Data processing codes for fatigue and tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Sarmiento, Gustavo; Iorio, A.F.; Crespi, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The processing of fatigue and tensile tests data in order to obtain several parameters of engineering interest requires a considerable effort of numerical calculus. In order to reduce the time spent in this work and to establish standard data processing from a set of similar type tests, it is very advantageous to have a calculation code for running in a computer. Two codes have been developed in FORTRAN language; one of them predicts cyclic properties of materials from the monotonic and incremental or multiple cyclic step tests (ENSPRED CODE), and the other one reduces data coming from strain controlled low cycle fatigue tests (ENSDET CODE). Two examples are included using Zircaloy-4 material from different manufacturers. (author) [es

  1. Experimental Assessment of Tensile Failure Characteristic for Advanced Composite Laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myoung Keon; Lee, Jeong Won; Yoon, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, major airplane manufacturers have been using the laminate failure theory to estimate the strain of composite structures for airplanes. The laminate failure theory uses the failure strain of the laminate to analyze composite structures. This paper describes a procedure for the experimental assessment of laminate tensile failure characteristics. Regression analysis was used as the experimental assessment method. The regression analysis was performed with the response variable being the laminate failure strain and with the regressor variables being two-ply orientation (0° and ±45°) variables. The composite material in this study is a carbon/epoxy unidirectional (UD) tape that was cured as a pre-preg at 177°C(350°F). A total of 149 tension tests were conducted on specimens from 14 distinct laminates that were laid up at standard angle layers (0°, 45°, -45°, and 90°). The ASTM-D-3039 standard was used as the test method.

  2. Experimental Assessment of Tensile Failure Characteristic for Advanced Composite Laminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Keon [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Won; Yoon, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jae Hoon [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    In recent years, major airplane manufacturers have been using the laminate failure theory to estimate the strain of composite structures for airplanes. The laminate failure theory uses the failure strain of the laminate to analyze composite structures. This paper describes a procedure for the experimental assessment of laminate tensile failure characteristics. Regression analysis was used as the experimental assessment method. The regression analysis was performed with the response variable being the laminate failure strain and with the regressor variables being two-ply orientation (0° and ±45°) variables. The composite material in this study is a carbon/epoxy unidirectional (UD) tape that was cured as a pre-preg at 177°C(350°F). A total of 149 tension tests were conducted on specimens from 14 distinct laminates that were laid up at standard angle layers (0°, 45°, -45°, and 90°). The ASTM-D-3039 standard was used as the test method.

  3. Interlaboratory verification of silicon nitride tensile creep properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luecke, W.E.; Wiederhorn, S.M. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Lab.

    1997-04-01

    Five laboratories tested NIST-supplied, pin-loaded, 76-mm-long tensile creep specimens at 1,400 C under a 150 MPa load using flag-based, laser extensometry. The laboratories reported failure time and strain and supplied the individual creep curves. Only one of the laboratories produced failure times that were significantly less than the others. It is likely that their reduced failure times resulted from small load calibration and test temperature errors. After steps were taken to ameliorate these problems, three additional tests yielded failure times that agreed with those of the other four laboratories. Although the times to failure from the four laboratories that initially agreed were statistically indistinguishable, their creep curves exhibited subtle differences. These differences probably arose because the laboratories used different gage length definitions. When the authors recalculated the creep curves to the same gage length definition, the differences between the four laboratories whose times to failure agreed, vanished. Although a number of the specimens exhibited edge chips, creep cracks, and obvious chemical interactions with the flags, the presence of these defects did not reduce the time or strain to failure. Two additional creep tests in the laboratory, using specimens that were grossly misaligned, yielded failure times and strains that were commensurate with those from well-aligned specimens.

  4. Influence of processing parameters on microstructure and tensile properties of TG6 titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tao; Guo Hongzhen; Wang Yanwei; Yao Zekun

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → This paper highlights the relationships among processing parameters, microstructure and tensile properties of TG6 high temperature titanium alloy. → The microstructural evolutions under different processing parameters were studied by the quantitative metallography, and the effects of microstructure on room and high temperature tensile properties of TG6 alloy were analysed by SEM and TEM. → Linear relationships of elongation vs. volume fraction of primary α phase and ultimate tensile strength vs. thickness of lamellar α phase were determined. - Abstract: Near-isothermal forging of the TG6 titanium alloy was conducted on microprocessor-controlled 630 ton hydraulic press at the deformation temperatures ranging from 850 deg. C to 1045 deg. C, the strain rates of 0.0008 s -1 , 0.003 s -1 and 0.008 s -1 and the deformation degree from 10% to 70%, and then different double heat treatments were applied to the forged specimens. The microstructural evolutions were researched by optical microscope and the microstructural features, i.e. volume fraction of primary α phase and thickness of lamellar α phase, were measured by means of the image analysis software. The room and high temperature tensile properties were obtained for all the specimens. Effects of microstructure on the properties were analysed by scanning electronic microscope. It was found that tenslie properties depended on microstructural features strongly. The plots of ultimate tensile strength vs. thickness of α lamellae and elongation vs. volume fraction of primary α phase produced straight lines. The liner equations were determined by fitting the experimental date, respectively. Compared to other parameters, heat treatment had more influence on the tensile strength and the tensile plasticity was more sensitive to the forging temperature.

  5. Characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of fresh and dry forewings of beetles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuo, Wanyong [School of Civil Engineering & International Institute for Urban Systems Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); School of Civil & Architectural Engineering, Anyang Institute of Technology, Anyang 455000 (China); Chen, Jinxiang, E-mail: chenjpaper@yahoo.co.jp [School of Civil Engineering & International Institute for Urban Systems Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan [School of Civil Engineering & International Institute for Urban Systems Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Wang, Yong [Nantong Vocational University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226007 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Based on a tensile experiment and observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), this study demonstrated the characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of the fresh and dry forewings of two types of beetles. The results revealed obvious differences in the tensile fracture morphologies and characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of fresh and dry forewings of Cybister tripunctatus Olivier and Allomyrina dichotoma. For fresh forewings of these two types of beetles, a viscous, flow-like, polymer matrix plastic deformation was observed on the fracture surfaces, with soft morphologies and many fibers being pulled out, whereas on the dry forewings, the tensile fracture surfaces were straightforward, and there were no features resembling those found on the fresh forewings. The fresh forewings exhibited a greater fracture strain than the dry forewings, which was caused by the relative slippage of hydroxyl inter-chain bonds due to the presence of water in the fibers and proteins in the fresh forewings. Our study is the first to demonstrate the phenomenon of sudden stress drops caused by the fracturing of the lower skin because the lower skin fractured before the forewings of A. dichotoma reached their ultimate tensile strength. We also investigated the reasons underlying this phenomenon. This research provides a much better understanding of the mechanical properties of beetle forewings and facilitates the correct selection of study objects for biomimetic materials and development of the corresponding applications. - Highlights: • There is a phenomenon of sudden stress drop on the tensile stress-train curve of forewing. • The causes of the differences of mechanical properties of fresh and dry forewings are explained. • The hypothesis raised in a previous review paper is verified. • This study brings better ideas into correct understanding of the mechanical properties that the biomimetic object exhibits.

  6. TENSILE RESPONSES OF TREATED CISSUS POPULNEA FIBERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    anhydride. This work is also in agreement with Troedec. , et al.. [28] report on modified hemp fibers for reinforcement of lime matrix using NaOH, Ca(OH)2,. EDTA and polyethylene imine. However, the closeness of tensile properties from experimental and response model indicated that the RSM approach using CCD.

  7. Interpretation of dynamic tensile behavior by austenite stability in ferrite-austenite duplex lightweight steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyeong; Jo, Min Cheol; Jeong, Hyeok Jae; Sohn, Seok Su; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-11-16

    Phenomena occurring in duplex lightweight steels under dynamic loading are hardly investigated, although its understanding is essentially needed in applications of automotive steels. In this study, quasi-static and dynamic tensile properties of duplex lightweight steels were investigated by focusing on how TRIP and TWIP mechanisms were varied under the quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. As the annealing temperature increased, the grain size and volume fraction of austenite increased, thereby gradually decreasing austenite stability. The strain-hardening rate curves displayed a multiple-stage strain-hardening behavior, which was closely related with deformation mechanisms. Under the dynamic loading, the temperature rise due to adiabatic heating raised the austenite stability, which resulted in the reduction in the TRIP amount. Though the 950 °C-annealed specimen having the lowest austenite stability showed the very low ductility and strength under the quasi-static loading, it exhibited the tensile elongation up to 54% as well as high strain-hardening rate and tensile strength (1038 MPa) due to appropriate austenite stability under dynamic loading. Since dynamic properties of the present duplex lightweight steels show the excellent strength-ductility combination as well as continuously high strain hardening, they can be sufficiently applied to automotive steel sheets demanded for stronger vehicle bodies and safety enhancement.

  8. On loading velocity oscillations during dynamic tensile testing with flying wheel systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erice Borja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flying Wheels (FW provide a space-saving alternative to Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB systems for generating the loading pulse for intermediate and high strain rate material testing. This is particularly attractive in view of performing ductile fracture experiments at intermediate strain rates that require a several milliseconds long loading pulse. More than 50 m long Hopkinson bars are required in that case, whereas the same kinetic energy (for a given loading velocity can be stored in rather compact flying wheels (e.g. diameter of less than 1.5 m. To gain more insight into the loading capabilities of FW tensile testing systems, a simple analytical model is presented to analyze the loading history applied by a FW system. It is found that due to the presence of a puller bar that transmits the tensile load from the rotating wheel to the specimen, the loading velocity applied onto the specimen oscillates between about zero and twice the tangential loading speed applied by the FW. The theoretical and numerical evaluation for a specific 1.1 m diameter FW system revealed that these oscillations occur at a frequency in the kHz range, thereby questioning the approximate engineering assumption of a constant strain rate in FW tensile experiments at strain rates of the order of 100/s.

  9. On the Processing of Spalling Experiments. Part I: Identification of the Dynamic Tensile Strength of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forquin, P.; Lukić, B.

    2017-11-01

    The spalling technique based on the use of a single Hopkinson bar put in contact with the tested sample has been widely adopted as a reliable method for obtaining the tensile response of concrete and rock-like materials at strain rates up-to 200 s- 1. However, the traditional processing method, based on the use of Novikov acoustic approach and the rear face velocity measurement, remains quite questionable due to strong approximations of this data processing method. Recently a new technique for deriving cross-sectional stress fields of a spalling sample filmed with an ultra-high speed camera and based on using the full field measurements and the virtual fields method (VFM) was proposed. In the present work, this topic is perused by performing several spalling tests on ordinary concrete at high acquisition speed of 1Mfps to accurately measure the tensile strength, Young's modulus, strain-rate at failure and stress-strain response of concrete at high strain-rate. The stress-strain curves contain more measurement points for a more reliable identification. The observed tensile stiffness is up-to 50% lower than the initial compressive stiffness and the obtained peak stress was about 20% lower than the one obtained by applying the Novikov method. In order to support this claim, numerical simulations were performed to show that the change of stiffness between compression and tension highly affects the rear-face velocity profile. This further suggests that the processing based only on the velocity "pullback" is quite sensitive and can produce an overestimate of the tensile strength in concrete and rock-like materials.

  10. Mechanical characterization of stomach tissue under uniaxial tensile action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Z G; Li, W; Zhou, Z R

    2015-02-26

    In this article, the tensile properties of gastric wall were investigated by using biomechanical test and theoretical analysis. The samples of porcine stomach strips from smaller and greater curvature of the stomach were cut in longitudinal and circumferential direction, respectively. The loading-unloading, stress relaxation, strain creep, tensile fracture tests were performed at mucosa-submucosa, serosa-muscle and intact layer, respectively. Results showed that the biomechanical properties of the porcine stomach depended on the layers, orientations and locations of the gastric wall and presented typical viscoelastic, nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical properties. During loading-unloading test, the stress of serosa-muscle layer in the longitudinal direction was 15-20% more than that in the circumferential direction at 12% stretch ratio, while it could reach about 40% for the intact layer and 50% for the mucosa-submucosa layer. The results of stress relaxation and strain creep showed that the variation degree was obviously faster in the circumferential direction than that in the longitudinal direction, and the ultimate residual values were also different for the different layers, orientations and locations. In the process of fracture test, the serosa-muscle layer fractured firstly followed by the mucosa-submucosa layer when the intact layer was tested, the longitudinal strips firstly began to fracture and the required stress value was about twice as much as that in the circumferential strips. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of mechanical characterization of the porcine stomach were related to its complicated geometry, structure and functions. The results would help us to understand the biomechanics of soft organ tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transient Thermal Tensile Behaviour of Novel Pitch-Based Ultra-High Modulus CFRP Tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pietro Terrasi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel ultra-high modulus carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP prestressing tendon made from coal tar pitch-based carbon fibres was characterized in terms of high temperature tensile strength (up to 570 °C with a series of transient thermal and steady state temperature tensile tests. Digital image correlation was used to capture the high temperature strain development during thermal and mechanical loading. Complementary thermogravimetric (TGA and dynamic mechanical thermal (DMTA experiments were performed on the tendons to elucidate their high temperature thermal and mechanical behaviour. The novel CFRP tendons investigated in the present study showed an ambient temperature design tensile strength of 1400 MPa. Their failure temperature at a sustained prestress level of 50% of the design tensile strength was 409 °C, which is higher than the failure temperature of most fibre reinforced polymer rebars used in civil engineering applications at similar utilisation levels. This high-temperature tensile strength shows that there is potential to use the novel high modulus CFRP tendons in CFRP pretensioned concrete elements for building applications that fulfill the fire resistance criteria typically applied within the construction industry.

  12. Tensile and compressive failure of 3D printed and natural sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, D.; Perras, M.; Walsh, S. D. C.; Dombrovski, E.

    2016-12-01

    Artificial 3D-printed sandstone samples have the potential to replicate the physical characteristics of natural sandstones, allowing the creation of reproducible rock specimens. If successful, such materials could be used to replicate heterogeneous specimens for destructive testing in a number of different configurations and across different test types. In this study, we consider to what degree such artificial samples can match the tensile and compressive failure behavior of natural sandstones. Specifically, 3D printed sandstone samples were subjected to both indirect Brazilian and unconfined compression tests. Two different types of 3D printed and three natural sandstones were tested, comparing their 1) tensile and compressive strength; 2) strain path to failure; 3) failure mode; and 4) fracture geometry after failure. The artificial sandstone samples demonstrated tensile strengths and failure modes similar to those exhibited in weak natural sandstones. Moreover, the ratio of tensile to compressive strength was found to be similar across all materials tested including the 3D printed materials. Finally, the small-scale fracture surface roughness is comparable between artificial and natural specimens of similar tensile strength - suggesting similar grain- and macro-scale failure behavior between the 3D printed and natural sandstone samples.

  13. Conversion of engineering stresses to Cauchy stresses in tensile and compression tests of thermoplastic polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schümann Kerstin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic polymers exhibit non-isochoric behaviour during tensile and compression testing as well as particular deformations like local necking (tension or buckling (compression. A method for the determination of Cauchy stresses from tensile and compression tests is presented, that considers the actual deformations of the test specimens. The exact geometry of the specimens in the respective present configuration is determined in photographs, which are taken continuously throughout the test. The engineering stresses at several time points are converted into Cauchy stresses using newly developed formulas in consideration of the actual specimen geometry. For validation finite element analyses of the tensile and compression tests are performed using the identified stress-strain curves. The numerical results show good agreement with the experiments for the tested polymers. Thus a method for conversion of engineering to Cauchy stresses in tensile and compression tests could be established considering the non-isochoric deformation in plasticity. With this method “true” stress-strain curves as input for finite element material models can be identified for arbitrary materials.

  14. Investigation of tensile properties of RTV Silicone based Isotropic Magnetorheological Elastomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandesh Bhaktha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetorheological elastomer (MRE consists of an elastomer matrix and a Ferro-magnetic ingredient. The mechanical properties of MR elastomers can be reversibly controlled by applying a magnetic field of suitable intensity. The current work focusses on the enhancement of tensile property of RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanization silicone based elastomer. The influence of Carbonyl iron powder (CIP content and magnetic field were experimentally investigated. Addition of CIP increases the tensile modulus but it reduces the percentage elongation and tensile strength making it brittle. Under the influence of magnetic field, the enhancement of tensile properties up to 20% content was linear. The behavior above 20% is observed to be non-linear. The onset of non-linear stress-strain behavior is investigated. Regression equation is developed from the experimental data relating percentage content with the mechanical properties of MRE. The developed equation predicted the behavior of 27% MRE with an error of less than 8%. Hyperelastic model developed by Yeoh was fitted to the stress-strain behavior of MRE with minimal error.

  15. Effect of Hydrogen and Strain-Induced Martensite on Mechanical Properties of AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hwan Bak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Plastic deformation and strain-induced martensite (SIM, α′ transformation in metastable austenitic AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated through room temperature tensile tests at strain rates ranging from 2 × 10−6 to 2 × 10−2/s. The amount of SIM was measured on the fractured tensile specimens using a feritscope and magnetic force microscope. Elongation to fracture, tensile strength, hardness, and the amount of SIM increased with decreasing the strain rate. The strain-rate dependence of RT tensile properties was observed to be related to the amount of SIM. Specifically, SIM formed during tensile tests was beneficial in increasing the elongation to fracture, hardness, and tensile strength. Hydrogen suppressed the SIM formation, leading to hydrogen softening and localized brittle fracture.

  16. A Simplified Micromechanical Modeling Approach to Predict the Tensile Flow Curve Behavior of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Tarun; Kumar, B. Ravi; Singh, Vishal

    2017-11-01

    Micromechanical modeling is used to predict material's tensile flow curve behavior based on microstructural characteristics. This research develops a simplified micromechanical modeling approach for predicting flow curve behavior of dual-phase steels. The existing literature reports on two broad approaches for determining tensile flow curve of these steels. The modeling approach developed in this work attempts to overcome specific limitations of the existing two approaches. This approach combines dislocation-based strain-hardening method with rule of mixtures. In the first step of modeling, `dislocation-based strain-hardening method' was employed to predict tensile behavior of individual phases of ferrite and martensite. In the second step, the individual flow curves were combined using `rule of mixtures,' to obtain the composite dual-phase flow behavior. To check accuracy of proposed model, four distinct dual-phase microstructures comprising of different ferrite grain size, martensite fraction, and carbon content in martensite were processed by annealing experiments. The true stress-strain curves for various microstructures were predicted with the newly developed micromechanical model. The results of micromechanical model matched closely with those of actual tensile tests. Thus, this micromechanical modeling approach can be used to predict and optimize the tensile flow behavior of dual-phase steels.

  17. A constitutive model of porous SMAs considering tensile-compressive asymmetry behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingfei; Dui, Guansuo; Xie, Benming; Xue, Lijun

    2014-04-01

    A constitutive model of the macroscopic behaviors of porous shape memory alloys (SMA) is developed in this work. A yield function for porous SMAs considering both the effect of hydrostatic stress and the tensile-compressive asymmetry is proposed. Combining the constitutive model of dense SMAs and the macroscale and microscale analysis, the evolution equation for the overall transformation strain is then derived. Examples for the response of both dense SMA and porous Ni-Ti SMA subjected to uniaxial tension and compression loads are supplied. Good agreement between the numerical prediction results and the published experimental data is observed. Numerical result shows that the yielding stresses, loop width and length, strain-hardening behaviors of porous SMAs under pure tensile and pure compressive are different. Importantly, the transformation initiation stress is much closer to the experiment result than simulated by Zhao et al. (2005). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Numerical Simulation on the Dynamic Splitting Tensile Test of reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhuan; Jia, Haokai; Jing, Lin

    2018-03-01

    The research for crack resistance was of RC was based on the split Hopkinson bar and numerical simulate software LS-DYNA3D. In the research, the difference of dynamic splitting failure modes between plane concrete and reinforced concrete were completed, and the change rule of tensile stress distribution with reinforcement ratio was studied; also the effect rule with the strain rate and the crack resistance was also discussed by the radial tensile stress time history curve of RC specimen under different loading speeds. The results shows that the reinforcement in the concrete can impede the crack extension, defer the failure time of concrete, increase the tension intensity of concrete; with strain rate of concrete increased, the crack resistance of RC increased.

  19. The influences of deformation velocity and temperature on localized deformation of zircaloy-4 in tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boratto, F.J.M.

    1973-01-01

    A new parameter to describe the necking stability in zircaloy-4 during tensile tests is introduced. The parameter is defined as: s = ∂Ln (dσ/dε)/∂Ln ((1/L)dL/dt) for constant temperature, deformation and history. Measures of stress strain rate sensitivity n, reduction of the area at fracture, and deformation profiles of tensile fracture, are done. A complete description of the curve of non-uniform deformation variation with the temperature, is presented. The results are compared with existing data for pure commercially titanium. The influence of strain rate and history on s and n parameters, in the temperature range from 100-700 0 C). (author) [pt

  20. The influence of strain on the diffusion of Si dimers on Si(001)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoethout, E.; Zoethout, E.; Gurlu, O.; Gürlü, O.; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2000-01-01

    The influence of lattice mismatch-induced tensile strain on the diffusion of Si dimers on Si(001) has been studied. The rate of surface diffusion of a Si dimer along the substrate dimer rows is relatively insensitive to tensile strain, whereas the rate of diffusion for a Si dimer across the

  1. Finite element analysis of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC): validation of experimental tensile capacity of dog-bone specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Sayeed, Md. Abu; Hossain, Elsha Al; Ahmed, Sheikh Saleh; Siddique, Ashfia

    2014-09-01

    Finite element analyses are conducted to model the tensile capacity of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC). For this purpose dog-bone specimens are casted and tested under direct and uniaxial tension. Two types of aggregates (brick and stone) are used to cast the SFRC and plain concrete. The fiber volume ratio is maintained 1.5 %. Total 8 numbers of dog-bone specimens are made and tested in a 1000-kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM). The strain data are gathered employing digital image correlation technique from high-definition images and high-speed video clips. Then, the strain data are synthesized with the load data obtained from the load cell of the UTM. The tensile capacity enhancement is found 182-253 % compared to control specimen to brick SFRC and in case of stone SFRC the enhancement is 157-268 %. Fibers are found to enhance the tensile capacity as well as ductile properties of concrete that ensures to prevent sudden brittle failure. The dog-bone specimens are modeled in the ANSYS 10.0 finite element platform and analyzed to model the tensile capacity of brick and stone SFRC. The SOLID65 element is used to model the SFRC as well as plain concretes by optimizing the Poisson's ratio, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and stress-strain relationships and also failure pattern as well as failure locations. This research provides information of the tensile capacity enhancement of SFRC made of both brick and stone which will be helpful for the construction industry of Bangladesh to introduce this engineering material in earthquake design. Last of all, the finite element outputs are found to hold good agreement with the experimental tensile capacity which validates the FE modeling.

  2. High-Tensile Strength Tape Versus High-Tensile Strength Suture: A Biomechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnandt, Ryan J; Smith, Jennifer L; Nguyen-Ta, Kim; McDonald, Lucas; LeClere, Lance E

    2016-02-01

    To determine which suture design, high-tensile strength tape or high-tensile strength suture, performed better at securing human tissue across 4 selected suture techniques commonly used in tendinous repair, by comparing the total load at failure measured during a fixed-rate longitudinal single load to failure using a biomechanical testing machine. Matched sets of tendon specimens with bony attachments were dissected from 15 human cadaveric lower extremities in a manner allowing for direct comparison testing. With the use of selected techniques (simple Mason-Allen in the patellar tendon specimens, whip stitch in the quadriceps tendon specimens, and Krackow stitch in the Achilles tendon specimens), 1 sample of each set was sutured with a 2-mm braided, nonabsorbable, high-tensile strength tape and the other with a No. 2 braided, nonabsorbable, high-tensile strength suture. A total of 120 specimens were tested. Each model was loaded to failure at a fixed longitudinal traction rate of 100 mm/min. The maximum load and failure method were recorded. In the whip stitch and the Krackow-stitch models, the high-tensile strength tape had a significantly greater mean load at failure with a difference of 181 N (P = .001) and 94 N (P = .015) respectively. No significant difference was found in the Mason-Allen and simple stitch models. Pull-through remained the most common method of failure at an overall rate of 56.7% (suture = 55%; tape = 58.3%). In biomechanical testing during a single load to failure, high-tensile strength tape performs more favorably than high-tensile strength suture, with a greater mean load to failure, in both the whip- and Krackow-stitch models. Although suture pull-through remains the most common method of failure, high-tensile strength tape requires a significantly greater load to pull-through in a whip-stitch and Krakow-stitch model. The biomechanical data obtained in the current study indicates that high-tensile strength tape may provide better repair

  3. Austenite stability in reversion-treated structures of a 301LN steel under tensile loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M.; Man, Jiří; Karjalainen, L. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 127, MAY (2017), s. 12-26 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-32665S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : austenitic stainless steel * austenite stability * grain size * reversion annealing * tensile straining * deformation induced martensite Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.714, year: 2016

  4. Effects of Static Tensile Load on the Thermal Expansion of Gr/PI Composite Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    is the effect of load on the thermal expansion. The effects of static tensile load on the coefficient of thermal expansion of mild steel and Invar ...thermally calibrated material ( Invar ) was used to com- pensate for apparent thermal strain. In all tests the specimens were reported to reach a... alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) specimen was performed to establish the general validity of the test method. This test was performed between room temperature and

  5. Effects of cell adhesion motif, fiber stiffness, and cyclic strain on tenocyte gene expression in a tendon mimetic fiber composite hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dharmesh; Sharma, Sadhana; Screen, Hazel R C; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2018-05-15

    We recently developed a fiber composite consisting of tenocytes seeded onto discontinuous fibers embedded within a hydrogel, designed to mimic physiological tendon micromechanics of tension and shear. This study examined if cell adhesion peptide (DGEA or YRGDS), fiber modulus (50 or 1300 kPa) and/or cyclic strain (5% strain, 1 Hz) influenced bovine tenocyte gene expression. Ten genes were analyzed and none were sensitive to peptide or fiber modulus in the absence of cyclic tensile strain. Genes associated with tendon (SCX and TNMD), collagens (COL1A1, COL3A1, COL11A1), and matrix remodelling (MMP1, MMP2, and TIMP3) were insensitive to cyclic strain. Contrarily, cyclic strain up-regulated IL6 by 30-fold and MMP3 by 10-fold in soft YRGDS fibers. IL6 expression in soft YRGDS fibers was 5.7 and 3.3-fold greater than in soft DGEA fibers and stiff RGD fibers, respectively, under cyclic strain. Our findings suggest that changes in the surrounding matrix can influence catabolic genes in tenocytes when cultured in a complex strain environment mimicking that of tendon, while having minimal effects on tendon and homeostatic genes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Environmental behaviour of tensile membrane structures

    OpenAIRE

    Elnokaly, Amira; Chilton, John; Wilson, Robin

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the environmental properties of spaces enclosed by tensile membrane structures (TMS). Limitations in the understanding of the environmental and thermal performance of TMS have to some extent hindered their acceptance by building clients and the building industry. A review of the early attempts to model the thermal environment of spaces enclosed by TMS is given and their environmental and thermal properties are discussed. The lack of appropriate tools for the investigation...

