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Sample records for tenrec echinops telfairi

  1. Molecular phylogeny and divergence times of Malagasy tenrecs: influence of data partitioning and taxon sampling on dating analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poux, C.; Madsen, O.; Glos, J.; Jong, de W.W.; Vences, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Malagasy tenrecs belong to the Afrotherian clade of placental mammals and comprise three subfamilies divided in eight genera (Tenrecinae: Tenrec, Echinops, Setifer and Hemicentetes; Oryzorictinae: Oryzorictes, Limnogale and Microgale; Geogalinae:Geogale). The diversity of their morphology

  2. Placental diversity in malagasy tenrecs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enders, A.C.; Blankenship, T.N.; Goodman, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Placentation in tenrecs of the subfamily Oryzorictinae, family Tenrecidae, has not been described previously. The structure of the placenta of this group and especially of the genus Microgale was investigated to determine its similarity or dissimilarity to previously described placentas of the te...

  3. Morphological diversity in tenrecs (Afrosoricida, Tenrecidae: comparing tenrec skull diversity to their closest relatives

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    Sive Finlay

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is important to quantify patterns of morphological diversity to enhance our understanding of variation in ecological and evolutionary traits. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of morphological diversity in a family of small mammals, the tenrecs (Afrosoricida, Tenrecidae. Tenrecs are often cited as an example of an exceptionally morphologically diverse group. However, this assumption has not been tested quantitatively. We use geometric morphometric analyses of skull shape to test whether tenrecs are more morphologically diverse than their closest relatives, the golden moles (Afrosoricida, Chrysochloridae. Tenrecs occupy a wider range of ecological niches than golden moles so we predict that they will be more morphologically diverse. Contrary to our expectations, we find that tenrec skulls are only more morphologically diverse than golden moles when measured in lateral view. Furthermore, similarities among the species-rich Microgale tenrec genus appear to mask higher morphological diversity in the rest of the family. These results reveal new insights into the morphological diversity of tenrecs and highlight the importance of using quantitative methods to test qualitative assumptions about patterns of morphological diversity.

  4. Glycosylation at the fetomaternal interface in hemomonochorial placentae from five widely separated species of mammal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Carolyn J. P.; Carter, Anthony M.; Aplin, John D.

    2007-01-01

    Hemomonochorial placentation occurs in diverse species. We have examined placental glycosylation in five widely separated mammals with this type of placentation--lesser hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi), spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta), nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus), human (Homo...... sapiens) and guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)--in order to assess whether evolutionary convergence to the hemomonochorial state is accompanied by a similar convergence of glycan expression. Placentae from 2 E. telfairi, 3 C. crocuta, 1 D. novemcinctus, 4 womenand 1 C. porcellus were fixed and processed...

  5. The adaptational strategies of the hindlimb muscles in the Tenrecidae species including the aquatic web-footed tenrec (Limnogale mergulus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hideki; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Rakotondraparany, Felix; Sasaki, Motoki; Hasegawa, Masami

    2006-07-01

    The hindlimb muscles in four species of Tenrecidae (Oryzoryctinae: Talazac long-tailed tenrec and web-footed tenrec, Tenrecinae: lesser hedgehog tenrec, and streaked tenrec), were examined macroscopically. The weight ratios of the muscles to the body in the oryzoryctinid species are larger than those in Tenrecinae, since the Oryzoryctinae species have an obviously smaller body from the evolutionary point of view. It can be primarily pointed out that the adaptation of the body size is different between the two subfamilies, and secondarily, that functional adaptation to locomotion is complete within each subfamily. The weight data and the morphological findings demonstrate that the web-footed tenrec possesses an extraordinary large M. semimembranosus in comparison to the Talazac long-tailed tenrec in their weight ratios. This muscle may act as a strong flexor motor in the knee joint during the aquatic locomotion of the web-footed tenrec. Since the other muscles of the web-footed tenrec are similar to those of the Talazac long-tailed tenrec regards weight ratio data, we think that the web-footed tenrec may have derived from a terrestrial ancestor such as the long-tailed tenrecs. In Tenrecinae the streaked tenrec is equipped with larger Mm. adductores, M. semimembranosus and M. triceps surae than the lesser hedgehog tenrec. This species is adapted to fossorial life derived from non-specialized ancestors within the evolutionary lines of the spiny tenrecs.

  6. Antimalarial Activity of Acetylenic Thiophenes from Echinops hoehnelii Schweinf

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    Helen Bitew

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the world’s most severe endemic diseases and due to the emergence of resistance to the currently available medicines, the need for new targets and relevant antimalarial drugs remains acute. The crude extract, four solvent fractions and two isolated compounds from the roots of Echinops hoehnelii were tested for their antimalarial activity using the standard four-day suppressive method in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. The 80% methanol extract exhibited suppression of 4.6%, 27.8%, 68.5% and 78.7% at dose of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg respectively. The dichloromethane fraction displayed chemosuppression of 24.9, 33.5 and 43.0% dose of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of body weight. Five acetylenicthiophenes were isolated from the dichloromethane fraction of which 5-(penta-1,3-diynyl-2-(3,4-dihydroxybut-1-ynyl-thiophene decreased the level of parasitaemia by 43.2% and 50.2% while 5-(penta-1,3-diynyl-2-(3-chloro-4-acetoxy-but-1-yn-thiophene suppressed by 18.8% and 32.7% at 50 and 100 mg/kg, respectively. The study confirmed the traditional claim of the plant to treat malaria and could be used as a new lead for the development of antimalarial drugs.

  7. Evaluation of Anti-ulcer Activity of Echinops Persicus on Experimental Gastric Ulcer Models in Rats

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    Ahmad Farajzadeh-Sheikh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Extract of Echinops persicus is traditionally used for a long time in Iran for treatment of cough and constipation. This extract is produced by activity of bug (Situphilus spp. on the plant. We documented its anti-tussive effect in rats in our previous study.The aim of this study was to assess the anti-ulcer effect of Echinops persicus in an animal model. In this study we evaluated anti-ulcer effect of Echinops persicus by Shay's method in rats. In 3 groups of rats, pylorus was ligatured under anesthesia. The rats were euthanized after 19 hours later and number and level of ulcer in stomach was measured. In group 2 the extract was orally administered 45 minutes before pyloric ligature, and in group 3, it was administered intraperitoneally 20 minutes before pyloric ligature. The number of ulcers in stomach was significantly low in group 2 (P = 0.01 and 3 (P = 0.037 in comparison with group 1. The level of ulcer was significantly decreased in group 2 (P = 0.047 with comparison to group 1. We conclude that, Echinops extract can exhibit potentially cytoprotective and anti-ulcer activity.

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12464-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CH251-519B7, W... 44 9.9 1 ( AC211808 ) Echinops telfairi clone CH238-314L5, WORKING DRAF... 44 9.9 1 ( AC201694 ) Echinops telfair...atus clone R3-13O9, WORK... 44 9.9 1 ( AC192906 ) Echinops telfairi clone CH238-4...98J3, WORKING DRAF... 44 9.9 1 ( AC192655 ) Echinops telfairi clone CH238-500O6, WORKING DRAF... 44 9.9 1 (

  9. Identification of Tenrec ecaudatus, a Wild Mammal Introduced to Mayotte Island, as a Reservoir of the Newly Identified Human Pathogenic Leptospira mayottensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadec, Erwan; Gomard, Yann; Le Minter, Gildas; Cordonin, Colette; Cardinale, Eric; Ramasindrazana, Beza; Dietrich, Muriel; Goodman, Steven M; Tortosa, Pablo; Dellagi, Koussay

    2016-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a bacterial zoonosis of major concern on tropical islands. Human populations on western Indian Ocean islands are strongly affected by the disease although each archipelago shows contrasting epidemiology. For instance, Mayotte, part of the Comoros Archipelago, differs from the other neighbouring islands by a high diversity of Leptospira species infecting humans that includes Leptospira mayottensis, a species thought to be unique to this island. Using bacterial culture, molecular detection and typing, the present study explored the wild and domestic local mammalian fauna for renal carriage of leptospires and addressed the genetic relationships of the infecting strains with local isolates obtained from acute human cases and with Leptospira strains hosted by mammal species endemic to nearby Madagascar. Tenrec (Tenrec ecaudatus, Family Tenrecidae), a terrestrial mammal introduced from Madagascar, is identified as a reservoir of L. mayottensis. All isolated L. mayottensis sequence types form a monophyletic clade that includes Leptospira strains infecting humans and tenrecs on Mayotte, as well as two other Malagasy endemic tenrecid species of the genus Microgale. The lower diversity of L. mayottensis in tenrecs from Mayotte, compared to that occurring in Madagascar, suggests that L. mayottensis has indeed a Malagasy origin. This study also showed that introduced rats (Rattus rattus) and dogs are probably the main reservoirs of Leptospira borgpetersenii and Leptospira kirschneri, both bacteria being prevalent in local clinical cases. Data emphasize the epidemiological link between the two neighbouring islands and the role of introduced small mammals in shaping the local epidemiology of leptospirosis.

