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Sample records for tensile fracture behavior

  1. Fracture behavior of nuclear graphites under tensile impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugachi, Hirokazu; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni

    1994-01-01

    Impact tensile strength test was performed with two kinds of HTTR graphites, fine grained isotropic graphite, IG-11 and coarse grained near isotropic graphite, PGX and deformation and fracture behavior under the strain rate of over 100s -1 was measured and the following results were derived: (1) Tensile strength for IG-11 graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but over 1 s -1 , tensile strength for IG-11 graphite increase larger than that measured under 1 s -1 . At the strain rate more than 100 s -1 , remarkable decrease of tensile strength for IG-11 graphite was found. Tensile strength of PGX graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but beyond this value, the sharp tensile strength decrease occurs. (2) Under 100 s -1 , fracture strain for both graphites increase with increase of strain rate and over 100 s -1 , drastic increase of fracture strain for IG-11 graphite was found. (3) At the part of gage length, volume of specimen increase with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (4) Poisson's ratio for both graphites decrease with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (5) Remarkable change of stress-strain curve for both graphites under 100 s -1 was not found, but over 100 s -1 , the slope of these curve for IG-11 graphite decrease drastically. (author)

  2. A study on the fracture behavior in tensile and fracture toughness tests of CFRP by acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Oh, Sae Kyoo; Nam, Ki Woo; Kim, Og Gyun [Bukyung National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    This study was carried out to analyze the fracture behavior and the acoustic emission(AE) characteristics, and to find relationship between tensile strength, fracture toughness and cure pressure in cure process of the carbon fiber reinforced composites of two types, [0 degree/90 degree]{sub 2s} and [0 degree{sub 2}/90 degree{sub 2}]{sub s}. AE signals were detected during the curing process, tensile tests and fracture toughness tests by acoustic emission(AE) measurements, respectively. Tensile strengths showed that the less cure pressurizing steps and the side of [0 degree/90 degree]{sub 2s} specimens had the higher strengths than those of the others. Fracture toughness showed nearly same values in the same temperature region, but the higher test temperature had the lower fracture toughness values. In order to examine between fracture behavior of tensile and fracture toughness test and post processing for AE parameters of AE data and observations of microscopy, SEM are carried out respectively.

  3. A study on the fracture behavior of CFRP in tensile and fracture toughness tests by acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Oh, Sae Kyoo; Nam, Ki Woo; Kim, Og Gyun [National Fishery University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    The Study was carried out to analyze the fracture behavior and the acoustic emission(AE) characteristics and to find the relationship among tensile strength, fracture toughness and cure pressure in cure process of the carbon fiber reinforced composites of two types, [0 deg/90 deg]{sub 2s} and [0 deg{sub 2}/90 deg{sub 2}]{sub s}. AE signals were detected during the curing process, tensile tests and fracture toughness tests by acoustic emission(AE) measurements, respectively. Tensile strengths showed that the less cure pressurizing steps and the side of [0 deg/90 deg]{sub 2s} specimens had the higher strengths than those of the others. Fracture toughness by the change of test temperature showed nearly same values in the same temperature region, but the higher test temperature had the lower fracture toughness values. In order to examine the relationship between fracture behavior of CFRP in tensile and fracture toughness tests and AE signals, the post processing for AE parameters of AE data and the observations of microscope and SEM have been carried out respectively. (author)

  4. A Study on the Fracture Behavior of CFRP in Tensile and Fracture Toughness Tests by Acoustic Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Oh, Sae Kyoo; Nam, Ki Woo; Kim, Og Gyun [Fisheries University of Pusan , Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    The study was carried out to analyze the fracture behavior and the acoustic emission(AE) characteristics and to find the relationship among tensile strength, fracture toughness and cure pressure in owe process of the carbon fiber reinforced composites of two types, [0 .deg. /90 .deg. ]{sub 2s} and [0 .deg. {sub 2}/90 .deg. {sub 2}]. AE signals were detected during the curing process, tensile tests and fracture toughness tests by acoustic emission(AE) measurements, respectively. Tensile strengths showed that the less cure pressurizing steps and the side of [0 .deg. /90 .deg. ]{sub 2s} specimens had the higher strengths than those of the others. Fracture toughness by the change of test temperature showed nearly same values in the same temperature region, but the higher test temperature had the lower fracture toughness values. In order to examine the relationship between fracture behavior of CFRP in tensile and fracture toughness tests and AE signals, the post processing for AE parameters of AE data and the observations of microscope and SEM have been carried out respectively

  5. Evaluation of tensile strength and fracture behavior of friction welded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In central power stations, the parts of the boiler that subjected to lower temperatures are made of low alloy ... monitored with the help of infrared thermometer and the axial pressure was set by the load cell attachment ... the experimentation that as we go on increasing the axial pressure the tensile strength goes on increasing ...

  6. Evaluation of tensile strength and fracture behavior of friction welded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study an attempt was made to join austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304) with low alloy steel (AISI 1021) at five different rotational speeds ranging from 800 to 1600 rpm and at as many different axial pressures ranging from 75 MPa to 135 MPa and then determining the strength of the joint by means of tensile ...

  7. Tensile Fracture Behavior of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Manufactured by Hot Isostatic Pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A. J.; Brayshaw, W. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2018-02-01

    Herein we investigate how the oxygen content in hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) 316L stainless steel affects the mechanical properties and tensile fracture behavior. This work follows on from previous studies, which aimed to understand the effect of oxygen content on the Charpy impact toughness of HIP'd steel. We expand on the work by performing room-temperature tensile testing on different heats of 316L stainless steel, which contain different levels of interstitial elements (carbon and nitrogen) as well as oxygen in the bulk material. Throughout the work we repeat the experiments on conventionally forged 316L steel as a reference material. The analysis of the work indicates that oxygen does not contribute to a measureable solution strengthening mechanism, as is the case with carbon and nitrogen in austenitic stainless steels (Werner in Mater Sci Eng A 101:93-98, 1988). Neither does oxygen, in the form of oxide inclusions, contribute to precipitation hardening due to the size and spacing of particles. However, the oxide particles do influence fracture behavior; fractography of the failed tension test specimens indicates that the average ductile dimple size is related to the oxygen content in the bulk material, the results of which support an on-going hypothesis relating oxygen content in HIP'd steels to their fracture mechanisms by providing additional sites for the initiation of ductile damage in the form of voids.

  8. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Different Carbon Nanotube-Grafted Polyacrylonitrile-Based Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-11-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of different carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted polyacrylonitrile-based (T1000GB) single carbon fibers were investigated. Grafting of CNTs was achieved via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). When Fe(C5H5)2 (also applied via CVD) was used as the catalyst, the tensile strength and Weibull modulus of the carbon fibers were improved, possibly due to the growth of dense CNT networks on the carbon fibers, which may have led to a reduction in the number of strength-limiting defects. Separately, at lower concentrations of an Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst in ethanol, which was applied via dipping, the tensile strength of CNT-grafted fibers was nearly identical to that of the as-received fibers, although the Weibull modulus was higher. For higher concentrations of the Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst, however, the tensile strength and the Weibull modulus were lower than those for the as-received material. Although the density of the CNT network increased with the concentration of the Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst in the ethanol solution, heating of the ethanolic Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst solution generated nitric acid (HNO3) due to decomposition, which damaged the fiber surfaces, resulting in an increase in the number of flaws and consequently a reduction in the tensile strength. Therefore, the tensile strength and Weibull modulus of CNT-grafted carbon fibers vary due to the combination of these effects and as a function of the catalyst concentration.

  9. Tensile properties and fracture behavior of laser cladded WC/Ni composite coatings with different contents of WC particle studied by in-situ tensile testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jin-Sha [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety, Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang, Xian-Cheng, E-mail: xczhang@ecust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety, Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200237 (China); Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Tian, Fu-Qiang; Wang, Zheng-Dong; Tu, Shan-Tung [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety, Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2013-01-10

    The aim of this paper was to address the effect of WC content on the tensile properties of WC/Ni composite coatings deposited by laser cladding on 45 steel substrates. The tensile tests were performed in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope. Experimental results showed that the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of WC/Ni coatings were strongly dependent on the volume fraction of WC reinforcing particles in the coatings. The tensile properties of the coating decreased with increasing content of WC particle. When the WC content was relatively high, multiple through-width cracks (TWC) in the coating can be found. The number of through-width cracks in the coating as a function of applied strain was measured. From the in-situ observation of coating surfaces, most of cracks were initiated from the WC particle, and then propagated throughout the coatings. This phenomenon was attributed to the stress concentration in the WC particle or near the WC particle, which was confirmed by using finite element analysis. The present research may provide some insights on the development of designing methodology of composite coatings.

  10. Tensile, Fracture, Fatigue Life, and Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Behavior of Structural Materials for the ITER Magnets: The European Contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyilas, A.; Nikbin, K.; Portone, A.; Sborchia, C.

    2004-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) are determined for R ratios between 0.1 - 0.7 at 7 K for three full-size Mock-up Models of the ITER Toroidal Field coil case produced by modified Type 316LN alloys. A representative forged block of Model 3 is additionally manufactured to determine its improved spatial tensile properties and compare it to former Model 3 data. From the new candidate jacket materials, developed for the ITER Central Solenoid coil, a batch is investigated to assess the fatigue life behavior at 7 K. Furthermore, the 4 K test facility, a 630 kN load capacity hydraulic machine has been used to allow fatigue life investigations under four point bending of the full-size jackets with artificial surface flaws. Cyclic life results have been assessed for the heat affected zone, weld, and base metal. The results are used in the fatigue analysis of the coil. Residual stresses resulting from jacket welding have been determined using two different techniques. First by distortion measurements of sliced pieces of the weld section and secondly by neutron diffraction measurements. In addition, tensile and fracture tests have been performed at 7 K with Al 7075, a candidate alloy for the pre-compression system of the CS coil

  11. Tensile, Fracture, Fatigue Life, and Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Behavior of Structural Materials for the ITER Magnets: The European Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyilas, A.; Nikbin, K.; Portone, A.; Sborchia, C.

    2004-06-01

    Fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) are determined for R ratios between 0.1 - 0.7 at 7 K for three full-size Mock-up Models of the ITER Toroidal Field coil case produced by modified Type 316LN alloys. A representative forged block of Model 3 is additionally manufactured to determine its improved spatial tensile properties and compare it to former Model 3 data. From the new candidate jacket materials, developed for the ITER Central Solenoid coil, a batch is investigated to assess the fatigue life behavior at 7 K. Furthermore, the 4 K test facility, a 630 kN load capacity hydraulic machine has been used to allow fatigue life investigations under four point bending of the full-size jackets with artificial surface flaws. Cyclic life results have been assessed for the heat affected zone, weld, and base metal. The results are used in the fatigue analysis of the coil. Residual stresses resulting from jacket welding have been determined using two different techniques. First by distortion measurements of sliced pieces of the weld section and secondly by neutron diffraction measurements. In addition, tensile and fracture tests have been performed at 7 K with Al 7075, a candidate alloy for the pre-compression system of the CS coil.

  12. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%–78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis.

  13. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Kamada, Hiroto; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-21

    Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%-78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE) analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis.

  14. Characterization the microstructure of pulsed Nd:YAG welding method in low frequencies; correlation with tensile and fracture behavior in laser-welded nitinol joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei Zoeram, Ali; Rahmani, Aida; Asghar Akbari Mousavi, Seyed Ali

    2017-05-01

    The precise controllability of heat input in pulsed Nd:YAG welding method provided by two additional parameters, frequency and pulse duration, has made this method very promising for welding of alloys sensitive to heat input. The poor weldability of Ti-rich nitinol as a result of the formation of Ti2Ni IMC has deprived us of the unique properties of this alloy. In this study, to intensify solidification rate during welding of Ti-rich nitinol, pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam in low frequency was employed in addition to the employment of a copper substrate. Specific microstructure produced in this condition was characterized and the effects of this microstructure on tensile and fracture behavior of samples welded by two different procedures, full penetration and double-sided method with halved penetration depth for each side were investigated. The investigations revealed although the combination of low frequencies, the use of a high thermal conductor substrate and double-sided method eliminated intergranular fracture and increased tensile strength, the particular microstructure, built in the pulsed welding method in low frequencies, results to the formation of the longitudinal cracks during the first stages of tensile test at weld centerline. This degrades tensile strength of welded samples compared to base metal. The results showed samples welded in double-sided method performed much better than samples welded in full penetration mode.

  15. Tensile mechanical behavior and fracture toughness of MWCNT and DWCNT modified vinyl-ester/polyester hybrid nanocomposites produced by 3-roll milling

    OpenAIRE

    Seyhan, Abdullah Tuğrul; Tanoğlu, Metin; Schulte, Karl

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the tensile mechanical behavior and fracture toughness of vinyl-ester/polyester hybrid nanocomposites containing various types of nanofillers, including multi- and double-walled carbon nanotubes with and without amine functional groups (MWCNTs, DWCNTs, MWCNT-NH2 and DWCNT-NH2). To prepare the resin suspensions, very low contents (0.05, 0.1 and 0.3 wt.%) of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were dispersed within a specially synthesized styrene-free polyester resin, conduct...

  16. Experimental and finite element study of the effect of temperature and moisture on the tangential tensile strength and fracture behavior in timber logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2014-01-01

    to a moisture content (MC) of 18% before TSt tests at 20°C, 60°C, and 90°C were carried out. The maximum stress results of the disc simulations by FEM were compared with the experimental strength results at the same temperature levels. There is a rather good agreement between the results of modeling......Timber is normally dried by kiln drying, in the course of which moisture-induced stresses and fractures can occur. Cracks occur primarily in the radial direction due to tangential tensile strength (TSt) that exceeds the strength of the material. The present article reports on experiments...... and numerical simulations by finite element modeling (FEM) concerning the TSt and fracture behavior of Norway spruce under various climatic conditions. Thin log disc specimens were studied to simplify the description of the moisture flow in the samples. The specimens designed for TS were acclimatized...

  17. Tensile mechanical behavior and fracture toughness of MWCNT and DWCNT modified vinyl-ester/polyester hybrid nanocomposites produced by 3-roll milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyhan, A. Tugrul [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Anadolu University (Australia), Iki Eylul Campus, 26550 Eskisehir (Turkey); Tanoglu, Metin, E-mail: metintanoglu@iyte.edu.tr [Izmir Institute of Technology (IZTECH), Mechanical Engineering Department, Gulbahce Campus 35437, Izmir (Turkey); Schulte, Karl [Technicshe Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (TUHH), Polymer Composites Section, Denickestrasse 15, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    This study aims to investigate the tensile mechanical behavior and fracture toughness of vinyl-ester/polyester hybrid nanocomposites containing various types of nanofillers, including multi- and double-walled carbon nanotubes with and without amine functional groups (MWCNTs, DWCNTs, MWCNT-NH{sub 2} and DWCNT-NH{sub 2}). To prepare the resin suspensions, very low contents (0.05, 0.1 and 0.3 wt.%) of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were dispersed within a specially synthesized styrene-free polyester resin, conducting 3-roll milling technique. The collected resin stuff was subsequently blended with vinyl-ester via mechanical stirring to achieve final suspensions prior to polymerization. Nanocomposites containing MWCNTs and MWCNT-NH{sub 2} were found to exhibit higher tensile strength and modulus as well as larger fracture toughness and fracture energy compared to neat hybrid polymer. However, incorporation of similar contents of DWCNTs and DWCNT-NH{sub 2} into the hybrid resin did not reflect the same improvement in the corresponding mechanical properties. Furthermore, experimentally measured elastic moduli of the nanocomposites containing DWCNTs, DWCNT-NH{sub 2}, MWCNTs and MWCNT-NH{sub 2} were fitted to Halphin-Tsai model. Regardless of amine functional groups or content of carbon nanotubes, MWCNT modified nanocomposites exhibited better agreement between the predicted and the measured elastic moduli values compared to nanocomposites with DWCNTs. Furthermore, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to reveal dispersion state of the carbon nanotubes within the hybrid polymer and to examine the CNT induced failure modes that occurred under mechanical loading, respectively. Based on the experimental findings obtained, it was emphasized that the types of CNTs and presence of amine functional groups on the surface of CNTs affects substantially the chemical interactions at the interface, thus tuning the ultimate mechanical

  18. Tensile behavior and tension stiffening of reinforced concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choun, Young Sun; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2001-03-01

    For the ultimate behavior analysis of containment buildings under severe accident conditions, a clear understanding of tensile behaviors of plain and reinforced concrete is necessary. Nonlinear models for tensile behaviors of concrete are also needed. This report describe following items: tensile behaviors of plain concrete, test results of reinforced concrete panels in uniaxial and biaxial tension, tension stiffening. The tensile behaviors of reinforced concrete are significantly influenced by the properties of concrete and reinforcing steel. Thus, for a more reliable evaluation of tensile behavior and ultimate pressure capacity of a reinforced or prestressed concrete containment building, an advanced concrete model which can be considered rebar-concrete interaction effects should be developed. In additions, a crack behavior analysis method and tension stiffening models, which are based on fracture mechanics, should be developed. The model should be based on the various test data from specimens considering material and sectional properties of the containment building.

  19. The Interactions of tensile fractures with the surrounding lithology and other tensile fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Tensile (mode 1) fractures such as joints and veins are ubiquitous in the upper crust and are potential pathways for fluid migration. Fractures often cross cut one another and terminate at other fractures. This is dependent on whether the older fracture was open or shut when the younger fracture propagated. There is a paucity of data concerning the geometric properties of the fracture intersections (branchlines), including their orientations, length, continuity and connectivity. This poster aims to investigate how natural hydraulic fractures propagated and interacted along branchlines, through study of well-preserved, three-dimensional exposures of natural hydraulic fracture surfaces that cut the organic rich Bituminous Shale (Mulgrave Shale Member of the Lower Jurassic Whitby Mudstone Formation) at Saltwick Nab, Whitby, the Yorkshire coast, UK. A specific objective is to investigate the possible influence of branchlines on key structures associated with fracture surfaces, such as fracture tip lines, radial striations and arrest lines, as well as petrographic differences between fractured and non-fractured rocks. These relationships will be investigated by quantifying: a) the spacings between neighbouring arrest lines, measured in directions parallel and perpendicular to the sedimentary layering, and b) the scaling relationships between arrest lines observed on large and smaller fracture surfaces. Combining these findings with previous work it will be possible to make models for how natural hydraulic fractures propagate and terminate giving a greater understanding of how natural hydraulic fractures link together within an exhumed shale analogue, such as those seen at Saltwick Nab. It may also provide an insight in to the growth of anthropogenic hydraulic fractures that are induced during stimulation of shale gas and oil reservoirs.

  20. An electron microscopy appraisal of tensile fracture in metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, D.T.A.; Ocelik, V.; Bronsveld, P.M. [Department of Applied Physics, Netherlands Institute for Metals Research and Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); De Hosson, J.Th.M. [Department of Applied Physics, Netherlands Institute for Metals Research and Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.t.m.de.hosson@rug.nl

    2008-05-15

    Three glass-forming alloy compositions were chosen for ribbon production and subsequent electron microscopy studies. In situ tensile testing with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), followed by ex situ TEM and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), allowed the deformation processes in tensile fracture of metallic glasses to be analysed. In situ shear band propagation was found to be jump-like, with the jump sites correlating with the formation of secondary shear bands. The effect of structural relaxation by in situ heating is also discussed. Nanocrystallization near the fracture surface was observed; however, no crystallization was also reported in the same sample and the reasons for this are discussed. Both the TEM and the SEM observations confirmed the presence of a liquid-like layer on or near the fracture surface of the ribbons. The formation of a liquid-like layer was characterized by the vein geometries and vein densities on the fracture surfaces and its dependence on shear displacement, {delta}, is discussed. A simple model is adapted to relate the temperature rise during shear banding to the glass transition and melting temperatures and this is used to explain the variety of fracture surfaces which are developed for macroscopically identical tensile testing of metallic glasses together with features which exhibit local melting.

  1. An electron microscopy appraisal of tensile fracture in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.T.A.; Ocelik, V.; Bronsveld, P.M.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2008-01-01

    Three glass-forming alloy compositions were chosen for ribbon production and subsequent electron microscopy studies. In situ tensile testing with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), followed by ex situ TEM and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), allowed the deformation processes in tensile fracture of metallic glasses to be analysed. In situ shear band propagation was found to be jump-like, with the jump sites correlating with the formation of secondary shear bands. The effect of structural relaxation by in situ heating is also discussed. Nanocrystallization near the fracture surface was observed; however, no crystallization was also reported in the same sample and the reasons for this are discussed. Both the TEM and the SEM observations confirmed the presence of a liquid-like layer on or near the fracture surface of the ribbons. The formation of a liquid-like layer was characterized by the vein geometries and vein densities on the fracture surfaces and its dependence on shear displacement, δ, is discussed. A simple model is adapted to relate the temperature rise during shear banding to the glass transition and melting temperatures and this is used to explain the variety of fracture surfaces which are developed for macroscopically identical tensile testing of metallic glasses together with features which exhibit local melting

  2. A Lateral Tensile Fracturing Model for Listric Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Z.

    2007-12-01

    The new discovery of a major seismic fault of the great 1976 Tangshan earthquake suggests a lateral tensile fracturing process at the seismic source. The fault is in listric shape but can not be explained with the prevailing model of listric fault. A double-couple of forces without moment is demonstrated to be applicable to simulate the source mechanism. Based on fracture mechanics, laboratory experiments as well as numerical simulations, the model is against the assumption of stick-slip on existing fault as the cause of the earthquake but not in conflict with seismological observations. Global statistics of CMT solutions of great earthquakes raises significant support to the idea that lateral tensile fracturing might account for not only the Tangshan earthquake but also others.

  3. Tensile and fracture toughness test results of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouadi, R.; Moons, F.; Puzzolante, J.L. [Centre d`Etude de l`Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium)

    1998-01-01

    Tensile and fracture toughness test results of four Beryllium grades are reported here. The flow and fracture properties are investigated by using small size tensile and round compact tension specimens. Irradiation was performed at the BR2 material testing reactor which allows various temperature and irradiation conditions. The fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV) ranges between 0.65 and 2.45 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2}. In the meantime, un-irradiated specimens were aged at the irradiation temperatures to separate if any the effect of temperature from irradiation damage. Test results are analyzed and discussed, in particular in terms of the effects of material grade, test temperature, thermal ageing and neutron irradiation. (author)

  4. Fracture propagation of cohesive soils under tensile loading and desiccation

    OpenAIRE

    Shannon, Benjamin Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tensile fracture of clay soils either due to loading or due to desiccation is a common problem encountered in many geotechnical, geoenvironmental and resources engineering applications such as in compacted clay liners, dams, embankments, slopes, seabed trenching for pipeline placement and in mine tailings. However, the fundamental understanding of this process and its modelling capability has not yet advanced satisfactorily. This research intends to fill this gap, following on the past and co...

  5. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of MA957: implications to the development of nanocomposited ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinger, M.J.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.

    2002-01-01

    A study to explore approaches to optimizing nanocomposited ferritic alloys was carried out on dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed (MA) MA957, in the form of extruded bar stock. Previous studies had indicated that this alloy manifested superior high temperature strength and radiation stability, but was extremely brittle in notch impact tests. Thus our objective was to develop a combination of tensile, fracture toughness and microstructural data to clarify the basis for this brittle behavior. To this end, tensile properties and fracture toughness were characterized as a function of temperature in various orientations relative to the grain and inclusion structures. This database along with extensive fractography suggests that brittleness is due to the presence of a large volume fraction of impurity alumina stringers. In orientations where the effects of the stringers are reduced, much higher toughness was observed. These results provide a path for alloy development approach to achieve high strength and toughness

  6. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of MA957: implications to the development of nanocomposited ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinger, M. J.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    A study to explore approaches to optimizing nanocomposited ferritic alloys was carried out on dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed (MA) MA957, in the form of extruded bar stock. Previous studies had indicated that this alloy manifested superior high temperature strength and radiation stability, but was extremely brittle in notch impact tests. Thus our objective was to develop a combination of tensile, fracture toughness and microstructural data to clarify the basis for this brittle behavior. To this end, tensile properties and fracture toughness were characterized as a function of temperature in various orientations relative to the grain and inclusion structures. This database along with extensive fractography suggests that brittleness is due to the presence of a large volume fraction of impurity alumina stringers. In orientations where the effects of the stringers are reduced, much higher toughness was observed. These results provide a path for alloy development approach to achieve high strength and toughness.

  7. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Fracture Behavior of Cold-Rolled High-Mn Light-Weight Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cho, Kyung Mox [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Joonoh; Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    The effects of the annealing temperature on the microstructure and tensile properties of cold-rolled light-weight steels are investigated using two Fe-30Mn-xAl-0.9C alloys that contain different Al content. The initial alloy microstructure is composed of a single austenite or a mixture of austenite and ferrite depending on the nominal aluminum content. For the alloy with 9 wt%Al content, the recrystallization and grain growth of austenite occurrs depending on the annealing temperature. However, for the alloy with 11 wt%Al content, the β-Mn phase is observed after annealing for 10 min at 550~800 ℃. The β-Mn transformation kinetics is the fastest at 700 ℃. The formation of the β-Mn phase has a detrimental effect on the ductility, and this leads to significant decreases in the total elongation. The same alloy also forms κ-carbide and DO3 ordering at 550~900 ℃. The investigated alloys exhibit a fully recrystallized microstructure after annealing at 900 ℃ for 10 min, which results in a high total elongation of 25~55%with a high tensile strength of 900~1170 MPa.

  8. Discrete fracture in quasi-brittle materials under compressive and tensile stress states

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Klerck, PA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for modelling discrete fracture in geomaterials under tensile and compressive stress fields has been developed based on a Mohr-Coulomb failure surface in compression and three independent anisotropic rotating crack models in tension...

  9. Effects of tensile loading on upper shelf fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, J.A. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Link, R.E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Constraint has been an important consideration in fracture mechanics from the earliest work that was done to develop the 1974 version of the ASTM Standard E399. O`Dowd and Shih (1991) have proposed that the difference in crack tip stress fields can be quantified in terms of a field quantity that they have call Q. The Q quantity is a function of J, the crack shape and size, the structural geometry, mode of loading and on the level of deformation and can only be calculated from a high resolution elastic-plastic computational analysis. A similar, simpler, but more controversial approach has been suggested by Betegon and Hancock (1991), who use the non-singular term of the elastic, crack singularity solution, called the T-Stress, as a measure of elastic-plastic crack tip constraint. The objective of this work is to develop some upper shelf, elastic-plastic experimental results to attempt to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness and J resistance curves. The first objective was to obtain upper shelf J resistance curves, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance results for a range of applied constraint. The J-Q and J-T stress loci were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. Constraint was varied by changing the crack length and also by changing the mode of loading from bending to predominantly tensile. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

  10. Investigation on the tensile behavior of fiber metal laminates based on self-reinforced polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Eon; Park, Tom; Kim, Jeong; Kang, Beom-Soo; Song, Woo-Jin

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical tests have been carried out to accurately evaluate the tensile properties of fiber metal laminates (FMLs). The FMLs in this paper comprised of a layer of self-reinforced polypropylene (SRPP) sandwiched between two layers of aluminum alloy 5052-H34. In this study, nonlinear tensile and fracture behavior of FMLs under the in-plane loading conditions has been investigated with numerical simulations and theoretical analysis. The numerical simulation based on finite element modeling using the ABAQUS/Explicit and the theoretical constitutive model based on a volume fraction approach and a modified classical lamination theory, which incorporates the elastic-plastic behavior of the aluminum alloy are used to predict the mechanical properties such as stress-strain response and deformation behavior of FMLs. In addition, through comparing the numerical simulations and the theoretical analysis with experimental results, it was concluded that a numerical simulation model adopted describes with sufficient accuracy the overall tensile stress-strain curve.

  11. Tensile fracture properties of seven tropical grasses at different phenological stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, A.A.A.; Scheper, J.A.; Benvenutti, M.A.; Gordon, I.J.; Poppi, D.P.; Elgersma, A.

    2011-01-01

    The intake of forage grasses by grazing ruminants is closely related to the mechanical fracture properties of grasses. The relationship between the tensile fracture properties of grasses and foraging behaviour is of particular importance in tropical reproductive swards composed of both stems and

  12. Microscopic observation and statics consideration of tensile fracture of TiC coating on stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Akira; Hasiguti, Ryukiti

    1986-01-01

    We have measured the tensile fracture properties of the TiC coated SUS316L stainless steel, applying a stress perpendicular to the plane of interface between the coating and the substrate. The fracture of the as grown or non-annealed specimens occurred partially within the TiC layer. A tensile fracture of the TiC coated specimens after vacuum annealing at about 1373 K (1100 deg C) presented arc-shape curved fracture surfaces which can be understood by statics consideration taking into account the maximum stress plane theory and the residual thermal stress. The strengths of non-annealed and annealed specimens are 34.4 MPa (350 kgf/cm 2 ) and 30.2 MPa (308 kgf/cm 2 ), respectively, expressed in terms of Weibull's 50 % fracture stresses. (author)

  13. Tensile properties and fracture mechanism of IN-100 superalloy in high temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan T. Jovanović

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties and fracture mechanism of a polycrystalline IN-100 superalloy have been investigated in the range from room temperature to 900°C. Optical microscopy (OM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM applying replica technique were used for microstructural investigation, whereas scanning electron microscopy (SEM was utilized for fracture study. High temperature tensile tests were carried out in vacuumed chamber. Results show that strength increases up to 700°C, and then sharply decreases with further increase in temperature. Elongation increases very slowly (6-7.5% till 500°C, then decreases to 4.5% at 900°C. Change in elongation may be ascribed to a change of fracture mechanism. Appearance of a great number of microvoids prevails up to 500°C resulting in a slow increase of elongation, whereas above this temperature elongation decrease is correlated with intergranular crystallographic fracture and fracture of carbides.

  14. Hydrologic behavior of fracture networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.C.S.; Endo, H.K.; Karasaki, K.; Pyrak, L.; MacLean, P.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1984-10-01

    This paper reviews recent research on the nature of flow and transport in discontinuous fracture networks. The hydrologic behavior of these networks has been examined using two- and three-dimensional numerical models. The numerical models represent random realizations of fracture networks based on statistical field measurements of fracture geometry and equivalent hydraulic aperture. We have compared the flux and mechanical transport behavior of these networks to the behavior of equivalent continua. In this way we are able to determine whether a given fracture network can be modeled as an equivalent porous media in both flux and advective transport studies. We have examined departures from porous media behavior both as a function of interconnectivity and heterogeneity. Parameter studies have revealed behavior patterns such as: given a fracture frequency that can be measured in the field, porous media like behavior and the magnitude of permeability are both enhanced if the fractures are longer and the standard deviation of fracture permeabilities is smaller. Transport studies have shown that the ratio between flux and velocity is not necessarily constant when the direction of flow is changed in systems which do behave like a porous media for flux. Thus the conditions under which porous media analysis can be used in transport studies are more restrictive than the condition for flux studies. We have examined systems which do not behave like porous media and have shown how the in situ behavior varies as a function of scale of observation. The behavior of well tests in fractured networks has been modeled and compared to a new analytical well test solution which accounts for the early time dominance of the fractures intersecting the well. Finally, a three-dimensional fracture flow model has been constructed which assumes fractures are randomly located discs. 13 references, 12 figures

  15. Statistical behavior of the tensile property of heated cotton fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    The temperature dependence of the tensile property of single cotton fiber was studied in the range of 160-300°C using Favimat test, and its statistical behavior was interpreted in terms of structural changes. The tenacity of control cotton fiber was well described by the single Weibull distribution,...

  16. Evaluation of fracture toughness of nuclear piping using real pipe and tensile compact pipe specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, J.M.; Park, S.; Seok, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The tensile compact pipe (CP) specimen was proposed. • J-integral for the specimen was obtained by the plastic limit load analysis and FEA. • Fracture toughness tests by several types of specimens were performed and compared. • The constraint effects were considered by comparing Q-stresses for them. -- Abstract: The leak-before-break (LBB) concept is generally used to design the primary heat transport piping for a nuclear power plant. The LBB concept is based on the fracture resistance curve, which is obtained by J–R tests on various types of specimens. Fracture toughness data differ according to the various types of specimens. It has also been known that there is a difference in the constraint effect between real pipes and standard specimens, and LBB design using standard specimens is conservative. We propose a new type of specimen for J–R tests, a tensile compact pipe (CP) specimen, and perform fracture toughness tests on various types of specimens. We also perform constraint effect analysis on such specimens. The Q-stresses of the tensile CP specimens are lower than those of real pipes under 4-point bending, and are higher than those of elbow pipes. If the lever length of a tensile CP specimen is controlled, the specimen can simulate various stress conditions, and it is thought that the LBB design of piping in service can be performed using this specimen

  17. Evaluation of fracture toughness of nuclear piping using real pipe and tensile compact pipe specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, J.M.; Park, S.; Seok, C.S., E-mail: seok@skku.edu

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • The tensile compact pipe (CP) specimen was proposed. • J-integral for the specimen was obtained by the plastic limit load analysis and FEA. • Fracture toughness tests by several types of specimens were performed and compared. • The constraint effects were considered by comparing Q-stresses for them. -- Abstract: The leak-before-break (LBB) concept is generally used to design the primary heat transport piping for a nuclear power plant. The LBB concept is based on the fracture resistance curve, which is obtained by J–R tests on various types of specimens. Fracture toughness data differ according to the various types of specimens. It has also been known that there is a difference in the constraint effect between real pipes and standard specimens, and LBB design using standard specimens is conservative. We propose a new type of specimen for J–R tests, a tensile compact pipe (CP) specimen, and perform fracture toughness tests on various types of specimens. We also perform constraint effect analysis on such specimens. The Q-stresses of the tensile CP specimens are lower than those of real pipes under 4-point bending, and are higher than those of elbow pipes. If the lever length of a tensile CP specimen is controlled, the specimen can simulate various stress conditions, and it is thought that the LBB design of piping in service can be performed using this specimen.

  18. High strain rate tensile behavior of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Paman, Ashish; Madhu, V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to perform quasi static and high strain rate tensile tests on Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy under different strain rates ranging from 0.01–3500/s and also at temperatures of 25,100, 200 and 300 °C. The combined effect of strain rate, temperature and stress triaxiality on the material behavior is studied by testing both smooth and notched specimens. Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive and fracture models are established based on high strain rate tensile data obtained from Split hopkinson tension bar (SHTB) and quasi-static tests. By modifying the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms in the Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive model, a new J–C constitutive model of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook constitutive model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive and fracture models, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different conditions for Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy were conducted. Numerical simulations are performed using a non-linear explicit finite element code autodyn. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical simulation results and the experiment results. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested under various strain rates and temperatures were studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  19. Tensile and fracture characteristics of oxide dispersion strengthened Fe–12Cr produced by hot isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Vanessa de, E-mail: vanessa.decastro@uc3m.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain); Garces-Usan, Jose Maria; Leguey, Teresa; Pareja, Ramiro [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    The mechanical characteristics of a model oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy with nominal composition Fe–12 wt%Cr–0.4 wt%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated by means of microhardness measurements, tensile tests up to fracture in the temperature range of 298–973 K, and fracture surface analyses. A non-ODS Fe–12 wt%Cr alloy was also studied to assess the real capacity of the oxide dispersion for strengthening the alloy. The materials were produced by mechanical alloying followed by hot isostatic pressing consolidation and heat treatment at 1023 K. The strengthening effect of the oxide nanodispersion was effective at all temperatures studied, although the tensile strength converges towards the one obtained for the reference alloy at higher temperatures. Moreover, the ODS alloys failed prematurely at T < 673 K due to the presence of Y-rich inclusions, as seen in the fracture surface of these alloys.

  20. Tensile and fracture characteristics of oxide dispersion strengthened Fe–12Cr produced by hot isostatic pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Vanessa de; Garces-Usan, Jose Maria; Leguey, Teresa; Pareja, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical characteristics of a model oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy with nominal composition Fe–12 wt%Cr–0.4 wt%Y 2 O 3 were investigated by means of microhardness measurements, tensile tests up to fracture in the temperature range of 298–973 K, and fracture surface analyses. A non-ODS Fe–12 wt%Cr alloy was also studied to assess the real capacity of the oxide dispersion for strengthening the alloy. The materials were produced by mechanical alloying followed by hot isostatic pressing consolidation and heat treatment at 1023 K. The strengthening effect of the oxide nanodispersion was effective at all temperatures studied, although the tensile strength converges towards the one obtained for the reference alloy at higher temperatures. Moreover, the ODS alloys failed prematurely at T < 673 K due to the presence of Y-rich inclusions, as seen in the fracture surface of these alloys

  1. Dynamic tensile behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy at ultra-high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Changjian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The samples having {0001} parallel to extruding direction (ED present a typical true stress–true strain curve with concave-down shape under tension at low strain rate. Ultra-rapid tensile tests were conducted at room temperature on a textured AZ31B magnesium alloy. The dynamic tensile behavior was investigated. The results show that at ultra-high strain rates of 1.93 × 102 s−1 and 1.70 × 103 s−1, the alloy behaves with a linear stress–strain response in most strain range and exhibits a brittle fracture. In this case, {10-12}  extension twinning is basic deformation mode. The brittleness is due to the macroscopic viscosity at ultra-high strain rate, for which the external critical shear stress rapidly gets high to result in a cleavage fracture before large amounts of dislocations are activated. Because {10-12} tension twinning, {10-11} compressive twinning, basal slip, prismatic slip and pyramidal slip have different critical shear stresses (CRSS, their contributions to the degree of deformation are very differential. In addition, Schmid factor plays an important role in the activity of various deformation modes and it is the key factor for the samples with different strain rates exhibit various mechanical behavior under dynamic tensile loading.

  2. Microstructure and Tensile Behavior of Laser Arc Hybrid Welded Dissimilar Al and Ti Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Gao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding was developed to welding-braze dissimilar Al and Ti alloys in butt configuration. Microstructure, interface properties, tensile behavior, and their relationships were investigated in detail. The results show the cross-weld tensile strength of the joints is up to 213 MPa, 95.5% of same Al weld. The optimal range of heat input for accepted joints was obtained as 83–98 J·mm−1. Within this range, the joint is stronger than 200 MPa and fractures in weld metal, or else, it becomes weaker and fractures at the intermetallic compounds (IMCs layer. The IMCs layer of an accepted joint is usually thin and continuous, which is about 1μm-thick and only consists of TiAl2 due to fast solidification rate. However, the IMCs layer at the top corner of fusion zone/Ti substrate is easily thickened with increasing heat input. This thickened IMCs layer consists of a wide TiAl3 layer close to FZ and a thin TiAl2 layer close to Ti substrate. Furthermore, both bead shape formation and interface growth were discussed by laser-arc interaction and melt flow. Tensile behavior was summarized by interface properties.

  3. Application of Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman constitutive model to the tensile behavior of reinforcing bars with corrosion pits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Xu

    Full Text Available Based on meso-damage mechanics and finite element analysis, the aim of this paper is to describe the feasibility of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN constitutive model in describing the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars. The orthogonal test results showed that different fracture pattern and the related damage evolution process can be simulated by choosing different material parameters of GTN constitutive model. Compared with failure parameters, the two constitutive parameters are significant factors affecting the tensile strength. Both the nominal yield and ultimate tensile strength decrease markedly with the increase of constitutive parameters. Combining with the latest data and trial-and-error method, the suitable material parameters of GTN constitutive model were adopted to simulate the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars in concrete under carbonation environment attack. The numerical predictions can not only agree very well with experimental measurements, but also simplify the finite element modeling process.

  4. Application of Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman Constitutive Model to the Tensile Behavior of Reinforcing Bars with Corrosion Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yidong; Qian, Chunxiang

    2013-01-01

    Based on meso-damage mechanics and finite element analysis, the aim of this paper is to describe the feasibility of the Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman (GTN) constitutive model in describing the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars. The orthogonal test results showed that different fracture pattern and the related damage evolution process can be simulated by choosing different material parameters of GTN constitutive model. Compared with failure parameters, the two constitutive parameters are significant factors affecting the tensile strength. Both the nominal yield and ultimate tensile strength decrease markedly with the increase of constitutive parameters. Combining with the latest data and trial-and-error method, the suitable material parameters of GTN constitutive model were adopted to simulate the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars in concrete under carbonation environment attack. The numerical predictions can not only agree very well with experimental measurements, but also simplify the finite element modeling process. PMID:23342140

  5. Specimen size effects on the tensile strength and fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teran, J.; Gonzalez, J. L.; Hallen, J. M.; Martinez, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an experimental research was conducted to determine size and orientation effects on tension and toughness properties through CTOD-R curves, using standard and miniature specimens taken from a structural steel plate.Compliance function estimation for the miniature size sample through load-displacement curves was considered. Experimental and statistical results showed that size and orientation affect tensioned toughness properties. The miniature tension test specimens showed strength values slightly greater than the standard ones but with less ductility. Miniature specimen CTOD-R curves showed sensibility to load changes and measurement method of crack aperture and crack length. Inconsistency in fracture toughness for specimen orientation longitudinal circumferential (LC) regarding size effect was also observed. Short orientations showed less strength and toughness than the other directions. (Author) 27 refs

  6. Characterization of the failure behavior of zinc coating on dual phase steel under tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Guiming; Sloof, Willem G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The microcracks and voids at the zinc grain boundaries are the initial sites for the coating cracking. → The crack spacing of the fragmentally fractured zinc coating is mainly determined by the zinc grain size. → Small zinc grain size and the c-axis direction of zinc grain parallel to the zinc surface are beneficial to the mitigation of the zinc coating delamination. - Abstract: The failure behavior of hot-dip galvanized zinc coatings on dual phase steels under tensile deformation is characterized with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Under tension, the pre-existed microcracks and voids at the zinc grain boundaries propagate along the zinc grain boundaries to form crack nets within the coating, leading to a segmented fracture of the zinc coating with the crack spacing approximately equal to the zinc grain size. With further loading, the coating segments partially delaminated along the interface between the top zinc layer and the inhibition layer instead of the interface between the inhibition layer and steel substrate. As the c-axis of zinc grains trends to be normal to the tensile loading direction, the twinning deformation became more noticeable, and meanwhile the coating delamination was diminished. The transverse and incline tunneling cracks occurred in the inhibition layer with tensile deformation. The existence of the brittle FeZn 13 particles on top of the inhibition layer was unfavorable to the coating adhesion.

  7. Fracture Behavior under Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    value still is ." the Charpy energy, i.e. the energy to break a Charpy V-notch specimen in a pendulum type impact tester. This material property...Most of the dynamic fracture toughness 3ata have been obtained in the lower impact velocity range with Charpy - and drop weight tests. An overview of...A .-..- ..- -6- =.., lyses (e.g. with Charpy tests [3]), theoretical analyses which some- times are based on nonrealistic assumptions (e.g. infinite

  8. Deformation and fracture in micro-tensile tests of freestanding electrodeposited nickel thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.; Yao, N.; Soboyejo, W.O.; Tarquinio, C.

    2008-01-01

    In situ scanning electron microscopy micro-tensile tests were conducted on freestanding LIGA nickel thin films of two thicknesses (70 and 270 μm). The deformation and fracture mechanisms were elucidated by in situ scanning electron microscopy imaging and ex situ fractographic analysis. Due to the film microstructural gradient, an apparent thickness effect on the film yield strengths was observed, which was then rationalized with a continuum micromechanics model

  9. Data characterizing tensile behavior of cenosphere/HDPE syntactic foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B R Bharath; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Zeltmann, Steven E; Gupta, Nikhil; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-03-01

    The data set presented is related to the tensile behavior of cenosphere reinforced high density polyethylene syntactic foam composites "Processing of cenosphere/HDPE syntactic foams using an industrial scale polymer injection molding machine" (Bharath et al., 2016) [1]. The focus of the work is on determining the feasibility of using an industrial scale polymer injection molding (PIM) machine for fabricating syntactic foams. The fabricated syntactic foams are investigated for microstructure and tensile properties. The data presented in this article is related to optimization of the PIM process for syntactic foam manufacture, equations and procedures to develop theoretical estimates for properties of cenospheres, and microstructure of syntactic foams before and after failure. Included dataset contains values obtained from the theoretical model.

  10. Data characterizing tensile behavior of cenosphere/HDPE syntactic foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.R. Bharath Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The data set presented is related to the tensile behavior of cenosphere reinforced high density polyethylene syntactic foam composites “Processing of cenosphere/HDPE syntactic foams using an industrial scale polymer injection molding machine” (Bharath et al., 2016 [1]. The focus of the work is on determining the feasibility of using an industrial scale polymer injection molding (PIM machine for fabricating syntactic foams. The fabricated syntactic foams are investigated for microstructure and tensile properties. The data presented in this article is related to optimization of the PIM process for syntactic foam manufacture, equations and procedures to develop theoretical estimates for properties of cenospheres, and microstructure of syntactic foams before and after failure. Included dataset contains values obtained from the theoretical model.

  11. Fracture behavior of quenched poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a quenching treatment applied on heated cast sheet extruded films of two poly(lactic acid (PLA commercial grades, with different optical purities, was studied. The thermal and mechanical properties of the films, as well as their fracture behavior, were assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, tensile tests, and the essential work of fracture (EWF approach. The heating-quenching treatment causes a de-aging effect with an increase in the free volume of polymer chains evidenced by a decrease in the glass transition temperature (Tg and a decrease in the tensile stiffness and yield stress. As a result, there is an abrupt increase in ductility, finding a dramatic change in the fracture behavior, from brittle to ductile. The use of digital image correlation (DIC of the strain field analysis during fracture testing has allowed relating the decrease on the yield stress promoted by quenching with the crack propagation kinetics. The use of the EWF method to characterize the fracture toughness of PLA has allowed to measure this enhancement on toughness, finding that the specific essential work of fracture (we and the plastic term (βwp parameters increased 120% and 1200%, respectively, after the quenching process.

  12. Tensile behavior of containment wall considering liner plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namso Cho; Namsik Kim; Youngsun Choun

    2005-01-01

    General design works in containment building would ignore a structural contribution of liner plate, which has been just taken for a functional member to finally prevent the radioactive leakage against an ultimate internal pressure due to unexpected accidents. However, since the sectional area of liner actually occupies a quite portion of concrete containment wall, and horizontal and vertical stiffeners may help the bondage of liner to concrete, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of liner on concrete tensile behavior. In this study, full-scale test specimens well-reflecting an existing containment wall were fabricated, and tensile failure tests had been carried out to investigate the cracking behavior and stress-strain relationship of concrete as considering liner. The experimental results had been analyzed for two critical cases, which represented the lower and upper bound as the composite extent of liner. One of the cases was assumed that liner could show a fully composite behavior with concrete, and in the other case liner was assumed to be no bond with concrete. (authors)

  13. Strain hardening and fracture behavior during tension of directionally solidified high-nitrogen austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Galina; Astafurova, Elena; Melnikov, Eugene; Moskvina, Valentina; Galchenko, Nina

    2017-12-01

    The effect of grain orientation relative to tensile load on the strain hardening behavior and fracture mechanism of directionally solidified high-nitrogen steel Fe-20Cr-22Mn-1.5V-0.2C-0.6N (in wt %) was studied. The tensile samples oriented along the longitudinal direction of columnar grains demonstrated the improved mechanical properties compared to specimens with the transversal directions of columnar grains: the values of tensile strength and strain-to-fracture were as high as 1080 MPa and 22%, respectively, for tension along the columnar grains and 870 MPa and 11%, respectively, for the tension transversal to the columnar grains. The change in the grain orientation relative to the tensile load varies a fracture mode of the steel. The fraction of the transgranular fracture was higher in the samples with longitudinal directions of the columnar grains compared to the transversal ones.

  14. Orientation dependent fracture behavior of nanotwinned copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobler, Aaron; Hahn, Horst; Hodge, Andrea M.; Kübel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Columnar grown nanotwinned Cu was tensile tested in-situ inside the TEM in combination with automated crystal orientation mapping scanning transmission electron microscopy to investigate the active deformation mechanisms present in this material. Two tensile directions were applied, one parallel to the twin boundaries and the other perpendicular to the twin boundaries. In case of tensile testing perpendicular to the twin boundaries, the material deformed by detwinning and the formation of new grains, whereas in the parallel case, no new grains were formed and the fracture happened along the twin boundaries and a boundary that has formed during the deformation

  15. Determination of the resistance to tensile fracture of refractory mixtures of gunite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Sanchez, A; Tomba Martinez, A.G

    2004-01-01

    The determination of the mechanical properties of cooled refractory mixtures is useful since it allows the materials to be compared for the purposes of selection and reports on their degree of internal cohesion, green or calcination, so that their structural ability can be estimated, especially during installation. Given the testing difficulties originating in the fragility of the ceramic materials, the tension test is not generally used in refractories. However, ASTM C-307 94 determines the tensile strength of cured chemical-resistant materials, for which this work considered the possibility of testing cement-based monolithic refractories in this non conventional condition. The tensile resistance to the fracture of three different refractory mixtures (A, B 1 and B 2 ), used in heat repairing by gunite in coking ovens, that were characterized by chemical, granulometric, and mineralogical analysis pycnometric density measurements. The pieces for the tests ('bone' type: length = 75 mm, maximum width = 40 mm, minimum width = 25 mm, thickness = 10 - 25 mm) were prepared by ramming of mixtures of material/water in a metallic mold; they were sinterized (1200 o C, 1h) and characterized by measures of bulk density, porosity and observation of the surface texture, in green and calcinated. The tensile tests, based on ASTM C-307 94, were performed in an Instron model 4467 machine in open air, at room temperature and position control (0.5 mm/min). The following values were obtained, in kPa: AW347±308; B 1 W738±130; B 2 W604±64. These values were lower than those for the tensile fracture module (MOR), although they displayed an equivalent order: A≤B 2 ≤B 1 . This was related to the characteristics of each refractory mixture and at the end of the pieces tested (CW)

  16. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness.

  17. Effect of Normalizing Temperature on Fracture Characteristic of Tensile and Impact Tested Creep Strength-Enhanced Ferritic P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, N.; Pandey, C.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2017-11-01

    The high-temperature Cr-Mo creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steels are mainly used in nuclear and thermal power plants. In the present investigation, a systematic study on fracture surface morphologies of tensile and impact tested specimens and mechanical properties of cast and forged (C&F) P92 steel was performed for various heat treatment conditions. The heat treatment was carried out in normalizing temperature range of 950-1150 °C and then tempered to a fixed tempering temperature of 760 °C. The effect of varying normalizing temperatures before and after tempering on microstructure evolution, tensile properties, Vicker's hardness and Charpy toughness was studied. The normalizing temperature before and after tempering was having a noticeable effect on mechanical properties of as-received P92 steel. The fracture surface of impact and tensile tested samples was also studied for various normalizing temperatures with or without tempering. Fracture surface morphology was affected by the presence of secondary phase carbide particles. The fraction area of cleavage facets on the tensile fracture surface was found to be increased with an increase in the normalizing temperature. The fractured tensile specimens were characterized by transgranular ductile dimples, tear ridges and transgranular cleavage facets for various heat treatments. The fracture mode of impact tested samples was more complex. It showed both quasi-cleavage facets and ductile dimple tearing for various normalizing temperatures.

  18. Finite Element Modeling of Tensile Deformation Behaviors of Iron Syntactic Foam with Hollow Glass Microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yi Je; Lee, Wookjin; Park, Yong Ho

    2017-10-19

    The elastoplastic deformation behaviors of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foam under tension were modeled using a representative volume element (RVE) approach. The three-dimensional microstructures of the iron syntactic foam with 5 wt % glass microspheres were reconstructed using the random sequential adsorption algorithm. The constitutive behavior of the elastoplasticity in the iron matrix and the elastic-brittle failure for the glass microsphere were simulated in the models. An appropriate RVE size was statistically determined by evaluating elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield strength in terms of model sizes and boundary conditions. The model was validated by the agreement with experimental findings. The tensile deformation mechanism of the syntactic foam considering the fracture of the microspheres was then investigated. In addition, the feasibility of introducing the interfacial deboning behavior to the proposed model was briefly investigated to improve the accuracy in depicting fracture behaviors of the syntactic foam. It is thought that the modeling techniques and the model itself have major potential for applications not only in the study of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foams, but also for the design of composites with a high modulus matrix and high strength reinforcement.

  19. Finite Element Modeling of Tensile Deformation Behaviors of Iron Syntactic Foam with Hollow Glass Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Je Cho

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The elastoplastic deformation behaviors of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foam under tension were modeled using a representative volume element (RVE approach. The three-dimensional microstructures of the iron syntactic foam with 5 wt % glass microspheres were reconstructed using the random sequential adsorption algorithm. The constitutive behavior of the elastoplasticity in the iron matrix and the elastic-brittle failure for the glass microsphere were simulated in the models. An appropriate RVE size was statistically determined by evaluating elastic modulus, Poisson’s ratio, and yield strength in terms of model sizes and boundary conditions. The model was validated by the agreement with experimental findings. The tensile deformation mechanism of the syntactic foam considering the fracture of the microspheres was then investigated. In addition, the feasibility of introducing the interfacial deboning behavior to the proposed model was briefly investigated to improve the accuracy in depicting fracture behaviors of the syntactic foam. It is thought that the modeling techniques and the model itself have major potential for applications not only in the study of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foams, but also for the design of composites with a high modulus matrix and high strength reinforcement.

  20. Coating of carbon nanotube fibers: variation of tensile properties, failure behavior and adhesion strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith eMäder

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the tensile properties of CNT fibers and their interphasial behavior in epoxy matrices is reported. One of the most promising applications of CNT fibers is their use as reinforcement in multifunctional composites. For this purpose, an increase of the tensile strength of the CNT fibers in unidirectional composites as well as strong interfacial adhesion strength is desirable. However, the mechanical performance of the CNT fiber composites manufactured so far is comparable to that of commercial fiber composites. The interfacial properties of CNT fiber/polymer composites have rarely been investigated and provided CNT fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength of 14.4 MPa studied by the microbond test.In order to improve the mechanical performance of the CNT fibers, an epoxy compatible coating with nano-dispersed aqueous based polymeric film formers and low viscous epoxy resin, respectively, was applied. For impregnation of high homogeneity, low molecular weight epoxy film formers and polyurethane film formers were used. The aqueous based epoxy film formers were not crosslinked and able to interdiffuse with the matrix resin after impregnation. Due to good wetting of the individual CNT fibers by the film formers, the degree of activation of the fibers was improved leading to increased tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Cyclic tensile loading and simultaneous determination of electric resistance enabled to characterize the fiber’s durability in terms of elastic recovery and hysteresis.The pull-out tests and SEM study reveal different interfacial failure mechanisms in CNT fiber/epoxy systems for untreated and film former treated fibers, on the one hand, and epoxy resin treated ones, on the other hand. The epoxy resin penetrated between the CNT bundles in the reference or film former coated fiber, forming a relatively thick CNT/epoxy composite layer and thus shifting the fracture zone within the fiber. In contrast to this

  1. Tensile properties and fracture of (α+γ) two phase stainless steel with fine grained microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogiyama, Hiroyuki; Tsukuda, Hitoshi; Soyama, Yoshiro

    1989-01-01

    The tensile properties and fracture of the (α+γ) two phase stainless steel with very fine γ grains were investigated. Two different microstructures with very fine γ grains can be obtianed by the thermomechanical treatments; One has both very fine γ and α grains, and the other has very fine γ and large α grains. The specimens were prepared in quenched and aged (475degC) conditions. The results obtained are as follows. The 0.2 % proof stress and tensile strength increase with the aging at 475degC for all specimens. The refinement of the γ grains plays an important role for the increase of strength in both quenched and aged conditions, and also for the ductility in the quenched condition. The refinement of α grains, however, contributes to the increase of the ductility in the aged condition. Accordingly, it is found that very good combinations of tensile strength and ductility can be achieved by the aging and the refinement of the γ and α grains (micro duplex structure). (author)

  2. Cascading lake drainage on the Greenland Ice Sheet triggered by tensile shock and fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Poul; Bougamont, Marion; Hubbard, Alun; Doyle, Samuel H; Grigsby, Shane; Pettersson, Rickard

    2018-03-14

    Supraglacial lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet are expanding inland, but the impact on ice flow is equivocal because interior surface conditions may preclude the transfer of surface water to the bed. Here we use a well-constrained 3D model to demonstrate that supraglacial lakes in Greenland drain when tensile-stress perturbations propagate fractures in areas where fractures are normally absent or closed. These melt-induced perturbations escalate when lakes as far as 80 km apart form expansive networks and drain in rapid succession. The result is a tensile shock that establishes new surface-to-bed hydraulic pathways in areas where crevasses transiently open. We show evidence for open crevasses 135 km inland from the ice margin, which is much farther inland than previously considered possible. We hypothesise that inland expansion of lakes will deliver water and heat to isolated regions of the ice sheet's interior where the impact on ice flow is potentially large.

  3. Reduction of cross section area at fracture in tensile test: measurement and applications for flat sheet steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, P.; Freudenthaler, J.; Weissböck, T.

    2017-09-01

    This contribution deals with the use of maximum thinning and reduction of sample cross section area at fracture after tensile testing and applications for industrial flat sheet steels. Although included in all usual tensile testing standards, this mechanical property (“Z-value”) has long been neglected for flat sheet materials. It happens however to include some most valuable information on local ductility at fracture of sheet steels. This is increasingly needed for a more suitable description and ranking of newly developed advanced high strength sheet steels with regard to local ductility (stretch-flangeability, bendability, crash-ability) versus global ductility (deep-drawability). It is shown in this investigation that the ISO16630 punched and milled hole expansion ratio correlates linearly with the relative thickness reduction at fracture. A classification of cold rolled AHSS-UHSS sheet steels is attempted by plotting the relative thickness & area reduction at fracture vs. uniform and fracture elongation.

  4. Effect of alcoholic treated MWCNT on tensile behavior of epoxy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tensile strength, Young's modulus, and Elongation are found to be effectively improved with the addition of alcoholic functionalized MWCNT in epoxy matrix. Increased tensile strength and elastic modulus of epoxy composites loaded with the alcoholic functionalized MWCNT are observed through experimental studies.

  5. Numerical Study on the Tensile Behavior of 3D Four Directional Cylindrical Braided Composite Shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoqi; Wang, Jiayi; Hao, Wenfeng; Liu, Yinghua; Luo, Ying

    2017-10-01

    The tensile behavior of 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts was analyzed with the numerical method. The unit cell models for the 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts with various braiding angles were constructed with ABAQUS. Hashin's failure criterion was used to analyze the tensile strength and the damage evolution of the unit cells. The influence of the braiding angle on the tensile behavior of the 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts was analyzed. The numerical results showed that the tensile strength along the braiding direction increased as the braiding angle decreased. These results should play an integral role in the design of braiding composites shafts.

  6. Characterising the fracture toughness of polymers at moderately high rates of loading with the use of instrumented tensile impact testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Roy; Caimmi, F.; Pavan, A.