  7. Tensile creep of beta phase zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, B.; Reynolds, G.L.; Barnes, J.P.

    1977-08-01

    The tensile creep and creep rupture properties of beta-phase zircaloy-2 are studied under vacuum in the temperature and stress range 1300-1550 K and 0.5-2 MN/m 2 . The new results are compared with previously reported uniaxial and biaxial data. A small but systematic difference is noted between the uniaxial and biaxial creep data and reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. (author)

  8. Determining tensile properties of sweetgum veneer flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.W. Price

    1976-01-01

    Rotary-cut 8weetgum veneer flakes measuring 3 inchee along the grain, 3/8 inch wide, and 0.015 inch thick, were stressed in tension parallel to the grain at gage lengths from 0.00 to 1.25 inchee for unpressed control and at 0.75 inch gage length for flakes pressed in a flakeboard mat. The control flakes had an average tensile strength of 9,400 psi for the smaller age...

  9. Tensile properties of structural fibre reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipka, M.; Vašková, J.

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with the comparison of several loading tests, which are using for determination of tensile strength of cementitious composites. The paper describes several test methods, their advantages, disadvantages and possible outputs. In the experimental program several recipes of concrete and fibre reinforced concrete were tested in splitting test, 3-point and 4-point bending tests and in 2 variants of axial tension test. Tension strength ratios and conversion factors between loading tests were determined for each recipe, based on test results.

  10. Strain fluctuations and elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that the elastic strain fluctuations are a direct measure of elastic compliances in a general anisotropic medium; depending on the ensemble in which the fluctuation is measured either the isothermal or the adiabatic compliances are obtained. These fluctuations can now be calculated in a constant enthalpy and pressure, and hence, constant entropy, ensemble due to recent develpments in the molecular dynamics techniques. A calculation for a Ni single crystal under uniform uniaxial 100 tensile or compressive load is presented as an illustration of the relationships derived between various strain fluctuations and the elastic modulii. The Born stability criteria and the behavior of strain fluctuations are shown to be related.

  11. Microstructure and texture evolution during tensile deformation of symmetric/asymmetric-rolled low carbon microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Minghui; Wei, Xing; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    The deformation and fracture mechanisms of a low carbon microalloyed steel processed by asymmetric rolling (AsR) and symmetric rolling (SR) were compared by microstructural and texture evolutions during uniaxial tensile deformation. A realistic microstructure-based micromechanical modeling was involved as well. AsR provides more effective grain refinement and beneficial shear textures, leading to higher ductility and extraordinary strain hardening with improved yield and ultimate tensile stresses as well as promoting the occurrence of ductile fracture. This was verified and further explained by means of the different fracture modes during quasi-static uniaxial deformation, the preferred void nucleation sites and crack propagation behavior, and the change in the dislocation density based on the kernel average misorientation (KAM) distribution. The equivalent strain/stress partitioning during tensile deformation of AsR and SR specimens was modeled based on a two-dimensional (2D) representative volume element (RVE) approach. The trend of strain/stress partitioning in the ferrite matrix agrees well with the experimental results

  12. 49 CFR 230.26 - Tensile strength of shell plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tensile strength of shell plates. 230.26 Section... Appurtenances Strength of Materials § 230.26 Tensile strength of shell plates. When the tensile strength of steel or wrought-iron shell plates is not known, it shall be taken at 50,000 psi for steel and 45,000...

  13. Strain rate dependent hardening of DP600 sheet metal for large strains under in-plane biaxial loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Guines, D.; Léotoing, L.; Ragneau, E.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, an in-plane biaxial tensile test of cruciform specimen is performed to identify the visco-plastic hardening behaviour of metallic sheets for both large strains and intermediate strain rates at room temperature. Firstly, an optimal shape of the specimen is suggested. Then, dynamic biaxial tensile tests are carried out for a dual phase DP600 steel sheet. Experimental forces on the two axes of the specimen are measured during the test and strains in the central area of the specimen are post-treated by means of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique. Finally, considering a Hill48 anisotropic yield criterion, two strain rate dependent hardening laws are identified thanks to an inverse procedure based on a Finite Element (FE) modelling of the biaxial tensile test and on the experimental data mentioned above. The identified biaxial flow curves are then compared with the ones from a classical uniaxial tensile test.

  14. Enhanced tensile properties of magnesium composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashad, Muhammad, E-mail: rashadphy87@gmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Pan, Fusheng, E-mail: fspan@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chongqing Academy of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401123 (China); Hu, Huanhuan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Asif, Muhammad [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Hussain, Shahid [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); She, Jia [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-04-10

    The aim of this study is to fabricate magnesium reinforced metal matrix composites using graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) via powder metallurgy processing in order to enhance room temperature mechanical properties. The microstructural evaluation and mechanical behaviors of composite powders and extruded bulk materials were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive spectrometer and mechanical tests. The uniform dispersion and large specific surface area per volume of GNPs embedded in magnesium matrix led to increament in microhardness, tensile strength and fracture strains of the composites. For example, when employing the pure magnesium reinforced with 0.30 wt% GNPs, the increase of Young's modulus, yield strength, and failure strain of extruded nanocomposite was +131%, +49.5% and +74.2% respectively, compared to those of extruded materials with no GNPs additive. Additionally, mechanical properties of synthesized composites were compared with previously reported Mg–CNTs composites. It was found that GNPs outperform CNTs due their high specific surface area.

  15. In situ neutron-diffraction study of tensile deformation of a bulk nanocrystalline alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, G.J.; Li, L.; Yang, Bin; Choo, H.; Liaw, P.K.; Saleh, T.A.; Clausen, B.; Brown, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    In situ neutron-diffraction technique has been employed to study the uniaxial tensile deformation of a bulk nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy. In contrast to an increase in the full-width half-maximum (FWHM) of the neutron-diffraction patterns for the coarse-grained Ni, the FWHM for the nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy decreases with increasing the plastic strain, ε P . The deformation with ε P < 1.5% did not introduce a residual lattice strain and a texture in the nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy, which were otherwise developed in the coarse-grained Ni

  16. Multi-scale investigation of tensile creep of ultra-high performance concrete for bridge applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garas Yanni, Victor Youssef

    achieving satisfactory microstructural refinement at the same temperature input despite the maximum temperature applied. For the first time, the presence of a 10 microm (394 micro inch) wide porous fiber-cementitious matrix interface was demonstrated by nanoindentation and SEM for non-thermally treated UHPC only. Tensile creep at 90 days increased by 64% and 46% upon eliminating fibers for thermally and non-thermally treated UHPC, respectively. Increases in creep upon reducing the fiber content suggested that fibers carry part of the sustained load and thus reduce creep. Tensile creep strain was proportional to the stress applied up to 60% of the ultimate strength. No tensile creep failure occurred for a period of 1 year for pre-cracked UHPC under stress level of 40%. Also, no tensile creep failure occurred for a period of 90 days under stress level of 60%. Tensile creep failure occurred at stress levels of 70% and 80%. This study showed that fibers cannot be accounted for as shear reinforcement in lieu of stirrups unless micro-defect-free fiber-matrix interface is achieved.

  17. Anisotropic behavior studies of aluminum alloy 5083-H0 using a micro-tensile test stage in a FEG-SEM

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motsi, GT

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The plastic anisotropic characteristics of aluminum alloy 5083-H0 at varying strain rates were investigated using uniaxial tensile testing inside an ultra-high resolution FEG-SEM. The stress strain graphs obtained show that for the rolling direction...

  18. Tensile Strength of Water Exposed to Pressure Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that pressurization for an extended period of time increases the tensile strength of water, but little information is available on the effect of pressure pulses of short duration. This is addressed in the present paper where we first measure the tensile strength of water...... at an extended water-solid interface by imposing a tensile stress pulse which easily causes cavitation. Next, a compressive pulse of duration ~1 ms and a peak intensity of a few bar is imposed prior to the tensile stress pulse. A dramatic increase of the tensile strength is observed immediately after...

  19. The influence of the dynamic loading rate on tensile failure properties of metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couque, H.

    2012-08-01

    The influence of the dynamic loading rate on the tensile failure properties of a series of tungsten alloys and an austenitic stainless steel were investigated by evaluating the flexural strength with unnotched and notched Charpy specimens. These data were generated with a newly developed Hopkinson pressure bar technique. The technique consists in impacting with a striker, at velocities ranging from 25 to 160 m/s, a round bar specimen placed against two incident Hopkinson pressure bars. Through the recording of the striker velocity before and after impact, failure energy is deduced. At impact velocities greater than 30 m/s, the results reveal a surprising increase of the Charpy energy with the increase of the impact velocity for both types of metallic materials. The results have been interpreted through numerical simulations of the Charpy test, the dependence of the material flow stress with the strain rate, and observations of the failure mechanisms. It was found that at impact velocities greater than 30 m/s, tangential strain rates exceed 3000s-1 at the failure initiation site of the Charpy specimen. These strain rates are within the strain rate regime where strengthening occurred due to the viscous behaviour of the dislocations. Data generated with moderate stress concentration using notched round bar Charpy specimens indicate that the strengthening occurring at high strain rates continues to pilot the tensile failure processes.

  20. Uniform tensile elongation in framed submicron metallic glass specimen in the limit of suppressed shear banding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Qingsong [Institute of Microstructure and Properties of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Cheng Yongqiang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Yue Yonghai; Zhang Lei [Institute of Microstructure and Properties of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Zhang Ze [Institute of Microstructure and Properties of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Department of Materials Science, State Key Lab of Si Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Han Xiaodong, E-mail: xdhan@bjut.edu.cn [Institute of Microstructure and Properties of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Ma, Evan, E-mail: ema@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Metallic glasses (MGs) normally plastically deform via severe strain localization in the form of shear banding at room temperature. Here we show that, in the event of much delayed shear banding, submicron-scale MG specimens can elongate homogeneously in tension to a uniform plastic strain as large as 12% before failure, plus an estimated elastic strain of {approx}5%, at a temperature close to room temperature (below 70 deg. C). This high deformability of MGs well below the glass transition temperature, revealed in situ using tensile testing inside a transmission electron microscope and specimens prepared via focused ion beam micromachining, is attributed to the suppression of shear banding instability due to the nanoscale samples together with a sample frame design that imparts high effective machine stiffness and confinement. We also point out that the pronounced 'homogeneous' deformation reported here is a form of non-localized deformation that is different from the homogeneous viscous flow for superplastic forming at high temperatures (in the supercooled liquid state), and from the intrinsic tensile ductility (stable uniform elongation) resulting from inherent strain hardening and strain-rate hardening mechanisms in free-standing conventional crystalline metals under uniaxial tension.

  1. The influence of the dynamic loading rate on tensile failure properties of metallic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couque H.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the dynamic loading rate on the tensile failure properties of a series of tungsten alloys and an austenitic stainless steel were investigated by evaluating the flexural strength with unnotched and notched Charpy specimens. These data were generated with a newly developed Hopkinson pressure bar technique. The technique consists in impacting with a striker, at velocities ranging from 25 to 160 m/s, a round bar specimen placed against two incident Hopkinson pressure bars. Through the recording of the striker velocity before and after impact, failure energy is deduced. At impact velocities greater than 30 m/s, the results reveal a surprising increase of the Charpy energy with the increase of the impact velocity for both types of metallic materials. The results have been interpreted through numerical simulations of the Charpy test, the dependence of the material flow stress with the strain rate, and observations of the failure mechanisms. It was found that at impact velocities greater than 30 m/s, tangential strain rates exceed 3000s−1 at the failure initiation site of the Charpy specimen. These strain rates are within the strain rate regime where strengthening occurred due to the viscous behaviour of the dislocations. Data generated with moderate stress concentration using notched round bar Charpy specimens indicate that the strengthening occurring at high strain rates continues to pilot the tensile failure processes.

  2. Tensile Properties of Medium Mn Steel with a Bimodal UFG α + γ and Coarse δ-Ferrite Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seonjong; Shin, Sunmi; Kwon, Minhyeok; Lee, Kyooyoung; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2017-04-01

    While the tensile strength and elongation obtained for medium Mn steel would appear to make it a candidate material in applications which require formable ultra-high strength materials, many secondary aspects of the microstructure-properties relationships have not yet been given enough attention. In this contribution, the microstructural and tensile properties of medium Mn steel with a bimodal microstructure consisting of an ultra-fine grained ferrite + austenite constituent and coarse-grained delta-ferrite are therefore reviewed in detail. The tensile properties of ultra-fine-grained intercritically annealed medium Mn steel reveal a complex dependence on the intercritical annealing temperature. This dependence is related to the influence of the intercritical annealing temperature on the activation of the plasticity-enhancing mechanisms in the microstructure. The kinetics of deformation twinning and strain-induced transformation in the ultra-fine grained austenite play a prominent role in determining the strain hardening of medium Mn steel. While excellent strength-ductility combinations are obtained when deformation twinning and strain-induced transformation occur gradually and in sequence, large elongations are also observed when strain-induced transformation plasticity is not activated. In addition, the localization of plastic flow is observed to occur in samples after intercritical annealing at intermediate temperatures, suggesting that both strain hardening and strain rate sensitivity are influenced by the properties of the ultra-fine-grained austenite.

  3. Tensile behavior of an eutectic Pb–Sn alloy processed by ECAP and rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Ponzo Lugon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A eutectic lead–tin alloy was prepared by melting the commercially pure metals and cast in cylindrical molds with 10 mm diameter. The billets were processed by 4 passes of ECAP using a die with 90° between channels through route A and rolled to a final thickness of ∼1 mm. The microstructure was determined by optical microscopy. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature in the strain rate range between 10−4 and 10−2 s−1. The results show the elongation to failure increases at low strain-rates. The strain-rate sensitivity parameter was determined and a maximum value of ∼0.4 was observed at the lowest strain-rate.

  4. Failure behavior / characteristics of fabric reinforced polymer matrix composite and aluminum6061 on dynamic tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Hyejin; Cho, Chongdu [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Composite materials are composed of multiple types of materials as reinforcement and matrix. Among them, CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced polymer) is widely used materials in automotive and defense industry. Carbon fibers are used as a reinforcement, of which Young's modulus is in a prepreg form. In automotive industry, especially, high strain rate test is needed to measure dynamic properties, used in dynamic analysis like high inertia included simulation as a car crash. In this paper, a SHTB (Split Hopkinson tensile bar) machine is employed for estimating stress-strain curve under dynamic load condition on aluminum 6061 and CFRP. The strain rate range is about from 100 /s to 1000 /s and the number of prepreg layers of composite specimen is total eight plies which are stacked symmetrically to structure CFRP. As a result, stress / strain point data are obtained and used for simulation into stacked composites.

  5. Study of tensile test behavior of austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes in cold worked condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terui, Clarice, E-mail: clarice.terui@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CINA/CTMSP), Iperó, SP (Brazil). Centro Industrial Nuclear da Marinha; Lima, Nelson B. de, E-mail: nblima@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    These austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes are potential candidates to be used in fuel elements of nuclear power plants (as PWR - Pressurized Water Reactor). So, their metallurgical condition and mechanical properties, as the tensile strength and yield strength, normally are very restrict in demanding project and design requirements. Several full size tensile tests at room temperature and high temperature (315 deg C) were performed in these seamless tubes in cold-worked condition. The results of specified tensile and yield strengths were achieved but the elongation of the tube, in the geometry of the component, could not be measured at high temperature due to unconventional mode of rupture (helical mode without separation of parts). The average value of elongation was obtained from stress-strain curves of hot tensile tests and was around 5%. The results obtained in this research show that this behavior of the full size tensile test samples of thin-walled tube (wall thickness less than 0.5 mm) in high temperature (315°C) is due to the combination of the manufacturing process, the material (crystallographic structure and chemical composition) and the final geometry of the component. In other words, the strong crystallographic texture of material induced by tube drawing process in addition with the geometry of the component are responsible for the behavior in hot uniaxial tensile tests. (author)

  6. Study of the concrete tensile creep: application for the containment vessel of the nuclear power plants (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviron, Nanthilde

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study experimentally and to conduct numerical simulations on the creep of concrete subjected to tensile stresses. The main purpose is to predict the behaviour of containment vessels of nuclear power plants (PWR) in the case of decennial test or accident. In order to satisfy to these industrial needs, it is necessary to characterize the behaviour of concrete under uniaxial tension. Thus, an important experimental study of tensile creep in concrete has been performed for different loading levels (50%, 70% and 90% of the tensile strength). In these tests, load was kept constant during 3 days. Several tests were performed: measurements of elastic properties and strength (in tension and in compression), monitoring of drying, shrinkage, basic creep and drying creep strains. Moreover, compressive creep tests were also performed and showed a difference with tensile creep. Furthermore, decrease of tensile strength and failure under tensile creep for large loading levels were observed. A numerical model has been proposed and developed in Cast3m finite element code. (author)

  7. Tensile Properties of Treated and Untreated Paddy Straw Fiber Using Sodium Hydroxide Strengthened with Polypropylene Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Masni A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focus on the effect of alkaline treatment by using sodium hydroxide on the tensile properties of paddy straw fibers strengthened with polypropylene resin. Two types of paddy straw fibers were used which are MR219 and MR220. The paddy straw fibers were prepared in two conditions as untreated and treated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH at 5% for 24 hours and then dried at 80°C for another 24 hours. For sampling process, these fibers were weighted according to 5% and 10% mass fraction. A total of 16 samples were prepared for this study based on ASTM D638 and tensile test was conducted by using ASTM D5083. The result showed that paddy straw fiber treated with NaOH had gain higher ultimate tensile strength compared to untreated paddy straw fiber where the highest ultimate tensile strength for the fibers is recorded at 10% of MR219 fiber with value of 2.0230 kN and 3.677 mm displacement were recorded. The highest strain were recorded by the same fibers with an average value of 5.253% and obtained the Young’s modulus up to 1110 MPa. However, the Young’s modulus which has been obtained by the same fibers was decreased with the percentage difference of 40%.

  8. Tensile Properties of the Deep Transverse Metatarsal Ligament in Hallux Valgus: A CONSORT-Compliant Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalbary, Sahar Ahmed; Elshaarawy, Ehab A A; Khalid, Bahaa E A

    2016-02-01

    The deep transverse metatarsal ligament (DTML) connects the neighboring2 metatarsal heads and is one of the stabilizers connecting the lateral sesamoid and second metatarsal head. In this study, we aimed to determine the tensile properties of the DTML in normal specimens and to compare these results with hallux valgus specimens. We hypothesized that the tensile properties of the DTML would be different between the 2 groups of specimens.The DTML in the first interspace was dissected from 12 fresh frozen human cadaveric specimens. Six cadavers had bilateral hallux valgus and the other 6 cadavers had normal feet. The initial length (L0) and cross-sectional area (A0) of the DTML were measured using a digital caliper, and tensile tests with load failure were performed using a material testing machine.There were significant between-groups differences in the initial length (L0) P = 0.009 and cross-sectional area (A0) of the DTML P = 0.007. There were also significant between-groups differences for maximum force (N) P = 0.004, maximum distance (mm) P = 0.005, maximum stress (N/mm) P = 0.003, and maximum strain (%) P = 0.006.The DTML is an anatomical structure for which the tensile properties differ in hallux valgus.

  9. Estimation of tensile force in the hamstring muscles during overground sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, T; Higashihara, A; Shinohara, J; Hirose, N; Fukubayashi, T

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the period of the gait cycle during which the hamstring muscles were likely injured by estimating the magnitude of tensile force in each muscle during overground sprinting. We conducted three-dimensional motion analysis of 12 male athletes performing overground sprinting at their maximal speed and calculated the hamstring muscle-tendon length and joint angles of the right limb throughout a gait cycle during which the ground reaction force was measured. Electromyographic activity during sprinting was recorded for the biceps femoris long head, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus muscles of ipsilateral limb. We estimated the magnitude of tensile force in each muscle by using the length change occurred in the musculotendon and normalized electromyographic activity value. The study found a quick increase of estimated tensile force in the biceps femoris long head during the early stance phase of the gait cycle during which the increased hip flexion angle and ground reaction force occurred at the same time. This study provides quantitative data of tensile force in the hamstring muscles suggesting that the biceps femoris long head muscle is susceptible to a strain injury during the early stance phase of the sprinting gait cycle. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Tensile Properties of the Deep Transverse Metatarsal Ligament in Hallux Valgus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalbary, Sahar Ahmed; Elshaarawy, Ehab A.A.; Khalid, Bahaa E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The deep transverse metatarsal ligament (DTML) connects the neighboring 2 metatarsal heads and is one of the stabilizers connecting the lateral sesamoid and second metatarsal head. In this study, we aimed to determine the tensile properties of the DTML in normal specimens and to compare these results with hallux valgus specimens. We hypothesized that the tensile properties of the DTML would be different between the 2 groups of specimens. The DTML in the first interspace was dissected from 12 fresh frozen human cadaveric specimens. Six cadavers had bilateral hallux valgus and the other 6 cadavers had normal feet. The initial length (L0) and cross-sectional area (A0) of the DTML were measured using a digital caliper, and tensile tests with load failure were performed using a material testing machine. There were significant between-groups differences in the initial length (L0) P = 0.009 and cross-sectional area (A0) of the DTML P = 0.007. There were also significant between-groups differences for maximum force (N) P = 0.004, maximum distance (mm) P = 0.005, maximum stress (N/mm2) P = 0.003, and maximum strain (%) P = 0.006. The DTML is an anatomical structure for which the tensile properties differ in hallux valgus. PMID:26937914

  11. Tensile Fabrics Enhance Architecture Around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Using a remarkable fabric originally developed to protect Apollo astronauts, Birdair Inc. of Amherst, New York, has crafted highly durable, safe, environmentally friendly, and architecturally stunning tensile membrane roofs for over 900 landmark structures around the world. Travelers in airports, sports fans at stadiums, and shoppers in malls have all experienced the benefits of the Teflon-coated fiberglass fabric that has enabled Birdair to grow from a small company established in its founder?s kitchen in 1955 to a multimillion-dollar specialty contractor today.

  12. Precise tensile creep measurement with refractory ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendtel, A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung; Huebner, H. [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Arbeitsbereich Werkstoffphysik und -technologie

    2001-08-01

    A recently established facility for tensile creep testing of ceramics at temperatures up to 1600 C in air is described. Displacement measurement is performed by flag-based scanning laser extensometry. A narrow and shielded laser path design and improvements in the furnace insulation were used to obtain a scatter of the displacement measurement of only {+-} 0,2 {mu}m, which is comparable to that obtained at room temperature. This stability of the displacement measurement was demonstrated with a hot-pressed (HP) silicon nitride containing 8 mass% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as sintering additive tested at 1500 C. (orig.)

  13. Strain rate measurement by Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry: A new look at the strain localization onset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelorget, Bruno [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS, CNRS FRE 2719), 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)]. E-mail: bruno.guelorget@utt.fr; Francois, Manuel [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS, CNRS FRE 2719), 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France); Vial-Edwards, Cristian [Departemento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Metalurgica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 6904411 Santiago (Chile); Montay, Guillaume [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS, CNRS FRE 2719), 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France); Daniel, Laurent [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS, CNRS FRE 2719), 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France); Lu, Jian [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Laboratoire des Systemes Mecaniques et d' ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS, CNRS FRE 2719), 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)

    2006-01-15

    In-plane Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry has been successfully used during tensile testing of semi-hard copper sheets in order to measure the strain rate. On one hand, heterogeneity in strain rate field has been found before the maximum of the tensile force ({epsilon} {sup t} {approx_equal} 19.4 and 25.4%, respectively). Thus, a localization phenomenon occurs before the classic Considere's criterion (dF = 0) for the diffuse neck initiation. On the other hand, strain rate measurement before fracture shows the moment where one of the two slip band systems becomes predominant, then strain concentrates in a small area, the shear band. Uncertainty evaluation has been carried out, which shows a very good accuracy of the total strain and the strain rate measurements.

  14. Quantitative investigation of the tensile plastic deformation characteristic and microstructure for friction stir welded 2024 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Z.L., E-mail: zhilihuhit@163.com [National Key Laboratory of Precision Hot Processing of Metals, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, X.S. [National Key Laboratory of Precision Hot Processing of Metals, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yuan, S.J., E-mail: syuan@hit.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Precision Hot Processing of Metals, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The effect of the microstructure heterogeneity on the tensile plastic deformation characteristic of friction stir welded (FSW) 2024 aluminum alloy was investigated for the potential applications on light weight design of vehicles. The microstructure characteristics of the FSW joints, such as the grain structure, dislocation density and the distribution of precipitation, were studied by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile deformation characteristic of the FSW joints was examined using the automatic strain measuring system (ASAME) by mapping the global and local strain distribution, and then was analyzed by mechanics calculation. It is found that the tensile deformation of the FSW joints is highly heterogeneous leading to a significant decrease in global ductility. The FSW joints mainly contain two typical deformation zones, which show great effect on the regional inhomogeneous deformation. One is the nugget zone (NZ) with a region of 8 mm in width, and the other is part of the BM with a region of 10 mm in width. The BM of the joints is the weakest region where the strain localizes early and this localization extends until fracture with a strain over 30%, while the strain in the NZ is only 4%. Differences in regional strain of FSW joints, which are essentially controlled by grain structure, the distribution of precipitation and dislocation density, result in decrease on the overall mechanical properties. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure heterogeneity of welds on tensile deformation behavior is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The welds contain two typical deformation zones, affecting the global ductility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regional strain of welds is controlled by grain structure and dislocation density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical calculation is in good agreement with experimental result.

  15. The tensile strength of liquid helium four

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissen, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, a piezoelectric transducer in the form of a hemispherical shell was used to focus high-intensity ultrasound into a small volume of 4 He. The transducer was gated at its resonant frequency of 566 kHz with gate widths of less than 1 msec in order to minimize the effects of transducer heating and acoustic streaming. The onset of the nucleation was detected from the absorption of acoustic energy and the scattering of laser light from microscopic bubbles. A new theory for the diffraction of light from the focal zone of a spherical converging sound wave was developed to confirm calculations of the acoustic pressure amplitude at the focus of the piezoelectric transducer, calculations which were based on the acoustic power radiated into the liquid and the nonlinear absorption of sound. The experimental results were in agreement with homogeneous nucleation theory for a nucleation rate of approximately 10 15 critical size bubbles/sec-cm 3 . This is only the third liquid for which the theoretical tensile strength has been reached and it confirms homogeneous nucleation theory over a range three times greater than any other experiment. A noticeable decrease in the magnitude of the tensile strength was noted at temperatures near the lambda transition and a hypothesis that bubbles are being nucleated heterogeneously on quantitized vortices is presented

  16. Effect of tensile offset angles on micro/nanoscale tensile testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaodong; Wang Xinnan; Chang Weiche; Chao, Yuh J.; Chang Ming

    2005-01-01

    For one-dimensional (1D) structures such as tubes, wires, and beams, tensile testing is a simple and reliable methodology for measuring their mechanical properties. The tensile offset angle effect on mechanical property measurement has long been ignored. In this study, theoretical and finite-element analysis (FEA) models for analyzing the tensile offset angle effect have been established. It is found that longitudinal stress decreases with increasing offset angles. The theoretically calculated elastic modulus relative errors reach 4.45% at the offset angle of 10 deg., whereas the experimentally measured elastic modulus relative errors are 45.4% at the offset angle of 15 deg. The difference in elastic modulus relative errors between the theoretical analysis and the experimental results is discussed with reference to the sensing system in the experimental instrumentation. To accurately measure the mechanical properties using the tensile testing technique, perfect alignment with a zero or small offset angle less than 5 deg. is needed. A calibration methodology for aligning specimens has been developed

  17. Tensile properties and fracture behavior of laser cladded WC/Ni composite coatings with different contents of WC particle studied by in-situ tensile testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jin-Sha [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety, Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang, Xian-Cheng, E-mail: xczhang@ecust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety, Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200237 (China); Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Tian, Fu-Qiang; Wang, Zheng-Dong; Tu, Shan-Tung [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety, Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2013-01-10

    The aim of this paper was to address the effect of WC content on the tensile properties of WC/Ni composite coatings deposited by laser cladding on 45 steel substrates. The tensile tests were performed in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope. Experimental results showed that the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of WC/Ni coatings were strongly dependent on the volume fraction of WC reinforcing particles in the coatings. The tensile properties of the coating decreased with increasing content of WC particle. When the WC content was relatively high, multiple through-width cracks (TWC) in the coating can be found. The number of through-width cracks in the coating as a function of applied strain was measured. From the in-situ observation of coating surfaces, most of cracks were initiated from the WC particle, and then propagated throughout the coatings. This phenomenon was attributed to the stress concentration in the WC particle or near the WC particle, which was confirmed by using finite element analysis. The present research may provide some insights on the development of designing methodology of composite coatings.