  10. Identification of Tenrec ecaudatus, a Wild Mammal Introduced to Mayotte Island, as a Reservoir of the Newly Identified Human Pathogenic Leptospira mayottensis.

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    Erwan Lagadec

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a bacterial zoonosis of major concern on tropical islands. Human populations on western Indian Ocean islands are strongly affected by the disease although each archipelago shows contrasting epidemiology. For instance, Mayotte, part of the Comoros Archipelago, differs from the other neighbouring islands by a high diversity of Leptospira species infecting humans that includes Leptospira mayottensis, a species thought to be unique to this island. Using bacterial culture, molecular detection and typing, the present study explored the wild and domestic local mammalian fauna for renal carriage of leptospires and addressed the genetic relationships of the infecting strains with local isolates obtained from acute human cases and with Leptospira strains hosted by mammal species endemic to nearby Madagascar. Tenrec (Tenrec ecaudatus, Family Tenrecidae, a terrestrial mammal introduced from Madagascar, is identified as a reservoir of L. mayottensis. All isolated L. mayottensis sequence types form a monophyletic clade that includes Leptospira strains infecting humans and tenrecs on Mayotte, as well as two other Malagasy endemic tenrecid species of the genus Microgale. The lower diversity of L. mayottensis in tenrecs from Mayotte, compared to that occurring in Madagascar, suggests that L. mayottensis has indeed a Malagasy origin. This study also showed that introduced rats (Rattus rattus and dogs are probably the main reservoirs of Leptospira borgpetersenii and Leptospira kirschneri, both bacteria being prevalent in local clinical cases. Data emphasize the epidemiological link between the two neighbouring islands and the role of introduced small mammals in shaping the local epidemiology of leptospirosis.

  11. GC-MS Analysis of Insecticidal Essential Oil of Aerial Parts of Echinops latifolius Tausch

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    Xin Chao Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The roots of Echinops latifolius Tausch (Asteraceae have been used in the traditional medicine. However, no report on chemical composition and insecticidal activities of the essential oil of this plant exists. The aim of this research was to determine chemical composition and insecticidal activities of the essential oil of E. latifolius aerial parts against maize weevils (Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky for the first time. Essential oil of E. latifolius aerial parts at flowering stage was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. A total of 35 components of the essential oil of E. latifolius aerial parts were identified. The major compounds in the essential oil were 1,8-cineole (19.63%, (Z-β-ocimene (18.44%, and β-pinene (15.56% followed by β-myrcene (4.75% and carvone (4.39%. The essential oil of E. latifolius possessed contact toxicity against S. zeamais with an LD50 value of 36.40 µg/adult. The essential oil also exhibited fumigant toxicity against S. zeamais with an LC50 value of 9.98 mg/L. The study indicates that the essential oil of E. latifolius aerial parts has a potential for development into a natural insecticide/fumigant for control of insects in stored grains.

  12. In vitro evaluation of antileishmanial activity and toxicity of essential oils of Artemisia absinthium and Echinops kebericho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariku, Yinebeb; Hymete, Ariaya; Hailu, Asrat; Rohloff, Jens

    2011-04-01

    Potential toxicity, costs, and drug-resistant pathogens necessitate the development of new antileishmanial agents. Medicinal and aromatic plants constitute a major source of natural organic compounds. In this study, essential oils of Artemisia absinthium L. and Echinops kebericho Mesfin were investigated by GC and GC/MS analyses. Isolated oils were screened for antileishmanial activity against two Leishmania strains (L. aethiopica and L. donovani), and toxicity on the human monocytic leukemia (THP-1) cell line and red blood cells in vitro. GC/MS Analysis revealed 65 compounds (93.74%) for Artemisia absinthium and 43 compounds (92.85%) for Echinops kebericho oil. The oils contained the oxygenated monoterpene camphor (27.40%) and the sesquiterpene lactone dehydrocostus lactone (41.83%) as major constituents, respectively. Both oils showed activity against promastigote (MIC 0.0097-0.1565 μl/ml) and axenic amastigote forms (EC(50) 0.24-42.00 nl/ml) of both leishmania species. Weak hemolytic effect was observed for both oils, showing a slightly decreased selectivity index (SI 0.8-19.2) against the THP-1 cell line. Among the two oils tested, E. kebericho exerted strong antileishmanial activity that was even higher than that of amphotericin B with significant cytotoxicity. This study, therefore, demonstrated the potential use of both oils as source of novel agents for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  13. Cytotoxicity and modes of action of four Cameroonian dietary spices ethno-medically used to treat cancers: Echinops giganteus, Xylopia aethiopica, Imperata cylindrica and Piper capense.

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    Kuete, Victor; Sandjo, Louis P; Wiench, Benjamin; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-08-26

    Echinops giganteus, Imperata cylindrica, Piper capense and Xylopia aethiopica are four medicinal spices used in Cameroon to treat cancers. The above plants previously displayed cytotoxicity against leukemia CCRF-CEM and CEM/ADR5000 cell lines as well as human pancreatic MiaPaCa-2 cells. The present study aims at emphasizing the study of the cytotoxicity and the modes of action of the above plants on a panel of ten cancer cell lines including various sensitive and drug-resistant phenotypes. The study has been extended to the isolation of the bioactive constituents from Echinops giganteus. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction assay, whereas the caspase-Glo assay was used to detect the activation of caspases 3/7, caspase 8 and caspase 9 in cells treated with the four extracts. Flow cytometry was used for cell cycle analysis and detection of apoptotic cells, analysis of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) as well as measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The four tested extracts inhibited the proliferation of all tested cancer cell lines including sensitive and drug-resistant phenotypes. Collateral sensitivity of cancer cells to the extract of Echinops giganteus was generally better than to doxorubicin. The recorded IC50 ranges were 3.29 µg/mL [against human knockout clones HCT116 (p53(-/-)) colon cancer cells] to 14.32 µg/mL (against human liver hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells) for the crude extract from Echinops giganteus, 4.17 µg/mL (against breast cancer cells transduced with control vector MDA-MB231 cells) to 19.45 µg/mL (against MDA-MB-231 BCRP cells) for that of Piper capense, 4.11 µg/mL (against leukemia CCRF-CEM cells) to 30.60 µg/mL (against leukemia HL60AR cells) for Xylopia aethiopica, 3.28 µg/mL [against HCT116 (p53(-/-)) cells] to 33.43 µg/mL (against HepG2 cells) for Imperata cylindica and 0.11 µg/mL (against CCRF-CEM cells) to 132.47 µg/mL (against HL60AR cells) for doxorubicin. The four

  14. 2-(Penta-1,3-diynyl-5-(3,4-dihydroxybut-1-ynylthiophene, a Novel NQO1 Inducing Agent from Echinops grijsii Hance

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    Hai Jiang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A natural alkynol group-substituted thiophene, 2-(penta-1,3-diynyl-5-(3,4-dihydroxybut-1-ynyl-thiophene (PDDYT, was isolated from the roots of Echinops grijsii Hance. It possessed potent NAD(PH: quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1 inducing activity and could activate Keap1-Nrf2 pathway effectively in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Further investigations indicated that the activation of Keap1-Nrf2 pathway by PDDYT might be attributed to the activation of Akt and depleting the cellular glutathione (GSH.