    2013-01-01

    The more common use of instrumentation in impact testing opened up the possibility to apply fracture mechanics testing methods to polymers at moderately high impact rates. Tensile impact testing offers some advantages over the more common three-point bending and compact tension geometries. Most

  7. Development of a new code to solve hydro-mechanical coupling, shear failure and tensile failure due to hydraulic fracturing operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    María Gómez Castro, Berta; De Simone, Silvia; Carrera, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, there are still some unsolved relevant questions which must be faced if we want to proceed to the hydraulic fracturing in a safe way. How much will the fracture propagate? This is one of the most important questions that have to be solved in order to avoid the formation of pathways leading to aquifer targets and atmospheric release. Will the fracture failure provoke a microseismic event? Probably this is the biggest fear that people have in fracking. The aim of this work (developed as a part of the EU - FracRisk project) is to understand the hydro-mechanical coupling that controls the shear of existing fractures and their propagation during a hydraulic fracturing operation, in order to identify the key parameters that dominate these processes and answer the mentioned questions. This investigation focuses on the development of a new C++ code which simulates hydro-mechanical coupling, shear movement and propagation of a fracture. The framework employed, called Kratos, uses the Finite Element Method and the fractures are represented with an interface element which is zero thickness. This means that both sides of the element lie together in the initial configuration (it seems a 1D element in a 2D domain, and a 2D element in a 3D domain) and separate as the adjacent matrix elements deform. Since we are working in hard, fragile rocks, we can assume an elastic matrix and impose irreversible displacements in fractures when rock failure occurs. The formulation used to simulate shear and tensile failures is based on the analytical solution proposed by Okada, 1992 and it is part of an iterative process. In conclusion, the objective of this work is to employ the new code developed to analyze the main uncertainties related with the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractures derived from the hydraulic fracturing operations.

  8. Direct assessment of tensile stress-crack opening behavior of Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2012-01-01

    The process of designing Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC) is driven by the need to achieve certain performance parameters in tension. These are typically the pseudo-strain hardening behavior and the ability to develop multiple cracks. The assessment of the tensile load-deformation ......The process of designing Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC) is driven by the need to achieve certain performance parameters in tension. These are typically the pseudo-strain hardening behavior and the ability to develop multiple cracks. The assessment of the tensile load......-deformation behavior of these materials is therefore of great importance and is frequently carried out by characterizing the material tensile stress–strain behavior. In this paper an alternative approach to evaluate the tensile performance of SHCC is investigated. The behavior of the material in tension is studied...... at the level of a single crack. The derived tensile stress-crack opening behavior is utilized to analyze and compare the influence of various composite parameters on the resulting tensile behavior. The deformations occurring during tensile loading are furthermore examined using a digital image...

  9. Tensile behavior of orthorhombic alpha ''-titanium alloy studied by in situ X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X.D.; Lou, H.B.; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    The tensile behavior of a Ti-11%Zr-14%Nb-10%Sn alloy with pure orthorhombic alpha '' phase was studied by in situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. It is found that no phase transformation happens during the whole tensile process. The "double-yielding" platforms of this alloy...

  10. Tensile mechanical behavior of hollow and filled carbon nanotubes under tension or combined tension-torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byeong-Woo; Lim, Jang-Keun; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    The tensile mechanical behavior of hollow and filled single-walled carbon nanotubes under tension or combined tension-torsion is examined using classical molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations indicate that the tensile strength under combined tension-torsion can be increased by filling the carbon nanotubes, and the amount of this increase depends on the kind of filling material. They also predict that the tensile strength under combined tension-torsion decreases linearly under applied torsion. The tensile strength can be modified by adjusting the system temperature and through chemical functionalization to the carbon nanotube walls.

  11. Effect of oxidation agent on wood biomass in ethylene vinyl acetate conductive polymer: tensile properties, tensile fracture surface and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, M. P. M.; Supri, A. G.; Rozyanty, A. R.; Tan, S. J.

    2017-10-01

    The wood fiber (WF) type of Pulverised Wood Filler obtained by combustion process at temperature under 700 °C for 3 hours was characterized and coated with ferric chloride (FeCl3) by ethanol solution. Both carbonized wood fiber (CWF) and carbonized wood fiber-ferric chloride (CWF-FeCl3) were used as filler in ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) conductive polymer. The filler was coated with FeCl3 to enhance the properties of the CWF to achieve progressive mechanical and electrical properties. The CWF and CWF-FeCl3 loading were varied from 2.5 to 10.0 wt%. EVA/CWF and EVA/CWF-FeCl3 conductive polymer were processed by using Brabender Plasticoder at 160 °C with 50 rpm rotor speed for 10 min. The mechanical properties were investigated by tensile testing and the tensile fractured surface of conductive polymers was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Then, the electrical conductivity of conductive polymer was determined by four-point probe I-V measurement system. The EVA/CWF-FeCl3 conductive polymer showed greater electrical conductivity and tensile strength but lower elongation at break than EVA/CWF conductive polymer. SEM morphology displayed rougher surface between CWF-FeCl3 and EVA phases compared to EVA/CWF conductive polymer.

  12. Evaluation of tensile strength and fracture behavior of friction welded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sadhana. Current Issue : Vol. 43, Issue 2 · Current Issue Volume 43 | Issue 2. February 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  13. Evaluation of tensile strength and fracture behavior of friction welded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table 3 shows the peak values of stress and strain achieved at every combination of axial pressure and rotational speed. It has been observed experimentally that as we go on increasing the axial pressure keeping the rotational speed constant, the value of stress also shows increase in trend. The value of stress also found ...

  14. Fracture Behaviors of Additive Manufactured Alloys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced fracture mechanics behavior, especially at depressed, cryogenic temperatures has not been reported in the literature nor is it being pursued in current open...

  15. The Tensile Behavior of High-Strength Carbon Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Tye

    2016-08-01

    Carbon fibers exhibit exceptional properties such as high stiffness and specific strength, making them excellent reinforcements for composite materials. However, it is difficult to directly measure their tensile properties and estimates are often obtained by tensioning fiber bundles or composites. While these macro scale tests are informative for composite design, their results differ from that of direct testing of individual fibers. Furthermore, carbon filament strength also depends on other variables, including the test length, actual fiber diameter, and material flaw distribution. Single fiber tensile testing was performed on high-strength carbon fibers to determine the load and strain at failure. Scanning electron microscopy was also conducted to evaluate the fiber surface morphology and precisely measure each fiber's diameter. Fiber strength was found to depend on the test gage length and in an effort to better understand the overall expected performance of these fibers at various lengths, statistical weak link scaling was performed. In addition, the true Young's modulus was also determined by taking the system compliance into account. It was found that all properties (tensile strength, strain to failure, and Young's modulus) matched very well with the manufacturers' reported values at 20 mm gage lengths, but deviated significantly at other lengths.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Tensile Behavior of Corroded Aluminum Alloy 2024 T3 Considering the Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina C. Vasco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi-scale modeling approach for simulating the tensile behavior of the corroded aluminum alloy 2024 T3 was developed, accounting for both the geometrical features of corrosion damage and the effect of corrosion-induced hydrogen embrittlement (HE. The approach combines two Finite Element (FE models: a model of a three-dimensional Representative Unit Cell (RUC, representing an exfoliated area and its correspondent hydrogen embrittled zone (HEZ, and a model of the tensile specimen. The models lie at the micro- and macro-scales, respectively. The characteristics of the HEZ are determined from measurements of nanoindentation hardness, conducted on pre-corroded specimens. Using the model of the RUC, the local homogenized mechanical behavior of the corroded material is simulated. Then, the behavior of the exfoliated areas is assigned into different areas (elements of the tensile specimen and final analyses are performed to simulate the tensile behavior of the corroded material. The approach was applied to model specimens after 8, 16 and 24 h exposure periods of the Exfoliation Corrosion (EXCO test. For validation of the approach, tensile tests were used. The numerical results show that this approach is suitable for accurately simulating the tensile behavior of pre-corroded experimental specimens, accounting for both geometrical features of corrosion damage and corrosion-induced HE.

  17. Fracture behaviors of isotactic polypropylene/poly(ethylene oxide) blends: Effect of annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Haiyan; Li Xiaoxi; Wang Yonghong; Wu Jun; Huang Ting [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang Yong, E-mail: yongwang1976@163.com [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Immiscible polypropylene/poly(ethylene oxide) was annealed at different temperatures (50-160 deg. C) for 12 h and at 100 deg. C for different durations (12-96 h). {yields} Fracture behaviors of the annealed samples were systematically investigated by means of various measurements. {yields} In a range of annealing temperature (100-140 deg. C), largely improved fracture resistance was observed. {yields} Annealing treatment is favorable for the improvement of the storage modulus of the immiscible polymer blend. - Abstract: As a part of serial work about the toughening of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) during annealing treatment, this work reports the effect of annealing on fracture behaviors of iPP blend with a little of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). Injection-molded bars of an iPP/PEO blend were annealed at different temperatures (50-160 deg. C) for 12 h and at 100 deg. C for different durations (12-96 h). The fracture behaviors of the annealed samples, including notched Izod impact fracture, universal tensile fracture, and single-edge notched tensile (SENT) fracture, were comparatively investigated to establish the role of annealing in improving the fracture resistance of the sample. The results showed that the annealing treatment greatly influences the fracture resistance of the blend. The impact-fractured surface morphologies were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to clarify the possible mechanisms for the improvement of the fracture resistance. It was proposed that, the excellent fracture resistance of iPP with a minor phase of which exhibits relatively low melting temperature can be easily achieved through the simple annealing treatment, even if the minor phase is immiscible with iPP.

  18. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  19. Fracture behavior of various welded steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdemir, Tevfik Ertugrul; Cetinel, Hakan [Celal Bayar Univ., Manisa (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Uyulgan, Bahadir [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    2016-02-01

    In this study, P295GH (17Mn4) pressure vessel steel and AISI 304 stainless steel were joined by using ER 309L electrodes. Welded specimens were fatigued by four point bending experiments. Cracks occurred on the stainless steel side of the weldment during the fatigue tests. Finite element (FE) analyses were conducted by fixing 2-D precracked model for welded 17Mn4 pressure vessel steel and AISI 304 stainless steel by using ER 309L electrodes. True stress and true strain values of the AISI 304, 17Mn4 steels and ER 309L electrodes were determined by tensile tests. Stress analyses were conducted after entering the linear and nonlinear properties of the materials into software manually. Eventually, fracture mechanics analyses were conducted for the model, and J integral fracture toughness values of the crack on the weldment were calculated.

  20. Effects of surface cracks and strain rate on the tensile behavior of Balmoral Red granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardoukhi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental procedure for studying the effects of surface cracks on the mechanical behavior of Balmoral Red granite under dynamic and quasi-static loading. Three different thermal shocks were applied on the surface of the Brazilian Disc test samples by keeping a flame torch at a fixed distance from the sample surface for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Microscopy clearly shows that the number of the surface cracks increases with the duration of the thermal shock. After the thermal shock, the Brazilian Disc tests were performed using a servohydraulic materials testing machine and a compression Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB device. The results show that the tensile strength of the rock decreases and the rate sensitivity of the rock increases as more cracks are introduced to the structure. The DIC analysis of the Brazilian disc tests shows that the fracture of the sample initiates at the center of the samples or slightly closer to the incident bar contact point. This is followed by crushing of the samples at both contact points with the stress bars.

  1. Tensile behavior of a TRIP-aided ultra-fine grained steel studied by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoo, Kazuya; Tomota, Yo; Harjo, Stefanus; Okitsu, Yoshitaka

    2011-01-01

    Tensile behavior of a nano-TRIP steel with 0.4 μm grain size showing tensile strength of 1326 MPa and total elongation of 23% was studied under in situ neutron diffraction. In spite of ultrafine grained structure, this steel realized a high work-hardening leading to a sufficient amount of uniform elongation. In the beginning of tensile deformation, Lueders band appeared similarly to many ultrafine grained materials. The stress induced martensitic transformation was found to occur during the Lueders deformation. A double-peak fitting was applied to the overlapped neutron diffraction profile for martensite and ferrite and then the stress partitioning behavior among ferrite, retained austenite and martensite were tracked during tensile deformation, revealing that the work-hardening after Lueders deformation was caused by higher load sharing of deformation induced martensite. (author)

  2. Effect of oxygen and oxidation on tensile behavior of V-5Cr-5Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Oxidation studies were conducted on V-5Cr-5Ti alloy specimens in an air environment to evaluate the oxygen uptake of the alloy as a function of temperature and exposure time. The oxidation rates calculated from parabolic kinetic measurements of thermogravimetric testing and confirmed by microscopic analyses of cross sections of exposed specimens were 5, 17, and 27 {mu}m per year after exposure at 300, 400, and 500{degrees}C, respectively. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at room temperature and at 500{degrees}C on preoxidized specimens of the alloy to examine the effects of oxidation and oxygen migration on tensile strength and ductility. Microstructural characteristics of several of the tested specimens were determined by electron optics techniques. Correlations were developed between tensile strength and ductility of the oxidized alloy and microstructural characteristics such as oxide thickness, depth of hardened layer, depth on intergranular fracture zone, and transverse crack length.

  3. Strain rate effects on fracture behavior of Austempered Ductile Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Andrew; Bonora, Nicola; Gentile, Domenico; Iannitti, Gianluca; Testa, Gabriel; Hörnqvist Colliander, Magnus; Masaggia, Stefano; Vettore, Federico

    2017-06-01

    Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs), combining high strength, good ductility and low density, are candidates to be a suitable alternative to high-strength steels. Nevertheless, the concern about a low ductility under dynamic loads often leads designers to exclude cast irons for structural applications. However, results from dynamic tensile tests contradict this perception showing larger failure strain with respect to quasistatic data. The fracture behaviour of ADIs depends on damage mechanisms occurring in the spheroids of graphite, in the matrix and at their interface, with the matrix (ausferrite) consisting of acicular ferrite in carbon-enriched austenite. Here, a detailed microstructural analysis was performed on the ADI 1050-6 deformed under different conditions of strain rates, temperatures, and states of stress. Beside the smooth specimens used for uniaxial tensile tests, round notched bars to evaluate the ductility reduction with increasing stress triaxiality and tophat geometries to evaluate the propensity to shear localization and the associated microstructural alterations were tested. The aim of the work is to link the mechanical and fracture behavior of ADIs to the load condition through the microstructural modifications that occur for the corresponding deformation path.

  4. Superplastic Grade Titanium Alloy: Comparative Evaluation of Mechanical Properties, Microstructure, and Fracture Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Sudhakar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, static fracture, microstructure, and the mechanical behavior of SP-700 alloy (a superplastic grade were evaluated and compared with two other titanium alloys. The comparisons were made in terms of suitably designed heat treatment cycles. The heat treatment cycles included annealing and a combination of solutionizing and aging treatments for all three alloys. Tensile properties were determined using MTS Landmark Servohydraulic Test System. Tensile tested samples’ fracture surfaces were investigated with LEO-VP SEM instrument. Ti-15-3-3-3 alloy exhibited relatively a higher combination of strength and ductility in comparison to the other two alloys. All three types of titanium alloys demonstrated a very good level of tensile strength and ductility suitable for applications in military and biomedical fields.

  5. Effects of Low Temperature and High Strain Rate on the Tensile Behaviors of High-Performance Energetic Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhe Jun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To further study the effects of low temperature and high strain rate on the tensile behaviors of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB propellant, an INSTRON testing machine was applied for carrying out the uniaxial tensile tests at low temperatures and room temperature after storage at low temperatures. The strain rates are in the range of 0.40 to 85.71 s−1. Scanning electron microscope (SEM was used for examining the failure mechanisms of HTPB propellant under the test conditions. The results reveal that HTPB propellant is still capable of large deformation at lower strain rates and low temperatures in the glass transition and glass state. The characteristics of stress-strain curves at room temperature after storage at low temperatures are the same with that directly obtained at room temperature. The effect of strain rate on the elastic modulus E at various temperatures is almost the same. However, the effect of strain rate on the maximum tensile stress σm becomes weak with decreasing temperature. Furthermore, the strain εm is nearly independence of the strain rate at higher strain rates and the lowest test temperature in glass state. Continuously decreasing temperature can more easily cause the extensive brittle fracture of AP particles, even at lower strain rates. The temperature changes from room temperature to low temperature and then from low temperature to room temperature in a short time cannot influence the failure mechanism of HTPB propellant at room temperature and high strain rate.

  6. Effect of Different Matrix Compositions and Micro Steel Fibers on Tensile Behavior of Textile Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, J.; Sharifi, I.; Andalibi, K.; Kasaei, J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents results of a research on uniaxial tensile behavior of textile reinforced concrete (TRC) prepared with different matrix compositions containing different contents of micro steel fibers. TRC exhibits very favorable stress-strain behavior, high Load-carrying capacity and a certain ductility which results in a strain-hardening behavior. At this paper, different Glass-TRCs were prepared using different commonly used normal and also innovative matrix compositions containing different volume fractions of micro steel fibers. Three commonly used matrices, a polymer-based composite and also a UHPC mixture were prepared containing different percentages of micro steel fibers. The direct tensile tests were applied on all specimens to study the tensile properties (first crack stress and ultimate tensile strength) and strain-hardening behavior. Considering the stress-strain curves of all specimens, it has been found that the tensile properties and strain-hardening behavior of Glass-TRC can be considerably improved by using steel micro fibers in an appropriate matrix composition.

  7. The tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite posterior to hydrostatic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of prehydrostatic loading on microstructural changes and tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite have been examined. Scanning electron micrographs show that formation of microcracks associated with delamination between basal planes occurs under hydrostatic loading. Hydrostatic loading on specimens results in the decrease in tensile strength and increase in residual strain generated by the applied tensile stress at various levels, indicating that the graphite material is weakened by hydrostatic loading. A relationship between residual strain and applied tensile stress for graphite hydrostatically-loaded at several pressure levels can be approximately expressed as element of= (AP + B) sigmasup(n) over a wide range hydrostatic pressure, where element of, P and sigma denote residual strain, hydrostatic pressure and applied tensile stress, respectively; A, B and n are constant. The effects of prehydrostatic loading on the tensile stress-strain behavior of the graphite were examined in more detail. The ratio of stress after hydrostatic loading to that before hydrostatic loading on the stress-strain relationship remains almost unchanged irrespective of strain. (orig.)

  8. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Raha, S.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  9. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India); Raha, S. [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Computational and Data Sciences (India); Mahapatra, D. Roy, E-mail: droymahapatra@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India)

    2017-02-15

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  10. Tensile testing

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  11. Tensile and fracture properties of an Fe14Mn8Ni1Mo-0.7C fully austenitic weld metal at 4 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, R. L.; Trevisan, R. E.; Reed, R. P.

    A fully austenitic steel butt weld 21 mm thick was produced by submerged arc welding using an experimental filler metal composition: Fe14Mn8Ni1Mo0.7C. The tensile and fracture properties of this weld were measured in liquid helium to evaluate its candidacy for applications at 4 K. The yield strength (1115 MPa) and toughness ( K lc ≈ 192 MPa m1/2) combination of this material compares favourably with existing base metal properties for AISI 304 type alloys. A conventional ductile fracture consisting of void formation and coalescence was shown by both tensile and fracture toughness specimens.

  12. Effect of strain rate and notch geometry on tensile properties and fracture mechanism of creep strength enhanced ferritic P91 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chandan; Mahapatra, M. M.; Kumar, Pradeep; Saini, N.

    2018-01-01

    Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) P91 steel were subjected to room temperature tensile test for quasi-static (less than 10-1/s) strain rate by using the Instron Vertical Tensile Testing Machine. Effect of different type of notch geometry, notch depth and angle on mechanical properties were also considered for different strain rate. In quasi-static rates, the P91 steel showed a positive strain rate sensitivity. On the basis of tensile data, fracture toughness of P91 steel was also calculated numerically. For 1 mm notch depth (constant strain rate), notch strength and fracture toughness were found to be increased with increase in notch angle from 45° to 60° while the maximum value attained in U-type notch. Notch angle and notch depth has found a minute effect on P91 steel strength and fracture toughness. The fracture surface morphology was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM).

  13. Fracture behavior of C/SiC composites at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Jae Hoon; Shin, Ihn Cheol; Lim, Byung Joo [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    The fracture behavior of carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composites used in rocket nozzles has been investigated under tension, compression, and fracture conditions at room temperature, 773 K and 1173 K. The C/SiC composites used in this study were manufactured by liquid silicon infiltration process at ~1723 K. All experiments were conducted using two types of specimens, considering fiber direction and oxidation condition. Experimental results show that temperature, fiber direction, and oxidation condition affect the behavior of C/SiC composites. Oxidation was found to be the main factor that changes the strength of C/SiC composites. By applying an anti-oxidation coating, the tensile and compressive strengths of the C/SiC composites increased with temperature. The fracture toughness of the C/SiC composites also increased with increase temperature. A fractography analysis of the fractured specimens was conducted using a scanning electron microscope.

  14. A modified Johnson–Cook model of dynamic tensile behaviors for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ding-Ni; Shangguan, Qian-Qian; Xie, Can-Jun; Liu, Fu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The dynamic mechanical behaviors at various strain rates were measured. • The strain rate hardening effect of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy is significant. • A new Johnson–Cook constitutive model of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy was obtained. • Numerical simulations of tensile tests at different rates were conducted. • Accuracy of the modified Johnson–Cook constitutive equation was proved. - Abstract: The dynamic mechanical behaviors of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy at various strain rates were measured by dynamic tensile tests using the electronic universal testing machine, high velocity testing system and split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB). Stress–strain curves at different rates were obtained. The results show that the strain rate hardening effect of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy is significant. By modifying the strain rate hardening term in the Johnson–Cook constitutive model, a new Johnson–Cook (JC) constitutive model of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive model, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different rates for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy were conducted. According to tensile loading and stress–strain relation of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy, calculation results were compared with experimental results. Accuracy of the modified Johnson–Cook constitutive equation was further proved

  15. Study on the Tensile Creep Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes-Reinforced Sn-58Bi Solder Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Liu, Haixiang; Zhang, Yaocheng

    2018-01-01

    The microstructure and tensile creep behavior of plain Sn-58Bi solder and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-reinforced composite solder joints were investigated. The stress exponent n under different stresses and the creep activation energy Q c under different temperatures of solder joints were obtained by an empirical equation. The results reveal that the microstructure of the composite solder joint is refined and the tensile creep resistance is improved by CNTs. The improvement of creep behavior is due to the microstructural change of the composite solder joints, since the CNTs could provide more obstacles for dislocation pile-up, which enhances the values of the stress exponent and the creep activation energy. The steady-state tensile creep rates of plain solder and composite solder joints are increased with increasing temperature and applied stress. The tensile creep constitutive equations of plain solder and composite solder joints are written as \\dot{ɛ }_{s1} = 14.94( {σ /G} )^{3.7} \\exp ( { - 81444/RT} ) and \\dot{ɛ }_{s2} = 2.5( {σ /G} )^{4.38} \\exp ( { - 101582/RT} ) , respectively. The tensile creep mechanism of the solder joints is the effects of lattice diffusion determined by dislocation climbing.

  16. Tensile Behavior Analysis on Different Structures of 3D Glass Woven Perform for Fibre Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Hussain Peerzada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three common 3D (Three Dimensional Glass woven structures were studied to analyze the tensile behavior. Each type of strand (Warp, weft and binder of 3D woven structure was studied in detail. Crimp percentage of those strands was measured by crimp meter. Standard size samples of each 3D woven structure were cut in warp and weft direction and were stretched by Instron Tensile testing computerized machine. Results reveal that hybrid possesses lowest crimp in core strands and higher strength in warp as well as weft direction. Layer to layer woven structure appeared with lower strength and higher strain value due to highest crimp percentage in core strands.

  17. Fracture Testing with Surface Crack Specimens. [especially the residual tensile strength test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recommendations are given for the design, preparation, and static fracture testing of surface crack specimens. The recommendations are preceded by background information including discussions of stress intensity factors, crack opening displacements, and fracture toughness values associated with surface crack specimens. Cyclic load and sustained load tests are discussed briefly.

  18. Tensile behavior of directionally solidified Ni3Al intermetallics with different Al contents and solidification rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun; Gu, Jiho; Kim, Sangshik; Hong, Hyunuk; Choi, Heekyu; Lee, Jehyun

    2014-03-01

    Despite the excellent high temperature mechanical properties of the Ni3Al intermetallic compound, its application is still limited due to its inherently weak grain boundary. Recent research advances have demonstrated that the tensile ductility can be enhanced by controlling the grain morphology using a directional solidification. In this study, a series of directional solidification experiments were carried out to increase both the tensile ductility and the strength of Ni3Al alloys by arraying either the ductile phase of γ-Ni-rich dendrite fibers or the hard phase of β-NiAl dendrite fibers in the γ'-Ni3Al matrix. The dendrite arm spacing could be controlled by the solidification rate, and the volume fraction of the γ or β phase could be altered by the Al content, ranging from 23 at.% to 27 at.%. With an increasing Al content, the γ dendritic microstructure was transformed into the β dendrite in the γ' matrix, thereby reducing the tensile ductility by increasing the volume fraction of brittle β dendrites in the γ' matrix. With an increasing solidification rate, the dendrite arm spacing decreased and the tensile properties of Ni3Al varied in a complex manner. The microstructural evolution affecting the tensile behavior of directionally solidified Ni3Al alloy specimens with different solidification rates and Al contents is discussed.

  19. Facile Synthesis and Tensile Behavior of TiO2 One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shu-you

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-yield synthesis of TiO2 one-dimensional (1D nanostructures was realized by a simple annealing of Ni-coated Ti grids in an argon atmosphere at 950 °C and 760 torr. The as-synthesized 1D nanostructures were single crystalline rutile TiO2 with the preferred growth direction close to [210]. The growth of these nanostructures was enhanced by using catalytic materials, higher reaction temperature, and longer reaction time. Nanoscale tensile testing performed on individual 1D nanostructures showed that the nanostructures appeared to fracture in a brittle manner. The measured Young’s modulus and fracture strength are ~56.3 and 1.4 GPa, respectively.

  20. Dynamic Fracturing Behavior of Layered Rock with Different Inclination Angles in SHPB Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiadong Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fracturing behavior of layered rocks is usually influenced by bedding planes. In this paper, five groups of bedded sandstones with different bedding inclination angles θ are used to carry out impact compression tests by split Hopkinson pressure bar. A high-speed camera is used to capture the fracturing process of specimens. Based on testing results, three failure patterns are identified and classified, including (A splitting along bedding planes; (B sliding failure along bedding planes; (C fracturing across bedding planes. The failure pattern (C can be further classified into three subcategories: (C1 fracturing oblique to loading direction; (C2 fracturing parallel to loading direction; (C3 mixed fracturing across bedding planes. Meanwhile, a numerical model of layered rock and SHPB system are established by particle flow code (PFC. The numerical results show that the shear stress is the main reason for inducing the damage along bedding plane at θ = 0°~75°. Both tensile stress and shear stress on bedding planes contribute to the splitting failure along bedding planes when the inclination angle is 90°. Besides, tensile stress is the main reason that leads to the damage in rock matrixes at θ = 0°~90°.

  1. Mechanical Behavior of Red Sandstone under Incremental Uniaxial Cyclical Compressive and Tensile Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyun Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniaxial experiments were carried out on red sandstone specimens to investigate their short-term and creep mechanical behavior under incremental cyclic compressive and tensile loading. First, based on the results of short-term uniaxial incremental cyclic compressive and tensile loading experiments, deformation characteristics and energy dissipation were analyzed. The results show that the stress-strain curve of red sandstone has an obvious memory effect in the compressive and tensile loading stages. The strains at peak stresses and residual strains increase with the cycle number. Energy dissipation, defined as the area of the hysteresis loop in the stress-strain curves, increases nearly in a power function with the cycle number. Creep test of the red sandstone was also conducted. Results show that the creep curve under each compressive or tensile stress level can be divided into decay and steady stages, which cannot be described by the conventional Burgers model. Therefore, an improved Burgers creep model of rock material is constructed through viscoplastic mechanics, which agrees very well with the experimental results and can describe the creep behavior of red sandstone better than the Burgers creep model.

  2. A Study on Mechanical behavior of Tensile Specimen Fabricated by Laser Cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Y. G.; Kim, G. S.; Baik, S. J.; Baek, S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical testing data are required for the assessment of dry storage of the spent nuclear fuel. Laser cutting system could be useful tools for material processing such as cutting in radioactive environment due to non-contact nature, ease in handling and the laser cutting process is most advantageous, offering the narrow kerf width and heat affected zone by using small beam spot diameter. The feasibility of the laser cutting system was demonstrated for the fabrication of various types of the unirradiated cladding with and without oxide layer on the specimens. In the present study, the dimensional measurement and tensile test were conducted to investigate the mechanical behavior of the axial tensile test specimens depending on the material processing methods in a hot cell at IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) of KAERI. Laser cutting system was used to fabricate the tensile test specimens, and the mechanical behavior was investigated using the dimensional measurement and tensile test. It was shown that the laser beam machining could be a useful tool to fabricate the specimens and this technique will be developed for the fabrication of various types of irradiated specimens in a hotcell

  3. Fracture, Longevity (Fatigue), Dynamics, and Aeroelasticity of Composite Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-31

    previous year examining the fracture behavior of a woven fabric .’." graphite/epoxy prepreg (Hercules A370-5H/3501-6) was more aggresively pursued this...tensile fracture, nonlinear stress- strain behavior , failure by delamination, sensitivity to notches under tensile loading, compressive failure...2.2 Fracture of Unnotched Tensile Coupons 10 2.3 Nonlinear Stress-Strain Behavior of 20 Graphite/Epoxy Laminates 2.4 Comparison of Tapered and Straight

  4. A Study on Tensile Behavior and Water Uptake of Wood Powder-Composites Based on Epoxy and Unsaturated Polyester Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Amir hossein Pirayeshfar; M.Mahdi Jalili; Yahya Musavi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, two kinds of epoxy resins (i.e. high-viscosity and low-viscosity) as well as one polyester resin (orthophthalic grade) were selected and examined as pure resins and also as a polymeric matrix for producing wood-composites. In this study, tensile properties, water uptake, and degradation of samples in water were also investigated. The results show that addition of wood particles to the thermoset resins strongly impresses on their tensile behavior and water uptake. Tensile studie...

  5. Characterization of Tensile Mechanical Behavior of MSCs/PLCL Hybrid Layered Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Intan Pangesty

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A layered construct was developed by combining a porous polymer sheet and a cell sheet as a tissue engineered vascular patch. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the influence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs sheet on the tensile mechanical properties of porous poly-(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone (PLCL sheet. The porous PLCL sheet was fabricated by the solid-liquid phase separation method and the following freeze-drying method. The MSCs sheet, prepared by the temperature-responsive dish, was then layered on the top of the PLCL sheet and cultured for 2 weeks. During the in vitro study, cellular properties such as cell infiltration, spreading and proliferation were evaluated. Tensile test of the layered construct was performed periodically to characterize the tensile mechanical behavior. The tensile properties were then correlated with the cellular properties to understand the effect of MSCs sheet on the variation of the mechanical behavior during the in vitro study. It was found that MSCs from the cell sheet were able to migrate into the PLCL sheet and actively proliferated into the porous structure then formed a new layer of MSCs on the opposite surface of the PLCL sheet. Mechanical evaluation revealed that the PLCL sheet with MSCs showed enhancement of tensile strength and strain energy density at the first week of culture which is characterized as the effect of MSCs proliferation and its infiltration into the porous structure of the PLCL sheet. New technique was presented to develop tissue engineered patch by combining MSCs sheet and porous PLCL sheet, and it is expected that the layered patch may prolong biomechanical stability when implanted in vivo.

  6. A constitutive model of porous SMAs considering tensile-compressive asymmetry behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingfei; Dui, Guansuo; Xie, Benming; Xue, Lijun

    2014-04-01

    A constitutive model of the macroscopic behaviors of porous shape memory alloys (SMA) is developed in this work. A yield function for porous SMAs considering both the effect of hydrostatic stress and the tensile-compressive asymmetry is proposed. Combining the constitutive model of dense SMAs and the macroscale and microscale analysis, the evolution equation for the overall transformation strain is then derived. Examples for the response of both dense SMA and porous Ni-Ti SMA subjected to uniaxial tension and compression loads are supplied. Good agreement between the numerical prediction results and the published experimental data is observed. Numerical result shows that the yielding stresses, loop width and length, strain-hardening behaviors of porous SMAs under pure tensile and pure compressive are different. Importantly, the transformation initiation stress is much closer to the experiment result than simulated by Zhao et al. (2005). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Modeling of material orientation effects on AHSS crush and fracture behavior in axial crush tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guofei; Link, Todd M; Shi, Ming F; Tyan, Tau

    2013-01-01

    Due to the rolling manufacturing process, most advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) demonstrate in-plane anisotropic material behavior. This study investigates the effects of material orientation on the axial crush behavior and fracture of AHSS with axial crush tests and computer simulations. Crush simulation models considering material anisotropy and damage evolution were developed in LS-DYNA based on the drop-tower crush test results and coupon characterization test data for DP780 steel. The modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC) isotropic fracture model was employed in the crush simulation models for fracture prediction. The 12-sided components fabricated in the transverse (T) direction of the sheet exhibited slightly higher crush loads and reduced crush distances compared to those in the longitudinal (L) direction. The crush behavior in each direction was generally proportional to ultimate tensile strength. All of the materials investigated in this study showed some cracking in the crush tests for both component orientations, but only DP780 showed significant anisotropy in fracture behavior with more cracking for the T direction compared to the L direction. Overall, the amount of cracking observed in the tests had little or no significant effect on the axial crush performance. The MMC fracture loci in both the L and T directions were determined using a reverse engineering approach, and the stress-strain curves beyond the uniform elongation point were extended using an optimization method. Both material models MAT103 and MAT224 predicted the crush and fracture behavior with reasonably good accuracy. The predicted fracture mode and force-displacement curves agreed well with the test data for both the L and T directions in axial crush tests of the 12-sided components. The simple isotropic material model MAT224 is adequate for crush simulations to predict material orientation effects on AHSS component crush performance and fracture behavior.

  8. Influence of Dynamic Strain Aging on Tensile Deformation Behavior of Alloy 617

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M.W. Ekaputra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the dynamic strain aging (DSA behavior of Alloy 617, high-temperature tensile tests were carried out with strain rates variations of 10−3/s, 10−4/s, and 10−5/s from 24°C to 950°C. Five flow relationships, Hollomon, Ludwik, Swift, Ludwigson, and Voce, were applied to describe the tensile true stress–strain curves, and the DSA region was defined. In describing the tensile curves, Ludwigson's equation was superior to the other equations, and the DSA region was adequately defined by this equation as plateaus at intermediate temperatures from 200°C to 700°C. It was identified that Alloy 617 is dominated by three types of serrations, known as Types D, A+B, and C. The activation energy values for each serration type were obtained by the Arrhenius equation. By using the obtained activation energy values, the serrated yielding map and the DSA mechanism were drawn and manifested. In addition, the relationship between the tensile strength and strain rate at higher temperatures above 700°C was found to be closely related to the amounts of slip lines. In the scanning electron microscope (SEM fractographs, there was a significant difference at the low, intermediate, and high temperatures, but almost the same to the three strain rates.

  9. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700/sup 0/C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625/sup 0/C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities.

  10. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700 0 C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625 0 C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities

  11. The Corrosion Characteristics and Tensile Behavior of Reinforcement under Coupled Carbonation and Static Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Xu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the non-uniform corrosion characteristics and mechanical properties of reinforcement under coupled action of carbonation and static loading. The two parameters, namely area-box (AB value and arithmetical mean deviation (Ra, are adopted to characterize the corrosion morphology and pitting distribution from experimental observations. The results show that the static loading affects the corrosion characteristics of reinforcement. Local stress concentration in corroded reinforcement caused by tensile stress drives the corrosion pit pattern to be more irregular. The orthogonal test results from finite element simulations show that pit shape and pit depth are the two significant factors affecting the tensile behavior of reinforcement. Under the condition of similar corrosion mass loss ratio, the maximum plastic strain of corroded reinforcement increases with the increase of Ra and load time-history significantly.

  12. Effect of Preparation Methods on Crystallization Behavior and Tensile Strength of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Xiaolong; Wu, Chunrui

    2013-11-21

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes were prepared by non solvent induced phase separation (NIPS), melt spinning and the solution-cast method. The effect of preparation methods with different membrane formation mechanisms on crystallization behavior and tensile strength of PVDF membranes was investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to examine the crystal form of the surface layers and the overall membranes, respectively. Spherulite morphologies and thermal behavior of the membranes were studied by polarized light optical microscopy (PLO) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) separately. It was found that the crystallization behavior of PVDF membranes was closely related to the preparation methods. For membranes prepared by the NIPS method, the skin layers had a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase, and the total crystallinity was 60.0% with no spherulite. For melt spinning membranes, the surface layers also showed a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase. The total crystallinity was 48.7% with perfect spherulites. Whereas the crystallization behavior of solution-cast membranes was related to the evaporation temperature and the additive, when the evaporation temperature was 140 °C with a soluble additive in the dope solution, obvious spherulites appeared. The crystalline morphology of PVDF exerted a great influence on the tensile strength of the membranes, which was much higher with perfect spherulites.

  13. Interpretation of dynamic tensile behavior by austenite stability in ferrite-austenite duplex lightweight steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyeong; Jo, Min Cheol; Jeong, Hyeok Jae; Sohn, Seok Su; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-11-16

    Phenomena occurring in duplex lightweight steels under dynamic loading are hardly investigated, although its understanding is essentially needed in applications of automotive steels. In this study, quasi-static and dynamic tensile properties of duplex lightweight steels were investigated by focusing on how TRIP and TWIP mechanisms were varied under the quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. As the annealing temperature increased, the grain size and volume fraction of austenite increased, thereby gradually decreasing austenite stability. The strain-hardening rate curves displayed a multiple-stage strain-hardening behavior, which was closely related with deformation mechanisms. Under the dynamic loading, the temperature rise due to adiabatic heating raised the austenite stability, which resulted in the reduction in the TRIP amount. Though the 950 °C-annealed specimen having the lowest austenite stability showed the very low ductility and strength under the quasi-static loading, it exhibited the tensile elongation up to 54% as well as high strain-hardening rate and tensile strength (1038 MPa) due to appropriate austenite stability under dynamic loading. Since dynamic properties of the present duplex lightweight steels show the excellent strength-ductility combination as well as continuously high strain hardening, they can be sufficiently applied to automotive steel sheets demanded for stronger vehicle bodies and safety enhancement.

  14. Contraction Twinning Dominated Tensile Deformation and Subsequent Fracture in Extruded Mg-1Mn (Wt Pct) at Ambient Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkedath, A.; Maiti, T.; Bohlen, J.; Yi, S.; Letzig, D.; Eisenlohr, P.; Boehlert, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    Due to their excellent strength-to-weight ratio, Mg alloys are attractive for applications where weight savings are critical. However, the limited cold formability of wrought Mg alloys severely restricts their widespread usage. In order to study the role that deformation twinning might play in limiting the elongation-to-failure ({ɛ} f ), in-situ tensile tests along the extrusion axis of Mg-1Mn (wt pct) were performed at 323 K, 423 K, and 523 K. The alloy exhibited a strong basal texture such that most of the grains experienced compression along their -axis during deformation. At 323 K, fracture occurred at about 10 pct strain. Although basal, prismatic, and pyramidal slip activity was observed along with extension twinning, contraction twinning significantly influenced the deformation, and such twins evolved into {10{\\bar{1}} 1}-{10{\\bar{1}} 2} double twins. Crystal plasticity simulation showed localized shear deformation within the contraction twins and double twins due to the enhanced activity of basal slip in the reoriented twin volume. Due to this, the twin-matrix interface was identified to be a potential crack initiation site. Thus, contraction twins were considered to have led to the failure of the material at a relatively low strain, suggesting that this deformation mode is detrimental to the cold formability of Mg and its alloys. With increasing temperature, there was a significant decrease in the activity of contraction twinning as well as extension twinning, along with a decrease in the tensile strength and an increase in the {ɛ} f value. A combination of basal, prismatic, and pyramidal slips accounted for a large percentage of the observed deformation activity at 423 K and 523 K. The lack of contraction twinning was explained by the expected decrease in the critical resolved shear stress values for pyramidal slip, and the improved {ɛ} f values at elevated temperatures were attributed to the vanishing activity of contraction twinning.

  15. Molecular structure of self-healing polyampholyte hydrogels analyzed from tensile behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao Lin; Luo, Feng; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Karobi, Sadia Nazneen; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2015-12-28

    Recently, charge balanced polyampholytes (PA) have been found to form tough and self-healing hydrogels. This class of physical hydrogels have a very high equilibrated polymer concentration in water (ca. 40-50 wt%), and are strongly viscoelastic. They are synthesized by random copolymerization of equal amounts of oppositely charged monomers at a high concentration, followed by a dialysis process of the small counter-ions and co-ions in water. The randomly distributed, opposite charges of the polymer form multiple ionic bonds of intra- and inter-chains with strength distribution. The strong inter-chain bonds, stabilized by topological entanglement, serve as quasi-permanent crosslinks, imparting the elasticity, while the weak bonds, both inter- and intra-chains, reversibly break and re-form to dissipate energy to toughen the materials. In this work, we intend to clarify the structure of the physical PA hydrogels from the tensile behaviors of the PA hydrogels. To clarify the structure and its formation mechanism, we analysed the tensile behaviors of the samples before and after the dialysis. We separated the quasi-permanent crosslinking of strong inter-chain bonds and the dynamic crosslinking of weak inter-chain bonds by using a combined model that consists of the Upper Convected Maxwell model and the Gent strain hardening model. The model fitting of the tensile behaviors extracts quantitative structural parameters, including the densities of weak and strong inter-chain bonds and the theoretical finite extensibility of polymer chains. Based on the fitting results of the combined model, the structural parameters of partial chains at a fixed observation time, including the Kuhn number, Kuhn length, and chain conformation, are determined using the scaling theory. The effects of monomer concentration at preparation, the effect of dialysis and the initial strain rate on the dynamic structure of PA gels, are discussed based on these analyses.

  16. The tensile behavior of Ti36Ni49Hf15 high temperature shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Q.; Zheng, Y.F.; Cai, W.; Zhao, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, ternary Ti-Ni-Hf alloys have attracted great interest in the field of high temperature shape memory materials research and development. Extensive studies have been made on its manufacture process, constitutional phases, phase transformation behavior, the structure, substructure and interface structure of martensite and the precipitation behavior during ageing. Yet up to date there is no report about the fundamental mechanical properties of Ti-Ni-Hf alloys, such as the stress-strain data, the variation laws of the yield strength and elongation with the temperature. In the present study, tensile tests at various temperatures are employed to investigate the mechanical behavior of Ti-Ni-Hf alloy with different matrix structures, from full martensite to full parent phase structure, with the corresponding deformation mechanism discussed

  17. Effect of High Temperature on the Tensile Behavior of CFRP and Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam A.

    1999-01-01

    Concrete and other composite manufacturing processes are continuing to evolve and become more and more suited for use in non-Earth settings such as the Moon and Mars. The fact that structures built in lunar environments would experience a range of effects from temperature extremes to bombardment by micrometeorites and that all the materials for concrete production exist on the Moon means that concrete appears to be the most feasible building material. it can provide adequate shelter from the harshness of the lunar environment and at the same time be a cost effective building material. With a return to the Moon planned by NASA to occur after the turn of the century, it will be necessary to include concrete manufacturing as one of the experiments to be conducted in one of the coming missions. Concrete's many possible uses and possibilities for manufacturing make it ideal for lunar construction. The objectives of this research are summarized as follows: i) study the possibility of concrete production on the Moon or other planets, ii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of concrete, and iii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of carbon fiber reinforced with inorganic polymer composites. Literature review indicates that production of concrete on the Moon or other planets is feasible using the indigenous materials. Results of this study has shown that both the tensile strength and static elastic modulus of concrete decreased with a rise in temperature from 200 to 500 C. The addition of silica fume to concrete showed higher resistance to high temperatures. Carbon fiber reinforced inorganic polymer (CFRIP) composites seemed to perform well up to 300 C. However, a significant reduction in strength was observed of about 40% at 400 C and up to 80% when the specimens were exposed to 700 C.

  18. Fracture behavior of polymers at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saatkamp, T.

    1991-12-01

    The crack propagation behavior of polymers at cryogenic temperatures is determined by the physical processes taking place at the crack tip. It is demonstrated in this paper that stable or unstable crack growth does not depend on the experimental setup, but on the properties of the polymers. The plastification processes at the crack tip are both temperature and time dependent. The critical energy release rate G IC was measured for three polymers, namely semi-crystalline HDPE, amorphous PS and amophous PC, as a function of the crack opening velocity δ at 4.2 and 77 K, respectively. During unstable crack growth, a crack arrest behavior (stick-slip behavior) caused by adiabatic heating and plastification at the crack tip can be observed in most of the polymers. The little specific heat and thermal conductivity of polymers at cryogenic temperatures lead to considerable temperature increases even at small inelastic deformation energies. Under certain conditions, the increase in temperature is sufficient to attain the dispersion range of the second glass transition, as a result of which plastification is intensified. During these processes, the fracture energy R and, hence, the critical energy release rate G IC are increased considerably. (orig.) [de

  19. Effect of tensile mean stress on fatigue behavior of single-crystal and directionally solidified superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Two nickel base superalloys, single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf, were studied in view of the potential usage of the former and usage of the latter as blade materials for the turbomachinery of the space shuttle main engine. The baseline zero mean stress (ZMS) fatigue life (FL) behavior of these superalloys was established, and then the effect of tensile mean stress (TMS) on their FL behavior was characterized. At room temperature these superalloys have lower ductilities and higher strengths than most polycrystalline engineering alloys. The cycle stress-strain response was thus nominally elastic in most of the fatigue tests. Therefore, a stress range based FL prediction approach was used to characterize both the ZMS and TMS fatigue data. In the past, several researchers have developed methods to account for the detrimental effect of tensile mean stress on the FL for polycrystalline engineering alloys. However, the applicability of these methods to single crystal and directionally solidified superalloys has not been established. In this study, these methods were applied to characterize the TMS fatigue data of single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf and were found to be unsatisfactory. Therefore, a method of accounting for the TMS effect on FL, that is based on a technique proposed by Heidmann and Manson was developed to characterize the TMS fatigue data of these superalloys. Details of this method and its relationship to the conventionally used mean stress methods in FL prediction are discussed.

  20. Characterization of applied tensile stress using domain wall dynamic behavior of grain-oriented electrical steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Fasheng; Ren, Wenwei; Tian, Gui Yun; Gao, Bin

    2017-06-01

    Stress measurement that provides early indication of stress status has become increasingly demanding in the field of Non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E). Bridging the correlation between micro magnetic properties and the applied tensile stress is the first conceptual step to come up with a new method of non-destructive testing. This study investigates the characterization of applied tensile stress with in-situ magnetic domain imaging and their dynamic behaviors by using magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) microscopy assisted with magneto-optical indicator film (MOIF). Threshold magnetic field (TMF) feature to reflect 180 ° domain wall (DW) characteristics behaviors in different grains is proposed for stress detection. It is verified that TMF is a threshold feature with better sensitivity and brings linear correlation for stress characterization in comparison to classical coercive field, remanent magnetization, hysteresis loss and permeability parameters. The results indicate that 180 ° DWs dynamic in the inner grain is highly correlated with stress. The DW dynamics of turn over (TO) tests for different grains is studied to illustrate the repeatability of TMF. Experimental tests of high permeability grain oriented (HGO) electrical steels under stress loading have been conducted to verify this study.

  1. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Yan Ma; Muxin Yang; Ping Jiang; Fuping Yuan; Xiaolei Wu

    2017-01-01

    The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS) with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been ...

  2. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Tensile Deformation Behavior of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys Manufactured by Complex Milling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Y.-K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to manufacture an ODS alloy by combining multiple milling processes in mechanical alloying stage to achieve high strength and fracture elongation. The complex milling process of this study conducted planetary ball milling, cryogenic ball milling and drum ball milling in sequential order, and then the microstructure and tensile deformation behavior were investigated after additional heat treatment. The oxide particles distributed within the microstructure were fine oxide particles of 5~20 nm and coarse oxide particles of 100~200 nm, and the oxide particles were confirmed to be composed of Cr, Ti, Y and O. Results of tensile tests at room temperature measured yield strength, tensile strength and elongation as 1320 MPa, 2245 MPa and 4.2%, respectively, before heat treatment, and 1161 MPa, 2020 MPa and 5.5% after heat treatment. This results indicate that the ODS alloy of this study gained very high strengths compared to other known ODS alloys, allowing greater plastic zones.

  3. A Simplified Micromechanical Modeling Approach to Predict the Tensile Flow Curve Behavior of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Tarun; Kumar, B. Ravi; Singh, Vishal

    2017-11-01

    Micromechanical modeling is used to predict material's tensile flow curve behavior based on microstructural characteristics. This research develops a simplified micromechanical modeling approach for predicting flow curve behavior of dual-phase steels. The existing literature reports on two broad approaches for determining tensile flow curve of these steels. The modeling approach developed in this work attempts to overcome specific limitations of the existing two approaches. This approach combines dislocation-based strain-hardening method with rule of mixtures. In the first step of modeling, `dislocation-based strain-hardening method' was employed to predict tensile behavior of individual phases of ferrite and martensite. In the second step, the individual flow curves were combined using `rule of mixtures,' to obtain the composite dual-phase flow behavior. To check accuracy of proposed model, four distinct dual-phase microstructures comprising of different ferrite grain size, martensite fraction, and carbon content in martensite were processed by annealing experiments. The true stress-strain curves for various microstructures were predicted with the newly developed micromechanical model. The results of micromechanical model matched closely with those of actual tensile tests. Thus, this micromechanical modeling approach can be used to predict and optimize the tensile flow behavior of dual-phase steels.

  4. Research of quasi-solid fracture behavior of casting AI-4.5Cu alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengquan DONG

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The influencing mechanisms of elements Ti and Ce and their interactions on fracture behaviors of casting alloys AI-4.5Cu-0.6Mn were studied by observing tensile fracture behavior in quasi-solid zone under SEM and EDX instruments.The results indicate that the resistance stress against hot cracking can be improved obviously by addition of Ti, because of its grain refining function. It is also found that, when Ce is added into the alloys, besides its effect in refining crystalline, the mechanical behavior of lower melting point eutectic phase in quasi-solid zone can be improved efficiently by some compounds with Ce formed and deposited between dendrites. Therefore, a colligating effect of Ti and Ce on improving resistance stress against hot cracking is more efficient than that only single alloy element is applied. When hot cracking occurs, grains yield at first, and then crack spreads. Both inter-grain and trans-grain fractures are observed, but the major fracture manner is brittleness.

  5. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Flow Behavior and Anisotropy of a Medium-Manganese TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturk, Rakan; Hector, Louis G.; Matthew Enloe, C.; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-04-01

    The dependence of the plastic anisotropy on the nominal strain rate for a medium-manganese (10 wt.% Mn) transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with initial austenite volume fraction of 66% (balance ferrite) has been investigated. The material exhibited yield point elongation, propagative instabilities during hardening, and austenite transformation to α'-martensite either directly or through ɛ-martensite. Uniaxial strain rates within the range of 0.005-500 s-1 along the 0°, 45°, and 90° orientations were selected based upon their relevance to automotive applications. The plastic anisotropy (r) and normal anisotropy (r n) indices corresponding to each direction and strain rate were determined using strain fields obtained from stereo digital image correlation systems that enabled both quasistatic and dynamic measurements. The results provide evidence of significant, orientation-dependent strain rate effects on both the flow stress and the evolution of r and r n with strain. This has implications not only for material performance during forming but also for the development of future strain-rate-dependent anisotropic yield criteria. Since tensile data alone for the subject medium-manganese TRIP steel do not satisfactorily determine the microstructural mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic-scale behavior observed on tensile testing, additional tests that must supplement the mechanical test results presented herein are discussed.

  6. Study of tensile test behavior of austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes in cold worked condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terui, Clarice, E-mail: clarice.terui@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CINA/CTMSP), Iperó, SP (Brazil). Centro Industrial Nuclear da Marinha; Lima, Nelson B. de, E-mail: nblima@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    These austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes are potential candidates to be used in fuel elements of nuclear power plants (as PWR - Pressurized Water Reactor). So, their metallurgical condition and mechanical properties, as the tensile strength and yield strength, normally are very restrict in demanding project and design requirements. Several full size tensile tests at room temperature and high temperature (315 deg C) were performed in these seamless tubes in cold-worked condition. The results of specified tensile and yield strengths were achieved but the elongation of the tube, in the geometry of the component, could not be measured at high temperature due to unconventional mode of rupture (helical mode without separation of parts). The average value of elongation was obtained from stress-strain curves of hot tensile tests and was around 5%. The results obtained in this research show that this behavior of the full size tensile test samples of thin-walled tube (wall thickness less than 0.5 mm) in high temperature (315°C) is due to the combination of the manufacturing process, the material (crystallographic structure and chemical composition) and the final geometry of the component. In other words, the strong crystallographic texture of material induced by tube drawing process in addition with the geometry of the component are responsible for the behavior in hot uniaxial tensile tests. (author)

  7. Modelling the Fracture Behavior of a 350WT Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    of the pendulum after fracturing the specimen. Figure 4.1: Charpy V-Notch Specimen, Anvil Supports and Striker [9] Modelling the Fracture Behavior of...determined through FE calibration with existing Charpy V-notch (CVN) and dynamic tear ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) data. Once the parameters...8 4.0 DETERMINATION OF FRACTURE PARAMETERS..........................................................................11 4.1 CHARPY V-NOTCH

  8. Fracturing Behavior of Methane-Hydrate-Bearing Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Y.; Jin, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Uchiumi, T.; Shinjou, K.; Nagao, J.

    2016-12-01

    As a part of a Japanese national hydrate research program (MH21, funded by the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry), we performed laboratory experiments of hydraulic fracturing in methane-hydrate-bearing sediment. Distilled water was injected into methane-hydrate-bearing sand which was artificially made in a tri-axial pressure cell. X-ray computed tomography revealed that tensile failure was occurred after a rapid drop in the injection pressure. It was found that generated fractures cause a significant increase in the effective water permeability of hydrate-bearing sand. The result contributes fundamental understanding of the accumulation mechanism of gas hydrates in sediments and shows that hydraulic fracturing is one of promising enhanced recovery methods for low-permeable gas hydrate reservoirs.

  9. Fracture behavior of W based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hack, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the results of a program to investigate the fracture properties of tungsten based materials. In particular, the role of crack velocity on crack instability was determined in a W-Fe-Ni-Co ''heavy alloy'' and pure polycrystalline tungsten. A considerable effort was expended on the development of an appropriate crack velocity gage for use on these materials. Having succeeded in that, the gage technology was employed to determine the crack velocity response to the applied level of stress intensity factor at the onset of crack instability in pre-cracked specimens. The results were also correlated to the failure mode observed in two material systems of interest. Major results include: (1) unstable crack velocity measurements on metallic specimens which require high spatial resolution require the use of brittle, insulating substrates, as opposed to the ductile, polymer based substrates employed in low spatial resolution measurements; and (2) brittle failure modes, such as cleavage, are characterized by relatively slow unstable crack velocities while evidence of high degrees of deformation are associated with failures which proceed at high unstable crack velocities. This latter behavior is consistent with the predictions of the modeling of Hack et al and may have a significant impact on the interpretation of fractographs in general

  10. An experimental study of the fracture behavior of laminated graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, H. F.; Yeow, Y. T.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the fracture behavior of unidirectional and multidirectional laminated graphite/epoxy composites is reported. Critical tensile fracture stresses for constant head rate uniaxial specimens containing single-edge notches, double-edge notches, and centrally located circular holes are presented. Results are reported for loads and notches at various angles to the fiber direction. Evidence of notch sensitivity and stable crack growth is presented. Self-similar crack growth is shown to occur for only a limited set of circumstances. Critical stresses are compared to the theories of Waddoups et al and Whitney et al. These comparisons are presented using isotropic and orthotropic stress concentration factors together with a finite width correction factor. The results tend to show that use of only isotropic correction factors allow good correlation between theory and experiment.

  11. Effects of Oxides on Tensile and Charpy Impact Properties and Fracture Toughness in Heat Affected Zones of Oxide-Containing API X80 Linepipe Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Sohn, Seok Su; Shin, Sang Yong; Oh, Kyung Shik; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-06-01

    This study is concerned with effects of complex oxides on acicular ferrite (AF) formation, tensile and Charpy impact properties, and fracture toughness in heat affected zones (HAZs) of oxide-containing API X80 linepipe steels. Three steels were fabricated by adding Mg and O2 to form oxides, and various HAZ microstructures were obtained by conducting HAZ simulation tests under different heat inputs. The no. of oxides increased with increasing amount of Mg and O2, while the volume fraction of AF present in the steel HAZs increased with increasing the no. of oxides. The strengths of the HAZ specimens were generally higher than those of the base metals because of the formation of hard microstructures of bainitic ferrite and granular bainite. When the total Charpy absorbed energy was divided into the fracture initiation and propagation energies, the fracture initiation energy was maintained constant at about 75 J at room temperature, irrespective of volume fraction of AF. The fracture propagation energy rapidly increased from 75 to 150 J and saturated when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 30 pct. At 253 K (-20 °C), the total absorbed energy increased with increasing volume fraction of AF, as the cleavage fracture was changed to the ductile fracture when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 45 pct. Thus, 45 vol pct of AF at least was needed to improve the Charpy impact energy, which could be achieved by forming a no. of oxides. The fracture toughness increased with increasing the no. of oxides because of the increased volume fraction of AF formed around oxides. The fracture toughness did not show a visible correlation with the Charpy absorbed energy at room temperature, because toughness properties obtained from these two toughness testing methods had different significations in view of fracture mechanics.

  12. Effect of holding pressure on microstructure and fracture behavior of low-pressure die cast A356-T6 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Yun, Ying; Zhang, Huarui; Ma, Zhen; Jia, Lina; Tao, Tongxiang; Zhang, Hu

    2017-12-01

    The effect of different holding pressures on microstructure, tensile properties and fracture behavior of A356-T6 aluminum alloy was investigated. It was observed that the ultimate strength, yield strength and elongation of A356-T6 aluminum alloy increased with the increasing of holding pressure from 85 kPa to 300 kPa. This was attributed to the finer microstructure and the elimination of porosity defects caused by high holding pressure. The fractographs of specimens obtained under lower holding pressure displayed mixed quasi-cleavage and dimple type morphology with flat dimples and large amount of porosities. However, the fractographs of specimens obtained under high holding pressure of 300 kPa clearly exhibited a dimple morphology with small and deep dimples. The differences in the tensile fracture were attributed to the different shape of eutectic Si particle and different amount of porosity defects.

  13. Meso-Scale Progressive Damage Behavior Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Tensile Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yiru; Zhang, Songjun; Jiang, Hongyong; Xiang, Jinwu

    2017-08-01

    Based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM), a sophisticated 3D meso-scale finite element (FE) model is proposed to characterize the progressive damage behavior of 2D Triaxial Braided Composites (2DTBC) with 60° braiding angle under quasi-static tensile load. The modified Von Mises strength criterion and 3D Hashin failure criterion are used to predict the damage initiation of the pure matrix and fiber tows. A combining interface damage and friction constitutive model is applied to predict the interface damage behavior. Murakami-Ohno stiffness degradation scheme is employed to predict the damage evolution process of each constituent. Coupling with the ordinary and translational symmetry boundary conditions, the tensile elastic response including tensile strength and failure strain of 2DTBC are in good agreement with the available experiment data. The numerical results show that the main failure modes of the composites under axial tensile load are pure matrix cracking, fiber and matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows, matrix tension failure in axial fiber tows and interface debonding; the main failure modes of the composites subjected to transverse tensile load are free-edge effect, matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows and interface debonding.