  18. Finite Element Modelling for Tensile Behaviour of Thermally Bonded Nonwoven Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xiaoping

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A nonwoven fabric has been widely used in geotextile engineering in recent years; its tensile strength is an important behaviour. Since the fibre distributions in nonwoven fabrics are random and discontinuous, the unit-cell model of a nonwoven fabric cannot be developed to simulate its tensile behaviour. This article presents our research on using finite element method (FEM to study the tensile behaviour of a nonwoven fabric in macro-scale based on the classical laminate composite theory. The laminate orientation was considered with orientation distribution function of fibres, which has been obtained by analysing the data acquired from scanning electron microscopy with Hough Transform. The FE model of a nonwoven fabric was developed using ABAQUS software; the required engineering constants of a nonwoven fabric were obtained from experimental data. Finally, the nonwoven specimens were stretched along with machine direction and cross direction. The experimental stress-strain curves were compared with the results of FE simulations. The approximate agreement proves the validity of an FE model, which could be used to precisely simulate the stress relaxation, strain creep, bending and shear property of a nonwoven fabric.

  19. Strain engineering of WS2, WSe2, and WTe2

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of WS2, WSe2, and WTe2 monolayers, taking into account the strong spin orbit coupling. A transition from a direct to an indirect band gap is achieved for compressive strain of 1% for WS2, 1.5% for WSe2, and 2% for WTe 2, while the nature of the band gap remains direct in the case of tensile strain. The size of the band gap passes through a maximum under compressive strain and decreases monotonically under tensile strain. A strong spin splitting is found for the valence band in all three compounds, which is further enhanced by tensile strain. The mobility of the electrons grows along the series WS2 < WSe2 < WTe2. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  20. Simultaneous 2D Strain Sensing Using Polymer Planar Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Manuel; Eisenbeil, Waltraud; Schmauss, Bernhard; Hellmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of polymer planar Bragg gratings for multi-axial strain sensing and particularly highlight simultaneous 2D strain measurement. A polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG) fabricated with a single writing step in bulk polymethylmethacrylate is used for measuring both tensile and compressive strain at various angles. It is shown that the sensitivity of the PPBG strongly depends on the angle between the optical waveguide into which the grating is inscribed and the direction along which the mechanical load is applied. Additionally, a 2D PPBG fabricated by writing two Bragg gratings angularly displaced from each other into a single polymer platelet is bonded to a stainless steel plate. The two reflected wavelengths exhibit different sensitivities while tested toward tensile and compressive strain. These characteristics make 2D PPBG suitable for measuring multi-axial tensile and compressive strain. PMID:25686313

  1. Strain Rate Effects in CFRP Used For Blast Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah. L. Orton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to gain a better understanding of strain rate effects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates exposed to blast loading. The use of CFRP offers an attractive option for mitigating structures exposed to blasts. However, the effect of high strain rates in CFRP composites commonly used in the civil industry is unknown. This research conducted tensile tests of 21 CFRP coupons using a hydraulically powered dynamic loader. The strain rates ranged from 0.0015 s−1 to 7.86 s−1 and are representative of strain rates that CFRP may see in a blast when used to strengthen reinforced concrete structures. The results of the testing showed no increase in the tensile strength or stiffness of the CFRP at the higher strain rates. In addition, the results showed significant scatter in the tensile strengths possibly due to the rate of loading or manufacture of the coupon.

  2. The tensile properties of alloys 800H and 617 in the range 20 to 950deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Azim, M.E.; Ennis, P.J.; Schuster, H.; Nickel, H.

    1990-01-01

    The tensile properties of Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 in the solution treated condition and after ageing or carburization have been determined for the temperature range 20 to 950deg C. It was found that ageing at 900deg C prior to testing led to an increase in strength and a decrease in ductility at test temperatures up to 700deg C. Above 700deg C, there was no significant difference between the tensile properties of solution treated and aged material. Carburization caused a severe loss of ductility in both alloys at temperatures of 20 to around 800deg C, but the ductility increased sharply at test temperatures above 800deg C, accompanied by a change in the fracture mode from fracture of the carbide particles themselves to void formation and separation at the carbide/matrix interface. The correlation between tensile properties and creep data was investigated in tests carried out at different strain rates. Reasonable agreement was found at 800 to 950deg C for Alloy 617 and at 800 to 900deg C for Alloy 800H. Strain ageing effects were observed in both alloys at some temperatures and strain rates; these effects were serrated flow, negative strain rate sensitivity, peaks in the normalized UTS-temperature curves and plateaus in the elongation-temperature curves. The experimental results were interpreted in the light of two current models for strain ageing, the dislocation-dislocation interaction model and the dislocation-solute interaction model. (orig.) [de

  3. Variation in the strain anisotropy of Zircaloy with temperature and strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Worswick, D.

    1984-04-01

    Strain anisotropy was investigated at temperatures in the range 293 to 1117K in circular tensile specimens prepared from rolled Zircaloy-2 plate so that their tensile axes were parallel to and transverse to the rolling direction. The strain anisotropy factor for both types of specimen increased markedly in the high alpha phase region above 923K reaching a maximum at circa 1070K. Above this temperature in the alpha-plus-beta phase region the strain anisotropy decreased rapidly as the proportion of beta phase increased and was almost non-existent at 1173K. The strain anisotropy was markedly strain dependent, particularly in the high alpha phase region. The study was extended to Zircaloy-4 pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 type fuel rod tubing specimens which were strained under biaxial conditions using cooling conditions which promoted uniform diametral strain over most of their lengths (circa 250 mm). In these circumstances the strain anisotropy is manifest by a reduction in length. Measurement of this change along with that in diameter and wall thickness produced data from which the strain anisotropy factor was calculated. The results, although influenced by additional factors discussed in the paper, were similar to those observed in the uniaxial Zircaloy-2 tensile tests. (author)

  4. Microbial lysate upregulates host oxytocin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J.; Poutahidis, Theofilos; DiBenedictis, Brett T.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Ibrahim, Yassin; Didyk, Eliska; Shikhman, Lana; Cheung, Harry K.; Hardas, Alexandros; Ricciardi, Catherine E.; Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; Veenema, Alexa H.; Alm, Eric J.; Erdman, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropeptide hormone oxytocin has roles in social bonding, energy metabolism, and wound healing contributing to good physical, mental and social health. It was previously shown that feeding of a human commensal microbe Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri) is sufficient to up-regulate endogenous oxytocin levels and improve wound healing capacity in mice. Here we show that oral L. reuteri-induced skin wound repair benefits extend to human subjects. Further, dietary supplementation with a sterile lysate of this microbe alone is sufficient to boost systemic oxytocin levels and improve wound repair capacity. Oxytocin-producing cells were found to be increased in the caudal paraventricular nucleus [PVN] of the hypothalamus after feeding of a sterile lysed preparation of L. reuteri, coincident with lowered blood levels of stress hormone corticosterone and more rapid epidermal closure, in mouse models. We conclude that microbe viability is not essential for regulating host oxytocin levels. The results suggest that a peptide or metabolite produced by bacteria may modulate host oxytocin secretion for potential public or personalized health goals. PMID:27825953

  5. The effect of strain path change on subgrain volume fraction determined from in situ X-ray measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejdemann, Christian; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Lienert, U.

    2009-01-01

    volume fraction to be quantified. The studied strain path changes are tension-tension sequences. Polycrystalline copper sheets are pre-deformed in tension to 5% strain, and tensile samples are cut with varying angles between the first and second loading axis. The second tensile deformation up...

  6. Tensile Properties of Unsaturated Polyester and Epoxy Resin Reinforced with Recycled Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Yuta

    2017-08-01

    To better understand the mechanical properties of recycled carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (rCFRP), CFRP crushed into small pieces was mixed randomly in different proportions (0-30 wt%) with two different resins: unsaturated polyester and epoxy resin. Two different sizes of crushed CFRP were used: 0.1 mm × 0.007 mm (milled CFRP) and 30 mm × 2 mm (chopped CFRP). The tensile strength of rCFRP was found to depend on both the proportion and the size of the CFRP pieces. It increased with increasing proportion of chopped CFRP, but decreased with increasing proportion of milled CFRP. There was no clear dependence of the tensile strength on the resin that was used. A low fracture strain was found for rCFRP samples made with chopped CFRP, in contrast to those made with milled CFRP. The fracture strain was found to increase with increasing content of milled CFRP up to 20 wt%, at which point, coalescence of existing microvoids occurred. However, there was a reduction in fracture strain for rCFRP with 30 wt% of milled CFRP, owing to the formation of defects (blow holes). Overall, the fracture strain was higher for rCFRPs based on epoxy resin than for those based on unsaturated polyester with the same CFRP content, because of the high ductility of the epoxy resin. The different tensile properties reflected different failure characteristics, with the use of chopped CFRP leading to a complicated rough fracture surface and with milled CFRP causing ductile failure through the presence of tiny dimple-like fractures. However, for a high content of milled CFRP (30 wt%), large blow holes were observed, leading to low ductility.

  7. On the Da Vinci size effect in tensile strengths of nanowires: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyu Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, size effects caused by grain size, strain gradient, typical defects etc., have been widely investigated. Nevertheless, the dependence of tensile strength on the specimen length, addressed by Da Vinci around 500 hundred years ago, has received rather limited attention, even though it is one unavoidable question to answer if people attempt to bring materials’ amazing nano-scale strengths up to macro-level. Therefore, we make efforts to study tensile behaviors of copper nanowires with a common cross-section and various lengths by employing the molecular dynamics simulations. Surprisingly, a strong size effect of Da Vinci type indeed arises. We have shown the influences of lattice orientation, temperature and prescribed notch on such a Da Vinci size effect. Two different theoretical explanations are briefly proposed for a qualitative understanding. Finally, a simple scaling rule is summarized to cover the tendencies observed.

  8. The Corrosion Characteristics and Tensile Behavior of Reinforcement under Coupled Carbonation and Static Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Xu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the non-uniform corrosion characteristics and mechanical properties of reinforcement under coupled action of carbonation and static loading. The two parameters, namely area-box (AB value and arithmetical mean deviation (Ra, are adopted to characterize the corrosion morphology and pitting distribution from experimental observations. The results show that the static loading affects the corrosion characteristics of reinforcement. Local stress concentration in corroded reinforcement caused by tensile stress drives the corrosion pit pattern to be more irregular. The orthogonal test results from finite element simulations show that pit shape and pit depth are the two significant factors affecting the tensile behavior of reinforcement. Under the condition of similar corrosion mass loss ratio, the maximum plastic strain of corroded reinforcement increases with the increase of Ra and load time-history significantly.

  9. Hoop Tensile Characterization Of SiC/SiC Cylinders Fabricated From 2D Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Yun, HeeMann; DiCarlo, James A.; Barnett, Terry R.

    2002-01-01

    Tensile stress-strain properties in the hoop direction were obtained for 100-mm diameter SiC/SiC cylinders using ring specimens machined from the cylinder ends. The cylinders were fabricated from 2D balanced fabric with several material variants, including wall thickness (6, 8, and 12 plies), Sic fiber type (Sylramic, Sylramic-iBN, Hi-Nicalon, and Hi-Nicalon S), fiber sizing type, and matrix type (full CVI Sic, and partial CVI plus melt-infiltrated SiC-Si). Fiber ply splices existed in the all the hoops. Tensile hoop measurements were made at room temperature and 1200 C using hydrostatic ring test facilities. The hoop results are compared with in-plane data measured on flat panels using same material variants, but containing no splices.

  10. Tensile behaviour of radiata pine with different moisture contents at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearson, Hamish; Gabbitas, Brian; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain tensile elastic modulus (EM) information for radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) sapwood in tangential grain direction, over a temperature range of 70 °C to 150 °C for a wide range of moisture contents. Such information is scarce, probably because of difficulties...... that moisture and temperature can play a significant role in reducing stress during drying, regardless of the drying time. Properties of wood, such as tensile elastic information at elevated temperatures, are important for mechanical design, distortion modelling and understanding the fundamental behaviour...... with research equipment design and process control strategies to perform accurate tests. As expected, EM dramatically decreased with increasing temperature and moisture content. The results were modelled to yield a relationship between stress and strain. The results were also successfully transposed...

  11. The effects of different possible modes of uniaxial strain on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... ... in this study, uniaxial tensile strain applied along the zig-zag direction is found to be the most efficacious, inducing a greater tunability in the band gap over a large energy range (from 1.689 to 0.772 eV corresponding to 0–9% of applied strain), followed by uniaxial tensile strain along arm-chair direction.

  12. Cervical Rotatory Manipulation Decreases Uniaxial Tensile Properties of Rabbit Atherosclerotic Internal Carotid Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoqun Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of one of the Chinese massage therapies, cervical rotatory manipulation (CRM, on uniaxial tensile properties of rabbit atherosclerotic internal carotid artery (ICA. Methods. 40 male purebred New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into CRM-Model group, Non-CRM-Model group, CRM-Normal group, and Non-CRM-Normal group. After modeling (atherosclerotic model and intervention (CRM or Non-CRM, uniaxial tensile tests were performed on the ICAs to assess the differences in tensile mechanical properties between the four groups. Results. Both CRM and modeling were the main effects affecting physiological elastic modulus (PEM of ICA. PEM in CRM-Model group was 1.81 times as much as Non-CRM-Model group, while the value in CRM-Model group was 1.34 times as much as CRM-Normal group. Maximum elastic modulus in CRM-Model group was 1.80 times as much as CRM-Normal group. Max strains in CRM-Model group and Non-CRM-Model group were 30.98% and 28.71% lower than CRM-Normal group and Non-CRM-Normal group, respectively. However, whether treated with CRM or not, the uniaxial tensile properties of healthy ICAs were not statistically different. Conclusion. CRM may decrease the uniaxial tensile properties of rabbit arteriosclerotic ICA, but with no effect on normal group. The study will aid in the meaningful explanation of the controversy about the harmfulness of CRM and the suitable population of CRM.

  13. Characterization of Tensile Mechanical Behavior of MSCs/PLCL Hybrid Layered Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Intan Pangesty

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A layered construct was developed by combining a porous polymer sheet and a cell sheet as a tissue engineered vascular patch. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the influence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs sheet on the tensile mechanical properties of porous poly-(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone (PLCL sheet. The porous PLCL sheet was fabricated by the solid-liquid phase separation method and the following freeze-drying method. The MSCs sheet, prepared by the temperature-responsive dish, was then layered on the top of the PLCL sheet and cultured for 2 weeks. During the in vitro study, cellular properties such as cell infiltration, spreading and proliferation were evaluated. Tensile test of the layered construct was performed periodically to characterize the tensile mechanical behavior. The tensile properties were then correlated with the cellular properties to understand the effect of MSCs sheet on the variation of the mechanical behavior during the in vitro study. It was found that MSCs from the cell sheet were able to migrate into the PLCL sheet and actively proliferated into the porous structure then formed a new layer of MSCs on the opposite surface of the PLCL sheet. Mechanical evaluation revealed that the PLCL sheet with MSCs showed enhancement of tensile strength and strain energy density at the first week of culture which is characterized as the effect of MSCs proliferation and its infiltration into the porous structure of the PLCL sheet. New technique was presented to develop tissue engineered patch by combining MSCs sheet and porous PLCL sheet, and it is expected that the layered patch may prolong biomechanical stability when implanted in vivo.

  14. Elastic properties of polycaprolactone at small strains are significantly affected by strain rate and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, D; Nor, F M; Lee, H Y; Lim, J Y

    2011-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on polycaprolactone at various strain rates and temperatures. Focusing on the mechanical properties within only the small-strain elastic region, i.e. up to the inflection point in the stress-strain diagram, it was found that strain rate and temperature had significant effects on the polymer. This finding implies that the effects of strain rate and temperature on the elastic properties of polycaprolactone should be considered in the design and manufacture of rigidity-sensitive, load-bearing applications, including use as biomaterial for scaffolds in tissue engineering applications.

  15. A user's manual for managing database system of tensile property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seok; Park, S. J.; Kim, D. H.; Jun, I.

    2003-06-01

    This manual is written for the management and maintenance of the tensile database system for managing the tensile property test data. The data base constructed the data produced from tensile property test can increase the application of test results. Also, we can get easily the basic data from database when we prepare the new experiment and can produce better result by compare the previous data. To develop the database we must analyze and design carefully application and after that, we can offer the best quality to customers various requirements. The tensile database system was developed by internet method using Java, PL/SQL, JSP(Java Server Pages) tool

  16. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-05-10

    and associated mechanical properties during long-term aging at elevated temperatures. Thermal aging experiments at different temperatures and periods of time have been completed: 550 C for up to 5000 h, 600 C for up to 7500 h, and 650 C for more than 10,000 h. Tensile properties were measured on thermally aged specimens and aging effect on tensile behavior was assessed. Effects of thermal aging on deformation and failure mechanisms were investigated by using in-situ straining technique with simultaneous synchrotron XRD measurements.

  17. Tensile Specimen’s Permanent Die Designing and Its Al-Mg Alloy Specimen’s Tensile Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongfei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the facts that there are many kinds of metallic tensile specimens with different dimensions, a set of rectangular cross-section and round cross-section tensile specimens are designed according to China national standard GB228-2002 which is called metallic materials’ tensile testing at ambient temperature to meet the needs of routine materials researching and testing in factory. According to the designing specimen, a complete set of permanent die was designed and manufactured. Then, Al-Mg alloy was chosen to do the casting processing experiment, and the tensile specimen was obtained and tensile test was finished. It showed that the designing specimen and permanent die met the requirements of tensile test. The round specimen is stronger than the rectangular one and the particles diameter of the studied Al-Mg alloy is from 20μm to 50μm.

  18. Knitting Technologies And Tensile Properties Of A Novel Curved Flat-Knitted Three-Dimensional Spacer Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaoying

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a knitting technique for making innovative curved three-dimensional (3D spacer fabrics by the computer flat-knitting machine. During manufacturing, a number of reinforcement yarns made of aramid fibres are inserted into 3D spacer fabrics along the weft direction to enhance the fabric tensile properties. Curved, flat-knitted 3D spacer fabrics with different angles (in the warp direction were also developed. Tensile tests were carried out in the weft and warp directions for the two spacer fabrics (with and without reinforcement yarns, and their stress–strain curves were compared. The results showed that the reinforcement yarns can reduce the fabric deformation and improve tensile stress and dimensional stability of 3D spacer fabrics. This research can help the further study of 3D spacer fabric when applied to composites.

  19. Pumping-induced stress and strain in aquifer systems in Wuxi, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Yu, Jun; Gong, Xulong; Wu, Jichun; Wang, Zhecheng

    2017-12-01

    Excessive groundwater withdrawal from an aquifer system leads to three-dimensional displacement, causing changes in the states of stress and strain. Often, land subsidence and sometimes earth fissures ensue. Field investigation indicates that land subsidence and earth fissures in Wuxi, a city in eastern China, are mainly due to excessive groundwater withdrawal, and that they are temporally and spatially related to groundwater pumping. Groundwater withdrawal may cause tensile strain to develop in aquifer systems, but tensile strain does not definitely mean tensile stress. Where earth fissures are concerned, the stress state should be adopted in numerical simulations instead of the strain state and displacement. The numerical simulation undertaken for the Wuxi area shows that the zone of tensile strain occupies a large area on the ground surface; nevertheless, the zone of tensile stress is very limited. The zone of tensile stress often occurs near the ground surface, beneath which the depth to the bedrock surface is relatively small and has considerable variability. Earth fissures often initiate near the ground surface where tensile stress occurs. Tensile stress and earth fissures rarely develop at the centers of land subsidence bowls, where compressive stress is dominant.

  20. Fundamental Studies on Tests for Tensile Strength of Concrete (II) : Unconfined Penetration Tensile Strength Test

    OpenAIRE

    尾崎, 叡司; 増川, 晋; 菊池, 一雄; 北浦, 豊明

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the test procedures and formula to be used for determination of tensile strength of concrete by unconfined penetration method. In this test, a cylindrical specimen of concrete is placed vertically between the loading plates of the test machine and compressed by two conic steel punches located concentrically on the conic cavities on the top and bottom surface of the cylindrical specimen. The specimen splites across the virtical diametric plane in exactly similar to that ob...

  1. Tensile deformation behaviors of Zircaloy-4 alloy at ambient and elevated temperatures: In situ neutron diffraction and simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hongjia; Sun, Guangai; Woo, Wanchuck; Gong, Jian; Chen, Bo; Wang, Yandong; Fu, Yong Qing; Huang, Chaoqiang; Xie, Lei; Peng, Shuming

    2014-01-01

    Tensile stress–strain relationship of a rolled Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) plate was examined in situ using a neutron diffraction method at room temperature (RT, 25 °C) and an elevated temperature (250 °C). Variations of lattice strains were obtained as a function of macroscopic bulk strains along prismatic (101 ¯ 0), basal (0 0 0 2) and pyramidal (101 ¯ 1) planes in the hexagonal close-packed structure of the Zr-4. The mechanisms of strain responses in these three major planes were simulated using elastic–plastic self-consistent (EPSC) model based on Hill–Hutchinson method, thus the inter-granular stresses and deformation systems of each individual grain under loading were obtained. Results show that there is a good agreement between the EPSC modeling and neutron diffraction measurements in terms of macroscopic stress–strain relationship and lattice strain evolutions of the planes at RT. However, there is a slight discrepancy in the lattice strains obtained from the EPSC modeling and neutron diffraction when the specimen was deformed at 250 °C. Analysis of grain structure and texture obtained using electron back-scattered diffraction suggests that dynamic recovery process is significant during the tensile deformation at the elevated temperature, which was not considered in the simulation

  2. Processing, Structural Characterization and Comparative Studies on Uniaxial Tensile Properties of a New Type of Porous Twisted Wire Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A self-developed rotary multi-cutter device cuts stainless steel wire ropes into segments to fabricate twisted wires. Stainless steel porous twisted wire materials (PTWMs with a spatial composite intertexture structure are produced by the compaction and subsequent vacuum solid-phase sintering of twisted wires. The stainless steel PTWMs show two types of typical uniaxial tensile failure modes, i.e., a 45° angle fracture mode and an auxetic failure mode (the PTWMs expand along the direction perpendicular to the tension. The effects of the sintering parameters, porosities, wire diameters, and sampling direction on the tensile properties of the PTWMs are carefully investigated. By increasing the sintering temperature from 1130 °C to 1330 °C, the tensile strength of the PTWMs with 70% target porosity increased from 7.7 MPa to 28.6 MPa and the total failure goes down to 50%. When increasing the sintering time from 90 min to 150 min, the tensile strength increases from 12.4 MPa to 19.1 MPa and the total failure elongation drops to 78.6%. The tensile strength of the PTWMs increases from 28.9 MPa to 112.7 MPa with decreasing porosity from 69.5% to 46.0%, and the total failure elongation also increases from 14.8% to 40.7%. The tensile strength and the failure strain of the PTWMs with fine wires are higher than those of the PTWMs with coarse wires under the same porosity. Sampling direction has a small influence on the tensile properties of the PTWMs.

  3. Meso-Scale Progressive Damage Behavior Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Tensile Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yiru; Zhang, Songjun; Jiang, Hongyong; Xiang, Jinwu

    2017-08-01

    Based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM), a sophisticated 3D meso-scale finite element (FE) model is proposed to characterize the progressive damage behavior of 2D Triaxial Braided Composites (2DTBC) with 60° braiding angle under quasi-static tensile load. The modified Von Mises strength criterion and 3D Hashin failure criterion are used to predict the damage initiation of the pure matrix and fiber tows. A combining interface damage and friction constitutive model is applied to predict the interface damage behavior. Murakami-Ohno stiffness degradation scheme is employed to predict the damage evolution process of each constituent. Coupling with the ordinary and translational symmetry boundary conditions, the tensile elastic response including tensile strength and failure strain of 2DTBC are in good agreement with the available experiment data. The numerical results show that the main failure modes of the composites under axial tensile load are pure matrix cracking, fiber and matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows, matrix tension failure in axial fiber tows and interface debonding; the main failure modes of the composites subjected to transverse tensile load are free-edge effect, matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows and interface debonding.

  4. Meso-Scale Progressive Damage Behavior Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Tensile Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yiru; Zhang, Songjun; Jiang, Hongyong; Xiang, Jinwu

    2018-04-01

    Based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM), a sophisticated 3D meso-scale finite element (FE) model is proposed to characterize the progressive damage behavior of 2D Triaxial Braided Composites (2DTBC) with 60° braiding angle under quasi-static tensile load. The modified Von Mises strength criterion and 3D Hashin failure criterion are used to predict the damage initiation of the pure matrix and fiber tows. A combining interface damage and friction constitutive model is applied to predict the interface damage behavior. Murakami-Ohno stiffness degradation scheme is employed to predict the damage evolution process of each constituent. Coupling with the ordinary and translational symmetry boundary conditions, the tensile elastic response including tensile strength and failure strain of 2DTBC are in good agreement with the available experiment data. The numerical results show that the main failure modes of the composites under axial tensile load are pure matrix cracking, fiber and matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows, matrix tension failure in axial fiber tows and interface debonding; the main failure modes of the composites subjected to transverse tensile load are free-edge effect, matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows and interface debonding.