  15. Study of Inhibitory Effect of Echinops cephalotes on Candida Spp. Isolated from Vulvovaginal Candidiasis Patients in Isfahan

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    Sara Heshmati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Candida spp. has been considered as the agents of acute and recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. Objectives The aim of current study was the evaluation of antifungal activity of Echinops cephalotes (Leaves and stem, manna plant against species of Candida isolated from patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis. Materials and Methods In this research study identification of clinical isolates (50 cases was inducted to the species level by means of conventional mycological methods, morophology on corn meal agar and chromogenic agar, germ tube production and biochemical methods. Antifungal activity of the ethanolic, methanolic and aqueous extracts of E. cephalotes was studied against isolated Candida using agar well diffusion and microdilution methods. Results Candida spp. which isolated from patients was C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. The inhibition zone of ethanolic extract was 16.6, 13.3, 14, and 22 mg/mL respectively. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for most the cases were 15.6 mg/mL. The inhibition zone of aqueous extract was 16.8, 16.7, 15 and 15 mg/mL respectively. MIC for most the cases were 15.6-31.2 mg/mL. The inhibition zone of methanolic extract was 15.4, 13.2, 12 and 18 respectively. MIC for most of the cases was 7.8 mg/mL. Among the different extracts, ethanolic extract has the highest and aqueous extract has the lowest anti-Candida activity. Ethanolic, methanolic and aqueous extracts of trehala manna did not show any antifungal activity. Conclusions This research is the first study on antifungal activity of E. cephalotes. Hence, this plant may be used further as medicinal plant against Candida spp.

  16. Trypanosoma brucei Inhibition by Essential Oils from Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Traditionally Used in Cameroon (Azadirachta indica, Aframomum melegueta, Aframomum daniellii, Clausena anisata, Dichrostachys cinerea and Echinops giganteus).

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    Kamte, Stephane L Ngahang; Ranjbarian, Farahnaz; Campagnaro, Gustavo Daniel; Nya, Prosper C Biapa; Mbuntcha, Hélène; Woguem, Verlaine; Womeni, Hilaire Macaire; Ta, Léon Azefack; Giordani, Cristiano; Barboni, Luciano; Benelli, Giovanni; Cappellacci, Loredana; Hofer, Anders; Petrelli, Riccardo; Maggi, Filippo

    2017-07-06

    Essential oils are complex mixtures of volatile components produced by the plant secondary metabolism and consist mainly of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and, to a minor extent, of aromatic and aliphatic compounds. They are exploited in several fields such as perfumery, food, pharmaceutics, and cosmetics. Essential oils have long-standing uses in the treatment of infectious diseases and parasitosis in humans and animals. In this regard, their therapeutic potential against human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) has not been fully explored. In the present work, we have selected six medicinal and aromatic plants ( Azadirachta indica , Aframomum melegueta , Aframomum daniellii , Clausena anisata , Dichrostachys cinerea , and Echinops giganteus ) traditionally used in Cameroon to treat several disorders, including infections and parasitic diseases, and evaluated the activity of their essential oils against Trypanosma brucei TC221. Their selectivity was also determined with Balb/3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line) cells as a reference. The results showed that the essential oils from A. indica , A . daniellii , and E. giganteus were the most active ones, with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) values of 15.21, 7.65, and 10.50 µg/mL, respectively. These essential oils were characterized by different chemical compounds such as sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, monoterpene hydrocarbons, and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Some of their main components were assayed as well on T. brucei TC221, and their effects were linked to those of essential oils.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of Echinops kebericho against human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and methods: Crude extracts of E. kebericho Mesfin were prepared by maceration method. Disc diffusion assay of the extracts was carried out in four different concentrations against three different bacterial species and two clinically isolated fungal species. Agar dilution method was used to determine minimum ...

  18. Toxicity of Thiophenes from Echinops transiliensis (Asteraceae) against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    aegypti larvae (LC50 , 3.21 mg/l; LC90, 6.81 mg/l). The LC50 value of permethrin was 0.0034 mg/l. In the screening bioassay, permethrin was used at a dose... Foods , Bloomingdale, Illinois), Brewers yeast (Lewis Laboratories Ltd., Westport, CT), and 1 ml of deionized H2O were added to each well with a... Permethrin (46.1% cis/53.2% trans, Chemical Service, West Chester, PA) was used as positive control. A series of five dosages were used in each treatment to

  19. Evaluation of the Methanol Extract of Yazd Native Plants on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Proliferation and IL-4 Secretion

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    N Jamshidian Tehrani

    2015-09-01

    Results: The different concentrations of root extracts of all plants showed inhibitory effect on PBMCs. There was a significant difference among Echinops lasiolepis extracts in different concentrations(p=0.045. The levels of IL-4 were similar in super natant in control group and different concentrations and the control groups. Conclusions: The results showed that root extracts of Echinops species had inhibitory effect on PBMCs proliferation and in some species with decrease in IL-4 secretion might have immunomedulatory effects. The effect of Echinops extract fractions on PBMC is suggested.

  20. Three new host-fungus records for Golovinomyces species in Montana and Washington

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    The powdery mildews Golovinomyces echinopis on Echinops exaltatus (tall globethistle), and G. biocellatus on Salvia officinalis (common sage), are documented for the first time in Washington State. Golovinomyces cynoglossi on Cynoglossum officinale (houndstongue) is documented for the first time in ...

  1. Discovery of Macrotarsomys bastardi at Beza Mahafaly Special ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Antho Youssouf Jack and Emilienne Rasoazanabary

    2008-12-01

    Malagasy Tenrecoidea (Mammalia). PhD Dissertation, City. University of New York. Salton, J. A. and Buffenstein, R. 2004. Field Thermoregulatory Profiles in. Tenrecs from the Rainforest and Xeric forest of Madagascar. Poster.

  2. Untitled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    they could be fatal to infants, the elderly antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance ... powdered and sieved with a mesh. Known mass of ... antibiotic (19). In our study, however,. Echinops spp., although relatively more inhibitory than the other crude preparations, did not show any effective inhibition on most Gram negative test strains.

  3. Placentation in mammals once grouped as insectivores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony; Enders, Allen

    2009-01-01

    nutrition involving columnar trophoblast cells. These range from areolae in moles through complexly folded hemophagous regions in tenrecs to the trophoblastic annulus in shrews. Of these placental characters, few offer support to current phylogenies. However, the case for placing hedgehogs and gymnures...

  4. The Fetal Membranes of the Otter Shrews and a Synapomorphy for Afrotheria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Anthony M.; Blankenship, T.N.; Enders, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    The otter shrews of mainland Africa are the closest relatives of the Madagascar tenrecs. We sought for similarities in placentation between the two groups and, in a wider context, with other mammals of the Afrotheria clade. Specimens of the Nimba otter shrew (Micropotamogale lamottei) were obtained...

  5. Molecular evidence for multiple origins of Insectivora and for a new order of endemic African insectivore mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Michael J.; Waddell, Victor G.; Madsen, Ole; de Jong, Wilfried; Hedges, S. Blair; Cleven, Gregory C.; Kao, Diana; Springer, Mark S.

    1998-01-01

    The traditional views regarding the mammalian order Insectivora are that the group descended from a single common ancestor and that it is comprised of the following families: Soricidae (shrews), Tenrecidae (tenrecs), Solenodontidae (solenodons), Talpidae (moles), Erinaceidae (hedgehogs and gymnures), and Chrysochloridae (golden moles). Here we present a molecular analysis that includes representatives of all six families of insectivores, as well as 37 other taxa representing marsupials, monotremes, and all but two orders of placental mammals. These data come from complete sequences of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA, tRNA-Valine, and 16S rRNA genes (2.6 kb). A wide range of different methods of phylogenetic analysis groups the tenrecs and golden moles (both endemic to Africa) in an all-African superordinal clade comprised of elephants, sirenians, hyracoids, aardvark, and elephant shrews, to the exclusion of the other four remaining families of insectivores. Statistical analyses reject the idea of a monophyletic Insectivora as well as traditional concepts of the insectivore suborder Soricomorpha. These findings are supported by sequence analyses of several nuclear genes presented here: vWF, A2AB, and α-β hemoglobin. These results require that the order Insectivora be partitioned and that the two African families (golden moles and tenrecs) be placed in a new order. The African superordinal clade now includes six orders of placental mammals. PMID:9707584

  6. THE subfossil occurrence and paleoecological significance of small mammals at ankilitelo cave, southwestern Madagascar

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    Muldoon, K.M.; De Blieux, D. D.; Simons, E.L.; Chatrath, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    Small mammals are rarely reported from subfossil sites in Madagascar despite their importance for paleoenvironmental reconstruction, especially as it relates to recent ecological changes on the island. We describe the uniquely rich subfossil small mammal fauna from Ankilitelo Cave, southwestern Madagascar. The Ankilitelo fauna is dated to the late Holocene (???500 years ago), documenting the youngest appearances of the extinct giant lemur taxa Palaeopropithecus, Megaladapis, and Archaeolemur, in association with abundant remains of small vertebrates, including bats, tenrecs, carnivorans, rodents, and primates. The Ankilitelo fauna is composed of 34 mammalian species, making it one of the most diverse Holocene assemblages in Madagascar. The fauna comprises the 1 st report of the short-tailed shrew tenrec (Microgale brevicaudata) and the ring-tailed mongoose (Galidia elegans) in southwestern Madagascar. Further, Ankilitelo documents the presence of southwestern species that are rare or that have greatly restricted ranges today, such as Nasolo's shrew tenrec (M. nasoloi), Grandidier's mongoose (Galidictis grandidieri), the narrow-striped mongoose (Mungotictis decemlineata), and the giant jumping rat (Hypogeomys antimena). A simple cause for the unusual small mammal occurrences at Ankilitelo is not obvious. Synergistic interactions between climate change, recent fragmentation and human-initiated degradation of forested habitats, and community-level processes, such as predation, most likely explain the disjunct distributions of the small mammals documented at Ankilitelo. ?? 2009 American Society of Mammalogists.