  14. Meso-Scale Progressive Damage Behavior Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Tensile Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yiru; Zhang, Songjun; Jiang, Hongyong; Xiang, Jinwu

    2018-04-01

    Based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM), a sophisticated 3D meso-scale finite element (FE) model is proposed to characterize the progressive damage behavior of 2D Triaxial Braided Composites (2DTBC) with 60° braiding angle under quasi-static tensile load. The modified Von Mises strength criterion and 3D Hashin failure criterion are used to predict the damage initiation of the pure matrix and fiber tows. A combining interface damage and friction constitutive model is applied to predict the interface damage behavior. Murakami-Ohno stiffness degradation scheme is employed to predict the damage evolution process of each constituent. Coupling with the ordinary and translational symmetry boundary conditions, the tensile elastic response including tensile strength and failure strain of 2DTBC are in good agreement with the available experiment data. The numerical results show that the main failure modes of the composites under axial tensile load are pure matrix cracking, fiber and matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows, matrix tension failure in axial fiber tows and interface debonding; the main failure modes of the composites subjected to transverse tensile load are free-edge effect, matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows and interface debonding.

  15. Effects of the Electron Beam Welding Process on the Microstructure, Tensile, Fatigue and Fracture Properties of Nickel Alloy Nimonic 80A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Huang, Chongxiang; Guan, Zhongwei; Li, Jiukai; Liu, Yongjie; Chen, Ronghua; Wang, Qingyuan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate rotary bending high-cycle fatigue properties and crack growth of Nimonic 80A-based metal and electron beam-welded joints. All the tests were performed at room temperature. Fracture surfaces under high-cycle fatigue and fatigue crack growth were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Microstructure, hardness and tensile properties were also evaluated in order to understand the effects on the fatigue results obtained. It was found that the tensile properties, hardness and high-cycle fatigue properties of the welded joint are lower than the base metal. The fracture surface of the high-cycle fatigue shows that fatigue crack initiated from the surface under the high stress amplitude and from the subsurface under the low stress amplitude. The effect of the welding process on the statistical fatigue data was studied with a special focus on probabilistic life prediction and probabilistic lifetime limits. The fatigue crack growth rate versus stress intensity factor range data were obtained from the fatigue crack growth tests. From the results, it was evident that the fatigue crack growth rates of the welded are higher than the base metal. The mechanisms and fracture modes of fatigue crack growth of welded specimens were found to be related to the stress intensity factor range ΔK. In addition, the effective fatigue crack propagation thresholds and mismatch of welded joints were described and discussed.

  16. Continuum model of tensile fracture of metal melts and its application to a problem of high-current electron irradiation of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Alexander E.; Mayer, Polina N.

    2015-01-01

    A continuum model of the metal melt fracture is formulated on the basis of the continuum mechanics and theory of metastable liquid. A character of temperature and strain rate dependences of the tensile strength that is predicted by the continuum model is verified, and parameters of the model are fitted with the use of the results of the molecular dynamics simulations for ultra-high strain rates (≥1–10/ns). A comparison with experimental data from literature is also presented for Al and Ni melts. Using the continuum model, the dynamic tensile strength of initially uniform melts of Al, Cu, Ni, Fe, Ti, and Pb within a wide range of strain rates (from 1–10/ms to 100/ns) and temperatures (from melting temperature up to 70–80% of critical temperature) is calculated. The model is applied to numerical investigation of a problem of the high-current electron irradiation of Al, Cu, and Fe targets

  17. Modeling and simulation of deformation and fracture behavior of components made of fully lamellar {gamma}TiAl alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, Mohammad Rizviul [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2008-07-01

    The present work deals with the modeling and simulation of deformation and fracture behavior of fully lamellar {gamma}TiAl alloy; focusing on understanding the variability of local material properties and their influences on translamellar fracture. Afracture model has been presented that takes the inhomogeneity of the local deformation behavior of the lamellar colonies as well as the variability in fracture strength and toughness into consideration. To obtain the necessary model parameters, a hybrid methodology of experiments and simulations has been adopted. The experiments were performed at room temperature that demonstrates quasi-brittle response of the TiAl polycrystal. Aremarkable variation in stress-strain curves has been found in the tensile tests. Additional fracture tests showed significant variations in crack initiation and propagation during translamellar fracture. Analyzing the fracture surfaces, the micromechanical causes of these macroscopic scatter have been explained. The investigation shows that the global scatter in deformation and fracture response is highly influenced by the colony orientation and tilting angle with respect to the loading axis. The deformation and fracture behavior have been simulated by a finite element model including the material decohesion process described by a cohesive model. In order to capture the scatter of the macroscopic behavior, a stochastic approach is chosen. The local variability of stressstrain in the polycrystal and the variability of fracture parameters of the colonies are implemented in the stochastic approach of the cohesive model. It has been shown that the proposed approach is able to predict the stochastic nature of crack initiation and propagation as observed from the experiments. The global specimen failure with stable or unstable crack propagation can be explained in terms of the local variation of material properties. (orig.)

  18. Dynamic Fracture Behavior of Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    instability of short cracks. To produce the required tensile pulse, we first examined the possi- bility of modifying a standard Charpy pendulum device. An...Mechanism Shaft r= .,91 Pendulum Damping Frame of System Charpy Machine Striker Plate P Vimpct SEN Specimen Damping System Any Striker Striker Plates...obtained by measuring A-a6 M the temperature histories in material near the tip of a fast running crack. During the first research year, a Charpy impact

  19. A combined experimental and FE analysis procedure to evaluate tensile behavior of zircaloy pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samal, M.K.; Vaze, K.K.; Balakrishnan, K.S.; Anantharaman, S.

    2012-01-01

    Determination of transverse mechanical properties from the ring type of specimens directly machined from the nuclear reactor pressure tubes is not straightforward because of the presence of combined membrane as well as bending stresses arising in the loaded condition. In this work, we have performed ring-tensile tests on the un-irradiated ring tensile specimen using two split semi-cylindrical mandrels as the loading device. A 3-D finite element (FE) analysis was performed in order to determine the material true stress-strain curve by comparing experimental load-displacement data with those predicted by FE analysis. In order to validate the methodology, miniaturized tensile specimens were machined from these tubes and tested. It was observed that the stress-strain data as obtained from ring tensile specimen could describe the load displacement curve of the miniaturized flat tensile specimen very well. (author)

  20. Tensile behavior of humid aged advanced composites for helicopter external fuel tank development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condruz Mihaela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of humid aging on tensile properties of two polymeric composites was studied. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the suitability of the materials for a naval helicopter external fuel tank. Due to the application, the humid environment was kerosene and saline solution to evaluate the sea water effect on the composite tensile strength. The composite samples were immersed in kerosene for 168 hours, respective 1752 hours and in saline solution for 168 hours. Tensile tests were performed after the immersion. The composite sample tensile tests showed that kerosene and saline solution had no influence on the elastic modulus of the materials, but it was observed a slight improvement of the tensile strength of the two polymeric composites.

  1. Analysis of tensile and fracture toughness results on irradiated molybdenum alloys, TZM and Mo-5%Re. Analysis of results performed in the frame of the NET task PDS 1.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scibetta, M.; Chaouadi, R.; Puzzolante, J.L.

    1999-10-01

    Due to their good resistance at high temperature, good thermal conductivity and swelling resistance, molybdenum alloys are considered amongst the candidates for divertor structural materials. However, little is known about their tensile and fracture toughness behaviour, in particular after irradiation. This report aims to investigate the tensile and fracture toughness properties of two molybdenum alloys, namely TZM and Mo-5%Re. Tensile and compact tension specimens were irradiated in the BR2 reactor at 40 and 450 degrees Celsius up to a fast neutron fluence of 3.5 1020 n/cm 2 (0.2 dpa). Fracture toughness tests were performed on both precracked and notched specimens. Results show a drastic decrease of the ductility due to irradiation, but only a slight decrease of the fracture toughness in the lower shelf domain

  2. Analysis of tensile and fracture toughness results on irradiated molybdenum alloys, TZM and Mo-5%Re. Analysis of results performed in the frame of the NET task PDS 1.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scibetta, M.; Chaouadi, R.; Puzzolante, J.L

    1999-10-01

    Due to their good resistance at high temperature, good thermal conductivity and swelling resistance, molybdenum alloys are considered amongst the candidates for divertor structural materials. However, little is known about their tensile and fracture toughness behaviour, in particular after irradiation. This report aims to investigate the tensile and fracture toughness properties of two molybdenum alloys, namely TZM and Mo-5%Re. Tensile and compact tension specimens were irradiated in the BR2 reactor at 40 and 450 degrees Celsius up to a fast neutron fluence of 3.5 1020 n/cm{sup 2} (0.2 dpa). Fracture toughness tests were performed on both precracked and notched specimens. Results show a drastic decrease of the ductility due to irradiation, but only a slight decrease of the fracture toughness in the lower shelf domain.

  3. Relaxation behavior of laser-peening residual stress under tensile loading investigated by X-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Koichi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Moriai, Atsushi; Hayashi, Kengo; Takeda, Kazuya; Ohya, Shin-ichi; Sano, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Compressive residual stresses induced by peening techniques improve the strength properties of steels, such as fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. However, the compressive residual stress might be reduced owing to thermal and mechanical loading in-service. In this study, the behavior of surface and internal residual stresses of a laser-peened ferritic steel under quasi-static tensile loading was investigated by X-ray and neutron diffraction. The complementary use of these diffraction techniques provided decisive experimental evidence for elucidating the relaxation process. As the applied tensile stress increases, the inside of the sample yields before the surface yielding at the critical applied stress (the applied stress for the onset of relaxation of the surface residual stress). The internal yielding causes the redistribution of residual stress, resulting in the relaxation of the surface compressive residual stress. Therefore, the relaxation of the surface compressive residual stress under tensile loading starts before the surface yielding. The critical applied stress of peened samples subjected to a tensile loading can be estimated from the von Mises yield criterion with the maximum tensile residual stress inside the sample. The FWHM of X-ray diffraction profile of the sample surface was increased by laser-peening, and it was further increased by further plastic deformation after peening. (author)

  4. Effect of strength mismatch on fracture mechanical behavior of NG-DMW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarikka, T.; Brederholm, A.; Mouginot, R.; Saukkonen, T.; Ahonen, M.; Karjalainen-Roikonen, P.; Nevasmaa, P.; Haenninen, H.

    2015-01-01

    In modern pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, dissimilar metal joints, e.g. reactor pressure vessel (RPV) safe-ends, are manufactured using a new weld design which takes advantage of narrow-gap (NG) welding technique. In addition to the new weld design, the filler metals have been changed from Alloys 82 and 182 to higher Cr containing Alloys 52 and 152 to ensure the structural integrity of the welds. In dissimilar metal welds (DMW), the mismatch in material properties between the two joined materials and their narrow local variation in different zones of the weld are of importance because the local strength mismatch state plays an important role in the fracture behavior of the weld. For the experimental determination of the local strength variations in a narrow-gap dissimilar metal weld (NG-DMW), a weld mock-up was manufactured using narrow-gap gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW) method. The weld consisted of SA 508 pressure vessel steel with AISI 309L/308L cladding, AISI 304 piping steel, and Alloy 52 weld metal. The weld was characterized in two different heat treatment conditions, in as-welded condition and in post-weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. The microstructure of the weld mock-up was characterized using FEGSEM. The fusion zone (FZ) between the SA 508 pressure vessel steel and Alloy 52 weld metal was characterized using micro- and nano-hardness testing and the strength mismatch state of the FZ was determined with tensile testing using miniature-sized tensile testing specimens allowing the determination of the local tensile properties of the narrow weld zones near the fusion line (FL). The fracture mechanical testing was performed at room temperature to examine the effect of local strength mismatch on the fracture behavior and crack propagation. The results of the tensile tests revealed that Alloy 52 weld metal had close to equivalent strength with SA 508 base material and the highest strength mismatch existed between the SA 508 heat-affected zone (HAZ

  5. Inelastic material behavior and fracture mechanics a variational approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, L

    1999-01-01

    A variational principle is presented, which relates the macroscopic fracture response of a mechanical component to its microscopic, inelastic material behavior. The principle allows a comparison between the crack driving force, expressed by the J-integral, and an integral expression of the fracture resistance. On this basis, the critical values of J are calculated for a Griffith crack under mixed- mode loading. The preliminary check with data available in literature shows a fairly good agreement. (8 refs).

  6. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) fabricated part behavior under tensile stress, thermal cycling, and fluid pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Shojib

    Material extrusion based additive manufacturing (AM) technology, such as fused deposition modeling (FDM), is gaining popularity with the numerous 3D printers available worldwide. FDM technology is advancing from exclusively prototype construction to achieving production-grade quality. Today, FDM-fabricated parts are widely used in the aerospace industries, biomedical applications, and other industries that may require custom fabricated, low volume parts. These applications are and were possible because of the different production grade material options (e.g., acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polycarbonate (PC), polyphenylsulfone (PPSF), etc.) available to use in FDM systems. Recent researchers are exploring other material options including polycaprolactone (PCL), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), composites containing ceramic, glass and metal fillers, and even metals which depict the diversified materials and possibility of new material options using FDM technology. The understanding of the behavior and mechanical properties of the finished FDM-fabricated parts is of utmost importance in the advancement of this technology. The processing parameters, e.g., build orientation, raster width (RW), contour width (CW), raster angle (RA), and raster to raster air gap (RRAG) are important factors in determining the mechanical properties of FDM fabricated parts. The work presented here focused on the mechanical properties improvement by modifying those build parameters. The main concentration is on how modifying those parameters can improve ultimate tensile stress (UTS), Young's modulus, and tensile strain of the final product. In this research, PC parts were fabricated using three build methods: 1) default method, 2) Insight revision method, and 3) visual feedback method. By modifying build parameters, the highest average UTS obtained for PC was 63.96 MPa which was 7% higher than that of 59.73 MPa obtained using the default build parameters. The parameter modification

  7. Fracture behavior of quasi-brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Sanjeev

    1997-11-01

    Cementitious materials are widely used in structural applications such as high rise buildings, dams, and aircraft runways. One limitation in the use of these materials is their low toughness. The intent of this work is to examine, firstly, the effect of loading rate on toughening and the evolution of resistance (R-) curves of cement paste, mortar and concrete, and, secondly and more importantly, to explain the differences in the microstructural aspects of the fracture surface which accompany the change in the loading rate. To obtain a better understanding of the toughening mechanisms active in cementitious materials, alumina was used as a model material. Resistance curves of fine-grained alumina were found to be independent of crack length. Coarse-grained alumina exhibited strongly rising R-curves. In both aluminas, the initial fracture toughness, Ksb{o}, was found to be independent of the loading rate. In coarse-grained alumina, the net toughening, Ksb{max}, was found to decrease with increasing loading rate. A rate-dependent coefficient of friction was incorporated into a crack bridging model to understand the effect of loading rate on toughness. Predictions based on the bridging model, using the measured coefficient of friction for coarse-grained alumina, were in good agreement with observed phenomenon. The relationship between loading rate effects on toughening and microstructural complexity of cementitious materials was investigated in cement paste, mortar, and concrete. For cement paste, fracture toughness was found to be independent of crack growth. Mortar and concrete exhibited strongly rising R-curves. In the case of cement paste and mortar, the peak fracture toughness, Ksb{max}, was found to be independent of the loading rate. In concrete, the peak toughness was found to decrease with increasing loading rate. Surface roughness measurements were performed to understand the effect of loading rate on the fracture mechanisms. The results of the roughness

  8. Research on Magnetoinductive NDE Techniques to Measure Tensile Strength and Fracture Toughness in Steels as They are Manufactured

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Charpy measurements, a knife edge pendulum was dropped from a height h. The minimum height from which the specimen fractures gives a measure of the...on Charpy specimens since the Charpy test is one way of measuring fracture toughness. Fracture 4 toughness was varied by heat-treating the specimens...specimens were machined with V- notches, according to the standard Charpy dimensional specifications [18], and then NLH measurements were performed at two

  9. Fatigue and fracture behavior of low alloy ferritic forged steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, V.; Sharma, A.K.; Muktibodh, U.C.; Borwankar, Neeraj; Singh, D.K.; Srinivasan, K.N.; Kulkarni, R.G.

    2016-01-01

    Low alloy ferritic steels are widely used in nuclear industry for the construction of pressure vessels. Pressure vessel forged low alloy steels 20MnMoNi55 (modified) have been developed indigenously. Experiments have been carried out to study the Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) and fracture behavior of these forged steels. Fully reversed strain controlled LCF testing at room temperature and at 350 °C has been carried out at a constant strain rate, and for different axial strain amplitude levels. LCF material behavior has been studied from cyclic stress-strain responses and the strain-life relationships. Fracture behavior of the steel has been studied based on tests carried out for crack growth rate and fracture toughness (J-R curve). Further, responses of fatigue crack growth rate tests have been compared with the rate evaluated from fatigue precracking carried out for fracture toughness (J-R) tests. Fractography of the samples have been carried out to reveal dominant damage mechanisms in crack propagation and fracture. The fatigue and fracture properties of indigenously developed low alloy steel 20MnMoNi55 (modified) steels are comparable with similar class of steels. (author)

  10. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of copper alloys and their HIP joints with austenitic stainless steel in unirradiated and neutron irradiated condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taehtinen, S.; Pyykkoenen, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland); Singh, B.N.; Toft, P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Materials Research Dept.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile strength and ductility of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys decreased continuously with increasing temperature up to 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 alloy decreased continuously with increasing temperature from 20 deg C to 350 deg C whereas the fracture toughness of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy remained almost constant at temperatures up to 100 deg C, was decreased significantly at 200 deg C and slightly increased at 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of HIP joints were lower than that of corresponding copper alloy and fracture path in HIP joint specimen was always within copper alloy side of the joint. Neutron irradiation to a dose level of 0.3 dpa resulted in hardening and reduction in uniform elongation to about 2-4% at 200 deg C in both copper alloys. At higher temperatures softening was observed and uniform elongation increased to about 5% and 16% for CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys, respectively. Fracture toughness of CuAl25 IG0 alloy reduced markedly due to neutron irradiation in the temperature range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated CuCrZr alloy also decreased in the range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C, although it remained almost unaffected at temperatures below 200 deg C and decreased significantly at 350 deg C when compared with that of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy. (orig.)

  11. Effect of the Volume Fraction of Jute Fiber on the Interlaminar Shear Stress and Tensile Behavior Characteristics of Hybrid Glass/Jute Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bar for Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Gi Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid glass/jute fiber reinforced polymer (HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured for concrete structures, and their interlaminar shear stress and tensile performance were evaluated. HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured using a combination of pultrusion and braiding processes. Jute fiber was surface-treated with a silane coupling agent. The mixing ratio of the fiber to the vinyl ester used in the HGJFRP composite bars was 7 : 3. Jute fiber was used to replace glass fiber in proportions of 0, 30, 50, 70, and 100%. The interlaminar shear stress decreased as the proportion of jute fiber increased. Fractures appeared due to delamination between the surface-treated component and the main part of the HGJFRP composite bar. Tensile load-strain curves with 50% jute fiber exhibited linear behavior. With a jute fiber volume fraction of 70%, some plastic deformation occurred. A jute fiber mixing ratio of 100% resulted in a display of linear elastic brittle behavior from the fiber; however, when the surface of the fiber was coated with poly(vinyl acetate, following failure, the jute fiber exhibited partial load resistance. The tensile strength decreased as the jute fiber content increased; however, the tensile strength did not vary linearly with jute fiber content.

  12. Mechanical behavior and essential work of fracture of starch-based blown films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottez, M.; Chaki, S.; Soulestin, J.; Lacrampe, M. F.; Krawczak, P.

    2015-05-01

    A fracture mechanics approach (Essential Work of Fracture, EWF) was applied to assess the toughness of novel partly starch-grafted polyolefin blown films, compared to that of a neat polyethylene reference. Tests were performed on double-end notched samples. The digital image correlation method was used to monitor the deformation field around the notch. Regular tensile and tear tests were also carried out. The specific essential work of fracture is a characteristic which is much more sensitive to materials structural modifications than the tensile or tear properties.

  13. Fracture behaviors of ceramic tissue scaffolds for load bearing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari, Ali; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Zhang, Zhongpu; Zreiqat, Hala; Dunstan, Colin R.; Li, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Healing large bone defects, especially in weight-bearing locations, remains a challenge using available synthetic ceramic scaffolds. Manufactured as a scaffold using 3D printing technology, Sr-HT-Gahnite at high porosity (66%) had demonstrated significantly improved compressive strength (53 ± 9 MPa) and toughness. Nevertheless, the main concern of ceramic scaffolds in general remains to be their inherent brittleness and low fracture strength in load bearing applications. Therefore, it is crucial to establish a robust numerical framework for predicting fracture strengths of such scaffolds. Since crack initiation and propagation plays a critical role on the fracture strength of ceramic structures, we employed extended finite element method (XFEM) to predict fracture behaviors of Sr-HT-Gahnite scaffolds. The correlation between experimental and numerical results proved the superiority of XFEM for quantifying fracture strength of scaffolds over conventional FEM. In addition to computer aided design (CAD) based modeling analyses, XFEM was conducted on micro-computed tomography (μCT) based models for fabricated scaffolds, which took into account the geometric variations induced by the fabrication process. Fracture strengths and crack paths predicted by the μCT-based XFEM analyses correlated well with relevant experimental results. The study provided an effective means for the prediction of fracture strength of porous ceramic structures, thereby facilitating design optimization of scaffolds.

  14. Predicted Fracture Behavior of Shaft Steels with Improved Corrosion Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vukelic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the crucial steps in the shaft design process is the optimal selection of the material. Two types of shaft steels with improved corrosion resistances, 1.4305 and 1.7225, were investigated experimentally and numerically in this paper in order to determine some of the material characteristics important for material selection in the engineering design process. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength have been experimentally obtained, proving that steel 1.4305 has higher values of both. In addition, J-integral is numerically determined as a measure of crack driving force for finite element models of standardized fracture specimens (single-edge notched bend and disc compact tension. Obtained J values are plotted versus specimen crack growth size (Δa for different specimen geometries (a/W. Higher resulting values of J-integral for steel 1.4305 as opposed to 1.7225 can be noted. Results can be useful as a fracture parameter in fracture toughness assessment, although this procedure differs from experimental analysis.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Arman Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A total of 8 numbers of cylinder specimens are cast and tested in 1000 kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM and also modeled in ANSYS. The enhancement of compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of SFRC specimen is achieved up to 17% and 146%, respectively, compared to respective plain concrete specimen. Results gathered from finite element analyses are validated with the experimental test results by identifying as well as optimizing the controlling parameters to make FE models. Modulus of elasticity, Poisson’s ratio, stress-strain behavior, tensile strength, density, and shear transfer coefficients for open and closed cracks are found to be the main governing parameters for successful model of plain concrete and SFRC in FE platform. After proper evaluation and logical optimization of these parameters by extensive analyses, finite element (FE models showed a good correlation with the experimental results.

  16. Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Corrosion Behavior of Die-Cast Mg-7Al-1Ca- xSn Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Dong, Haikuo; Sun, Shijie; Wang, Zhi; Mao, Pingli; Liu, Zheng

    2018-02-01

    The microstructure, tensile properties, and corrosion behavior of die-cast Mg-7Al-1Ca- xSn ( x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt.%) alloys were studied using OM, SEM/EDS, tensile test, weight loss test, and electrochemical test. The experimental results showed that Sn addition effectively refined grains and intermetallic phases and increased the amount of intermetallic phases. Meanwhile, Sn addition to the alloys suppressed the formation of the (Mg,Al)2Ca phase and resulted in the formation of the ternary CaMgSn phase and the binary Mg2Sn phase. The Mg-7Al-1Ca-0.5Sn alloy exhibited best tensile properties at room temperature, while Mg-7Al-1Ca-1.0Sn alloy exhibited best tensile properties at elevated temperature. The corrosion resistance of studied alloys was improved by the Sn addition, and the Mg-7Al-1Ca-0.5Sn alloy presented the best corrosion resistance.

  17. A Study on Tensile Behavior and Water Uptake of Wood Powder-Composites Based on Epoxy and Unsaturated Polyester Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir hossein Pirayeshfar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two kinds of epoxy resins (i.e. high-viscosity and low-viscosity as well as one polyester resin (orthophthalic grade were selected and examined as pure resins and also as a polymeric matrix for producing wood-composites. In this study, tensile properties, water uptake, and degradation of samples in water were also investigated. The results show that addition of wood particles to the thermoset resins strongly impresses on their tensile behavior and water uptake. Tensile studies show that addition of wood powder improves the tensile properties of polyester resin as compared with viscosity epoxy one, although its modulus value is relatively less than that of low viscosity epoxy resin. Water uptake measurements also revealed that pure polyester resin and its related composites possess minimum water uptake and less degradation in water as compared with corresponding epoxy specimens and from which the lowest extent of materials is extracted and migrated to the water even after 50 days immersion in water.

  18. Thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste, F.

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to model Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical behavior of fractured rock mass regarding a nuclear waste re-depository. For this, a methodology of modeling was proposed and was applied to a real underground site (EDF site at Nouvelle Romanche). This methodology consists, in a first step, to determine hydraulic and mechanical REV. Beyond the greatest of these REV, development of a finite element code allows to model all the fractures in an explicit manner. The homogenized mechanical properties are determined in drained and undrained boundary conditions by simulating triaxial tests that represent rock mass subject to loading. These simulations allow to study the evolution of hydraulic and mechanical properties as a function of stress state. Drained and undrained boundary conditions enable to discuss the validity of assimilation of a fractured rock mass to a porous medium. The simulations lead to a better understanding of the behavior of the fractured rock masses and allow to show the dominant role of the shear behavior of the fractures on the hydraulic and mechanical homogenized properties. From a thermal point of view, as long as conduction is dominant, thermal properties of the rock mass are almost the same as those the intact rock. (author)

  19. Prediction of Tensile Behavior of UHSFRC Considering the Flow Field in the Placing Dominated by Shear Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Shik Moon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the case of fabricating a UHSFRC (ultra-high strength fiber-reinforced concrete beam with the method of one end placing and self-flowing to the other end, it was intended to simulate the variation of the fiber orientation distribution according to the flow distance and the variation of the resultant tensile behaviors. Then the validity of the simulation approach was shown by comparing the simulated results with experimental ones. A three-point bending test with a notched beam was adopted for the experiment and a finite element analysis was performed to obtain the simulated results for the bending test considering the flow-dependent tensile behavior of the UHSFRC. From the simulation for the fiber orientation distribution according to the flow distance, it could be found that the major change in the fiber orientation distribution took place within a short flow distance and most of the fibers became nearly aligned to the flow direction. After some flow distance, there was a not-so-remarkable variation in the fiber orientation distribution that could influence the tensile behavior of the composite. For this flow region, the consistent flexural test results, regardless of flow distance, demonstrate the reliability of the simulation.

  20. Prediction of Tensile Behavior of UHSFRC Considering the Flow Field in the Placing Dominated by Shear Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joon-Shik; Kang, Su-Tae

    2018-01-26

    Considering the case of fabricating a UHSFRC (ultra-high strength fiber-reinforced concrete) beam with the method of one end placing and self-flowing to the other end, it was intended to simulate the variation of the fiber orientation distribution according to the flow distance and the variation of the resultant tensile behaviors. Then the validity of the simulation approach was shown by comparing the simulated results with experimental ones. A three-point bending test with a notched beam was adopted for the experiment and a finite element analysis was performed to obtain the simulated results for the bending test considering the flow-dependent tensile behavior of the UHSFRC. From the simulation for the fiber orientation distribution according to the flow distance, it could be found that the major change in the fiber orientation distribution took place within a short flow distance and most of the fibers became nearly aligned to the flow direction. After some flow distance, there was a not-so-remarkable variation in the fiber orientation distribution that could influence the tensile behavior of the composite. For this flow region, the consistent flexural test results, regardless of flow distance, demonstrate the reliability of the simulation.

  1. Effect of Solute Segregation on Fracture Behavior of Mg Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Ikeo, Naoko; Mukai, Toshiji

    Improving mechanical properties of magnesium and understanding fracture behavior under impact loading are necessary to apply magnesium alloys to structural components of automobiles. We have investigated the fracture behavior of binary magnesium alloys by three-point bending experiment and conducted a first principle calculation to estimate the effect of solute segregation on fracture energy. In this paper, we have focused on experimental result of impact three-point bending test for Mg-0.3at.%Y alloy and the results of the test were compared with that of AZ31 commercially available alloy [1]. As a result, the crack propagation speed of Mg-0.3at.%Y was found to be slower than that of AZ31 alloys. Moreover, the absorbed energy of Mg-0.3at.%Y was more than twice as high as that of AZ31 alloys. These results suggested that yttrium solute in magnesium improved the fracture toughness of magnesium under impact loading. Then, fracture surface was observed by SEM to consider the effect of microstructure on crack propagation speed.

  2. Tensile behavior of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 aluminum alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidarzadeh, A.; Khodaverdizadeh, H.; Mahmoudi, A.; Nazari, E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Range of parameters for defect-free friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 was reached. ► A model was developed for predicting UTS and EL of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4. ► The maximum values of UTS and EL of joints were estimated by developed model. ► The optimum values of FSW process parameters were determined. -- Abstract: In this investigation response surface methodology based on a central composite rotatable design with three parameters, five levels and 20 runs, was used to develop a mathematical model predicting the tensile properties of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 aluminum alloy joints at 95% confidence level. The three welding parameters considered were tool rotational speed, welding speed and axial force. Analysis of variance was applied to validate the predicted model. Microstructural characterization and fractography of joints were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Also, the effects of the welding parameters on tensile properties of friction stir welded joints were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the optimum parameters to get a maximum of tensile strength were 920 rev/min, 78 mm/min and 7.2 kN, where the maximum of tensile elongation was obtained at 1300 rev/min, 60 mm/min and 8 kN.

  3. Effect of the martensite distribution on the strain hardening and ductile fracture behaviors in dual-phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyosun, E-mail: paku08@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nishiyama, Masato, E-mail: nishiyama11@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nakada, Nobuo, E-mail: nakada@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshi@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Takaki, Setsuo, E-mail: takaki@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    In order to clarify the effects of the martensite distribution on the mechanical properties of low-carbon dual-phase steel, four types of dual-phase steel with different ferrite grain sizes and martensite distributions were prepared using a thermomechanical treatment. The tensile properties of these steels were investigated; in particular, the strain hardening and the ductile fracture behaviors were discussed in terms of the strain partitioning between the ferrite and martensite and the formation and growth of micro-voids, respectively. When the martensite grains surround the ferrite grains and form a chain-like networked structure, the strain hardenability is greatly improved without a significant loss of elongation, while the necking deformability is considerably reduced. A digital-image correlation analysis revealed that the tensile strain in the martensite region in the chain-like networked dual-phase structure is markedly increased during tensile deformation, which leads to an improvement in the strain hardenability. On the other hand, the joint part of the martensite grains in the structure acts as a preferential formation site for micro-voids. The number density of the micro-voids rapidly increases with increasing tensile strain, which would cause the lower necking deformability.

  4. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1].

  5. Tensile Properties and Fracture Characteristics of Nanostructured Copper and Cu-SiC Nanocomposite Produced by Mechanical Milling and Spark Plasma Sintering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarpour, M. R.

    2018-03-01

    The presence of large grains within nanometric and ultrafine grain matrix is an effective method in order to enhance strength while keeping the high ductility of metals. For this purpose, in this research, spark plasma sintering (SPS) was used to consolidate milled Cu and Cu-SiC powders. In SPS process, local sparks with high temperature between particles take place and locally lead to intense grain growth, and therefore, this method has the ability to produce bimodal grain structures in copper and copper-based composites. Microstructural and mechanical studies showed ≈ 185 and ≈ 437 nm matrix grain sizes, high tensile yield strength values of ≈ 188.4 and ≈ 296.9 MPa, and fracture strain values of 15.1 and 6.7% for sintered Cu and Cu-4 vol.% SiC nanocomposite materials, respectively. The presence of nanoparticles promoted the occurrence of static recrystallization and decreased the fraction of coarse grains in microstructure. The high tensile properties of the produced materials are attributed to fine grain size, homogenous dispersion of nanoparticles and retarded grain boundary migration during sintering.

  6. Fracture behavior of stainless steel-toughened NiAl composite plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Vincent C.

    1992-02-01

    Analysis of the tensile and fracture behavior of a composite system consisting of boron carbide particulate-reinforced NiAl with continuous 304 stainless steel toughening regions was performed. The composite was fabricated by extrusion, with the toughening regions extending along the length of the plate in the extrusion direction. Mechanical properties were determined as a function of orientation. Tensile testing revealed that the composite modulus varied only slightly as a function of testing direction, the strength was approximately 25 pct greater in the longitudinal relative to the transverse orientation, and the transverse failure strain was only 0.3 pct compared to values in excess of 10 pct for longitudinal testing. Notched Charpy impact testing indicated that the energy absorption values varied significantly as a function of specimen location and crack growth direction, ranging from 2 to 40 Joules. In addition, K IC values measured on subsize compact tension samples were found to range from 17 to 27 MPa ṡ m1/2. It was also established that the K max values determined from the maximum load measured during compact tension testing were similar to the K Q values calculated from instrumented notched Charpy impact testing. Finally, the fatigue crack growth characteristics of the composite were determined as a function of orientation.

  7. In Situ Radiography During Tensile Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory system for testing specimens of metal-, ceramic-, and intermetallic-matrix composite materials incorporates both electromechanical tensile-testing subsystem and either of two imaging subsystems that take x-ray photographs of specimens before, during, and after tensile tests. Used to test specimens of reaction-bonded silicon nitride reinforced with silicon carbide fibers (SiC/RBSN) considered for high-temperature service in advanced aircraft turbine engines. Provides data on effects of preexisting flaws (e.g., high-density impurities and local variations of density) on fracture behavior. Accumulated internal damage monitored during loading. X-ray source illuminates specimen in load frame while specimen is pulled. X-ray images on film correlated with stress-vs.-strain data from tensile test.

  8. Evolution of tensile behavior on polyester-glass fibre composites thermal and sunligth degraded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia, F.; Ferrer, C.; Salvador, M. D.; Vicente, A.; Amigo, V.

    2001-01-01

    Composite materials have been subjected to moderate temperature and high sunlight doses of radiation for long periods of time. All tensile mechanical characteristics increase at moderately high temperature, in accordance with a damped increasing exponential model. Sunlight exposition yields ageing on all mechanical properties, in agreement with a damped decreasing exponential model. These mechanical properties loses in fire-resistant composites are less than standard resin composites ones. Toughness characteristics show loses stronger than strength ones. (Author) 33 refs

  9. Effect of cold work on tensile behavior of irradiated type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Tensile specimens were irradiated in ORR at 250, 290, 450, and 500 0 C to produce a displacement damage of approx.5 dpa and 40 at. ppM He. Irradiation at 250 and 290 0 C caused an increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength and a decrease in ductility relative to unaged and thermally aged controls. The changes were greatest for the 20%-cold-worked steel and lowest for the 50%-cold-worked steel. Irradiation at 450 0 C caused a slight relative decrease in strength for all cold-worked conditions. A large decrease was observed at 500 0 C, with the largest decrease occurring for the 50%-cold-worked specimen. No bubble, void, or precipitate formation was observed for specimens examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The irradiation hardening was correlated with Frank-loop and ''black-dot'' loop damage. A strength decrease at 500 0 C was correlated with dislocation network recovery. Comparison of tensile and TEM results from ORR-irradiated steel with those from steels irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Experimental Breeder Reactor indicated consistent strength and microstructure changes

  10. Tensile, Creep, and Fatigue Behaviors of 3D-Printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyin; Cai, Linlin; Golub, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Xuehui; Schlarman, Kate; Zhang, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) is a widely used thermoplastics in 3D printing. However, there is a lack of thorough investigation of the mechanical properties of 3D-printed ABS components, including orientation-dependent tensile strength and creep fatigue properties. In this work, a systematic characterization is conducted on the mechanical properties of 3D-printed ABS components. Specifically, the effect of printing orientation on the tensile and creep properties is investigated. The results show that, in tensile tests, the 0° printing orientation has the highest Young's modulus of 1.81 GPa, and ultimate strength of 224 MPa. In the creep test, the 90° printing orientation has the lowest k value of 0.2 in the plastics creep model, suggesting 90° is the most creep resistant direction. In the fatigue test, the average cycle number under load of 30 N is 3796 cycles. The average cycle number decreases to 128 cycles when the load is 60 N. Using the Paris law, with an estimated crack size of 0.75 mm, and stress intensity factor is varied from 352 to 700 N√ m, the derived fatigue crack growth rate is 0.0341 mm/cycle. This study provides important mechanical property data that is useful for applying 3D-printed ABS in engineering applications.

  11. Analysis of the Tensile Behavior of 12 pct Mn Multi-phase ( α + γ) TWIP + TRIP Steel by Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangwon; Woo, Wanchuck; de Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-05-01

    The tensile behavior of intercritically annealed Fe-12 pctMn-0.3 pctC-2 pctAl and Fe-12 pctMn-0.3 pctC-3 pctAl steel was studied by means of in situ neutron diffraction and microstructural analysis. The in situ neutron diffraction measurements showed that the ferrite had a much higher yield strength and lower work hardening rate as compared to the austenite. The strain hardening of the austenite was controlled by deformation twinning and strain-induced transformation, occurring in succession. This TWIP + TRIP effect acted as an effective plasticity-enhancing mechanism which increased the work hardening rate.

  12. Microstructural Characterization of Internal Welding Defects and Their Effect on the Tensile Behavior of FSW Joints of AA2198 Al-Cu-Li Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Jolu, Thomas; Morgeneyer, Thilo F.; Denquin, Anne; Sennour, Mohamed; Laurent, Anne; Besson, Jacques; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Françoise

    2014-11-01

    Internal features and defects such as joint line remnant, kissing bond, and those induced by an initial gap between the two parent sheets were investigated in AA2198-T851 friction stir welded joints. They were compared with the parent material and to defect-free welds obtained using a seamless sheet. The cross-weld tensile strength was reduced by the defects by less than 6 pct. The fracture elongation was not significantly affected in view of experimental scatter. Fracture location, however, changed from the thermomechanically affected zone (retreating side) to the defect in the weld nugget for the welds bearing a kissing bond and for some of the gap welds. The kissing bond was shown by EBSD to be an intergranular feature; it fractured under a normal engineering stress close to 260 MPa during an in situ SEM tensile test. Synchrotron tomography after interrupted tensile testing confirmed opening of the kissing bond. For an initial gap of 23 pct of the sheet thickness, intergranular fracture of copper-enriched or oxide-bearing grain boundaries close to the nugget root was evidenced. The stress and strain state of cross-weld specimens loaded under uniaxial tension was assessed using a 3D finite element, multi-material model, determined on the basis of experimental data obtained on the same specimens using digital image correlation.

  13. Microstructural characterization of internal welding defects and their effect on the tensile behavior of FSW joints of AA2198 Al-Cu-Li alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Jolu, Thomas; Morgeneyer, Thilo F.; Sennour, Mohamed; Laurent, Anne; Besson, Jacques; Gourgues-Lorenzon Anne-Francoise; Denquin, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Internal features and defects such as joint line remnant, kissing bond, and those induced by an initial gap between the two parent sheets were investigated in AA2198-T851 friction stir welded joints. They were compared with the parent material and to defect-free welds obtained using a seamless sheet. The cross-weld tensile strength was reduced by the defects by less than 6 pct. The fracture elongation was not significantly affected in view of experimental scatter. Fracture location, however, changed from the thermo mechanically affected zone (retreating side) to the defect in the weld nugget for the welds bearing a kissing bond and for some of the gap welds. The kissing bond was shown by EBSD to be an intergranular feature; it fractured under a normal engineering stress close to 260 MPa during an in situ SEM tensile test. Synchrotron tomography after interrupted tensile testing confirmed opening of the kissing bond. For an initial gap of 23 pct of the sheet thickness, intergranular fracture of copper-enriched or oxide bearing grain boundaries close to the nugget root was evidenced. The stress and strain state of cross-weld specimens loaded under uniaxial tension was assessed using a 3D finite element, multi-material model, determined on the basis of experimental data obtained on the same specimens using digital image correlation. (authors)

  14. The use of finite element analysis and notch tensile testing to determine the cryogenic fracture toughness of thick section weldment in forged CSUS-JN1 plate with Inconel 625 type filler metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Yasuhide; Mano, Yasunori; Horiguchi, Katsumi; Sugo, Tomo

    2000-01-01

    The use of the notch tensile test to estimate the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J IC ) of structural alloys and weldments for superconducting magnets in fusion energy systems was studied. Notch tensile tests were performed with small round bar specimens containing an electro discharge machined (EDM) notch at liquid helium temperature (4 K) using crosshead rates of 3.3 x 10 -3 and 20 mm/s. Notch tensile test specimens were 5 mm in diameter with a 30-mm reduced section. In the mid section of the specimen a 1 mm deep EDM notch of 0.2 mm width was machined around the girth, thus maintaining a starting diameter of 3 mm. Correlations between notch tensile strength, failure energy absorption, and J IC were assessed. A finite element analysis was also performed to compute directly the J-values. Comparisons of the predicted J IC with results obtained from conventional JIS Z 2284 standard tests were made. (author)

  15. A Study on the Effect of Nano Alumina Particles on Fracture Behavior of PMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezou Sezavar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current research, the role of nano-sized alumina on deformation and fracture mechanism of Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA was investigated. For this purpose, PMMA matrix nanocomposite reinforced with different wt% of alumina (i.e., 5, 10 and 15 were fabricated using the compression molding technique. Tensile properties of produced nanocomposites were studied using Zwick Z250 apparatus at cross head speed of about 5 mm/min. In order to specify the role of alumina nanoparticles on deformation and fracture mechanism of PMMA, microscopic evaluation was performed using scanning electron microscope (SEM. The achieved results prove that tensile properties of PMMA depend on alumina wt%. For example, addition of 15 wt% alumina to PMMA causes an increase of about 25% modulus of elasticity. Micrographs taken from the fracture surface of PMMA and its nanocomposites show deformation and fracture mechanism of PMMA changes as alumina is added to it.

  16. Stress partitioning behavior of multilayered steels during tensile deformation measured by in situ neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, M.; Inoue, J.; Nambu, S.; Xu, P.; Akita, K.; Suzuki, H.; Koseki, T.

    2012-01-01

    Stress partitioning in multilayered steels consisting of martensitic and austenitic layers was measured during tensile deformation by in situ neutron diffraction measurements to investigate the mechanism of the improved strength–elongation balance. The deformation mode can be classified into three stages, and the results indicate that the applied stress is effectively transferred to the martensitic phase, because no stress concentration sites exist, owing to the multilayered structure. Hence, even as-quenched martensite deformed uniformly, resulting in improved strength–elongation balance in multilayered steels.

  17. Tensile behavior of Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowire with a B2 crystalline precipitate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda-Macias, Matias; Amigo, Nicolas; Gutierrez, Gonzalo

    2018-02-01

    A molecular dynamics study of the effect of a single B2-CuZr precipitate on the mechanical properties of Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowires is presented. Four different samples are considered: three with a 2, 4 and 6 nm radii precipitate and a precipitate-free sample. These systems are submitted to uniaxial tensile test up to 25% of strain. The interface region between the precipitate and the glass matrix has high local atomic shear strain, activating shear transformation zones, which concentrates in the neighborhood of the precipitate. The plastic regime is dominated by necking, and no localized shear band is observed for the samples with a 4 and 6 nm radii precipitate. In addition, the yield stress decreases as the size of the precipitate increases. Regarding the precipitate structure, no martensitic phase transformation is observed, since neither the shear band hit the precipitate nor the stress provided by the tensile test is enough to initiate the transformation. It is concluded that, in contrast to the case when multiple precipitates are present in the sample, a single precipitate concentrates the shear strain around its surface, eventually causing the failure of the nanowire.

  18. Tensile behaviors of three-dimensionally free-formable titanium mesh plates for bone graft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianmei

    2017-11-01

    Present metal artificial bones for bone grafts have the problems like too heavy and excessive elastic modulus compared with natural bones. In this study, three-dimensionally (3D) free-formable titanium mesh plates for bone graft applications was introduced to improve these problems. Fundamental mesh shapes and patterns were designed under different base shapes and design parameters through three dimensional CAD tools from higher flexibility and strength points of view. Based on the designed mesh shape and patterns, sample specimens of titanium mesh plates with different base shapes and design variables were manufactured through laser processing. Tensile properties of the sample titanium mesh plates like volume density, tensile elastic modulus were experimentally and analytically evaluated. Experimental results showed that such titanium mesh plates had much higher flexibility and their mechanical properties could be controlled to close to the natural bones. More details on the mechanical properties of titanium mesh plates including compression, bending, torsion and durability will be carried out in future study.

  19. Tensile behavior of CF8-CPF8-304H and CF8M-CPF8M-316H stainless steel static and centrifugal castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEnerney, J.W.; Sikka, V.K.; Booker, M.K.

    1981-10-01

    We have analyzed the tensile behavior of 11 heats of grades CF8-CPF8-304H and 13 heats of grades CF8M-CPF8M-316H static and centrifugal castings from room temperature to 650 0 C. Except for anomalous conditions, the centrifugal castings exhibited uniform composition. All CPF8-304H centrifugal castings contained only radial columnar grains, but some CPF8M-316H castings had columnar, banded, or equiaxed structures. Ultimate tensile strength and total elongation were the properties in which castings showed the most inferiority to wrought material. With increasing ferrite content, 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength increased while uniform elongation, total elongation, and reduction of area decreased. Although centrifugal castings did not exhibit significant end-to-end variation in tensile behavior, the 0.2% yield strength displayed anisotropy, with axial and circumferential values being greater than radial

  20. The Effect of Short Duration Electric Current on the Quasi-Static Tensile Behavior of Magnesium AZ31 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Thien Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a single pulse of electric current with short duration on the quasi-static tensile behavior of a magnesium AZ31 alloy is experimentally investigated. A single pulse of electric current with duration less than 1 second is applied to the specimen, while the specimen is being deformed in the plastic region under quasi-static tensile loads. After a nearly instant decrease of flow stress at the pulse of electric current, the flow stress shows strain hardening until the failure of the specimen. The experimental result shows that the strain-hardening parameters (the strength coefficient and the strain-hardening exponent of the hardening curve after the electric current strongly depend on the applied electric energy density (electric energy per unit volume. Empirical expressions are suggested to describe the hardening behavior after the pulse as a function of the electric energy density and are compared with the empirical expressions suggested for advanced high-strength steels.

  1. In-Plane Anisotropy in Mechanical Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of Commercially Pure Titanium in Tensile and Cyclic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Subhasis; Gurao, N. P.

    2017-12-01

    Tensile and cyclic deformation behavior of three samples oriented at 0, 45, and 90 deg to the rolling direction in the rolling direction-transverse direction (RD-TD) plane of cold-rolled and annealed plate of commercially pure titanium is studied in the present investigation. The sample along the RD (R0) shows the highest strength but lowest ductility in monotonic tension. Although ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation of samples along 45 and 90 deg to the RD (R45 and R90, respectively) are similar, the former has significantly higher yield strength than the latter, indicating different strain-hardening behavior. It is found that the R90 sample exhibits the highest monotonic ductility as well as fatigue life. This is attributed to a higher propensity for twinning in this sample with the presence of multiple variants and twin intersections. Cyclic life is also influenced by the high tendency for detwinning of contraction twins in this orientation. Elastoplastic self-consistent (EPSC) simulations of one-cycle tension-compression load reversal indicate that the activity of pyramidal 〈 c + a〉 slip and extension twinning oscillates during cyclic loading that builds up damage in a cumulative manner, leading to failure in fatigue.

  2. Effect of dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading on fracture behavior for Japanese carbon steel pipe STS410

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Kanji; Murayama, Kouichi; Ogata, Hiroyuki [and others

    1997-04-01

    The fracture behavior for Japanese carbon steel pipe STS410 was examined under dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading through a research program of International Piping Integrity Research Group (EPIRG-2), in order to evaluate the strength of pipe during the seismic event The tensile test and the fracture toughness test were conducted for base metal and TIG weld metal. Three base metal pipe specimens, 1,500mm in length and 6-inch diameter sch.120, were employed for a quasi-static monotonic, a dynamic monotonic and a dynamic cyclic loading pipe fracture tests. One weld joint pipe specimen was also employed for a dynamic cyclic loading test In the dynamic cyclic loading test, the displacement was controlled as applying the fully reversed load (R=-1). The pipe specimens with a circumferential through-wall crack were subjected four point bending load at 300C in air. Japanese STS410 carbon steel pipe material was found to have high toughness under dynamic loading condition through the CT fracture toughness test. As the results of pipe fracture tests, the maximum moment to pipe fracture under dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading condition, could be estimated by plastic collapse criterion and the effect of dynamic monotonic loading and cyclic loading was a little on the maximum moment to pipe fracture of the STS410 carbon steel pipe. The STS410 carbon steel pipe seemed to be less sensitive to dynamic and cyclic loading effects than the A106Gr.B carbon steel pipe evaluated in IPIRG-1 program.

  3. Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and tensile behavior of a hot isostatically pressed nickel-based superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Chunlei; Wu, Xinhua; Mei, Junfa; Andrews, Paul; Voice, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Post-HIP heat treatment led to refined microstructure and improved tensile properties. •Deformation occurred mainly by forming stacking faults in γ′ at RT and elevated temperature. •Net-shape HIPed RR1000 failed in a transgranular fracture mode. -- Abstract: A nickel-based superalloy powder RR1000 has been hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) and heat treated to produce different microstructures. Microstructures were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Tensile testing was performed at room temperature and 700 °C and the deformed samples were examined using SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that in the as-HIPed condition the microstructure consisted of coarse and irregular-shaped primary and secondary γ′ together with a low volume fraction of fine γ′ (<50 nm in diameter). Solution treatment below the γ′ solvus followed by air cooling resulted in the formation of finer cuboidal secondary γ′ (350–750 nm) and medium-sized spherical tertiary γ′ (100–200 nm). This led to an improvement of both the 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Ageing of the solution-treated or of the as-HIPed samples at 760 °C resulted in the precipitation of a high population of fine γ′ (around 50 nm) which further increased the strength. Within the resolution limit of the current TEM analysis, deformation at room temperature seemed to occur mainly by dislocations cutting through secondary γ′ and very fine γ′, accompanied by the formation of stacking faults within these precipitates; most of the medium-sized tertiary γ′ precipitates in solution-treated and aged samples were not cut through but were surrounded by dislocations. Deformation at 700 °C happened by dislocations cutting through γ′ precipitates and γ matrix, leading to the formation of extended stacking faults across both γ and γ′. It is suggested that the optimum treatment of the current powder superalloy is to

  4. Fracture Behavior Investigation of a Typical Sandstone Under Mixed-Mode I/II Loading Using the Notched Deep Beam Bending Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2017-08-01

    The brittle fracture behavior of rocks under mixed-mode loading is important in rock engineering. First, a new configuration called the notched deep beam (NDB) specimen was introduced for the fracture testing of rock materials under mixed-mode I/II loading, and a series of finite element analyses were performed to calibrate the dimensionless fracture parameters (i.e., Y I, Y II and T^{*}). The results showed that an NDB specimen subjected to three-point bending is able to generate pure mode I loading, pure mode II loading, and any mixed-mode loading in between. Then, several NDB specimens made of sandstone were used to investigate the brittle fracture behavior of rock under mixed-mode I/II loading. The fracture surfaces were theoretically described using a statistical method, and the results indicated that all the fracture surfaces generated under different mixed-mode loading were statistically identical; to some extent, these results experimentally showed that only tensile fracture occurs under mixed-mode I/II loading. The obtained fracture strengths were then analyzed using several brittle fracture criteria. The empirical criterion, maximum energy release rate criterion, generalized maximum tangential stress (GMTS) criterion, and improved R-criterion accurately predicted the fracture strength envelope of the sandstone. Finally, based on the concepts of point stress and mean stress, the micro-crack zones (MCZs) under different mixed-mode loading were theoretically estimated based on the MTS and GMTS criteria. The critical radius of MCZ in the crack propagation direction was not a constant for all mixed-mode loading conditions regardless of whether the T-stress was considered. This result suggests that the size of the core region used to predict the crack initiation direction and fracture strength based on the GMTS criterion should be chosen more carefully.

  5. A semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pin; Cheng, Linsong; Huang, Shijun; Wu, Yonghui

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks. The model dynamically couples an analytical dual-porosity model with a numerical discrete fracture model. The small-scale fractures with the matrix are idealized as a dual-porosity continuum and an analytical flow solution is derived based on source functions in Laplace domain. The large-scale fractures are represented explicitly as the major fluid conduits and the flow is numerically modeled, also in Laplace domain. This approach allows us to include finer details of the fracture network characteristics while keeping the computational work manageable. For example, the large-scale fracture network may have complex geometry and varying conductivity, and the computations can be done at predetermined, discrete times, without any grids in the dual-porosity continuum. The validation of the semi-analytical model is demonstrated in comparison to the solution of ECLIPSE reservoir simulator. The simulation is fast, gridless and enables rapid model setup. On the basis of the model, we provide detailed analysis of the flow behavior of a horizontal production well in fractured reservoir with multi-scale fracture networks. The study has shown that the system may exhibit six flow regimes: large-scale fracture network linear flow, bilinear flow, small-scale fracture network linear flow, pseudosteady-state flow, interporosity flow and pseudoradial flow. During the first four flow periods, the large-scale fracture network behaves as if it only drains in the small-scale fracture network; that is, the effect of the matrix is negligibly small. The characteristics of the bilinear flow and the small-scale fracture network linear flow are predominantly determined by the dimensionless large-scale fracture conductivity. And low dimensionless fracture conductivity will generate large pressure drops in the large-scale fractures surrounding the wellbore. With

  6. Tensile behavior of an eutectic Pb–Sn alloy processed by ECAP and rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Ponzo Lugon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A eutectic lead–tin alloy was prepared by melting the commercially pure metals and cast in cylindrical molds with 10 mm diameter. The billets were processed by 4 passes of ECAP using a die with 90° between channels through route A and rolled to a final thickness of ∼1 mm. The microstructure was determined by optical microscopy. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature in the strain rate range between 10−4 and 10−2 s−1. The results show the elongation to failure increases at low strain-rates. The strain-rate sensitivity parameter was determined and a maximum value of ∼0.4 was observed at the lowest strain-rate.

  7. Failure behavior / characteristics of fabric reinforced polymer matrix composite and aluminum6061 on dynamic tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Hyejin; Cho, Chongdu [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Composite materials are composed of multiple types of materials as reinforcement and matrix. Among them, CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced polymer) is widely used materials in automotive and defense industry. Carbon fibers are used as a reinforcement, of which Young's modulus is in a prepreg form. In automotive industry, especially, high strain rate test is needed to measure dynamic properties, used in dynamic analysis like high inertia included simulation as a car crash. In this paper, a SHTB (Split Hopkinson tensile bar) machine is employed for estimating stress-strain curve under dynamic load condition on aluminum 6061 and CFRP. The strain rate range is about from 100 /s to 1000 /s and the number of prepreg layers of composite specimen is total eight plies which are stacked symmetrically to structure CFRP. As a result, stress / strain point data are obtained and used for simulation into stacked composites.

  8. Size and constraint effects on mechanical and fracture behavior of micro-scale Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Ni solder joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang, X.P., E-mail: mexzhang@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhou, M.B.; Zeng, J.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Mai, Y.-W. [Centre for Advanced Materials Technology (CAMT), School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering J07, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-11-03

    Solder joints are generally regarded as the weakest part in packaging systems and electronic assemblies in modern electronic products and devices. In this study, both experimental and finite element methods were used to characterize the mechanical behavior of micro-scale Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Ni sandwich-structured joints with different thickness-to-diameter ratios (R varying from 1/3 to 1/12) under quasi-static tension loading using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). Experimental results show that crack initiation and propagation in the solder matrix occur in a typical ductile manner. Compared with Cu/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu sandwich-structured solder joints, Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Ni solder joints have much higher tensile strengths due to the dispersion strengthening effect through the fine Ag{sub 3}Sn particles. With decreasing R, both stiffness and tensile strength of solder joints increase obviously with decreasing coefficient of stress state and damage equivalent stress. Moreover, results of quantitative fractographic analysis by SEM and EDS display three fracture modes with decreasing R. Joints with R≥1/4 all fail by ductile fracture, those with R=1/6 fail by either ductile fracture or mixed ductile and brittle fractures, and for joints with R=1/12, brittle fracture is dominant. Furthermore, results obtained have also shown that the crack growth driving forces, K{sub I} and K{sub II}, as well as the strain energy release rate, G{sub I}, in the Ni{sub 3}Sn{sub 4} layer and at the Ni{sub 3}Sn{sub 4}/Ni interface, increase significantly with decreasing R. Hence, under tensile loading the fracture mode of solder joints changes from ductile to brittle as R is decreased.

  9. Effects of strontium and titanium on the microstructure, tensile properties and creep behavior of AM50 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Peng; Wang Qudong; Zhai Chunquan; Zhu Yanping

    2007-01-01

    The microstructure, tensile properties and creep behavior of Mg-5Al based alloys with strontium and titanium additions were investigated. Small additions of strontium mainly dissolved into Mg 17 Al 12 particles and increased the thermal stability and creep strength, since they did not cause the formation of any new phase in the microstructure. Small additions of strontium could refine the as-cast microstructure and improve the mechanical properties. A strontium addition higher than 0.4 wt% could result in Al 4 Sr phase information, which suppressed the formation of Mg 17 Al 12 phases. Addition of 1% strontium decreased the tensile strength and elongation though improved the yield strength at room temperature. However, greater amounts of strontium can improve the mechanical properties at high temperature. Creep strength of the alloy increased with the strontium content. Further additions of Ti increased the alloy mechanical properties both at room and high temperature though slightly reduce the creep strength. Creep mechanisms of alloys with 0.1% and 1% strontium for different temperature/stress regimes were proposed, which showed that the alloys underwent different creep mechanisms with the change of strontium content. These observations indicated that alloys show two different strengthening mechanisms in the strontium content range of 0.02-1 wt%

  10. Effect of Specimen Size on the Tensile Strength Behavior of the Plastic Waste Fiber Reinforced Soil – Lime – Rice Husk Ash Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntohar A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of tensile strength in fiber reinforced soil is an important research topic. A study has been undertaken to investigate the strength of stabilized clay-soil reinforced with randomly distributed discrete plastic waste fibers by carrying out split tensile strength test. In this study, the clay soil was stabilized with lime and rice husk ash mixtures. The main purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of specimen size to the tensile strength behavior. Testing procedure was formulated using extended ASTM C496 standard. The laboratory investigation results showed that split-tensile strength of reinforced specimens increased with increase in size. The limitations of the dataset indicate that specimen size of 70 mm in diameter is the threshold to produce reasonable representative strengths.