  5. Tensile Response of Hoop Reinforced Multiaxially Braided Thin Wall Composite Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sree Shankhachur; Potluri, Prasad; Soutis, Constantinos

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents the tensile response of thin-walled composite tubes with multi-axial fibre architecture. A hybrid braid-wound layup has the potential to optimise the composite tube properties, however, stacking sequence plays a role in the failure mechanism. A braid-winding method has been used to produce stacked overwound braid layup [(±45°/0°)5/90°4]T. Influence of stacking sequence on premature failure of hoop layers has been reported. Under tensile loading, a cross-ply composite tube with the alternate stacking of hoop and axial fibre show hoop plies splitting similar to the overwound braided composite tube. However, splitting has been restricted by the surrounding axial plies and contained between the adjacent axial fibre tows. This observation suggests hoop layers sandwiched between braid layers will improve structural integrity. A near net shape architecture with three fibre orientation in a triaxial braid will provide additional support to prevent extensive damage for plies loaded in off-axis. Several notable observations for relatively open braid structures such as tow scissoring, high Poisson's ratio and influence of axial tow crimp on the strain to failure have been reported. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) in conjunction with surface strain gauging has been employed to capture the strain pattern.

  6. Tensile behavior of Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowire with a B2 crystalline precipitate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda-Macias, Matias; Amigo, Nicolas; Gutierrez, Gonzalo

    2018-02-01

    A molecular dynamics study of the effect of a single B2-CuZr precipitate on the mechanical properties of Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowires is presented. Four different samples are considered: three with a 2, 4 and 6 nm radii precipitate and a precipitate-free sample. These systems are submitted to uniaxial tensile test up to 25% of strain. The interface region between the precipitate and the glass matrix has high local atomic shear strain, activating shear transformation zones, which concentrates in the neighborhood of the precipitate. The plastic regime is dominated by necking, and no localized shear band is observed for the samples with a 4 and 6 nm radii precipitate. In addition, the yield stress decreases as the size of the precipitate increases. Regarding the precipitate structure, no martensitic phase transformation is observed, since neither the shear band hit the precipitate nor the stress provided by the tensile test is enough to initiate the transformation. It is concluded that, in contrast to the case when multiple precipitates are present in the sample, a single precipitate concentrates the shear strain around its surface, eventually causing the failure of the nanowire.

  7. Dynamic tensile tests with superimposed ultrasonic oscillations applied to stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinke, B.

    1986-09-01

    For the analysis of the mechanical consequences of core disruptive accidents in Fast Breeder Reactors various computer codes have been developed in the European Community. In recent years an extensive assessment has been performed by comparing the results of these codes with explosion tests in waterfilled vessels (COVA-experiments). Common to the various codes, a systematic underestimation of the vessel strains was found. In the COVA tests high frequency pressure oscillations were observed and thus it was conjectured that the phenomenon of ''acoustic softening'' might be relevant in explaining the discrepancies in the strains. To validate this conjecture a hydro-pneumatic tensile test apparatus was developed which allows dynamic tensile testing at room temperature with and without superimposed ultrasonic oscillations (40 kHz). The mean strain rate can be varied from 5 x 10 -5 to 30 s -1 and the ultrasound intensity may amount up to 30 W/mm -2 . The test specimens were fabricated from the actual COVA sheet material (stainless steel type 321). (orig./GL) [de

  8. Influence of relative humidity on tensile and compressive creep of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an experimental study on the influence of ambient relative humidity on tensile creep of plain concrete amended with Ground Granulated Blast - furnace Slag and compares it with its influence on compressive creep. Tensile and compressive creep tests were carried out on concrete specimens of 34.49 ...

  9. influence of relative humidity on tensile and compressive creep

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    This paper presents an experimental study on the influence of ambient relative humidity on tensile creep of plain concrete amended with Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag and compares it with its influence on compressive creep. Tensile and compressive creep tests were carried out on concrete specimens of ...

  10. Sterilization effects on tensile strength of non-conventional suture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was carried out to determine the tensile strength of embroidery, braiding, cobbler's thread and nylon mono-filament fishing line (NMFL) use as non-conventional suture material. Their tensile strength were determined pre- sterilization using various calibrated weights (50gm, 100gm, 500gm).

  11. Tensile behaviour of polyethylene and poly(p-xylylene) fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werff, Harm

    1991-01-01

    This thesis deals with the tensile behaviour of fibres prepared from high molecular weight polymers.The tensile strength of a polymeric fibre is in general much lower than the corresponding theoretical value. In case of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), fibres can be prepared by

  12. Hybrid filler composition optimization for tensile strength of jute fibre ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of weight content of bagasse fibre, carbon black and calcium carbonate on tensile strength of pultruded GFRP composite is evaluated and the optimum hybrid filler composition for maximizing the tensile strength is determined. Different compositions of hybrid filler are prepared by mixing three fillers using Taguchi ...

  13. Effect of Temperature on the Tensile Strength and Thermoelectric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tensile strength and thermoelectric e.m.f. values of 6063 aluminum alloy quenched at different temperatures from 2500C to 6000C were investigated. The result empirically confirmed that a perfect correlation exists between the tensile strength and thermoelectric e.m.f. values with concurrent minimum temperature ...

  14. Effect of alcoholic treated MWCNT on tensile behavior of epoxy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tensile strength, Young's modulus, and Elongation are found to be effectively improved with the addition of alcoholic functionalized MWCNT in epoxy matrix. Increased tensile strength and elastic modulus of epoxy composites loaded with the alcoholic functionalized MWCNT are observed through experimental studies.

  15. An investigation of microstructure, hardness, tensile behaviour of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An investigation of microstructure, hardness, tensile behaviour of a titanium alloy: Role of .... tester using an indentation load of 200 gm for a dwell time of 11 seconds with the aid of a. Vickers tool indenter. .... tensile strength where as iron, which aids in stabilizing the beta (β) phase form binary sys- tem of the β-eutectoid type ...

  16. New Scanning Electron Microscope Used for Cryogenic Tensile Testing

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    At CERN engineering department's installation for cryogenic tensile testing, the new scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for detailed optical observations to be carried out. Using the SEM, surface coatings and tensile properties of materials can investigated in order to better understand how they behave under different conditions.

  17. Numerical and experimental analysis on tensile properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Shadrach Jeyasekaran

    2014-11-17

    Nov 17, 2014 ... posites made from short sun hemp, banana, and sisal and it has been identified that sun hemp shows favorable tensile strength. Indira et al [5] used resin transfer molding (RTM) and compression molding (CM) methods to make banana fiber phenol formaldehyde resin composites. Its tensile properties are ...

  18. Tensile behavior and tension stiffening of reinforced concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choun, Young Sun; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2001-03-01

    For the ultimate behavior analysis of containment buildings under severe accident conditions, a clear understanding of tensile behaviors of plain and reinforced concrete is necessary. Nonlinear models for tensile behaviors of concrete are also needed. This report describe following items: tensile behaviors of plain concrete, test results of reinforced concrete panels in uniaxial and biaxial tension, tension stiffening. The tensile behaviors of reinforced concrete are significantly influenced by the properties of concrete and reinforcing steel. Thus, for a more reliable evaluation of tensile behavior and ultimate pressure capacity of a reinforced or prestressed concrete containment building, an advanced concrete model which can be considered rebar-concrete interaction effects should be developed. In additions, a crack behavior analysis method and tension stiffening models, which are based on fracture mechanics, should be developed. The model should be based on the various test data from specimens considering material and sectional properties of the containment building.

  19. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  20. Numerical simulation of non-standard tensile tests of thin metal foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzon, Gabriella; Shahmardani, Mahdieh

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of the fracture processes occurring in thin metal foils can be evidenced by tensile tests performed on samples of non-standard dimensions. The load versus displacement record of these experiments does not return directly the local stress-strain relationship and the fracture characteristics of the investigated material. In fact, the overall response of thin foils is sensitive to local imperfections, size and geometric effects. Simulation models of the performed tests can support the interpretation of the experimental results, provided that the most significant physical phenomena are captured. The present contribution focuses on the role of modelling details on the numerical output that can be obtained in this context.

  1. Microstructure evolution of a [011] orientation single crystal nickel-base superalloy during tensile creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Sugui; Yu, Lili; Qian, Benjiang [Shenyang University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang (China); Su, Yong; Zhang, Shu [Shenyang University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang (China); Shenyang University of Chemical Technology, College of Mechanical Engineering, Shenyang (China); Yu, Huichen [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing (China)

    2011-08-15

    Microstructure of [011] oriented single crystal nickel-base superalloy consists of the cubical {gamma}' phase embedded coherently in the {gamma} matrix, and arranged regularly along left angle 100 right angle orientations. After tensile creep, the cubical {gamma}' phase in the alloy is transformed into the strip-like rafted structure along [001] direction under the ordering transformation free-energy and strain energy change. And the directional growing of {gamma}' phase is attributed to the atoms Al and Ta into (001) plane to form the stable stacking mode. (orig.)

  2. In situ tensile testing of nanofibers by combining atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Fei; Lu, Dun; Bailey, Russell J.; Jimenez-Palomar, Ines; Stachewicz, Urszula; Cortes-Ballesteros, Beatriz; Davies, Martin; Zech, Martin; Bödefeld, Christoph; Barber, Asa H.

    2011-09-01

    A nanomechanical testing set-up is developed by integrating an atomic force microscope (AFM) for force measurements with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to provide imaging capabilities. Electrospun nanofibers of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), nylon-6 and biological mineralized collagen fibrils (MCFs) from antler bone were manipulated and tensile-tested using the AFM-SEM set-up. The complete stress-strain behavior to failure of individual nanofibers was recorded and a diversity of mechanical properties observed, highlighting how this technique is able to elucidate mechanical behavior due to structural composition at nanometer length scales.

  3. Quantitative in situ TEM tensile testing of an individual nickel nanowire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yang; Peng Cheng; Ganesan, Yogeeswaran; Lou Jun; Huang Jianyu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the usage of a novel micro-mechanical device (MMD) to perform quantitative in situ tensile tests on individual metallic nanowires inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our preliminary experiment on a 360 nm diameter nickel nanowire showed that the sample fractured at an engineering stress of ∼ 1.2 GPa and an engineering strain of ∼ 4%, which is consistent with earlier experiments performed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). With in situ high resolution TEM imaging and diffraction capabilities, this novel experimental set-up could provide unique opportunities to reveal the underlying deformation and damage mechanisms for metals at the nanoscale.

  4. A simple constrained uniaxial tensile apparatus for in situ investigation of film stretching processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingpu; Li, Jing; Cui, Kunpeng; Chen, Xiaowei; Lin, Yuanfei; Xu, Jiali; Li, Liangbin

    2013-11-01

    A simple constrained uniaxial tensile apparatus was designed and constructed to obtain stress-strain curve during stretching and subsequent structural evolution of polymeric films. Stretch is carried out through two motor driven clamps in the machine direction and scissor-like clamps in the transverse direction keeping the sample width constant. The force information during film stretching process is recorded by a tension sensor and structural evolution can be obtained by in situ X-ray scattering technique. All parameters related to film stretching manufacturing, such as temperature, draw ratio, and stretching speed can be set independently, making the apparatus an effective method to explore the relationship between processing parameters and structure.

  5. An Evaluation of Global and Local Tensile Properties of Friction-Stir Welded DP980 Dual-Phase Steel Joints Using a Digital Image Correlation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoungwook; Kim, Cheolhee; Song, Jung Han

    2015-12-04

    The effect of the microstructure heterogeneity on the tensile plastic deformation characteristic of friction-stir-welded (FSW) dual-phase (DP) steel was investigated for the potential applications on the lightweight design of vehicles. Friction-stir-welded specimens with a butt joint configuration were prepared, and quasi-static tensile tests were conducted, to evaluate the tensile properties of DP980 dual-phase steels. The friction-stir welding led to the formation of martensite and a significant hardness rise in the stir zone (SZ), but the presence of a soft zone in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was caused by tempering of the pre-existing martensite. Owing to the appearance of severe soft zone, DP980 FSW joint showed almost 93% joint efficiency with the view-point of ultimate tensile strength and relatively low ductility than the base metal (BM). The local tensile deformation characteristic of the FSW joints was also examined using the digital image correlation (DIC) methodology by mapping the global and local strain distribution, and was subsequently analyzed by mechanics calculation. It is found that the tensile deformation of the FSW joints is highly heterogeneous, leading to a significant decrease in global ductility. The HAZ of the joints is the weakest region where the strain localizes early, and this localization extends until fracture with a strain near 30%, while the strain in the SZ and BM is only 1% and 4%, respectively. Local constitutive properties in different heterogeneous regions through the friction-stir-welded joint was also briefly evaluated by assuming iso-stress conditions. The local stress-strain curves of individual weld zones provide a clear indication of the heterogeneity of the local mechanical properties.

  6. Stiff and tough: a comparative study on the tensile properties of shark skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creager, Shelby B; Porter, Marianne E

    2017-10-31

    In sharks, the skin is a biological composite with mineralized denticles embedded within a collagenous matrix. Swimming performance is enhanced by the dermal denticles on the skin, which have drag reducing properties produced by regional morphological variations and changes in density along the body. We used mechanical testing to quantify the effect of embedded mineralized denticles on the quasi-static tensile properties of shark skin to failure in four coastal species. We investigated regional differences in denticle density and skin properties by dissecting skin from the underlying fascia and muscle at 10 anatomical landmarks. Hourglass-shaped skin samples were extracted in the cranial to caudal orientation. Denticle density was quantified and varied significantly among both regions and species. We observed the greatest denticle densities in the cranial region of the body for the bonnethead, scalloped hammerhead, and bull sharks. Skin samples were then tested in tension until failure, stress strain curves were generated, and mechanical properties calculated. We found significant species and region effects for all three tensile mechanical properties. We report the greatest ultimate tensile strength, stiffness, and toughness near the cranial and lateral regions of the body for all 4 of the coastal species. We also report that denticle density increases with skin stiffness but decreases with toughness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. The physical interpretation of the parameters measured during the tensile testing of materials at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, B.

    1984-01-01

    Hot tensile (or compression) testing, where the stress developed in a material is measured under an imposed strain rate, is often used as an alternative to conventional creep testing. The advantages of the hot tensile test are that its duration can be more closely controlled by the experimenter and also that the technique is more convenient, since high precision testing machines are available. The main disadvantage is that the interpretation of results is more complex. The present paper relates the parameters which are measured in hot tensile tests, to physical processes which occur in materials deforming by a variety of mechanisms. For cases where no significant structural changes occur, as in viscous or superplastic flow, analytical expressions are derived which relate the stresses measured in these tests to material constants. When deformation is controlled by recovery processes, account has to be taken of the structural changes which occur concurrently. A wide variety of behaviour may then be exhibited which depends on the initial dislocation density, the presence of second-phase particles and the relative values of the recovery rate parameters and the velocity imposed by the testing machine. Numerical examples are provided for simple recovery models. (author)

  8. Round robin comparison of tensile results on GlidCop Al25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.J.; Zinkle, S.J.; Fabritsiev, S.A.; Pokrovsky, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    A round robin comparison of the tensile properties of GlidCop trademark Al25 oxide dispersion strengthened copper was initiated between collaborating laboratories to evaluate the test and analysis procedures used in the irradiation experiments in SRIAR in Dimitrovgrad. The tests were conducted using the same tensile specimen geometry as used in previous irradiation experiments, with tests at each laboratory being conducted in air or vacuum at 25, 150, and 300 C at a strain rate of 3 x 10 -4 s -1 . The strength of the GlidCop Al25 decreased as the test temperature increased, with no observable effect of testing in air versus vacuum on the yield and ultimate strengths. The uniform elongation decreased by almost a factor of 3 when the test temperature was raised from room temperature to 300 C, but the total elongation remained roughly constant over the range of test temperatures. Any effect of testing in air on the ductility may have been masked by the scatter introduced into the results because each laboratory tested the specimens in a different grip setup. In light of this, the results of the round robin tests demonstrated that the test and analysis procedures produced essentially the same values for tensile yield and ultimate, but significant variability was present in both the uniform and total elongation measurements due to the gripping technique

  9. Tensile Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Helical Structural Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhon, Young I; Kim, Chulki; Seo, Minah; Cho, Woon Jo; Lee, Seok; Jhon, Young Min

    2016-02-04

    Recently, evidence was presented that certain single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess helical defective traces, exhibiting distinct cleaved lines, yet their mechanical characterization remains a challenge. On the basis of the spiral growth model of SWNTs, here we present atomic details of helical defects and investigate how the tensile behaviors of SWNTs change with their presence using molecular dynamics simulations. SWNTs have exhibited substantially lower tensile strength and strain than theoretical results obtained from a seamless tubular structure, whose physical origin cannot be explained either by any known SWNT defects so far. We find that this long-lasting puzzle could be explained by assuming helical defects in SWNTs, exhibiting excellent agreement with experimental observation. The mechanism of this tensile process is elucidated by analyzing atomic stress distribution and evolution, and the effects of the chirality and diameter of SWNTs on this phenomenon are examined based on linear elastic fracture mechanics. This work contributes significantly to our understanding of the growth mechanism, defect hierarchies, and mechanical properties of SWNTs.

  10. Tensile strength of oxygen plasma-created surface layer of PDMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Taiki; Noda, Haruka; Matsui, Tsubasa S.; Jile, Huge; Deguchi, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a commonly used silicone elastomer with broad applications. Particularly for bioengineering use, PDMS is treated with oxygen plasma with which its surface is oxidized to allow positive interaction with water and live cells. In exchange for the acquisition of hydrophilicity, the oxidized PDMS becomes mechanically brittle so that resulting formation of cracks affects the system in various ways. However, tensile strength (TS), which is an inherent capacity of a material to withstand tensile loads before breaking and is thus a key parameter limiting the use of the material, remains unclear regarding oxidized PDMS. Here we determine the TS of oxide layers created on the surface of PDMS based on micro-stretch experiments using a custom-made device. We show that the surface layer displays cracks upon tensile loading of small strains of within 10% to have a TS of ~10-100 kPa, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than that of unmodified PDMS. We further show that the TS sharply decreases with oxidation duration to become highly brittle, while the thickness of the resulting oxide layer finally reaches a plateau even with prolonged plasma treatment. Consequently, we suggest that gradual surface modification of PDMS takes place only within a finite region even with prolonged plasma treatment, as distinct from previously held assumptions. These quantitative data provide critical design information for the oxide layer of plasma-hydrophilized PDMS.

  11. Analysis of critical current-bend strain relationships in composite Nb3Sn superconducting wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhman, T.; Welch, D.O.

    1979-01-01

    In order to be used successfully in fusion magnets, Nb 3 Sn conductors must meet several mechanical strain criteria, including tolerance to bending strains encountered during magnet construction. Since Nb 3 Sn is extremely brittle much information has been generated regarding the sensitivity of these conductros to tensile strain. A recent comparison of critical current-bend and tensile test data indicates that the strain required to initiate compound cracking during bending is significantly less than the strain required to do so by tensile of critical current on bending strains in monofilamentary Nb 3 Sn wires is calculated and compared with experimental data. The calculation takes into account a shift in the composite's neutral axis which occurs during bending. The analysis correctly predicts the observed depdndence of the critical current on bending strains

  12. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%–78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis.

  13. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Kamada, Hiroto; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-21

    Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%-78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE) analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis.

  14. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Isochronous Stress-Strain Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jill K. Wright; Richard N. Wright; Nancy J. Lybeck

    2014-03-01

    Isochronous stress-strain curves for Alloy 617 up to a temperature of 1000°C will be required to qualify the material for elevated temperature design in Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Several potential methods for developing these curves are reviewed in this report. It is shown that in general power-law creep is the rate controlling deformation mechanism for a wide range of alloy heats, test temperatures and stresses. Measurement of the strain rate sensitivity of Alloy 617 indicates that the material is highly strain rate sensitive in the tensile deformation range above about 750°C. This suggests that the concept of a hot tensile curve as a bounding case on the isochronous stress-strain diagrams is problematic. The impact of strain rate on the hot tensile curves is examined and it is concluded that incorporating such a curve is only meaningful if a single tensile strain rate (typically the ASTM standard rate of 0.5%/min) is arbitrarily defined. Current experimentally determined creep data are compared to isochronous stress-strain curves proposed previously by the German programs in the 1980s and by the 1990 draft ASME Code Case. Variability in how well the experimental data are represented by the proposed design curves that suggests further analysis is necessary prior to completing a new draft Code Case.

  15. Standard practice for verification of testing frame and specimen alignment under tensile and compressive axial force application

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 Included in this practice are methods covering the determination of the amount of bending that occurs during the application of tensile and compressive forces to notched and unnotched test specimens in the elastic range and to plastic strains less than 0.002. These methods are particularly applicable to the force application rates normally used for tension testing, creep testing, and uniaxial fatigue testing.

  16. Ultrasound transmission measurements for tensile strength evaluation of tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonaho, Simo-Pekka; Takala, T Aleksi; Kuosmanen, Marko; Ketolainen, Jarkko

    2011-05-16

    Ultrasound transmission measurements were performed to evaluate the tensile strength of tablets. Tablets consisting of one ingredient were compressed from dibasic calcium phosphate dehydrate, two grades of microcrystalline cellulose and two grades of lactose monohydrate powders. From each powder, tablets with five different tensile strengths were directly compressed. Ultrasound transmission measurements were conducted on every tablet at frequencies of 2.25 MHz, 5 MHz and 10 MHz and the speed of sound was calculated from the acquired waveforms. The tensile strength of the tablets was determined using a diametrical mechanical testing machine and compared to the calculated speed of sound values. It was found that the speed of sound increased with the tensile strength for the tested excipients. There was a good correlation between the speed of sound and tensile strength. Moreover, based on the statistical tests, the groups with different tensile strengths can be differentiated from each other by measuring the speed of sound. Thus, the ultrasound transmission measurement technique is a potentially useful method for non-destructive and fast evaluation of the tensile strength of tablets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  18. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  19. Effect of Local Post Weld Heat Treatment on Tensile Properties in Friction Stir Welded 2219-O Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Guannan; Sun, Lei; Lin, Caiyuan; Lin, Yanli

    2017-11-01

    To improve the formability of the aluminum alloy welds and overcome the size limitation of the bulk post weld heat treatment (BPWHT) on large size friction stir welded joints, a local post weld heat treatment method (LPWHT) was proposed. In this method, the resistance heating as the moving heat source is adopted to only heat the weld seam. The temperature field of LPWHT and its influence on the mechanical properties and formability of FSW 2219-O Al alloy joints was investigated. The evaluation of the tensile properties of FSW samples was also examined by mapping the global and local strain distribution using the digital image correlation methodology. The results indicated that the formability was improved greatly after LPWHT, while the hardness distribution of the FSW joint was homogenized. The maximum elongation can reach 1.4 times that of as-welded joints with increase the strength and the strain of the nugget zone increased from 3 to 8% when annealing at 300 °C. The heterogeneity on the tensile deformation of the as-welded joints was improved by the nugget zone showing large local strain value and the reason was given according to the dimple fracture characteristics at different annealing temperatures. The tensile strength and elongation of LPWHT can reach 93.3 and 96.1% of the BPWHT, respectively. Thus, the LPWHT can be advantageous compared to the BPWHT for large size welds.

  20. STRESS - STRAIN CURVE ANALYSIS OF WOVEN FABRICS MAD E FROM COMBED YARNS TYPE WOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VÎLCU Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the tensile behavior of woven fabrics made from 45%Wool + 55% PES used for garments. Analysis of fabric behavior during wearing has shown that these are submitted to simple and repeated uni-axial or bi-axial tensile strains. The level of these strains is often within the elastic limit, rarely going over yielding. Therefore the designer must be able to evaluate the mechanical behavior of such fabrics in order to control the fabric behavior in the garment. This evaluation is carried out based on the tensile testing, using certain indexes specific to the stress-strain curve. The paper considers an experimental matrix based on woven fabrics of different yarn counts, different or equal yarn count for warp and weft systems and different structures. The fabrics were tested using a testing machine and the results were then compared in order to determine the fabrics’ tensile behavior and the factors of influence that affect it.From the point of view of tensile testing, the woven materials having twill weave are preferable because this type of structure is characterized by higher durability and better yarn stability in the fabric. In practice, the woven material must exhibit an optimum behavior to repeated strains, flexions and abrasions during wearing process. The analysis of fabrics tensile properties studied by investigation of stress-strain diagrams reveals that the main factors influencing the tensile strength are: yarns fineness, technological density of those two systems of yarns and the weaving type.

  1. In-situ electron microscopy studies on the tensile deformation mechanisms in aluminium 5083 alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motsi, G

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study tensile deformation mechanisms of aluminium alloy 5083 were investigated under observations made from SEM equipped with a tensile stage. Observations during tensile testing revealed a sequence of surface deformation events...

  2. Static strain aging in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.

    1978-07-01

    The static strain aging effects were investigated in austenitic stainless steels by measuring the yield points developed in tensile tests following the arrest of the crosshead for some period of time. The results appear to indicate that the dragging of dislocations in the interval of temperatures from 100 to 300 0 C, where the strain aging is effective, does not apparently depend on the Cottrell's atmosphere. Moreover the influence of the pre-deformation and time on the yield point intensity displayed the existence of stages. The strain aging mechanics and the reasons for the stages were discussed. (Author) [pt

  3. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Size effect studies on smooth tensile specimens at room temperature and 400 {sup o}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krompholz, K.; Kamber, J.; Groth, E.; Kalkhof, D

    2000-06-15

    One of the objectives of the REVISA project (REactor Vessel Integrity in Severe Accidents) is to assess the size effect related to deformation and failure models as well as material data under quasistatic and dynamic conditions in homogeneous and non-homogeneous states of strain. For these investigations the reactor pressure vessel material 20 MnMoNi 55 was selected. It was subjected to a size effect study on smooth scaled tensile specimens of three sizes. Two strain rates (2*10{sup -5}/s and 10{sup -3}/s) and two temperatures (room temperature and 400 {sup o}C) were selected. The investigations are aimed at a support for a gradient plasticity approach to size effects. Test on the small specimens (diameters 3 and 9 mm) were performed at an electromechanical test machine, while the large specimens (diameter 30 mm) had to be tested at a servohydraulical closed loop test machine with a force capacity of 1000 kN.

  5. The effects of different possible modes of uniaxial strain on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dimple

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... strain along its two non-equivalent lattice directions, namely, the zig-zag and the arm-chair directions. Among all the strain types considered in this study, uniaxial tensile strain applied along the zig-zag direction is found to be the most efficacious, inducing a greater tunability in the band gap over a large ...

  6. Mechanical and electronic properties of monolayer and bilayer phosphorene under uniaxial and isotropic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ting; Han, Yang; Dong, Jinming

    2014-11-14

    The mechanical and electronic properties of both the monolayer and bilayer phosphorenes under either isotropic or uniaxial strain have been systematically investigated using first-principles calculations. It is interesting to find that: 1) Under a large enough isotropic tensile strain, the monolayer phosphorene would lose its pucker structure and transform into a flat hexagonal plane, while two inner sublayers of the bilayer phosphorene could be bonded due to its interlayer distance contraction. 2) Under the uniaxial tensile strain along a zigzag direction, the pucker distance of each layer in the bilayer phosphorene can exhibit a specific negative Poisson's ratio. 3) The electronic properties of both the monolayer and bilayer phosphorenes are sensitive to the magnitude and direction of the applied strains. Their band gaps decrease more rapidly under isotropic compressive strain than under uniaxial strain. Also, their direct-indirect band gap transitions happen at the larger isotropic tensile strains compared with that under uniaxial strain. 4) Under the isotropic compressive strain, the bilayer phosphorene exhibits a transition from a direct-gap semiconductor to a metal. In contrast, the monolayer phosphorene initially has the direct-indirect transition and then transitions to a metal. However, under isotropic tensile strain, both the bilayer and monolayer phosphorene show the direct-indirect transition and, finally, the transition to a metal. Our numerical results may open new potential applications of phosphorene in nanoelectronics and nanomechanical devices by external isotropic strain or uniaxial strain along different directions.