  7. Ethnopharmacological survey and phytochemical screening of some medicinal Asteraceae from Algerian Sahara

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    A. CHERITI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A first report of Asteraceae species census of the Algerian folk medicine, currently used in Sahara for the treatment of illenes is presented. 11 Asteraceae species namely: Anvillea radiata Coss, Artemisia herba-alba, Brocchia cinerea, Bubonium graveolens, Cotula anthemoides, Echinops spinosus, Launaea arborescens, Launaea nudicaulis, Launaea resedifolia, Scorzonera undulata and Warionia saharae were selected based on the survey through interviews with local inhabitant, herbalist in the Souk and old women according to our previous works. Ethnopharmacolgical potential and chemical constituents of this species are described.

  8. Ethnopharmacological survey and phytochemical screening of some medicinal Asteraceae from Algerian Sahara

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    A CHERITI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A first report of Asteracea species census of the Algerian folk medicine, currently used in Sahara for the treatment of illenes is presented. 11 Asteraceae species namely: Anvillea radiata coss, Artemisia herba-alba, Brocchia cinerea, Bubonium graveolens, Cotula anthemoides, Echinops spinosus, Launaea arborescens, Launaea nudicaulis, Launaea resedifolia, Scorzonera undulata and Warionia saharae were selected based on the survey through interviews with local inhabitant, herbalist in the Souk and old women according to our previous works. Ethnopharmacolgical potential and chemical constituents of this species are described.

  9. Dental eruption in afrotherian mammals

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    Lehmann Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Afrotheria comprises a newly recognized clade of mammals with strong molecular evidence for its monophyly. In contrast, morphological data uniting its diverse constituents, including elephants, sea cows, hyraxes, aardvarks, sengis, tenrecs and golden moles, have been difficult to identify. Here, we suggest relatively late eruption of the permanent dentition as a shared characteristic of afrotherian mammals. This characteristic and other features (such as vertebral anomalies and testicondy recall the phenotype of a human genetic pathology (cleidocranial dysplasia, correlations with which have not been explored previously in the context of character evolution within the recently established phylogeny of living mammalian clades. Results Although data on the absolute timing of eruption in sengis, golden moles and tenrecs are still unknown, craniometric comparisons for ontogenetic series of these taxa show that considerable skull growth takes place prior to the complete eruption of the permanent cheek teeth. Specimens showing less than half (sengis, golden moles or two-thirds (tenrecs, hyraxes of their permanent cheek teeth reach or exceed the median jaw length of conspecifics with a complete dentition. With few exceptions, afrotherians are closer to median adult jaw length with fewer erupted, permanent cheek teeth than comparable stages of non-afrotherians. Manatees (but not dugongs, elephants and hyraxes with known age data show eruption of permanent teeth late in ontogeny relative to other mammals. While the occurrence of delayed eruption, vertebral anomalies and other potential afrotherian synapomorphies resemble some symptoms of a human genetic pathology, these characteristics do not appear to covary significantly among mammalian clades. Conclusion Morphological characteristics shared by such physically disparate animals such as elephants and golden moles are not easy to recognize, but are now known to include late eruption

  10. Genome size: a novel genomic signature in support of Afrotheria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, Carlo Alberto; Garagna, Silvia; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Capanna, Ernesto

    2007-04-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analyses suggest an emerging phylogeny for the extant Placentalia (eutherian) that radically departs from morphologically based constructions of the past. Placental mammals are partitioned into four supraordinal clades: Afrotheria, Xenarthra, Laurasiatheria, and Euarchontoglires. Afrotheria form an endemic African clade that includes elephant shrews, golden moles, tenrecs, aardvarks, hyraxes, elephants, dugongs, and manatees. Datamining databases of genome size (GS) shows that till today just one afrotherian GS has been evaluated, that of the aardvark Orycteropus afer. We show that the GSs of six selected representatives across the Afrotheria supraordinal group are among the highest for the extant Placentalia, providing a novel genomic signature of this enigmatic group. The mean GS value of Afrotheria, 5.3 +/- 0.7 pg, is the highest reported for the extant Placentalia. This should assist in planning new genome sequencing initiatives.

  11. Ensembl 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, T J P; Aken, B L; Beal, K; Ballester, B; Caccamo, M; Chen, Y; Clarke, L; Coates, G; Cunningham, F; Cutts, T; Down, T; Dyer, S C; Fitzgerald, S; Fernandez-Banet, J; Graf, S; Haider, S; Hammond, M; Herrero, J; Holland, R; Howe, K; Howe, K; Johnson, N; Kahari, A; Keefe, D; Kokocinski, F; Kulesha, E; Lawson, D; Longden, I; Melsopp, C; Megy, K; Meidl, P; Ouverdin, B; Parker, A; Prlic, A; Rice, S; Rios, D; Schuster, M; Sealy, I; Severin, J; Slater, G; Smedley, D; Spudich, G; Trevanion, S; Vilella, A; Vogel, J; White, S; Wood, M; Cox, T; Curwen, V; Durbin, R; Fernandez-Suarez, X M; Flicek, P; Kasprzyk, A; Proctor, G; Searle, S; Smith, J; Ureta-Vidal, A; Birney, E

    2007-01-01

    The Ensembl (http://www.ensembl.org/) project provides a comprehensive and integrated source of annotation of chordate genome sequences. Over the past year the number of genomes available from Ensembl has increased from 15 to 33, with the addition of sites for the mammalian genomes of elephant, rabbit, armadillo, tenrec, platypus, pig, cat, bush baby, common shrew, microbat and european hedgehog; the fish genomes of stickleback and medaka and the second example of the genomes of the sea squirt (Ciona savignyi) and the mosquito (Aedes aegypti). Some of the major features added during the year include the first complete gene sets for genomes with low-sequence coverage, the introduction of new strain variation data and the introduction of new orthology/paralog annotations based on gene trees.

  12. Increased homeothermy during reproduction in a basal placental mammal.

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    Levesque, Danielle L; Lovegrove, Barry G

    2014-05-01

    Homeothermic endothermy, the maintenance of a high and stable body temperature (Tb) using heat produced by elevated metabolism, is energetically expensive. There is increasing evidence that the earliest endotherms were heterotherms that, rather than maintaining strict homeothermy, allowed Tb to fluctuate with large variations between active and rest-phase Tb. The high level of homeothermy observed in modern mammals is therefore likely to have evolved from an ancestral heterothermic state. One of the hypotheses for the evolution of endothermy is that homeothermy allows for greater energetic output during reproduction (parental care model). We tested this hypothesis by measuring metabolic rates over a range of ambient temperatures in both reproductive and non-reproductive greater hedgehog tenrecs (Setifer setosus), a physiologically primitive mammal from Madagascar. Tenrecs have some of the lowest metabolic rates and highest levels of Tb variability of any mammal and are therefore good models of the ancestral eutherian state. During pregnancy and lactation, there was an increase in metabolism and Tb below the thermoneutral zone, accompanied by a decrease in Tb variability. The lower critical limit of the thermoneutral zone was estimated at ~25°C. However, whereas increases in resting metabolism were substantial below 20°C (up to 150% higher during reproduction), daytime rest-phase ambient temperatures at the study site rarely reached equivalent low levels. Thus, S. setosus provide an example for how relatively low-cost increases in homeothermy could have led to substantial increases in fitness by allowing for the faster production of young. The mechanisms necessary for increases in thermogenesis during reproduction would have further benefited the development of homeothermy in mammals.