  11. Estimation of a stress field in the earth`s crust using drilling-induced tensile fractures observed at well WD-1 in the Kakkonda geothermal field; Kakkonda WD-1 sei de kansokusareta drilling induced tensile fracture ni yoru chikaku oryokuba no suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, T. [GERD Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Fluid Science; Kato, O.; Doi, N.; Miyazaki, S. [Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, T. [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo, (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    This paper describes estimation of a stress field in the earth`s crust in the Kakkonda geothermal field. Formation micro imager (FMI) logging known as a crack detecting logging was performed in the well WD-1. This FMI logging has made observation possible on cracks along well axis thought to indicate size and direction of the crust stress, and drilling-induced tensile fractures (DTF). It was verified that these DTFs are generated initially in an azimuth determined by in-situ stress (an angle up to the DTF as measured counterclockwise with due north as a starting point, expressed in {theta}) in the well`s circumferential direction. It was also confirmed that a large number of cracks incline at a certain angle to the well axis (an angle made by the well axis and the DTF, expressed in {gamma}). The DTF is a crack initially generated on well walls as a result of such tensile stresses as mud pressure and thermal stress acting on the well walls during well excavation, caused by the in-situ stress field. Measurement was made on the {theta} and {gamma} from the FMI logging result, and estimation was given on a three-dimensional stress field. Elucidating the three-dimensional crust stress field in a geothermal reservoir is important in making clear the formation mechanism thereof and the growth of water-permeable cracks. This method can be regarded as an effective method. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Fatigue crack growth and fracture behavior of bainitic rail steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    "The microstructuremechanical properties relationships, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth and fracture surface morphology of J6 bainitic, manganese, and pearlitic rail steels were studied. Microstructuremechanical properties correlation ...

  13. Fracture Behavior in Nylon 6 Fibers. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques are used to determine the number of free radicals produced during deformation leading to fracture of nylon 6 fibers. A reaction rate molecular model is proposed to explain some of the deformation and bond rupture behavior leading to fracture. High-strength polymer fibers are assumed to consist of a sandwich structure of disordered and ordered regions along the fiber axis. In the disordered or critical flaw regions, tie chains connecting the ordered or crystalline block regions are assumed to have a statistical distribution in length. These chains are, therefore, subjected to different stresses. The effective length distribution was determined by EPR. The probability of bond rupture was assumed to be controlled by reaction-rate theory with a stress-aided activation energy and behavior of various loadings determined by numerical techniques. The model is successfully correlated with experimental stress, strain, and bond rupture results for creep, constant rate loadings, cyclic stress, stress relaxation and step strain tests at room temperature.

  14. Work hardening behavior of the extruded and equal-channel angularly pressed Mg–Li–Zn alloys under tensile and shear deformation modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, M.; Mahmudi, R., E-mail: mahmudi@ut.ac.ir

    2014-06-01

    The flow and work hardening behaviors of extruded and equal-channel angularly pressed (ECAPed) Mg–6Li–1Zn (LZ61) and Mg–12Li–1Zn (LZ121) alloys were studied by tensile and shear punch testing methods. It was shown that the Kocks–Mecking type plots for tensile and shear deformation of both alloys, exhibited similar work hardening (WH) stages in both extruded and ECAPed conditions. WH rates were found to be lower for the ECAPed materials, due to a reasonably uniform and well-refined microstructure. In the case of hcp LZ61 alloy, textural studies showed that the extruded fiber-type texture was replaced by a typical ECAP texture, in which basal planes rotated about 45° to the extrusion axis. This was found to be responsible for the lower tensile strength and higher shear strength in the ECAPed material, as compared to the extruded condition. For the bcc LZ121 alloy, it was observed that the grain refinement achieved after ECAP increases the strength and ductility in both tensile and shear deformation, compared with those of extruded condition. Stage II of the Kocks–Mecking plot in both shear and tensile deformation of LZ121 was eliminated most likely due to stacking fault energy improvement caused by higher Li content of the Mg lattice structure. The shear punch testing (SPT) method was found to yield the flow and WH curves similar to those obtained in tensile testing.

  15. The Effect of Aluminum Content and Processing on the Tensile Behavior of High Pressure Die Cast Mg Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deda, Erin M.

    Due to their high specific strength and good castability, magnesium alloys are desirable for use in weight reduction strategies in automotive applications. However, the mechanical properties of high pressure die cast (HPDC) magnesium can be highly variable and dependent on location in the casting. To better understand the relationship between microstructure and tensile properties, the influence of alloying and section thickness on the microstructural features and tensile properties of Mg-Al and Mg-Al-Mn alloys is quantified. This investigation provides experimental input to modeling activities for the development of an Integrated Computational Materials Engineering capability, to assess and quantify the impact of microstructure on the tensile behavior of HPDC Mg AM series (magnesium-aluminum-manganese) alloys. As a result of this work, it is found that with increasing aluminum content, the yield strength increases and the ductility decreases. Increasing the plate thickness results in a decrease in both the yield strength and ductility. HPDC components have varying microstructural features through the plate thickness, developing a "skin" and "core". The grain size, beta-Mg 17Al12 phase, and solute content are all quantified through the thickness of the plates. By quantifying microstructural variations, a physics-based model has been developed which is able to predict the effects of alloying and plate thickness on yield strength. The primary factors affecting strengthening are accounted for using a linear superposition model of solid solution, grain size, and dispersion hardening. This model takes into account through-thickness microstructure gradients that exist in HPDC components by using a composite model to incorporate the skin and core changes. The yield strength in these alloys is dominated by grain boundary strengthening and solute hardening effects. In order to isolate the effects of eutectic phases, shrinkage porosity and oxide films on strength and

  16. Influence of cooling conditions and amount of retained austenite on the fracture of austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VYACHESLAV GORYANY

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available SEM Analysis of fracture surfaces from tensile test specimens of thick-walled, austempered ductile irons (diameter 160 mm shows different fracture behavior depending on the austenite retained in the matrix. The results show ductile fractures only in areas containing retained austenite sections. In section areas without or with a very low content of retained austenite, only brittle fracture without any plastic deformation occurs. The content of retained austenite determines the amount of ductile fracture in the microstructure.

  17. Static tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and synchrotron radiation white x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Noriyuki; Kawahata, Taiji; Ishimaru, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Akihiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shobu, Takahisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel (S32101) from the viewpoints of plastic deformability among phases or grains, we performed static tensile tests, in situ neutron diffraction, and white x-ray diffraction experiments at room temperature. In the static tensile tests, the S32101 steel displayed a larger uniform elongation and a better tensile strength-uniform elongation balance than a commercial SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel. A larger uniform elongation of S32101 is associated with the macroscopic work hardening behavior that a work hardening rate higher than the flow stress can maintain up until high true strains. From the experimental results of synchrotron radiation white x-ray diffraction experiments, the hard phase of S32101 was changed from the ferrite (α) phase to austenite (γ) one during tensile deformation. This led to a larger stress partitioning between the phases at the latter stage of deformation. From the experimental results of in situ neutron diffraction, it was found that the stress partitioning of the γ phase in the S32101 was the largest among the present results. Therefore, the larger work hardening rate of S32101 can be explained by the large stress partitioning of the γ phase, that between γ and α phases and γ volume fraction. (author)

  18. A correlative study between analysis and experiment on the fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper compares the fracture behavior of a composite material by using the analytical models of Waddoups et al. (1971), Whitney and Nuismer (1974, 1975), and Snyder and Cruse (1975) with experimental results from tests performed on center-notched tensile strips. Laminate configurations of (0 deg)8s, (0 deg/90 deg)4s, (+ and -45 deg)4s, and (0 deg/+ and -45 deg/0 deg)2s from T300/934 graphite/epoxy are tested. These particular configurations are used so that the effect of various degrees of anisotropy can be studied. The procedure adopted uses the results from one test for crack size aspect ratio to predict the results of tests of other aspect ratios. For those methods that use a characteristic dimension, predictions are made by assuming the magnitude of this dimension to be constant. The validity of this assumption for a laminate is assessed by comparing predicted and experimental results. Analytical models using a characteristic dimension are compared to the model developed by Cruse (1973).

  19. A study of microstructure, quasi-static response, fatigue, deformation and fracture behavior of high strength alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Manigandan

    The history of steel dates back to the 17th century and has been instrumental in the betterment of every aspect of our lives ever since, from the pin that holds the paper together to the Automobile that takes us to our destination steel touches everyone every day. Path breaking improvements in manufacturing techniques, access to advanced machinery and understanding of factors like heat treatment, corrosion resistance have aided in the advancement in the properties of steel in the last few years. In this dissertation document, the results of a study aimed at the influence of alloy chemistry, processing and influence of the quasi static and fatigue behavior of seven alloy steels is discussed. The microstructure of the as-received steel was examined and characterized for the nature and morphology of the grains and the presence of other intrinsic features in the microstructure. The tensile, cyclic fatigue and bending fatigue tests were done on a fully automated closed-loop servo-hydraulic test machine at room temperature. The failed samples of high strength steels were examined in a scanning electron microscope for understanding the fracture behavior, especially the nature of loading be it quasi static, cyclic fatigue or bending fatigue . The quasi static and cyclic fatigue fracture behavior of the steels examined coupled with various factors contributing to failure are briefly discussed in light of the conjoint and mutually interactive influences of intrinsic microstructural effects, nature of loading, and stress (load)-deformation-microstructural interactions.

  20. Improved tensile and buckling behavior of defected carbon nanotubes utilizing boron nitride coating – A molecular dynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badjian, H.; Setoodeh, A.R., E-mail: setoodeh@sutech.ac.ir

    2017-02-15

    Synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have led to immense studies due to their many interesting functional features such as piezoelectricity, high temperature resistance to oxygen, electrical insulation, high thermal conductivity and very long lengths as physical features. In order to utilize the superior properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a hybrid nanotube is proposed in this study by forming BNNTs surface coating on the CNTs. The benefits of such coating on the tensile and buckling behavior of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are illustrated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the resulted nanostructures during the deformation. The AIREBO and Tersoff-Brenner potentials are employed to model the interatomic forces between the carbon and boron nitride atoms, respectively. The effects of chiral indices, aspect ratio, presence of mono-vacancy defects and coating dimension on coated/non-coated CNTs are examined. It is demonstrated that the coated defective CNTs exhibit remarkably enhanced ultimate strength, buckling load capacity and Young's modulus. The proposed coating not only enhances the mechanical properties of the resulted nanostructure, but also conceals it from few external factors impacting the behavior of the CNT such as humidity and high temperature.

  1. Floating liquid bridge tensile behavior: Electric-field-induced Young's modulus measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Omar; Mendez Soares, David; Valente Filho, Juracyr Ferraz

    2013-12-01

    A floating bridge is formed spontaneously when high voltage is applied to polar fluids in two capillary tubes that were in contact and then separated. This bridge bends under its own weight, and its bending profile was used to calculate its Young's modulus. For electric field intensities of ˜106 V/m, water bridges exhibit viscoelastic behavior, with Young's moduli of ˜24 MPa; dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) bridges exhibited Young's moduli of ˜60 kPa. The scheme devised to measure the voltage drop across the water bridge for high voltages applied between the electrodes shows that the bulk water resistance decreases with increasing voltage.

  2. Mesoscopic Modeling and Simulation of the Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Simone, A.; Sluys, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    of the most significant constitutive model parameters on global and local response. Different distributions and shapes of the aggregate grains are tested. Three model parameter sets, corresponding to different moisture conditions, are employed in the analysis of two specimens in which the applied loading rate......We present a two-dimensional mesoscopic finite element model for simulating the rate- and moisture-dependent material behavior of concrete. The idealized mesostructure consists of aggregate grains surrounded by an interfacial transition zone embedded in the bulk material. We examine the influence...

  3. The Effects of Fe-Particles on the Tensile Properties of Al-Si-Cu Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Bjurenstedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Fe-rich particles has been a topic for discussion in the aluminum casting industry because of the negative impact they exert on the mechanical properties. However, there are still contradictions on the effects of various morphologies of Fe-particles. In this study, microstructural characterization of tensile tested samples has been performed to reveal how unmodified and modified Fe-rich particles impact on the tensile behavior. Analysis of additions of Fe modifiers such as Mn and Cr, showed higher amounts of primary Fe-rich particles (sludge with increased porosity and, as result, degraded tensile properties. From the fracture analysis of tensile tested hot isostatic pressed (HIPed samples it could be concluded that the mechanical properties were mainly governed by the Fe-rich particles, which were fracturing through cleavage, not by the porosity.

  4. An elastic-plastic fracture mechanics based methodology to characterize cracking behavior and its application to environmental assisted processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.A.; Gutierrez-Solana, F.

    1999-01-01

    Cracking processes suffered by new structural and piping steels when used in petroleum or other energy installations have demonstrated the need for a cracking resistance characterization methodology. This methodology, valid for both elastic and elastoplastic regimes, should be able to define crack propagation kinetics as a function of their controlling local parameters. This work summarizes an experimental and analytical methodology that has been shown to be suitable for characterizing cracking processes using compact tensile specimens, especially subcritical environmentally assisted ones, such as those induced by hydrogen in microalloyed steels. The applied and validated methodology has been shown to offer quantitative results of cracking behavior and to correlate these with the existing fracture micromechanisms. (orig.)

  5. Fracture behavior of nano-scale rubber-modified epoxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupo, Lauren N.

    The primary focus of the first portion of this study is to compare physical and mechanical properties of a model epoxy that has been toughened with one of three different types of rubber-based modifier: a traditional telechelic oligomer (phase separates into micro-size particles), a core-shell latex particle (preformed nano-scale particles) and a triblock copolymer (self-assembles into nano-scale particles). The effect of modifier content on the physical properties of the matrix was determined using several thermal analysis methods, which provided insight into any inherent alterations of the epoxy matrix. Although the primary objective is to study the role of particle size on the fracture toughness, stiffness and strength were also determined since these properties are often reduced in rubber-toughened epoxies. It was found that since the CSR- and SBM-modified epoxies are composed of less rubber, thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy were better maintained. In order to better understand the fracture behavior and mechanisms of the three types of rubber particles utilized in this study, extensive microscopy analysis was conducted. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) was used to quantify the volume fraction of particles, transmission optical microscopy (TOM) was used to determine plastic damage zone size, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to assess void growth in the plastic zone after fracture. By quantifying these characteristics, it was then possible to model the plastic damage zone size as well as the fracture toughness to elucidate the behavior of the rubber-modified epoxies. It was found that localized shear yielding and matrix void growth are the active toughening mechanisms in all rubber-modified epoxies in this study, however, matrix void growth was more prevalent. The second portion of this study investigated the use of three acrylate-based triblocks and four acrylate-based diblocks to modify a model epoxy system. By

  6. Microstructure and Tensile Behavior of Al8Co17Cr17Cu8Fe17Ni33 (at.%) High-Entropy Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, H. M.; Manzoni, A.; Völkl, R.; Wanderka, N.; Glatzel, U.

    2013-12-01

    Microstructure evolution and tensile behavior of the high-entropy alloy Al8Co17Cr17Cu8Fe17Ni33 (at.%) are investigated at room temperature and at 500°C in the as-cast state and under different heat-treatment conditions. Detailed microstructural characterizations are carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The equilibrium phase evolution as a function of temperature was calculated using the Thermo-Calc software (Thermo-Calc Software, Stockholm, Sweden) integrated with TTNi-7 database. The observed majority phase is a face-centered cubic solid solution for all tested specimens. Tensile ductility at room temperature and at elevated temperature is enhanced by heat treatment at 1150°C. An embrittlement phenomenon has been observed after a heat treatment at 700°C resulting in significant degradation in tensile properties.

  7. Analysis of structure and deformation behavior of AISI 316L tensile specimens from the second operational target module at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussev, M. N.; McClintock, D. A.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In an earlier publication, tensile testing was performed on specimens removed from the first two operational targets of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There were several anomalous features in the results. First, some specimens had very large elongations (up to 57%) while others had significantly smaller values (10-30%). Second, there was a larger than the usual amount of data scatter in the elongation results. Third, the stress-strain diagrams of nominally similar specimens spanned a wide range of behavior ranging from expected irradiation-induced hardening to varying levels of force drop after yield point and indirect signs of "traveling deformation wave" behavior associated with strain-induced martensite formation. To investigate the cause(s) of such variable tensile behavior, several specimens from Target 2, spanning the range of observed tensile behavior, were chosen for detailed microstructural examination using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. It was shown that the steel employed in the construction of the target contained an unexpected bimodal grain size distribution, containing very large out-of-specification grains surrounded by "necklaces" of grains of within-specification sizes. The large grains were frequently comparable to the width of the gauge section of the tensile specimen. The propensity to form martensite during deformation was shown to be accelerated by radiation but also to be very sensitive to the relative orientation of the grains with respect to the tensile axis. Specimens having large grains in the gauge that were most favorably oriented for production of martensite strongly exhibited the traveling deformation wave phenomenon, while those specimens with less favorably oriented grains had lesser or no degree of the wave effect, thereby accounting for the observed data scatter.

  8. Numerical Analysis on the Formation of Fracture Network during the Hydraulic Fracturing of Shale with Pre-Existing Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming He

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, configurations of pre-existing fractures in cubic rock blocks were investigated and reconstructed for the modeling of experimental hydraulic fracturing. The fluid-rock coupling process of hydraulic fracturing was simulated based on the displacement discontinuities method. The numerical model was validated against the related laboratory experiments. The stimulated fracture configurations under different conditions can be clearly shown using the validated numerical model. First, a dominated fracture along the maximum principle stress direction is always formed when the stress difference is large enough. Second, there are less reopened pre-existing fractures, more newly formed fractures and less shear fractures with the increase of the cohesion value of pre-existing fractures. Third, the length of the stimulated shear fracture decreases rapidly with the increase of the friction coefficient, while the length of the tensile fracture has no correlation to the fiction coefficient. Finally, the increase of the fluid injection rate is favorable to the formation of a fracture network. The unfavorable effects of the large stress difference and the large cohesion of pre-existing fractures can be partly suppressed by an increase of the injection rate in the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The results of this paper are useful for understanding fracture propagation behaviors during the hydraulic fracturing of shale reservoirs with pre-existing fractures.

  9. Fracture Behavior and Properties of Functionally Graded Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, Jeffery; Bordelon, Amanda; Gaedicke, Cristian; Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio

    2008-01-01

    In concrete pavements, a single concrete mixture design is selected to resist mechanical loading without attempting to adversely affect the concrete pavement shrinkage, ride quality, or noise attenuation. An alternative approach is to design distinct layers within the concrete pavement surface which have specific functions thus achieving higher performance at a lower cost. The objective of this research was to address the structural benefits of functionally graded concrete materials (FGCM) for rigid pavements by testing and modeling the fracture behavior of different combinations of layered plain and synthetic fiber-reinforced concrete materials. Fracture parameters and the post-peak softening behavior were obtained for each FGCM beam configuration by the three point bending beam test. The peak loads and initial fracture energy between the plain, fiber-reinforced, and FGCM signified similar crack initiation. The total fracture energy indicated improvements in fracture behavior of FGCM relative to full-depth plain concrete. The fracture behavior of FGCM depended on the position of the fiber-reinforced layer relative to the starter notch. The fracture parameters of both fiber-reinforced and plain concrete were embedded into a finite element-based cohesive zone model. The model successfully captured the experimental behavior of the FGCMs and predicted the fracture behavior of proposed FGCM configurations and structures. This integrated approach (testing and modeling) demonstrates the viability of FGCM for designing layered concrete pavements system

  10. Microstructural evolution during tensile deformation of polypropylenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasari, A.; Rohrmann, J.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2003-01-01

    Tensile deformation processes occurring at varying strain rates in high and low crystallinity polypropylenes and ethylene-propylene di-block copolymers have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy. This is examined for both long and short chain polymeric materials. The deformation processes in different polymeric materials show striking dissimilarities in spite of the common propylene matrix. Additionally, the deformation behavior of long and their respective short chain polymers was different. Deformation mechanisms include crazing/tearing, wedging, ductile ploughing, fibrillation, and brittle fracture. The different modes of deformation are depicted in the form of strain rate-strain diagrams. At a constant strain rate, the strain to fracture follows the sequence: high crystallinity polypropylenes< low crystallinity polypropylenes< ethylene-propylene di-block copolymers, indicative of the trend in resistance to plastic deformation

  11. Microstructural evolution and the variation of tensile behavior after aging heat treatment of precipitation hardened martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jong-Ho; Jeong, JaeSuk; Lee, Jong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging temperature on the microstructural evolution and the tensile behavior of precipitation hardened martensitic steel were investigated. Microscopic analysis using transmission electron microscope (TEM) was combined with the microstructural analysis using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to characterize the microstructural evolution with aging temperature. Peak hardness was obtained by precipitation of the Ni 3 Al ordered phase. After aging at temperature range from 420 to 590 °C, spherical Ni 3 Al precipitates and ellipsoidal M 23 C 6 carbides were observed within laths and at lath boundaries, respectively. Strain hardening behavior was analyzed with Ludwik equation. It is observed that the plastic strain regimes can be divided into two different stages by a rapid increase in strain hardening followed by a comparatively lower increase. At the first strain hardening stage, the aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen, and the exponent in the aged specimen was not changed considerably with increasing aging temperature. It is revealed that the strain hardening exponents at the first and the second stages were associated with the Ni 3 Al precipitates and the domain size representing the coherent scattering area, respectively. - Highlights: • All of aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen at the first stage. • The value of strain hardening exponent in the aged specimen was nearly constant with aging temperature. • Ni 3 Al precipitation dominantly influenced to the increase of strain hardening exponent at the first strain hardening stage. • Domain size was associated with strain hardening exponent at the second strain hardening stage

  12. Effects of Temperature and Strain Rate on Tensile Deformation Behavior of 9Cr-0.5Mo-1.8W-VNb Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Weng, Xiaoxiang; Jiang, Yong; Gong, Jianming

    2017-09-01

    A series of uniaxial tensile tests were carried out at different strain rate and different temperatures to investigate the effects of temperature and strain rate on tensile deformation behavior of P92 steel. In the temperature range of 30-700 °C, the variations of flow stress, average work-hardening rate, tensile strength and ductility with temperature all show three temperature regimes. At intermediate temperature, the material exhibited the serrated flow behavior, the peak in flow stress, the maximum in average work-hardening rate, and the abnormal variations in tensile strength and ductility indicates the occurrence of DSA, whereas the sharp decrease in flow stress, average work-hardening rate as well as strength values, and the remarkable increase in ductility values with increasing temperature from 450 to 700 °C imply that dynamic recovery plays a dominant role in this regime. Additionally, for the temperature ranging from 550 to 650 °C, a significant decrease in flow stress values is observed with decreasing in strain rate. This phenomenon suggests the strain rate has a strong influence on flow stress. Based on the experimental results above, an Arrhenius-type constitutive equation is proposed to predict the flow stress.

  13. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Ibna Zahid, Zubayer

    2016-01-01

    Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE) platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A tot...

  14. Multifilamentary MgB2 wires fracture behavior during the drawing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, D.; Yan, G.; Zhou, L.; Li, J.S.; Li, C.S.; Wang, Q.Y.; Xiong, X.M.; Jiao, G.F.

    2012-01-01

    The fracture behavior of 6 + 1 filamentary MgB 2 superconductive wires is presented here. The composite wires were fabricated by in situ Powder-in-Tube method using Nb as a barrier and copper as a stabilizer. The microstructure of the material has a great influence on its fracture behavior. The microstructural aspects of crack nucleation and propagation are discussed. It shows that there are complicated correlations between fracture behavior and the main influencing parameters, which contain specific drawing conditions (drawing velocity, reduction in area per pass), materials properties (strength, yield stress, microstructure) as well as the extent of bonding between the metal sheaths at their interface.

  15. Fracture performance of high strength steels, aluminium and magnesium alloys during plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of uniaxial tension tests were performed for 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys, AZ31B magnesium alloy, TRIP600 and DP600 steels, to obtain a better understanding of their fracture performance. Scanning electron microscope (SEM observation of the microstructure evolution was conducted. The dimple structure, orientation relationship between the fracture surface and tensile direction, necking behavior were analyzed. The fracture mechanism and fracture mode of each material was discussed in detail. The results show that TRIP600 steel is subject to a typical inter-granular ductile fracture combined by shear fracture. DP600 steel belongs to mainly ductility mixed with normal fracture. Both 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys are subject to a mixed ductility fracture and brittle fracture. AA5052 and AA6061 belong to a typical shear fracture and a normal fracture, respectively. Magnesium AZ31B is typical of a brittle fracture combined with normal fracture.

  16. Contaminant behavior in fractured sedimentary rocks: Seeing the fractures that matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, B. L.

    2017-12-01

    High resolution spatial sampling of continuous cores from sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents over many decades was used as a strategy to quantify mass stored in low permeability blocks of rock between hydraulically active fractures. Given that core and geophysical logging methods cannot distinguish between hydraulically active fractures and those that do not transmit water, these samples were informed by careful logging of visible fracture features in the core with sample spacing determined by modelled diffusion transport distances given rock matrix properties and expected ages of contamination. These high resolution contaminant concentration profiles from long term contaminated sites in sedimentary rock showed evidence of many more hydraulically active fractures than indicated by the most sophisticated open-hole logging methods. Fracture density is an important attribute affecting fracture connectivity and influencing contaminant plume evolution in fractured porous sedimentary rock. These contaminant profile findings were motivation to find new borehole methods to directly measure hydraulically active fracture occurrence and flux to corroborate the long term "DNAPL tracer experiment" results. Improved sensitivity is obtained when boreholes are sealed using flexible fabric liners (FLUTeTM technology) and various sensor options are deployed in the static water columns used to inflate these liners or in contact with the borehole wall behind the liners. Several methods rely on high resolution temperature measurements of ambient or induced temperature variability such as temperature vector probes (TVP), fiber optic cables for distributed temperature sensing (DTS), both using active heat; packer testing, point dilution testing and groundwater flux measurements between multiple straddle packers to account for leakage. In all cases, numerous hydraulically active fractures are identified over 100 to 300 meters depth, with a large range in transmissivities and

  17. Experimental study on the usefulness of magnetotherapy in bone fractures (tibial osteotomy in the rat). Accumulation of 99 mTc MDP - tests of tensile strength - determination of alkaline phosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sailer, R.

    1985-01-01

    Non-directional magnetic field therapy using a flux density of 60 G and a frequency of 25 Hz was carried out over 12 hours daily in rats in order to ascertain its influence on the healing process following osteotomy of the tibia with internal splint fixation of the fractured bone being carried out as an additional measure. The results thus achieved were compared to those seen in control animals, were no magnetotherapy was carried out, on the basis of scintiscan studies using 99 mTc MDP (degree of density in the callus formed around the fracture zone), the plasma levels of alkaline phosphatase and tests of tensile strength. The follow-up observations of the healing process were additionally based on radiological and histological evaluations of the animals. Beneficial effects of magnetotherapy on the healing process could not be confirmed with any statistical significance. (TRV) [de

  18. Fracture Behavior of Dielectric Elastomer under Pure Shear Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, D.; Patra, K.

    2017-09-01

    Dielectric elastomer has become a very important material for many emerging applications areas like optics, micro fluidics, sensors, actuators and energy harvesting. However, these elastomer components are prone to fracture or catastrophic failure because of defects likes notches, flaws, and fatigue crack, impurities which occur during production or during service. To make better use of this material, it is important to investigate fracture characteristics under different operating conditions. This study experimentally investigated the effects of notch length and strain rate on the fracture toughness, failure stretch and failure stress of acrylic elastomer under pure shear deformation mode. It is observed that failure stretch depends on notch length and independent of strain rate, but failure stress decreases with increasing notch length and increases with increasing strain rate. It is also found that fracture toughness is independent of notch lengths. However, fracture toughness is found to increase with strain rate.

  19. Fracture and strain rate behavior of airplane fuselage materials under blast loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mediavilla Varas, J.; Soetens, F.; Kroon, E.; Aanhold, J.E. van; Meulen, O.R. van der; Sagimon, M.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of three commonly used airplane fuselage materials is investigated, namely of Al2024-T3, Glare-3 and CFRP. Dynamic tensile tests using a servo-hydraulic and a light weight shock testing machine (LSM) have been performed. The results showed no strain rate effect on Al2024-T3 and

  20. Porosity Defect Remodeling and Tensile Analysis of Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties on ASTM A216 WCB cast steel with centerline porosity defect were studied with radiographic mapping and finite element remodeling technique. Non-linear elastic and plastic behaviors dependent on porosity were mathematically described by relevant equation sets. According to the ASTM E8 tensile test standard, matrix and defect specimens were machined into two categories by two types of height. After applying radiographic inspection, defect morphologies were mapped to the mid-sections of the finite element models and the porosity fraction fields had been generated with interpolation method. ABAQUS input parameters were confirmed by trial simulations to the matrix specimen and comparison with experimental outcomes. Fine agreements of the result curves between simulations and experiments could be observed, and predicted positions of the tensile fracture were found to be in accordance with the tests. Chord modulus was used to obtain the equivalent elastic stiffness because of the non-linear features. The results showed that elongation was the most influenced term to the defect cast steel, compared with elastic stiffness and yield stress. Additional visual explanations on the tensile fracture caused by void propagation were also given by the result contours at different mechanical stages, including distributions of Mises stress and plastic strain.

  1. Fracture generation in human vertebrae under compression loading: The influence of pedicle preservation and bone mineral density on in vitro fracture behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraxenberger, Michael; Schröder, Christian; Geith, Tobias; Büttner, Andreas; von Schulze-Pellengahr, Christoph; Birkenmaier, Christof; Müller, Peter E; Jansson, Volkmar; Wegener, Bernd

    2018-01-01

    Fractured vertebral bodies are a common and wide spread health issue. The purpose of this study was to develop a standardized method to experimentally generate compression fractures in vertebral bodies. The influence of the pedicles has been investigated with regards to the fracture behavior. The correlation between bone mineral density (BMD), the cause of fractures and the fracture behavior was investigated. Twenty-one fresh frozen human lumbar spines were examined for bone mineral density (BMD) by means of quantitative computed tomography (qCT). All soft tissue was removed, vertebrae were carefully separated from each other and the exposed cranial and caudal endplates were covered with a thin layer of resin to generate a plane and homogeneous surface. A total of 80 vertebral bodies were tested until fracture. A good positive correlation was found between BMD, fracture compression force and stiffness of the vertebral body. No significant differences were found between the fractures generated in vertebral bodies with and without pedicles, respectively. Our model represents a consolidation of already existing testing devices. The comparative measurement of the BMD and the fracture behavior shows validity. In contrast to other authors, the force was applied to the whole vertebral body. Furthermore the upper and lower plates were not parallelized and therefore the natural anatomic shape was imitated. Fracture behavior was not altered by removing the pedicles.

  2. Fracture behavior of the ODS steels prepared by internal oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stratil, Luděk; Šiška, Filip; Hadraba, Hynek; Bártková, Denisa; Fintová, Stanislava; Puchý, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, NOV (2017), s. 1108-1111 ISSN 0920-3796 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-21292Y; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-25246S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : ODS * Internal oxidation * Fracture toughness * J-R curve * Fracture analysis Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016

  3. Failure mode and fracture behavior evaluation of pipes with local wall thinning subjected to bending load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seok Hwan; Nam, Ki Woo; Kim, Seon Jin; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Do, Jae Yoon

    2003-01-01

    Fracture behaviors of pipes with local wall thinning are very important for the integrity of nuclear power plant. In pipes of energy plants, sometimes, the local wall thinning may result from severe Erosion-Corrosion (E/C) damage. However, the effects of local wall thinning on strength and fracture behaviors of piping system were not well studied. In this paper, the monotonic bending tests were performed of full-scale carbon steel pipes with local wall thinning. A monotonic bending load was applied to straight pipe specimens by four-point loading at ambient temperature without internal pressure. From the tests, fracture behaviors and fracture strength of locally thinned pipe were manifested systematically. The observed failure modes were divided into four types; ovalization, crack initiation/growth after ovalization, local buckling and crack initiating/growth after local buckling. Also, the strength and the allowable limit of piping system with local wall thinning were evaluated

  4. Plastic Behavior and Fracture of Aluminum and Copper in Torsion Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressan, Jose Divo

    2007-01-01

    Present work investigates the plastic behavior, work hardening and the beginning of plastic instabilities, of cylindrical specimens deformed by high speed cold plastic torsion tests and at low speed tensile test. The tests were carried out in a laboratory torsion test equipment and an universal tensile test machine. The tensile tests were performed at room temperature in an universal testing machine at low strain rate of 0.034/s. Experimental torsion tests were carried out at constant angular speed that imposed a constant shear strain rate to the specimen. In the tests, the rotation speed were set to 62 rpm and 200 rpm which imposed high strain rates of about 2/s and 6.5/s respectively. The torsion tests performed at room temperature on annealed commercial pure copper and aluminum. Two types of torsion specimen for aluminum were used: solid and tubular. The solid aluminum specimen curves presented various points of maximum torque. The tubular copper specimens showed two points of maximum. Shear bands or shear strain localization at specimen were possibly the mechanism of maximum torque points formation. The work hardening coefficient n and the strain rate sensitivity parameter m were evaluated from the equivalent stress versus strain curve from tensile and torsion tests. The n-value remained constant whereas the m-value increased ten folds for aluminum specimens: from tensile test m= 0.027 and torsion test m= 0.27. However, the hardening curves were sigmoidal

  5. Modeling of the fracture behavior of spot welds using advanced micro-mechanical damage models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, Silke

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling of deformation and fracture behavior of resistance spot welded joints in DP600 steel sheets. Spot welding is still the most commonly used joining technique in automotive engineering. In overloading situations like crash joints are often the weakest link in a structure. For those reasons, crash simulations need reliable and applicable tools to predict the load bearing capacity of spot welded components. Two series of component tests with different spot weld diameters have shown that the diameter of the weld nugget is the main influencing factor affecting fracture mode (interfacial or pull-out fracture), load bearing capacity and energy absorption. In order to find a correlation between nugget diameter, load bearing capacity and fracture mode, the spot welds are simulated with detailed finite element models containing base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal in lap-shear loading conditions. The change in fracture mode from interfacial to pull-out or peel-out fracture with growing nugget diameter under lap-shear loading was successfully modeled using the Gologanu-Leblond model in combination with the fracture criteria of Thomason and Embury. A small nugget diameter is identified to be the main cause for interfacial fracture. In good agreement with experimental observations, the calculated pull-out fracture initiates in the base metal at the boundary to the heat affected zone.

  6. Modeling of the fracture behavior of spot welds using advanced micro-mechanical damage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Silke

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents the modeling of deformation and fracture behavior of resistance spot welded joints in DP600 steel sheets. Spot welding is still the most commonly used joining technique in automotive engineering. In overloading situations like crash joints are often the weakest link in a structure. For those reasons, crash simulations need reliable and applicable tools to predict the load bearing capacity of spot welded components. Two series of component tests with different spot weld diameters have shown that the diameter of the weld nugget is the main influencing factor affecting fracture mode (interfacial or pull-out fracture), load bearing capacity and energy absorption. In order to find a correlation between nugget diameter, load bearing capacity and fracture mode, the spot welds are simulated with detailed finite element models containing base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal in lap-shear loading conditions. The change in fracture mode from interfacial to pull-out or peel-out fracture with growing nugget diameter under lap-shear loading was successfully modeled using the Gologanu-Leblond model in combination with the fracture criteria of Thomason and Embury. A small nugget diameter is identified to be the main cause for interfacial fracture. In good agreement with experimental observations, the calculated pull-out fracture initiates in the base metal at the boundary to the heat affected zone.

  7. Tensile and Creep Testing of Sanicro 25 Using Miniature Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymáček, Petr; Jarý, Milan; Dobeš, Ferdinand; Kloc, Luboš

    2018-01-01

    Tensile and creep properties of new austenitic steel Sanicro 25 at room temperature and operating temperature 700 °C were investigated by testing on miniature specimens. The results were correlated with testing on conventional specimens. Very good agreement of results was obtained, namely in yield and ultimate strength, as well as short-term creep properties. Although the creep rupture time was found to be systematically shorter and creep ductility lower in the miniature test, the minimum creep rates were comparable. The analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed similar ductile fracture morphology for both specimen geometries. One exception was found in a small area near the miniature specimen edge that was cut by electro discharge machining, where an influence of the steel fracture behavior at elevated temperature was identified. PMID:29337867

  8. Tensile and Creep Testing of Sanicro 25 Using Miniature Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymáček, Petr; Jarý, Milan; Dobeš, Ferdinand; Kloc, Luboš

    2018-01-16

    Tensile and creep properties of new austenitic steel Sanicro 25 at room temperature and operating temperature 700 °C were investigated by testing on miniature specimens. The results were correlated with testing on conventional specimens. Very good agreement of results was obtained, namely in yield and ultimate strength, as well as short-term creep properties. Although the creep rupture time was found to be systematically shorter and creep ductility lower in the miniature test, the minimum creep rates were comparable. The analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed similar ductile fracture morphology for both specimen geometries. One exception was found in a small area near the miniature specimen edge that was cut by electro discharge machining, where an influence of the steel fracture behavior at elevated temperature was identified.

  9. Tensile and Creep Testing of Sanicro 25 Using Miniature Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Dymáček

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tensile and creep properties of new austenitic steel Sanicro 25 at room temperature and operating temperature 700 °C were investigated by testing on miniature specimens. The results were correlated with testing on conventional specimens. Very good agreement of results was obtained, namely in yield and ultimate strength, as well as short-term creep properties. Although the creep rupture time was found to be systematically shorter and creep ductility lower in the miniature test, the minimum creep rates were comparable. The analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed similar ductile fracture morphology for both specimen geometries. One exception was found in a small area near the miniature specimen edge that was cut by electro discharge machining, where an influence of the steel fracture behavior at elevated temperature was identified.

  10. Weibull Analysis of the Behavior on Tensile Strength of Hemp Fibers for Different Intervals of Fiber Diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohen, Lázaro A.; Margem, Frederico M.; Neves, Anna C. C.; Gomes, Maycon A.; Monteiro, Sérgio N.; Vieira, Carlos Maurício F.; de Castro, Rafael G.; Borges, Gustavo X.

    Economic and environmental benefits are motivating studies on natural fibers, especially lignocellulosic extracted from plants, have been studied to substitute synthetic fibers, such as glass fiber as reinforcement in polymer matrices. By contrast to synthetic fibers, natural fibers have the disadvantage of being heterogeneous in their dimensions specially the diameter. About the hemp fiber, little is known of their dimensional characteristics. The aim of the present work was to statistically characterize the distribution of the diameter of hemp fibers. Based on this characterization, diameter intervals were set and the dependence of the tensile strength of theses fibers with a corresponding diameter was analyzed by the Weibull method. The diameter was measured with precision using a profile projector. Tensile tests were conducted on each fiber obtain mechanical strength. The results interpreted by Weibull statistical showed a correlation between the resistances of the fiber to its diameter.

  11. The fracture behavior of an Al-Mg-Si alloy during cyclic fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzam, Diya; Menzemer, Craig C.; Srivatsan, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, is presented and discussed the cyclic fracture behavior of the Al-Mg-Si alloy 6063 that is a candidate used in luminaire light poles. The light poles were subject to fatigue deformation. Test sections were taken from the failed region of the light pole and carefully examined in a scanning electron microscope with the objective of rationalizing the macroscopic fracture mode and intrinsic micromechanisms governing fracture under cyclic loading. The fatigue fracture surface of the alloy revealed distinct regions of early microscopic crack growth, stable crack growth and unstable crack growth and overload. An array of fine striations was found covering the regions of early and stable crack growth. Both macroscopic and fine microscopic cracks were found in the region of unstable crack growth. Very few microscopic voids and shallow dimples were evident on the fatigue fracture surface indicative of the limited ductility of the alloy under cyclic loading conditions.

  12. Effect of Process Parameters on Fatigue and Fracture Behavior of Al-Cu-Mg Alloy after Creep Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Zhan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A set of creep aging tests at different aging temperatures and stress levels were carried out for Al-Cu-Mg alloy, and the effects of creep aging on strength and fatigue fracture behavior were studied through tensile tests and fatigue crack propagation tests. The microstructures were further analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results show that temperature and stress can obviously affect the creep behavior, mechanical properties, and fatigue life of Al-Cu-Mg alloy. As the aging temperature increases, the fatigue life of alloy first increases, and then decreases. The microstructure also displays a transition from the Guinier-Preston-Bagaryatsky (GPB zones to the precipitation of S phase in the grain interior. However, the precipitation phases grow up and become coarse at excessive temperatures. Increasing stress can narrow the precipitation-free zone (PFZ at the grain boundary and improve the fatigue life, but overhigh stress can produce the opposite result. In summary, the fatigue life of Al-Cu-Mg alloy can be improved by fine-dispersive precipitation phases and a narrow PFZ in a suitable creep aging process.

  13. System for vacuum pouring of epoxy tensile and impact specimens with a study of the behavior of these specimens at 77 K and 293 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, C.M.; Stoddart, W.C.T.

    1978-03-01

    The purpose of the investigation described in this report was to establish a suitable technique for vacuum pouring of epoxy test specimens and to study the behavior of these specimens at 77 K and 293 K. A series of tensile and impact tests was conducted using specimens made from the following resins: Epon 828, Epon 871, and Epon curing agent Z. These materials are of general interest to designers of magnets for cryogenic service. Some of the applications that may be considered are: structural support, spacing, electrical insulation, and thermal insulation. The epoxies mentioned above were selected for more extensive testing because they have been used successfully, at room temperature in EBT and ORMAK programs in the Fusion Energy Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Liquid nitrogen was chosen over liquid helium because it is less difficult to handle, less expensive, and in most instances physical properties of epoxies seem to change very little from 77 K to 4.2 K. The two main features of the vacuum pouring apparatus are (1) batches can be poured under near-identical conditions, and (2) samples can be handled free from air contamination. Tests of the specimens were carried out at 77 K and 293 K. The 77 K data indicate that tensile strength increases proportionally with the increase of Epon 871 relative to Epon 828. When the mixture includes more than 90% Epon 871, impact testing at 293 K becomes practically impossible due to the rubbery condition of the material. However, when tested at 77 K, this same mixture evinces high tensile strength. When optimum data are sought over a wide range of temperatures, 77 K to 293 K, it appears that a mixture of 70% Epon 871, 30% Epon 838 with 13 ppH curing agent Z offers the best compromise in tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and impact resistance

  14. Quasi-static analysis of elastic behavior for some systems having higher fracture densities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J.G.; Aydin, A.

    2009-10-15

    Elastic behavior of geomechanical systems with interacting (but not intersecting) fractures is treated using generalizations of the Backus and the Schoenberg-Muir methods for analyzing layered systems whose layers are intrinsically anisotropic due to locally aligned fractures. By permitting the axis of symmetry of the locally anisotropic compliance matrix for individual layers to differ from that of the layering direction, we derive analytical formulas for interacting fractured regions with arbitrary orientations to each other. This procedure provides a systematic tool for studying how contiguous, but not yet intersecting, fractured domains interact, and provides a direct (though approximate) means of predicting when and how such interactions lead to more dramatic weakening effects and ultimately to failure of these complicated systems. The method permits decomposition of the system elastic behavior into specific eigenmodes that can all be analyzed, and provides a better understanding about which of these specific modes are expected to be most important to the evolving failure process.

  15. Fracture behavior analysis of EuBaCuO superconducting ring bulk reinforced by a stainless steel ring during field-cooled magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K.; Fujishiro, H.; Naito, T.; Yanagi, Y.; Itoh, Y.; Nakamura, T.

    2017-11-01

    We have magnetized the EuBaCuO ring bulk reinforced by a stainless steel ring during field-cooled magnetization (FCM) at 50 K under the magnetic fields from 6.3, 7.3 or 8.3 T, in which the ring bulk was broken at the intermediate step of FCM from 8.3 T. To discuss the fracture behavior of the bulk, we have performed the numerical simulation using a three dimensional finite element method for the bulk with realistic superconducting characteristics, and obtained both the electromagnetic hoop stress, {{σ }θ }{{FCM}}, during FCM and thermal hoop stress, {{σ }θ }{{cool}}, under cooling from 300 to 50 K. The difference of the thermal contraction coefficient between the bulk and the stainless steel ring caused an inhomogeneous {{σ }θ }{{cool}} profile with a tensile stress at the outermost edge on the bulk surface under cooling process. The maximum of the total hoop stress, {{σ }θ }{{total}} (={{σ }θ }{{FCM}}+{{σ }θ }{{cool}}), was estimated to be +50 MPa and +59 MPa during FCM from 7.3 T and 8.3 T, respectively. These results suggest that the actual fracture strength of the present ring bulk is between 50 and 59 MPa. The {{σ }θ }{{total}} value should be reduced as low as possible in the whole area of the bulk to avoid the fracture behavior during FCM.

  16. Fracture and fatigue behavior of WC-Co and WC-CoNi cemented carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Tarragó Cifre, Jose María; Roa Rovira, Joan Josep; Valle, Vladimir; Marsahll, J. M.; Llanes Pitarch, Luis Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The fracture and fatigue characteristics of several cemented carbide grades are investigated as a function of their microstructure. In doing so, the influence of binder chemical nature and content (Co and 76 wt.% Co-24 wt.% Ni), as well as carbide grain size on hardness, flexural strength, fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior is evaluated. Mechanical testing is combined with a detailed inspection of crack-microstructure interaction, by means of scanning electron microsco...

  17. Behavioral differences of laying hens with fractured keel bones within furnished cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Marie Casey-Trott

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of keel bone fractures in laying hens is reported in all housing systems. Keel fractures have been associated with pain and restricted mobility in hens in loose housing. The objective was to determine whether keel fractures were associated with activity of hens in furnished cages. Thirty-six pairs of LSL Lite hens (72 wk were enrolled in the study. One hen with a fractured keel and one hen without were identified by palpation in each of 36 groups of hens housed in either 30 or 60-bird cages stocked at 750cm2/hen. Behavioral activity of each hen was recorded by four observers blind to keel status using focal animal sampling for 10 min within a 2 hr period in the morning (08:00-10:00, afternoon (12:00-14:00, and evening (17:00-19:00. All hens were observed during each of the three sample periods for three days totaling 90 min, and individual hen data was summed for analysis. Hens were euthanized 48hr after final observations, dissected, and classified by keel status: F0 (no fracture, N=24; F1 (single fracture, N=17; F2 (multiple fractures, N=31. The percentages of time hens performed each behavior were analyzed using a mixed procedure in SAS with fracture severity, body weight, cage size, rearing environment, and tier in the model. Fracture severity affected the duration of perching (P=0.04 and standing (P=0.001, bout length of standing (P<0.0001, and location (floor vs perch of resting behaviors (P=0.01. F2 hens perched longer than F0 hens, 20.0% ± 2.9 and 11.6% ± 3.2. F2 hens spent less time standing, 15.2% ± 1.5, than F0 and F1 hens, 20.7% ± 1.6 and 21.6% ± 1.8. F2 hens had shorter standing bouts (22.0 sec ± 4.2 than both F0 and F1 hens, 33.1 sec ± 4.3 and 27.4 sec ± 4.4. Non-fractured hens spent 80.0% ± 6.9 of total resting time on the floor whereas F1 and F2 hens spent 56.9% ± 12.4 and 51.5% ± 7.7, resting on the floor. Behavioral differences reported here provide insight into possible causes of keel damage, or

  18. Tensile and compressive failure of 3D printed and natural sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, D.; Perras, M.; Walsh, S. D. C.; Dombrovski, E.

    2016-12-01

    Artificial 3D-printed sandstone samples have the potential to replicate the physical characteristics of natural sandstones, allowing the creation of reproducible rock specimens. If successful, such materials could be used to replicate heterogeneous specimens for destructive testing in a number of different configurations and across different test types. In this study, we consider to what degree such artificial samples can match the tensile and compressive failure behavior of natural sandstones. Specifically, 3D printed sandstone samples were subjected to both indirect Brazilian and unconfined compression tests. Two different types of 3D printed and three natural sandstones were tested, comparing their 1) tensile and compressive strength; 2) strain path to failure; 3) failure mode; and 4) fracture geometry after failure. The artificial sandstone samples demonstrated tensile strengths and failure modes similar to those exhibited in weak natural sandstones. Moreover, the ratio of tensile to compressive strength was found to be similar across all materials tested including the 3D printed materials. Finally, the small-scale fracture surface roughness is comparable between artificial and natural specimens of similar tensile strength - suggesting similar grain- and macro-scale failure behavior between the 3D printed and natural sandstone samples.

  19. Effect of tensile dwell on high-temperature low-cycle fatigue and fracture behaviour of cast superalloy MAR-M247

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šulák, Ivo; Obrtlík, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 185, NOV (2017), s. 92-100 ISSN 0013-7944. [ICMFM 2016 - International Colloquium on Mechanical Fatigue of Metals /18./. Gijón, 05.09.2016-07.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20991S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Nickel-based superalloy * High-temperature low-cycle fatigue * Tensile dwell * Fatigue life * Damage mechanisms Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.151, year: 2016

  20. Fracture behavior of short circumferentially surface-cracked pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnaswamy, P.; Scott, P.; Mohan, R.

    1995-11-01

    This topical report summarizes the work performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Comniission's (NRC) research program entitled ''Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds'' that specifically focuses on pipes with short, circumferential surface cracks. The following details are provided in this report: (i) material property deteminations, (ii) pipe fracture experiments, (iii) development, modification and validation of fracture analysis methods, and (iv) impact of this work on the ASME Section XI Flaw Evaluation Procedures. The material properties developed and used in the analysis of the experiments are included in this report and have been implemented into the NRC's PIFRAC database. Six full-scale pipe experiments were conducted during this program. The analyses methods reported here fall into three categories (i) limit-load approaches, (ii) design criteria, and (iii) elastic-plastic fracture methods. These methods were evaluated by comparing the analytical predictions with experimental data. The results, using 44 pipe experiments from this and other programs, showed that the SC.TNP1 and DPZP analyses were the most accurate in predicting maximum load. New Z-factors were developed using these methods. These are being considered for updating the ASME Section XI criteria

  1. Tensile deformation behaviors of Zircaloy-4 alloy at ambient and elevated temperatures: In situ neutron diffraction and simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hongjia; Sun, Guangai; Woo, Wanchuck; Gong, Jian; Chen, Bo; Wang, Yandong; Fu, Yong Qing; Huang, Chaoqiang; Xie, Lei; Peng, Shuming

    2014-01-01

    Tensile stress–strain relationship of a rolled Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) plate was examined in situ using a neutron diffraction method at room temperature (RT, 25 °C) and an elevated temperature (250 °C). Variations of lattice strains were obtained as a function of macroscopic bulk strains along prismatic (101 ¯ 0), basal (0 0 0 2) and pyramidal (101 ¯ 1) planes in the hexagonal close-packed structure of the Zr-4. The mechanisms of strain responses in these three major planes were simulated using elastic–plastic self-consistent (EPSC) model based on Hill–Hutchinson method, thus the inter-granular stresses and deformation systems of each individual grain under loading were obtained. Results show that there is a good agreement between the EPSC modeling and neutron diffraction measurements in terms of macroscopic stress–strain relationship and lattice strain evolutions of the planes at RT. However, there is a slight discrepancy in the lattice strains obtained from the EPSC modeling and neutron diffraction when the specimen was deformed at 250 °C. Analysis of grain structure and texture obtained using electron back-scattered diffraction suggests that dynamic recovery process is significant during the tensile deformation at the elevated temperature, which was not considered in the simulation

  2. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Boning [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Herbold, Eric B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homel, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Regueiro, Richard A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  3. Venlafaxine-induced REM sleep behavioral disorder presenting as two fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ryan Williams

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavioral disorder is characterized by the absence of muscular atonia during REM sleep. In this disorder, patients can violently act out their dreams, placing them at risk for traumatic fractures during these episodes. REM sleep behavioral disorder (RBD can be a sign of future neurodegenerative disease and has also been found to be a side effect of certain psychiatric medications. We present a case of venlafaxine-induced RBD in a 55 year old female who presented with a 13 year history of intermittent parasomnia and dream enactment in addition to a recent history of two fractures requiring intervention.

  4. Dynamic Response in Transient Stress-Field Behavior Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Andrew

    magnitude. These types of shifts are of great concern because they can impact subsequent fracture development causing non-uniform fracture propagation and the potential overlapping of fracture paths as they extend from the wellbore at the point of injection. The dynamics of stress variation that occur with respect to hydraulic fracturing is a somewhat new area of study. In order to accomplish the goals of this thesis and continue future research in this area a new transient model has been developed in order to asses these dynamic systems and determine their influence on fracture behavior. This applies the use of a fully coupled finite element method in 2-D using linear elastic fracture mechanics which is then expanded using displacement discontinuity to a cohesive zone model in 3-D. A static boundary element model was also used to determine stress fields surrounding static, predetermined fracture geometries. These models have been verified against analytical solutions for simple cases and are now being applied to more detailed case studies and analysis. These models have been briefly discussed throughout this thesis in order to give insight on their current capabilities and application as well as their future potential within this area of research. The majority of this work introduces transient stress field prediction to cases of single and multiple hydraulic fractures. The static assessment of these stresses is determined for verification of results to those found in publication which leads into these transient stress field variations. A new method has been developed and applied to the stress state prediction for the first time in a transient fracture model which is partly based upon a critical distance theory. These dynamic interactions can provide useful insight to pertinent issues within the petroleum and natural gas industry such as those to hydraulic fracturing fluid loss and induced seismic events, as well as to applications of efficiency and optimization of the

  5. Fatigue and fracture behavior of coiled pipes; Comportamento a fratura e fadiga de tubos bobinados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Alexandre M.; Silva, Renato M.C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Frainer, Vitor J; Tarnowski, Gabriel A.; Strohaecker, Telmo R. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The possibility of applying coiled pipes in dynamic situations, such as risers, was investigated through full scale fatigue and fracture tests. A total of sixteen X-65 pipe specimens 41/2'' Od x 0.3'' x 13', containing a bias weld at the mid length, were fatigue tested in a resonance rig at 27 Hz. Six specimens were tested in the as fabricated condition while the ten others were previously subjected to five plastic deformation cycles, simulating reeling operations.. Tests were run until a crack propagated through thickness or 10{sup 7} cycles were achieved. Two cracked specimens were fracture tested in tension. All tests were carried out at room temperature. Test results showed that the fatigue lives were above the Bs-7608 mean class 'B' curves independently whether the specimen were plastically deformed or not. Post fatigue inspection and fractographic examination revealed that fatigue cracks propagate mostly from pits or surface scratches rather than from the bias weld. The two full size tensile specimens failed by ductile fracture at 80% of the material measured strength. (author)

  6. Fracture Behavior of Silica- and Rubber-Nanoparticle-Toughed Epoxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labak, Amelia K.

    Particle-toughened crosslinked epoxies are popular materials for a variety of applications, including the microelectronics industry. For this application, the properties of these materials, such as a high fracture toughness and a low coefficient of thermal expansion, are highly appealing. In order to achieve these properties, inorganic particles are often added into the matrix. For this study, both inorganic and organic particles-toughened epoxies are investigated in the hopes of finding an optimized system. In particular, in this study, micron-sized silica and nano-sized rubbery block copolymers are added to an amine-cured epoxy matrix. A series of rubber-only and silica-only systems are investigated for their contribution to the fracture toughness. Then, a series of hybrid systems are investigated. The hypothesis is that the rubber will contribute toughness through rubber particle cavitation and matrix void growth and the silica will contribute toughness through crack pinning and bridging and particle debonding. In the hybrid systems, these mechanisms will take place at a different scale. Therefore, the nanoscale mechanisms of the rubber will be able to function at the same time as the micron sized mechanisms of the silica and the resultant toughness will be synergistically higher. The results from this study show an interesting contribution from the rubber particles both in the rubber-only systems and the hybrid system. Ultimately, there was a marked increase in the fracture toughness of the hybrid systems, although not synergistic. This increase indicates that it would be possible to create an optimized hybrid system from the combined addition of these particles.

  7. High-Temperature Tensile and Tribological Behavior of Hybrid (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 In Situ Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, G.; Kumar, N.; Mohan, A.; Gautam, R. K.; Mohan, S.

    2016-09-01

    During service life, components such as piston, cylinder blocks, brakes, and discs/drums, have to work under high-temperature conditions. In order to have appropriate material for such applications high-temperature studies are important. Hybrid (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 in situ composite has been investigated from ambient to 523 K (250 °C) at an interval of 50 deg. (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 in situ composite has been fabricated by the direct melt reaction of AA5052 alloy with zirconium and boron salts. Microstructure studies show refinement in the grain size of base alloy on in situ formation of reinforcement particles. Al3Zr particles are observed in rectangular and polyhedron shapes. It is observed from the tensile studies that ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and percentage elongation decrease with increase in test temperature. Similar kind of behavior is also observed for flow curve properties. The tensile results have also been correlated with fractography. Wear and friction results indicate that the wear rate increases with increase in normal load, whereas coefficient of friction shows decreasing trend. With increasing test temperature, wear rate exhibits a typical phenomenon. After an initial increase, wear rate follows a decreasing trend up to 423 K (150 °C), and finally a rapid increase is observed, whereas coefficient of friction increases continuously with increase in test temperature. The mechanisms responsible for the variation of wear and friction with different temperatures have been discussed in detail with the help of worn surfaces studies under scanning electron microscope (SEM) & 3D-profilometer and debris analysis by XRD.

  8. Fracture behavior of nickel-based alloys in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, W.J.; Brown, C.M.

    1999-08-01

    The cracking resistance of Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and their welds, EN82H and EN52, was characterized by conducting J{sub IC} tests in air and hydrogenated water. All test materials displayed excellent toughness in air and high temperature water, but Alloy 690 and the two welds were severely embrittled in low temperature water. In 54 C water with 150 cc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O, J{sub IC} values were typically 70% to 95% lower than their air counterparts. The toughness degradation was associated with a fracture mechanism transition from microvoid coalescence to intergranular fracture. Comparison of the cracking response in water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that susceptibility to low temperature cracking is due to hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries. The effects of water temperature, hydrogen content and loading rate on low temperature crack propagation were studied. In addition, testing of specimens containing natural weld defects and as-machined notches was performed to determine if low temperature cracking can initiate at these features. Unlike the other materials, Alloy 600 is not susceptible to low temperature cracking as the toughness in 54 C water remained high and a microvoid coalescence mechanism was operative in both air and water.

  9. Heat treatment effect on the microstructure, tensile properties and dry sliding wear behavior of A356-10%B4C cast composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashgari, H.R.; Zangeneh, Sh.; Shahmir, H.; Saghafi, M.; Emamy, M.

    2010-01-01

    In present paper, an attempt was made to examine the influence of T6 heat treatment (solution treatment at 540 o C for 5 h, quenching in hot water and artificial aging at 170 o C for 8 h) on the microstructure, tensile properties and dry sliding wear behavior of A356-10%B 4 C cast composites. The composite ingots were made by stir casting process. In this work, the matrix alloy and composite were characterized by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, tensile tests and conventional pin-on-disk experiment. The obtained results showed that in Al-B 4 C composite, T6 treatment was a dominant factor on the hardness improvement in comparison with hardness increasing due to the addition of B 4 C hard particles. In addition, T6 treatment can contribute to the strong bonding between B 4 C and matrix alloy and also it can change eutectic silicon morphology from acicular to near spherical. This case can lead to higher strength and wear properties of heat treated metal matrix composites in comparison with unheat treated state. Observation of worn surfaces indicated detachment of mechanically mixed layer which can primarily due to the delamination wear mechanism under higher applied load.

  10. Effect of water uptake on the fracture behavior of low-k organosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyu Guo; Joseph E. Jakes; Samer Banna; Yoshio Nishi; J. Leon Shohet

    2014-01-01

    Water uptake in porous low-k dielectrics has become a significant challenge for both back-end-of-the-line integration and circuit reliability. This work examines the effects of water uptake on the fracture behavior of nanoporous low-k organosilicate glass. By using annealing dehydration and humidity conditioning, the roles of different water types...