  7. Numerical simulation for determination of limit strains of a cold rolled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The properties evaluated include the 0·2% yield stress. (YS), the ultimate tensile stress (UTS), elongation (total plas- tic strain to fracture), the uniform strain (εu) and the work hardening exponent (n) using Hollomon equation: σ = Kεn p , where σ is the true stress, K the strength coefficient, εp the true plastic strain and 'n' the ...

  8. Uniaxial Strain Induced Critical Current Degradation of Ag-Sheathed Bi-2212 Round Wire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dai, Chao; Qin, Jinggang; Liu, Bo; Liu, Peihang; Wu, Yu; Nijhuis, Arend; Zhou, Chao; Li, Chenshan; Hao, Qingbin; Liu, Sheng

    2018-01-01

    The critical current degradation of Bi-2212 Ag-sheathed round wire subjected to uniaxial strain was studied at 4.2 K in 14 T background field. The strains applied on the sample are both tension and compression. The additional tensile strain caused by the difference in thermal expansion between the

  9. Molecular structure of self-healing polyampholyte hydrogels analyzed from tensile behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao Lin; Luo, Feng; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Karobi, Sadia Nazneen; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2015-12-28

    Recently, charge balanced polyampholytes (PA) have been found to form tough and self-healing hydrogels. This class of physical hydrogels have a very high equilibrated polymer concentration in water (ca. 40-50 wt%), and are strongly viscoelastic. They are synthesized by random copolymerization of equal amounts of oppositely charged monomers at a high concentration, followed by a dialysis process of the small counter-ions and co-ions in water. The randomly distributed, opposite charges of the polymer form multiple ionic bonds of intra- and inter-chains with strength distribution. The strong inter-chain bonds, stabilized by topological entanglement, serve as quasi-permanent crosslinks, imparting the elasticity, while the weak bonds, both inter- and intra-chains, reversibly break and re-form to dissipate energy to toughen the materials. In this work, we intend to clarify the structure of the physical PA hydrogels from the tensile behaviors of the PA hydrogels. To clarify the structure and its formation mechanism, we analysed the tensile behaviors of the samples before and after the dialysis. We separated the quasi-permanent crosslinking of strong inter-chain bonds and the dynamic crosslinking of weak inter-chain bonds by using a combined model that consists of the Upper Convected Maxwell model and the Gent strain hardening model. The model fitting of the tensile behaviors extracts quantitative structural parameters, including the densities of weak and strong inter-chain bonds and the theoretical finite extensibility of polymer chains. Based on the fitting results of the combined model, the structural parameters of partial chains at a fixed observation time, including the Kuhn number, Kuhn length, and chain conformation, are determined using the scaling theory. The effects of monomer concentration at preparation, the effect of dialysis and the initial strain rate on the dynamic structure of PA gels, are discussed based on these analyses.

  10. Tensile properties and microstructural analysis of spheroidized hydroxyapatite-poly (etheretherketone) biocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Bakar, M.S.; Cheang, P.; Khor, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) or PEEK, is a high performance thermoplastic possessing exceptional mechanical properties, high temperature durability, good chemical and fatigue resistance. These coupled with its ability to withstand sterilization treatment, make it a preferred material for biomedical applications. This study examines the benefit of incorporating hydroxyapatite particulates in poly(etheretherketone) for possible usage as bone analogue materials. Flame spheroidized hydroxyapatite (FSHA) were incorporated into semi-crystalline poly(etheretherketone) polymer through a series of processes comprising melt compounding, granulating and injection molding. Biocomposites with high hydroxyapatite loading of up to 40 vol.% were processed successfully using this technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed fair dispersion and distribution of hydroxyapatite particles within the polymer matrix. The series of composites were characterized in terms of tensile and microhardness properties. Microstructural analysis was also carried out to correlate the structure-property relationship of the composite. The dependency of tensile properties such as modulus, strength and strain to fracture as well as the micro-hardness on the volume percentage of hydroxyapatite were investigated. By varying the amount of hydroxyapatite particles in the composite, a wide range of mechanical properties were obtained. In general, the tensile modulus and microhardness increased, while strength and strain to fracture decreased correspondingly with progressive addition of hydroxyapatite particles. The composite system under investigation also exhibited mechanical properties matching those of human bone. With hydroxyapatite loading beyond 30 vol.%, the modulus were within the bounds of the human cortical bone. Findings from this study suggest that this bioactive composite system have the potential as an alternative implant material for orthopaedic application

  11. Analysis of the Tensile Behavior of 12 pct Mn Multi-phase ( α + γ) TWIP + TRIP Steel by Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangwon; Woo, Wanchuck; de Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-05-01

    The tensile behavior of intercritically annealed Fe-12 pctMn-0.3 pctC-2 pctAl and Fe-12 pctMn-0.3 pctC-3 pctAl steel was studied by means of in situ neutron diffraction and microstructural analysis. The in situ neutron diffraction measurements showed that the ferrite had a much higher yield strength and lower work hardening rate as compared to the austenite. The strain hardening of the austenite was controlled by deformation twinning and strain-induced transformation, occurring in succession. This TWIP + TRIP effect acted as an effective plasticity-enhancing mechanism which increased the work hardening rate.

  12. Use of micro-tomography for validation of method to identify interfacial shear strength from tensile tests of short regenerated cellulose fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajlane, A.; Miettinen, A.; Madsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The interfacial shear strength of short regenerated cellulose fibre/polylactide composites was characterized by means of an industry-friendly adhesion test method. The interfacial shear strength was back-calculated from the experimental tensile stress-strain curves of composites by using a micro-...

  13. Mechanical and Microstructural Response of Near Beta Ti Alloys to Hot Tensile Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi S.M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot tensile tests were carried out on Timetal-125 and Timetal-LCB near beta Ti alloys at temperatures in range of 600-1000°C and constant strain rate of 0.1 s−1. At temperatures below 700-800°C, the homogenuous and total strains for Timetal-LCB were greater than those for Timetal-125. In contrast, at temperatures over 800°C, Timetal-125 showed better hot ductility. The yield point phenomena was observed in Timetal-LCB at all temperatures. Unlikely, for Timetal-125, it was observed only at temperatures over 800°C. The weaker yield point phenomena in Timetal-125 could be attributed to the negative effect of Al on the diffusion of V. At all temperatures Timetal-LCB exhibited higher strength than Timetal-125. It was found that there should be a direct relationship between the extent of yield point phenomena and strength and dynamic softening through hot tensile testing. It was observed that at temperatures beyond 800°C (beta phase field in both alloys dynamic recrystallization can progress more in Timetal-125 than in Timetal-LCB. These results were in good agreement with the better hot ductility of Timetal-125 at high temperatures. At low temperatures, i.e. below 700-800°C, partial dynamic recrystallization occurs in beta and dynamic globularization in alpha phase. These processes progress more in Timetal-LCB than in Timetal-125.

  14. HIGH TEMPERATURE TENSILE PROPERTIES OF NEW FE-CR-MN DEVELOPED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahmoudiniya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Ni-free austenitic stainless steels are being developed rapidly and high price of nickel is one of the most important motivations for this development. At present research a new FeCrMn steel was designed and produced based on Fe-Cr-Mn-C system. Comparative studies on microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of  new steel and AISI 316 steel were done. The results showed that new FeCrMn developed steel has single austenite phase microstructure, and its tensile strength and toughness were higher than those of 316 steel at 25, 200,350 and 500°C. In contrast with 316 steel, the new FeCrMn steel did not show strain induced transformation and dynamic strain aging phenomena during tensile tests that represented higher austenite stability of new developed steel. Lower density and higher strength of the new steel caused higher specific strength in comparison with the 316 one that can be considered as an important advantage in structural applications but in less corrosive environment

  15. Analysis of new Gleeble tensile specimen design for hot stamping application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy Manikandan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hot tensile testing is useful to understand the material behavior at elevated temperatures. Hence it is of utmost importance that the test condition is accurate enough to derive stress-strain data in fully austenitic state and to ensure homogeneous deformation throughout the gauge length of the specimen. But present limitation of standard Gleeble hot tensile sample geometry could not be used to achieve a uniform temperature distribution along the gauge section, thus creating errors of experimental data. In order to understand the effect of sample geometry on temperature gradient within the gauge section coupled electrical-thermal and thermo-mechanical finite element analysis has been carried out using Abaqus, with the use of viscoplastic damage constitutive equations presented by Li [1]. Based on the experimental study and numerical analysis, it was observed that the new sample geometry introduced by Abspoel [2], is able to achieve a better uniformity in temperature distribution along the gauge length; The temperature deviation along the gauge length within 25 ∘C during soaking and 5 ∘C after cooling and onset of deformation; also the strain deformation is found to be almost homogeneous.

  16. Using hardness to model yield and tensile strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.

    2005-02-01

    The current direction in hardness research is towards smaller and smaller loads as nano-scale materials are developed. There remains, however, a need to investigate the mechanical behavior of complex alloys for severe environment service. In many instances this entails casting large ingots and making numerous tensile samples as the bounds of the operating environment are explored. It is possible to gain an understanding of the tensile strength of these alloys using room and elevated temperature hardness in conjunction with selected tensile tests. The approach outlined here has its roots in the work done by Tabor for metals and low alloy and carbon steels. This research seeks to extend the work to elevated temperatures for multi-phase, complex alloys. A review of the approach will be given after which the experimental data will be examined. In particular, the yield stress and tensile strength will be compared to their corresponding hardness based values.

  17. Aluminum/steel wire composite plates exhibit high tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Composite plate of fine steel wires imbedded in an aluminum alloy matrix results in a lightweight material with high tensile strength. Plates have been prepared having the strength of titanium with only 85 percent of its density.

  18. Tensile properties of polymethyl methacrylate coated natural fabric Sterculia urens

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jayaramudu, J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available before and after alkali treatment and polymethyl methacrylate coating was studied using the scanning electron microscopy and polarized optical microscopic techniques respectively. The improvement in the tensile properties on polymethyl methacrylate...

  19. Covalent Crosslinking of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Improved Tensile Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted much interest in recent years due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Currently, the tensile properties of bulk carbon nanotube-based materials (yarns, sheets, etc.) fall far short of those of the individual nanotube elements. The premature failure in these materials under tensile load has been attributed to inter-tube sliding, which requires far less force than that needed to fracture individual nanotubes.1,2 In order for nanotube materials to achieve their full potential, methods are needed to restrict this tube-tube shear and increase inter-tube forces.Our group is examining covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes as a means to increase the tensile properties of carbon nanotube materials. We are working with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet and yarn materials obtained from commercial sources. Several routes to functionalize the nanotubes have been examined including nitrene, aryl diazonium, and epoxide chemistries. The functional nanotubes were crosslinked through small molecule or polymeric bridges. Additionally, electron beam irradiation induced crosslinking of the non-functional and functional nanotube materials was conducted. For example, a nanotube sheet material containing approximately 3.5 mol amine functional groups exhibited a tensile strength of 75 MPa and a tensile modulus of 1.16 GPa, compared to 49 MPa and 0.57 GPa, respectively, for the as-received material. Electron beam irradiation (2.2x 1017 ecm2) of the same amine-functional sheet material further increased the tensile strength to 120 MPa and the modulus to 2.61 GPa. This represents approximately a 150 increase in tensile strength and a 360 increase in tensile modulus over the as-received material with only a 25 increase in material mass. Once we have optimized the nanotube crosslinking methods, the performance of these materials in polymer matrix composites will be evaluated.

  20. Ply Tensile Properties of Banana Stem and Banana Bunch Fibres ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural rubber composite lamina reinforced with BSF which were treated with a mixture of NaOH and Na2SO3 had a superior tensile strength of 4.0 MPa and Young's modulus of 147.34MPa over the untreated BSF with tensile strength and Young's Modulus of 3.7MPa and 84.30MPa respectively. Both the treated and ...

  1. Strain Hardening and Size Effect in Five-fold Twinned Ag Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sankar; Cheng, Guangming; Zeng, Zhi; Zhu, Yong; Zhu, Ting

    2015-06-10

    Metallic nanowires usually exhibit ultrahigh strength but low tensile ductility owing to their limited strain hardening capability. Here we study the unique strain hardening behavior of the five-fold twinned Ag nanowires by nanomechanical testing and atomistic modeling. In situ tensile tests within a scanning electron microscope revealed strong strain hardening behavior of the five-fold twinned Ag nanowires. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that such strain hardening was critically controlled by twin boundaries and pre-existing defects. Strain hardening was size dependent; thinner nanowires achieved more hardening and higher ductility. The size-dependent strain hardening was found to be caused by the obstruction of surface-nucleated dislocations by twin boundaries. Our work provides mechanistic insights into enhancing the tensile ductility of metallic nanostructures by engineering the internal interfaces and defects.

  2. Ceramide-induced TCR up-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menné, C; Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Dietrich, J

    2000-01-01

    inhibitors indicated that ceramide-induced TCR up-regulation was most probably mediated by serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A. Analyses of T cell variants demonstrated that TCR up-regulation was dependent on the presence of an intact CD3gamma L-based motif and thus acted on TCR engaged in the recycling......The TCR is a constitutively recycling receptor meaning that a constant fraction of TCR from the plasma membrane is transported inside the cell at the same time as a constant fraction of TCR from the intracellular pool is transported to the plasma membrane. TCR recycling is affected by protein...... kinase C activity. Thus, an increase in protein kinase C activity affects TCR recycling kinetics leading to a new TCR equilibrium with a reduced level of TCR expressed at the T cell surface. Down-regulation of TCR expression compromises T cell activation. Conversely, TCR up-regulation is expected...

  3. Characterization of cracking in Strain-Hardening Cementitious Composites using the compact tension test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A. O.

    The characterization of the tensile behavior of strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) is of significant importance to the material design. In a previous work the tensile stress-crack opening response of different types of SHCC was characterized using notched specimens tested in direct...... tension, where a single crack was obtained and mechanically characterized by performing Single Crack Tension Test (SCTT). In this study the tensile behavior of SHCC materials is characterized under eccentric tensile load using the Compact Tension Test (CTT). The long edge notch placed in the rectangular...... results are discussed and compared to the numerically derived responses. The tensile load-displacement responses observed in the CTTs were simulated using the cohesive crack model. The tensile stress-crack opening behaviors previously obtained with the SCTT tests were utilized to derive the traction...

  4. Influence of deuterium content on tensile behavior of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material in the temperature range of ambient to 300 degC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bind, A.K.; Singh, R.N.; Chakravartty, J.K.; Dhandharia, Priyesh; Ghosh, Agnish; More, Nitin S.; Chhatre, A.G.; Vijayakumar, S.

    2011-08-01

    Tensile properties of autoclaved zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium pressure tube material were evaluated by uniaxial tension tests at temperatures between 25 and 300 degC and under strain-rates of 1.075 x 10 -4 /s. Six number of Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube spools of length 130 mm were obtained from pressure tube number 19-2557-2. Five spools were polished with abrasive paper to remove the oxide layer. These spools were gaseously charged with controlled amount of deuterium. The target deuterium concentrations were 25, 50, 75, 100 and 200 wppm of hydrogen equivalent. Ten samples were machined by EDM wire cutting from every spool. The tensile specimen axis was oriented along longitudinal direction of the tube. Metallographic examination of the deuterium charged samples suggested that the deuterides were predominantly circumferential deuterides. Analysis of tensile results showed that both yield and ultimate tensile strengths of this alloy decreased monotonically with increasing test temperatures. The tensile ductility decreased marginally with increase in test temperature from ambient to 300 degC. It was also observed that both strength and ductility appear to be unaffected by deuterium content at all temperatures, thereby suggesting that at least up to 200 wppm (Heq.) of deuterium tensile properties are not influenced by deuterium. (author)

  5. Analysis of threshold current of uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge and Ge/SiGe quantum well lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jialin; Sun, Junqiang; Gao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2017-10-30

    We propose and design uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge and Ge/SiGe quantum well lasers with the stress along direction. The micro-bridge structure is adapted for introducing uniaxial stress in Ge/SiGe quantum well. To enhance the fabrication tolerance, full-etched circular gratings with high reflectivity bandwidths of ~500 nm are deployed in laser cavities. We compare and analyze the density of state, the number of states between Γ- and L-points, the carrier injection efficiency, and the threshold current density for the uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge and Ge/SiGe quantum well lasers. Simulation results show that the threshold current density of the Ge/SiGe quantum well laser is much higher than that of the bulk Ge laser, even combined with high uniaxial tensile stress owing to the larger number of states between Γ- and L- points and extremely low carrier injection efficiency. Electrical transport simulation reveals that the reduced effective mass of the hole and the small conduction band offset cause the low carrier injection efficiency of the Ge/SiGe quantum well laser. Our theoretical results imply that unlike III-V material, uniaxially tensile stressed bulk Ge outperforms a Ge/SiGe quantum well with the same strain level and is a promising approach for Si-compatible light sources.

  6. Experimental and computational approach to evaluate the effect of leveling on the change of tensile properites of heavy steel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrunner, Thomas; Ecker, Werner; Antretter, Thomas; Kaiser, Robert; Parteder, Erik; Egger, Rupert

    2017-10-01

    Advancing requirements and decreasing tolerances for the mechanical properties of heavy steel plates, especially the yield strength and the tensile strength, necessitate sound knowledge of the influence of all consecutive process steps. In this work the focus is taken on the leveling process. The present paper represents a combined methodology to characterize the tensile properties with experimental as well as numerical simulation techniques. An four-point bending test rig has been designed which enables the cyclic testing of plate like samples up to 40 mm thickness applying typical strain histories of the leveling operation. Small-scale tensile specimens with rectangular cross section are taken across the entire plate thickness to characterize the change of the local tensile behavior from the un-deformed to the deformed state. The bending experiments are reproduced by finite element simulations. The implemented material model has been calibrated on the basis of uniaxial cyclic tension/compression tests. With this technique it is possible to evaluate a material model which can then be used for modeling the entire leveling process as well as to predict the local strength distribution across the thickness of the final plate.

  7. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Arman Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A total of 8 numbers of cylinder specimens are cast and tested in 1000 kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM and also modeled in ANSYS. The enhancement of compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of SFRC specimen is achieved up to 17% and 146%, respectively, compared to respective plain concrete specimen. Results gathered from finite element analyses are validated with the experimental test results by identifying as well as optimizing the controlling parameters to make FE models. Modulus of elasticity, Poisson’s ratio, stress-strain behavior, tensile strength, density, and shear transfer coefficients for open and closed cracks are found to be the main governing parameters for successful model of plain concrete and SFRC in FE platform. After proper evaluation and logical optimization of these parameters by extensive analyses, finite element (FE models showed a good correlation with the experimental results.

  8. Neutron diffraction study on anisotropy of strain age hardening in ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Ishino, Mayuko; Shinohara, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Kensuke; Tsuru, Eiji; Xu, Pingguang

    2012-01-01

    The work-hardening characteristics of anisotropic tensile deformations and the corresponding residual strain changes of pre-strained ferritic steels without and with aging treatment were investigated by using angle dispersive neutron diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction pattern analysis. The plastic deformation along the pre-strained direction leads to evident work-hardening at the beginning stage, showing discontinuous yielding behavior. Comparably, the plastic deformation perpendicular to the pre-strained direction shows continuously yielding. The tensile and compressive residual strains were found in the and grains along the pre-strained direction, respectively. It is also found that the difference in various oriented grains after strain aging become more evident along the pre-strained direction but smaller perpendicular to the pre-strained direction, revealing a higher work hardening capability in the former case than in the latter case. (author)

  9. Strain engineering of phonon thermal transport properties in monolayer 2H-MoTe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafique, Aamir; Shin, Young-Han

    2017-12-06

    The effect of strain on the phonon properties such as phonon group velocity, phonon anharmonicity, phonon lifetime, and lattice thermal conductivity of monolayer 2H-MoTe 2 is studied by solving the Boltzmann transport equation based on first principles calculations. The phonon thermal transport properties of the unstrained monolayer 2H-MoTe 2 are compared to those of the strained case under different biaxial tensile strains. One of the common features of two-dimensional materials is the quadratic nature near the Γ point of the out-of-plane phonon flexural mode that disappears by applying tensile strain. We find that the lattice thermal conductivity of the monolayer 2H-MoTe 2 is very sensitive to strain, and the lattice thermal conductivity is reduced by approximately 2.5 times by applying 8% biaxial tensile strain due to the reduction in phonon group velocities and phonon lifetime. We also analyze how the contribution of each mode to lattice thermal conductivity changes with tensile strain. These results highlight that tensile strain is a key parameter in engineering phonon thermal transport properties in monolayer 2H-MoTe 2 .

  10. Location specific in situ TEM straining specimens made using FIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R.D.; Papin, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    A method has been devised and demonstrated for producing in situ straining specimens for the transmission electron microscope (TEM) from specific locations in a sample using a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB) instrument. The specimen is removed from a polished surface in the FIB using normal methods and then attached to a pre-fabricated substrate in the form of a modified TEM tensile specimen. In this manner, specific features of the microstructure of a polished optical mount can be selected for in situ tensile straining. With the use of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), this technique could be extended to select specific orientations of the specimen as well

  11. Tensile properties of Zr-2.5 Nb pressure tube alloy between 25 and 800 degC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Kishore, R.; Sinha, T.K.; Banerjee, S.

    2000-10-01

    Tensile properties of zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium pressure tube material were evaluated by uniaxial tension tests at temperatures between 25 and 800 degC and under strain-rates varying from 3.3 x 10 -5 to 3.3 x 10 -3 /s. Tests were carried out on specimens fabricated from the sections of finished (autoclaved) tubes as well as on those machined from the sections of cold worked (2 nd pilgered) tubes. Moreover, specimens fabricated from finished tubes belonging to twenty different heats were tested at 300 degC to study the heat to heat variation in tensile properties of this alloy. In order to study the effect of the crystallographic texture on the tensile properties, specimens oriented in longitudinal as well as, in transverse directions of the tubes were also tested. Results showed that both yield and ultimate tensile strengths of this alloy decreased monotonically with increasing test temperatures, with a rapid fall in strengths above a temperature of 350 degC (623 K). The tensile ductility did not change appreciably up to 400 degC (673K) but increased rapidly above this temperature. The observed results on the temperature dependence of the strength and ductility indicated the possible occurrence of dynamic strain-ageing in this alloy in the temperature range of 200-300 degC (473 to 573 K). The transverse specimens showed higher strengths and lower ductility as compared to those of the longitudinal specimens up to a temperature of 350 degC (623 K). Above 350 degC, the difference in the strengths and the ductility of the two types of the specimens, became negligibly small indicating that the texture did not appreciably influence the tensile properties of this alloy at temperatures exceeding 350 degC. The alloy developed extensive superplasticity (ductility exceeding 100 %), when tested in the temperature range of 650-800 degC. Maximum ductility values of 650 % for longitudinal and 900 % for the transverse orientation with strain-rate sensitivity (m) exceeding 0

  12. Increased effects of machining damage in beryllium observed at high strain rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitscher, S.; Brewer, A.W.; Corle, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Tensile tests at both low and high strain rates, and also impact shear tests, were performed on a weldable grade powder-source beryllium. Impact energies increased by a factor of 2 to 3 from the as-machined level after etching or annealing. Similar increases in the ductility from machining damage removal were observed from the tensile data at the higher strain rate (10 s -1 ) while an insignificant increase in elongation was measured at the lower strain rate (10 -4 s -1 ). High strain-rate tests appear to be more sensitive and reliable for evaluating machining practice and damage removal methods for beryllium components subjected to sudden loads. 2 tables

  13. Tensile strength of two soldered alloys (Minalux and Verabond2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mohammad Rezaee S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently. Minalux alloy, a base metal free from Be, has been presented on the market while no special soldering has been recommended for it. On the other hand, based on the manufacturer's claim, this alloy is similar to Verabond2. The aim of this study was to investigate the tensile strength of Minalux and Verabond2, soldered by Verasolder. Twelve standard dambble shape samples, with the length of 18 mm and the diameter of 3mm, were prepared from each alloy. Six samples of each alloy were divided into two pieces with carboradom disk. Soldering gap distance was 0.3mm, measured by a special jig and they were soldered by Verasolder alloy. Six other samples, of both Iranian and foreign unsoldered alloys were considered as control group. Then samples were examined under tensile force and their tensile strength was recorded. Two- way variance analysis showed that the tensile strength of Minalux alloy and Verabond2 were not statistically significant (Verasoler 686, Minalux 723, but after soldering, such difference became significant (Minalux 308, Verabond2 432. Verabond2 showed higher tensile strength after soldering.

  14. In vitro tensile strength of luting cements on metallic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara A; Varoli, Fernando K; Pieroni, Carlos H P; Ferreira, Marly C C G; Borie, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the tensile strength of crowns cemented on metallic substrate with four different types of luting agents. Twenty human maxillary molars with similar diameters were selected and prepared to receive metallic core castings (Cu-Al). After cementation and preparation the cores were measured and the area of crown's portion was calculated. The teeth were divided into four groups based on the luting agent used to cement the crowns: zinc phosphate cement; glass ionomer cement; resin cement Rely X; and resin cement Panavia F. The teeth with the crowns cemented were subjected to thermocycling and later to the tensile strength test using universal testing machine with a load cell of 200 kgf and a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load required to dislodge the crowns was recorded and converted to MPa/mm(2). Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis analysis with a significance level of 1%. Panavia F showed significantly higher retention in core casts (3.067 MPa/mm(2)), when compared with the other cements. Rely X showed a mean retention value of 1.877 MPa/mm(2) and the zinc phosphate cement with 1.155 MPa/mm(2). Glass ionomer cement (0.884 MPa/mm(2)) exhibited the lowest tensile strength value. Crowns cemented with Panavia F on cast metallic posts and cores presented higher tensile strength. The glass ionomer cement showed the lowest tensile strength among all the cements studied.

  15. Tensile and shear methods for measuring strength of bilayer tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shao-Yu; Li, Jian-Xin; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2017-05-15

    Both shear and tensile measurement methods have been used to quantify interfacial bonding strength of bilayer tablets. The shear method is more convenient to perform, but reproducible strength data requires careful control of the placement of tablet and contact point for shear force application. Moreover, data obtained from the shear method depend on the orientation of the bilayer tablet. Although more time-consuming to perform, the tensile method yields data that are straightforward to interpret. Thus, the tensile method is preferred in fundamental bilayer tableting research to minimize ambiguity in data interpretation. Using both shear and tensile methods, we measured the mechanical strength of bilayer tablets made of several different layer combinations of lactose and microcrystalline cellulose. We observed a good correlation between strength obtained by the tensile method and carefully conducted shear method. This suggests that the shear method may be used for routine quality test of bilayer tablets during manufacturing because of its speed and convenience, provided a protocol for careful control of the placement of the tablet interface, tablet orientation, and blade is implemented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Continuum model of tensile fracture of metal melts and its application to a problem of high-current electron irradiation of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Alexander E.; Mayer, Polina N.