  13. The importance of taboos and social norms to conservation in Madagascar.

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    Jones, Julia P G; Andriamarovololona, Mijasoa M; Hockley, Neal

    2008-08-01

    Informal institutions governing the use of wild species are present in many societies. A system of prohibitions known as fady is central to Malagasy culture. We examined whether fady that relate to the use of natural resources in the eastern rainforests of Madagascar play an important conservation role. Prohibitions ranged from strict taboos in which a species or area was forbidden by the ancestors to social norms that concerned acceptable behavior when harvesting wild species. Strict taboos offered real protection to threatened species, such as the lemur Propithecus edwardsi and the carnivore Cryptoprocta ferox. Taboos also reduced pressure on some economically important endemic species by preventing their sale or limiting the harvest season. Despite their value for conservation, the taboos did not appear to originate from attempts to sustainably manage resources. Nevertheless, social norms, in which the sanction was social disapproval rather than supernatural retribution, encouraged sustainable harvesting practices for tenrecs (Tenrec ecudatus) and pandans (Pandanus spp.). Unfortunately, the social norms concerning methods of harvesting pandans appeared to be breaking down in villages surrounding Ranomafana National Park, and we suggest that the imposition of external conservation rules is weakening traditional management. Informal institutions are important to conservation because they suggest ways of improving cultural understanding and conservation communication. Food taboos influence societal preferences, which affect the wider demand for a species. Most important, where capacity to enforce external conservation rules is limited, informal institutions may provide the only effective regulations. Informal institutions should receive greater attention from conservation biologists so that local people's conservation roles can be acknowledged fairly and so that potential synergies with conservation objectives can be realized.

  14. Seasonal variation in the abundance and distribution of ticks that parasitize Microcebus griseorufus at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar

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    Idalia A. Rodriguez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve (BMSR, Madagascar, mouse lemurs (Microcebus griseorufus are parasitized by multiple species of haemaphysaline ticks. At present we know little about the role ticks play in wild lemur populations and how they can alter interspecies relationships within communities or impact host fitness. In order to better understand these dynamics at BMSR, we examined parasite-host interactions as well as the ecology of mouse lemurs and their infesting ticks, Haemaphysalis lemuris and H. sp. cf. simplex. We show that season, host sex, and habitat influence the relative abundance of ticks on mouse lemurs. Specifically, infestations occur only during the dry season (May–October, are higher in males, and are higher at the study site with the most ground cover and with greater density of large-bodied hosts. Microcebus likely experience decreased susceptibility to tick infestations during the wet season because at that time they rarely if ever descend to the ground. Similarly, male mouse lemurs have higher infestation rates than females because of the greater time they spend traveling and foraging on the ground. During the dry season, Microcebus likely serve as hosts for the tenrec tick, H. sp. cf. simplex, when tenrecs hibernate. In turn, during the wet season when mouse lemurs rarely descend to the ground, other small mammals at the reserve may serve as maintenance hosts for populations of immature ticks. The synchronous development of larvae and nymphs could present high risk for vector-borne disease in Microcebus. This study also provides a preliminary description of the ecology and life cycle of the most common lemur tick, H. lemuris.

  15. Effects of reproductive status and high ambient temperatures on the body temperature of a free-ranging basoendotherm.

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    Levesque, Danielle L; Lobban, Kerileigh D; Lovegrove, Barry G

    2014-12-01

    Tenrecs (Order Afrosoricida) exhibit some of the lowest body temperatures (T b) of any eutherian mammal. They also have a high level of variability in both active and resting T bs and, at least in cool temperatures in captivity, frequently employ both short- and long-term torpor. The use of heterothermy by captive animals is, however, generally reduced during gestation and lactation. We present data long-term T b recordings collected from free-ranging S. setosus over the course of two reproductive seasons. In general, reproductive females had slightly higher (~32 °C) and less variable T b, whereas non-reproductive females and males showed both a higher propensity for torpor as well as lower (~30.5 °C) and more variable rest-phase T bs. Torpor expression defined using traditional means (using a threshold or cut-off T b) was much lower than predicted based on the high degree of heterothermy in captive tenrecs. However, torpor defined in this manner is likely to be underestimated in habitats where ambient temperature is close to T b. Our results caution against inferring metabolic states from T b alone and lend support to the recent call to define torpor in free-ranging animals based on mechanistic and not descriptive variables. In addition, lower variability in T b observed during gestation and lactation confirms that homeothermy is essential for reproduction in this species and probably for basoendothermic mammals in general. The relatively low costs of maintaining homeothermy in a sub-tropical environment might help shed light on how homeothermy could have evolved incrementally from an ancestral heterothermic condition.

  16. The application of multiplex fluorimetric sensor for the analysis of flavonoids content in the medicinal herbs family Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytar, Oksana; Bruckova, Klaudia; Hunkova, Elena; Zivcak, Marek; Konate, Kiessoun; Brestic, Marian

    2015-01-16

    The aim of our research work was to quantify total flavonoid contents in the leaves of 13 plant species family Asteraceae, 8 representatives of family Lamiaceae and 9 plant species belonging to family Rosaceae, using the multiplex fluorimetric sensor. Fluorescence was measured using optical fluorescence apparatus Multiplex(R) 3 (Force-A, France) for non-destructive flavonoids estimation. The content of total flavonoids was estimated by FLAV index (expressed in relative units), that is deduced from flavonoids UV absorbing properties. Among observed plant species, the highest amount of total flavonoids has been found in leaves of Helianthus multiflorus (1.65 RU) and Echinops ritro (1.27 RU), Rudbeckia fulgida (1.13 RU) belonging to the family Asteraceae. Lowest flavonoid content has been observed in the leaves of marigold (Calendula officinalis) (0.14 RU) also belonging to family Asteraceae. The highest content of flavonoids among experimental plants of family Rosaceae has been estimated in the leaves of Rosa canina (1.18 RU) and among plant species of family Lamiaceae in the leaves of Coleus blumei (0.90 RU). This research work was done as pre-screening of flavonoids content in the leaves of plant species belonging to family Asteraceae, Lamiaceae and Rosaceae. Results indicated that statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) in flavonoids content were observed not only between families, but also among individual plant species within one family.

  17. A new species of semiarboreal toad of the Rhinella festae group (Anura, Bufonidae) from the Cordillera Azul National Park, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusi, Juan C.; Moravec, Jiří; Lehr, Edgar; Gvoždík, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A new semiarboreal species of the Rhinella festae group is described from montane forests of the Cordillera Azul National Park between 1245 and 1280 m a.s.l. in the Cordillera Oriental, San Martín region, northern Peru. The new species is morphologically and genetically compared with members of the Rhinella acrolopha group (former genus Rhamphophryne) and members of the R. festae group. The new species is characterized by its large size (female SVL 47.1–58.3 mm, n = 4), eight presacral vertebrae, fusion of the sacrum and coccyx, long protuberant snout, snout directed slightly anteroventral in lateral view, cranial crests moderately developed, absence of occipital crest, presence of tympanic membrane, dorsolateral rows of small conical tubercles extending from parotoid gland to groin, hands and feet with long digits, fingers basally webbed and toes moderately webbed. Phylogenetically it is a member of the R. festae group which is most closely related to R. chavin and R. yanachaga from Peru. Morphologically the new species shares similarities with R. tenrec and R. truebae, members of the R. acrolopha group from Colombia. PMID:28769671

  18. [Resurgence of the plague in the Ikongo district of Madagascar in 1998. 1. Epidemiological aspects in the human population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliani, R; Ratsitorahina, M; Rahalison, L; Rakotoarivony, I; Duchemin, J B; Duplantier, J M; Rakotonomenjanahary, J; Chanteau, S

    2001-05-01

    Between the 20th October and the 18th November 1998, an outbreak of bubonic plague was declared in a hamlet in the Ikongo district of Madagascar. We conducted an epidemiological survey because of the re-emergence of the disease in this area (the last cases had been notified in 1965) and because of the low altitude compared to the classical Malagasy foci. The outbreak had been preceded by an important rat epizootics during September. A total of 21 cases were registered with an attack rate of 16.7% (21/126) and a lethality rate of 33% (7/21). The disease was more prevalent in males (66% of cases) and children aged < 15 years, as observed in general throughout the country. The anti-F1 seroprevalence among the contact population was 13.5% (13/96), probably attributable to subclinical infection by Yersinia pestis. No rodent was trapped during the survey, but an endemic hedgehog (Tenrec ecaudatus) was highly seropositive, suggesting a recent transmission of the plague bacillus among this species. The small mammals and vectors possibly involved in these new foci were investigated in May 1999.