  11. Investigation of the Fracture Behavior of Scaled HY-130 Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    Protective enwirornneat Aig,)n Argon Argon Preheat temperature 90-100C 90-100"C 90-1001C Interpa=s tempefature 90-150’C 90-I5t"C 90-150"C Number of passes 2...1.5 mm Ampe•se 150-160 A 150-165 A 190-200 A Voltage 18-19 V 18-20 V 26-28 V Protective environment Argon Argon Argon Preheat tempemature 65"C 69-95...Prediction of Ductile Tearing," Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics (L. H. Larson, ed.), ECSC, EEC, EAEC, Brussels and Luxembourg , Belgium, 1985, pp. 263

  12. R-curve behavior and micromechanisms of fracture in resin based dental restorative composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M B; Ferracane, J L; Kruzic, J J

    2009-10-01

    The fracture properties and micromechanisms of fracture for two commercial dental composites, one microhybrid (FiltekZ250) and one nanofill (FiltekSupreme Plus), were studied by measuring fracture resistance curves (R-curves) using pre-cracked compact-tension specimens and by conducting both unnotched and double notched four point beam bending experiments. Four point bending experiments showed about 20% higher mean flexural strength of the microhybrid composite compared to the nanofill. Rising fracture resistance was observed over approximately 1 mm of crack extension for both composites, and higher overall fracture resistance was observed for the microhybrid composite. Such fracture behavior was attributed to crack deflection and crack bridging toughening mechanisms that developed with crack extension, causing the toughness to increase. Despite the lower strength and toughness of the present nanofill composite, based on micromechanics observations, large nanoparticle clusters appear to be as effective at deflecting cracks and imparting toughening as solid particles. Thus, with further microstructural refinement, it should be possible to achieve a superior combination of aesthetic and mechanical performance using the nanocluster approach for dental composites.

  13. Tensile, Compression, Open-Hole Compression and Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Multiple NASA Langley Research Center Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    The attached data summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Research Group at the University of Wyoming funded by the NASA LaRC Research Grant NAG-1-1294. The work consisted primarily of tension, compression, open-hole compression and double cantilever beam fracture toughness testing performed an a variety of NASA LaRC composite materials. Tests were performed at various environmental conditions and pre-conditioning requirements. The primary purpose of this work was to support the LaRC material development efforts. The data summaries are arranged in chronological order from oldest to newest.

  14. Fracture of Fe--Cr--Mn austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Tensile tests of Tenelon (U.S. Steel), a nitrogen-strengthened iron-base alloy containing 18% chromium and 15% manganese, demonsterated that cleavage fracture can occur in some austenitic steels and is promoted by the presence of hydrogen. Tensile failure of Tenelon at 78 0 K occurred with no detectable necking at low strain levels. The fracture surface contained cleavage facets that lay along coherent twin boundaries oriented transversely to the tensile axis. Charging gaseous hydrogen at 679 MPa pressure and 650 0 K had no significant effect on the mechanical behavior or fracture mode at 78 0 K, but raised the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature from less than 200 0 K to about 250 0 K

  15. Effect of solution treatment on the microstructure, tensile properties, and corrosion behavior of the Mg–5Sn–2Zn–0.1Mn alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mahallawy, N.; Hammouda, R.; Shoeib, M.; Diaa, Alia A.

    2018-01-01

    Working on magnesium alloys containing relatively inexpensive alloying elements such as tin, zinc, and manganese have been a target for many studies. The binary Mg–Sn and Mg–Zn systems have a wide range of solid solubility which make them heat-treatable alloys. In the present study, the microstructure, tensile properties, and corrosion behavior of the Mg–5Sn–2Zn–0.1Mn alloy was studied in the as cast state and after heat treatment at a temperature reaching 450 °C for about 24 h. It was found that a noticeable enhancement in strength and corrosion resistance was achieved through heat treatment. The strength of the as cast alloy increased from 76.24 ± 6.21 MPa to 187.33 ± 10.3 MPa, while the corrosion rate decreased from 1.129 to 0.399 mm y‑1.

  16. An Analysis of the Macroscopic Tensile Behavior of a Nonlinear Nylon Reinforced Elastomeric Composite System Using MAC/GMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaad, Mahmoud; Arnold, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A special class of composite laminates composed of soft rubbery matrices and stiff reinforcements made of steel wires or synthetic fibers is examined, where each constituent behaves in a nonlinear fashion even in the small strain domain. Composite laminates made of piles stacked at alternating small orientation angles with respect to the applied axial strain are primarily dominated by the nonlinear behavior of the reinforcing fibers. However; composites with large ply orientations or those perpendicular to the loading axis, will approximate the behavior of the matrix phase and respond in even a more complex fashion for arbitrarily stacked piles. The geometric nonlinearity due to small cord rotations during loading was deemed here to have a second order effect and consequently dropped from any consideration. The user subroutine USRMAT within the Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), was utilized to introduce the constituent material nonlinear behavior. Stress-strain behavior at the macro level was experimentally generated for single and multi ply composites comprised of continuous Nylon-66 reinforcements embedded in a carbon black loaded rubbery matrix. Comparisons between the predicted macro composite behavior and experimental results are excellent when material nonlinearity is included in the analysis. In this paper, a brief review of GMC is provided, along with a description of the nonlinear behavior of the constituents and associated constituent constitutive relations, and the improved macro (or composite) behavior predictions are documented and illustrated.

  17. Mechanical Behavior and Fracture Properties of NiAl Intermetallic Alloy with Different Copper Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Hsing Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deformation behavior and fracture characteristics of NiAl intermetallic alloy containing 5~7 at% Cu are investigated at room temperature under strain rates ranging from 1 × 10−3 to 5 × 103 s−1. It is shown that the copper contents and strain rate both have a significant effect on the mechanical behavior of the NiAl alloy. Specifically, the flow stress increases with an increasing copper content and strain rate. Moreover, the ductility also improves as the copper content increases. The change in the mechanical response and fracture behavior of the NiAl alloy given a higher copper content is thought to be the result of the precipitation of β-phase (Ni,CuAl and γ'-phase (Ni,Cu3Al in the NiAl matrix.

  18. Fracture toughness and fracture behavior of CLAM steel in the temperature range of 450 °C-550 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanyun; Liang, Mengtian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Jiang, Man; Liu, Shaojun

    2018-04-01

    In order to analyze the fracture toughness and fracture behavior (J-R curves) of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel under the design service temperature of Test Blanket Module of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, the quasi-static fracture experiment of CLAM steel was carried out under the temperature range of 450 °C-550 °C. The results indicated that the fracture behavior of CLAM steel was greatly influenced by test temperature. The fracture toughness increased slightly as the temperature increased from 450 °C to 500 °C. In the meanwhile, the fracture toughness at 550 °C could not be obtained due to the plastic deformation near the crack tip zone. The microstructure analysis based on the fracture topography and the interaction between dislocations and lath boundaries showed two different sub-crack propagation modes: growth along 45° of the main crack direction at 450 °C and growth perpendicular to the main crack at 500 °C.

  19. Metallographic investigation of fracture behavior in ITER-style Nb$_{3}$Sn superconducting strands

    CERN Document Server

    Jewell, M C; Larbalestier, D C; Nijhuis, A

    2009-01-01

    In this work we specify the extent to which fracture in two ITER-style Nb$_{3}$Sn composite strands occurs in a collective or individual manner, under mechanical tension and bending from the TARSIS apparatus at the University of Twente. A bronze-route strand from European Advanced Superconductors (EAS), which has very uniform, well-spaced filaments, has a widely distributed (200 μm) fracture field and exhibits a composite of individual and collective cracks. An internal tin strand from Oxford Instruments – Superconducting Technology (OST) demonstrates much more localized, collective fracture behavior. The filaments in this strand are about four times larger (in area) than the filaments in the EAS strand, and also agglomerate significantly during heat treatment upon conversion of the Nb to Nb$_{3}$Sn. These results demonstrate that the architecture of the strand can play a significant role in determining the mechanical toughness of the composite, and that strand design should incorporate mechanical consider...

  20. A Modified Constitutive Model for Tensile Flow Behaviors of BR1500HS Ultra-High-Strength Steel at Medium and Low Temperature Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Quan, Guo-Zheng; Pan, Jia; Wang, Xuan; Wu, Dong-Sen; Xia, Yu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Constitutive model of materials is one of the most requisite mathematical model in the finite element analysis, which describes the relationships of flow behaviors with strain, strain rate and temperature. In order to construct such constitutive relationships of ultra-high-strength BR1500HS steel at medium and low temperature regions, the true stress-strain data over a wide temperature range of 293-873 K and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 were collected from a series of isothermal uniaxial tensile tests. The experimental results show that stress-strain relationships are highly non-linear and susceptible to three parameters involving temperature, strain and strain rate. By considering the impacts of strain rate and temperature on strain hardening, a modified constitutive model based on Johnson-Cook model was proposed to characterize flow behaviors in medium and low temperature ranges. The predictability of the improved model was also evaluated by the relative error (W(%)), correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). The R-value and AARE-value for modified constitutive model at medium and low temperature regions are 0.9915 & 1.56 % and 0.9570 & 5.39 %, respectively, which indicates that the modified constitutive model can precisely estimate the flow behaviors for BR1500HS steel in the medium and low temperature regions.

  1. In situ observation of fracture behavior of canine cortical bone under bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zilan X. [Department of Orthopaedics, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street Suite 708 MSC 622, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Xu, Zhi-Hui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); An, Yuehuei H. [Department of Orthopaedics, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street Suite 708 MSC 622, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Southside Hospital, North Shore-LIJ Health System, 217 East Main Street, Bay Shore, NY 11706 (United States); Li, Xiaodong, E-mail: xl3p@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, 122 Engineer' s Way, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Cortical bone provides many important body functions and maintains the rigidness and elasticity of bone. A common failure mode for bone structure is fracture under a bending force. In the current study, the fracture behavior of canine cortical bone under three-point bending was observed in situ using an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and an optical microscope to examine the fracture process in detail. Nanoindentation was carried out to determine the elastic modulus and hardness of different building blocks of the canine cortical bone. The results have shown that the special structure of Haversian systems has significant effects on directing crack propagation. Although Haversian systems contain previously believed weak points, and micro-cracks initiate within Haversian systems, our findings have demonstrated that macro-cracks typically form around the boundaries of Haversian systems, i.e. the cement lines. Micro-cracks that developed inside Haversian systems have the functions of absorbing and dissipating energy and slow down on expanding when interstitial tissue cannot hold any more pressure, then plastic deformation and fracture occur. - Highlights: • Macro- and micro-cracks occur in unique patterns in the bone fracturing process under a bending force. • Early developed micro-cracks inside Haversian systems absorb and dissipate energy in order to delay fracture initiation. • The mechanical properties of Haverisan systems and its surrounding structures influence the developments of macro- and micro-crack formation. • Previously believed weak spots in the bone matrix are not necessarily the origins of fracture development.

  2. High strain rate tensile testing of sheet materials using three Hopkinson pressure bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary G.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to circumvent the inherent problems associated with Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar (SHTB systems, a new experimental technique is proposed for the high strain rate tensile testing of sheet specimens in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB systems. Existing solutions employ a multiple gage section hat-shaped specimen to transform the incoming pulse from compression into tension at the specimen level. However, multiple gage section specimens are not suitable for studying the post-necking behavior of materials as the required symmetry of the mechanical system is no longer guaranteed in the post-necking range. Here, we present a new load-inversion device that is used in conjunction with three Hopkinson pressure bars for the tensile loading of single gage section sheet specimen. The device is designed to transform the compression load applied at its boundaries into a tensile loading of the specimen. Two output bars are used to measure the total force applied on the specimen boundaries, while Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to determine the strain histories on the specimen surface based on photographs acquired at a frequency of about 100 kHz. In addition to uniaxial tensile experiments on TRIP780 steel sheet specimens at strain rates ranging from 200/s to 1000/s, results are presented on the dynamic fracture testing of notched tensile specimens.

  3. Fracture behavior of circumferentially surface-cracked elbows. Technical report, October 1993--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilinski, T.; Mohan, R.; Rudland, D.; Fleming, M. [and others

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results from Task 2 of the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. The focus of the Task 2 work was directed towards furthering the understanding of the fracture behavior of long-radius elbows. This was accomplished through a combined analytical and experimental program. J-estimation schemes were developed for both axial and circumferential surface cracks in elbows. Large-scale, quasi-static and dynamic, pipe-system, elbow fracture experiments under combined pressure and bending loads were performed on elbows containing an internal surface crack at the extrados. In conjunction with the elbow experiments, material property data were developed for the A106-90 carbon steel and WP304L stainless steel elbow materials investigated. A comparison of the experimental data with the maximum stress predictions using existing straight pipe fracture prediction analysis methods, and elbow fracture prediction methods developed in this program was performed. This analysis was directed at addressing the concerns regarding the validity of using analysis predictions developed for straight pipe to predict the fracture stresses of cracked elbows. Finally, a simplified fitting flaw acceptance criteria incorporating ASME B2 stress indices and straight pipe, circumferential-crack analysis was developed.

  4. Fracture behavior of circumferentially surface-cracked elbows. Technical report, October 1993--March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilinski, T.; Mohan, R.; Rudland, D.; Fleming, M.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results from Task 2 of the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. The focus of the Task 2 work was directed towards furthering the understanding of the fracture behavior of long-radius elbows. This was accomplished through a combined analytical and experimental program. J-estimation schemes were developed for both axial and circumferential surface cracks in elbows. Large-scale, quasi-static and dynamic, pipe-system, elbow fracture experiments under combined pressure and bending loads were performed on elbows containing an internal surface crack at the extrados. In conjunction with the elbow experiments, material property data were developed for the A106-90 carbon steel and WP304L stainless steel elbow materials investigated. A comparison of the experimental data with the maximum stress predictions using existing straight pipe fracture prediction analysis methods, and elbow fracture prediction methods developed in this program was performed. This analysis was directed at addressing the concerns regarding the validity of using analysis predictions developed for straight pipe to predict the fracture stresses of cracked elbows. Finally, a simplified fitting flaw acceptance criteria incorporating ASME B2 stress indices and straight pipe, circumferential-crack analysis was developed

  5. Fatigue damage and fracture behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced Zr-based metallic glassy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Zhang, Z.F.; Wang, Z.G.; Qiu, K.Q.; Zhang, H.F.; Zang, Q.S.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2006-01-01

    The fatigue life, damage and fracture behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced metallic glass Zr 41.25 Ti 13.75 Ni 10 Cu 12.5 Be 22.5 composites are investigated under cyclic push-pull loading. It is found that the fatigue life of the composite increases with increasing the volume fraction of tungsten fibers. Similar to crystalline metals, the regions of crack initiation, propagation and overload fracture can be discerned on the fracture surface of the specimen. Fatigue crack normally initiates in the metallic glass matrix at the outer surface of the composite specimen and propagates predominantly in the matrix. Different crack front profile around the tungsten fibers and fiber pullout demonstrate that fatigue crack may propagate around the fiber, leading to bridging of the crack faces by the unbroken fiber and hence improved fatigue crack-growth resistance. Locally decreased effective stiffness in the region where fiber distribution is sparse may provide preferential crack path in the composite. A proposed model was exercised to elucidate different tungsten fiber fracture morphologies in the fatigue crack propagation and overload fracture regions in the light of Poisson's ratio effect during fatigue loading

  6. A study of damage zones or characteristic lengths as related to the fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Brinson, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile tests conducted on a variety of graphite/epoxy laminates, containing narrow rectangular slits, square or circular holes with various aspect ratios are discussed. The techniques used to study stable crack or damage zone growth--namely, birefringence coatings, COD gages, and microscopic observations are discussed. Initial and final fracture modes are discussed as well as the effect of notch size and shape, and laminate type on the fracture process. Characteristic lengths are calculated and compared to each other using the point, average and inherent flaw theories. Fracture toughnesses are calculated by the same theories and compared to a boundary integral equation technique. Finite width K-calibration factors are also discussed.

  7. Tensile and superelastic fatigue characterization of NiTi shape memory cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Muhammad M.; Ozbulut, Osman E.

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the tensile response and functional fatigue characteristics of a NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) cable with an outer diameter of 5.5 mm. The cable composed of multiple strands arranged as one inner core and two outer layers. The results of the tensile tests revealed that the SMA cable exhibits good superelastic behavior up to 10% strain. Fatigue characteristics were investigated under strain amplitudes ranging from 3% to 7% and a minimum of 2500 loading cycles. The evolutions of maximum tensile stress, residual strains, energy dissipation, and equivalent viscous damping under a number of loading cycles were analyzed. The fracture surface of a specimen subjected to 5000 loading cycles and 7% strain was discussed. Functional fatigue test results indicated a very high superelastic fatigue life cycle for the tested NiTi SMA cable.

  8. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Fracture Simulation of Solution-Treated AA 5754

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Singh, Akhilendra

    2017-10-01

    In this work, mechanical properties and fracture toughness of as-received and solution-treated aluminum alloy 5754 (AA 5754) are experimentally evaluated. Solution heat treatment of the alloy is performed at 530 °C for 2 h, and then, quenching is done in water. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, impact toughness, hardness, fatigue life, brittle fracture toughness (K_{Ic} ) and ductile fracture toughness (J_{Ic} ) are evaluated for as-received and solution-treated alloy. Extended finite element method has been used for the simulation of tensile and fracture behavior of material. Heaviside function and asymptotic crack tip enrichment functions are used for modelling of the crack in the geometry. Ramberg-Osgood material model coupled with fracture energy is used to simulate the crack propagation. Fracture surfaces obtained from various mechanical tests are characterized by scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Laboratory Visualization Experiments of Temperature-induced Fractures Around a Borehole (Cryogenic Fracturing) in Shale and Analogue Rock Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Wu, Y. S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    In tight shales, hydraulic fracturing is the dominant method for improving reservoir permeability. However, injecting water-based liquids can induce formation damage and disposal problems, thus other techniques are being sought. One alternative to hydraulic fracturing is producing fractures thermally, using low-temperature fluids (cryogens). The primary consequence of thermal stimulation is that shrinkage fractures are produced around the borehole wall. Recently, cryogenic stimulation produced some promising results when the cryogen (typically liquid nitrogen and cold nitrogen gas) could be brought to reservoir depth. Numerical modeling also showed possible significant increases in gas production from a shale reservoir after cryogenic stimulation. However, geometry and the dynamic behavior of these thermally induced fractures under different stress regimes and rock anisotropy and heterogeneity is not yet well understood.Currently, we are conducting a series of laboratory thermal fracturing experiments on Mancos Shale and transparent glass blocks, by injecting liquid nitrogen under atmospheric pressure into room temperature blocks under various anisotropic stress states. The glass blocks allow clear optical visualization of fracture development and final fracturing patterns. For the shale blocks, X-ray CT is used to image both pre-existing and induced fractures. Also, the effect of borehole orientation with respect to the bedding planes and aligned preexisting fractures is examined. Our initial experiment on a uniaxially compressed glass block showed fracturing behavior which was distinctly different from conventional hydraulic fracturing. In addition to tensile fractures in the maximum principal stress directions, the thermal contraction by the cryogen induced (1) chaotic, spalling fractures around the borehole wall, and (2) a series of disk-shaped annular fractures perpendicular to the borehole. When applied to a horizontal borehole, the propagation plane of the

  10. Tensile Behavior of Electron Beam-Welded and Post-Weld Vacuum-Annealed Nb-10% Hf-1% Ti Refractory Alloy Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil Kumar, V.; Gupta, R. K.; Venkateswaran, T.; Ram Kumar, P.

    2018-02-01

    Nb-10% Hf-1% Ti refractory alloy is a high performance material extensively used for high temperature applications. Electron beam welding is one of the most widely used techniques to join refractory and reactive alloys. Bigger sizes of nozzles for rocket propulsion applications can be either made through deep drawing and flow turning route or by roll bending and welding route both using sheets/plates as input material for fabrication. The latter is a more economical option for mass production of the hardware using such exotic and expensive alloys. In view of this, both as-welded (AW) coupon and weld plus post-weld vacuum-annealed (AW + VA) coupon have been prepared to study their mechanical behavior. It has been observed that tensile strength and ductility have not been reduced in both these conditions vis-à-vis the base metal, confirming weld efficiency of the alloy to be 100%. Microhardness is found to be 150-160 VHN in the base metal and 200-225 VHN in the weld fusion zone in AW condition, which became uniform (145-155 VHN) throughout the weldment in AW + VA condition. Microstructure of the weldment in AW condition is found to be consisting of grains solidified by epitaxial mode from base metal toward the weld centre. In AW + VA condition, improvement in tensile elongation is observed, which is found to be due to the presence of homogenized grains/more uniform microstructure near the heat-affected zone as compared to the steep gradient in grain size in different zones in the weld in AW condition.

  11. Tensile properties and strain-hardening behavior of double-sided arc welded and friction stir welded AZ31B magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, S.M.; Chen, D.L.; Bhole, S.D.; Cao, X.; Powidajko, E.; Weckman, D.C.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Microstructures, tensile properties and work hardening behavior of double-sided arc welded (DSAWed) and friction stir welded (FSWed) AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloy sheet were studied at different strain rates. While the yield strength was higher, both the ultimate tensile strength and ductility were lower in the FSWed samples than in the DSAWed samples due to welding defects present at the bottom surface in the FSWed samples. Strain-hardening exponents were evaluated using the Hollomon relationship, the Ludwik equation and a modified equation. After welding, the strain-hardening exponents were nearly twice that of the base metal. The DSAWed samples exhibited stronger strain-hardening capacity due to the larger grain size coupled with the divorced eutectic structure containing β-Mg 17 Al 12 particles in the fusion zone, compared to the FSWed samples and base metal. Kocks-Mecking type plots were used to show strain-hardening stages. Stage III hardening occurred after yielding in both the base metal and the welded samples. At lower strains a higher strain-hardening rate was observed in the base metal, but it decreased rapidly with increasing net flow stress. At higher strains the strain-hardening rate of the welded samples became higher, because the recrystallized grains in the FSWed and the larger re-solidified grains coupled with β particles in the DSAWed provided more space to accommodate dislocation multiplication during plastic deformation. The strain-rate sensitivity evaluated via Lindholm's approach was observed to be higher in the base metal than in the welded samples.

  12. Electrical permeability and domain switching effect on fracture behavior of piezoelectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanam, Sureshkumar

    The crystal structure and domain microstructure within each grain of a piezoelectric material and 90°, 180° polarization switch observed experimentally are discussed. The work and internal energy density domain switching criteria are used to predict domain switch zones near crack tip of CT fracture specimen. Constitutive relations are modified to reflect changes in material properties and strains arising from domain switch. An incremental finite element solution procedure using UNIX program was developed to use ABAQUS piezoelectric FEA software along with FORTRAN codes for prediction and modeling of domain switching in piezoelectric material. Insulating materials like silicone oil are used by researchers to prevent electric arcing between crack faces during fracture tests with piezoelectric material. A finite element (UEL) was developed to model dielectric medium filling crack cavity of piezoelectric fracture test specimens. An iterative procedure was adopted to solve geometrically nonlinear crack opening using an UNIX program. The effect of permeability of crack cavity medium on near tip electric fields in CT fracture specimen was investigated. A CT fracture specimen was modeled using incremental domain switch finite element solution procedure. Domain switch zones in the vicinity of the crack tip were obtained for various electrical and mechanical fracture loads applied. The effect of actual crack profile on near tip domain switch zones, opening stress, stress intensity is discussed. A gradual polarization switch model which considers the gradual change in the average polarization direction from the original poling direction was developed. Fracture load predictions using stress intensity factor obtained from assuming linear material behavior, nonlinear behavior using the instantaneous and gradual polarization switch model are compared. Gradual polarization switch model was used to model a SENB fracture specimen to obtain the near tip strain field and compare it

  13. Tensile Strength of the Eggshell Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnková, J.; Nedomová, Š.; Kumbár, V.; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2016), s. 159-164 ISSN 1211-8516 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : eggshell membrane * tesile test * loading rate * tensile strength * fracture strain Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing

  14. Comparison of damaging behavior of oxide scales grown on austenitic stainless steels using tensile test and cyclic thermogravimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorova, Elena N.; Braccini, Muriel; Parry, Valérie; Pascal, Celine; Mantel, Marc; Roussel-Dherbey, Francine; Oquab, Djar; Wouters, Yves; Monceau, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Two austenitic stainless steels, AISI 304L and AISI 303, were submitted to cyclic oxidation and to staticmechanical loading after isothermal oxidation at 1000◦C. Alloy 303 contains ten times more S than 304Land some Mn addition. During the steel process, it formed manganese sulfides that lead to the formationof a less resistant oxide scale. Both alloys showed similar behavior during thermal cycling but breakawayoxidation and intensive spallation occurred much sooner for alloy 303 than for all...

  15. Multiscale Roughness Influencing on Transport Behavior of Passive Solute through a Single Self-affine Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Z.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the influence of multi-scale roughness on transport behavior of the passive solute through the self-affine fracture was investigated. The single self-affine fracture was constructed by the successive random additions (SRA) and the fracture roughness was decomposed into two different scales (i.e. large-scale primary roughness and small-scale secondary roughness) by the Wavelet analysis technique. The fluid flow in fractures, which was characterized by the Forchheimer's law, showed the non-linear flow behaviors such as eddies and tortuous streamlines. The results indicated that the small-scale secondary roughness was primarily responsible for the non-linear flow behaviors. The direct simulations of asymptotic passive solute transport represented the Non-Fickian transport characteristics (i.e. early arrivals and long tails) in breakthrough curves (BTCs) and residence time distributions (RTDs) with and without consideration of the secondary roughness. Analysis of multiscale BTCs and RTDs showed that the small-scale secondary roughness played a significant role in enhancing the Non-Fickian transport characteristics. We found that removing small-scale secondary roughness led to the lengthening arrival and shortening tail. The peak concentration in BTCs decreased as the secondary roughness was removed, implying that the secondary could also enhance the solute dilution. The estimated BTCs by the Fickian advection-dispersion equation (ADE) yielded errors which decreased with the small-scale secondary roughness being removed. The mobile-immobile model (MIM) was alternatively implemented to characterize the Non-Fickian transport. We found that the MIM was more capable of estimating Non-Fickian BTCs. The small-scale secondary roughness resulted in the decreasing mobile domain fraction and the increasing mass exchange rate between immobile and mobile domains. The estimated parameters from the MIM could provide insight into the inherent mechanism of roughness

  16. Effect of He implantation on fracture behavior and microstructural evolution in F82H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Sato, Kiminori; Nogami, Shuhei; Hasegawa, Akira; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-12-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are the primary candidate structural materials for fusion reactor blanket components. He bubbles, which formed under 14 MeV neutron irradiation, is considered to cause some mechanical property changes. In a previous study, Hasegawa et al. investigated the fracture behavior using Charpy impact test of He implanted F82H by 50 MeV α-particles with cyclotron accelerator, and the ductile brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was increased and intergranular fracture (IGF) was observed. However, the cause of the IGF was not shown in the previous study. To clarify the cause of the IGF of the He implanted F82H by 50 MeV α-particles with cyclotron accelerator, the microstructure of the He implanted F82H was investigated. After Charpy impact test at 233 K, the brittle fracture surface of the He implanted specimen was observed by SEM and TEM. By SEM observation, grain boundary surface was clearly observed from the bottom of the notch to a depth of about 400 μm. This area correspond to the He implanted region. On the other hand, at unimplanted region, river pattern was observed and transgranular fracture occurred. TEM observation revealed the He bubbles agglomeration at dislocations, lath boundaries, and grain boundaries, and the coarsening of precipitates on grain boundaries. IGF of the He implanted F82H was caused by both He bubbles and coarsening precipitates.

  17. Effect of He implantation on fracture behavior and microstructural evolution in F82H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro, E-mail: kiyohiro.yabuuchi@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Sato, Kiminori; Nogami, Shuhei; Hasegawa, Akira [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166, Oaza-Obuchi-Aza-Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are the primary candidate structural materials for fusion reactor blanket components. He bubbles, which formed under 14 MeV neutron irradiation, is considered to cause some mechanical property changes. In a previous study, Hasegawa et al. investigated the fracture behavior using Charpy impact test of He implanted F82H by 50 MeV α-particles with cyclotron accelerator, and the ductile brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was increased and intergranular fracture (IGF) was observed. However, the cause of the IGF was not shown in the previous study. To clarify the cause of the IGF of the He implanted F82H by 50 MeV α-particles with cyclotron accelerator, the microstructure of the He implanted F82H was investigated. After Charpy impact test at 233 K, the brittle fracture surface of the He implanted specimen was observed by SEM and TEM. By SEM observation, grain boundary surface was clearly observed from the bottom of the notch to a depth of about 400 μm. This area correspond to the He implanted region. On the other hand, at unimplanted region, river pattern was observed and transgranular fracture occurred. TEM observation revealed the He bubbles agglomeration at dislocations, lath boundaries, and grain boundaries, and the coarsening of precipitates on grain boundaries. IGF of the He implanted F82H was caused by both He bubbles and coarsening precipitates.

  18. Hydraulic Fracture Containment in Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of hydraulic fracturing in soft, high permeability material is considered fundamentally different from that in hard, low permeability rock, where a tensile fracture is created and conventional linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) applies. The fracturing and associated modeling work

  19. Damage-induced tensile instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hult, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a unified description of ductile and brittle rupture phenomena in structural components under tensile loading with particular emphasis on creep rupture. Two structural elements are analyzed in detail: 1) the uniform tensile bar subject to a Heaviside history of tensile force and superimposed such loadings, i.e. staircase histories, and 2) the thinwalled spherical pressure vessel subject to a Heaviside history of internal pressure. For both these structures the conditions for instantaneous as well as delayed rupture are analysed. It is shown that a state of mechanical instability will be reached at a certain load or after a certain time. The cases of purely ductile rupture and purely brittle fracture are identified as two limiting cases of this general instability phenomenon. The Kachanov-Rabotnov damage law implies that a structural component will fail in tension only when it has reached a state of complete damage, i.e. zero load carrying capacity. The extended law predicts failure at an earlier stage of the deterioration process and is therefore more compatible with experimental observation. Further experimental support is offered by predictions for staircase loading histories, both step-up and step-down type. The presented damage theory here predicts strain histories which are in closer agreement with test data than predictions based on other phenomenological theories

  20. Brittle behavior of SSC yokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, M.L.; Turner, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    In liquid helium at 4 K ultra--low carbon steel is known to be brittle. Fracture toughness and ultimate strength measured by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are used here to examine the brittle behavior of the SSC yokes. The fracture toughness K Ic of the material is used to estimate the maximum allowable length of pre--existing cracks. Tensile properties of the steel at 4 K are compared with maximum tensile stresses obtained from the ANSYS finite element analysis of the DSX201 cross--section. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Investigation of structure-property relationships of polyisobutylene-based biomaterials: Morphology, thermal, quasi-static tensile and long-term dynamic fatigue behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, C; Lim, G T; Puskas, J E; Altstädt, V

    2012-06-01

    This study examines the morphology, thermal, quasi-static and long-term dynamic creep properties of one linear and three arborescent polyisobutylene-based block copolymers (L_SIBS31, D_IBS16, D_IBS27 and D_IBS33). Silicone rubber, a common biopolymer, was considered as a benchmark material for comparison. A unique hysteretic testing methodology of Stepwise Increasing Load Test (SILT) and Single Load Test (SLT) was used in this study to evaluate the long-term dynamic fatigue performance of these materials. Our experimental findings revealed that the molecular weight of polyisobutylene (PIB) and polystyrene (PS) arms [M(n)(PIB(arm)) and M(n)(PS(arm))], respectively had a profound influence on the nano-scaled phase separation, quasi-static tensile, thermal transition, and dynamic creep resistance behaviors of these PIB-based block copolymers. However, silicone rubber outperformed the PIB-based block copolymers in terms of dynamic creep properties due to its chemically crosslinked structure. This indicates a need for a material strategy to improve the dynamic fatigue and creep of this class of biopolymers to be considered as alternative to silicone rubber for biomedical devices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of fast neutron irradiation on the fracture behavior of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Fish, R.L.

    1982-03-01

    In designing against premature fracture, the characteristics of materials must be measured and design criteria developed. The reduction in ductility for irradiated stainless steels has been observed, but little work has been conducted on evaluating the effects of notches on these materials. A reduction in notch ductility has been investigated in Charpy-V impact tests of irradiated Type 304 and Type 316 stainless steel; in irradiated Type 304 stainless steel, notch effects were not observed at 232 and 317 0 C, but as the test temperature was increased from 538 to 593 0 C, the material irradiated to a fluence of 3 X 10 22 n/cm 2 exhibited a notch weakening. Recently, similar experiments were performed on irradiated 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel to determine the effects of irradiation on the fracture behavior of this alloy

  3. Microstructure and texture evolution during tensile deformation of symmetric/asymmetric-rolled low carbon microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Minghui; Wei, Xing; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    The deformation and fracture mechanisms of a low carbon microalloyed steel processed by asymmetric rolling (AsR) and symmetric rolling (SR) were compared by microstructural and texture evolutions during uniaxial tensile deformation. A realistic microstructure-based micromechanical modeling was involved as well. AsR provides more effective grain refinement and beneficial shear textures, leading to higher ductility and extraordinary strain hardening with improved yield and ultimate tensile stresses as well as promoting the occurrence of ductile fracture. This was verified and further explained by means of the different fracture modes during quasi-static uniaxial deformation, the preferred void nucleation sites and crack propagation behavior, and the change in the dislocation density based on the kernel average misorientation (KAM) distribution. The equivalent strain/stress partitioning during tensile deformation of AsR and SR specimens was modeled based on a two-dimensional (2D) representative volume element (RVE) approach. The trend of strain/stress partitioning in the ferrite matrix agrees well with the experimental results

  4. Neutron flux effect on the fracture toughness behavior of Tihange-III RPV material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, R.; Chaouadi, R.; Bertolis, D.

    2015-01-01

    The question whether material test reactor (MTR) data can be used to supplement power reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance data is still debated in the international community and its implications are particularly important in the perspective of long term operation (LTO). However, addressing the flux effect can be confusing if specific material and irradiation variables are not taken into account. This means that the answer to whether there is flux effect or not is neither 'no' nor 'yes' without specifying the application range. Indeed, neutron flux effect was recognized to occur in high Cu-containing steels in the low fluence range. But at high fluence, relevant for long term operation, it becomes difficult to clearly distinguish the differences between high flux and low flux. In this work, we irradiated the low Cu base metal and weld of the Tihange-III surveillance coupon in the BR2 reactor at high flux. The BR2 flux is about two orders of magnitude higher than the flux in the surveillance position. Tensile, Charpy impact and fracture toughness tests were performed on both the surveillance and MTR specimens and compared to assess the neutron flux effect. The results confirm that, at high fluence levels, the flux effect on mechanical properties is not significant, offering therefore the possibility of accelerated irradiation to investigate RPV embrittlement in the high fluence regime relevant for long term operation. (authors)

  5. Mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons under uniaxial tensile strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Kazufumi; Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2018-03-01

    Based on the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation, we investigated the mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons in terms of their edge shape under a uniaxial tensile strain. The nanoribbons with armchair and zigzag edges retain their structure under a large tensile strain, while the nanoribbons with chiral edges are fragile against the tensile strain compared with those with armchair and zigzag edges. The fracture started at the cove region, which corresponds to the border between the zigzag and armchair edges for the nanoribbons with chiral edges. For the nanoribbons with armchair edges, the fracture started at one of the cove regions at the edges. In contrast, the fracture started at the inner region of the nanoribbons with zigzag edges. The bond elongation under the tensile strain depends on the mutual arrangement of covalent bonds with respect to the strain direction.

  6. Axial dynamic tensile strength of concrete under static lateral compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.

    2006-01-01

    The rate effect on concrete tensile strength can be modeled by the description of crack extension in a fictitious fracture plane [1,2].The plane represents the initial, internal damage and the geometry of the final fracture plane. In the paper, the same approach is applied to model the failure

  7. Influence of deuterium content on tensile behavior of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material in the temperature range of ambient to 300 degC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bind, A.K.; Singh, R.N.; Chakravartty, J.K.; Dhandharia, Priyesh; Ghosh, Agnish; More, Nitin S.; Chhatre, A.G.; Vijayakumar, S.

    2011-08-01

    Tensile properties of autoclaved zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium pressure tube material were evaluated by uniaxial tension tests at temperatures between 25 and 300 degC and under strain-rates of 1.075 x 10 -4 /s. Six number of Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube spools of length 130 mm were obtained from pressure tube number 19-2557-2. Five spools were polished with abrasive paper to remove the oxide layer. These spools were gaseously charged with controlled amount of deuterium. The target deuterium concentrations were 25, 50, 75, 100 and 200 wppm of hydrogen equivalent. Ten samples were machined by EDM wire cutting from every spool. The tensile specimen axis was oriented along longitudinal direction of the tube. Metallographic examination of the deuterium charged samples suggested that the deuterides were predominantly circumferential deuterides. Analysis of tensile results showed that both yield and ultimate tensile strengths of this alloy decreased monotonically with increasing test temperatures. The tensile ductility decreased marginally with increase in test temperature from ambient to 300 degC. It was also observed that both strength and ductility appear to be unaffected by deuterium content at all temperatures, thereby suggesting that at least up to 200 wppm (Heq.) of deuterium tensile properties are not influenced by deuterium. (author)

  8. Brittle Fracture Behaviors of Large Die Holders Used in Hot Die Forging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifang Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Brittle fracture of large forging equipment usually leads to catastrophic consequences. To avoid this kind of accident, the brittle fracture behaviors of a large die holder were studied by simulating the practical application. The die holder is used on the large die forging press, and it is made of 55NiCrMoV7 hot-work tool steel. Detailed investigations including mechanical properties analysis, metallographic observation, fractography, transmission electron microscope (TEM analysis and selected area electron diffraction (SAED were conducted. The results reveal that the material generated a large quantity of large size polyhedral M23C6 (M: Fe and Cr mainly and elongated M3C (M: Fe mainly carbides along the martensitic lath boundaries when the die holder was recurrently tempered and water-cooled at 250 °C during the service. The large size carbides lead to the material embrittlement and impact toughness degradation, and further resulted in the brittle fracture of the die holder. Therefore, the operation specification must be emphasized to avoid the die holder being cooled by using water, which is aimed at accelerating the cooling.

  9. Flexural and tensile bond strength, related via a stochastic numerical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluijm, R. van der

    1998-01-01

    The flexural strength of masonry parallel to the bed joint depends on the geometry of the cross section, tensile bond strength, fracture energy, stiffness of units and of mortar joints. In experiments, tensile bond strength and fracture energy determined on relatively small specimens, show a large

  10. Tensile properties of irradiated TZM and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steichen, J.M.

    1975-04-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the elevated temperature tensile properties of TZM and tungsten has been experimentally determined. Specimens were irradiated at a temperature of approximately 720 0 F to fluences of 0.4 and 0.9 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Test parameters for both control and irradiated specimens included strain rates from 3 x 10 -4 to 1 s -1 and temperatures from 72 to 1700 0 F. The results of these tests were correlated with a rate-temperature parameter (T ln A/epsilon) to provide a concise description of material behavior over the range of deformation conditions of this study. The yield strength of the subject materials was significantly increased by decreasing temperature, increasing strain rate, and increasing fluence. Ductility was significantly reduced at any temperature or strain rate by increasing fluence. Cleavage fractures occurred in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens when the yield strength was elevated to the effective cleavage stress by temperature and/or strain rate. Neutron irradiation for the conditions of this study increased the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of tungsten by approximately 300 0 F and TZM by approximately 420 0 F. (U.S.)

  11. Triblock copolymer gels - structure, fracture behavior and application in ceramic processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Michelle E.

    Acrylic triblock copolymer gels transition rapidly from free-flowing liquids to elastic solids and their nanoscale self-assembly leads to reproducible structure and properties. They are an ideal model system for understanding the link between gel structure and the deformation and fracture behavior of soft, self-assembled materials. While a basic understanding of gel structure and linear viscoelastic response exists, this research aims to extend this understanding to include the nonlinear mechanical response and fracture behavior as well as the effect of gel concentration, block length, endblock fraction, and homopolymer solubilization. This expanded understanding will be applied to optimize triblock design for the thermoreversible gelcasting of ceramics. Gel structure was characterized using small angle scattering and self-consistent field theory simulations while mechanical properties were studied using a combination of rheology, swelling, indentation, uniaxial compression, and fracture experiments. Birefringence and shear alignment were used to differentiate between spherical and cylindrical micelle morphologies. An effective energy barrier of 550 kJ/mol describes gels relaxation behavior over a 40°C temperature range where the relaxation times vary by a factor of 1010. At high endblock contents, gels exhibit greater permanent deformation and moduli over an order of magnitude larger than would be expected from rubber elasticity alone due to a transition from spherical to cylindrical micelles. The rate dependence of a gels energy release rate, G , is independent of the gel concentration when G is normalized by the small strain Young's modulus, E. The gels exhibit a transition from rough, slow crack propagation to smooth, fast crack propagation for a well-defined value of the characteristic length, G /E. Crack tip stresses become highly anisotropic at stress values below the failure strength of the gels and are poorly described using linear elastic fracture

  12. Direct Shear Tests of Sandstone Under Constant Normal Tensile Stress Condition Using a Simple Auxiliary Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Duofeng; Huang, Da

    2017-06-01

    Tension-shear failure is a typical failure mode in the rock masses in unloading zones induced by excavation or river incision, etc., such as in excavation-disturbed zone of deep underground caverns and superficial rocks of high steep slopes. However, almost all the current shear failure criteria for rock are usually derived on the basis of compression-shear failure. This paper proposes a simple device for use with a servo-controlled compression-shear testing machine to conduct the tension-shear tests of cuboid rock specimens, to test the direct shear behavior of sandstone under different constant normal tensile stress conditions ( σ = -1, -1.5, -2, -2.5 and -3 MPa) as well as the uniaxial tension behavior. Generally, the fracture surface roughness decreases and the proportion of comminution areas in fracture surface increases as the change of stress state from tension to tension-shear and to compression-shear. Stepped fracture is a primary fracture pattern in the tension-shear tests. The shear stiffness, shear deformation and normal deformation (except the normal deformation for σ = -1 MPa) decrease during shearing, while the total normal deformation containing the pre-shearing portion increases as the normal tensile stress level (| σ|) goes up. Shear strength is more sensitive to the normal tensile stress than to the normal compressive stress, and the power function failure criterion (or Mohr envelope form of Hoek-Brown criterion) is examined to be the optimal criterion for the tested sandstone in the full region of tested normal stress in this study.

  13. Experimental Characterization and Modeling of the Fracturing Behavior of Marcellus Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, C.; Li, W.; Sageman, B. B.; Cusatis, G.

    2014-12-01

    Adequate knowledge and prediction of mechanical properties of shale are pivotal to the design of hydraulic fractures. The urgent technical challenge of such an endeavor is how to translate the highly heterogeneous nature of shale into a predictive model of the mechanical properties. Our group addressed this challenge by adopting a combined experimental and numerical approach to investigate fracture processes and failure mechanisms of shale.Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM), having shown superior capabilities in predicting qualitative and quantitative behavior of concrete and concrete-like materials, as shown in Fig. 1, has been adopted to simulate mesoscale behavior of shale. The polyhedral cell system defining the geometric attributes of the rock microstructure is built via a 3D tessellation procedure based on X-ray microtomography results of microstructure and grain size distribution of shale specimens. The adopted tessellation procedure makes use of well-established packing algorithms for no-contact spherical particle placement and non-overlapping volume tessellation. The polyhedral particles interact through triangular facets where appropriate measure of stresses and strains are defined. Especially, LDPM is extended to simulate transversely isotropic materials by using orientation-dependent and strain-dependent strength limits coupled with orientation-dependent normal and shear stiffnesses on each facet. Appropriate interface constitutive equations are formulated to simulate all phenomena occurring at a scale that is smaller than the resolution of LDPM system, including microscopic fracture, frictional contact, particle breakage, pore collapse, and distributed damage. Bedding planes and natural joints are characterized by greatly decreased strength limits for facets within that region. To calibrate/validate the LDPM model, microscopic and mesoscopic experiments, including Brazilian tests, uniaxial compression tests, and three point-bending tests, are

  14. Tensile properties of unirradiated path A PCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braski, D.N.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The tensile properties of PCA in the Al (solution annealed), A3 (25%-cold worked), and B2 (aged, cold worked, and reaged) conditions were determined from room temperature to 600 0 C. The tensile behavior of PCA-A1 and -A3 was generally similar to that of titanium-modified type 316 stainless steel with similar microstructures. The PCA-B2 was weaker than PCA-A3, especially above 500 0 C, but demonstrated slightly better ducility

  15. Fabrication, Structural Characterization and Uniaxial Tensile Properties of Novel Sintered Multi-Layer Wire Mesh Porous Plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Liuyang; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Yao, Bibo

    2018-01-17

    There is an increasing interest in developing porous metals or metallic foams for functional and structural applications. The study of the physical and mechanical properties of porous metals is very important and helpful for their application. In this paper, a novel sintered multilayer wire mesh porous plate material (WMPPs) with a thickness of 0.5 mm-3 mm and a porosity of 10-35% was prepared by winding, pressing, rolling, and subsequently vacuum sintering them. The pore size and total size distribution in the as-prepared samples were investigated using the bubble point method. The uniaxial tensile behavior of the WMPPs was investigated in terms of the sintering temperature, porosity, wire diameter, and manufacturing technology. The deformation process and the failure mechanism under the tensile press was also discussed based on the appearance of the fractures (SEM figures). The results indicated that the pore size and total size distribution were closely related to the raw material used and the sintering temperature. For the WMPPs prepared by the wire mesh, the pore structures were inerratic and the vast majority of pore size was less than 10 μm. On the other hand, for the WMPPs that were prepared by wire mesh and powder, the pore structures were irregular and the pore size ranged from 0 μm-50 μm. The experimental data showed that the tensile strength of WMPPs is much higher than any other porous metals or metallic foams. Higher sintering temperatures led to coarser joints between wires and resulted in higher tensile strength. The sintering temperature decreased from 1330 °C to 1130 °C and the tensile strength decreased from 296 MPa to 164 MPa. Lower porosity means that there are more metallurgical joints and metallic frameworks resisting deformation per unit volume. Therefore, lower porosities exhibit higher tensile strength. An increase of porosity from 17.14% to 32.5% led to the decrease of the tensile strength by 90 MPa. The coarser wires led to a bigger

  16. Fabrication, Structural Characterization and Uniaxial Tensile Properties of Novel Sintered Multi-Layer Wire Mesh Porous Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuyang Duan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in developing porous metals or metallic foams for functional and structural applications. The study of the physical and mechanical properties of porous metals is very important and helpful for their application. In this paper, a novel sintered multilayer wire mesh porous plate material (WMPPs with a thickness of 0.5 mm–3 mm and a porosity of 10–35% was prepared by winding, pressing, rolling, and subsequently vacuum sintering them. The pore size and total size distribution in the as-prepared samples were investigated using the bubble point method. The uniaxial tensile behavior of the WMPPs was investigated in terms of the sintering temperature, porosity, wire diameter, and manufacturing technology. The deformation process and the failure mechanism under the tensile press was also discussed based on the appearance of the fractures (SEM figures. The results indicated that the pore size and total size distribution were closely related to the raw material used and the sintering temperature. For the WMPPs prepared by the wire mesh, the pore structures were inerratic and the vast majority of pore size was less than 10 μm. On the other hand, for the WMPPs that were prepared by wire mesh and powder, the pore structures were irregular and the pore size ranged from 0 μm–50 μm. The experimental data showed that the tensile strength of WMPPs is much higher than any other porous metals or metallic foams. Higher sintering temperatures led to coarser joints between wires and resulted in higher tensile strength. The sintering temperature decreased from 1330 °C to 1130 °C and the tensile strength decreased from 296 MPa to 164 MPa. Lower porosity means that there are more metallurgical joints and metallic frameworks resisting deformation per unit volume. Therefore, lower porosities exhibit higher tensile strength. An increase of porosity from 17.14% to 32.5% led to the decrease of the tensile strength by 90 MPa. The

  17. Time-dependent fracture toughness of cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonsomboon, Khaow; Koh, Ching Theng; Oyen, Michelle L

    2014-06-01

    The fracture and time-dependent properties of cornea are very important for the development of corneal scaffolds and prostheses. However, there has been no systematic study of cornea fracture; time-dependent behavior of cornea has never been investigated in a fracture context. In this work, fracture toughness of cornea was characterized by trouser tear tests, and time-dependent properties of cornea were examined by stress-relaxation and uniaxial tensile tests. Control experiments were performed on a photoelastic rubber sheet. Corneal fracture resistance was found to be strain-rate dependent, with values ranging from 3.39±0.57 to 5.40±0.48kJm(-2) over strain rates from 3 to 300mmmin(-1). Results from stress-relaxation tests confirmed that cornea is a nonlinear viscoelastic material. The cornea behaved closer to a viscous fluid at small strain but became relatively more elastic at larger strain. Although cornea properties are greatly dependent on time, the stress-strain responses of cornea were found to be insensitive to the strain rate when subjected to tensile loading. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanical Behavior and Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Multiphase Polymer Nanocomposites Using Impact and J-Integral via Locus Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu P. Panda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture behaviors of fibrillar silicate clay (MMT filled thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO containing polypropylene (PP blended with ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM were systematically investigated using impact test method and J-integral by locus method. Drastic increase in impact strength is observed for all developed compositions and generally shows higher value for the selected phases containing dispersed nanoclay in PP matrix. A fracture mechanics approach has been adopted by mode I test, and the effects of specimen geometry have been investigated. Increase in interlaminar fracture energy value, Gc, and J-integral value, Jc, is marked as the crack propagated through the composite; that is, a rising “R-curve” is observed. Toughness measurements revealed that the fracture toughness increased with increasing clay content reaching maximum at 3 wt% of clay than pure PP. Moreover, enhancement of fracture toughness was more remarkable than that of stiffness. The fracture surfaces taken from different specimens were observed for exploring the fracture mechanisms using transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed a strong particle-matrix adhesion.

  19. An Assessment of the Ductile Fracture Behavior of Hot Isostatically Pressed and Forged 304L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A. J.; Smith, R. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2017-05-01

    Type 300 austenitic stainless steel manufactured by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has recently been shown to exhibit subtly different fracture behavior from that of equivalent graded forged steel, whereby the oxygen remaining in the component after HIP manifests itself in the austenite matrix as nonmetallic oxide inclusions. These inclusions facilitate fracture by acting as nucleation sites for the initiation, growth, and coalescence of microvoids in the plastically deforming austenite matrix. Here, we perform analyses based on the Rice-Tracey (RT) void growth model, supported by instrumented Charpy and J-integral fracture toughness testing at ambient temperature, to characterize the degree of void growth ahead of both a V-notch and crack in 304L stainless steel. We show that the hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) 304L steel exhibits a lower critical void growth at the onset of fracture than that observed in forged 304L steel, which ultimately results in HIP'd steel exhibiting lower fracture toughness at initiation and impact toughness. Although the reduction in toughness of HIP'd steel is not detrimental to its use, due to the steel's sufficiently high toughness, the study does indicate that HIP'd and forged 304L steel behave as subtly different materials at a microstructural level with respect to their fracture behavior.

  20. Shape effect related to crystallographic orientation of deformation behavior in copper crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Chang, C.H.; Koo, Y.M.; MacDowell, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The deformation behavior of pure copper single crystals has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation using the in situ reflection Laue method. Two types of samples with the same orientation of tensile axes, but with different crystallographic orientations in the directions of the width and thickness of the samples, have been studied. They showed different characteristics of deformation behavior, such as the activated slip systems, the movement of the tensile axis, and the mode of fracture

  1. Microstructure-Fracture Behavior Relationships of Slot-Welded Rail Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allie, Aldinton; Aglan, Heshmat; Fateh, Mahmood

    2011-09-01

    Microstructural analyses of the parent pearlitic and bainitic rail steels were performed, and the results were compared with the microstructure of the welded pearlitic and bainitic steels. An increase in the ASTM grain size number of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) for both pearlitic and bainitic slot welds was observed. The microstructural features that were identified in the weldment of both slot-welded steels were very similar. This was expected since the same welding wire was used to weld both rail steels. The weld consisted of mainly ferrite and had similar grain size. The fusion zones of the welded pearlitic and bainitic rail steels were examined after flexural tests to determine if there were any cracks present due to improper or weak fusion. Examination of the entire fusion zone under high optical magnification revealed no cracks, indicating that a perfect fusion was achieved. The three-point flexural behavior of the parent pearlitic and bainitic steels was evaluated and compared with that of the slot-welded steels. It was found that that the welded pearlitic steel has superior fracture resistance properties when compared to the parent pearlitic steel. The average fracture resistance of the parent pearlitic steel was 79 MPa√m compared to 119 MPa√m for the welded pearlitic steel. The slot-welded bainitic steel, however, showed similar fracture resistance properties to the parent bainitic steel with average values of 121 and 128 MPa√m, respectively. The failure mechanism of the welded and parent pearlitic and bainitic steels was also identified. Microvoid coalescence was observed in both welded rail steel samples. This was manifested by dimpled features, which are associated with ductile failure.

  2. Anisotropic behavior studies of aluminum alloy 5083-H0 using a micro-tensile test stage in a FEG-SEM

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motsi, GT

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The plastic anisotropic characteristics of aluminum alloy 5083-H0 at varying strain rates were investigated using uniaxial tensile testing inside an ultra-high resolution FEG-SEM. The stress strain graphs obtained show that for the rolling direction...

  3. Behavior of rare earth elements in fractured aquifers: an application to geological disposal criteria for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Gu; Kim, Yong Je; Lee, Kil Yong; Kim, Kun Han

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the geochemistry of potential host rocks is very important in the site evaluation for construction of an underground geologic repository for radioactive waste. Because of similar valence and ionic radii and high similarity in electronic structure with trivalent actinides (such as Am 3+ and Cm 3+ ), the rare earth elements (REEs) have been used to predict the behavior of actinide-series elements in solution (Runde et al., 1992). For Am and Cm, which occur only in the trivalent states in most waste-disposal repository environments, the analogy with the REEs is particularly relevant. In order to discuss the behavior of REEs in geological media and to deduce the behavior of actinides in geological environments based on the REE abundance, and to provide an useful tool in deciding an optimum geological condition for radioactive disposal, we estimated the REE abundance from various kinds of fractured rock type. In fractured granitic aquifer, chondrite-normalized REE pattern show Eu positive anomaly due to fracture-filling calcite precipitation. However, in fractured meta-basaltic and volcanic tuffaceous aquifer, REE pattern do not show the change of Eu anomaly due to fracture-filling calcite precipitation. Eu shows very similar properties such as cohesive energy, ionic radii with coordination number compared to Am. Therefore, if we consider the Eu behavior in fractured rocks and the similar physical/chemical properties of Eu and Am, together, our results strongly suggest that Eu is a very useful analogue for predicting the behavior of Am in geological environment

  4. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  5. Experimental and Model Studies on Loading Path-Dependent and Nonlinear Gas Flow Behavior in Shale Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Honglian; Lu, Yiyu; Zhou, Lei; Tang, Jiren; Han, Shuaibin; Ao, Xiang

    2018-01-01

    Interest in shale gas as an energy source is growing worldwide. Because the rock's natural fracture system can contribute to gas production, it is important to understand the flow behavior of natural fractures in shale. Previous studies on the flow characteristics in shale fractures were limited and did not consider the effect of nonlinearity. To understand the basic mechanics of the gas flow behavior in shale fractures, laboratory investigations with consideration of the fluid pressure gradient, the confining stress, the loading history and the fracture geometry were conducted in this paper. Izbash's equation was used to analyze the nonlinearity of the flow. The results show that the behavior of the friction factors is similar to that shown in flow tests in smooth and rough pipes. The increase of the confining stress and the irreversible damage to the shale decreased the hydraulic aperture and increased the relative roughness. Thus, turbulent flow could appear at a low Reynolds number, resulting in a significant pressure loss. The limits of the cubic law and the existing correction factor for transmissivity are discussed. It is found that the previous friction models overestimate the friction factor in the laminar regime and underestimate the friction factor in the turbulent regime. For this reason, a new friction model based on a linear combination of the Reynolds number and the relative roughness was developed.

  6. Effect of high-temperature water and hydrogen on the fracture behavior of a low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Seifert, H.-P.; Spätig, P.; Que, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is critical for safety and lifetime. Possible degradation of fracture resistance of RPV steel due to exposure to coolant and hydrogen is a concern. In this study tensile and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) tests in air (hydrogen pre-charged) and EFPM tests in hydrogenated/oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) was done, using a low-alloy RPV steel. 2–5 wppm hydrogen caused embrittlement in air tensile tests at room temperature (25 °C) and at 288 °C, effects being more significant at 25 °C and in simulated weld coarse grain heat affected zone material. Embrittlement at 288 °C is strain rate dependent and is due to localized plastic deformation. Hydrogen pre-charging/HTW exposure did not deteriorate the fracture resistance at 288 °C in base metal, for investigated loading rate range. Clear change in fracture morphology and deformation structures was observed, similar to that after air tests with hydrogen. - Highlights: • Hydrogen content, microstructure of LAS, and strain rate affects tensile properties at 288 °C. • Strength affects hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility to a greater extent than grain size. • Hydrogen in LAS leads to strain localization and restricts cross-slip at 288 °C. • Possible hydrogen pickup due to exposure to 288 °C water alters fracture surface appearance without affecting fracture toughness in bainitic base material. • Simulated weld heat affected zone microstructure shows unstable crack propagation in 288 °C water.