    2015-01-01

    A continuum model of the metal melt fracture is formulated on the basis of the continuum mechanics and theory of metastable liquid. A character of temperature and strain rate dependences of the tensile strength that is predicted by the continuum model is verified, and parameters of the model are fitted with the use of the results of the molecular dynamics simulations for ultra-high strain rates (≥1–10/ns). A comparison with experimental data from literature is also presented for Al and Ni melts. Using the continuum model, the dynamic tensile strength of initially uniform melts of Al, Cu, Ni, Fe, Ti, and Pb within a wide range of strain rates (from 1–10/ms to 100/ns) and temperatures (from melting temperature up to 70–80% of critical temperature) is calculated. The model is applied to numerical investigation of a problem of the high-current electron irradiation of Al, Cu, and Fe targets

  17. Microstructural evolution and the variation of tensile behavior after aging heat treatment of precipitation hardened martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jong-Ho; Jeong, JaeSuk; Lee, Jong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging temperature on the microstructural evolution and the tensile behavior of precipitation hardened martensitic steel were investigated. Microscopic analysis using transmission electron microscope (TEM) was combined with the microstructural analysis using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to characterize the microstructural evolution with aging temperature. Peak hardness was obtained by precipitation of the Ni 3 Al ordered phase. After aging at temperature range from 420 to 590 °C, spherical Ni 3 Al precipitates and ellipsoidal M 23 C 6 carbides were observed within laths and at lath boundaries, respectively. Strain hardening behavior was analyzed with Ludwik equation. It is observed that the plastic strain regimes can be divided into two different stages by a rapid increase in strain hardening followed by a comparatively lower increase. At the first strain hardening stage, the aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen, and the exponent in the aged specimen was not changed considerably with increasing aging temperature. It is revealed that the strain hardening exponents at the first and the second stages were associated with the Ni 3 Al precipitates and the domain size representing the coherent scattering area, respectively. - Highlights: • All of aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen at the first stage. • The value of strain hardening exponent in the aged specimen was nearly constant with aging temperature. • Ni 3 Al precipitation dominantly influenced to the increase of strain hardening exponent at the first strain hardening stage. • Domain size was associated with strain hardening exponent at the second strain hardening stage

  18. Impact of strain on electronic defects in (Mg,Zn)O thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Florian, E-mail: fschmidt@physik.uni-leipzig.de; Müller, Stefan; Wenckstern, Holger von; Benndorf, Gabriele; Pickenhain, Rainer; Grundmann, Marius [Universität Leipzig, Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Linnéstraße 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-09-14

    We have investigated the impact of strain on the incorporation and the properties of extended and point defects in (Mg,Zn)O thin films by means of photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), and deep-level optical spectroscopy. The recombination line Y₂, previously detected in ZnO thin films grown on an Al-doped ZnO buffer layer and attributed to tensile strain, was exclusively found in (Mg,Zn)O samples being under tensile strain and is absent in relaxed or compressively strained thin films. Furthermore a structural defect E3´ can be detected via DLTS measurements and is only incorporated in tensile strained samples. Finally it is shown that the omnipresent deep-level E3 in ZnO can only be optically recharged in relaxed ZnO samples.

  19. Constitutive Behavior Modelling of AA1100-O AT Large Strain and High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Gabriel; Iannitti, Gianluca; Ruggiero, Andrew; Gentile, Domenico; Bonora, Nicola

    2017-06-01

    Constitutive behavior of AA1100-O, provided as extruded bar, was investigated. Microscopic observation showed that the cross-section has a peculiar microstructure consisting in the inner core with a large grain size surrounded by an external annulus with finer grains. Low and high strain rates tensile tests were carried out at different temperature ranging from -190 ° C to 100 ° C. Constitutive behavior was modelled using a modified version of Rusinek & Klepaczko model. Parameters were calibrated on tensile test results. Tests and numerical simulations of symmetric Taylor (RoR) and dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests at different impact velocities were carried out in order to validate the model under complex deformation paths.

  20. The effect of residence time on the tensile properties of superelastic and thermal activated Ni-Ti orthodontic wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathia Maria Fosenca de Britto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s, different devices based on superelastic alloys have been developed to fulfill orthodontic applications. Particularly in the last decades several researches have been carried out to evaluate the mechanical behavior of Ni-Ti alloys, including their tensile, torsion and fatigue properties. However, studies regarding the dependence of elastic properties on residence time of Ni-Ti wires in the oral cavity are scarce. Such approach is essential since metallic alloys are submitted to mechanical stresses during orthodontic treatment as well as pH and temperature fluctuations. The goal of the present contribution is to provide elastic stress-strain results to guide the orthodontic choice between martensitic thermal activated and austenitic superelastic Ni-Ti alloys. From the point of view of an orthodontist, the selection of appropriate materials and the correct maintenance of the orthodontic apparatus are essential needs during clinical treatment. The present work evaluated the elastic behavior of Ni-Ti alloy wires with diameters varying from 0.014 to 0.020 inches, submitted to hysteresis tensile tests with 8% strain. Tensile tests were performed after periods of use of 1, 2 and 3 months in the oral cavity of patients submitted to orthodontic treatment. The results from the hysteresis tests allowed to exam the strain range covered by isostress lines upon loading and unloading, as well as the residual strain after unloading for both superelastic and thermal activated Ni-Ti wires. Superelastic Ni-Ti wires exhibited higher load isostress values compared to thermal activated wires. It was found that such differences in the load isostress values can increase with increasing residence time.

  1. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  2. Tensile Properties and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Investigation of Stereoblock Elastomeric Polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Elastomeric polypropylene (ePP) produced from unbridged 2-arylindene metallocene catalysts was studied by uniaxial tensile and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. The ePP can be separated into three fractions by successive boiling-solvent fractionation method to yield: a low-tacticity fraction soluble in ether (ES), an intermediate-tacticity fraction soluble in heptane (HS), and a high-tacticity fraction insoluble in heptane (HI). Tensile properties of ePP were compared to its solvent fractions, and the role of each solvent fraction residing within ePP was investigated by blending 5 weight % deuterated fraction with ePP. The tensile properties of each fraction vary considerably, exhibiting properties from a weak gum elastomer for ES, to a semi-crystalline thermoplastic for HI. The intermediate-tacticity HS fraction exhibits elastic properties similar to the parent elastomer (ePP). In the melt at 160 C, SANS shows that all deuterated fractions are homogeneously mixed with ePP in a one-phase system. At 25 C upon a slow cooling from the melt, the low-tacticity fraction is preferentially segregated in the amorphous domains induced by different crystallization temperatures and kinetics of the deuterated ES and high-tacticity components. The high-tacticity component within ePP (dHI-ePP) retains its plastic properties in the blend. Despite its low crystallinity (∼ 2%), the low-tacticity fraction can co-crystallize with the crystalline matrix. The dES-ePP shows little or no relaxation when held under strain and recovers readily upon the release of stress

  3. Accurate anisotropic material modelling using only tensile tests for hot and cold forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abspoel, M.; Scholting, M. E.; Lansbergen, M.; Neelis, B. M.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate material data for simulations require a lot of effort. Advanced yield loci require many different kinds of tests and a Forming Limit Curve (FLC) needs a large amount of samples. Many people use simple material models to reduce the effort of testing, however some models are either not accurate enough (i.e. Hill’48), or do not describe new types of materials (i.e. Keeler). Advanced yield loci describe the anisotropic materials behaviour accurately, but are not widely adopted because of the specialized tests, and data post-processing is a hurdle for many. To overcome these issues, correlations between the advanced yield locus points (biaxial, plane strain and shear) and mechanical properties have been investigated. This resulted in accurate prediction of the advanced stress points using only Rm, Ag and r-values in three directions from which a Vegter yield locus can be constructed with low effort. FLC’s can be predicted with the equations of Abspoel & Scholting depending on total elongation A80, r-value and thickness. Both predictive methods are initially developed for steel, aluminium and stainless steel (BCC and FCC materials). The validity of the predicted Vegter yield locus is investigated with simulation and measurements on both hot and cold formed parts and compared with Hill’48. An adapted specimen geometry, to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution in the Gleeble hot tensile test, was used to measure the mechanical properties needed to predict a hot Vegter yield locus. Since for hot material, testing of stress states other than uniaxial is really challenging, the prediction for the yield locus adds a lot of value. For the hot FLC an A80 sample with a homogeneous temperature distribution is needed which is due to size limitations not possible in the Gleeble tensile tester. Heating the sample in an industrial type furnace and tensile testing it in a dedicated device is a good alternative to determine the necessary parameters for the FLC

  4. Tensile Properties and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Investigation of Stereoblock Elastomeric Polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pople, John A

    2002-08-06

    Elastomeric polypropylene (ePP) produced from unbridged 2-arylindene metallocene catalysts was studied by uniaxial tensile and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. The ePP can be separated into three fractions by successive boiling-solvent fractionation method to yield: a low-tacticity fraction soluble in ether (ES), an intermediate-tacticity fraction soluble in heptane (HS), and a high-tacticity fraction insoluble in heptane (HI). Tensile properties of ePP were compared to its solvent fractions, and the role of each solvent fraction residing within ePP was investigated by blending 5 weight % deuterated fraction with ePP. The tensile properties of each fraction vary considerably, exhibiting properties from a weak gum elastomer for ES, to a semi-crystalline thermoplastic for HI. The intermediate-tacticity HS fraction exhibits elastic properties similar to the parent elastomer (ePP). In the melt at 160 C, SANS shows that all deuterated fractions are homogeneously mixed with ePP in a one-phase system. At 25 C upon a slow cooling from the melt, the low-tacticity fraction is preferentially segregated in the amorphous domains induced by different crystallization temperatures and kinetics of the deuterated ES and high-tacticity components. The high-tacticity component within ePP (dHI-ePP) retains its plastic properties in the blend. Despite its low crystallinity ({le} 2%), the low-tacticity fraction can co-crystallize with the crystalline matrix. The dES-ePP shows little or no relaxation when held under strain and recovers readily upon the release of stress.

  5. Microstructure evolution of a pre-compression nickel-base single crystal superalloy during tensile creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xingfu; Tian Sugui; Du Hongqiang; Yu Huichen; Wang Minggang; Shang Lijuan; Cui Shusen

    2009-01-01

    By pre-compressive creep treatment, the cubical γ' phase in the nickel-base single crystal superalloy is transformed into the P-type rafted structure along the direction parallel to the applied stress axis. And the microstructure evolution of the P-type γ' rafted alloy during tensile creep is investigated by means of the measurement of the creep curve and microstructure observation. Results show that the P-type γ' rafted phase in the alloy is transformed into the N-type structure along the direction perpendicular to the applied stress axis in the initial stage of the tensile creep. In the role of the tensile stress at high temperature, the change of the element's equilibrium concentration in the different regions of P-type γ' rafted phase occurs, which promotes the inhomogeneous coarsening of the P-type γ' phase. And then, the decomposition of the P-type γ' rafted phase in the alloy occurs to form the groove structure. As of result of the directional diffusion of the elements, the fact that the P-type γ' rafted phase is decomposed to transform into the cubical-like structure is attributed to the increment of the solute elements M(Ta, Al) chemical potential in the groove regions. Further, the lattice constriction in the horizontal interfaces of the cubical-like γ' phase may repel out the Al and Ta atoms with higher radius due to the role of the shearing stress, and the lattice expanding in the upright interfaces of the cubical-like γ' phase, due to the role of the tension stress, may trap the Ta and Al atoms, which promotes the directional growing of γ' phase into the N-type rafted structure. Therefore, the change of the strain energy density in different interfaces of the cubical-like γ' phase is thought to be the driving force of the elements diffusing and the directional coarsening of γ' phase

  6. Tensile properties of austempered ductile iron under thermomechanical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achary, J.

    2000-02-01

    A new processing method was investigated for improving the strength and elongation of austempered ductile iron (ADI) by grain refinement of parent austenite using thermomechanical treatment. The material was deformed at the austenitization temperature by single and multipass rolling before the austempering treatment. The effects of the amount of deformation, austenitization temperature, austempering temperatures, reaustenitization, and secondary deformation on the tensile properties were studied. The properties obtained using the method were compared with those of the ASTM standards. The effect of deformation on the graphite shape was also studied. Tensile strength/yield strength/elongation values were found to increase with increasing austenite deformation up to 40% and then to start decreasing. Tensile strength/yield strength and elongation values of 1,700 MPa/1,300 MPa/5% and 1,350 MPa/920 MPa/15% can be achieved with this method in the ranges of variables studied.

  7. Tensile strength of glulam laminations of Nordic spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Bräuner, Lise; Boström, Lars

    1999-01-01

    Design of glulam according to the European timber code Eurocode 5 is based on the standard document prEN1194 , according to which glulam beam strength is to be established either by full scale testing or by calculation. The calculation must be based on a knowledge of lamination tensile strength....... This knowledge may be obtained either by adopting a general rule that the characteristic tensile strength is sixty percent of the characteristic bending strength, or by performing tensile tests on an adequate number of laminations representative of the whole population. The present paper presents...... an investigation aimed at establishing such an adequate experimental background for the assignment of strength classes for glulam made of visually strength graded laminations from Nordic sawmills. The investigation includes more than 1800 boards (laminations) of Norway spruce (Picea abies) sampled from eight...

  8. Indigenous Design for Automatic Testing of Tensile Strength Using Graphical User Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Rafay; Junejo Faraz; Imtiaz Rafey; Shamsi Usama Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Tensile Testing is a fundamental material test to measure the tenacity and tensile strength. Tensile strength means ability to take tensile stress. This Universal Testing Machine is designed using Dual Cylinder Technique in order to comply with the maximun load (tensile force) with the reduction of minimum physical effort and minimized losses.It is to provide material testing opportunity to the students of different institutions, locally and globally, at lowest price; so that they can have a ...

  9. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON TENSILE STRENGTH OF JACQUARD KNITTED FABRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRAD Raluca

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An objective approach to select the best fabric for technical and home textiles consists in mechanical properties evaluation. The goal of this study is to analyze the behavior of knitted fabrics undergoing stretch stress. In this respect, three types of 2 colors Rib structure (backstripes jacquard, twillback jacquard and double-layered 3x3 rib fabric have been presented and tested for tensile strength and elongation on three directions. First, the elasticity and the behavior of knitted Rib fabrics were described The fabrics were knitted using 100% PAN yarns with Nm 1/15x2 on a E5 CMS 330 Stoll V-bed knitting machine, and have been tested using INSTROM 5587 Tensile Testing Machine in respect of standards conditions. After a relaxation period, 15 specimens were prepared, being disposed at 0°, 45 and 90 angles to the wale direction on the flat knitted panel. The tensile strength and the elongation values were recorded and mean values were computed. After strength and tensile elongation testing for 3 types of rib based knitted fabrics, one can see that the double layer knit presents the best mechanical behavior, followed by birds-eyebacking 2 colors Jacquard and then back striped Jacquard. For tensile stress in bias direction, the twillbacking Jacquard has a good breakage resistance value due to the higher number of rib sinker loops in structure that are positioned on the same direction with the tensile force. The twillbacking Jacquard structure could be considered as an alternative for the base material for decorative and home textile products.

  10. Internal residual strain mapping in carburized chrome molybdenum steel after quenching by neutron strain scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaida, Yoshihisa; Serizawa, Takanobu; Manzanka, Michiya

    2011-01-01

    A hollow circular cylinder specimen with an annular U-notch of chrome molybdenum steel with 0.20 mass% C (SCM420) was carburized in carrier gas and quenched in oil bath. In order to determine the case depth, the specimen was cut off and carbon content and Vickers hardness gradients were measured experimentally near the carburized surface. The residual strain mapping in the interior of carburized cylinder was conducted nondestructively by neutron strain scanning. In this study, the neutron diffraction from Fe-211 plane was used for strain scanning. The neutron wavelength was tuned to 0.1654nm so that diffraction angle became about 90deg. Radial, hoop and axial residual strains were measured by scanning diffracting volume along the axial direction of cylinder specimen. Each residual strain was calculated from lattice spacing change. Unstressed lattice spacing was determined experimentally using reference coupon specimens that were cut from the interior of same carburized cylinder. As a result, the diffraction peak width at half height, FWHM, near the carburized surface was about 3.7 times wider than that of coupon specimens. On the other hand, the most peak widths in the interior equaled to that of coupon specimens. Peak width broadened slightly as the diffracting volume approached the carburized case layer. From the center to the quarter of cylinder specimen, the hoop and axial strains were tensile, and the radial one was compressive in the interior. From the quarter to the edge of the cylinder specimen, the hoop tensile strain increased, radial and axial strains changed to tensile and compressive, respectively. Therefore, the interior of the cylinder specimen was found to be deformed elastically to balance the existence of compressive residual stresses in the carburized case layer. (author)

  11. Method and apparatus for tensile testing of metal foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, O. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method for obtaining accurate and reproducible results in the tensile testing of metal foils in tensile testing machines is described. Before the test specimen are placed in the machine, foil side edges are worked until they are parallel and flaw free. The specimen are also aligned between and secured to grip end members. An aligning apparatus employed in the method is comprised of an alignment box with a longitudinal bottom wall and two upright side walls, first and second removable grip end members at each end of the box, and a means for securing the grip end members within the box.

  12. Strain effects on the work function of an organic semiconductor

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Yanfei

    2016-02-01

    Establishing fundamental relationships between strain and work function (WF) in organic semiconductors is important not only for understanding electrical properties of organic thin films, which are subject to both intrinsic and extrinsic strains, but also for developing flexible electronic devices. Here we investigate tensile and compressive strain effects on the WF of rubrene single crystals. Mechanical strain induced by thermal expansion mismatch between the substrate and rubrene is quantified by X-ray diffraction. The corresponding WF change is measured by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The WF of rubrene increases (decreases) significantly with in-plane tensile (compressive) strain, which agrees qualitatively with density functional theory calculations. An elastic-to-plastic transition, characterized by a steep rise of the WF, occurs at ~0.05% tensile strain along the rubrene π-stacking direction. The results provide the first concrete link between mechanical strain and WF of an organic semiconductor and have important implications for understanding the connection between structural and electronic disorder in soft organic electronic materials.

  13. Tensile properties of carbon black-filled natural rubber latex films using two different approaches of film preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarkasi, Siti Aisyah; Samsuri, Azemi; Hashim, M. Y. Amir; Kamarun, Dzaraini

    2017-09-01

    A study was structured to investigate the effects of two different approaches of black-filled NRL films preparation on tensile strengths and tensile stress at 100% strain (M100). In the "First Approach", carbon black dispersion was added into the NRL and mixed using mechanical stirrer. Then the black-filled NRL was coagulated with acetic acid and dried to form NR black-filled masterbatch. This black-filled NR masterbatch was then masticated and mixed with other compounding ingredients on the 2-roll mill. In the "Second Approach", carbon black dispersion was mixed with NRL plus all other compounding ingredients using a mechanical stirrer at high mechanical stirring speed (200 rpm) for 3 hrs. Tensile test-pieces from these two rubber specimens were tested according to ISO37. It was observed that the tensile strengths are affected by both methods. In the case of masticated latex masterbatch, the black-filled NRL films gave higher tensile strength (25-27 MPa) as compared to un-masticated black-filled NRL films (11-17 MPa). The optimum amount of filler loading for highest tensile strength in both approaches was 20 phr of carbon black. However these different approaches did not give significant effect to the elongation at break, EB and M100. SEM images of samples prepared from both approaches suggested that the dispersion of filler in the rubber matrix was better in the masticated samples compared to the un-masticated samples. The reason for the difference in the tensile strength between the two black-filled rubbers might be associated with the degree of dispersions and the uniformity of the dispersions within the rubber matrix. The first mixing approach involved high mechanical shearing action during mastication and mixing process on the 2-roll mill. The high shearing actions were able to breakdown filler aggregates efficiently and distributed the dispersed filler uniformly within the rubber matrix. In the second approach, the breakdown of filler aggregates relied on

  14. On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg (University of Texas-Austin)

    2010-02-01

    In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.

  15. Measurement of ultimate tensile strength and Young modulus in LYSO scintillating crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalise, Lorenzo, E-mail: l.scalise@univpm.it [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Rinaldi, Daniele [Dipartimento di Fisica e Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Perugia (Italy); Davi, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Architettura Costruzioni e Strutture, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Paone, Nicola [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2011-10-21

    Scintillating crystals are employed in high energy physics, in medical imaging, diagnostic and security. Two mechanical properties of lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate cerium-doped Lu{sub 2(1-x)}Y{sub 2x}SiO{sub 5}:Ce with x=0.1 (LYSO) crystals have been measured: the ultimate tensile stress ({sigma}{sub UTS}) and the Young elastic modulus (E). Measurements are made by means of a 4-points loading device and the experimental results account for an elastic-brittle stress-strain relation, which depends heavily on the specimen preparation and the material defects. {sigma}{sub UTS} along the [0 1 0] tensile direction ranges within 68.14 and 115.61 MPa, which, in the lowest case, is more than twice with respect to those measured for PbWO{sub 4} (PWO), exhibiting a marked difference between the annealed and the not-annealed samples. The mean elastic modulus (E), along the same direction, is E=1.80x10{sup 11} ({+-}2.15x10{sup 10}) N/m{sup 2}, with lower dispersion respect to UTS data. This type of analysis and study can be included into quality control procedures of crystals, based on samples taken out of production; such procedures can be established for industrial processing of crystals aimed to the high energy physics (calorimeters) and medical imaging (PET, etc.) applications.

  16. Effect of tensile mean stress on fatigue behavior of single-crystal and directionally solidified superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Two nickel base superalloys, single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf, were studied in view of the potential usage of the former and usage of the latter as blade materials for the turbomachinery of the space shuttle main engine. The baseline zero mean stress (ZMS) fatigue life (FL) behavior of these superalloys was established, and then the effect of tensile mean stress (TMS) on their FL behavior was characterized. At room temperature these superalloys have lower ductilities and higher strengths than most polycrystalline engineering alloys. The cycle stress-strain response was thus nominally elastic in most of the fatigue tests. Therefore, a stress range based FL prediction approach was used to characterize both the ZMS and TMS fatigue data. In the past, several researchers have developed methods to account for the detrimental effect of tensile mean stress on the FL for polycrystalline engineering alloys. However, the applicability of these methods to single crystal and directionally solidified superalloys has not been established. In this study, these methods were applied to characterize the TMS fatigue data of single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf and were found to be unsatisfactory. Therefore, a method of accounting for the TMS effect on FL, that is based on a technique proposed by Heidmann and Manson was developed to characterize the TMS fatigue data of these superalloys. Details of this method and its relationship to the conventionally used mean stress methods in FL prediction are discussed.

  17. Tensile and Compressive Responses of Ceramic and Metallic Nanoparticle Reinforced Mg Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quy Bau Nguyen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, room temperature mechanical properties of pure magnesium, Mg/ZrO2 and Mg/(ZrO2 + Cu composites with various compositions are investigated. Results revealed that the use of hybrid (ZrO2 + Cu reinforcements in Mg led to enhanced mechanical properties when compared to that of single reinforcement (ZrO2. Marginal reduction in mechanical properties of Mg/ZrO2 composites were observed mainly due to clustering of ZrO2 particles in Mg matrix and lack of matrix grain refinement. Addition of hybrid reinforcements led to grain size reduction and uniform distribution of hybrid reinforcements, globally and locally, in the hybrid composites. Macro- and micro- hardness, tensile strengths and compressive strengths were all significantly increased in the hybrid composites. With respect to unreinforced magnesium, failure strain was almost unchanged under tensile loading while it was reduced under compressive loading for both Mg/ZrO2 and Mg/(ZrO2 + Cu composites.

  18. X-ray Tomographic Imaging of Tensile Deformation Modes of Electrospun Biodegradable Polyester Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jekaterina Maksimcuka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning allows the production of fibrous networks for tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing in health care. It enables the production of constructs with large surface area and a fibrous morphology that closely resembles the extracellular matrix of many tissues. A fibrous structure not only promotes cell attachment and tissue formation but could also lead to very interesting mechanical properties. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate (P(3HB-co-4HB is a biodegradable polyester that exhibits a large (>400% elongation before failure. In this study, synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging was performed during tensile deformation to failure on a non-woven fiber mat of P(3HB-co-4HB fibers. Significant reorientation of the fibers in the straining direction was observed, followed by localized necking and eventual failure. From an original average fiber diameter of 4.3 µm, a bimodal distribution of fiber diameter (modal diameters of 1.9 and 3.7 µm formed after tensile deformation. Extensive localized necking (thinning of fibers between (thicker fiber–fiber contacts was found to be the cause for non-uniform thinning of the fibers, a phenomenon that is expected but has not been observed in 3D previously. The data presented here have implications not only in tissue regeneration but for fibrous materials in general.

  19. Measurement of ultimate tensile strength and Young modulus in LYSO scintillating crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Rinaldi, Daniele; Davì, Fabrizio; Paone, Nicola

    2011-10-01

    Scintillating crystals are employed in high energy physics, in medical imaging, diagnostic and security. Two mechanical properties of lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate cerium-doped Lu 2(1- x) Y 2 xSiO 5:Ce with x=0.1 (LYSO) crystals have been measured: the ultimate tensile stress ( σUTS) and the Young elastic modulus ( E). Measurements are made by means of a 4-points loading device and the experimental results account for an elastic-brittle stress-strain relation, which depends heavily on the specimen preparation and the material defects. σUTS along the [0 1 0] tensile direction ranges within 68.14 and 115.61 MPa, which, in the lowest case, is more than twice with respect to those measured for PbWO 4 (PWO), exhibiting a marked difference between the annealed and the not-annealed samples. The mean elastic modulus ( E), along the same direction, is E=1.80×10 11 (±2.15×10 10) N/m 2, with lower dispersion respect to UTS data. This type of analysis and study can be included into quality control procedures of crystals, based on samples taken out of production; such procedures can be established for industrial processing of crystals aimed to the high energy physics (calorimeters) and medical imaging (PET, etc.) applications.

  20. Application of ANFIS for analytical modeling of tensile strength of functionally graded steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the tensile strength of ferritic and austenitic functionally graded steels produced by electroslag remelting has been modeled. To produce functionally graded steels, two slices of plain carbon steel and austenitic stainless steels were spot welded and used as electroslag remelting electrode. Functionally graded steel containing graded layers of ferrite and austenite may be fabricated via diffusion of alloying elements during remelting stage. Vickers microhardness profile of the specimen has been obtained experimentally and modeled with adaptive network-based fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS. To build the model for graded ferritic and austenitic steels, training, testing and validation using respectively 174 and 120 experimental data were conducted. According to the input parameters, in the ANFIS model, the Vickers microhardness of each layer was predicted. A good fit equation which correlates the Vickers microhardness of each layer to its corresponding chemical composition was achieved by the optimized network for both ferritic and austenitic graded steels. Afterwards; the Vickers microhardness of each layer in functionally graded steels was related to the yield stress of the corresponding layer and by assuming Holloman relation for stress-strain curve of each layer, they were acquired. Finally, by applying the rule of mixtures, tensile strength of functionally graded steels configuration was found through a numerical method. The obtained results from the proposed model are in good agreement with those acquired from the experiments.