  19. Le mini-élevage, son développement villageoiset l'action de BEDIM

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    Jacques Hardouin

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Minilivestock, village development and the role of BEDIM.Minilivestock encompasses all animals of small site, and little-known in terras of production but usable as food, feed or revenues if not eaten. Sustainable breeding becomes possible, and should progressively replace uncontrolled gathering in the wild. Amongst vertebrates, an important meat supply is based on edible rodents like Thryonomys, Cricetomys, Xerus, Atherurus, Tenrec; Hydrochoerus, Dasyprocta, Myocastor, Capromys, Dolichotis, Agouti, etc. The saine applies to the guinea-pig Cavia porcellus and to frogs. Invertebrates farming is also practised through breeding of maggots, termites, butterflies (pupae and adults for consumption or sale; giant snails are also highly appreciated in many African countries. Minilivestock development is usually a back-yard activity, hence its interest as it relies on local species, substrates and raw materials for infrastructure. The demand for minilivestock product is high but there is still reluctance often from the official authorities, unfortunately. However minilivestock is not an utopia, and a country like Papua-New-Guinea, which bas officially adopted minilivestock production as a tool to help to develop remote villages, is an excellent example of success

  20. Digital cranial endocast of Hyopsodus (Mammalia, "Condylarthra": a case of paleogene terrestrial echolocation?

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    Maeva J Orliac

    Full Text Available We here describe the endocranial cast of the Eocene archaic ungulate Hyopsodus lepidus AMNH 143783 (Bridgerian, North America reconstructed from X-ray computed microtomography data. This represents the first complete cranial endocast known for Hyopsodontinae. The Hyopsodus endocast is compared to other known "condylarthran" endocasts, i. e. those of Pleuraspidotherium (Pleuraspidotheriidae, Arctocyon (Arctocyonidae, Meniscotherium (Meniscotheriidae, Phenacodus (Phenacodontidae, as well as to basal perissodactyls (Hyracotherium and artiodactyls (Cebochoerus, Homacodon. Hyopsodus presents one of the highest encephalization quotients of archaic ungulates and shows an "advanced version" of the basal ungulate brain pattern, with a mosaic of archaic characters such as large olfactory bulbs, weak ventral expansion of the neopallium, and absence of neopallium fissuration, as well as more specialized ones such as the relative reduction of the cerebellum compared to cerebrum or the enlargement of the inferior colliculus. As in other archaic ungulates, Hyopsodus midbrain exposure is important, but it exhibits a dorsally protruding largely developed inferior colliculus, a feature unique among "Condylarthra". A potential correlation between the development of the inferior colliculus in Hyopsodus and the use of terrestrial echolocation as observed in extant tenrecs and shrews is discussed. The detailed analysis of the overall morphology of the postcranial skeleton of Hyopsodus indicates a nimble, fast moving animal that likely lived in burrows. This would be compatible with terrestrial echolocation used by the animal to investigate subterranean habitat and/or to minimize predation during nocturnal exploration of the environment.

  1. Collagen Sequence Analysis of the Extinct Giant Ground Sloths Lestodon and Megatherium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Michael; Fariña, Richard A.; Lawless, Craig; Tambusso, P. Sebastián; Varela, Luciano; Carlini, Alfredo A.; Powell, Jaime E.; Martinez, Jorge G.

    2015-01-01

    For over 200 years, fossils of bizarre extinct creatures have been described from the Americas that have ranged from giant ground sloths to the ‘native’ South American ungulates, groups of mammals that evolved in relative isolation on South America. Ground sloths belong to the South American xenarthrans, a group with modern although morphologically and ecologically very different representatives (anteaters, armadillos and sloths), which has been proposed to be one of the four main eutherian clades. Recently, proteomics analyses of bone collagen have recently been used to yield a molecular phylogeny for a range of mammals including the unusual ‘Malagasy aardvark’ shown to be most closely related to the afrotherian tenrecs, and the south American ungulates supporting their morphological association with condylarths. However, proteomics results generate partial sequence information that could impact upon the phylogenetic placement that has not been appropriately tested. For comparison, this paper examines the phylogenetic potential of proteomics-based sequencing through the analysis of collagen extracted from two extinct giant ground sloths, Lestodon and Megatherium. The ground sloths were placed as sister taxa to extant sloths, but with a closer relationship between Lestodon and the extant sloths than the basal Megatherium. These results highlight that proteomics methods could yield plausible phylogenies that share similarities with other methods, but have the potential to be more useful in fossils beyond the limits of ancient DNA survival. PMID:26540101

  2. Contrasting GC-content dynamics across 33 mammalian genomes: relationship with life-history traits and chromosome sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romiguier, Jonathan; Ranwez, Vincent; Douzery, Emmanuel J P; Galtier, Nicolas

    2010-08-01

    The origin, evolution, and functional relevance of genomic variations in GC content are a long-debated topic, especially in mammals. Most of the existing literature, however, has focused on a small number of model species and/or limited sequence data sets. We analyzed more than 1000 orthologous genes in 33 fully sequenced mammalian genomes, reconstructed their ancestral isochore organization in the maximum likelihood framework, and explored the evolution of third-codon position GC content in representatives of 16 orders and 27 families. We showed that the previously reported erosion of GC-rich isochores is not a general trend. Several species (e.g., shrew, microbat, tenrec, rabbit) have independently undergone a marked increase in GC content, with a widening gap between the GC-poorest and GC-richest classes of genes. The intensively studied apes and (especially) murids do not reflect the general placental pattern. We correlated GC-content evolution with species life-history traits and cytology. Significant effects of body mass and genome size were detected, with each being consistent with the GC-biased gene conversion model.

  3. Introduced mammals on Western Indian Ocean islands

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    James C. Russell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of introduced mammals and their introduction history varies greatly across the Western Indian Ocean (WIO islands, from ancient introductions in the past millennia on islands off the East coast of Africa where extant terrestrial native mammal communities exist, to very recent invasions in the past decades on islands in the Mascarene archipelago. We compile the distribution of 16 introduced mammal taxa on 28 island groups comprising almost 2000 islands. Through an exhaustive literature review and expert consultation process we recorded all mammal eradications, and species recoveries which could be attributed to introduced mammal eradication or control. All island groups have been invaded by mammals, and invasive cats and rats in particular are ubiquitous, but cultural contingency has also led to regional invasions by other mammals such as lemurs, civets and tenrecs. Mammal eradications have been attempted on 45 islands in the WIO, the majority in the Seychelles and Mauritius, and where successful have resulted in spectacular recovery of species and ecosystems. Invasive mammalian predator eradication or control in association with habitat management has led to improved conservation prospects for at least 24 species, and IUCN red-list down-listing of eight species, in the Mascarene Islands. Future island conservation prioritisation in the region will need to take account of global climate change and predicted sea-level rises and coastal inundation. Greater investment and prioritisation in island conservation in the region is warranted, given its high biodiversity values and the extent of invasions.

  4. Mitogenomic analyses of eutherian relationships.

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    Arnason, U; Janke, A

    2002-01-01

    Reasonably correct phylogenies are fundamental to the testing of evolutionary hypotheses. Here, we present phylogenetic findings based on analyses of 67 complete mammalian mitochondrial (mt) genomes. The analyses, irrespective of whether they were performed at the amino acid (aa) level or on nucleotides (nt) of first and second codon positions, placed Erinaceomorpha (hedgehogs and their kin) as the sister group of remaining eutherians. Thus, the analyses separated Erinaceomorpha from other traditional lipotyphlans (e.g., tenrecs, moles, and shrews), making traditional Lipotyphla polyphyletic. Both the aa and nt data sets identified the two order-rich eutherian clades, the Cetferungulata (comprising Pholidota, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea) and the African clade (Tenrecomorpha, Macroscelidea, Tubulidentata, Hyracoidea, Proboscidea, and Sirenia). The study corroborated recent findings that have identified a sister-group relationship between Anthropoidea and Dermoptera (flying lemurs), thereby making our own order, Primates, a paraphyletic assembly. Molecular estimates using paleontologically well-established calibration points, placed the origin of most eutherian orders in Cretaceous times, 70-100 million years before present (MYBP). The same estimates place all primate divergences much earlier than traditionally believed. For example, the divergence between Homo and Pan is estimated to have taken place approximately 10 MYBP, a dating consistent with recent findings in primate paleontology. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Immunomodulatory properties of Trehala manna decoction and its isolated carbohydrate macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Azadeh; Farjadian, Shirin; Karami, Mohammad Reza