  7. Fracture mechanics study on stress corrosion cracking behavior under corrosive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tomoyuki; Tohgo, Keiichiro; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Ishizuka, Naohiro; Takanashi, Masahiro; Itabashi, Yu; Nakayama, Gen; Sakakibara, Yohei; Hirano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with applicability of non-linear fracture mechanics to crack growth by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under large-scale yielding and in a plastically deformed area. Crack growth test by compact tension specimen is carried out to evaluate crack growth rate under small-scale and large-scale yielding conditions. To evaluate the crack growth behavior from a crack initiated in a plastically deformed area, crack growth test is also carried out for a very short pre-crack in a plastically deformed four-point bending specimen. Conventional stress intensity factor (K) and equivalent stress intensity factor (K J ) defined by J integral are used as fracture mechanics parameters which characterize the crack growth rate. On da/dt-K diagram, a data band shows wide scatter, especially the crack growth rate in a plastically deformed area is higher than that under small-scale yielding condition. On the other hand, da/dt-K J diagram exhibits narrower scatter on a data band than da/dt-K diagram. The equivalent stress intensity factor is appropriate for characterization of crack growth rate by SCC under small-scale yielding through large scale yielding conditions and in a plastically deformed area. (author)

  8. A novel approach for preparation and in situ tensile testing of silica glass membranes in the TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mačković, Mirza; Przybilla, Thomas; Dieker, Christel; Herre, Patrick; Romeis, Stefan; Stara, Hana; Schrenker, Nadine; Peukert, Wolfgang; Spiecker, Erdmann

    2017-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of glasses in the micro- and/or nanometer regime increasingly gains importance in nowadays modern technology. However, suitable small scale preparation and mechanical testing approaches for a reliable assessment of the mechanical properties of glasses still remain a big challenge. In the present work, a novel approach for site-specific preparation and quantitative in situ tensile testing of thin silica glass membranes in the transmission electron microscope is presented. Thereby, advanced focused ion beam techniques are used for the preparation of nanoscale dog bone shaped silica glass specimens suitable for in situ tensile testing. Small amounts of gallium are detected on the surface of the membranes resulting from redeposition effects during the focused ion beam preparation procedure. Possible structural changes of silica glass upon irradiation with electrons and gallium ions are investigated by controlled irradiation experiments, followed by a structural analysis using Raman spectroscopy. While moderate electron beam irradiation does not alter the structure of silica glass, ion beam irradiation results in minor densification of the silica glass membranes. In situ tensile testing of membranes under electron beam irradiation results in distinctive elongations without fracture confirming the phenomenon of superplasticity. In contrast, in situ tensile testing in the absence of the electron beam reveals an elastic/plastic deformation behavior, and finally leads to fracture of the membranes. The Young’s moduli of the glass membranes pulled at beam off conditions in the TEM are comparable with values known for bulk fused silica, while the tensile strength is in the range of values reported for silica glass fibers with comparable dimensions. The impact of electron beam irradiation on the mechanical properties of silica glass membranes is further discussed. The results of the present work open new avenues for dedicated preparation and

  9. Weakening of an aluminum grain boundary induced by sulfur segregation: A first-principles computational tensile test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Lu Guanghong; Deng Shenghua; Wang Tianmin; Xu Huibin; Kohyama, Masanori; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2007-01-01

    We have performed a first-principles computational tensile test on an aluminum grain boundary (GB) with sulfur segregation. We show that the tensile strength is reduced by 18% (to 7.80 GPa) due to sulfur segregation in comparison with 9.50 GPa of the clean GB, and the GB fracture is caused by the interfacial bond breaking. We demonstrate the peculiar behavior of a sulfur-aluminum atom cluster at the interface during the tensile test, which originates from the intrinsic bonding characteristic of sulfur. Such cluster forms a one-dimensional chain structure that is similar to that in the bulk S, and remains unchanged in the tensile process until the fracture occurs but significantly changes the GB structure. This is responsible for the observed fact that the segregated sulfur atom bonds strongly with only a few of its neighboring aluminum atoms, leading to weaker interfacial aluminum-sulfur bonds. We suggest that the experimentally observed aluminum intergranular embrittlement is induced by the GB weakening due to sulfur segregation

  10. Deformation Behavior between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures Using Fully Coupled Hydromechanical Model with XFEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a growing consensus that preexisting natural fractures play an important role during stimulation. A novel fully coupled hydromechanical model using extended finite element method is proposed. This directly coupled scheme avoids the cumbersome process during calculating the fluid pressure in complicated fracture networks and translating into an equivalent nodal force. Numerical examples are presented to simulate the hydraulic fracture propagation paths for simultaneous multifracture treatments with properly using the stress shadow effects for horizontal wells and to reveal the deformation response and interaction mechanism between hydraulic induced fracture and nonintersected natural fractures at orthotropic and nonorthotropic angles. With the stress shadow effects, the induced hydraulic flexural fracture deflecting to wellbore rather than transverse fracture would be formed during the progress of simultaneous fracturing for a horizontal well. The coupled hydromechanical simulation reveals that the adjacent section to the intersection is opened and the others are closed for orthogonal natural fracture, while the nonorthogonal natural fracture is activated near the intersection firstly and along the whole section with increasing perturbed stresses. The results imply that the induced hydraulic fracture tends to cross orthotropic natural fracture, while it is prior to being arrested by the nonorthotropic natural fracture.

  11. Tensile Properties of Polyimide Composites Incorporating Carbon Nanotubes-Grafted and Polyimide-Coated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of polyimide composite bundles incorporating carbon nanotubes-grafted (CNT-grafted) and polyimide-coated (PI-coated) high-tensile-strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB), and high-modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers were investigated. The CNT were grown on the surface of the carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition. The pyromellitic dianhydride/4,4'-oxydianiline PI nanolayer coating was deposited on the surface of the carbon fiber by high-temperature vapor deposition polymerization. The results clearly demonstrate that CNT grafting and PI coating were effective for improving the Weibull modulus of T1000GB PAN-based and K13D pitch-based carbon fiber bundle composites. In addition, the average tensile strength of the PI-coated T1000GB carbon fiber bundle composites was also higher than that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites, while the average tensile strength of the CNT-grafted T1000GB, K13D, and the PI-coated K13D carbon fiber bundle composites was similar to that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites.

  12. Microstructural effects on constitutive and fatigue fracture behavior of TinSilverCopper solder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jonathon P.

    As microelectronic package construction becomes more diverse and complex, the need for accurate, geometry-independent material constitutive and failure models increases. Evaluations of packages based on accelerated environmental tests (such as accelerated thermal cycling or power cycling) only provide package-dependent reliability information. In addition, extrapolations of such test data to life predictions under field conditions are often empirical. Besides geometry, accelerated environmental test data must account for microstructural factors such as alloy composition or isothermal aging condition, resulting in expensive experimental variation. In this work, displacement-controlled, creep, and fatigue lap shear tests are conducted on specially designed SnAgCu test specimens with microstructures representative to those found in commercial microelectronic packages. The data are used to develop constitutive and fatigue fracture material models capable of describing deformation and fracture behavior for the relevant temperature and strain rate ranges. Furthermore, insight is provided into the microstructural variation of solder joints and the subsequent effect on material behavior. These models are appropriate for application to packages of any geometrical construction. The first focus of the thesis is on Pb-mixed SnAgCu solder alloys. During the transition from Pb-containing solders to Pb-free solders, joints composed of a mixture of SnPb and SnAgCu often result from either mixed assemblies or rework. Three alloys of 1, 5 and 20 weight percent Pb were selected so as to represent reasonable ranges of Pb contamination expected from different 63Sn37Pb components mixed with Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu. Displacement-controlled (constant strain rate) and creep tests were performed at temperatures of 25°C, 75°C, and 125°C using a double lap shear test setup that ensures a nearly homogeneous state of plastic strain at the joint interface. Rate-dependent constitutive models for Pb

  13. In vitro fracture behavior of maxillary premolars with metal crowns and several post-and-core systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Kreulen, C.M.; Bell-Ronnlof, A.M. Le; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro fracture behavior of severely damaged premolars, restored with metal crowns with limited ferrule and several post-and-core systems, was investigated. Crowns of maxillary premolars were removed and canals were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and with Parapost drills. Groups of 11

  14. First-order Description of the Mechanical Fracture Behavior of Fine-Grained Surficial Marine Sediments During Gas Bubble Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    shape using an industrial CT scanner. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics; (LEFM) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT...scales. These results do not preclude the visco- elasto-plastic behavior of sediment for all geomechanical problems, but in the case of growing gas

  15. Fracture behavior of structurally compromised non-vital maxillary premolars restored using experimental fiber reinforced composite crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Kreulen, C.M.; Bell-Ronnlof, A.M. Le; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the fracture behavior of direct resin composite crowns with or without experimental fiber reinforcement. METHODS: Clinical crowns of single-rooted maxillary premolars were cut off at the cemento-enamel junction. Canals were prepared with Gates Glidden drills up to size 4. No

  16. Effect of Nanocomposite Structures on Fracture Behavior of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by Different Dispersion Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of organic modifier and processing method on morphology and mechanical properties of epoxy-clay nanocomposites were investigated. In this study, the preparation of nanocomposites by exfoliation-adsorption method involved an ultrasonic mixing procedure, and mechanical blending was used for in situ intercalative polymerization. The microstructure study revealed that the organoclay, which was ultrasonically mixed with the epoxy, partially exfoliated and intercalated. In contrast, organoclay remained in phase-separated and flocculated state after the mechanical blending process. Tensile stiffness increased significantly for the nanocomposite prepared by ultrasonic dispersion method through realizing the reinforcing potential of exfoliated silicate layers. Nanocomposites with exfoliated and intercalated nanoclay morphology were ineffective in enhancing the fracture toughness whereas nanocomposites with phase-separated and flocculated morphology have improved crack resistance predominantly by crack deflecting and pinning mechanisms.

  17. Modified maximum tangential stress criterion for fracture behavior of zirconia/veneer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsayar, M M; Park, P

    2016-06-01

    The veneering porcelain sintered on zirconia is widely used in dental prostheses, but repeated mechanical loadings may cause a fracture such as edge chipping or delamination. In order to predict the crack initiation angle and fracture toughness of zirconia/veneer bi-layered components subjected to mixed mode loadings, the accuracy of a new and traditional fracture criteria are investigated. A modified maximum tangential stress criterion considering the effect of T-stress and critical distance theory is introduced, and compared to three traditional fracture criteria. Comparisons to the recently published fracture test data show that the traditional fracture criteria are not able to properly predict the fracture initiation conditions in zirconia/veneer bi-material joints. The modified maximum tangential stress criterion provides more accurate predictions of the experimental results than the traditional fracture criteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  19. On the effect of x-ray irradiation on the deformation and fracture behavior of human cortical bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Holly D.; Launey, Maximilien E.; McDowell, Alastair A.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-01-10

    In situ mechanical testing coupled with imaging using high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction or tomography imaging is gaining in popularity as a technique to investigate micrometer and even sub-micrometer deformation and fracture mechanisms in mineralized tissues, such as bone and teeth. However, the role of the irradiation in affecting the nature and properties of the tissue is not always taken into account. Accordingly, we examine here the effect of x-ray synchrotron-source irradiation on the mechanistic aspects of deformation and fracture in human cortical bone. Specifically, the strength, ductility and fracture resistance (both work-of-fracture and resistance-curve fracture toughness) of human femoral bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation were evaluated following exposures to 0.05, 70, 210 and 630 kGy irradiation. Our results show that the radiation typically used in tomography imaging can have a major and deleterious impact on the strength, post-yield behavior and fracture toughness of cortical bone, with the severity of the effect progressively increasing with higher doses of radiation. Plasticity was essentially suppressed after as little as 70 kGy of radiation; the fracture toughness was decreased by a factor of five after 210 kGy of radiation. Mechanistically, the irradiation was found to alter the salient toughening mechanisms, manifest by the progressive elimination of the bone's capacity for plastic deformation which restricts the intrinsic toughening from the formation 'plastic zones' around crack-like defects. Deep-ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy indicated that this behavior could be related to degradation in the collagen integrity.

  20. Development and implementation of a fluid flow code to evaluate block hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Jeong-Gi; Han, Jisu; Lee, Dahye; Cho, Taechin

    2017-04-01

    A computer program code was developed to estimate the hydraulic head distribution through the 2-D DFN(discrete fracture network) blocks considering hydraulic aperture of the individual fractures, and to determine flow quantity, directional block hydraulic conductivity and principal hydraulic conductivity tensor according to fracture geometry such as orientation, frequency and size of the fracture network systems. The generated stochastic DFN system is assumed to have a network structure in which the equivalent flow pipe composed linear fractures is complexly connected. DFN systems often include individual or group of sub-network that are isolated from a network that can act as fluid flow passages from one flow boundary to another, and the fluid flow is completely blocked due to lack of connectivity. Fractures that are completely or partially isolated in the DFN system do not contribute to the overall fluid flow through the DFN system and add to the burden of numerical computation. This sometimes leads to numerical instability and failure to provide a solution. In this study, geometric and mathematical routines were designed and implemented to classify and eliminate such sub-networks. The developed program code can calculate the total head at each node connected to the flow path with various aperture as well as hydraulic conductivity of the individual flow pipe using the SOR method. Numerical experiments have been carried out to explore the applicability of the developed program code. A total of 108 stochastic 2-D DFN blocks of 20 m×20 m with various hydraulic aperture were prepared using two joint sets with fixed input parameters of fracture orientation, frequency and size distribution. The hydraulic anisotropy and the chance for equivalent continuum behavior of the DFN system were found to depend on the variability of fracture aperture.

  1. Assessment of patient's pain-related behavior at physical examination may allow diagnosis of recent osteoporotic vertebral fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postacchini, Roberto; Paolino, Michela; Faraglia, Silvia; Cinotti, Gianluca; Postacchini, Franco

    2013-09-01

    Although innumerable studies have analyzed the multiple aspects of osteoporotic vertebral fractures, no study has focused on the clinical features related to spine pain in patients with recent osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). To determine whether the assessment of pain-related behavior (P-RB) of patients with osteoporotic VCFs of recent onset may allow the fracture to be strongly suspected, or even diagnosed, at physical examination. Pain-related behavior of elderly patients attending an outpatient spine clinic was evaluated on the basis of six consecutive movements made on the examining table. Fifty-six patients complaining only of lumbar or thoracic pain. The fractured patients (FPs), representing the fracture group (FG), were the 19 who had a recent VCF, whereas the control group (CG) consisted of the remaining 37 patients. Assessment of P-RB was based on six parameters: grimacing, sighing, clenching or blocking eyelids, gaping or strongly tightening the lips, need for help to take positions, and extreme difficulty to turn in the prone position. A score of 1 or a decimal was assigned to each parameter, the final score to each patient being 0 to 6. Three types of injury, acute (I), subacute (II), or chronic (III), were identified on the basis of the time elapsed from the probable occurrence of the fracture. The diagnosis of recent fracture was based on magnetic resonance images. Patients were videotaped during their movements. An examiner, unaware of the clinical history and diagnosis, gave a P-RB score to all patients and indicated whether they had to be placed in FG or CG, and also their presumable type of fracture. Subsequently, a DVD with the videotapes of all patients was given to three independent examiners, not specifically expert of spine conditions, who were asked to make the same evaluations as the first examiner. The mean scores for P-RB given by the first examiner were 4.6 to FG and 0.7 to CG (pPain-related behavior evaluation of

  2. Coupled deformation and fluid-flow behavior of a natural fracture in the CSM in situ test block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertsch, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal was the evaluation of an in situ block test as a data source for modeling the coupled flow and mechanical behavior of natural rock fractures. The experiments were conducted with the Colorado School of Mines in situ test block, an 8 m 3 (280 ft 3 ) gneiss cube which has been the focus of several previous studies. A single continuous fracture within the block was surrounded with instruments to measure stresses, deformations, and gas conductivity. The setup was subjected to combinations of normal and shear stress by pressurizing the block sides differentially with hydraulic flatjacks. The induced fracture deformation, as measured by two separate sensor systems, did not correlate closely with the fracture conductivity changes or with each other. The test fracture is more complicated physically than two parallel rock faces. Many joints which were not detected by mapping intersect the test fracture and strongly influence its behavior. These invisible joints create sub-blocks which react complexly to changes in applied load. The flow tests reflected the aggregate sub-block dislocations in the flow path. The deformation readings, however, were the movements of discrete points sparsely located among the sub-blocks. High-confidence extrapolation of block test results to large volumes, such as required for nuclear waste repository design, is not feasible currently. Present instrumentation does not sample rock mass behavior in situ at the proper scales. More basically, however, a fundamental gap exists between the nature of jointed rock and our conception of it. Therefore, the near-field rock mass must be discounted as an easily controllable barrier to groundwater flow, until radically different approaches to rock mass testing and modeling are developed

  3. Hygrothermal effects on dynamic mechanical snalysis and fracture behavior of polymeric composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Leali Costa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composites used above their glass transition temperatures Tg present a substantial degradation of physical properties; therefore a material's glass transition temperature and its change with moisture absorption are of practical importance. Little attention has been paid to the role of the adhesive bonding between the reinforcing fiber and matrix, particularly for BMI matrix. In this work the effect of moisture on the dynamic mechanical behavior and the fiber/matrix interface was investigated. Two systems were evaluated: carbon fabric/epoxy and carbon fabric/bismaleimide laminates. The results demonstrated that the moisture absorbed by the laminates causes either reversible or irreversible plasticization of the matrix. The humidity combined with the temperature effects may cause significant changes in the Tg matrix and toughness affecting the laminate strength. Moisture absorption was correlated to the fracture mode of the laminate demonstrating the deleterious effect of moisture on the interface. This leads to debonding between fiber and matrix. This behavior was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis.

  4. Fracture Behavior and Delamination Toughening of Molybdenum in Charpy Impact Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babinsky, K.; Primig, S.; Knabl, W.; Lorich, A.; Stickler, R.; Clemens, H.

    2016-11-01

    This study combines advanced characterization techniques with conventional Charpy impact tests to relate the mechanical properties to the microstructure of technically pure molybdenum, especially regarding its toughness. V-notched samples with different orientations were prepared from a rolled molybdenum plate in stress-relieved and recrystallized condition. The ductile-to-brittle transition-temperature was analyzed in terms of the delamination behavior influenced by the microstructure. A pronounced increase of toughness was found for specific oriented samples, which can be explained by macroscopic delamination. Elongated grains led to enhanced delamination in Charpy impact tests with variations for different orientations. In general, delamination occurs as a result of brittle fracture; however, an increase in toughness in the Charpy impact test can be provoked. This mechanism is called thin sheet toughening or delamination toughening. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements were performed to get a deeper knowledge about crack propagation and delamination behavior in the rolled plate. Recrystallization shifts the transition region to significantly higher temperatures, which is explained by the globular grain shape as well as grain boundary segregation. The occurrence of delamination is discussed, taking texture, grain shape and segregation effects into account.

  5. Fractured Identity: A Framework for Understanding Young Asian American Women's Self-harm and Suicidal Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Hyeouk Chris; Gonyea, Judith G; Chiao, Christine; Koritsanszky, Luca Anna

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high suicide rate among young Asian American women, the reasons for this phenomenon remain unclear. This qualitative study explored the family experiences of 16 young Asian American women who are children of immigrants and report a history of self-harm and/or suicidal behaviors. Our findings suggest that the participants experienced multiple types of "disempowering parenting styles" that are characterized as: abusive, burdening, culturally disjointed, disengaged, and gender-prescriptive parenting. Tied to these family dynamics is the double bind that participants suffer. Exposed to multiple types of negative parenting, the women felt paralyzed by opposing forces, caught between a deep desire to satisfy their parents' expectations as well as societal expectations and to simultaneously rebel against the image of "the perfect Asian woman." Torn by the double bind, these women developed a "fractured identity," which led to the use of "unsafe coping" strategies. Trapped in a "web of pain," the young women suffered alone and engaged in self-harm and suicidal behaviors.

  6. Early age fracture properties of microstructurally-designed mortars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Bella, Carmelo; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    This paper compares the fracture properties as well as crack initiation and propagation of real and equivalent mortars. The development of the elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture energy at different hydration stages were determined by inverse analysis of load-displacement curves...... the two mortars. At early age, the moisture content has a considerable influence on the tensile strength and the fracture energy....

  7. Deformation Microstructures of 30 dpa AISI 304 Stainless Steel after Monotonic Tensile and Constant Load Autoclave Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Wade; Pakarinen, Janne; Toivonen, Aki; Ehrnstén, Ulla

    Irradiated AISI 304 stainless steel extracted from the Chooz A center filler assembly has been the subject of a number of studies. Previously the results of slow strain rate tensile and constant load autoclave tests of 30 dpa material have been reported. They showed an influence of temperature, strain rate and environment on the fracture behavior of the material. The irradiated microstructure and deformation micro structures of those materials following testing have now been examined by TEM. The findings suggest that substantial channel deformation was associated with the purely ductile fracture following SSRT testing in argon, while the intergranular fractures following SSRT in simulated PWR environment and constant load testing in both simulated PWR and argon environments were associated with very localized deformation primarily exhibiting alpha martensite. This possibility is discussed in the light of literature.

  8. Influence of scan strategy and molten pool configuration on microstructures and tensile properties of selective laser melting additive manufactured aluminum based parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Donghua; Gu, Dongdong; Zhang, Han; Xiong, Jiapeng; Ma, Chenglong; Hong, Chen; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2018-02-01

    Selective laser melting additive manufacturing of the AlSi12 material parts through the re-melting of the previously solidified layer using the continuous two layers 90° rotate scan strategy was conducted. The influence of the re-melting behavior and scan strategy on the formation of the ;track-track; and ;layer-layer; molten pool boundaries (MPBs), dimensional accuracy, microstructure feature, tensile properties, microscopic sliding behavior and the fracture mechanism as loaded a tensile force has been studied. It showed that the defects, such as the part distortion, delamination and cracks, were significantly eliminated with the deformation rate less than 1%. The microstructure of a homogeneous distribution of the Si phase, no apparent grain orientation on both sides of the MPBs, was produced in the as-fabricated part, promoting the efficient transition of the load stress. Cracks preferentially initiate at the ;track-track; MPBs when the tensile stress increases to a certain value, resulting in the formation of the cleavage steps along the tensile loading direction. The cracks propagate along the ;layer-layer; MPBs, generating the fine dimples. The mechanical behavior of the SLM-processed AlSi12 parts can be significantly enhanced with the ultimate tensile strength, yield strength and elongation of 476.3 MPa, 315.5 MPa and 6.7%, respectively.

  9. Mechanical behavior of wood subjected to mode II fracture, using an energetic criterion: Application on THUJA of Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Saoud

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Shear strength is one of the properties often used to qualify a wood species for use in industry. But until now there is no standardized test which allows understanding this phenomenon. This paper constitutes a new approach to study the behavior of the wood material subjected to the mode II fracture. For that we designed and realized a new prototype of a wooden specimen that we tested in our laboratory which gives rise to an evaluation of the fracture until separation by pure shear of the specimen in the TL plane. The experimental data from a first series of tests on Thuja wood (Tetraclinis Articulata (Vahl Masters as a test material as well as the calculation of mode II initiation fracture toughness and the critical stress intensity factor are presented in this paper

  10. A correlative experimental and ab initio approach to improve the fracture behavior of Mo thin films by alloying with Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörg, Tanja; Music, Denis; Cordill, Megan J.; Franz, Robert; Köstenbauer, Harald; Linke, Christian; Winkler, Jörg; Schneider, Jochen M.; Mitterer, Christian

    2017-09-01

    The effect of Cu alloying on the deformation behavior of Mo thin films is investigated as a feasible concept to overcome their poor ductility, which severely limits performance in flexible electronics. 50 nm thick Mo1-xCux films (with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.51) were sputter-deposited on polyimide substrates and subjected to uniaxial tensile loading while measuring their electrical resistance in situ. A significant ductility enhancement is experimentally observed with increasing Cu content. This can be rationalized by considering the associated changes in bond character as the Cu additions weaken the covalent and hence shear resistant contribution to the overall bond character.

  11. Verification and characterization of continuum behavior of fractured rock at AECL Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.C.S.

    1985-02-01

    The purposes of this study are to determine when a fracture system behaves as a porous medium and what the corresponding permeability tensor is. A two-dimensional fracture system model is developed with density, size, orientation, and location of fractures in an impermeable matrix as random variables. Simulated flow tests through the models measure directional permeability, K/sub g/. Polar coordinate plots of 1/√K/sub g/, which are ellipses for equivalent anistropic homogeneous porous media, are graphed and best fit ellipses are calculated. Fracture length and areal density were varied such that fracture frequency was held constant. The examples showed the permeability increased with fracture length. The modeling techniques were applied to data from the Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.'s Underground Research Laboratory facility in Manitoba, Canada by assuming the fracture pattern at the surface persists at depth. Well test data were used to estimate the aperture distribution by both correlating and not correlating the aperture with fracture length. The permeability of models with uncorrelated length and aperture were smaller than those for correlated models. A Monte Carlo type study showed that analysis of steady state packer tests consistently underestimate the mean aperture. Finally, a three-dimensional model in which fractures are discs randomly located in space, interactions between the fractures are line segments, and the solution of the steady state flow equations is based on image theory was discussed

  12. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Reactor Pressure Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

    2013-01-01

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  13. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potirniche, Gabriel [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Barlow, Fred D. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Rink, Karl [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2013-11-26

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  14. Microstructure and elevated-temperature tensile properties of differential pressure sand cast Mg-4Y-3Nd-0.5Zr alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-hui Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures of an Mg-4Y-3Nd-0.5Zr alloy by differential pressure casting were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and its tensile deformation behavior was measured using a Gleeble1500D themo-simulation machine in the temperature range of 200 to 400 °C at initial strain rates of 5×10-4 to 10-1 s-1. Results show that the as-cast microstructure consists of primary α-Mg phase and bone-shaped Mg5RE eutectic phase distributed along the grain boundary. The eutectic phase is dissolved into the matrix after solution treatment and subsequently precipitates during peak aging. Tensile deformation tests show that the strain rate has little effect on stress under 300 °C. Tensile stress decreases with an increase in temperature and the higher strain rate leads to an increase in stress above 300 °C. The fracture mechanism exhibits a mixed quasi-cleavage fracture at 200 °C, while the fracture above 300 °C is a ductile fracture. The dimples are melted at 400 °C with the lowest strain rate of 10-4 s-1.

  15. Preliminary study on tensile properties and fractography of the recycled aluminum cast product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishamuddin Hussain; Mohd Harun; Hafizal Yazid; Shaiful Rizam Shamsudin; Zaiton Selamat; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2004-01-01

    Among many mechanical properties of materials, tensile properties are probably the most frequently considered, evaluated, and referred by the industry. This paper presents the result of preliminary study regarding the tensile properties and fractography of the recycled aluminum cast product. For this purpose, three sets of specimen were prepared for tensile testing by using permanent mold casting technique. The cast products are in durable shaped tensile specimens with the gauge length of 50mm. The tensile testing was conducted in accordance with BS EN 10002-1 and ISO 6892 standards. Fracture surface analysis was also conducted to understand materials behaviour. (Author)

  16. Fracture mechanics behavior of a Ni-Fe superalloy sheath for superconducting fusion magnets. Pt. 2. Magnet life analysis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.1 see ibid., p.251-67,(1997). From previous results of fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness measurements for a Ni-Fe base superalloy, a primary candidate for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) central solenoid (CS) conduit, we derive an improved magnet life analysis model from the framework of Newman and Raju. For the superalloy conduit with an initial semielliptical surface crack in its thickness direction, the model predicts the evolution of crack aspect ratio for a wide range of initial crack geometries under pure tension and bending fatigue. The prediction of final fracture due to fatigue crack growth using the linear elastic fracture mechanics approach is shown to be underconservative. An alternative model based on Newman's elastic-plastic fracture toughness parameter is derived for the base metal with nearly semicircular cracks. The improved life analysis model taking into account the fatigue and fracture behavior is applied to the ITER CS magnet and the results are compared with those from earlier models. Accounting for the crack shape evolution leads to significantly longer life compared to assuming a constant aspect ratio. For the superalloy base metal we find that the expected fatigue life of engineering design activity design of the CS magnet is about eight times the design requirement. Even the conceptual design activity design with a free-standing CS meets the life requirement when analyzed by the improved model. (orig.)

  17. The influence of coarse aggregate size and volume on the fracture behavior and brittleness of self-compacting concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beygi, Morteza H.A.; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Nikbin, Iman M.; Vaseghi Amiri, Javad; Rabbanifar, Saeed; Rahmani, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on fracture characteristics and brittleness of self-compacting concrete (SCC), involving the tests of 185 three point bending beams with different coarse aggregate size and content. Generally, the parameters were analyzed by the work of fracture method (WFM) and the size effect method (SEM). The results showed that with increase of size and content of coarse aggregate, (a) the fracture energy increases which is due to the change in fractal dimensions, (b) behavior of SCC beams approaches strength criterion, (c) characteristic length, which is deemed as an index of brittleness, increases linearly. It was found with decrease of w/c ratio that fracture energy increases which may be explained by the improvement in structure of aggregate-paste transition zone. Also, the results showed that there is a correlation between the fracture energy measured by WFM (G F ) and the value measured through SEM (G f ) (G F = 3.11G f )

  18. Effect of tensile overloads on fatigue crack growth of high strength steel wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, J.; Reguly, A.; Strohaecker, T.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A proof load process may be an option to increase the fatigue life of flexible pipelines. • There is possibility to produce plastic deformation at crack tip of tensile armor wires. • Controlled overloads provide effective crack growth retardation. • Crack growth retardation is also evident at higher stress ratios. - Abstract: Fatigue of the tensile armor wires is the main failure mode of flexible risers. Techniques to increase the life of these components are required to improve the processes safety on oil exploration. This work evaluates the crack growth retardation of high strength steel wires used in flexible pipelines. Fracture toughness tests were performed to establish the level of stress intensity factor wherein the wires present significant plastic deformation at the crack tip. The effect of tensile overload on fatigue behavior was assessed by fatigue crack growth testing under constant ΔK control and different overload ratios with two different load ratios. The outcomes show that the application of controlled overloads provides crack retardation and increases the fatigue life of the wires more than 31%. This behavior is also evident at stress ratio of 0.5, in spite of the crack closure effect being minimized by increasing the applied mean stress

  19. The research on delayed fracture behavior of high-strength bolts in steel structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo dong; Li, Nan

    2017-07-01

    High-strength bolts have been widely used in power plants. However, the high-strength bolts which being employed in pumping station, steel structure and pipeline anti-whip structure have been found delayed fracture for many times in a power plant, this will affect the reliability of steel fracture and bring blow risk caused by falling objects. The high-strength bolt with delayed fracture was carried out fracture analysis, metallurgical analysis, chemical analysis, mechanical analysis, as well as bolts installation analysis, it can be comprehensively confirmed that the direct cause of high-strength bolts delayed fracture is the stress corrosion, and the root cause of high-strength bolts delayed fracture should be the improper installation at the initial and the imperfect routine anti-corrosion maintenance.

  20. Mechanical behavior of nanocellulose coated jute/green epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, A.; Militký, J.; Ali, A.; Usman Javed, M.

    2017-10-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of nanocellulose coating on the mechanical behavior of jute/green epoxy composites. Cellulose was purified from waste jute fibers, converted to nanocellulose by acid hydrolysis and subsequently 3, 5 and 10 wt % of nanocellulose suspensions were coated over woven jute reinforcement. The composites were prepared by hand layup and compression molding technique. The surface topologies of treated jute fibers, jute cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), nanocellulose coated jute fabrics and fractured surfaces of composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The prepared composites were evaluated for tensile, flexural, fatigue and fracture toughness properties. The results revealed the improvement in tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus, fatigue life and fracture toughness of composites with the increase in concentration of nanocellulose coating over jute reinforcement except the decrease in tensile strength.

  1. Effect of long-term aging at 8150C on the tensile properties and microstructural stability of four cobalt- and nickel-base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, J.P.

    1976-08-01

    Two heats of Haynes alloy 25 and one heat each of Haynes alloy 188, Hastelloy N, and Inconel 625 were tensile tested after aging for 11,000 h at 816 0 C. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation were determined 24, 316, 760, and 982 0 C and compared with typical properties for these materials in the solution annealed condition. Toughness values were determined for these materials from their engineering stress-strain curves. The long-term aging treatment degraded ductility and toughness at room temperature but, contrary to behavior expected for overaging, enhanced them over those for the solution annealed condition in tests at 760 0 C. The tensile properties of the aged superalloys were correlated with mode of fracture and the amounts, identity, and morphology of the precipitates. Aging substantially depleted the hardener tungsten from the matrix in the cobalt-base alloys

  2. Effect of meshing element on J-integral value for homogenous crown fracture behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnulhadi, K.; Daud, R.; Mat, F.; Basaruddin, K. S.; Sulaiman, M. H.; Ariffin, A. K.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the meshing strategy schemes to solve the inconsistency of J-integral value for stress intensity factor (SIF) evaluation using finite element (FE) analysis. The effect of meshing element types on homogenous crown fracture behavior is investigated using developed ANSYS APDL code. For simplicity of the analysis, complex geometry of the dental crown was simplified into four point bending model. Two-dimensional FE single edge notch four-point bending model on In-Ceram Alumina was implemented in this study. A series of convergence analysis was performed to reveal the effect of various element types and combination quadrilateral and triangular elements on J-Integral for 10 contours. The meshing region was divided by two; non-critical part was set as global region and the critical part which is the pre-cracked area was set as local region. The effect of meshing size and combination of meshing shape were observed. For validation, the results of SIF through FE analysis using J-Integral have been compared and proved to have the good agreement with published theoretical result. It can be concluded that the smallest the meshing size at local region, the highest the number of contour of integration can be drawn.

  3. The pipeline fracture behavior and pressure assessment under HIC (Hydrogen induced cracking) environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaohua, Dong [China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), Beijing (China); Lianwei, Wang [University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), Beijing (China)

    2009-07-01

    As Hydrogen's transmit and diffuse, after gestating for a while, the density of hydrogen around crack tip of pipeline will get to the critical density, and the pipeline material will descend, make critical stress factor, the reason of pipeline Hydrogen Induced Cracking is Hydrogen's transmit and diffuse. The stress factor of Hydrogen Induced Cracking under surroundings-condition of stress is the key that estimate material's rupture behavior. The paper study the relationship among hydrogen concentrate, crack tip stress, stain field, hydrogen diffusion and inner pressure for crack tip process zone, then determined the length of HIC (hydrogen induced cracking) process zone. Based on the theory of propagation which reason micro-crack making core, dislocation model is produced for fracture criteria of HIC, the influence between material and environments under the HIC is analyzed, step by step pipeline maximum load pressure and threshold of J-integrity ( J{sub ISCC} ) is calculated, which is very significant for pipeline safety operation. (author)

  4. Microstructure evolution of titanium after tensile test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronski, S.; Wierzbanowski, K.; Jędrychowski, M.; Tarasiuk, J; Wronski, M.; Baczmanski, A.; Bacroix, B.

    2016-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative behavior of titanium T40 during tensile loading with a special emphasis on the presence of deformation twins in the observed microstructures is described. The samples for tensile tests were cut out from the rolled titanium sheet along the rolling and transverse directions. Several microstructure maps were determined using Electron Backscatter Diffraction technique (EBSD). These data were used to obtain crystallographic textures, misorientation distributions, grain size, twin boundary length, grain orientation spread, low and high angle boundary fractions and Schmid and Taylor factors. The deformation mechanisms and microstructure characteristics are different in the samples stretched along rolling and transverse directions. A strong appearance of tensile twins was observed in the samples deformed along transverse direction. On the other hand, more frequent subgrain formation and higher orientation spread was observed in the sample deformed along rolling direction, which caused’‘orientation blurring’ leading to an increase of grain size with deformation, as determined from OIM analysis.

  5. An investigation of microstructure, hardness, tensile behaviour of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this technical paper, the microstructure, hardness, tensile deformation and final fracture behaviour of an emerging titanium alloy for performance-critical applications are presented and discussed. Both longitudinal and transverse test specimens were prepared from the as-provided sheet stock of the alloy and deformed in ...

  6. Comparison of migration behavior between single and dual lag screw implants for intertrochanteric fracture fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katonis Pavlos G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lag screw cut-out failure following fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in osteoporotic bone remains an unsolved challenge. This study tested if resistance to cut-out failure can be improved by using a dual lag screw implant in place of a single lag screw implant. Migration behavior and cut-out resistance of a single and a dual lag screw implant were comparatively evaluated in surrogate specimens using an established laboratory model of hip screw cut-out failure. Methods Five dual lag screw implants (Endovis, Citieffe and five single lag screw implants (DHS, Synthes were tested in the Hip Implant Performance Simulator (HIPS of the Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory. This model simulated osteoporotic bone, an unstable fracture, and biaxial rocking motion representative of hip loading during normal gait. All constructs were loaded up to 20,000 cycles of 1.45 kN peak magnitude under biaxial rocking motion. The migration kinematics was continuously monitored with 6-degrees of freedom motion tracking system and the number of cycles to implant cut-out was recorded. Results The dual lag screw implant exhibited significantly less migration and sustained more loading cycles in comparison to the DHS single lag screw. All DHS constructs failed before 20,000 cycles, on average at 6,638 ± 2,837 cycles either by cut-out or permanent screw bending. At failure, DHS constructs exhibited 10.8 ± 2.3° varus collapse and 15.5 ± 9.5° rotation around the lag screw axis. Four out of five dual screws constructs sustained 20,000 loading cycles. One dual screw specimens sustained cut-out by medial migration of the distal screw after 10,054 cycles. At test end, varus collapse and neck rotation in dual screws implants advanced to 3.7 ± 1.7° and 1.6 ± 1.0°, respectively. Conclusion The single and double lag screw implants demonstrated a significantly different migration resistance in surrogate specimens under gait loading simulation with

  7. Effect of mushy state rolling on age-hardening and tensile behavior of Al-4.5Cu alloy and in situ Al-4.5Cu-5TiB2 composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddhalingeshwar, I.G.; Herbert, M.A.; Chakraborty, M.; Mitra, R.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Mushy state rolling of composites reduces peak-aging times to ∼7.5-10% of that of as-cast alloy. → Uniform Cu atom distribution achieved in matrices by mushy state rolling enhances aging kinetics. → Uniform precipitate distribution obtained by mushy state rolling leads to higher microhardness. → Peak-age tensile strength and strain hardening rates are found to increase on mushy state rolling. - Abstract: The effect of mushy state rolling on aging kinetics of stir-cast Al-4.5Cu alloy and in situ Al-4.5Cu-5TiB 2 composite and their tensile behavior in solution-treated (495 deg. C) or differently aged (170 deg. C) conditions, has been investigated. As-cast or pre-hot rolled alloy and composite samples were subjected to single or multiple mushy state roll passes to 5% thickness reduction at temperatures for 20% liquid content. Peak-aging times of mushy state rolled composite matrices have been found as ∼7.5-10% of that of as-cast alloy. Such enhancement in aging kinetics is attributed to homogeneity in Cu atom distribution as well as increase in matrix dislocation density due to thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Al and TiB 2 , matrix grain refinement and particle redistribution, achieved by mushy state rolling. Uniform precipitate distribution in mushy state rolled composite matrices leads to greater peak-age microhardness with higher yield and ultimate tensile strengths than those in as-cast alloy and composite.

  8. The understanding of the R7T7 glass blocks long term behavior: chemical and transport coupling in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomat, L.

    2008-04-01

    The long term behavior of nuclear waste glass blocks depends highly on chemical reactions which occur at the surface in contact with water. Studies carried out on inactive fractured glass blocks show that fracture networks play a significant part in reactive surface area. Nevertheless, the complexity of results interpretation, due to a weak knowledge of fracture networks and local lixiviation conditions, does not allow us to comprehend the physical and chemical mechanisms involved. Model cracks are a key step to study chemical and transport coupling in fractured media. Crack lixiviation in aggressive conditions (pH≥11) show that the crack's position (horizontal or vertical) determines the dominant transport mechanism (respectively diffusion or convection induced by gravity). This gravity driven flow seems to be negligible in lower pH conditions. The convective velocity is estimated by a 1D model of reactive transport. Two other parameters are studied: the influence of thermal gradient and the influence of interconnected cracks on alteration. A strong retroactive effect of convection, due to thermal gradient, on the alteration kinetic is observed inside the crack. These works lead to a complete alteration experiment of a 163 crack network subject to a thermal gradient. The use of the geochemical software, HYTEC, within the framework of this study shows the potential of the software which is however limited by the kinetics law used. (author)

  9. Micro-mechanical analysis and modelling of the behavior and brittle fracture of a french 16MND5 steel: role of microstructural heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, J.Ph.

    2006-10-01

    Reactor Pressure Vessel is the second containment barrier between nuclear fuel and the environment. Electricite de France's reactors are made with french 16MND5 low-alloyed steel (equ. ASTM A508 Cl.3). Various experimental techniques (scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction...) are set up in order to characterize mechanical heterogeneities inside material microstructure during tensile testing at different low temperatures [-150 C;-60 C]. Heterogeneities can be seen as the effect of both 'polycrystalline' and 'composite' microstructural features. Interphase (until 150 MPa in average between ferritic and bainitic macroscopic stress state) and intra-phase (until 100 MPa in average between ferritic orientations) stress variations are highlighted. Modelling involves micro-mechanical description of plastic glide, mean fields models and realistic three-dimensional aggregates, all put together inside a multi-scale approach. Calibration is done on macroscopic stress-strain curves at different low temperatures, and modelling reproduces experimental stress heterogeneities. This modelling allows to apply a local micro-mechanical fracture criterion for crystallographic cleavage. Deterministic computations of time to fracture for different carbides random selection provide a way to express probability of fracture for the elementary volume. Results are in good agreement with hypothesis made by local approach to fracture. Hence, the main difference is that no dependence to loading nor microstructure features is supposed for probability of fracture on the representative volume: this dependence is naturally introduced by modelling. (author)

  10. Tensile Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Helical Structural Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhon, Young I; Kim, Chulki; Seo, Minah; Cho, Woon Jo; Lee, Seok; Jhon, Young Min

    2016-02-04

    Recently, evidence was presented that certain single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess helical defective traces, exhibiting distinct cleaved lines, yet their mechanical characterization remains a challenge. On the basis of the spiral growth model of SWNTs, here we present atomic details of helical defects and investigate how the tensile behaviors of SWNTs change with their presence using molecular dynamics simulations. SWNTs have exhibited substantially lower tensile strength and strain than theoretical results obtained from a seamless tubular structure, whose physical origin cannot be explained either by any known SWNT defects so far. We find that this long-lasting puzzle could be explained by assuming helical defects in SWNTs, exhibiting excellent agreement with experimental observation. The mechanism of this tensile process is elucidated by analyzing atomic stress distribution and evolution, and the effects of the chirality and diameter of SWNTs on this phenomenon are examined based on linear elastic fracture mechanics. This work contributes significantly to our understanding of the growth mechanism, defect hierarchies, and mechanical properties of SWNTs.

  11. Effect of sample test volume and geometry on the tensile mechanical behavior of SiC/SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Neogi, J.

    1998-09-01

    The development of a silicon carbide-type fiber from an organometallic precursor has led to a major resurgence of interest in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites. By combining this high strength fiber with a variety of ceramic matrices it has been possible to achieve tough composites offering significant potential advantages over monolithic ceramics and carbon-carbon for high temperature applications. A continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composite (CFCC) typical of materials proposed for such industrial applications as power generation, heat recovery and chemical production as well as biomedical and environmental applications was tested in uniaxial tension using a universal test machine. Test parameters investigated included: test mode (load versus displacement), test rate (0.003 mm/s, 0.03 mm/s, 50 N/s and 500 N/s), specimen geometry (straight-sided versus reduced-gauge section) and type of specimen volume (long/thin versus short/fat). Typical properties include an average elastic modulus 130 {+-} 10 Gpa, an average proportional limit stress of 45 {+-} 20 Mpa, an average ultimate tensile strength of 180 {+-} 20 MPa and an average modulus of toughness of 8.4 {+-} 2 (x10{sup 5})J/m{sup 3}.

  12. In situ formation of ZrB2 particulates and their influence on microstructure and tensile behavior of AA7075 aluminum matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. David Raja Selvam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In situ synthesis of aluminum matrix composites (AMCs has become a popular method due to several advantages over conventional stir casting method. In the present study, AA7075/ZrB2 AMCs reinforced with various content of ZrB2 particulates (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 wt.% were synthesized by the in situ reaction of molten aluminum with inorganic salts K2ZrF6 and KBF4. The composites were characterized using XRD, OM, SEM, EBSD and TEM. The XRD patterns revealed the formation of ZrB2 particulates without the presence of any other compounds. The formation of ZrB2 particulates refined the grains of aluminum matrix extensively. Most of the ZrB2 particulates were located near the grain boundaries. The ZrB2 particulates exhibited various morphologies including spherical, cylindrical and hexagonal shapes. The size of the ZrB2 particulates was in the order of nano, sub micron and micron level. A good interfacial bonding was observed between the aluminum matrix and the ZrB2 particulates. The in situ formed ZrB2 particulates enhanced the mechanical properties such as microhardness and the ultimate tensile strength. Various strengthening mechanisms were identified.

  13. SIMULATION OF FRACTURE USING A MESH-DEPENDENT FRACTURE CRITERION IN THE DISCRETE ELEMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Dimaki

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Pohrt and Popov have shown that for simulation of adhesive contacts a mesh dependent detachment criterion must be used to obtain the mesh-independent macroscopic behavior of the system. The same principle should be also applicable for the simulation of fracture processes in any method using finite discretization. In particular, in the Discrete Element Methods (DEM the detachment criterion of particles should depend on the particle size. In the present paper, we analyze how the mesh dependent detachment criterion has to be introduced to guarantee the macroscopic invariance of mechanical behavior of a material. We find that it is possible to formulate the criterion which describes fracture both in tensile and shear experiments correctly.

  14. Fracture behavior of all-ceramic, implant-supported, and tooth-implant-supported fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkharrat, Abdul Rahman; Schmitter, Marc; Rues, Stefan; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2017-12-02

    In vitro investigation of the effects of fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) support and loading conditions on the fracture behavior of all-ceramic, zirconia-based FDP veneered with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-manufactured lithium disilicate ceramic. Based on a model for a 3-unit FDP in the molar region (tooth in region 15, implant in region 17), 16 identical zirconia frameworks were fabricated and veneered with milled lithium disilicate ceramic. Another 16 FDPs were manufactured similarly, using a model in which the tooth was replaced by an implant. The specimens underwent 10,000 thermal cycles between 6.5 and 60 °C and 1,200,000 chewing cycles with a force magnitude of 100 N. All were then subsequently loaded until fracture in a universal testing device. Half of the FDPs were subjected to centric and axial loading on the pontic, the others to eccentric and oblique loading on one cusp of the pontic. No failures were observed after artificial aging. Fracture loads of tooth-implant-supported restorations were 1636 ± 158 and 1086 ± 156 N for axial and oblique loading, respectively; implant-supported FDPs fractured at 1789 ± 202 and 1200 ± 68 N, respectively. Differences were significant for load application (P veneered implant-supported all-ceramics restorations might be reduced by use of CAD/CAM-manufactured lithium disilicate veneers. FDPs veneered with lithium disilicate resist occlusal forces of 500 N, irrespective of load application and support type. The fracture resistance of implant-supported FDPs was, however, higher than that of combined tooth-implant-supported FDPs. Their clinical use seems to be justified.

  15. Effect of Cu content on the microstructure evolution and fracture behavior of Al-Mg-Si-xCu (x  =  0, 1, 2 and 4 wt.%) alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Tanzilur; Sakib Rahman, Saadman; Zurais Ibne Ashraf, Md; Ibn Muneer, Khalid; Rashed, H. M. Mamun Al

    2017-10-01

    Lightweighting automobiles can dramatically reduce their consumption of fossil fuels and the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Heat-treatable Al-Mg-Si has attracted a great deal of research interest due to their high strength-to-weight ratio, good formability, and resistance to corrosion. In the past, it has been reported that the mechanical properties of Al-Mg-Si can be ameliorated by the addition of Cu. However, determining the right amount of Cu content still remains a challenge. To address this the microstructure evolution, phase transformation, mechanical properties, and fracture behavior of Al-Mg-Si-xCu (x  =  0, 1, 2 and 4 wt.%) alloys were studied through optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, hardness measurements, and tensile tests. The obtained results indicate that the addition of Cu of up to 4 wt.% improved the hardness (17.5% increase) of the alloy, but reduced its ductility. Moreover, an alloy with 4 wt.% Cu fractured in a brittle manner while Al-Mg-Si showed ductile fracture mechanism. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry analysis revealed five exothermic peaks in all Cu containing alloys. Our results also showed that θʹ and Qʹ-type intermetallic phases formed owing to the addition of Cu, which affected the strength and ductility. Thus, Al-Mg-Si-xCu alloy with the right amount of Cu content serves as an excellent candidate for replacing more costly alloys for cost-effective lightweighting and other applications.

  16. Acoustic emission analysis of crack resistance and fracture behavior of 20GL steel having the gradient microstructure and strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulin, S.; Nikitin, A.; Belov, V.; Rozhnov, A.; Turilina, V.; Anikeenko, V.; Khatkevich, V.

    2017-07-01

    The crack resistances as well as fracture behavior of 20GL steel quenched with a fast-moving water stream and having gradient microstructure and strength are analyzed. Crack resistance tests with quenched and normalized flat rectangular specimens having different cut lengths loaded by three-point bending with acoustic emission measurements have been performed. The critical J-integral has been used as the crack resistance parameter of the material. Quenching with a fast moving water stream leads to gradient (along a specimen wall thickness) strengthening of steel due to highly refined gradient microstructure formation of the troostomartensite type. Quenching with a fast-moving water stream increases crack resistance Jc , of 20GL steel by a factor of ∼ 1.5. The fracture accrues gradually with the load in the normalized specimens while the initiated crack is hindered in the variable ductility layer and further arrested in the more ductile core in the quenched specimens.

  17. Grain boundary imaging, gallium diffusion and the fracture behavior of Al-Zn Alloy - An in situ study

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, W L; Chen, C H; Chang, L W; Je, J H; Lin, H M; Margaritondo, G

    2003-01-01

    Phase contrast radiology using unmonochromatic synchrotron X-ray successfully imaged the grain boundaries of Al and AlZn alloy without contrast agent. Combining the high penetration of X-ray and the possibility of 3D reconstruction by tomorgraphy or stereography method, this approach can be very used for nondestructive characterization of polycrystalline materials. By examine the images with 3D perspective, we were able locate the observed void-like defects which lies exclusively on the grain boundary and identify their origin from last stage of the rolling process. We studied the Ga Liquid metal diffusion in the AlZn alloy, under different temperature and stress conditions. High resolution images, approx 2 mu m, of Ga liquid metal diffusion in AlZn were obtained in real time and diffusion paths alone grain boundaries and surfaces were clearly identified. Embrittled AlZn responses to the tensile stress and fractures in a drastic different manner than the pure AlZn. These results, although very much expected f...

  18. Nose fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It most ... occurs with other fractures of the face. Nose injuries and neck ...

  19. In-situ SEM observation on fracture behavior of austempered silicon alloyed steel

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiang; Vuorinen, Esa; Grahn, Johnny

    2009-01-01

    Crack initiation, propagation and microfracture processes of austempered high silicon cast steel have been investigated by using an in-situ tensile stage installed inside a scanning electron microscope chamber. It is revealed that micro cracks always nucleate at the yielding near imperfections and the boundary of matrix-inclusions due to the stress concentration. There are four types of crack propagations in the matrix: crack propagates along the boundary of two clusters of bainitic ferrite; ...

  20. Elastic-plastic fracture toughness and rising JR-curve behavior of cortical bone is partially protected from irradiation-sterilization-induced degradation by ribose protectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodside, Mitchell; Willett, Thomas L

    2016-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that pre-treating cortical bone with ribose would protect the rising fracture resistance curve behavior and crack initiation fracture toughness of both bovine and human cortical bone from the degrading effects of γ-irradiation sterilization. A ribose pre-treatment (1.8 M for bovine, and 1.2 M for human, in PBS at 60 °C for 24 h) was applied to single-edge notched bending fracture specimens prior to sterilization with a 33 kGy dose of γ-irradiation. Fracture resistance curves were generated with a single specimen method using an optical crack length measurement technique. The effect of the treatment on overall fracture resistance behavior, crack initiation fracture toughness, and tearing modulus was compared with non-irradiated and conventionally irradiation sterilized controls. Hydrothermal isometric tension testing was used to examine collagen network connectivity and thermal stability to explore relationships between collagen network quality and fracture resistance. The ribose pre-treatment successfully protected the crack growth initiation fracture toughness of bovine and human bone by 32% and 63%, respectively. The rising JR-curve behavior was also partially protected. Furthermore, collagen connectivity and thermal stability followed similar patterns to those displayed by fracture toughness. This paper demonstrates that the fracture toughness of irradiation-sterilized bone tissue can be partially protected with a ribose pre-treatment. This new approach shows potential for the production and clinical application of sterilized allografts with improved mechanical performance and durability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chain structure, aggregation state structure, and tensile behavior of segmented ethylene-propylene copolymers produced by an oscillating unbridged metallocene catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zai-Zai; Huang, Yao; Xu, Jun-Ting; Fu, Zhi-Sheng; Fan, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-05-14

    Segmented ethylene-propylene copolymers (SEPs) with different propylene contents were prepared by an unbridged metallocene bis(2,4,6-trimethylindenyl)zirconium dichloride [(2,4,6-Me3Ind)2ZrCl2] catalyst. Due to oscillation of the unbridged ligands in the catalyst, the SEPs are composed of segments with low propylene contents, alternated by the segments with high propylene contents. Such a chain structure was verified by (13)C NMR and successive self-nucleation and annealing (SSA). As the propylene/ethylene feed ratio during copolymerization increases, the comonomer contents in both segments are increased, leading to noncrystallizability of the high propylene segments and smaller crystallinity of the low propylene segments. Consequently, SEPs may be used as thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs). The aggregation state structures at nano- and micro-scales were characterized with small angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy and polarized optical microscopy, and compared with those of ethylene-octene multiblocky copolymers (OBCs) with similar crystallinity. It is found that SEPs form thinner lamellar crystals with a lower melting temperature due to shorter length and higher comonomer content of the low propylene segments. Moreover, the short length of the high propylene segments in SEPs results in an evidently thinner amorphous layer among the lamellar crystals, thus lots of amorphous phases are excluded out of the interlamellae. Accordingly, ill-developed spherulites or even bundle crystals are formed in SEPs, as compared with the well-developed spherulites in OBCs. SEPs exhibit the tensile property of typical TPEs with diffused yielding and large strain at break.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Sears, John S.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-10-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion, usually of equal atomic percent, they have high configurational entropy, and thus, they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and alloy stability. The present study investigates the mechanical behavior, fracture characteristics, and microstructure of two single-phase FCC HEAs CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn with some detailed attention given to melting, homogenization, and thermo-mechanical processing. Ingots approaching 8 kg in mass were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent to small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was given to both alloys in order to eliminate any solidification segregation. The alloys were then fabricated in the usual way (forging, followed by hot rolling) with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters employed. Transmission electron microscopy was subsequently used to assess the single-phase nature of the alloys prior to mechanical testing. Tensile specimens (ASTM E8) were prepared with tensile mechanical properties obtained from room temperature through 800 °C. Material from the gage section of selected tensile specimens was extracted to document room and elevated temperature deformation within the HEAs. Fracture surfaces were also examined to note fracture failure modes. The tensile behavior and selected tensile properties were compared with results in the literature for similar alloys.

  3. Statistical analysis of the behavior of fracture toughness of compound bioceramic artificial bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shilian; Xu, Renping; Li, Ruoqi

    2011-12-01

    We show the manufacturing procedure of the test specimen of the compound bioceramic artificial bone, conduct experiments to measure its fracture toughness, and conclude that the experiment data conform to the two-parameter Weibull distribution with scale parameter β = 0.527369 and form parameter α = 5.24317. Furthermore, compound bioceramic artificial bone is of a high level of crack sensitivity and its data for the fracture toughness is has a high dispersion. We also analyze the evolution of the confidence level of the reliability of its fracture toughness. With the increase of the confidence level γ, the crack sensitivity increases, but the median, the discreteness, and the confidence intervals decrease. The size of the test specimen influences the experiment for the fracture toughness, the measured values and their dispersion, and there exists the conversion between size of the test specimen and that of the real device. We extend the results to introduce the statistic model of the size effect of the fracture toughness. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dynamic tensile stress–strain characteristics of carbon/epoxy laminated composites in through-thickness direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakai Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of strain rate up to approximately ε̇ = 102/s on the tensile stress–strain properties of unidirectional and cross-ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites in the through-thickness direction is investigated. Waisted cylindrical specimens machined out of the laminated composites in the through-thickness direction are used in both static and dynamic tests. The dynamic tensile stress–strain curves up to fracture are determined using the split Hopkinson bar (SHB. The low and intermediate strain-rate tensile stress–strain relations up to fracture are measured on an Instron 5500R testing machine. It is demonstrated that the ultimate tensile strength and absorbed energy up to fracture increase significantly, while the fracture strain decreases slightly with increasing strain rate. Macro- and micro-scopic examinations reveal a marked difference in the fracture surfaces between the static and dynamic tension specimens.

  5. Pore-level influence of micro-fracture parameters on visco-capillary behavior of two-phase displacements in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhforouz, M. R.; Akhlaghi Amiri, H. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, coupled Cahn-Hilliard phase field and Navier-Stokes equations were solved using finite element method to address the effects of micro-fracture and its characterizations on water-oil displacements in a heterogeneous porous medium. Sensitivity studies at a wide range of viscosity ratios (M) and capillary numbers (Ca), and the resultant log Ca-log M stability phase diagram, revealed that in both media, with/without fracture, the three regimes of viscous fingering, capillary fingering and stable displacement similarly occur. However, presence of the fracture caused water channeling phenomenon which resulted in reduction of the number of active fingers and hence the final oil recovery factor. At high Ca (especially in the stable regime, with log Ca ≥ -2.5 and log M ≥ 0), recovery factor for the fractured medium was relatively identical with the non-fractured one. At log M ≥ 0, the fracture was fully swept, but flow instabilities were observed inside the fracture at lower M values, especially for log Ca > -4.6. In the case of the fractured medium at log Ca = -4.6 and log M = 0 (capillary dominant flow), it is observed that the primary breakthrough took place by a finger progressed through the matrix, not those channeled through the fracture. Geometrical properties of the fracture, including length, aperture and orientation, highly affected both displacement profile and efficiency. The fracture length inversely influenced the oil recovery factor. It was observed that there is a critical fracture width (almost half of the medium average pore diameter) at which the recovery factor of the medium during displacement is minimum, compared to the media having thinner and thicker fractures. Minor channeling effect in the media with thinner fracture and larger fracture swept volume as well as high fracture/matrix cross flow in the media with thicker fracture were detected as the main cause of this non-monotonic behavior. In the models with thick fractures (with

  6. Investigation of meso-failure behaviors of Jinping marble using SEM with bending loading system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Zuo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the meso-failure mechanism and fracture surface of Jinping marble were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM with bending loading system and laser-scanner equipment. The Yantang and Baishan marbles specimens from Jinping II hydropower station were used. Test results show that the fracture toughness and mechanical behaviors of Yantang marble were basically higher than those of Baishan marble. This is mainly due to the fact that Baishan marble contains a large percentage of dolomite and minor mica. Crack propagation path and fracture morphology indicated that the direction of tensile stress has a significant effect on the mechanical behaviors and fracture toughness of Baishan marble. For Yantang and Baishan marbles, a large number of microcracks around the main crack tip were observed when the direction of tensile stress was parallel to the bedding plane. Conversely, few microcracks occurred when the direction of tensile stress was perpendicular to the bedding plane. The presence of a large number of microcracks at the main crack tip decreased the global fracture toughness of marble. The results of three-point bending tests showed that the average bearing capacity of intact marble is 3.4 times the notched marble, but the ductility property of the defective marble after peak load is better than that of the intact marble. Hence, large deformation may be generated before failure of intact marbles at Jinping II hydropower station. The fractal dimension of fracture surface was also calculated by the cube covering method. Observational result showed that the largest fractal dimension of Yantang marble is captured when the direction of tensile stress is parallel to the bedding plane. However, the fractal dimension of fracture surface of Yantang and Baishan marbles with tensile stress vertical to the bedding plane is relatively small. The fractal dimension can also be used to characterize the roughness of fracture

  7. Evaluation of the tensile properties of fuel cladding at high temperatures using a ring specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Bong Kook; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the ring tensile test at high temperature was suggested to evaluate the hoop tensile properties of small tube such as the cladding in the nuclear reactor. Using the Arsene's ring model, the ring tensile test was performed and the test data were calibrated. From the result of the ring test with strain gauge and the numerical analysis with 1/8 model, LCRR(Load-displacement Conversion Relationship of Ring specimen) was determined. We could obtain the hoop tensile properties by means of applying the LCRR to the calibrated data of the ring tensile test. A few difference was observed in view of the shape of fractured surface and the fracture mechanism between at the high temperature and at the room temperature

  8. Evaluation of fracture behavior of SA-516 steel welds using acoustic emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Eui Gyun; Ono, Kanji; Lee, Dong Whan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the AE characteristics for the basemetal, PWHT (Post-Weld Heat Treatment) and weldment specimens of SA-516 steel during fracture testing. Four-point bending and AE tests were conducted simultaneously. AE signals were emitted in the process of plastic deformation. AE signal strength and amplitude of the weldment was the strongest, followed by PWHT specimen and basemetal. More AE signals were emitted from the weldment samples because of the oxides, and discontinuous mechanical properties. AE signal strength and amplitude for the basemetal or PWHT specimen decreased remarkably compared to the weldment because of lower strength. Pre-cracked specimens emitted even lower event counts than the corresponding blunt notched specimens. Dimple fracture from void coalescence mechanism is associated with low-level AE signal strength for the basemetal or PWHT. Tearing mode and dimple formation were shown on the fracture surfaces of the weldment, but only a small fraction produced detectable AE

  9. The Bearing Strength and Fracture Behavior of Bolted Connections in Two Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinl, N.; Menzemer, C. C.; Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the bearing capacity, taken as a combination of strength, elongation, and failure by fracture characteristics of bolt holes in two aluminum alloys, 5052-H32 and 6061-T6, that were deformed in uniaxial tension is presented and discussed. The specific role played by bolt hole confinement on the bearing capacity of each aluminum alloy is highlighted. An increase in the bearing ratio caused plastic deformation around the holes to gradually increase. For both the chosen aluminum alloys the average bearing ratio at the time of failure of the test sample was found to vary with end distance. The experimentally determined strength was observably larger than the calculated bearing strength obtained using guaranteed minimum mechanical properties and recommended mathematical relationships. The nature of final fracture of each aluminum alloy is carefully examined and the intrinsic features present on the fracture surface are rationalized in concurrence with macroscopic mechanical response.