  1. Application of slip-band visualization technique to tensile analysis of laser-welded aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchiar, -; Yoshida, Sanichiro J.; Widiastuti, Rini; Kusnowo, A.; Takahashi, Kunimitsu; Sato, Shunichi

    1997-03-01

    Recently we have developed a new optical interferometric technique capable of visualizing slip band occurring in a deforming solid-state object. In this work we applied this technique to a tensile analysis of laser-welded aluminum plate samples, and successfully revealed stress concentration that shows strong relationships with the tensile strength and the fracture mechanism. We believe that this method is a new, convenient way to analyze the deformation characteristics of welded objects and evaluate the quality of welding. The analysis has been made for several types of aluminum alloys under various welding conditions, and has shown the following general results. When the penetration is deep, a slip band starts appearing at the fusion zone in an early stage of the elastic region of the strain-stress curve and stays there till the sample fractures at that point. When the penetration is shallow, a slip band appears only after the yield point and moves vigorously over the whole surface of the sample till a late stage of plastic deformation when the slip band stays at the fusion zone where the sample eventually fractures. When the penetration depth is medium, some intermediate situation of the above two extreme cases is observed.

  2. Structure and tensile properties of polypropylene/carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhui; Zuo, Jicheng; Qin, Jie; Li, Chengwu

    2014-09-01

    Polypropylene/carbon nanotubes (PP/CNTs) nancomposites were prepared with a single screw extruder by adding maleic anhydride-grafted poplypropylene (PP-g-MAH) as compatibilizer to polypropylene (PP) with different amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the range of 0.1-0.7 wt.%. Structure and morphology of the prepared samples were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarizing light microscopy (PLM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that PP spherulites decreased in size when CNTs were introduced into the polymer. Mechanical properties of the samples were also studied. Tensile tests showed that with increasing amount of CNTs the strain at break decreased whereas the Young's modulus was improved of 16.41 % to 36.05 % and tensile strength of 36.67 % to 64.70 % compared to pristine PP. The SEM microphotographs showed that majority of the CNTs were dispersed individually and oriented along the shear flow direction.

  3. Effect of heat on tensile properties of thin pure titanium foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of size effects in microforming process may result in nonhomogeneous material characteristics. Heat assisted microforming is an effective approach to reduce the influence of size effects. To improve the heating rate, resistance heating method is introduced to the microforming process. To investigate the size effect of heat on material deformation for thin foils in microforming, uniaxial tensile tests were performed for the foils with different grain sizes at different temperatures by tensile testing system incorporating with resistance heating method. The results show that the reduction of the stress at elevated temperatures compared to room temperature is higher for the foils with larger grain size than that for the foils with smaller grain size. The fracture strain decreases with increasing temperature when the temperature is below 300 °C, and then increases as the temperature increases when the temperature is above 300 °C. In addition, the work hardening behavior of the material is independent of the grain size. As temperature increases, the work hardening increases.

  4. Tensile, Compressive and Thermal Properties of Epoxy / Hollow Glass Beads/ Graphene Ternary Foamed Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, X. F.; Zhao, Y. K.; Zhao, Z. H.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, S. S.; Xiao, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    Hollow glass beads and graphene were used to improve the performances of the epoxy resin. The density, tensile, compressive properties and thermal behaviors of the as-prepared samples were discussed. Experiment results showed that hollow glass beads could effectively reduce the density of the epoxy resin matrix. When the hollow glass beads loading was 30 wt percent, the density of the composites was 0.81 gcm-3. Moreover, graphene could enhance the mechanical performances of the foamed composites. When the graphene loading was 0.75 wt percent, the tensile strength, Young modulus and strain break of the epoxy/hollow glass beads/graphene ternary samples were 85.2 percent, 53.4 percent and 11.0 percent more than the control binary sample, respectively. Moreover, the compressive strength and modulus were 10.8 percent and 68.6 percent more than the control binary sample, respectively. In addition, DSC and TG results showed that graphene could accelerate the curing and improve the thermal stability of the foamed composites. (author)

  5. Effect of long-term aging at 8150C on the tensile properties and microstructural stability of four cobalt- and nickel-base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, J.P.

    1976-08-01

    Two heats of Haynes alloy 25 and one heat each of Haynes alloy 188, Hastelloy N, and Inconel 625 were tensile tested after aging for 11,000 h at 816 0 C. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation were determined 24, 316, 760, and 982 0 C and compared with typical properties for these materials in the solution annealed condition. Toughness values were determined for these materials from their engineering stress-strain curves. The long-term aging treatment degraded ductility and toughness at room temperature but, contrary to behavior expected for overaging, enhanced them over those for the solution annealed condition in tests at 760 0 C. The tensile properties of the aged superalloys were correlated with mode of fracture and the amounts, identity, and morphology of the precipitates. Aging substantially depleted the hardener tungsten from the matrix in the cobalt-base alloys

  6. A method for determining the critical strain for recrystallisation in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, G.A. de; Pagnano, C.A.G.; Gouvea, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    A rapid method of determining the critical strain for recrystallisation is metals is described, the results having been verified in the case of rolled pure titanium sheet. Using experimentally checked hypotheses, the plastic strain in a tensile test piece of varying cross-section could be calculated. After straining, the test piece was annealed isothermically at various temperatures, thus showing the variation of grain size with strain [pt

  7. I-V characteristics of in-plane and out-of-plane strained edge-hydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cartamil-Bueno, S.J.; Rodriguez-Bolivar, S.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of tensile strain on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of hydrogenated-edge armchair graphene nanoribbons are investigated by using DFT theory. The strain is introduced in two different ways related to the two types of systems studied in this work: in-plane strained systems (A)

  8. Comparison of strain fields in truncated and un-truncated quantum dots in stacked InAs/GaAs nanostructures with varying stacking periods

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, H; Yoo, Y H

    2003-01-01

    Strain fields in truncated and un-truncated InAs quantum dots with the same height and base length have been compared numerically when the dots are vertically stacked in a GaAs matrix at various stacking periods. The compressive hydrostatic strain in truncated dots decreases slightly as compared with the un-truncated dots without regard to the stacking period studied. However, the reduction in tensile biaxial strain, compressive radial strain and tensile axial strain was salient in the truncated dot and the reduction increased with decreasing stacking period. From such changes in strain, changes in the band gap and related properties are anticipated.

  9. External-strain-induced semimetallic and metallic phase of chlorographene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Shivam; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the limitations of graphene due to lack of intrinsic band gap, it is generally functionalized with hydrogen or halogen atoms such as fluorine and chlorine. Generally, such functionalization yields a moderate- to high-band-gap material in case of 100% coverage, for example ≈1.5 eV in graphene functionalized with chlorine atoms or chlorographene. In this paper, using ab initio calculations, we report very interesting transformations observed in chlorographene under external strain, driving it to a state with nearly vanishing band gap (under tensile strain) and even converting it to a metal (under compressive strain). We also show the importance of spin-orbit coupling, responsible for the few meV band gap of chlorographene observed under high tensile strain, which would have been a gapless semimetal otherwise.

  10. Orientation and strain modulated electronic structures in puckered arsenene nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Y. Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthorhombic arsenene was recently predicted as an indirect bandgap semiconductor. Here, we demonstrate that nanostructuring arsenene into nanoribbons successfully transform the bandgap to be direct. It is found that direct bandgaps hold for narrow armchair but wide zigzag nanoribbons, which is dominated by the competition between the in-plane and out-of-plane bondings. Moreover, straining the nanoribbons also induces a direct bandgap and simultaneously modulates effectively the transport property. The gap energy is largely enhanced by applying tensile strains to the armchair structures. In the zigzag ones, a tensile strain makes the effective mass of holes much higher while a compressive strain cause it much lower than that of electrons. Our results are crucial to understand and engineer the electronic properties of two dimensional materials beyond the planar ones like graphene.

  11. Strain enhanced lithium adsorption and diffusion on silicene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Luo, Youhua; Yan, Ting; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Meng

    2017-03-01

    The performance of Li-ion batteries relies heavily on the capacity and stability of constituent electrodes. Recently synthesized 2D silicene has demonstrated excellent Li-ion capacity with high charging rates. To explore the external influences for battery performance, in this work, first-principles calculations are employed to investigate the effect of external strain on the adsorption and diffusion of Li on silicene monolayers. It was found that tensile strain could enhance Li binding on silicene. The diffusion barrier is also calculated and the results show that Li diffusion through silicene is facilitated by tensile strain, whereas the strain has a limited effect on the energy barrier of diffusion parallel to the plane of pristine silicene. Our results suggest that silicene could be a promising electrode material for lithium ion batteries.

  12. Quasi-Static Tensile Stress-Strain Curves. 1, 2024-T3510 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    FOR PURL*C RELEASE UNDER DOD DIRECTIVE 5200,20AND NO RESTRICTIONS ARE IMPOSED UPON ITS USE AND DISCLOSURE, DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A APPROVED FOR PUBLIC...Dept of Engineering Sciencc Sciencies and Mechanics ATTN: Dr. U. Lindholm ATTN: Dr. C. A. Sciammarilla Dr. W. Baker Dr. L. Malvern 8500 Culebra Road Dr

  13. A tensile stage for high-stress low-strain fibre studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauw, Brian Richard; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Mortensen, Kell

    2011-01-01

    be observed using in situ small-angle X-ray scattering. For this purpose, a compact in-vacuum stretching device is described here, capable of applying a force of up to 500 N using specially designed fibre clamps. Furthermore, a small radiative heater is placed around the fibre at the measurement position, so...

  14. Double-curved textile reinforced concrete panels with tensile strain-hardening characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.; Schipper, H.R.; Grunewald, S.; Nijsse, R.

    2014-01-01

    The construction of buildings with fi-ee-form surfaces can be accompanied with relatively high costs. An innovative method to produce free-form surfaces in concrete is the application of double-curved precast panels produced with a flexible re-usable mould technique. Traditional placing of

  15. Experimental study on concrete under dynamic tensile loading | Yan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the test results it was found that with increase in strain rate the strength, initial elastic modulus and strain at peak stress of concrete all increase definitely but the fundamental shape of stress-strain response of specimen to higher strain rate is similar to that observed in static test. From the results of the study, two ...

  16. The Interactions of tensile fractures with the surrounding lithology and other tensile fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Tensile (mode 1) fractures such as joints and veins are ubiquitous in the upper crust and are potential pathways for fluid migration. Fractures often cross cut one another and terminate at other fractures. This is dependent on whether the older fracture was open or shut when the younger fracture propagated. There is a paucity of data concerning the geometric properties of the fracture intersections (branchlines), including their orientations, length, continuity and connectivity. This poster aims to investigate how natural hydraulic fractures propagated and interacted along branchlines, through study of well-preserved, three-dimensional exposures of natural hydraulic fracture surfaces that cut the organic rich Bituminous Shale (Mulgrave Shale Member of the Lower Jurassic Whitby Mudstone Formation) at Saltwick Nab, Whitby, the Yorkshire coast, UK. A specific objective is to investigate the possible influence of branchlines on key structures associated with fracture surfaces, such as fracture tip lines, radial striations and arrest lines, as well as petrographic differences between fractured and non-fractured rocks. These relationships will be investigated by quantifying: a) the spacings between neighbouring arrest lines, measured in directions parallel and perpendicular to the sedimentary layering, and b) the scaling relationships between arrest lines observed on large and smaller fracture surfaces. Combining these findings with previous work it will be possible to make models for how natural hydraulic fractures propagate and terminate giving a greater understanding of how natural hydraulic fractures link together within an exhumed shale analogue, such as those seen at Saltwick Nab. It may also provide an insight in to the growth of anthropogenic hydraulic fractures that are induced during stimulation of shale gas and oil reservoirs.

  17. High temperature tensile properties and deep drawing of fully green composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research and development of materials using biomass sources are much expected to construct a sustainable society. The so-called green composite consisting of natural fibers and biodegradable resin, is one of the most promising materials in developing biomass products. In this study, especially, we focus on the tensile deformation behavior of the green composites reinforced with ramie woven fabrics at high temperature. The results show that the fracture strain at high temperatures increases larger than that of room temperature, and initial deformation resistance of the composites seen at room temperature does not appear at high temperatures. Thus, several conditions to cause more deformability of the green composites were found. Finally, in order to utilize such deformability, Lankford-values of the green composites were clarified, and deep drawing was carried out for sheet materials made of the green composites.

  18. Transition in Deformation Mechanism of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy during High-Temperature Tensile Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Noda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys can be used for reducing the weight of various structural products, because of their high specific strength. They have attracted considerable attention as materials with a reduced environmental load, since they help to save both resources and energy. In order to use Mg alloys for manufacturing vehicles, it is important to investigate the deformation mechanism and transition point for optimizing the material and vehicle design. In this study, we investigated the transition of the deformation mechanism during the high-temperature uniaxial tensile deformation of the AZ31 Mg alloy. At a test temperature of 523 K and an initial strain rate of 3×10−3 s-1, the AZ31 Mg alloy (mean grain size: ~5 μm exhibited stable deformation behavior and the deformation mechanism changed to one dominated by grain boundary sliding.

  19. The tensile behavior of Ti36Ni49Hf15 high temperature shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Q.; Zheng, Y.F.; Cai, W.; Zhao, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, ternary Ti-Ni-Hf alloys have attracted great interest in the field of high temperature shape memory materials research and development. Extensive studies have been made on its manufacture process, constitutional phases, phase transformation behavior, the structure, substructure and interface structure of martensite and the precipitation behavior during ageing. Yet up to date there is no report about the fundamental mechanical properties of Ti-Ni-Hf alloys, such as the stress-strain data, the variation laws of the yield strength and elongation with the temperature. In the present study, tensile tests at various temperatures are employed to investigate the mechanical behavior of Ti-Ni-Hf alloy with different matrix structures, from full martensite to full parent phase structure, with the corresponding deformation mechanism discussed

  20. Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

  1. Line profile analyses of a martensitic steel during continuous and stepwise tensile deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, T.; Harjo, S.; Gong, W.; Aizawa, K.

    2016-09-01

    Dislocation characteristics in an as-quenched 22SiMn2TiB martensitic steel during tensile deformation were monitored by in-situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction combined with the Convolutional Multiple Whole Profile fitting analysis. Two loading conditions, continuous and stepwise followed by unloading, were adopted in the experiments. The diffraction patterns both in the loading (axial) and the transversal directions were measured simultaneously. The dislocation densities obtained from the experiments behaved differently in two loading conditions and in two measured directions, respectively. The different behaviour was mainly due to the increase of intergranular strains with the increase of deformation, and the profiles measured in the axial direction in the loading condition of stepwise followed by unloading gave most reliable dislocation characteristics among the profiles measured in other conditions.

  2. Constitutive modeling of the dynamic-tensile-extrusion test of PTFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Brown, E. N.; Trujillo, C. P.; Gray, G. T.

    2017-01-01

    Use of polymers in defense, aerospace and industrial applications under extreme loading conditions makes prediction of the behavior of these materials very important. Crucial to this is knowledge of the physical damage response in association with phase transformations during loading and the ability to predict this via multi-phase simulation accounting for thermodynamical non-equilibrium and strain rate sensitivity. The current work analyzes Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) experiments on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). In particular, the phase transition during loading and subsequent tension are analyzed using a two-phase rate sensitive material model implemented in the CTH hydrocode. The calculations are compared with experimental high-speed photography. Deformation patterns and their link with changing loading modes are analyzed numerically and correlated to the test observations. It is concluded that the phase transformation is not as critical to the response of PTFE under Dyn-Ten-Ext loading as it is during the Taylor rod impact testing.

  3. Constitutive modeling of void-growth-based tensile ductile failures with stress triaxiality effects

    KAUST Repository

    Mora Cordova, Angel

    2014-07-01

    In most metals and alloys, the evolution of voids has been generally recognized as the basic failure mechanism. Furthermore, stress triaxiality has been found to influence void growth dramatically. Besides strain intensity, it is understood to be the most important factor that controls the initiation of ductile fracture. We include sensitivity of stress triaxiality in a variational porous plasticity model, which was originally derived from hydrostatic expansion. Under loading conditions rather than hydrostatic deformation, we allow the critical pressure for voids to be exceeded so that the growth due to plasticity becomes dependent on the stress triaxiality. The limitations of the spherical void growth assumption are investigated. Our improved constitutive model is validated through good agreements with experimental data. Its capacity for reproducing realistic failure patterns is also indicated by a numerical simulation of a compact tensile (CT) test. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Evaluation of the plastic yield locus for embossed sheet using biaxial tensile tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Oh, Seok-Hwan; Do, Van-Cuong; Lee, Bong-Hyun

    2016-11-01

    3D-structured (embossed) aluminium sheets have been used as heat insulation materials in automotive exhaust parts because the embossments on the sheets increase the surface area and reinforce the stiffness of exhaust components. Unlike the press-forming process for flat (non-embossed) sheets, however, that for embossed aluminium sheets is constrained by many restrictions given the distinct mechanical properties and geometric 3D shape of the latter. In designing sheet-stamping tools, manufacturers have recently used CAE technologies based on finite element analysis. Guaranteeing the effectiveness of CAE technologies necessitates information about the plastic yield criterion, which is determined primarily by performing a biaxial tensile test on cruciform-shaped specimens. We measured the yield locus of an embossed aluminium 3004-P sheet by using the camera vision method instead of strain gauge measurement because of the difficulty in attaching a strain gauge to the central region of the aluminium body. The measured yield locus of the studied sheet shows that its yield stress in equi-biaxial stress is smaller than the flat sheet yield locus measured by the strain gauge method. The shape of the yield locus of the embossed aluminium sheet also adequately corresponds with Logan-Hosford anisotropic yield function.

  5. Experimental investigation of quasi-static and intermediate strain rate behaviour of polypropylene glass fibre (PPGF) woven composite

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Antoine; Othman, Ramzi; Rozycki, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This article covers an in plane experimental characterisation of a polypropylene glass fibre reinforced woven composite. Tensile, shear and compression loadings were carried out with a standard tensile rig and a crossbow/Hopkinson pressure bar rig. The specimen strain was measured by digital image correlation technique. It is concluded that the composite stiffness and strength are highly sensitive to strain rate. Static and dynamic multicycle tests were also undertaken...

  6. Void nucleation in spheroidized steels during tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.R. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of various mechanical and material parameters on void formation at cementite particles in axisymmetric tensile specimens of spheroidized plain carbon steels. Desired microstructures for each of three steel types were obtained. Observations of void morphology with respect to various microstructural features were made using optical and scanning electron microscopy

  7. Vacuum fused deposition modelling system to improve tensile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a possible solution to this problem by incorporating vacuum technology in FDM system to improve tensile strength of 3D printed specimens. In this study, a desktop FDM machine was placed and operated inside a low pressure vacuum chamber. The results obtained show an improvement of 12.83 % of ...

  8. Mechanical properties of concrete to cyclic uniaxial tensile loading ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mechanical properties of concrete under cyclic tensile loading using square waveform, sine waveform and ramp waveform are studied. ... College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Hobai University, Nanjing 210098, China; College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing ...

  9. Axial dynamic tensile strength of concrete under static lateral compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.

    2006-01-01

    The rate effect on concrete tensile strength can be modeled by the description of crack extension in a fictitious fracture plane [1,2].The plane represents the initial, internal damage and the geometry of the final fracture plane. In the paper, the same approach is applied to model the failure

  10. Regional Variation in the Microscopy and Tensile Strength of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The linea alba (LA), a midline tendinous structure formed by the interlocking anterior abdominal wall aponeurotic fibers, acts as a passive tensile band that prevents sagging of the lower abdomen. The microstructure and the strength of these fibres would thus be expected to reflect on the forces that act on the linea alba.

  11. Split tensile strength of soilcrete blocks | Okere | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the ever increasing problems associated with dredging of rivers to obtain river sand, reduced dependence on river sand should be encouraged by using alternative materials in block production. This work deals with the production of soilcrete blocks using readily available and affordable laterite. Split tensile strength of ...

  12. Concrete under Impact Loading, Tensile Strength and Bond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Uniaxial impact tensile tests on plain concrete were carried out with the aid of Split Hopkinson Bar equipment with stress rates of up to 60000 N/mm2. s. Various concrete mixes were investigated under. dry and wet conditions. All the concretes showed an increase in strength with increasing stress

  13. An investigation of microstructure, hardness, tensile behaviour of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this technical paper, the microstructure, hardness, tensile deformation and final fracture behaviour of an emerging titanium alloy for performance-critical applications are presented and discussed. Both longitudinal and transverse test specimens were prepared from the as-provided sheet stock of the alloy and deformed in ...

  14. Hybrid filler composition optimization for tensile strength of jute fibre ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    one and it enjoys the right potential for usage in compos- ites due to its high aspect ratio, toughness, tensile ... modulus, and also reduce costs of polymer composite [5–8]. Polymer composites have shown an improved ... long profile of fibre-reinforced plastic (FRP) composites, but there is very limited work undertaken to ...

  15. Compressive and Tensile Strength of Expanded Polystyrene Beads Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Subhan, Tengku Fitriani L

    2005-01-01

    Penelitian ini betujuan untuk mempelajari property dari beton ringan yang mengandung expanded polystyrene beads, yaitu kuat tekan (compressive strength) dan kuat tarik (tensile strength). Property tersebut kemudian dibandingkan dengan beton normal (beton tanpa expanded polystyrene beads) sebagai campuran pengontrol. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa jumlah polystyrene beads yang dimasukkan sebagai campuran beton mempengaruhi property beton; yaitu dapat menurunkan kuat tekan beton. Tetapi...

  16. Void nucleation in spheroidized steels during tensile deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Jr, J R

    1980-04-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of various mechanical and material parameters on void formation at cementite particles in axisymmetric tensile specimens of spheroidized plain carbon steels. Desired microstructures for each of three steel types were obtained. Observations of void morphology with respect to various microstructural features were made using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  17. Tensile properties of segmented block copolymers with monodisperse hard segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, G.J.E.; Feijen, Jan; Gaymans, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    The tensile properties of segmented block copolymers with mono-disperse hard segments were studied with respect to the hard segment content (16–44 wt.%) and the temperature (20–110 °C). The copolymers were comprised of poly(tetramethylene oxide) segments with the molecular weights of 650–2,900 Da

  18. Numerical and experimental analysis on tensile properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Shadrach Jeyasekaran

    2014-11-17

    Nov 17, 2014 ... Banana fiber; glass fiber; unidirectional; tensile; ANSYS; SEM. 1. Introduction. Green environment for future motivated researchers to seek for an eco-friendly alternative. The interest in exploring the other available materials from agro industries has grown in recent years. The manufacturing and utilization of.

  19. Influence of deformation rate on tensile behaviour in 5 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelly, M.

    1980-01-01

    Development of elastic limit, maximum stress, distributed elongation and elongation at break in 5 types of steel for tensile deformation rates between 10 -4 and 10 3 s -1 . Propagation and homogenisation of the deformations along the specimen right at the start of the test in the case of high-speed tests [fr

  20. Statistical behavior of the tensile property of heated cotton fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    The temperature dependence of the tensile property of single cotton fiber was studied in the range of 160-300°C using Favimat test, and its statistical behavior was interpreted in terms of structural changes. The tenacity of control cotton fiber was well described by the single Weibull distribution,...

  1. Shear instabilities in perfect bcc crystals during simulated tensile tests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, M.; Šesták, P.; Pokluda, J.; Šob, Mojmír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2013), 014117/1-014117/4 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/0311 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : instabilities * tensile test * bcc metals * ab initio calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2013

  2. Tensile Strength of Finger Joints at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter C.; Olesen, Frits Bolonius

    A series of test s aimed a t establishing the effect of temperature upon the tensile strength parallel-to-grain of finger jointed laminae for glulam has been conducted in the Fire Research Laboratory at Aalborg University Centre. The objective of this report is to present the background...

  3. Evaluation of microtensile and tensile bond strength tests ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare two different bond strength test methods (tensile and microtensile) in investing the influence of erbium, chromium: yttrium‑scandium‑gallium‑garnet (Er, Cr: YSGG) laser pulse frequency on resin‑enamel bonding. Materials and Methods: One‑hundred and twenty‑five ...

  4. Dynamic Tensile Experimental Techniques for Geomaterials: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, W.; Song, B.; Williams, B.; Martin, B.; Sparks, P.; Nie, X.

    2018-01-01

    This review article is dedicated to the Dynamic Behavior of Materials Technical Division for celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Society for Experimental Mechanics (SEM). Understanding dynamic behavior of geomaterials is critical for analyzing and solving engineering problems of various applications related to underground explosions, seismic, airblast, and penetration events. Determining the dynamic tensile response of geomaterials has been a great challenge in experiments due to the nature of relatively low tensile strength and high brittleness. Various experimental approaches have been made in the past century, especially in the most recent half century, to understand the dynamic behavior of geomaterials in tension. In this review paper, we summarized the dynamic tensile experimental techniques for geomaterials that have been developed. The major dynamic tensile experimental techniques include dynamic direct tension, dynamic split tension, and spall tension. All three of the experimental techniques are based on Hopkinson or split Hopkinson (also known as Kolsky) bar techniques and principles. Uniqueness and limitations for each experimental technique are also discussed.

  5. Improvement in tensile properties of PVC–montmorillonite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we present the results exhibiting an improvement in the tensile properties of polyvinyl chlo- ride (PVC)–montmorillonite ... obtained for both unstretched and stretched films in order to determine the improvement in various properties. The controlled uniaxial .... the stretching process. Thus, the brittleness of films ...

  6. Analog Experiments on Tensile Strength of Dusty and Cometary Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiolik, Grzegorz; de Beule, Caroline; Wurm, Gerhard

    2017-11-01

    The tensile strength of small dusty bodies in the solar system is determined by the interaction between the composing grains. In the transition regime between small and sticky dust (μm) and non cohesive large grains (mm), particles still stick to each other but are easily separated. In laboratory experiments we find that thermal creep gas flow at low ambient pressure generates an overpressure sufficient to overcome the tensile strength. For the first time it allows a direct measurement of the tensile strength of individual, very small (sub)-mm aggregates which consist of only tens of grains in the (sub)-mm size range. We traced the disintegration of aggregates by optical imaging in ground based as well as microgravity experiments and present first results for basalt, palagonite and vitreous carbon samples with up to a few hundred Pa. These measurements show that low tensile strength can be the result of building loose aggregates with compact (sub)-mm units. This is in favour of a combined cometary formation scenario by aggregation to compact aggreates and gravitational instability of these units.

  7. Tensile Strength of GFRP Reinforcing Bars with Hollow Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP has been proposed to replace steel as a reinforcing bar (rebar due to its high tensile strength and noncorrosive material properties. One obstacle in using FRP rebars is high price. Generally FRP is more expensive than conventional steel rebar. There are mainly two ways to reduce the cost. For example, one is making the price of each composition cost of FRP rebar (e.g., fibers, resin, etc. lower than steel rebar. Another is making an optimized design for cross section and reducing the material cost. The former approach is not easy because the steel price is very low in comparison with component materials of FRP. For the latter approach, the cost could be cut down by reducing the material cost. Therefore, an idea of making hollow section over the cross section of FRP rebar was proposed in this study by optimizing the cross section design with acceptable tensile performance in comparison with steel rebar. In this study, glass reinforced polymer (GFRP rebars with hollow section and 19 mm of outer diameter were manufactured and tested to evaluate the tensile performance in accordance with the hollowness ratio. From the test results, it was observed that the tensile strength decreased almost linearly with increase of hollowness ratio and the elastic modulus decreased nonlinearly.