    2015-03-13

    Trehala manna (Shekar tighal) is a cocoon-shaped manna produced by larval activity of Curculionidae family on some Echinops species. In Persian traditional medicine, it is used not only for the treatment of fever and constipation but also for sore throat, influenza and some other viral and bacterial infections which seems to be related to its boosting effects on immune system. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunomodulatory properties of Trehala manna and its isolated polysaccharides. Several carbohydrate macromolecules were isolated from Trehala manna decoction using solvent-solvent extraction, ion exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The macromolecules were characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and spectrophotometric methods. The immunomodulatory effects of Trehala manna decoction and its isolated polysaccharides were evaluated on Jurkat cells at different concentrations using WST-1 reagent. Seven water-soluble polysaccharides were isolated with the structures of rhamnogalacturonan, glucogalacturonan, manno-arabinogalacturonan or homogalacturonan and the molecular weights (MW) of ≤1.67-667 ≤ kDa. Large polysaccharides with MW ≥667 kDa and pectin inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat cells in a dose-dependent manner with the IC50 range of 98.06-429.53 µg/mL. The IC50 for low MW polysaccharides (around 1 kDa) did not show considerable cytotoxicity (IC50>1000 µg/mL), in contrast, they exhibited a dose-dependent enhancement of cell proliferation at concentration range of 15.62-62.50 μg/mL. Trehala aqueous decoction and its isolated polysaccharides showed some immunomodulatory effects on Jurkat cell line in a dose-dependent manner and the molecular weight of these polysaccharides also revealed a great impact on their cytotoxic/proliferative properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative aspects of trophoblast development and placentation

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    Enders Allen C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based on the number of tissues separating maternal from fetal blood, placentas are classified as epitheliochorial, endotheliochorial or hemochorial. We review the occurrence of these placental types in the various orders of eutherian mammals within the framework of the four superorders identified by the techniques of molecular phylogenetics. The superorder Afrotheria diversified in ancient Africa and its living representatives include elephants, sea cows, hyraxes, aardvark, elephant shrews and tenrecs. Xenarthra, comprising armadillos, anteaters and sloths, diversified in South America. All placentas examined from members of these two oldest superorders are either endotheliochorial or hemochorial. The superorder Euarchontoglires includes two sister groups, Glires and Euarchonta. The former comprises rodents and lagomorphs, which typically have hemochorial placentas. The most primitive members of Euarchonta, the tree shrews, have endotheliochorial placentation. Flying lemurs and all higher primates have hemochorial placentas. However, the lemurs and lorises are exceptional among primates in having epitheliochorial placentation. Laurasiatheria, the last superorder to arise, includes several orders with epitheliochorial placentation. These comprise whales, camels, pigs, ruminants, horses and pangolins. In contrast, nearly all carnivores have endotheliochorial placentation, whilst bats have endotheliochorial or hemochorial placentas. Also included in Laurasiatheria are a number of insectivores that have many conserved morphological characters; none of these has epitheliochorial placentation. Consideration of placental type in relation to the findings of molecular phylogenetics suggests that the likely path of evolution in Afrotheria was from endotheliochorial to hemochorial placentation. This is also a likely scenario for Xenarthra and the bats. We argue that a definitive epitheliochorial placenta is a secondary specialization and that it

  7. Evolution of trappin genes in mammals

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    Furutani Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trappin is a multifunctional host-defense peptide that has antiproteolytic, antiinflammatory, and antimicrobial activities. The numbers and compositions of trappin paralogs vary among mammalian species: human and sheep have a single trappin-2 gene; mouse and rat have no trappin gene; pig and cow have multiple trappin genes; and guinea pig has a trappin gene and two other derivativegenes. Independent duplications of trappin genes in pig and cow were observed recently after the species were separated. To determine whether these trappin gene duplications are restricted only to certain mammalian lineages, we analyzed recently-developed genome databases for the presence of duplicate trappin genes. Results The database analyses revealed that: 1 duplicated trappin multigenes were found recently in the nine-banded armadillo; 2 duplicated two trappin genes had been found in the Afrotherian species (elephant, tenrec, and hyrax since ancient days; 3 a single trappin-2 gene was found in various eutherians species; and 4 no typical trappin gene has been found in chicken, zebra finch, and opossum. Bayesian analysis estimated the date of the duplication of trappin genes in the Afrotheria, guinea pig, armadillo, cow, and pig to be 244, 35, 11, 13, and 3 million-years ago, respectively. The coding regions of trappin multigenes of almadillo, bovine, and pig evolved much faster than the noncoding exons, introns, and the flanking regions, showing that these genes have undergone accelerated evolution, and positive Darwinian selection was observed in pig-specific trappin paralogs. Conclusion These results suggest that trappin is an eutherian-specific molecule and eutherian genomes have the potential to form trappin multigenes.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of the allometry of metabolic rate and mitochondrial basal proton leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polymeropoulos, Elias T; Oelkrug, R; White, C R; Jastroch, M

    2017-08-01

    The mitochondrial basal proton leak (MBPL) significantly contributes to high body temperatures (Tb) and basal metabolic rates (BMR) in endotherms. In endotherms at a given body mass (M), liver MBPL is higher than in ectotherms, supporting the notion that MBPL may partly explain the evolutionary increase in metabolic rate (MR), fostering endothermy. Here, we re-addressed this assumption by performing a phylogenetic analysis comparing all available liver MBPL data for ecto- and endotherms. While MBPL within endotherms negatively scales with M and BMR as shown previously, MBPL of ectotherms does not scale allometrically with M. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that this result is confounded by a positive scaling coefficient for MBPL with M for reptiles. Strikingly, the reptilian MBPL reaches endothermic levels above a body mass of 6.6kg. Thus, phylogenetic scaling of MBPL supports previous claims of endotherm-like physiological characteristics in large reptiles. It appears that diversification of ancestral ectothermic tetrapods to a body mass of at least 6kg may have been required to reach a MBPL that is beneficial for sustained high body temperatures. Novel MBPL data for the lesser hedgehog tenrec, a protoendothermic eutherian that displays reptile-like thermoregulatory patterns, fall within the endo- and ectothermic allometric regressions. Finally, we add additional evidence that within endotherms, phylogenetic differences in MR do not correlate with MBPL. Collectively, these data suggest that MBPL does not universally scale with metabolic rate in ecto- or endotherms and that an increasing MBPL with M may have played an important physiological role in the evolutionary history of reptilian thermoregulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of ethnomedicinal plants used in folklore medicine in Jordan as antibiotic resistant inhibitors on Escherichia coli

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    Aburjai Talal A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli occurs naturally in the human gut; however, certain strains that can cause infections, are becoming resistant to antibiotics. Multidrug-resistant E. coli that produce extended-spectrum β lactamases (ESBLs, such as the CTX-M enzymes, have emerged within the community setting as an important cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs and bloodstream infections may be associated with these community-onsets. This is the first report testing the antibiotic resistance-modifying activity of nineteen Jordanian plants against multidrug-resistant E. coli. Methods The susceptibility of bacterial isolates to antibiotics was tested by determining their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs using a broth microdilution method. Nineteen Jordanian plant extracts (Capparis spinosa L., Artemisia herba-alba Asso, Echinops polyceras Boiss., Gundelia tournefortii L, Varthemia iphionoides Boiss. & Blanche, Eruca sativa Mill., Euphorbia macroclada L., Hypericum trequetrifolium Turra, Achillea santolina L., Mentha longifolia Host, Origanum syriacum L., Phlomis brachydo(Boiss. Zohary, Teucrium polium L., Anagyris foetida L., Trigonella foenum-graecum L., Thea sinensis L., Hibiscus sabdariffa L., Lepidium sativum L., Pimpinella anisum L. were combined with antibiotics, from different classes, and the inhibitory effect of the combinations was estimated. Results Methanolic extracts of the plant materials enhanced the inhibitory effects of chloramphenicol, neomycin, doxycycline, cephalexin and nalidixic acid against both the standard strain and to a lesser extent the resistant strain of E. coli. Two edible plant extracts (Gundelia tournefortii L. and Pimpinella anisum L. generally enhanced activity against resistant strain. Some of the plant extracts like Origanum syriacum L.(Labiateae, Trigonella foenum- graecum L.(Leguminosae, Euphorbia macroclada (Euphorbiaceae and Hibiscus sabdariffa (Malvaceae did not enhance the activity of