  10. Fracture behavior of single-structure fiber-reinforced composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kohji; Garoushi, Sufyan K; Vallittu, Pekka K; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2016-12-01

    Objective: The applications of single-structure fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) in restorative dentistry have not been well reported. This study aimed to clarify the static mechanical properties of anterior crown restorations prepared using two types of single-structure FRC. Materials and methods : An experimental crown restoration was designed for an upper anterior incisor. The restorations were made from IPS Empress CAD for CEREC (Emp), IPS e.max ® CAD (eMx), experimental single-structure all-FRC (a-FRC), Filtek™ Supreme XTE (XTE), and commercially available single-structure short-FRC (everX Posterior™) ( n = 8 for each material) (s-FRC). The a-FRC restorations were prepared from an experimental FRC blank using a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. A fracture test was performed to assess the fracture load, toughness, and failure mode. The fracture loads were vertically applied on the restorations. The surface micromorphology of the FRC restorations was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The data were analyzed by analysis of variance ( p = .05) followed by Tukey's test. Results : s-FRC showed the highest mean fracture load (1145.0 ± 89.6 N) and toughness (26.2 ± 5.8 Ncm) among all the groups tested. With regard to the micromorphology of the prosthetic surface, local crushing of the fiberglass was observed in s-FRC, whereas chopped fiberglass was observed in a-FRC. Conclusions : The restorations made of short-FRC showed a higher load-bearing capacity than those made of the experimental all-FRC blanks for CAD/CAM. The brittle-like fractures were exhibited in the recent dental esthetic materials, while local crushing fractures were shown for single-structure FRC restorations.

  11. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. Part 2: Delamination behavior and fracture mechanics parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    Based on theories of laminate anisotropic elasticity and interlaminar fracture, the complete solution structure associated with a composite delamination is determined. Fracture mechanics parameters characterizing the interlaminar crack behavior are defined from asymptotic stress solutions for delaminations with different crack-tip deformation configurations. A numerical method employing singular finite elements is developed to study delaminations in fiber composites with any arbitrary combinations of lamination, material, geometric, and crack variables. The special finite elements include the exact delamination stress singularity in its formulation. The method is shown to be computationally accurate and efficient, and operationally simple. To illustrate the basic nature of composite delamination, solutions are shown for edge-delaminated (0/-0/-0/0) and (+ or - 0/+ or - 0/90/90 deg) graphite-epoxy systems under uniform axial extenstion. Three-dimensional crack-tip stress intensity factors, associated energy release rates, and delamination crack-closure are determined for each individual case. The basic mechanics and mechanisms of composite delamination are studied, and fundamental characteristics unique to recently proposed tests for interlaminar fracture toughness of fiber composite laminates are examined.

  12. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. II - The delamination behavior and fracture mechanics parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    Based on theories of laminate anisotropic elasticity and interlaminar fracture, the complete solution structure associated with a composite delamination is determined. Fracture mechanics parameters characterizing the interlaminar crack behavior are defined from asymptotic stress solutions for delaminations with different crack-tip deformation configurations. A numerical method employing singular finite elements is developed to study delaminations in fiber composites with any arbitrary combinations of lamination, material, geometric, and crack variables. The special finite elements include the exact delamination stress singularity in its formulation. The method is shown to be computationally accurate and efficient, and operationally simple. To illustrate the basic nature of composite delamination, solutions are shown for edge-delaminated (0/-0/-0/0) and (+ or - 0/+ or - 0/90/90 deg) graphite-epoxy systems under uniform axial extension. Three-dimensional crack-tip stress intensity factors, associated energy release rates, and delamination crack-closure are determined for each individual case. The basic mechanics and mechanisms of composite delamination are studied, and fundamental characteristics unique to recently proposed tests for interlaminar fracture toughness of fiber composite laminates are examined. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13222

  13. Deposition behavior of polystyrene latex particles on solid surfaces during migration through an artificial fracture in a granite rock sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinju, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Satoru; Kuno, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    The deposition behavior of colloids during transport through heterogeneous media was observed by conducting column experiments to study migration of polystyrene latex particles (diameter=309 nm) through columns packed with artificially fractured granite rock (length=300 and 150 mm). The experiments were conducted under conditions of different ionic strengths and flow rates. The results were similar to those for colloid deposition in columns packed with glass beads reported previously; the colloid breakthrough curves showed three stages, characterized by different rates of change in the concentration of effluent. Colloid deposition on the fracture surfaces was described by considering strong and weak deposition sites. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations indicated the existence of strong and weak sites on the fracture surfaces regardless of mineral composition. The observations also showed that the strong deposition sites tended to exist on surface irregularities such as cracks or protrusions. The degree of colloid deposition increased with increasing ionic strength and decreasing flow rate. The dependencies on ionic strength and flow rate agreed qualitatively with the DLVO theory and the previous experimental results, respectively. (author)

  14. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  15. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  16. A study of hydrogen effects on fracture behavior of radioactive waste storage tanks. Final report, October 1992-September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, K.L.; Elleman, T.S.

    1994-01-01

    The processing of high-level radioactive wastes now stored at Hanford and Savannah River Laboratories will continue over many years and it will be necessary for some of the liquids to remain in the tanks until well into the next century. Continued tank integrity is therefore an issue of prime importance and it will be necessary to understand any processes which could lead to tank failure. Hydrogen embrittlement resulting from absorption of radiolytic hydrogen could alter tank fracture behavior and be an issue in evaluating the effect of stresses on the tanks from rapid chemical oxidation-reduction reactions. The intense radiation fields in some of the tanks could be a factor in increasing the hydrogen permeation rates through protective oxide films on the alloy surface and be an additional factor in contributing to embrittlement. The project was initiated in October 1992 for a two year period to evaluate hydrogen uptake in low carbon steels that are representative of storage tanks. Steel specimens were exposed to high gamma radiation fields to generate radiolytic hydrogen and to potentially alter the protective surface films to increase hydrogen uptake. Direct measurements of hydrogen uptake were made using tritium as a tracer and fracture studies were undertaken to determine any alloy embrittlement. The rates of hydrogen uptake were noted to be extremely low in the experimental steels. Gamma radiation did not reveal any significant changes in the mechanical and fracture characteristics following exposures as long as a month. It is highly desirable to investigate further the tritium diffusion under stress in a cracked body where stress-assisted diffusion is expected to enhance these rates. More importantly, since welds are the weakest locations in the steel structures, the mechanical and fracture tests should be performed on welds exposed to tritium with and without stressed crack-fronts

  17. Permanent effect of a cryogenic spill on fracture properties of structural steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keseler, H.; Westermann, I.; Kandukuri, S. Y.; Nøkleby, J. O.; Holmedal, B.

    2015-12-01

    Fracture analysis of a standard construction steel platform deck, which had been exposed to a liquid nitrogen spill, showed that the brittle fracture started at a flaw in the weld as a consequence of low-temperature embrittlement and thermal stresses experienced by the material. In the present study, the permanent effect of a cryogenic spill on the fracture properties of carbon steels has been investigated. Charpy V-notch impact testing was carried out at 0 °C using specimens, from the platform deck material. The average impact energy appeared to be below requirements only for transverse specimens. No pre-existing damage was found when examining the fracture surfaces and cross sections in the scanning electron microscope. Specimens of the platform deck material and a DOMEX S355 MCD carbon steel were tensile tested immersed in liquid nitrogen. Both steels showed a considerable increase in yield- and fracture strength and a large increase in the Lüders strain compared to the room temperature behavior. A cryogenic spill was simulated by applying a constant tensile force to the specimens for 10 min, at -196 C. Subsequent tensile tests at room temperature showed no significant influence on the stress-strain curve of the specimens. A small amount of microcracks were found after holding a DOMEX S355 MCD specimen at a constant force below the yield point. In a platform deck material tensile tested to fracture in liquid nitrogen, cracks associated with elongated MnS inclusions were found through the whole test region. These cracks probably formed as a result of the inclusions having a higher thermal contraction rate than the steel, causing decohesion at the inclusion-matrix interface on cooling. Simultaneous deformation may have caused formation of cracks. Both the microcracks and sulphide related damage may give permanently reduced impact energy after a cryogenic exposure.

  18. Fracture prediction in hydraulic bulging of AISI 304 austenitic steel sheets based on a modified ductile fracture criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Song, H. W.; Zhang, S. H.; Cheng, M.

    2011-08-01

    The demand for weight reduction in modern vehicle construction has resulted in an increase in the application of hydroforming processes for the manufacture of automotive lightweight components. This trend led to the research of evaluation on formability of the sheet or tube hydroforming to be noted, particularly the prediction of fracture. In this study, a new proposed approach based on damage theory for fracture prediction considering the deformation history was introduced. And the modified ductile fracture criterion was applied to predict the failure for hydraulic bulging of AISI 304 austenitic steel sheets. The material parameters in terms of the function of strain rate in the failure criterion were determined from the equivalent fracture strains corresponding tensile tests under different stress conditions. Then, in the finite element simulation the effect of strain rates and their distribution as well during practical sheet metal forming process was considered. The hydraulic bulging tests were carried out to identify the fracture behavior predicted from FE analysis. A comparison between the prediction and experimental results showed that the proposed approach with a modified ductile fracture criteria can give better fracture predictions than traditional ways.

  19. Acoustic emission, fracture behavior and morphology of dry crispy foods : a discussion article

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luyten, J.M.J.G.; Vliet, van T.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes sound properties that are special for crispy foods and relates them to general knowledge on the acoustic emission and mechanical properties of fracturing materials. From properties like the occurrence of sound, the sound energy, the duration of single sound waves, the time

  20. A simple fracture energy prediction method for fiber network based on its morphological features extracted by X-ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiang; Wang, Qinghui; Zhou, Wei; Li, Jingrong

    2013-01-01

    The fracture behavior of a novel porous metal fiber sintered sheet (PMFSS) was predicted using a semi-empirical method combining the knowledge of its morphological characteristics and micro-mechanical responses. The morphological characteristics were systematically summarized based on the analysis of the topologically identical skeleton representation extracted from the X-ray tomography images. The analytical model firstly proposed by Tan et al. [1] was further modified according to the experimental observations from both tensile tests of single fibers and sintered fiber sheets, which built the coupling of single fiber segment and fiber network in terms of fracture energy using a simple prediction method. The efficacy of the prediction model was verified by comparing the predicted results to the experimental measurements. The prediction error that arose at high porosity was analyzed through fiber orientation distribution. Moreover, the tensile fracture process evolving from single fiber segments at micro-scale to the global mechanical performance was investigated

  1. A simple fracture energy prediction method for fiber network based on its morphological features extracted by X-ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiang, E-mail: 522250912@qq.com [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Qinghui [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhou, Wei [Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Li, Jingrong, E-mail: Catherine.JRLi@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2013-11-15

    The fracture behavior of a novel porous metal fiber sintered sheet (PMFSS) was predicted using a semi-empirical method combining the knowledge of its morphological characteristics and micro-mechanical responses. The morphological characteristics were systematically summarized based on the analysis of the topologically identical skeleton representation extracted from the X-ray tomography images. The analytical model firstly proposed by Tan et al. [1] was further modified according to the experimental observations from both tensile tests of single fibers and sintered fiber sheets, which built the coupling of single fiber segment and fiber network in terms of fracture energy using a simple prediction method. The efficacy of the prediction model was verified by comparing the predicted results to the experimental measurements. The prediction error that arose at high porosity was analyzed through fiber orientation distribution. Moreover, the tensile fracture process evolving from single fiber segments at micro-scale to the global mechanical performance was investigated.

  2. Quantitative analysis of tensile deformation behavior by in-situ neutron diffraction for ferrite-martensite type dual-phase steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Satoshi; Umezawa, Osamu; Harjo, Stefanus; Hasegawa, Kohei; Toji, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    The yielding and work-hardening behavior of ferrite-martensite type dual-phase (DP) alloys were clearly analyzed using the in-situ neutron diffraction technique. We successfully established a new method to estimate the stress and strain partitioning between ferrite and martensite phase during loading. Although these phases exhibit the same lattice structure with similar lattice parameters, their lattice strains on (110), (200) and (211) are obviously different from each other under an applied stress. The misfit strains between those phases were clearly accompanied with the phase-scaled internal stream (phase stress). Thus, the martensite phase yielded by higher applied stress than macro-yield stress, which resulted in high work-hardening rate of the DP steel. We also demonstrated that ferrite phase fraction influenced work-hardening behavior. (author)

  3. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  4. Enhanced tensile properties of magnesium composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashad, Muhammad, E-mail: rashadphy87@gmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Pan, Fusheng, E-mail: fspan@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chongqing Academy of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401123 (China); Hu, Huanhuan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Asif, Muhammad [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Hussain, Shahid [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); She, Jia [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-04-10

    The aim of this study is to fabricate magnesium reinforced metal matrix composites using graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) via powder metallurgy processing in order to enhance room temperature mechanical properties. The microstructural evaluation and mechanical behaviors of composite powders and extruded bulk materials were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive spectrometer and mechanical tests. The uniform dispersion and large specific surface area per volume of GNPs embedded in magnesium matrix led to increament in microhardness, tensile strength and fracture strains of the composites. For example, when employing the pure magnesium reinforced with 0.30 wt% GNPs, the increase of Young's modulus, yield strength, and failure strain of extruded nanocomposite was +131%, +49.5% and +74.2% respectively, compared to those of extruded materials with no GNPs additive. Additionally, mechanical properties of synthesized composites were compared with previously reported Mg–CNTs composites. It was found that GNPs outperform CNTs due their high specific surface area.

  5. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  6. Covalent Crosslinking of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Improved Tensile Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted much interest in recent years due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Currently, the tensile properties of bulk carbon nanotube-based materials (yarns, sheets, etc.) fall far short of those of the individual nanotube elements. The premature failure in these materials under tensile load has been attributed to inter-tube sliding, which requires far less force than that needed to fracture individual nanotubes.1,2 In order for nanotube materials to achieve their full potential, methods are needed to restrict this tube-tube shear and increase inter-tube forces.Our group is examining covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes as a means to increase the tensile properties of carbon nanotube materials. We are working with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet and yarn materials obtained from commercial sources. Several routes to functionalize the nanotubes have been examined including nitrene, aryl diazonium, and epoxide chemistries. The functional nanotubes were crosslinked through small molecule or polymeric bridges. Additionally, electron beam irradiation induced crosslinking of the non-functional and functional nanotube materials was conducted. For example, a nanotube sheet material containing approximately 3.5 mol amine functional groups exhibited a tensile strength of 75 MPa and a tensile modulus of 1.16 GPa, compared to 49 MPa and 0.57 GPa, respectively, for the as-received material. Electron beam irradiation (2.2x 1017 ecm2) of the same amine-functional sheet material further increased the tensile strength to 120 MPa and the modulus to 2.61 GPa. This represents approximately a 150 increase in tensile strength and a 360 increase in tensile modulus over the as-received material with only a 25 increase in material mass. Once we have optimized the nanotube crosslinking methods, the performance of these materials in polymer matrix composites will be evaluated.

  7. Advanced High Tensile Strength Steel of 100 kgf/mm^2 Grade for Penstock Use

    OpenAIRE

    Ryuji, SHIMODA; Toshihiko, MATSUURA; Yoshihiro, KURE; Itaru, WATANABE; Motoaki, SUZUKI; Shin, SAKUI; Sakai Iron Works Co., Ltd.; Sakai Iron Works Co., Ltd.; Sakai Iron Works Co., Ltd.; Nippon Kokan K.K.; Nippon Kokan K.K.; Nippon Kokan K.K.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of a 100 kgf/mm^2 grade high tensile strength steel developed for penstock was evaluated in this paper. Firstly, Jive kinds of weld cracking tests were performed and it was demonstrated that the 100 kgf/mm^2 grade steel, including its weld metal, has a good resistance to cold cracking. Secondly, its mechanical properties and fracture toughness were investigated and evaluated the safety of its weldment against brittle fracture. Finally, the correlation between its fracture to...

  8. Orientation-dependent tensile deformation and damage of a T700 carbon fiber/epoxy composite: A synchrotron-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bie, B. X.; Huang, J. Y.; Fan, D.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Xiao, X. H.; Qi, M. L.; Luo, S. N.

    2017-09-01

    Uniaxial tensile experiments are conducted on a T700 carbon fiber/epoxy composite along various offaxis angles. Stressestrain curves are measured along with strain fields mapped via synchrotron x-ray digital image correlation, as well as computerized tomography. Elastic modulus and tensile strength decrease with increasing off-axis angles, while fracture strain exhibits a nonmonotonic trend as a combined result of tensile strength decrease and fracture mode transition. At high off-axis angles, strain field mapping demonstrates distinct tensile and shear strain localizations and deformation bands approximately along the fiber directions, while deformation is mainly achieved via continuous growth of tensile strain at low off-axis angles. Roughness of fracture planes decreases exponentially as the off-axis angle increases. The stressestrain curves, strain fields, tomography and fractographs show consistent features, and reveal a fracture mode transition from mainly tension (fiber fracture) to in-plane shear (interface debonding).

  9. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  10. Specimen size effects on the tensile strength and fracture toughness; Efecto del tamano de probeta y orientacion en la resistencia a la traccion y a la tenacidad a la fractura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teran, J.; Gonzalez, J. L.; Hallen, J. M.; Martinez, M.

    2007-07-01

    In this work, an experimental research was conducted to determine size and orientation effects on tension and toughness properties through CTOD-R curves, using standard and miniature specimens taken from a structural steel plate.Compliance function estimation for the miniature size sample through load-displacement curves was considered. Experimental and statistical results showed that size and orientation affect tensioned toughness properties. The miniature tension test specimens showed strength values slightly greater than the standard ones but with less ductility. Miniature specimen CTOD-R curves showed sensibility to load changes and measurement method of crack aperture and crack length. Inconsistency in fracture toughness for specimen orientation longitudinal circumferential (LC) regarding size effect was also observed. Short orientations showed less strength and toughness than the other directions. (Author) 27 refs.

  11. Fracture simulation of structural steel at elevated temperature using XFEM technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenyu

    2017-11-01

    Modeling fracture is important for predicting the actual behavior of structural steel in fire, where fracture of steel members is often the failure mode that affects the overall strength and deformation capacity of steel members. Therefore, in this paper, recent research on modeling steel fracture at elevated temperature is presented. Extended Finite Element (XFEM) together with fracture criterion of principle logarithmic strain is used to simulate the fracture behavior of three different types of tensile test specimens named MA, MB and MC made from American structural steel ASTM A992 at elevated temperature up to 1000°C. The simulation results are then compared with test results to validate the accuracy of simulations. In addition, study is conducted to evaluate how sensitive the predicted engineering stress-strain curves and fracture initiation point on the curves to the selected value of principle logarithmic strain at fracture. Finally, the generalized principle logarithmic strains at each temperature case are proposed for fracture simulation of ASTM A992 steel specimens.

  12. Observation of fracture behavior of 3-D printed specimens under rolling contact fatigue in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizobe Koshiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer bearing was widely used in the corrosive conditions because of its high corrosion durability. The polymer bearing had been formed using molding and machining until the new 3-D printing method was developed. In this study, we performed the rolling contact fatigue tests of the 3-D printed specimens in water and observed the fracture behaviour of the specimens. We found that the surface cracks are related to both the rolling direction and the lamination directions.

  13. Status of automated tensile machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satou, M.; Hamilton, M.L.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop the Monbusho Automated Tensile machine (MATRON) and install and operate it at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The machine is designed to provide rapid, automated testing of irradiated miniature tensile specimen in a vacuum at elevated temperatures. The MATRON was successfully developed and shipped to PNL for installation in a hot facility. The original installation plan was modified to simplify the current and subsequent installations, and the installation was completed. Detailed procedures governing the operation of the system were written. Testing on irradiated miniature tensile specimen should begin in the near future

  14. Research on Design and Simulation of Biaxial Tensile-Bending Complex Mechanical Performance Test Apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailian Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize a micro-mechanic performance test of biaxial tensile-bending-combined loading and solve the problem of incompatibility of test apparatus and observation apparatus, novel biaxial-combined tensile-bending micro-mechanical performance test apparatus was designed. The working principle and major functions of key constituent parts of test apparatus, including the servo drive unit, clamping unit and test system, were introduced. Based on the finite element method, biaxial tensile and tension-bending-combined mechanical performances of the test-piece were studied as guidance to learn the distribution of elastic deformation and plastic deformation of all sites of the test-piece and to better plan test regions. Finally, this test apparatus was used to conduct a biaxial tensile test under different pre-bending loading and a tensile test at different rates; the image of the fracture of the test-piece was acquired by a scanning electron microscope and analyzed. It was indicated that as the pre-bending force rises, the elastic deformation phase would gradually shorten and the slope of the elastic deformation phase curve would slightly rise so that a yield limit would appear ahead of time. Bending speed could exert a positive and beneficial influence on tensile strength but weaken fracture elongation. If bending speed is appropriately raised, more ideal anti-tensile strength could be obtained, but fracture elongation would decline.

  15. In-situ SEM observation on fracture behavior of austempered silicon alloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Crack initiation, propagation and microfracture processes of austempered high silicon cast steel have been investigated by using an in-situ tensile stage installed inside a scanning electron microscope chamber. It is revealed that micro cracks always nucleate at the yielding near imperfections and the boundary of matrix-inclusions due to the stress concentration. There are four types of crack propagations in the matrix: crack propagates along the boundary of two clusters of bainitic ferrite; crack propagates along the boundary of ferrite朼ustenite in bainitic ferrite laths; crack propagates into bainitic ferrite laths; crack nucleates and propagates in the high carbon brittle plate shape martensite which is transformed from some blocky retained austenite due to plastic deformation. Based on the observation and analysis of microfracture processes, a schematic diagram of the crack nucleation and propagation process of high silicon cast steel is proposed

  16. High temperature tensile properties and deep drawing of fully green composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research and development of materials using biomass sources are much expected to construct a sustainable society. The so-called green composite consisting of natural fibers and biodegradable resin, is one of the most promising materials in developing biomass products. In this study, especially, we focus on the tensile deformation behavior of the green composites reinforced with ramie woven fabrics at high temperature. The results show that the fracture strain at high temperatures increases larger than that of room temperature, and initial deformation resistance of the composites seen at room temperature does not appear at high temperatures. Thus, several conditions to cause more deformability of the green composites were found. Finally, in order to utilize such deformability, Lankford-values of the green composites were clarified, and deep drawing was carried out for sheet materials made of the green composites.

  17. Effects of thermal - mechanical treatment in the creep - and tensile properties of niobium at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botta Filho, W.J.; Pinatti, Dyonisio G.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical behavior of Nb at high temperature was studied based upon the samples morfology. The samples were obtainned after thermal mechanical treatment of 50mm diameter and 250mm length ingot produced by electron beam vacuum. A lot of the samples was tensile tested as a function of temperature showing small interstitials solute effect and a matrix hardened probably by substitutionals. Other lot was creep tested at homologous temperature of 0,34 and stress between 80 and 120 MPa. The results of these tests were analysed as a function of the sample morfology and showed a dependence of the percentage of recrystalization and of the grain size on the minimum creep rate. The fracture analysis showed significant effect of the oxygen content although it didn't contribute to the creep results. (Author) [pt

  18. Characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of fresh and dry forewings of beetles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuo, Wanyong [School of Civil Engineering & International Institute for Urban Systems Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); School of Civil & Architectural Engineering, Anyang Institute of Technology, Anyang 455000 (China); Chen, Jinxiang, E-mail: chenjpaper@yahoo.co.jp [School of Civil Engineering & International Institute for Urban Systems Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan [School of Civil Engineering & International Institute for Urban Systems Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Wang, Yong [Nantong Vocational University, Nantong, Jiangsu 226007 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Based on a tensile experiment and observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), this study demonstrated the characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of the fresh and dry forewings of two types of beetles. The results revealed obvious differences in the tensile fracture morphologies and characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of fresh and dry forewings of Cybister tripunctatus Olivier and Allomyrina dichotoma. For fresh forewings of these two types of beetles, a viscous, flow-like, polymer matrix plastic deformation was observed on the fracture surfaces, with soft morphologies and many fibers being pulled out, whereas on the dry forewings, the tensile fracture surfaces were straightforward, and there were no features resembling those found on the fresh forewings. The fresh forewings exhibited a greater fracture strain than the dry forewings, which was caused by the relative slippage of hydroxyl inter-chain bonds due to the presence of water in the fibers and proteins in the fresh forewings. Our study is the first to demonstrate the phenomenon of sudden stress drops caused by the fracturing of the lower skin because the lower skin fractured before the forewings of A. dichotoma reached their ultimate tensile strength. We also investigated the reasons underlying this phenomenon. This research provides a much better understanding of the mechanical properties of beetle forewings and facilitates the correct selection of study objects for biomimetic materials and development of the corresponding applications. - Highlights: • There is a phenomenon of sudden stress drop on the tensile stress-train curve of forewing. • The causes of the differences of mechanical properties of fresh and dry forewings are explained. • The hypothesis raised in a previous review paper is verified. • This study brings better ideas into correct understanding of the mechanical properties that the biomimetic object exhibits.

  19. Ratio between mature and immature enzymatic cross-links correlates with post-yield cortical bone behavior: An insight into greenstick fractures of the child fibula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Gineyts, Evelyne; Pithioux, Martine; Baron, Cécile; Boivin, Georges; Lasaygues, Philippe; Chabrand, Patrick; Follet, Hélène

    2015-10-01

    As a determinant of skeletal fragility, the organic matrix is responsible for the post-yield and creep behavior of bone and for its toughness, while the mineral apatite acts on stiffness. Specific to the fibula and ulna in children, greenstick fractures show a plastic in vivo mechanical behavior before bone fracture. During growth, the immature form of collagen enzymatic cross-links gradually decreases, to be replaced by the mature form until adolescence, subsequently remaining constant throughout adult life. However, the link between the cortical bone organic matrix and greenstick fractures in children remains to be explored. Here, we sought to determine: 1) whether plastic bending fractures can occur in vitro, by testing cortical bone samples from children's fibula and 2) whether the post-yield behavior (ωp plastic energy) of cortical bone before fracture is related to total quantity of the collagen matrix, or to the quantity of mature and immature enzymatic cross-links and the quantity of non-enzymatic cross-links. We used a two-step approach; first, a 3-point microbending device tested 22 fibula machined bone samples from 7 children and 3 elderly adults until fracture. Second, biochemical analysis by HPLC was performed on the sample fragments. When pooling two groups of donors, children and elderly adults, results show a rank correlation between total energy dissipated before fracture and age and a linear correlation between plastic energy dissipated before fracture and ratio of immature/mature cross-links. A collagen matrix with more immature cross-links (i.e. a higher immature/mature cross-link ratio) is more likely to plastically deform before fracture. We conclude that this ratio in the sub-nanostructure of the organic matrix in cortical bone from the fibula may go some way towards explaining the variance in post-yield behavior. From a clinical point of view, therefore, our results provide a potential explanation of the presence of greenstick fractures in

  20. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Cameron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  1. Fall and Fracture Risk in Nursing Home Residents With Moderate-to-Severe Behavioral Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias Initiating Antidepressants or Antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Jung; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Lucas, Judith A; Brandt, Nicole

    2017-05-01

    Both antidepressants and antipsychotics are used in older adults with behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Despite the prevalent use of these agents, little is known about their comparative risks for falls and fractures. Using 2007-2009 Medicare claims data linked to Minimum Data Set 2.0, we identified new users of antidepressants and antipsychotics among nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias who had moderate-to-severe behavioral symptoms. Separate discrete-time survival models were used to estimate risks of falls, fractures, and a composite of both among antidepressant group versus antipsychotic group. Compared to antipsychotic users, antidepressant users experienced significantly higher risk for fractures (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval = 1.10-1.66). The overall risk of falls or fractures remained significant in the antidepressant versus antipsychotic group (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.32). Antidepressants are associated with higher fall and fracture risk compared to antipsychotics in the management of older adults with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias who experience moderate-to-severe behavioral symptoms. Clinicians need to assess the ongoing risks/benefits of antidepressants for these symptoms especially in light of the increasingly prevalent use of these agents. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Spatial Distribution, Scaling and Self-similar Behavior of Fracture Arrays in the Los Planes Fault, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Samaniego, A. F.; Alaniz-Alvarez, S. A.; Tolson, G.; Oleschko, K.; Korvin, G.; Xu, S. S.; Pérez-Venzor, J. A.

    2005-05-01

    We present a case of detailed analysis of fracture arrays spanning four orders of magnitude in length; all of them measured at a single natural site by acquiring images at progressively larger scales. There is a high dispersion of cumulative-length exponents, box dimensions and fracture densities. However, the fractal analysis supports the fractal nature of fracture arrays. Our data indicate the existence of an upper limit for the density parameters, as similarly reported by other authors. We prove that box dimension is in inverse relation with fracture concentration and in direct relation with fracture density. These relations are also observed in our data and additionally there is an upper limit for the box dimensions. We interpret the dispersion in our results as more fundamental than methodological problems. It represents a truncation in the complete evolution of the fracture systems because in natural cases strain initiates overprinting of previous fracture arrays. Considering that larger fractures accommodate strain more efficiently than small fractures, the generation of small fractures is inhibited in the presence of pre-existing larger fractures. Maximum values of fracture density prevent accommodating an excess of strain in a single or restricted range of scales; we claim this condition produces migration of fracturing to larger scales originating fracture scaling.

  3. Tensile and bending fatigue of the adhesive interface to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Braem, Marc; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fatigue limits of the dentin-composite interfaces established either with an etch-and-rinse or an one-step self-etch adhesive systems under tensile and bending configurations. Flat specimens (1.2 mm×5 mm×35 mm) were prepared using a plexiglass mold where dentin sections from human third molars were bonded to a resin composite, exhibiting the interface centrally located. Syntac Classic and G-Bond were used as adhesives and applied according to the manufacturer's instructions. The fluorochrome Rhodamine B was added to the adhesives to allow for fractographic evaluation. Tensile strength was measured in an universal testing machine and the bending strength (n=15) in a Flex machine (Flex, University of Antwerp, Belgium), respectively. Tensile (TFL) and bending fatigue limits (BFL) (n=25) were determined under wet conditions for 10(4) cycles following a staircase approach. Interface morphology and fracture mechanisms were observed using light, confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using three-way ANOVA (mod LSD test, pTensile and bending characteristic strengths at 63.2% failure probability for Syntac were 23.8 MPa and 71.5 MPa, and 24.7 MPa and 72.3 MPa for G-Bond, respectively. Regarding the applied methods, no significant differences were detected between adhesives. However, fatigue limits for G-Bond (TFL=5.9 MPa; BFL=36.2 MPa) were significantly reduced when compared to Syntac (TFL=12.6 MPa; BFL=49.7 MPa). Fracture modes of Syntac were generally of adhesive nature, between the adhesive resin and dentin, while G-Bond showed fracture planes involving the adhesive-dentin interface and the adhesive resin. Cyclic loading under tensile and bending configurations led to a significant strength degradation, with a more pronounced fatigue limit decrease for G-Bond. The greater decrease in fracture strength was observed in the tensile configuration. Copyright © 2010 Academy of

  4. Requirements for investigating the temperature-dependent fracture behavior of irradiated materials by indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacksteder, Irène, E-mail: irene.sacksteder@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hostettler, Simon [Synton-MDP Inc., Nidau (Switzerland); Charbonneau, Grégoire; Albinski, Bartlomiej; Schneider, Hans-Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A custom-made indenter is designed for indentations at high temperature. • The instrumented indentation technique at high temperature will be used to investigate temperature dependent fracture mechanisms in structural materials. • A finite-element based model has been validated with a view to predict crack initiation and propagation in Eurofer97 and tungsten-like materials. -- Abstract: The instrumented indentation technique is an interesting testing tool to examine temperature-dependent fracture mechanisms. It is planned to be used to generate cracks at defined temperatures in hard and brittle metallic materials. The present study describes the properties needed for the use of a new type of indenter operating at high temperature. The indenter was designed to meet mechanical and thermal requirements and other constraints relating to the operation of functional units of the indentation instrument. Additionally, a finite element model has been built with a view to predict indentation induced cracks in Eurofer97 and tungsten. The model has been validated both with the theory of Hertz and experimentally by comparison with indentation curves.

  5. Mechanistic aspects of fracture and R-curve behavior in elk antler bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Chen, Po-Yu; McKittrick, Joanna; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-11-23

    Bone is an adaptative material that is designed for different functional requirements; indeed, bones have a variety of properties depending on their role in the body. To understand the mechanical response of bone requires the elucidation of its structure-function relationships. Here, we examine the fracture toughness of compact bone of elk antler which is an extremely fast growing primary bone designed for a totally different function than human (secondary) bone. We find that antler in the transverse (breaking) orientation is one of the toughest biological materials known. Its resistance to fracture is achieved during crack growth (extrinsically) by a combination of gross crack deflection/twisting and crack bridging via uncracked 'ligaments' in the crack wake, both mechanisms activated by microcracking primarily at lamellar boundaries. We present an assessment of the toughening mechanisms acting in antler as compared to human cortical bone, and identify an enhanced role of inelastic deformation in antler which further contributes to its (intrinsic) toughness.

  6. Dynamic Fracture Behavior of Steel Fiber Reinforced Self-Compacting Concretes (SFRSCCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarifa, Manuel; Cendón, David; Gálvez, Francisco; Alhazmi, Waleed H.

    2017-01-01

    Three-point bending tests on notched beams of three types of steel fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) have been performed by using both a servo-hydraulic machine and a drop-weight impact instrument. The lo ading rates had a range of six orders of magnitude from 2.20 × 10−3 mm/s (quasi-static) to 2.66 × 103 mm/s. These SFRSCCs had the same matrix, but various types of steel fiber (straight and hooked-end) and contents (volume ratios), 0.51%, 0.77% and 1.23%, respectively. The results demonstrate that the fracture energy and the flexural strength increase as the loading rate increases. Moreover, such tendency is relatively moderate at low rates. However, at high rates it is accentuated. For the 0.51% fiber content, the dynamic increase factors of the flexural strength and the fracture energy are approximately 6 and 3, while for the 1.23% fiber content, they are around 4 and 2, respectively. Thus, the higher the fiber content the less rate sensitivity there is. PMID:29113095

  7. Dynamic Fracture Behavior of Steel Fiber Reinforced Self-Compacting Concretes (SFRSCCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxin Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Three-point bending tests on notched beams of three types of steel fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC have been performed by using both a servo-hydraulic machine and a drop-weight impact instrument. The lo ading rates had a range of six orders of magnitude from 2.20 × 10−3 mm/s (quasi-static to 2.66 × 103 mm/s. These SFRSCCs had the same matrix, but various types of steel fiber (straight and hooked-end and contents (volume ratios, 0.51%, 0.77% and 1.23%, respectively. The results demonstrate that the fracture energy and the flexural strength increase as the loading rate increases. Moreover, such tendency is relatively moderate at low rates. However, at high rates it is accentuated. For the 0.51% fiber content, the dynamic increase factors of the flexural strength and the fracture energy are approximately 6 and 3, while for the 1.23% fiber content, they are around 4 and 2, respectively. Thus, the higher the fiber content the less rate sensitivity there is.

  8. Dynamic Fracture Behavior of Steel Fiber Reinforced Self-Compacting Concretes (SFRSCCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Ruiz, Gonzalo; Tarifa, Manuel; Cendón, David; Gálvez, Francisco; Alhazmi, Waleed H

    2017-11-05

    Three-point bending tests on notched beams of three types of steel fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) have been performed by using both a servo-hydraulic machine and a drop-weight impact instrument. The lo ading rates had a range of six orders of magnitude from 2.20 × 10 -3 mm/s (quasi-static) to 2.66 × 10³ mm/s. These SFRSCCs had the same matrix, but various types of steel fiber (straight and hooked-end) and contents (volume ratios), 0.51%, 0.77% and 1.23%, respectively. The results demonstrate that the fracture energy and the flexural strength increase as the loading rate increases. Moreover, such tendency is relatively moderate at low rates. However, at high rates it is accentuated. For the 0.51% fiber content, the dynamic increase factors of the flexural strength and the fracture energy are approximately 6 and 3, while for the 1.23% fiber content, they are around 4 and 2, respectively. Thus, the higher the fiber content the less rate sensitivity there is.

  9. Using hardness to model yield and tensile strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.

    2005-02-01

    The current direction in hardness research is towards smaller and smaller loads as nano-scale materials are developed. There remains, however, a need to investigate the mechanical behavior of complex alloys for severe environment service. In many instances this entails casting large ingots and making numerous tensile samples as the bounds of the operating environment are explored. It is possible to gain an understanding of the tensile strength of these alloys using room and elevated temperature hardness in conjunction with selected tensile tests. The approach outlined here has its roots in the work done by Tabor for metals and low alloy and carbon steels. This research seeks to extend the work to elevated temperatures for multi-phase, complex alloys. A review of the approach will be given after which the experimental data will be examined. In particular, the yield stress and tensile strength will be compared to their corresponding hardness based values.

  10. Microstructures and Tensile Mechanical Properties of Titanium Rods Made by Powder Compact Extrusion of a Titanium Hydride Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yifeng; Yao, Xun; Liang, Jiamiao; Zhang, Deliang

    2016-04-01

    Nearly fully dense titanium with good mechanical properties was fabricated rapidly by induction heating, holding, and hot extrusion of the TiH2 powder compacts. The dehydrogenation and consolidation processes took less than 15 minutes in total. The microstructures, contents of interstitial elements (H, O), tensile mechanical properties, and fracture behaviors of titanium samples made with different holding and extrusion temperatures [1273 K, 1373 K, and 1473 K (1000 °C, 1100 °C, and 1200 °C)] were investigated. The results showed that the hydrogen content in the extruded rods was around 0.09 wt pct when the holding and extrusion temperature was 1373 K or 1473 K (1100 °C or 1200 °C), with almost all of the TiH2 phase being transformed into Ti phase during the heating, holding, and extrusion process steps. The extruded Ti samples had a lamellar structure consisting of fine α lamellae with random orientations in different lamellar colonies and the relative density of all the extruded samples exceeded 99.5 pct. The residual TiH2 phase can reduce the ductility of extruded rods. The sample extruded at 1373 K (1100 °C) has the best elongation to fracture of 21.0 pct, and its average yield strength and ultimate tensile strength reached 536.8 and 691.8 MPa, respectively.

  11. On the Processing of Spalling Experiments. Part II: Identification of Concrete Fracture Energy in Dynamic Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, Bratislav B.; Saletti, Dominique; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a second part of the study aimed at investigating the fracture behavior of concrete under high strain rate tensile loading. The experimental method together with the identified stress-strain response of three tests conducted on ordinary concrete have been presented in the paper entitled Part I (Forquin and Lukić in Journal of Dynamic Behavior of Materials, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40870-017-0135-1). In the present paper, Part II, the investigation is extended towards directly determining the specific fracture energy of each observed fracture zone by visualizing the dynamic cracking process with a temporal resolution of 1 µs. Having access to temporal displacement fields of the sample surface, it is possible to identify the fracture opening displacement (FOD) and the fracture opening velocity of any principle (open) and secondary (closed) fracture at each measurement instance, that may or may not lead to complete physical failure of the sample. Finally, the local Stress-FOD curves were obtained for each observed fracture zone, opposed to previous works where indirect measurements were used. The obtained results indicated a much lower specific fracture energy compared to the results often found in the literature. Furthermore, numerical simulations were performed with a damage law to evaluate the validity of the proposed experimental data processing and compare it to the most often used one in the previous works. The results showed that the present method can reliably predict the specific fracture energy needed to open one macro-fracture and suggested that indirect measurement techniques can lead to an overestimate of specific fracture energy due to the stringent assumption of linear elasticity up-to the peak and the inability of having access to the real post-peak change of axial stress.

  12. Effects of twin boundaries in vanadium nitride films subjected to tensile/compressive deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Peng, Xianghe; Huang, Cheng; Zhao, Yinbo; Weng, Shayuan; Chen, Xiang; Hu, Ning

    2017-12-01

    Two kinds of atoms can serve as the twin boundary (TB) atoms in a transition metal nitride (TMN). In this work, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for the responses of vanadium nitride (VN) films with different kinds of TB atoms (V or N) subjected to uniaxial tensile/compressive deformations, to investigate their effects and the tensile-compressive asymmetry. In compressive deformation, the migration of TBs with V atoms to that with N atoms contributes to softening, while the pile-up of dislocations at TBs contributes to strengthening. During tension, fractures occur at the TBs without distinct nucleation of dislocations, the nature of the brittle fracture, which does not result in any improvement of fracture toughness and critical stress. Different frictional effects, cutoff radii, asymmetrical tensile and compressive nature of the interatomic potential and different deformation mechanisms are responsible for the tension-compression asymmetry in VN.

  13. Fracture Behavior of Adhesive-Bonded Aluminum Foam with Double Cantilever Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Hye-jin; Lee, Sang-kyo; Cho, Chongdu; Choi, Hae-kyu; Cho, Jae-ung

    2014-01-01

    In this study, closed-cell aluminum foam with an initial crack was investigated to produce an axial load-time graph. Using the 10-kN Landmarks of MTS Corporation, a 15-mm/min velocity of mode I shape was applied to the aluminum foam specimen using the displacement control method. ABAQUS 6.10 simulation was used to model and analyze the identical model in three dimensions under conditions identical to those of the experiment. The energy release rate was calculated on the basis of an axial load-displacement graph obtained from the experiment and a transient image of the crack length, and then an FE model was analyzed on the basis of this fracture energy condition. The relation between load and displacement was discussed; it was found that the aluminum foam deformed somewhat less than the adhesive layer owing to the difference in elastic modulus

  14. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-02-01

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. The significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.

  15. Effect of heat on tensile properties of thin pure titanium foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of size effects in microforming process may result in nonhomogeneous material characteristics. Heat assisted microforming is an effective approach to reduce the influence of size effects. To improve the heating rate, resistance heating method is introduced to the microforming process. To investigate the size effect of heat on material deformation for thin foils in microforming, uniaxial tensile tests were performed for the foils with different grain sizes at different temperatures by tensile testing system incorporating with resistance heating method. The results show that the reduction of the stress at elevated temperatures compared to room temperature is higher for the foils with larger grain size than that for the foils with smaller grain size. The fracture strain decreases with increasing temperature when the temperature is below 300 °C, and then increases as the temperature increases when the temperature is above 300 °C. In addition, the work hardening behavior of the material is independent of the grain size. As temperature increases, the work hardening increases.

  16. Bending Mechanical Behavior of Polyester Matrix Reinforced with Fique Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altoé, Giulio Rodrigues; Netto, Pedro Amoy; Barcelos, Mariana; Gomes, André; Margem, Frederico Muylaert; Monteiro, Sergio Neves

    Environmentally correct composites, made from natural fibers, are among the most investigated and applied today. In this paper, we investigate the mechanical behavior of polyester matrix composites reinforced with continuous fique fibers, through bending tensile tests. Specimens containing 0, 10, 20 and 30% in volume of fique fiber were aligned along the entire length of a mold to create plates of these composites, those plates were cut following the ASTM standard to obtained bending tests specimens. The test was conducted in a Instron Machine and the fractured specimens were analyzed by SEM, the results showed the increase in the materials tensile properties with the increase of fiber amount.

  17. Ductile fracture behavior of 6-inch diameter type 304 stainless steel and STS 42 carbon steel piping containing a through-wall or part-through crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Ohba, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Takaichi; Miyazono, Shohachiro; Kaneko, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Norio.

    1986-05-01

    The double ended guillotine break philosophy in the design base accident of the nuclear power plant is considered to be overly conservative from the view point of piping design. Through the past experiences and developments of the fabrication, inspection, and operation of nuclear power plants, it has been recognized that the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept can be justified in the LWR pressure boundary pipings. In order to verify the LBB concept, extensive experimental and theoretical works are being conducted in many countries. Furthermore, a revised piping design standard, in which LBB concept is introduced, is under preparation in Japan, U.S.A., and European countries. At JAERI, a research program to investigate the unstable ductile fracture behavior of LWR piping under bending load has been carried out as a part of the LBB verification researches since 1983. This report summarizes the result of the ductile fracture tests conducted at room temperature in 1983 and 84. The 6-inch diameter pipes of type 304 stainless steel and STS 42 carbon steel pipe with a through-wall or part-through crack were tested under bending load with low or high compliance condition at room temperature. Pipe fracture data were obtained from the test as regards to load- displacement curve, crack extension, net section stress, J-resistance curve, and so on. Besides, the influence of the compliance on the fracture behavior was examined. Discussions are performed on the ductile pipe fracture criterion, flaw evaluation criterion, and LBB evaluation method. (author)

  18. Characterization of fracture loci in metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, P.A.F.; Bay, Niels; Tekkaya, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Fracture in metal forming can occur in three different modes: (i) tensile; (ii) in-plane shear; and (iii) out-of-plane shear (respectively the same as modes I, II and III of fracture mechanics). The circumstances under which each mode will occur are identified in terms of plastic flow and microst...

  19. Tensile, swelling and morphological properties of bentonite-filled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Muhamad Nadhli Amin; Ismail, Hanafi; Othman, Nadras

    2017-10-01

    Tensile, swelling and morphological properties of bentonite filled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR/Bt) composites were studied. The experiments were conducted at room temperature by using two rolled mill, universal testing machine (INSTRON), and American Standard Testing Method (ASTM) D471 for compounding, tensile testing, and swelling test, respectively. Results obtained indicated that a better tensile strength, elongation at break and tensile modulus were recorded as compared to the pure NBR particularly up to 90 phr of Bt loading. However, swelling (%) exhibited the opposite trend where the liquid uptake by the composites was indirectly proportional with the increasing of Bt loading. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used on the tensile fractured surface of the NBR/Bt composites have shown that the fillers were well embedded in the NBR matrix, for Bt loading up to 90 phr. The agglomeration of fillers occurred for Bt loading exceeding 90 phr.

  20. Effect of Strain-Induced Martensite on Tensile Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement of 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Suk; Bak, Sang Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Room temperature tensile tests have been conducted at different strain rates ranging from 2 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-2/s on hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 stainless steel (SS). Using a ferritescope and neutron diffraction, the amount of strain-induced martensite (SIM) has been in situ measured at the center region of the gage section of the tensile specimens or ex situ measured on the fractured tensile specimens. The ductility, tensile stress, hardness, and the amount of SIM increase with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and decrease in hydrogen-charged one. Specifically, SIM that forms during tensile tests is beneficial in increasing the ductility, strain hardening, and tensile stress of 304 SS, irrespective of the presence of hydrogen. A correlation of the tensile properties of hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 SS and the amount of SIM shows that hydrogen suppresses the formation of SIM in hydrogen-charged 304 SS, leading to a ductility loss and localized brittle fracture. Consequently, we demonstrate that hydrogen embrittlement of 304 SS is related to hydrogen-suppressed formation of SIM, corresponding to the disordered phase, according to our proposition. Compelling evidence is provided by the observations of the increased lattice expansion of martensite with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and its lattice contraction in hydrogen-charged one.

  1. Effects of fiber length on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Tiesong; Jia Dechang; He Peigang; Wang Meirong; Liang Defu

    2008-01-01

    A kind of sheet-like carbon fiber preform was developed using short fibers (2, 7 and 12 mm, respectively) as starting materials and used to strengthen a geopolymer. Mechanical properties, fracture behavior, microstructure and toughening mechanisms of the as-prepared composites were investigated by three-point bending test, optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the short carbon fibers disperse uniformly in geopolymer matrix. The C f /geopolymer composites exhibit apparently improved mechanical properties and an obvious noncatastrophic failure behavior. The composite reinforced by the carbon fibers of 7 mm in length shows a maximum flexural strength as well as the highest work of facture, which are nearly 5 times and more than 2 orders higher than that of the geopolymer matrix, respectively. The predominant strengthening and toughening mechanisms are attributed to the apparent fiber bridging and pulling-out effect based on the weak fiber/matrix interface as well as the sheet-like carbon fiber preform

  2. On the Fracture Response of Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jape, Sameer; Parrinello, Antonino; Baxevanis, Theocharis; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    In this paper, the effect of global thermo-mechanically-induced phase transformation on the driving force for crack growth in polycrystalline shape memory alloys is analyzed in an infinite center-cracked plate subjected to thermal actuation under isobaric, plane strain, mode I loading. Finite element calculations are carried out to determine the mechanical fields near the static crack and the crack-tip energy release rate using the virtual crack closure technique. Analysis of the static crack shows that, as compared to constant mechanical loading, the energy release rate during cooling increases by approximately an order of magnitude. This increase is attributed to the stress redistribution at the crack-tip induced by global phase transformation during cooling. Crack growth during actuation is assumed to occur when the crack-tip energy release rate reaches a material specific critical value. Fracture toughening behavior is observed during crack growth and is mainly associated with the energy dissipated by the progressively occurring phase transformation close to the moving crack tip. Lastly, the effect of crack configuration on fracture toughness enhancement in the large-scale transformation problem is studied. Numerical results for static cracks in compact tensile and three-point bending SMA specimens are reported and a comparison of fracture toughening during thermal actuation in the semi-infinite crack configuration with the compact tensile and three-point bending geometries is presented.

  3. The mechanical behaviour of hydraulic fractured, possibly saturated materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.H.M.; Mier, J.G.M. van

    1998-01-01

    The influence of a fluid pressure load on the extensile fracturing of mortar and sandstone has been investigated. A fluid pressure in the (initiating) fracture stimulates both fracture initiation and propagation and may be as effective as a directly applied uniaxial tensile stress. The efficiency of

  4. Evaluation of tensile properties of 5052 type aluminum-magnesium alloy at warm temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    S. Kilic; S. Toros; F. Ozturk

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the tensile properties of 5052 type aluminum-manganese alloyin warm temperatures.Design/methodology/approach: In this research, uniaxial tensile deformation behavior of 5052-H32 typealuminum magnesium alloy was studied range between room to 300°C and in the strain rate range of 0.0083-0.16 s-1.Findings: It was observed that the uniaxial tensile elongation of the material increases with increasing temperaturesand decreases with increasing strain...

  5. Deep gold mine fracture zone behaviour

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Napier, JAL

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available dimensional section through the samples using the standard DIGS displacement discontinuity program has proved that the numerical techniques are able to capture the nucleation from flaws and the effect of larger scale stress re-distributions by grain... boundaries. The coalescence of the fractures depends on a complicated process whereby tensile stresses produced ahead of growing fractures initiate other fractures and lead to a localized failure surface on a larger scale. In certain cases, the compressive...

  6. Mechanical behavior and fracture characterization of the T91 martensitic steel in liquid sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdane, Ouadie

    2012-01-01

    The T91 martensitic steel is designed to constitute structural material of future sodium fast reactors of fourth generation, where it will be subjected to stresses in presence of liquid sodium. This study presents a qualitative and quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of T91 steel towards the phenomenon of liquid metal embrittlement. The effect of liquid sodium on T91 steel was studied and quantified according to the temperature and the cross head rate displacement, by using a set-up of Small Punch Test, three and four bending test, developed in laboratory. Mechanical tests in sodium environment are carried out inside a Plexiglas cell, conceived and developed at the laboratory. The atmosphere inside this cell is severely purified and controlled, in order to avoid on the one hand an explosive reaction of sodium with moisture, or an ignition with oxygen, and on the other hand to minimize the presence of impurities in liquid sodium used. The presence of sodium accelerates T91 steel fracture at low temperature, without modifying its ductile character. The T91 pre-immersion in sodium makes it possible to dissolve the protective layer of chromium oxide, and to obtain an intimate contact with the molten metal. However, pre-immersion generates a surface defects which cause a partial embrittlement by sodium. The hardening of T91 steel by heat treatment with a tempering temperature of 550 C (T91-TR550) causes a total embrittlement of steel in presence of sodium, with and without pre-immersion. The rupture of the T91-TR550 steel takes then place by intergranular de-cohesion, corresponding to the crack initiation phase, followed by laths de-cohesion, corresponding to the phase of propagation of these cracks. The mechanism suggested in this study is based on the intergranular penetration of sodium, supported by the presence of segregated impurities such phosphorus, and by the plastic deformation [fr

  7. Effect of ion irradiation on tensile ductility, strength and fictive temperature in metallic glass nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magagnosc, D.J.; Kumar, G.; Schroers, J.; Felfer, P.; Cairney, J.M.; Gianola, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Ion irradiation of thermoplastically molded Pt 57.5 Cu 14.3 Ni 5.7 P 22.5 metallic glass nanowires is used to study the relationship between glass structure and tensile behavior across a wide range of structural states. Starting with the as-molded state of the glass, ion fluence and irradiated volume fraction are systematically varied to rejuvenate the glass, and the resulting plastic behavior of the metallic glass nanowires probed by in situ mechanical testing in a scanning electron microscope. Whereas the as-molded nanowires exhibit high strength, brittle-like fracture and negligible inelastic deformation, ion-irradiated nanowires show tensile ductility and quasi-homogeneous plastic deformation. Signatures of changes to the glass structure owing to ion irradiation as obtained from electron diffraction are subtle, despite relatively large yield strength reductions of hundreds of megapascals relative to the as-molded condition. To reconcile changes in mechanical behavior with glass properties, we adapt previous models equating the released strain energy during shear banding to a transit through the glass transition temperature by incorporating the excess enthalpy associated with distinct structural states. Our model suggests that ion irradiation increases the fictive temperature of our glass by tens of degrees – the equivalent of many orders of magnitude change in cooling rate. We further show our analytical description of yield strength to quantitatively describe literature results showing a correlation between severe plastic deformation and hardness in a single glass system. Our results highlight not only the capacity for room temperature ductile plastic flow in nanoscaled metallic glasses, but also processing strategies capable of glass rejuvenation outside of the realm of traditional thermal treatments

  8. Environment-tensile property relationship in AISI 1018 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivatsan, T.S.; Hanigofsky, M.; Auradkar, R.; Hoff, T.

    1990-01-01

    Environment-material interaction depends on several concurrent and mutually competitive variables ranging from nature of the environment to composition of the steel and including: the test temperature; the time of exposure of the material to the environment; the deformation rate; and intrinsic microstructural effects; The present work is a characterization of strain rate and environment influences on the tensile properties of a steel, AISI 1018, having a fully spheroidized microstructure. Tensile tests were performed at ambient temperature (300 K) in environments which are mildly aggressive (moist laboratory air-relative humidity 50%) and inert (dry gaseous nitrogen). The specimens were deformed to failure at strain rates of 10 -4 sec -1 and 10 -5 sec -1 . No appreciable increase in yield and tensile strengths was observed at the strain rate of 10 -4 sec -1 . However, the increase in both was of the order of 10 to 12% at the strain rate of 10 -5 sec -1 . Ductility showed no variation with strain rate, but increased in the inert environment at both strain rates. Both environment and strain rate were found to have little to no influence on reduction in area of the test specimens. The true fracture stress followed a similar trend to the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. (author)

  9. A 3-dimensional finite-element analysis investigating the biomechanical behavior of the mandible and plate osteosynthesis in cases of fractures of the condylar process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Arne; Krach, Wolfgang; Schicho, Kurt; Undt, Gerhard; Ploder, Oliver; Ewers, Rolf

    2002-12-01

    The condylar region is one of the most frequent sites for mandibular fractures, with direct application of miniplates being the most commonly used open-fixation technique today. Yet, anatomic and biomechanical limitations continue to make this application technically challenging with a considerable complication rate. We sought to analyze such incongruencies with respect to the complex biomechanical behavior of the mandible. Individual human mandible geometry, the specific bone density distribution, and the position and orientation of the masticatory muscles were evaluated by performing computed tomography scans and a sequential dissection of the cadaver mandible. Three-dimensional finite-element analysis was performed for different fracture sites, osteosynthesis plates, and loading conditions. Osteosynthesis of fractures of the condylar neck with 1 or 2 miniplates of a diameter of 2.35 x 1.00 mm was found to be an insufficient fixation method. This also applies for plates (3.60 x 1.54 mm), according to Pape et al,(8) when used in singular fashion (high condylar neck fractures excepted). In cases of singular occlusal contacts in the molar region (particularly at the contralateral side of the fracture), the highest stress values inside the mandible and osteosynthetic devices could be observed. With even the static yield limit of titanium being exceeded in such cases, consecutive rapid failure of the miniplates becomes most likely when loading of the condylar region caused by bite forces cannot be prevented. We strongly recommend the use, whenever possible, of 2 plates in the manner described by Pape et al(8) for osteosynthesis of fractures of the condylar neck in combination with bicortically placed screws. The stiffness of a singular osteosynthesis plate made of titanium in a diametrical dimension of approximately 5.0 x 1.75 mm was found to be equivalent to the physiological bone stiffness in the investigated fracture sites. The actual stiffness of such a fixation

  10. Quantitative investigation of the tensile plastic deformation characteristic and microstructure for friction stir welded 2024 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Z.L., E-mail: zhilihuhit@163.com [National Key Laboratory of Precision Hot Processing of Metals, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, X.S. [National Key Laboratory of Precision Hot Processing of Metals, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yuan, S.J., E-mail: syuan@hit.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Precision Hot Processing of Metals, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The effect of the microstructure heterogeneity on the tensile plastic deformation characteristic of friction stir welded (FSW) 2024 aluminum alloy was investigated for the potential applications on light weight design of vehicles. The microstructure characteristics of the FSW joints, such as the grain structure, dislocation density and the distribution of precipitation, were studied by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile deformation characteristic of the FSW joints was examined using the automatic strain measuring system (ASAME) by mapping the global and local strain distribution, and then was analyzed by mechanics calculation. It is found that the tensile deformation of the FSW joints is highly heterogeneous leading to a significant decrease in global ductility. The FSW joints mainly contain two typical deformation zones, which show great effect on the regional inhomogeneous deformation. One is the nugget zone (NZ) with a region of 8 mm in width, and the other is part of the BM with a region of 10 mm in width. The BM of the joints is the weakest region where the strain localizes early and this localization extends until fracture with a strain over 30%, while the strain in the NZ is only 4%. Differences in regional strain of FSW joints, which are essentially controlled by grain structure, the distribution of precipitation and dislocation density, result in decrease on the overall mechanical properties. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure heterogeneity of welds on tensile deformation behavior is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The welds contain two typical deformation zones, affecting the global ductility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regional strain of welds is controlled by grain structure and dislocation density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical calculation is in good agreement with experimental result.