  8. Metallurgical factors of pressure vessel steel tensile strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, P.; Buisine, D.; Dunand-Roux, L.

    1997-01-01

    This article gives the main microstructural factors (grain, quenched structure) and the embrittlement phenomena to take into account in order to improve the tensile strength. Moreover, the effect of chemical or structural discontinuities that are the segregated zones on resilience is quantified. The advances are described and their contribution to the increasing safety margins is shown. (O.M.)

  9. Evaluation of tensile strength and fracture behavior of friction welded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In central power stations, the parts of the boiler that subjected to lower temperatures are made of low alloy ... monitored with the help of infrared thermometer and the axial pressure was set by the load cell attachment ... the experimentation that as we go on increasing the axial pressure the tensile strength goes on increasing ...

  10. Swelling Characteristics and Tensile Properties of Natural Fiber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Swelling characteristics of samples of this composite material were determined by monitoring- forth nightly, changes in weight of the samples within the test period and tensile test was conducted on the samples after 16 weeks using Hounsfeild (Monsanto) tensometer. The results show that the solvents reduced the strengths ...

  11. Tensile capacity of loop connections grouted with concrete or mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Olesen, John Forbes

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study of grout failure in symmetric U-bar loop connections loaded in tension, with focus on the performance of two grouting materials – concrete and mortar. The study contains an experimental investigation as well as a rigid-plastic modelling of the tensile capacity. The tes...

  12. Evaluation of tensile strength and fracture behavior of friction welded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study an attempt was made to join austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304) with low alloy steel (AISI 1021) at five different rotational speeds ranging from 800 to 1600 rpm and at as many different axial pressures ranging from 75 MPa to 135 MPa and then determining the strength of the joint by means of tensile ...

  13. Tensile and Hardness Property Evaluation of Kaolin- Sisal Fibre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, the tensile and hardness properties of Kaolin- sisal fibre- epoxy composite were evaluated using standard methods. Epoxy type 3354A with its hardener was mixed in the ratio 2:1. Calcined kaolin particle with average size of 35µm and 3-4mm sisal fibre were added to the epoxy matrix during the composite ...

  14. Tunnel Magnetoresistance Sensors with Magnetostrictive Electrodes: Strain Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meier, Tobias; Quandt, Eckhard; Hölscher, Hendrik; Reiss, Günter; Meyners, Dirk

    2016-11-11

    Magnetostrictive tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors pose a bright perspective in micro- and nano-scale strain sensing technology. The behavior of TMR sensors under mechanical stress as well as their sensitivity to the applied stress depends on the magnetization configuration of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ)s with respect to the stress axis. Here, we propose a configuration resulting in an inverse effect on the tunnel resistance by tensile and compressive stresses. Numerical simulations, based on a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth (SW) model, are performed in order to understand the magnetization reversal of the sense layer and to find out the optimum bias magnetic field required for high strain sensitivity. At a bias field of -3.2 kA/m under a 0.2 × 10 - 3 strain, gauge factors of 2294 and -311 are calculated under tensile and compressive stresses, respectively. Modeling results are investigated experimentally on a round junction with a diameter of 30 ± 0.2 μ m using a four-point bending apparatus. The measured field and strain loops exhibit nearly the same trends as the calculated ones. Also, the gauge factors are in the same range. The junction exhibits gauge factors of 2150 ± 30 and -260 for tensile and compressive stresses, respectively, under a -3.2 kA/m bias magnetic field. The agreement of the experimental and modeling results approves the proposed configuration for high sensitivity and ability to detect both tensile and compressive stresses by a single TMR sensor.

  15. Microstructure and elevated-temperature tensile properties of differential pressure sand cast Mg-4Y-3Nd-0.5Zr alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-hui Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures of an Mg-4Y-3Nd-0.5Zr alloy by differential pressure casting were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and its tensile deformation behavior was measured using a Gleeble1500D themo-simulation machine in the temperature range of 200 to 400 °C at initial strain rates of 5×10-4 to 10-1 s-1. Results show that the as-cast microstructure consists of primary α-Mg phase and bone-shaped Mg5RE eutectic phase distributed along the grain boundary. The eutectic phase is dissolved into the matrix after solution treatment and subsequently precipitates during peak aging. Tensile deformation tests show that the strain rate has little effect on stress under 300 °C. Tensile stress decreases with an increase in temperature and the higher strain rate leads to an increase in stress above 300 °C. The fracture mechanism exhibits a mixed quasi-cleavage fracture at 200 °C, while the fracture above 300 °C is a ductile fracture. The dimples are melted at 400 °C with the lowest strain rate of 10-4 s-1.

  16. Improved Tensile Adhesion Specimens for High Strength Epoxy Systems in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, M. Reed; McLennan, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    An improved tensile adhesion button has been designed and tested that results in higher measured tensile adhesion strength while providing increased capability for testing high strength epoxy adhesive systems. The best attributes of two well-established tensile button designs were combined and refined into an optimized tensile button. The most significant design change to the tensile button was to improve alignment of the bonded tensile button specimens during tensile testing by changing the interface between the tensile button and the tensile test machine. The established or old button design uses a test fixture that pulls from a grooved annulus or anvil head while the new button design pulls from a threaded hole in the centerline of the button. Finite element (FE) analysis showed that asymmetric loading of the established anvil head tensile button significantly increases the stress concentration in the adhesive, causing failure at lower tensile test loads. The new tensile button was designed to eliminate asymmetric loading and eliminate misalignment sensitivity. Enhanced alignment resulted in improved tensile adhesion strength measurement up to 13.8 MPa (2000psi) over the established button design. Another design change increased the capability of the button by increasing the threaded hole diameter allowing it to test high strength epoxy systems up to 85 MPa(less than 12,000 psi). The improved tensile button can be used in button- to-button or button-to-panel configurations.

  17. Knitted Strain Sensors: Impact of Design Parameters on Sensing Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Atalay, Ozgur; Kennon, William Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the sensing properties exhibited by textile-based knitted strain sensors. Knitted sensors were manufactured using flat-bed knitting technology, and electro-mechanical tests were subsequently performed on the specimens using a tensile testing machine to apply strain whilst the sensor was incorporated into a Wheatstone bridge arrangement to allow electrical monitoring. The sensing fabrics were manufactured from silver-plated nylon and elastomeric yarns. The compon...

  18. Probing strain in bent semiconductor nanowires with Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianing; Conache, Gabriela; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Gray, Struan M; Borgström, Magnus T; Xu, Hongxing; Xu, H Q; Samuelson, Lars; Håkanson, Ulf

    2010-04-14

    We present a noninvasive optical method to determine the local strain in individual semiconductor nanowires. InP nanowires were intentionally bent with an atomic force microscope and variations in the optical phonon frequency along the wires were mapped using Raman spectroscopy. Sections of the nanowires with a high curvature showed significantly broadened phonon lines. These observations together with deformation potential theory show that compressive and tensile strain inside the nanowires is the physical origin of the observed phonon energy variations.

  19. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Low Cycle Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Interaction on Surface Morphology and Tensile Properties of 316L(N) Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, K.; Shankar, Vani; Sandhya, R.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Laha, Kinkar

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, the deformation and damage evolution in 316L(N) stainless steel during low cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep-fatigue interaction (CFI) loadings have been compared by evaluating the residual tensile properties. Towards this, LCF and CFI experiments were carried out at constant strain amplitude of ±0.6 pct, strain rate of 3 × 10-3 s-1 and temperature of 873 K (600 °C). During CFI tests, 30 minutes hold period was introduced at peak tensile strain. Experiments were interrupted up to various levels of fatigue life viz. 5, 10, 30, 50, and 60 pct of the total fatigue life ( N f) under both LCF and CFI conditions. The specimens subjected to interrupted fatigue loadings were subsequently monotonically strained at the same strain rate and temperature up to fracture. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and profilometry were conducted on the untested and tested samples to elucidate the damage evolution during the fatigue cycling under both LCF and CFI conditions. The yield strength (YS) increased sharply with the progress of fatigue damage and attained saturation within 10 pct of N f under LCF condition. On the contrary, under CFI loading condition, the YS continuously increased up to 50 pct of N f, with a sharp increase of YS up to 5 pct of N f followed by a more gradual increase up to 50 pct of N f. The difference in the evolution of remnant tensile properties was correlated with the synergistic effects of the underlying deformation and damage processes such as cyclic hardening/softening, oxidation, and creep. The evolution of tensile properties with prior fatigue damage has been correlated with the change in surface roughness and other surface features estimated by surface replica technique and fractography.

  20. Strain Rate Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Transition of Graphite Platelet Reinforced Vinyl Ester Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmananda Pramanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, the fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces of vinyl ester based nanocomposites were estimated applying classical method on 3D digital microscopic images. The fracture energy and fracture toughness were obtained from fractal dimensions. A noteworthy observation, the strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of vinyl ester based nanocomposites, is reinvestigated in the current study. The candidate materials of xGnP (exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets reinforced and with additional CTBN (Carboxyl Terminated Butadiene Nitrile toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites that are subjected to both quasi-static and high strain rate indirect tensile load using the traditional Brazilian test method. High-strain rate indirect tensile testing is performed with a modified Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB. Pristine vinyl ester shows ductile deformation under quasi-static loading and brittle failure when subjected to high-strain rate loading. This observation reconfirms the previous research findings on strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of this material system. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Contribution of nanoreinforcement to the tensile properties is reported in this paper.

  1. Static tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and synchrotron radiation white x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Noriyuki; Kawahata, Taiji; Ishimaru, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Akihiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shobu, Takahisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel (S32101) from the viewpoints of plastic deformability among phases or grains, we performed static tensile tests, in situ neutron diffraction, and white x-ray diffraction experiments at room temperature. In the static tensile tests, the S32101 steel displayed a larger uniform elongation and a better tensile strength-uniform elongation balance than a commercial SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel. A larger uniform elongation of S32101 is associated with the macroscopic work hardening behavior that a work hardening rate higher than the flow stress can maintain up until high true strains. From the experimental results of synchrotron radiation white x-ray diffraction experiments, the hard phase of S32101 was changed from the ferrite (α) phase to austenite (γ) one during tensile deformation. This led to a larger stress partitioning between the phases at the latter stage of deformation. From the experimental results of in situ neutron diffraction, it was found that the stress partitioning of the γ phase in the S32101 was the largest among the present results. Therefore, the larger work hardening rate of S32101 can be explained by the large stress partitioning of the γ phase, that between γ and α phases and γ volume fraction. (author)

  2. The Effect of Short Duration Electric Current on the Quasi-Static Tensile Behavior of Magnesium AZ31 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Thien Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a single pulse of electric current with short duration on the quasi-static tensile behavior of a magnesium AZ31 alloy is experimentally investigated. A single pulse of electric current with duration less than 1 second is applied to the specimen, while the specimen is being deformed in the plastic region under quasi-static tensile loads. After a nearly instant decrease of flow stress at the pulse of electric current, the flow stress shows strain hardening until the failure of the specimen. The experimental result shows that the strain-hardening parameters (the strength coefficient and the strain-hardening exponent of the hardening curve after the electric current strongly depend on the applied electric energy density (electric energy per unit volume. Empirical expressions are suggested to describe the hardening behavior after the pulse as a function of the electric energy density and are compared with the empirical expressions suggested for advanced high-strength steels.

  3. Strain engineering the work function in monolayer metal dichalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A; Simbeck, Adam J; Nayak, Saroj K

    2015-01-01

    We use first-principles density functional theory to investigate the effect of both tensile and compressive strain on the work functions of various metal dichalcogenide monolayers. We find that for all six species considered, including MoS 2 , WS 2 , SnS 2 , VS 2 , MoSe 2 and MoTe 2 , that compressive strain of up to 10% decreases the work function continuously by as much as 1.0 eV. Large enough tensile strain is also found to decrease the work function, although in some cases we observe an increase in the work function for intermediate values of tensile strain. This work function modulation is attributed to a weakening of the chalcogenide-metal bonds and an increase in total energy of each system as a function of strain. Values of strain which bring the metal atoms closer together lead to an increase in electrostatic potential energy, which in turn results in an increase in the vacuum potential level. The net effect on the work function can be explained in terms of the balance between the increases in the vacuum potential levels and Fermi energy. (paper)

  4. Ductility of aluminium alloy AA7075 at high strain rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Magd, E.; Brodmann, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Mater. Sci.

    2000-09-01

    Under dynamic loading the stabilising effect of increased strain rate sensitivity of the material restrains neck formation in tension tests and leads to an increase in ductility. On the other hand the adiabatic character of the deformation process reduces the flow stress and promotes instability, localisation and adiabatic shear band initiation. Furthermore, the notch sensitivity of the material increases with increasing strain rate. Dynamic and quasi-static tension and compression tests were carried out on the age hardenable aluminium wrought alloy AA7075. There, dispers distributed precipitations are often the starting point for ductile fracture caused by impact due to the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids and micro-cracks in case of tension. Neck formation under tensile loading and instabilities like shear bands in case of compression are discussed on the basis of the theory of imperfection under consideration of the increased strain rate sensitivity of the material and the adiabatic character of the deformation process at high strain rates. In case of tensile loading, tests with various notched geometries allowed the study of the influence of degree of multiaxiality. Through combination of experiment and simulation, the influence of strain rate on the local fracture strain could be determined for tensile and compression loading. (orig.)

  5. Stress and strain effects on the electronic structure and optical properties of ScN monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamleh, Shirin; Rezaei, Ghasem; Jalilian, Jaafar

    2018-02-01

    Based on the density functional theory, electronic and optical properties of a monolayer scandium nitride structure have been studied under different strain conditions. Our results indicate that both biaxial compressive and tensile strain effects lead to change the band gap of this structure with different rates. Also, optical absorption spectrum peaks experience an obvious red and blue shifts with the exerting of tensile and compressive strains, respectively. Our results express that ScN monolayer can be the promising candidate for the future nano-base electrical and optical devices.

  6. Numerical method for a 2D drift diffusion model arising in strained n ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports the calculation of electron transport in metal oxide semiconductor field effects transistors (MOSFETs) with biaxially tensile strained silicon channel. The calculation is formulated based on two-dimensional drift diffusion model (DDM) including strain effects. The carrier mobility dependence on the lateral and ...

  7. The effects of different possible modes of uniaxial strain on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Among all the strain types considered in this study, uniaxial tensile strain applied along the zig-zag direction is found to be the most efficacious, ... Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Phase 10, Sector 64, Mohali 160 062, India; National Institute of Technology, Ravangla Campus, Barfung Block, ...

  8. Elasticity at large deformations and high strain rates in injection molded polypropylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.T.S.; Gaymans, R.J.; van Dijk, D.J.; Huetink, Han

    2003-01-01

    The deformation behavior of isotactic polypropylene (PP) as a function of strain rate was investigated at 50°C in uniaxial tension. Injection molded dogbone specimens were tested at high strain rates, E = lo-' - 1@ s-l, and the local deformation in the neck was studied using fast tensile videometry.

  9. Effect of strain field on displacement cascade in tungsten studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao, N., E-mail: ning.gao@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Z.G., E-mail: zhgwang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gao, X. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); He, W.H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cui, M.H.; Pang, L.L.; Zhu, Y.B. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Using atomistic methods, the coupling effect of strain field and displacement cascade in body-centered cubic (BCC) tungsten is directly simulated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different temperatures. The values of the hydrostatic and uniaxial (parallel or perpendicular to primary knock-on atom (PKA) direction) strains are from −2% to 2% and the temperature is from 100 to 1000 K. Because of the annealing effect, the influence of strain on radiation damage at low temperature has been proved to be more significant than that at high temperature. When the cascade proceeds under the hydrostatic strain, the Frenkel Pair (FP) production, the fraction of defect in cluster and the average size of the defect cluster, all increase at tensile state and decrease at compressive state. When the cascade is under uniaxial strain, the effect of strain parallel to PKA direction is less than the effect of hydrostatic strain, while the effect of strain perpendicular to PKA direction can be negligible. Under the uniaxial strain along 〈1 1 1〉 direction, the SIA and SIA cluster is observed to orientate along the strain direction at tensile state and the uniaxial compressive strain with direction perpendicular to 〈1 1 1〉 has led to the similar preferred nucleation. All these results indicate that under irradiation, the tensile state should be avoided for materials used in nuclear power plants.

  10. Effect of Controlled Cooling on Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Low C Nb-Ti-Containing HSLA Steel for Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-mechanical control processing (TMCP of low carbon (C Nb-Ti-containing HSLA steel with different cooling rates from 5 to 20 °C/s was simulated using a Gleeble 3500 system. The samples’ microstructure was characterized and the tensile properties measured. The results show that a microstructure mainly consisting of quasi-polygonal ferrite (QPF, granular bainitic ferrite (GBF, and martensite/austenite (M/A constituent formed in each sample. Furthermore, the accelerated cooling led to a significant grain refinement of the QPF and GBF, and an increase in the density of dislocations, as well as suppressed the precipitation of nanoscale particles; however, the overall yield strength (YS still increased obviously. The accelerated cooling also brought about a decrease in amount of M/A constituent acting as a mixed hard phase, which weakened the overall strain-hardening capacity of the QPF + GBF + M/A multiphase steel and simultaneously elevated yield-to-tensile strength ratio (YR. In addition, the mechanisms in dominating the influence of controlled cooling on the final microstructure and tensile properties were discussed.

  11. Transverse Tensile Properties of 3 Dimension-4 Directional Braided Cf/SiC Composite Based on Double-Scale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xuming; Sun, Zhigang; Song, Yingdong

    2017-11-01

    In this thesis, a double-scale model for 3 Dimension-4 directional(3D-4d) braided C/SiC composites(CMCs) has been proposed to investigate mechanical properties of it. The double-scale model involves micro-scale which takes fiber/matrix/porosity in fibers tows into consideration and the unit cell scale which considers the 3D-4d braiding structure. Basing on the Micro-optical photographs of composite, we can build a parameterized finite element model that reflects structure of 3D-4d braided composites. The mechanical properties of fiber tows in transverse direction are studied by combining the crack band theory for matrix cracking and cohesive zone model for interface debonding. Transverse tensile process of 3D-4d CMCs can be simulated by introducing mechanical properties of fiber tows into finite element of 3D-4d braided CMCs. Quasi-static tensile tests of 3D-4d braided CMCs have been performed with PWS-100 test system. The predicted tensile stress-strain curve by the double scale model finds good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. A Study of Influencing Factors on the Tensile Response of a Titanium Matrix Composite With Weak Interfacial Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    The generalized method of cells micromechanics model is utilized to analyze the tensile stress-strain response of a representative titanium matrix composite with weak interfacial bonding. The fiber/matrix interface is modeled through application of a displacement discontinuity between the fiber and matrix once a critical debonding stress has been exceeded. Unidirectional composites with loading parallel and perpendicular to the fibers are examined, as well as a cross-ply laminate. For each of the laminates studied, analytically obtained results are compared to experimental data. The application of residual stresses through a cool-down process was found to have a significant effect on the tensile response. For the unidirectional laminate with loading applied perpendicular to the fibers, fiber packing and fiber shape were shown to have a significant effect on the predicted tensile response. Furthermore, the interface was characterized through the use of semi-emperical parameters including an interfacial compliance and a "debond stress;" defined as the stress level across the interface which activates fiber/matrix debonding. The results in this paper demonstrate that if architectural factors are correctly accounted for and the interface is appropriately characterized, the macro-level composite behavior can be correctly predicted without modifying any of the fiber or matrix constituent properties.

  13. A stretchable strain sensor based on a metal nanoparticle thin film for human motion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehwan; Kim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Jinjae; Yang, Daejong; Park, Byong Chon; Ryu, Seunghwa; Park, Inkyu

    2014-09-01

    Wearable strain sensors for human motion detection are being highlighted in various fields such as medical, entertainment and sports industry. In this paper, we propose a new type of stretchable strain sensor that can detect both tensile and compressive strains and can be fabricated by a very simple process. A silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) thin film patterned on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp by a single-step direct transfer process is used as the strain sensing material. The working principle is the change in the electrical resistance caused by the opening/closure of micro-cracks under mechanical deformation. The fabricated stretchable strain sensor shows highly sensitive and durable sensing performances in various tensile/compressive strains, long-term cyclic loading and relaxation tests. We demonstrate the applications of our stretchable strain sensors such as flexible pressure sensors and wearable human motion detection devices with high sensitivity, response speed and mechanical robustness.Wearable strain sensors for human motion detection are being highlighted in various fields such as medical, entertainment and sports industry. In this paper, we propose a new type of stretchable strain sensor that can detect both tensile and compressive strains and can be fabricated by a very simple process. A silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) thin film patterned on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp by a single-step direct transfer process is used as the strain sensing material. The working principle is the change in the electrical resistance caused by the opening/closure of micro-cracks under mechanical deformation. The fabricated stretchable strain sensor shows highly sensitive and durable sensing performances in various tensile/compressive strains, long-term cyclic loading and relaxation tests. We demonstrate the applications of our stretchable strain sensors such as flexible pressure sensors and wearable human motion detection devices with high sensitivity, response

  14. Fluoxetin Upregulates Connexin 43 Expression in Astrocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mostafavi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent studies have shown that astrocytes play major roles in normal and disease condition of the central nervous system including multiple sclerosis (MS. Molecular target therapy studies in MS have revealed that connexin-43 (Cx43 and Aquaporin-4 (AQP4 contents of astrocytes undergo expression alteration. Fluoxetine had some effects in MS patients unrelated to its known antidepressant effects. Some of fluoxetine effects were attributed to its capability of cAMP signaling pathway stimulation. This study aimed to investigate possible acute effects of fluoxetine on Cx43 and AQP4 expression in astrocyte.  Methods: Astrocytoma cells were treated for 24 hours with fluoxetine (10 and 20 &mug/ml with or without adenyl cyclase (AC and protein kinase A (PKA inhibition. Cx43 expression at both mRNA and protein levels and AQP4 expression at mRNA level were evaluated.  Results: Acquired results showed that fluoxetine with and without AC and PKA inhibition resulted in Cx43 up-regulation both in mRNA and protein levels, whereas AQP4 expression have not changed.  Discussion: In conclusion, data showed that fluoxetine alone and in the absence of serotonin acutely up-regulated Cx43 expression in astrocytes that can be assumed in molecular target therapy of MS patients. It seems that cAMP involvement in fluoxetine effects need more researches.

  15. Tensile and bending fatigue of the adhesive interface to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Braem, Marc; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fatigue limits of the dentin-composite interfaces established either with an etch-and-rinse or an one-step self-etch adhesive systems under tensile and bending configurations. Flat specimens (1.2 mm×5 mm×35 mm) were prepared using a plexiglass mold where dentin sections from human third molars were bonded to a resin composite, exhibiting the interface centrally located. Syntac Classic and G-Bond were used as adhesives and applied according to the manufacturer's instructions. The fluorochrome Rhodamine B was added to the adhesives to allow for fractographic evaluation. Tensile strength was measured in an universal testing machine and the bending strength (n=15) in a Flex machine (Flex, University of Antwerp, Belgium), respectively. Tensile (TFL) and bending fatigue limits (BFL) (n=25) were determined under wet conditions for 10(4) cycles following a staircase approach. Interface morphology and fracture mechanisms were observed using light, confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using three-way ANOVA (mod LSD test, pTensile and bending characteristic strengths at 63.2% failure probability for Syntac were 23.8 MPa and 71.5 MPa, and 24.7 MPa and 72.3 MPa for G-Bond, respectively. Regarding the applied methods, no significant differences were detected between adhesives. However, fatigue limits for G-Bond (TFL=5.9 MPa; BFL=36.2 MPa) were significantly reduced when compared to Syntac (TFL=12.6 MPa; BFL=49.7 MPa). Fracture modes of Syntac were generally of adhesive nature, between the adhesive resin and dentin, while G-Bond showed fracture planes involving the adhesive-dentin interface and the adhesive resin. Cyclic loading under tensile and bending configurations led to a significant strength degradation, with a more pronounced fatigue limit decrease for G-Bond. The greater decrease in fracture strength was observed in the tensile configuration. Copyright © 2010 Academy of

  16. Strain hardening and fracture behavior during tension of directionally solidified high-nitrogen austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Galina; Astafurova, Elena; Melnikov, Eugene; Moskvina, Valentina; Galchenko, Nina

    2017-12-01

    The effect of grain orientation relative to tensile load on the strain hardening behavior and fracture mechanism of directionally solidified high-nitrogen steel Fe-20Cr-22Mn-1.5V-0.2C-0.6N (in wt %) was studied. The tensile samples oriented along the longitudinal direction of columnar grains demonstrated the improved mechanical properties compared to specimens with the transversal directions of columnar grains: the values of tensile strength and strain-to-fracture were as high as 1080 MPa and 22%, respectively, for tension along the columnar grains and 870 MPa and 11%, respectively, for the tension transversal to the columnar grains. The change in the grain orientation relative to the tensile load varies a fracture mode of the steel. The fraction of the transgranular fracture was higher in the samples with longitudinal directions of the columnar grains compared to the transversal ones.

  17. Effect of heat treatment, with and without mechanical work, on the tensile and creep behaviour at 6000C of austenitic stainless steel stabilised with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of various heat treatments, with and without mechanical work, on the microstructure and the tensile and creep behaviour at 600 0 C of the titanium stabilised austenitic stainless steel DIN 1.4970, as well as the effects of aging temperature, pre-strain and small boron additions on the creep behaviour of these steels are discussed. The most probable mechanism is suggested. (Author) [pt

  18. Tensile Characterization of FRP Rods for Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micelli, F.; Nanni, A.

    2003-07-01

    The application of FRP rods as an internal or external reinforcement in new or damaged concrete structures is based on the development of design equations that take into account the mechanical properties of FRP material systems.The measurement of mechanical characteristics of FRP requires a special anchoring and protocol, since it is well known that these characteristics depend on the direction and content of fibers. In this study, an effective tensile test method is described for the mechanical characterization of FRP rods. Twelve types of glass and carbon FRP specimens with different sizes and surface characteristics were tested to validate the procedure proposed. In all, 79 tensile tests were performed, and the results obtained are discussed in this paper. Recommendations are given for specimen preparation and test setup in order to facilitate the further investigation and standardization of the FRP rods used in civil engineering.

  19. Elevated temperature tensile properties of borated 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.J.; Sorenson, K.B.; McConnell, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the tensile properties of Powder Metallurgy (PM) 'Grade A' material with that of the conventional IM 'Grade B' material for two selected Types (i.e., boron contents) as defined by the ASTM A887 specification: Types 304B5 and 304B7. Tensile properties have been generated for these materials at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 400degC (752degF). The data at higher temperatures are required for ASME Code Case purposes, since the use temperature of a basket under 'worst case' cask conditions may be as high as 343degC (650degF), due to self-heating by the activated fuel elements. We will also discuss the current status of efforts aimed at obtaining an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Case for selected grades of borated stainless steel covered by the ASTM A887 specification. (J.P.N.)

  20. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.