  11. Impact of the Weld Geometry on the Stress Intensity Factor of the Welded T-Joint Exposed to the Tensile Force and the Bending Moment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoković Jelena M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is analyzed the welded T-joint exposed to the axial tensile force and the bending moment, for determining the impact of the weld geometry on the fracture mechanics parameters. The stress intensity factor was calculated analytically, based on the concept of the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM, by application of the Mathematica® programming routine. The presence of the weld was taken into account through the corresponding correction factors. The results show that increase of the size of the triangular welds leads to decrease of the stress intensity factor, while the SIF increases with increase of the welds’ width. The ratio of the two welded plates’ thicknesses shows that plate thicknesses do not exhibit significant influence on the stress intensity factor behavior.

  12. Effects of laser shock peening on stress corrosion behavior of 7075 aluminum alloy laser welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.T., E-mail: jiasqq1225@126.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Zhang, Y.K. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Chen, J.F.; Zhou, J.Y.; Ge, M.Z.; Lu, Y.L.; Li, X.L. [School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China)

    2015-10-28

    7075 aluminum alloy weldments were processed by an intensive process known as laser shock peening (LSP), meanwhile its stress corrosion behaviors were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests. Results showed that the effect of LSP on corrosion behavior of the joint was fairly useful and obvious. With LSP, the elongation, time of fracture and static toughness after the SSRT test were improved by 11.13%, 20% and 100%, respectively. At the same time, the location of the fracture also changed. LSP led to a transition of the fracture type from transgranular to intergranular The reasons for these enhancements of the joint on corrosion behavior were caused by microstructure, residual stress, micro-hardness, and fracture appearance.

  13. Tensile Strength of Epoxy Composites Reinforced with Fique Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altoé, Giulio Rodrigues; Netto, Pedro Amoy; Teles, Maria Carolina Andrade; Borges, Luiz Gustavo Xavier; Margem, Frederico Muylaert; Monteiro, Sergio Neves

    Environmentally friendly composites, made from natural fibers, are among the most investigated and applied today. Natural fibers have showed advantages, such as, flexibility and toughness, if compared with synthetic fibers. This work investigates the tensile strength of epoxy composites reinforced with Fique fibers. The Fique fiber was extracted from Fique leaf presents some significant characteristic, but until now only few studies on Fique fiber were performed. Composites reinforced with up to 30% in volume of long, continuous and aligned Fique fibers were tested in an Instron machine at room temperature. The incorporation of Fique fibers increases the tensile strength of the composite. After fracture the specimens were analyzed by a SEM (scanning electron microscope).

  14. A casting and imaging technique for determining void geometry and relative permeability behavior of a single fracture specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B.L.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1990-01-01

    A casting technique has been developed for making translucent replicas of the void space of natural rock fractures. Attenuation of light shined through the cast combined with digital image analysis provides a pointwise definition of fracture apertures. The technique has been applied to a fracture specimen from Dixie Valley, Nevada, and the measured void space geometry has been used to develop theoretical predictions of two-phase relative permeability. A strong anisotropy in relative permeabilities has been found, which is caused by highly anisotropic spatial correlations among fracture apertures. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON TENSILE STRENGTH OF JACQUARD KNITTED FABRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRAD Raluca

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An objective approach to select the best fabric for technical and home textiles consists in mechanical properties evaluation. The goal of this study is to analyze the behavior of knitted fabrics undergoing stretch stress. In this respect, three types of 2 colors Rib structure (backstripes jacquard, twillback jacquard and double-layered 3x3 rib fabric have been presented and tested for tensile strength and elongation on three directions. First, the elasticity and the behavior of knitted Rib fabrics were described The fabrics were knitted using 100% PAN yarns with Nm 1/15x2 on a E5 CMS 330 Stoll V-bed knitting machine, and have been tested using INSTROM 5587 Tensile Testing Machine in respect of standards conditions. After a relaxation period, 15 specimens were prepared, being disposed at 0°, 45 and 90 angles to the wale direction on the flat knitted panel. The tensile strength and the elongation values were recorded and mean values were computed. After strength and tensile elongation testing for 3 types of rib based knitted fabrics, one can see that the double layer knit presents the best mechanical behavior, followed by birds-eyebacking 2 colors Jacquard and then back striped Jacquard. For tensile stress in bias direction, the twillbacking Jacquard has a good breakage resistance value due to the higher number of rib sinker loops in structure that are positioned on the same direction with the tensile force. The twillbacking Jacquard structure could be considered as an alternative for the base material for decorative and home textile products.

  16. Performance of Grouted Splice Sleeve Connector under Tensile Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alias

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The grouted splice sleeve connector system takes advantage of the bond-slip resistance of the grout and the mechanical gripping of reinforcement bars to provide resistance to tensile force. In this system, grout acts as a load-transferring medium and bonding material between the bars and sleeve. This study adopted the end-to-end rebars connection method to investigate the effect of development length and sleeve diameter on the bonding performance of the sleeve connector. The end-to-end method refers to the condition where reinforcement bars are inserted into the sleeve from both ends and meet at the centre before grout is filled. Eight specimens of grouted splice sleeve connector were tested under tensile load to determine their performance. The sleeve connector was designed using 5 mm thick circular hollow section (CHS steel pipe and consisted of one external and two internal sleeves. The tensile test results show that connectors with a smaller external and internal sleeve diameter appear to provide better bonding performance. Three types of failure were observed in this research, which are bar fracture (outside the sleeve, bar pullout, and internal sleeve pullout. With reference to these failure types, the development length of 200 mm is the optimum value due to its bar fracture type, which indicates that the tensile capacity of the connector is higher than the reinforcement bar. It is found that the performance of the grouted splice sleeve connector is influenced by the development length of the reinforcement bar and the diameter of the sleeve.

  17. High-speed imaging on static tensile test for unidirectional CFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Hideaki; Aoki, Yuichiro; Hirano, Yoshiyasu; Kondo, Yasushi; Nagao, Yosuke

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) under static tensile loading. The advantages of CFRP are higher specific stiffness and strength than the metal material. The use of CFRP is increasing in not only the aerospace and rapid transit railway industries but also the sports, leisure and automotive industries. The tensile fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP has not been experimentally made clear because the fracture speed of unidirectional CFRP is quite high. We selected the intermediate modulus and high strength unidirectional CFRP laminate which is a typical material used in the aerospace field. The fracture process under static tensile loading was captured by a conventional high-speed camera and a new type High-Speed Video Camera HPV-1. It was found that the duration of fracture is 200 microseconds or less, then images taken by a conventional camera doesn't have enough temporal-resolution. On the other hand, results obtained by HPV-1 have higher quality where the fracture process can be clearly observed.

  18. Experimental Investigation on the Fracture Behavior of Black Shale by Acoustic Emission Monitoring and CT Image Analysis during Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Li, C. H.; Hu, Y. Z.

    2018-01-01

    Plenty of mechanical experiments have been done to investigate the deformation and failure characteristics of shale; however, the anisotropic failure mechanism has not been well studied. Here, laboratory Uniaxial Compressive Strength (UCS) tests on cylindrical shale samples obtained by drilling at different inclinations to bedding plane were performed. The failure behaviors of the shale samples were studied by real-time acoustic emission (AE) monitoring and post-test X-ray computer tomography (CT) analysis. The experimental results suggest that the pronounced bedding planes of shale have a great influence on the mechanical properties and AE patterns. The AE counts and AE cumulative energy release curves clearly demonstrate different morphology, and the `U' shaped curve relationship between the AE counts, AE cumulative energy release and bedding inclination was first documented. The post-test CT image analysis shows the crack patterns via 2D image reconstructions, an index of stimulated fracture density is defined to represent the anisotropic failure mode of shale. What is more, the most striking finding is that the AE monitoring results are in good agreement with the CT analysis. The structural difference in the shale sample is the controlling factor resulting in the anisotropy of AE patterns. The pronounced bedding structure in the shale formation results in an anisotropy of elasticity, strength, and AE information from which the changes in strength dominate the entire failure pattern of the shale samples.

  19. Hydro-fracture in the laboratory: matching diagnostic seismic signals to fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehne, S.; Benson, P. M.; Koor, N.; Dobson, K. J.; Enfield, M.; Barber, A.

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a key process in both natural (e.g. dyke intrusion) and engineered environments (e.g. shale gas). To better understand this process, we present new data from simulated hydraulic fracturing in a controlled laboratory environment in order to track fracture nucleation (location) and propagation (velocity) in space and time to assess the fracture mechanics and developing fracture network. Fluid overpressure is used to generate a permeable network of micro tensile fractures in an anisotropic sandstone and a highly anisotropic shale. A newly developed technique, using a steel guide arrangement to direct pressurised fluid into a sealed section of an axially drilled conduit, allows the pore fluid to contact the rock directly and to initiate tensile fractures from a pre-defined zone inside the sample. Acoustic emission location is used to record and map the nucleation and development of the micro-fracture network. For both rock types, fractures progresses parallel to the bedding plane (short-transverse) if the bedding plane is aligned with the direction of σ1 requiring breakdown pressures of approximately 7 and 13MPa respectively at a confining pressure of 8MPa. The data also indicates a more ductile behaviour of the shale than expected. We use X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) to evaluate the evolved fracture network in terms of fracture pattern and aperture. Hydraulic fracturing produces very planar fractures in the shale, with axial fractures over the entire length of the sample broadly following the bedding. In contrast, fractures in the sandstone are more diffuse, linking pore spaces as they propagate. However, secondary micro cracking, branching of the main fracture, are also observed. These new experiments suggest that fracture pattern, fracture propagation trajectories, and fracturing fluid pressures are predominantly controlled by the interaction between the anisotropic mechanical properties of the rock and the anisotropic stress environment.

  20. Ductile Fracture Behaviour of Hot Isostatically Pressed Inconel 690 Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A. J.; Brayshaw, W. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2018-01-01

    Herein we assess the differences in Charpy impact behavior between Hot Isostatically Pressed and forged Inconel 690 alloy over the temperature range of 300 °C to - 196 °C. The impact toughness of forged 690 exhibited a relatively small temperature dependence, with a maximum difference of ca. 40 J measured between 300 °C and - 196 °C, whereas the HIP'd alloy exhibited a difference of approximately double that of the forged alloy over the same temperature range. We have conducted Charpy impact testing, tensile testing, and metallographic analyses on the as-received materials as well as fractography of the failed Charpy specimens in order to understand the mechanisms that cause the observed differences in material fracture properties. The work supports a recent series of studies which assess differences in fundamental fracture behavior between Hot Isostatically Pressed and forged austenitic stainless steel materials of equivalent grades, and the results obtained in this study are compared to those of the previous stainless steel investigations to paint a more general picture of the comparisons between HIP vs forged material fracture behavior. Inconel 690 was selected in this study since previous studies were unable to completely omit the effects of strain-induced martensitic transformation at the tip of the Chary V-notch from the fracture mechanism; Inconel 690 is unable to undergo strain-induced martensitic transformation due to the alloy's high nickel content, thereby providing a sister study with the omission of any martensitic transformation effects on ductile fracture behavior.

  1. Influence of strain rate and temperature on the yield and fracture toughness behavior of selected steels for an LMFBR spent fuel shipping cask, a literature assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, H.J.

    1976-02-01

    The literature has been reviewed to determine the possible influences of strain rate and temperature on the yield and fracture toughness behavior of selected steels suggested for use in an LMFBR Spent Fuel Shipping Cask. Based on this information, recommendations have been made for further work which is intended to alleviate potential problems prior to their having a major impact on the shipping cask program

  2. Tensile Properties and Failure Mechanism of 3D Woven Hollow Integrated Sandwich Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Cai, Deng'an; Zhou, Guangming; Lu, Fangzhou

    2017-10-01

    Tensile properties and failure mechanism of 3D woven hollow integrated sandwich composites are investigated experimentally, theoretically and numerically in this paper. Firstly, the tensile properties are obtained by quasi-static tensile tests on the specimens in two principal directions of the sandwich panels, called warp and weft. The experimental results shows that the tensile performances of the warp are better than that of the weft. By observing the broken specimens, it is found that the touch parts between yarns are the main failure regions under tension. Then, a theoretical method is developed to predict the tensile properties. By comparing with the experimental data, the accuracy of the theoretical method is verified. Simultaneously, a finite element model is established to predict the tensile behavior of the composites. The numerical results agree well with the experimental data. Moreover, the simulated progressive damages show that the contact regions in the warp and weft tension are both the initial failure areas.

  3. Low temperature tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking resistance in the super duplex stainless steels weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeung Woo; Sung, Jang Hyun; Lee, Sung Keun

    1998-01-01

    Low temperature tensile properties and SCC resistances of super duplex stainless steels and their weldments are investigated. Tensile strengths increase remarkably with decreasing test temperature, while elongations decrease steeply at -196 .deg. C after showing peak or constant value down to -100 .deg. C. Owing to the low tensile deformation of weld region, elongations of welded specimen decrease in comparison to those of unwelded specimen. The welded tensile specimen is fractured through weld region at -196 .deg. C due to the fact that the finely dispersed ferrite phase in the austenite matrix increases an opportunity to supply the crack propagation path through the brittle ferrite phase at low temperature. The stress corrosion cracking initiates preferentially at the surface ferrite phase of base metal region and propagates through ferrite phase. When the corrosion crack meets with the fibrously aligned austenite phase to the tensile direction, the ferrite phase around austenite continues to corrode. Eventually, fracture of the austenite phase begins without enduring the tensile load. The addition of Cu+W to the super duplex stainless steel deteriorates the SCC resistance in boiling MgCl 2 solution, possibly due to the increment of pits in the ferrite phase and reduction of N content in the austenite phase

  4. Dynamic Tensile Experimental Techniques for Geomaterials: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, W.; Song, B.; Williams, B.; Martin, B.; Sparks, P.; Nie, X.

    2018-01-01

    This review article is dedicated to the Dynamic Behavior of Materials Technical Division for celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Society for Experimental Mechanics (SEM). Understanding dynamic behavior of geomaterials is critical for analyzing and solving engineering problems of various applications related to underground explosions, seismic, airblast, and penetration events. Determining the dynamic tensile response of geomaterials has been a great challenge in experiments due to the nature of relatively low tensile strength and high brittleness. Various experimental approaches have been made in the past century, especially in the most recent half century, to understand the dynamic behavior of geomaterials in tension. In this review paper, we summarized the dynamic tensile experimental techniques for geomaterials that have been developed. The major dynamic tensile experimental techniques include dynamic direct tension, dynamic split tension, and spall tension. All three of the experimental techniques are based on Hopkinson or split Hopkinson (also known as Kolsky) bar techniques and principles. Uniqueness and limitations for each experimental technique are also discussed.

  5. Role of Chloride in the Corrosion and Fracture Behavior of Micro-Alloyed Steel in E80 Simulated Fuel Grade Ethanol Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunmilayo O. Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, micro-alloyed steel (MAS material normally used in the production of auto parts has been immersed in an E80 simulated fuel grade ethanol (SFGE environment and its degradation mechanism in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl was evaluated. Corrosion behavior was determined through mass loss tests and electrochemical measurements with respect to a reference test in the absence of NaCl. Fracture behavior was determined via J-integral tests with three-point bend specimens at an ambient temperature of 27 °C. The mass loss of MAS increased in E80 with NaCl up to a concentration of 32 mg/L; beyond that threshold, the effect of increasing chloride was insignificant. MAS did not demonstrate distinct passivation behavior, as well as pitting potential with anodic polarization, in the range of the ethanol-chloride ratio. Chloride caused pitting in MAS. The fracture resistance of MAS reduced in E80 with increasing chloride. Crack tip blunting decreased with increasing chloride, thus accounting for the reduction in fracture toughness.

  6. Role of Chloride in the Corrosion and Fracture Behavior of Micro-Alloyed Steel in E80 Simulated Fuel Grade Ethanol Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Olufunmilayo O; Loto, Cleophas A; Sivaprasad, Seetharaman; Ajayi, John A; Tarafder, Soumitra

    2016-06-16

    In this study, micro-alloyed steel (MAS) material normally used in the production of auto parts has been immersed in an E80 simulated fuel grade ethanol (SFGE) environment and its degradation mechanism in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl) was evaluated. Corrosion behavior was determined through mass loss tests and electrochemical measurements with respect to a reference test in the absence of NaCl. Fracture behavior was determined via J-integral tests with three-point bend specimens at an ambient temperature of 27 °C. The mass loss of MAS increased in E80 with NaCl up to a concentration of 32 mg/L; beyond that threshold, the effect of increasing chloride was insignificant. MAS did not demonstrate distinct passivation behavior, as well as pitting potential with anodic polarization, in the range of the ethanol-chloride ratio. Chloride caused pitting in MAS. The fracture resistance of MAS reduced in E80 with increasing chloride. Crack tip blunting decreased with increasing chloride, thus accounting for the reduction in fracture toughness.

  7. Tensile and elastic properties of thermoplastic elastomers based on PTMO and tetra-amide units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijgsman, J.; Gaymans, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    The tensile and elastic properties of melt spun threads of segmented copolymers based on T6T6T-dimethyl (5–16 wt%) and PTMO1000/DMT of different lengths (3000–10,000 g/mol) are very good. Stress–strain measurements show that extruded threads of these polymers have high fracture strains (>1000%) and

  8. Tensile behaviour and properties of a bone analogue composite (HA, HDPE) crosslinked by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, G.; Smolko, Eduardo E.

    2005-01-01

    A natural composite material, hydroxyapatite (HA) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) crosslinked by ionizing radiations is been developed as a bioactive analogue material for bone replacement. Mechanical properties of the composites irradiated up to 300 kGy under tensile tests was studied. Gel content and micrographs of different composite fractures are shown. (author)

  9. Tensile bond strength of dual curing resin-based cements to commercially pure titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Rafael; de Goes, Mario Fernando; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Chan, Daniel C N

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of dual curing luting resin cements to commercially pure titanium at 10 min and 24h after removal of the oxide layer. One hundred and twenty titanium discs were obtained by casting and polishing with silicon carbide papers. The titanium discs were sandblasted with 50 microm aluminum oxide, ultrasonic cleaned and bonded in pairs with the resin-based cements Panavia F and Rely X ARC at 10 min and 24h after the sandblasting. The tensile test was performed with a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min in an Instron Universal testing machine. The Rely X ARC reached the highest tensile strength value at 24h after sandblasting (18.27 MPa), but there was no statistically significant difference between the two dual curing resin cements for both times tested. All specimens showed a mixture of cohesive fracture in the resin cement and adhesive failure. However, the predominant failure mode for Panavia F was cohesive in resin cement, and the Rely X ARC exhibited a greater proportion of specimens with adhesive failure between the alloy and resin luting cement at 10 min and 24h. Both cements had, statistically, the same tensile bond strength. But in the fracture mode analysis, the adhesive predominant fracture mode of Rely X ARC cement indicates a premature clinical adhesive failure. On the other hand, the cohesive predominant fracture mode of Panavia F indicates a longer clinical adhesive bond with titanium.

  10. Failure analysis based on microvoid growth for sheet metal during uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbassi, Fethi; Mistou, Sebastien; Zghal, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cruciform specimen designed and biaxial tensile test carried out. ► Stereo Correlation Image technique is used for 3D full-filed measurements. ► SEM fractography analysis is used to explain the fracture mechanism. ► Constitutive modeling of the necking phenomenon was developed using GTN model. - Abstract: The aim of the presented investigations is to perform an analysis of fracture and instability during simple and complex load testing by addressing the influence of ductile damage evolution in necking processes. In this context, an improved experimental methodology was developed and successfully used to evaluate localization of deformation during uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests. The biaxial tensile tests are carried out using cruciform specimen loaded using a biaxial testing machine. In this experimental investigation, Stereo-Image Correlation technique has is used to produce the heterogeneous deformations map within the specimen surface. Scanning electron microscope is used to evaluate the fracture mechanism and the micro-voids growth. A finite element model of uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests are developed, where a ductile damage model Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman (GTN) is used to describe material deformation involving damage evolution. Comparison between the experimental and the simulation results show the accuracy of the finite element model to predict the instability phenomenon. The advanced measurement techniques contribute to understand better the ductile fracture mechanism

  11. Tensile strength of hydrated cement paste phases assessed by microbending tests and nanoindentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, J.; Králík, V.; Šmilauer, V.; Polívka, Leoš; Jäger, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 73, Oct (2016), 164-173 ISSN 0958-9465 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cement * hydration products * micro-beam * tensile strength * fracture energy * nanoindentation * focused ion beam Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.265, year: 2016

  12. Computer simulation of ductile fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, M.L.; Streit, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Finite difference computer simulation programs are capable of very accurate solutions to problems in plasticity with large deformations and rotation. This opens the possibility of developing models of ductile fracture by correlating experiments with equivalent computer simulations. Selected experiments were done to emphasize different aspects of the model. A difficult problem is the establishment of a fracture-size effect. This paper is a study of the strain field around notched tensile specimens of aluminum 6061-T651. A series of geometrically scaled specimens are tested to fracture. The scaled experiments are conducted for different notch radius-to-diameter ratios. The strains at fracture are determined from computer simulations. An estimate is made of the fracture-size effect

  13. Strength criterion for rocks under compressive-tensile stresses and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqing You

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating in-situ stress with hydraulic borehole fracturing involves tensile strength of rock. Several strength criteria with three parameters result in tensile strengths with great differences, although they may describe the relation between strength of rock and confining pressure with low misfits. The exponential criterion provides acceptable magnitudes of tensile strengths for granites and over-estimates that for other rocks, but the criterion with tension cut-off is applicable to all rocks. The breakdown pressure will be lower than the shut-in pressure during hydraulic borehole fracturing, when the maximum horizontal principal stress is 2 times larger than the minor one; and it is not the peak value in the first cycle, but the point where the slope of pressure-time curve begins to decline.

  14. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  15. A study of hydrogen environment effects on microstructure property behavior of NASA-23 alloy and related alloy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diwan, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the tensile properties and ductility behavior of NASA-23 alloy were analyzed. NASA-23 and other referenced alloys in cast and hipped conditions were solution treated and aged under selected conditions and characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis techniques. The yield strength of NASA-23 is not affected much by hydrogen under tensile tests carried at 5000 psig conditions; however, the ultimate strength and ductility properties are degraded. This implies that the physical mechanisms operating would be related to the plastic deformation process. The fracture surfaces characteristics of NASA-23 specimens tensile tested in hydrogen, helium, and air were also analyzed. These revealed surface cracks around specimen periphery with the fracture surface showing a combination of intergranular and transgranular modes of fracture. It is seen that the specimens charged in hydrogen seem to favor a more brittle fracture mode in comparison to air and helium charged specimens. The AMCC casting characterization program is to be analyzed for their hydrogen behavior. As a result of this program, the basic microstructural factors and fracture characteristics in some cases were analyzed

  16. A study of hydrogen environment effects on microstructure property behavior of NASA-23 alloy and related alloy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is part of the overall advanced main combustion chamber (AMCC) casting characterization program of the Materials and Processes Laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The influence of hydrogen on the tensile properties and ductility behavior of NASA-23 alloy were analyzed. NASA-23 and other referenced alloys in cast and hipped conditions were solution treated and aged under selected conditions and characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis techniques. The yield strength of NASA-23 is not affected much by hydrogen under tensile tests carried at 5000 psig conditions; however, the ultimate strength and ductility properties are degraded. This implies that the physical mechanisms operating would be related to the plastic deformation process. The fracture surfaces characteristics of NASA-23 specimens tensile tested in hydrogen, helium, and air were also analyzed. These revealed surface cracks around specimen periphery with the fracture surface showing a combination of intergranular and transgranular modes of fracture. It is seen that the specimens charged in hydrogen seem to favor a more brittle fracture mode in comparison to air and helium charged specimens. The AMCC casting characterization program is to be analyzed for their hydrogen behavior. As a result of this program, the basic microstructural factors and fracture characteristics in some cases were analyzed.

  17. Tensile rock mass strength estimated using InSAR

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Sigurjon

    2012-11-01

    The large-scale strength of rock is known to be lower than the strength determined from small-scale samples in the laboratory. However, it is not well known how strength scales with sample size. I estimate kilometer-scale tensional rock mass strength by measuring offsets across new tensional fractures (joints), formed above a shallow magmatic dike intrusion in western Arabia in 2009. I use satellite radar observations to derive 3D ground displacements and by quantifying the extension accommodated by the joints and the maximum extension that did not result in a fracture, I put bounds on the joint initiation threshold of the surface rocks. The results indicate that the kilometer-scale tensile strength of the granitic rock mass is 1–3 MPa, almost an order of magnitude lower than typical laboratory values.

  18. Time and temperature dependence on flexural state creep and fatigue fracture behaviors of unidirectional CFRP laminates; Ichihoko CFRP sekisoban no mage ni yoru seiteki, creep oyobi hiro no hakai kyodo no jikan oyobi ondo izonsei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyano, Y.; Nakata, M.; Ishiguro, T. [Kanazawa Inst. of Tech., Ishikawa (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan)

    1998-07-15

    The time and temperature dependencies of static, creep, and fatigue fracture behavior of unidirectional CERP are investigated by 3-point bending tests in the direction parallel to fibers. The effects of time and temperature on the fracture behavior are investigated by the observation of fractured surface. The fracture behavior evaluated by the strength, deformation, and fractured surface varies markedly by the rate of loading and temperature irrespective of the forms of static, creep, and fatigue load. Regardless of the loading forms of static, creep, and fatigue, the same time-temperature equivalent law holds good between the time dependence and temperature dependence of the fracture behavior as that of dynamic behavior of the matrix resins. As a result, long-term behaviors of static, creep, and fatigue can be estimated by using the time-temperature equivalent law, and they can be compared and evaluated on the same time and temperature axes if each of the static test, creep test, and fatigue test are performed by varying the temperature. 9 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Tensile Damage Mechanism of 3-D Angle-Interlock Woven Composite using Acoustic Emission Events Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Qian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The quasi-static tensile damage behavior of one type of layer-to-layer 3-Dimensional Angle-interlock Woven Composite (3DAWC was tested and analyzed in this paper. Incorporated with the acoustic emission (AE events monitoring, the mechanical behavior of the 3DAWC under tensile loading condition was characterized. The Load-Extension curve, Load/AE events-Time curves occurred during the entire testing process and tensile damage modes were recorded to characterize and summarize the mechanical properties and damage mechanism of the 3DAWC subjected to tensile loading. It was found that the tensile damage of the 3DAWC could be summarized into 3 steps. And each step has a distinct primary damage mode. Moreover, the resin cracks, resin-yarn interface debonding and yarn breakages were the main damage modes for the 3DAWC.

  20. Mechanical characterization of stomach tissue under uniaxial tensile action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Z G; Li, W; Zhou, Z R

    2015-02-26

    In this article, the tensile properties of gastric wall were investigated by using biomechanical test and theoretical analysis. The samples of porcine stomach strips from smaller and greater curvature of the stomach were cut in longitudinal and circumferential direction, respectively. The loading-unloading, stress relaxation, strain creep, tensile fracture tests were performed at mucosa-submucosa, serosa-muscle and intact layer, respectively. Results showed that the biomechanical properties of the porcine stomach depended on the layers, orientations and locations of the gastric wall and presented typical viscoelastic, nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical properties. During loading-unloading test, the stress of serosa-muscle layer in the longitudinal direction was 15-20% more than that in the circumferential direction at 12% stretch ratio, while it could reach about 40% for the intact layer and 50% for the mucosa-submucosa layer. The results of stress relaxation and strain creep showed that the variation degree was obviously faster in the circumferential direction than that in the longitudinal direction, and the ultimate residual values were also different for the different layers, orientations and locations. In the process of fracture test, the serosa-muscle layer fractured firstly followed by the mucosa-submucosa layer when the intact layer was tested, the longitudinal strips firstly began to fracture and the required stress value was about twice as much as that in the circumferential strips. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of mechanical characterization of the porcine stomach were related to its complicated geometry, structure and functions. The results would help us to understand the biomechanics of soft organ tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Stress State on Fracture Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arpan

    2018-02-01

    Present article comprehensively explores the influence of specimen thickness on the quantitative estimates of different ductile fractographic features in two dimensions, correlating tensile properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel tested under ambient temperature where the initial crystallographic texture, inclusion content, and their distribution are kept unaltered. It has been investigated that the changes in tensile fracture morphology of these steels are directly attributable to the resulting stress-state history under tension for given specimen dimensions.

  2. Influence of Austenitizing Parameters on Mechanical Behavior of Press Hardened Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golem, Lindsay

    Recent increases in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standard have led to an increased focus on lightweight materials for use in vehicle architectures. In particular, press hardened steels (PHS) have been identified as suitable materials to reduce vehicle mass while maintaining or possibly improving vehicle crash performance. A fundamental understanding of the mechanical behavior of PHS with respect to changes in processing conditions is critical to their proper use. In this work, 22MnB5 Al-Si coated blanks were austenitized at several different times and temperatures to produce a range of prior austenite grain sizes. Mechanical behavior was evaluated using smooth sided tensile testing, double edge notch tensile testing, and free bend testing. Metrics, such as notch tensile strength, notch strength ratio, and notch displacement, which is based on the fracture mechanics parameter crack tip opening displacement, were derived from double edge notch tensile testing to assess material notch sensitivity and toughness as a function of processing conditions. Additionally, bend angle at maximum load, post uniform bending slope, and energy for fracture were measured using free bend testing to provide another means for evaluating mechanical behavior. Increasing the austenitizing temperature and hold time resulted in an increase in the measured prior austenite grain size; however, elevated austenitizing temperatures also increased the thickness of the coating interdiffusion layer. In the coated material, tensile strength decreased with increasing prior austenite grain size for both notched and smooth sided tensile samples, but minimal difference was observed in the strain to failure results. Notch displacement, bend angle at maximum load, and energy for fracture during free bend testing all decreased with increasing prior austenite grain size in the coated PHS and also showed a significant drop in measured behavior for the 1025 °C for 30 minutes austenitizing condition

  3. Effects of soldering methods on tensile strength of a gold-palladium metal ceramic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadhanfari, Husain A; Khajah, Hasan M; Monaco, Edward A; Kim, Hyeongil

    2014-10-01

    The tensile strength obtained by conventional postceramic application soldering and laser postceramic welding may require more energy than microwave postceramic soldering, which could provide similar tensile strength values. The purpose of the study was to compare the tensile strength obtained by microwave postceramic soldering, conventional postceramic soldering, and laser postceramic welding. A gold-palladium metal ceramic alloy and gold-based solder were used in this study. Twenty-seven wax specimens were cast in gold-palladium noble metal and divided into 4 groups: laser welding with a specific postfiller noble metal, microwave soldering with a postceramic solder, conventional soldering with the same postceramic solder used in the microwave soldering group, and a nonsectioned control group. All the specimens were heat treated to simulate a normal porcelain sintering sequence. An Instron Universal Testing Machine was used to measure the tensile strength for the 4 groups. The means were analyzed statistically with 1-way ANOVA. The surface and fracture sites of the specimens were subjectively evaluated for fracture type and porosities by using a scanning electron microscope. The mean (standard deviation) ultimate tensile strength values were as follows: nonsectioned control 818 ±30 MPa, microwave 516 ±34 MPa, conventional 454 ±37 MPa, and laser weld 191 ±39 MPa. A 1-way ANOVA showed a significant difference in ultimate tensile strength among the groups (F3,23=334.5; Ptensile strength for gold and palladium noble metals than either conventional soldering or laser welding. Conventional soldering resulted in a higher tensile strength than laser welding. Under the experimental conditions described, either microwave or conventional postceramic soldering would appear to satisfy clinical requirements related to tensile strength. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamic Mechanical Behaviors of 6082-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Yibo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural components of high speed trains are usually made of aluminum alloys, for example, 6082. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the material is one of key factors considered in structural design and safety assessment. In this paper, dynamic mechanical experiments were conducted with strain rate ranging from 0.001 s−1 to 100 s−1 using Instron tensile testing machine. The true stress-strain curves were fitted based on experimental data. Johnson-Cook model of 6082-T6 aluminum alloy was built to investigate the effect of strain and strain rate on flow stress. It has shown that the flow stress was sensitive to the strain rate. Yield strength and tensile strength increased with a high strain rate, which showed strain rate effect to some extent. Fracture analysis was carried out by using Backscattered Electron imaging (BSE. As strain rate increased, more precipitates were generated in fracture.

  5. Evolution of tensile behavior on polyester-glass fibre composites thermal and sunligth degraded; Evolucion del comportamiento a traccion de composites poliester y fibra de vidrio sometidos a degradacion termica y luminica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segovia, F.; Ferrer, C.; Salvador, M. D.; Vicente, A.; Amigo, V.

    2001-07-01

    Composite materials have been subjected to moderate temperature and high sunlight doses of radiation for long periods of time. All tensile mechanical characteristics increase at moderately high temperature, in accordance with a damped increasing exponential model. Sunlight exposition yields ageing on all mechanical properties, in agreement with a damped decreasing exponential model. These mechanical properties loses in fire-resistant composites are less than standard resin composites ones. Toughness characteristics show loses stronger than strength ones. (Author) 33 refs.

  6. Effects of short fiber reinforcement and mean stress on tensile fatigue strength characteristics of polyethersulfone; Tansen`i kyoka porieterusaruhon no hippari hiro tokusei ni oyobosu heikin oryoku no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furue, H.; Nonaka, K. [Mechanical Engineering Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-01-15

    Thermoplastics are often reinforced with short fibers with aims of improvement of their strengths, rigidities and hardness or maintenance of their dimensional stabilities. Such short fiber reinforced plastic materials have more expectation for high performance plastics. Authors already examined of some effects of reinforced fiber and of orientation in injection molding on flexural fatigue characteristics of the injection-molded high performance thermoplastic materials. However, the examination of short fiber reinforced effects on fatigue strength characteristics was not always sufficient. In this study, in order to obtain a guiding principle for fatigue resistant design of the short fiber reinforced injection molding materials, polyethersulfones (PES) was examined on its tensile fatigue strength and an effect of short fiber reinforcement for improvement of its fundamental dynamic properties on its fatigue characteristics. Especially, its fatigue life characteristics was elucidated mainly on relationship of mean stress, stress amplitude and number of repeating fracture in tensile fatigue behavior. 10 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Superelastic behavior and fracture of a Cu-11.8%wAl-0.5%wBe alloy as used in seismic energy dispersors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montecinos, S; Sepulveda, A; Moroni, M; Lund, F

    2004-01-01

    Some results are shown of the characterization of the super elastic behavior and fracturing of a polycrystalline alloy Cu-11.8% w Al-0.5% w Be. It was submitted to monotonic traction and cyclic (at 1 Hz) tests. The alloy was provided by Trefim aux, in the form of 3 and 6 mm diameter wires. This work aims to present a preliminary mechanical definition of this alloy, with a view to its eventual use in seismic energy absorption devices in civil constructions. Similar behavior trends were found for the two diameters, although some differences were detected in the values of the measured properties. The material is super elastic within a deformation range of 2.3% for the 3mm wire and 3.1% for the 6 mm wire. Increasing the grain size increased the material's super elastic range. When the maximum applied deformation was increased, the temperature of the test pieces went up and a change occurred in the form of the cycles, increasing the absorption (with values of 5% in the super elastic limit) and decreasing the K parameter and the rigidity of the cycles. With the monotonic traction tests, the material presents a transgranular fracture from a mixed mechanism of cleavage and micropores, elongating the larger fracture by 15% and a maximum force (UTS) greater than 5000 kg cm 2 (CW)

  8. The Influence of Fold and Fracture Development on Reservoir Behavior of the Lisburne Group of Northern Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L.; Whalen, M.T.; Jensen, J.; Atkinson, P.K.; Brinton, J.S.

    2001-01-09

    The objectives of this study were to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults, (2) The influence of folding and lithostratigraphy on fracture patterns, (3) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics, and (4) The influence of lithostratigraphy and deformation on fluid flow.

  9. Seismological Studies for Tensile Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwo-Bin Ou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A shear slip fault, an equivalence of a double couple source, has often been assumed to be a kinematic source model in ground motion simulation. Estimation of seismic moment based on the shear slip model indicates the size of an earthquake. However, if the dislocation of the hanging wall relative to the footwall includes not only a shear slip tangent to the fault plane but also expansion and compression normal to the fault plane, the radiating seismic waves will feature differences from those out of the shear slip fault. Taking account of the effects resulting from expansion and compression to a fault plane, we can resolve the tension and pressure axes as well as the fault plane solution more exactly from ground motions than previously, and can evaluate how far a fault zone opens or contracts during a developing rupture. In addition to a tensile angle and Poisson¡¦s ratio for the medium, a tensile fault with five degrees of freedom has been extended from the shear slip fault with only three degrees of freedom, strike, dip, and slip.

  10. An analysis of the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the tensile deformation of aluminum-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, C.; Llorca, J.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of superposed hydrostatic pressure on the tensile deformation of particle-reinforced Al-matrix composites was analyzed using a self-consistent approximation. The composite was represented in terms of an interpenetrating network of randomly distributed spheres, which stand for the intact and damaged regions in the composite. Each sphere contained an intact or broken ceramic particle at the center, and the model assumed that the fraction of damaged spheres increased during deformation. The load partitioning between intact and damaged regions in the composite as well as the stress redistribution due to damage was computed through a self-consistent scheme. It was shown that the tensile stresses in the ceramic particles, and thus the fraction of broken particles, were reduced as the hydrostatic pressure increased. This led to a moderate improvement in the composite flow stress but more significant gains were achieved in the strain at the onset of plastic instability. Both magnitudes increased with the hydrostatic pressure until a saturation stress was reached. Particle fracture was completely inhibited at this point, and higher pressures did not have any influence on the composite behavior, which was equivalent to that of the undamaged phase in the absence of hydrostatic pressure. Using reasonable values for the matrix and reinforcement properties, the model predictions for the composite strength and strain at the onset of plastic instability were in good agreement with the experimental data in the literature for high strength Al alloys reinforced with SiC and Al 2 O 3 particles

  11. Microstructure and tensile properties of Fe-40 at. pct Al alloys with C, Zr, Hf, and B additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydosh, D. J.; Draper, S. L.; Nathal, M. V.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of small additions of C, Zr, and Hf, alone or in combination with B, on the microstructure and tensile behavior of substoichiometric FeAl was investigated. Tensile properties were determined from 300 to 1100 K on powder which was consolidated by hot extrusion. All materials possessed some ductility at room temperature, although ternary additions generally reduced ductility compared to the binary alloy. Adding B to the C- and Zr-containing alloys changed the fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular and restored the ductility to approximately 5 percent elongation. Additions of Zr and Hf increased strength up to about 900 K. Fe6Al6Zr and Fe6Al6Hf precipitates, both with identical body-centered tetragonal structures, were identified as the principal second phase in these alloys. Strength decreased steadily as temperature increased above 700 K, as diffusion-assisted mechanisms became operative. Although all alloys had similar strengths at 1100 K, Hf additions significantly improved high-temperature ductility by suppressing cavitation.

  12. Mechanical behavior of Fe{sub 75}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 10}C{sub 7.5}B{sub 2.5} bulk-metallic glass under torsional loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xinjian [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, 92 Weijin Road, Tianjin 300072 (China); Huang Lu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Chen Xu, E-mail: xchen@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, 92 Weijin Road, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); An Ke [Neutron Scattering Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN 37831 (United States); Zhang Tao [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang Gongyao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Fe{sub 75}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 10}C{sub 7.5}B{sub 2.5} bulk-metallic glass exhibits a brittle characteristic under torsional loading. {yields} The BMG occurs in a tensile mode failure under torsional loading. {yields} A slight cyclic-hardening behavior was observed in the initial loading cycles during torsional-fatigue tests. {yields} The torsional fatigue-fracture surface consists of three main regions. - Abstract: Pure- and cyclic-torsional studies were conducted on a Fe{sub 75}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 10}C{sub 7.5}B{sub 2.5} (atomic percent, at.%) bulk-metallic glass at room temperature for an understanding of its damage and fracture mechanisms. Under pure-torsional loading, the metallic glass exhibited very little plastic strain before fracture. The fracture initiated along the maximum tensile-stress plane, which is about 45{sup o} to the axial direction. The shear-fracture strength ({approx}510 MPa) is much lower than the compressive-fracture strength ({approx}3280 MPa), which suggests that different deformation mechanisms be present under various loading modes. Instead of an apparent vein-type structure, the fracture morphologies revealed a crack-initiation site, a mirror region, a mist region, and a hackle region. Under cyclic-torsional loading, fatigue cracks initiated from casting defects, and propagate generally along the maximum tensile-stress plane. A slight cyclic-hardening behavior was observed in initial loading steps. The fatigue-fracture surface consists of three main regions: the fatigue crack-initiation, crack-propagation, and final-fast-fracture areas. The striations resulting from the blunting and re-sharpening of the fatigue crack tip were observed in the crack-propagation region. Based on these results, the damage and fracture mechanisms of the metallic glass induced by torsional loadings are elucidated.

  13. Conjugate Shear Fractures at 'Ki Corona,' Southeast Parga Chasma, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, J. J.; Hansen, V. L.

    1996-03-01

    Brittle tensile failure of Venus' surface is evident in many tectonic regimes, including as extension fractures associated with caldera collapse, radial and concentric fractures of coronae, fractures normal to folds, and fracture belts. However, evidence of brittle shear failure has been described at only two localities_intersecting fractures oblique to wrinkle ridges in Lavinia Planitia were interpreted as conjugate shear fractures by Watters, and en echelon fractures in Guinevere Planitia record dominant extension. but with a component of shear. We confirm these earlier interpretations, and recognize the widespread nature of conjugate shear fractures across the Venus surface, identifying examples at over 100 locations in varied tectonic regimes, including coronae, wrinkle-ridged plains, and fracture belts. However, we focus here on fracture and fold relations at "Ki Corona" (46.8 degrees S, 302.5 degrees E), and their implications toward corona evolution.

  14. Insights into the effects of tensile and compressive loadings on human femur bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaldar, Raviraj; Pilli, S C; Putti, B B

    2014-01-01

    Fragile fractures are most likely manifestations of fatigue damage that develop under repetitive loading conditions. Numerous microcracks disperse throughout the bone with the tensile and compressive loads. In this study, tensile and compressive load tests are performed on specimens of both the genders within 19 to 83 years of age and the failure strength is estimated. Fifty five human femur cortical samples are tested. They are divided into various age groups ranging from 19-83 years. Mechanical tests are performed on an Instron 3366 universal testing machine, according to American Society for Testing and Materials International (ASTM) standards. The results show that stress induced in the bone tissue depends on age and gender. It is observed that both tensile and compression strengths reduces as age advances. Compressive strength is more than tensile strength in both the genders. The compression and tensile strength of human femur cortical bone is estimated for both male and female subjecting in the age group of 19-83 years. The fracture toughness increases till 35 years in male and 30 years in female and reduces there after. Mechanical properties of bone are age and gender dependent.

  15. Creep Behavior of Poly(lactic acid Based Biocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Morreale

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composites containing natural fibers are receiving growing attention as possible alternatives for composites containing synthetic fibers. The use of biodegradable matrices obtained from renewable sources in replacement for synthetic ones is also increasing. However, only limited information is available about the creep behavior of the obtained composites. In this work, the tensile creep behavior of PLA based composites, containing flax and jute twill weave woven fabrics, produced through compression molding, was investigated. Tensile creep tests were performed at different temperatures (i.e., 40 and 60 °C. The results showed that the creep behavior of the composites is strongly influenced by the temperature and the woven fabrics used. As preliminary characterization, quasi-static tensile tests and dynamic mechanical tests were carried out on the composites. Furthermore, fabrics (both flax and jute were tested as received by means of quasi-static tests and creep tests to evaluate the influence of fabrics mechanical behavior on the mechanical response of the resulting composites. The morphological analysis of the fracture surface of the tensile samples showed the better fiber-matrix adhesion between PLA and jute fabric.

  16. Experimental Analyses for The Mechanical Behavior of Pressed All-Ceramic Molar Crowns with Anatomical Design

    OpenAIRE

    Porojan Liliana; Porojan Sorin; Rusu Lucian; Boloş Adrian; Savencu Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic restorations show considerable variation in strength and structural reliability regarding to the type of material, and design characteristics. The fracture of ceramics occurs with little or no plastic deformation, with cracks propagated in an unstable manner under applied tensile stresses. The aim of the study was to assess experimental analyses of pressed monolithic ceramic crowns with anatomical design used in the posterior areas in order to understand their mechanical behavior befo...

  17. Fracture behavior of inlay and onlay fixed partial dentures - An in-vitro experimental and XFEM modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Thompson, Mark; Field, Clarice; Li, Wei; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael V

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the "sensitivity" of the fracture load and initiation site to loading position on the central occlusal surface of a pontic tooth for both all-ceramic inlay retained and onlay supported partial denture systems. Three dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) inlay retained and onlay supported partial denture models were established for simulating crack initiation and propagation by using the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM). The models were subjected to a mastication force up to 500N on the central fossa of the pontic. The loading position was varied to investigate its influence on fracture load and crack path. Small perturbation of the loading position caused the fracture load and crack pattern to vary considerably. For the inlay fixed partial dentures (FPDs), the fracture origins changed from the bucco-gingival aspect of the molar embrasure to the premolar embrasure when the indenter force location is slightly shifted from the mesial to distal side. In contrast, for onlay FPDs, cracking initiated from bucco-gingival aspect of the premolar embrasure when the indenter is slightly shifted to the buccal side and from molar embrasure when the indenter is shifted to the lingual side. The fracture load and cracking path were found to be very sensitive to loading position in the all-ceramic inlay and onlay FPDs. The study provides a basis for improved understanding on the role of localized contact loading of the cusp surface in all-ceramic FPDs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of Cooling Holes Distribution on High Cycle Fatigue Fracture Behavior of DD6 Single Crystal Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Chun-yan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The modeling air-cooled turbine blades specimens of DD6 single crystal superalloy with different distributions of cooling film holes were used to study the high cycle fatigue properties at room temperature. The SEM fracture observation was carried out. The results indicate that the cooling holes have significant effects on the high fatigue life of DD6 single crystal superalloy. The average life of non-hole specimens is four times of that of the three-row holes specimens under the same testing conditions. However, the distribution of cooling film holes has relatively less influence on fatigue life. The fracture of the specimens with non-hole is linear source by SEM analysis, but the cracks are found around the cooling film holes and the fracture of the specimens with single row to three rows is a typical multi-source rupture, and cracks all initiate from near film holes. According to fracture and crystallography theoretical conjecture, the cracks propagate along the {001} slip plane for non-hole, single-row holes and the middle location of the multi-row holes specimens. However, the cracks around the holes grow along the {111} slip plane for upper and lower holes of the specimens with multi-row holes. In addition, the distribution of stress field along cooling holes of four different specimens was analysed by FEM method. The results show that the fracture location and morphology of specimens are consistent well with numerical simulation analysis.

  19. Effect of the Cr2Nb Phase on the Tensile Behavior and Oxidation Resistance of a Two-Step Heat-Treated Nb-24Ti-12Si-10Cr-2Al-2Hf Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, L. N.; Zhang, H.

    2018-04-01

    After a two-step heat treatment, the Cr2Nb particles in a directionally solidified Nb-24Ti-12Si-10Cr-2Al-2Hf (at pct, unless stated otherwise) alloy were substantially refined into nanoscale precipitates. These precipitates showed the following orientation relationship with the NbSS matrix: (111)Nb//(111)Cr2Nb, [110]Nb//[220]Cr2Nb. The formation of nanoscale Cr2Nb particles via an aging heat treatment at 1273 K (1000 °C) improved the tensile strength to 950 MPa and reduced the alloy weight gain from 218.27 to 144.41 mg/cm2.

  20. Tensile properties of orthodontic elastomeric ligatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, F; Jalaly, T; Zebarjad, M

    2010-01-01

    Tensile properties of elastomeric ligatures become important when efficiency of orthodontic appliances is considered. The aim of this study was to compare tensile strength, extension to tensile strength, toughness and modulus of elasticity of elastomeric ligatures in both the as--received condition and after 28 days of immersion in the simulated oral environment. Furthermore, the changes that occurred in tensile properties of each brand of ligatures after 28 days were evaluated. Experimental-laboratory based. Elastomeric ligatures were obtained from different companies and their tensile properties were measured using Zwick testing machine in both the as-received condition and after 28 days of immersion in the simulated oral environment. The data were analyzed using independent sample t-tests, analysis of variance and Tukey tests. After 28 days, all the ligatures experienced a significant decrease in tensile strength, extension to tensile strength and toughness ( P tensile properties of different brands of ligatures in both conditions ( P tensile properties of different brands of ligatures, which should be considered during selection of these products.

  1. The Effect of Si/Al on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Stainless Steel Mesh/Crp Reinforced Geopolymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jingkun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a series stainless steel mesh/Crp reinforced geopolymer composites with different Si/Al molar ratio (N were designed and prepared, where N = 1.75, 2 and 2.25, respectively. The effect of Si/Al molar ratio in the geopolymer matrix on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the geopolymer composites were investigated. The microstructure of geopolymer became more compact when Si/Al increased from 1.75 to 2, which was beneficial to the improvement of geopolymer’s mechanical properties. And continuing to rise to 2.25 for Si/Al, the completely curing of geopolymer composites required more time compared with lower Si/Al, which can be attributed to the different microstructure and chemical composition caused by the different Si/Al. The optimum Si/Al molar ratio was about 2 at which the composites samples present the best mechanical properties with the flexure strength of 115.3 MPa and elastic modulus of 11.0 GPa, respectively. The results of fracture behavior suggested that geopolymer composites with N is 2.25 displayed the behavior characteristics of metal materials, which can be attributed to a poor integrated condition in interface between reinforcements and geopolymer matrix.

  2. Effect of interfragmentary gap on the mechanical behavior of mandibular angle fracture with three fixation designs: A finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Russell; Liu, Yunfeng; Wang, Joanne Helen; Baur, Dale Allen

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to simulate stress and strain distribution numerically on a normal mandible under physiological occlusal loadings. The results were compared with those of mandibles that had an angle fracture stabilized with different fixation designs under the same loadings. The amount of displacement at two interfragmentary gaps was also studied. A three-dimensional (3D) virtual mandible was reconstructed with an angle fracture that had a fracture gap of either 0.1 or 1 mm. Three types of plate fixation designs were used: Type I, a miniplate was placed across the fracture line following the Champy technique; Type II, two miniplates were used; and Type III, a reconstruction plate was used on the inferior border of the mandible. Loads of 100 and 500 N were applied to the models. The maximum von Mises stress, strain, and displacement were computed using finite element analysis. The results from the control and experimental groups were analyzed and compared. The results demonstrated that high stresses and strains were distributed to the condylar and angular areas regardless of the loading position. The ratio of the plate/bone average stress ranged from 215% (Type II design) to 848% (Type I design) irrespective of the interfragmentary gap size. With a 1-mm fracture gap, the ratio of the plate/bone stress ranged from 204% (Type II design) to 1130% (Type I design). All strains were well below critical bone strain thresholds. Displacement on the cross-sectional mapping at fracture interface indicated that uneven movement occurred in x, y, and z directions. Interfragmentary gaps between 0.1 and 1 mm did not have a substantial effect on the average stress distribution to the fractured bony segments; however, they had a greater effect on the stress distribution to the plates and screws. Type II fixation was the best mechanical design under bite loads. Type I design was the least stable system and had the highest stress distribution and the largest displacement

  3. The Influence of Fold and Fracture Development on Reservoir Behavior of the Lisburne Group of Northern Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Wesley K.; Hanks, Catherine L.; Whalen, Michael T.; Jensen1, Jerry; Shackleton, J. Ryan; Jadamec, Margarete A.; McGee, Michelle M.; Karpov1, Alexandre V.

    2001-07-23

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively underformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults, (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns, (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow, and (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics.

  4. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo, E-mail: yongskim@hanyang.ac.kr

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 10{sup 13} to 1 × 10{sup 16} protons/cm{sup 2}. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples’ surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson–Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  5. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  6. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of the effect of microstructure on tensile behavior and retained austenite stability of thermo-mechanically processed transformation induced plasticity steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Kun [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Liss, Klaus-Dieter [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Timokhina, Ilana B. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3217 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V., E-mail: elenap@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-04-26

    Transmission electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the martensitic transformation and lattice strains under uniaxial tensile loading of Fe-Mn-Si-C-Nb-Mo-Al Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel subjected to different thermo-mechanical processing schedules. In contrast with most of the diffraction analysis of TRIP steels reported previously, the diffraction peaks from the martensite phase were separated from the peaks of the ferrite-bainite α-matrix. The volume fraction of retained γ-austenite, as well as the lattice strain, were determined from the diffraction patterns recorded during tensile deformation. Although significant austenite to martensite transformation starts around the macroscopic yield stress, some austenite grains had already experienced martensitic transformation. Hooke’s Law was used to calculate the phase stress of each phase from their lattice strain. The ferrite-bainite α-matrix was observed to yield earlier than austenite and martensite. The discrepancy between integrated phase stresses and experimental macroscopic stress is about 300 MPa. A small increase in carbon concentration in retained austenite at the early stage of deformation was detected, but with further straining a continuous slight decrease in carbon content occurred, indicating that mechanical stability factors, such as grain size, morphology and orientation of the retained austenite, played an important role during the retained austenite to martensite transformation.

  7. Effects of single-fracture aperture statistics on entrapment, dissolution and source depletion behavior of dense non-aqueous phase liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibing; Niemi, Auli; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2012-05-15

    Understanding of the entrapment and dissolution behavior of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in single fractures is important for modeling contaminant flux generation from fractured sites. Here a systematic numerical study is presented to investigate the effect of fracture aperture statistics on DNAPL migration, entrapment and dissolution within individual, variable-aperture fractures. Both fractures with open and closed bottom boundaries were considered. For the simulation a continuum-based two-phase model was used with a capillary pressure function which calculates the entry pressure based on the local aperture. Prior to application the model was compared against the invasion percolation approach and found more suitable for the present study, in particular as it allows a more versatile presentation of boundary conditions. The results showed that increasing aperture standard deviation and/or decreasing correlation length lead to larger amounts of entrapped DNAPL (due to the fact that larger standard deviation produces more distinct contrast between small and large aperture regions and the fact that longer correlation length provides more possible channels through the fracture) as well as larger maximum and average sizes of DNAPL blobs, and subsequently lead to longer times for complete dissolution. To understand the relationship between the solute flux and the remaining mass, a simplified source depletion function which links the outflow concentration to the DNAPL saturation was found adequate to describe the dissolution process for the case where the bottom boundary is open for DNAPL migration and thus the DNAPL does not accumulate to form a pool. The parameters in this function were not very sensitive to variations in correlation length but were sensitive to aperture standard deviation. The same average entrapped DNAPL saturation produced considerably smaller solute concentrations in cases with larger aperture variability due to the larger average size

  8. Delayed Fracture Healing in Diabetics with Distal Radius Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pscherer, S; Sandmann, G H; Ehnert, S; Nussler, A K; Stöckle, U; Freude, T

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Diabetics may have an increased fracture risk, depending on disease duration, quality of metabolic adjustment and extent of comorbidities, and on an increased tendency to fall. The aim of this retrospective one-centre study consisted in detecting differences in fracture healing between patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Data of patients with the most common fracture among older patients were analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS Classification of distal radius fractures was established according to the AO classification. Inital assessment and followup were made by conventional x-rays with radiological default settings. To evaluate fracture healing, formation of callus and sclerotic border, assessment of the fracture gap, and evidence of consolidation signs were used. RESULTS The authors demonstrated that fracture morphology does not influence fracture healing regarding time span, neither concerning consolidation signs nor in fracture gap behavior. However, tendency for bone remodeling is around 70% lower in investigated diabetics than in non-diabetics, while probability for a successful fracture consolidation is 60% lower. CONCLUSIONS To corroborate the authors hypothesis of delayed fracture healing in patients with diabetes mellitus, prospective studies incorporating influencing factors like duration of metabolic disease, quality of diabetes control, medical diabetes treatment, comorbidities and secondary diseaseas, like chronic nephropathy and osteoporosis, have to be carried out. Key words: diabetes, delayed fracture healing, distal radius fractures, callus formation, blood glucose level, osteoblasts.

  9. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  10. Strengthening in and fracture behaviour of CNT and carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Advanced materials such as continuous fibre-reinforced polymer matrix composites offer significant enhancements in strength and fracture resistance properties as compared with their bulk, monolithic counterparts. In the present work, mode-I (tensile) fracture behaviour of the neat epoxy (without nano- or hybrid ...

  11. Effect of tempering on quasi-static and impact fracture toughness and mechanical properties for 5140 H steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepaczko, J. R.; Solecki, A.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of various thermal treatments, i.e., oil quench and different tempering conditions, on quasi-static and impact fracture toughness, stress-strain characteristics, hardness, and Charpy energy of 5140 H steel were examined. During quasi-static and impact loading notched round tensile specimens were used with a prefatigued crack. A specially designed device together with a pendulum hammer and electronic measuring system was used enabling testing of the opening mode fracture toughness at loading rates up to K1 = 3 x 106 MPa√m per second. It has been found that within the region of the lower tempering temperatures, 500 K≤ 650 K, the critical stress intensity factor KIc determined from impact testing is lower than that obtained during slow loading, whereas at the higher tempering temperatures, 650 K ≤ T* ≤ 900 K, dynamic KIu values show a tendency to be higher than their quasi-static counterparts. This behavior was analyzed quantitatively using the Hahn-Rosenfield model which relates tensile properties to fracture toughness. A good agreement was found between quasi-static experimental results and the model. The relation between Charpy energy Kv and the critical stress intensity factor KIc was also evaluated. Changes of the fracture toughness are discussed within the framework of SEM fractographs taken after quasi-static and impact tests.

  12. Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Nickel-Based Superalloy Inconel 718 Powders onto AISI 4140 Alloy Steel Substrates: Interface Bond and Fracture Failure Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoyeol; Cong, Weilong; Zhang, Hong-Chao; Liu, Zhichao

    2017-03-25

    As a prospective candidate material for surface coating and repair applications, nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN718) was deposited on American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 4140 alloy steel substrate by laser engineered net shaping (LENS) to investigate the compatibility between two dissimilar materials with a focus on interface bonding and fracture behavior of the hybrid specimens. The results show that the interface between the two dissimilar materials exhibits good metallurgical bonding. Through the tensile test, all the fractures occurred in the as-deposited IN718 section rather than the interface or the substrate, implying that the as-deposited interlayer bond strength is weaker than the interfacial bond strength. From the fractography using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS), three major factors affecting the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part are (i) metallurgical defects such as incompletely melted powder particles, lack-of-fusion porosity, and micropores; (ii) elemental segregation and Laves phase, and (iii) oxide formation. The fracture failure mechanism is a combination of all these factors which are detrimental to the mechanical properties and structural integrity by causing premature fracture failure of the as-deposited IN718.

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Michael T. Whalen; Jerry Jensen; Paul K. Atkinson; Joseph S. Brinton

    2000-05-01

    The Lisburne Group