  10. Effect of ethnomedicinal plants used in folklore medicine in Jordan as antibiotic resistant inhibitors on Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Rula M; Aburjai, Talal A

    2010-02-28

    Escherichia coli occurs naturally in the human gut; however, certain strains that can cause infections, are becoming resistant to antibiotics. Multidrug-resistant E. coli that produce extended-spectrum beta lactamases (ESBLs), such as the CTX-M enzymes, have emerged within the community setting as an important cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bloodstream infections may be associated with these community-onsets. This is the first report testing the antibiotic resistance-modifying activity of nineteen Jordanian plants against multidrug-resistant E. coli. The susceptibility of bacterial isolates to antibiotics was tested by determining their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) using a broth microdilution method. Nineteen Jordanian plant extracts (Capparis spinosa L., Artemisia herba-alba Asso, Echinops polyceras Boiss., Gundelia tournefortii L, Varthemia iphionoides Boiss. & Blanche, Eruca sativa Mill., Euphorbia macroclada L., Hypericum trequetrifolium Turra, Achillea santolina L., Mentha longifolia Host, Origanum syriacum L., Phlomis brachydo(Boiss.) Zohary, Teucrium polium L., Anagyris foetida L., Trigonella foenum-graecum L., Thea sinensis L., Hibiscus sabdariffa L., Lepidium sativum L., Pimpinella anisum L.) were combined with antibiotics, from different classes, and the inhibitory effect of the combinations was estimated. Methanolic extracts of the plant materials enhanced the inhibitory effects of chloramphenicol, neomycin, doxycycline, cephalexin and nalidixic acid against both the standard strain and to a lesser extent the resistant strain of E. coli. Two edible plant extracts (Gundelia tournefortii L. and Pimpinella anisum L.) generally enhanced activity against resistant strain. Some of the plant extracts like Origanum syriacum L.(Labiateae), Trigonella foenum- graecum L.(Leguminosae), Euphorbia macroclada (Euphorbiaceae) and Hibiscus sabdariffa (Malvaceae) did not enhance the activity of amoxicillin against both standard and resistant E

  11. Medical ethnobotany of the Albanian Alps in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical studies are crucial in South-Eastern Europe for fostering local development and also for investigating the dynamics of Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) related to plants in one of the most crucial European hotspots for biocultural diversity. The current medico-ethnobotanical survey was conducted in rural alpine communities in Kosovo. The aims of the study were twofold: 1) to document the state of TEK of medicinal plants in these communities; 2) to compare these findings with that of similar field studies previously conducted among local populations inhabiting the Montenegrin and Albanian side of the same Alpine range. Methods Field research was conducted in 36 villages on the Kosovar side of the Albanian Alps. Snowball sampling techniques were used to recruit 91 elderly informants (≥ 50 years-old) for participation in semi-structured interviews and structured surveys regarding the use of the local flora for medicinal and food purposes. Standard ethnobotanical methods were employed and prior informed consent was obtained for all study participants. Results and Conclusion The uses of 98 plants species belonging to 39 families were recorded; the most quoted botanical families were Rosaceae, Asteraceae, and Lamiaceae. Mainly decoctions and infusions were quoted as folk medicinal preparations and the most common uses referred to gastrointestinal and respiratory disorders, as well as illnesses of the uro-genital system. Among the most uncommon medicinal taxa quoted by the informants, Carduus nutans L., Echinops bannaticus Rochel ex Schrad., and Orlaya grandiflora Hoffm. may merit phytochemical and phytopharmacological investigations. Comparison of the data with other ethnobotanical field studies recently conducted on the Albanian and Montenegrin sides of the same Alps has shown a remarkable link between the medical ethnobotany of Montenegrin and Kosovar side of the Albanian Alps. Moreover, folk uses of the most quoted wild medicinal

  12. Potential of Central, Eastern and Western Africa Medicinal Plants for Cancer Therapy: Spotlight on Resistant Cells and Molecular Targets

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    Armelle T. Mbaveng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer remains a major health hurdle worldwide and has moved from the third leading cause of death in the year 1990 to second place after cardiovascular disease since 2013. Chemotherapy is one of the most widely used treatment modes; however, its efficiency is limited due to the resistance of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents. The present overview deals with the potential of the flora of Central, Eastern and Western African (CEWA regions as resource for anticancer drug discovery. It also reviews the molecular targets of phytochemicals of these plants such as ABC transporters, namely P-glycoprotein (P-gp, multi drug-resistance-related proteins (MRPs, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2 as well as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB-1/HER1, human tumor suppressor protein p53, caspases, mitochondria, angiogenesis, and components of MAP kinase signaling pathways. Plants with the ability to preferentially kills resistant cancer cells were also reported. Data compiled in the present document were retrieved from scientific websites such as PubMed, Scopus, Sciencedirect, Web-of-Science, and Scholar Google. In summary, plant extracts from CEWA and isolated compounds thereof exert cytotoxic effects by several modes of action including caspases activation, alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS in cancer cells and inhibition of angiogenesis. Ten strongest cytotoxic plants from CEWA recorded following in vitro screening assays are: Beilschmiedia acuta Kosterm, Echinops giganteus var. lelyi (C. D. Adams A. Rich., Erythrina sigmoidea Hua (Fabaceae, Imperata cylindrical Beauv. var. koenigii Durand et Schinz, Nauclea pobeguinii (Pobég. ex Pellegr. Merr. ex E.M.A., Piper capense L.f., Polyscias fulva (Hiern Harms., Uapaca togoensis Pax., Vepris soyauxii Engl. and Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal A. Rich. Prominent antiproliferative compounds include: isoquinoline alkaloid isotetrandrine (51

  13. Medical ethnobotany of the Albanian Alps in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Behxhet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnobotanical studies are crucial in South-Eastern Europe for fostering local development and also for investigating the dynamics of Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK related to plants in one of the most crucial European hotspots for biocultural diversity. The current medico-ethnobotanical survey was conducted in rural alpine communities in Kosovo. The aims of the study were twofold: 1 to document the state of TEK of medicinal plants in these communities; 2 to compare these findings with that of similar field studies previously conducted among local populations inhabiting the Montenegrin and Albanian side of the same Alpine range. Methods Field research was conducted in 36 villages on the Kosovar side of the Albanian Alps. Snowball sampling techniques were used to recruit 91 elderly informants (≥ 50 years-old for participation in semi-structured interviews and structured surveys regarding the use of the local flora for medicinal and food purposes. Standard ethnobotanical methods were employed and prior informed consent was obtained for all study participants. Results and Conclusion The uses of 98 plants species belonging to 39 families were recorded; the most quoted botanical families were Rosaceae, Asteraceae, and Lamiaceae. Mainly decoctions and infusions were quoted as folk medicinal preparations and the most common uses referred to gastrointestinal and respiratory disorders, as well as illnesses of the uro-genital system. Among the most uncommon medicinal taxa quoted by the informants, Carduus nutans L., Echinops bannaticus Rochel ex Schrad., and Orlaya grandiflora Hoffm. may merit phytochemical and phytopharmacological investigations. Comparison of the data with other ethnobotanical field studies recently conducted on the Albanian and Montenegrin sides of the same Alps has shown a remarkable link between the medical ethnobotany of Montenegrin and Kosovar side of the Albanian Alps. Moreover, folk uses of the

  14. Ocepeia (Middle Paleocene of Morocco): The Oldest Skull of an Afrotherian Mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheerbrant, Emmanuel; Amaghzaz, Mbarek; Bouya, Baadi; Goussard, Florent; Letenneur, Charlène

    2014-01-01

    While key early(iest) fossils were recently discovered for several crown afrotherian mammal orders, basal afrotherians, e.g., early Cenozoic species that comprise sister taxa to Paenungulata, Afroinsectiphilia or Afrotheria, are nearly unknown, especially in Africa. Possible stem condylarth-like relatives of the Paenungulata (hyraxes, sea-cows, elephants) include only Abdounodus hamdii and Ocepeia daouiensis from the Selandian of Ouled Abdoun Basin, Morocco, both previously only documented by lower teeth. Here, we describe new fossils of Ocepeia, including O.grandis n. sp., and a sub-complete skull of O. daouiensis, the first known before the Eocene for African placentals. O.daouiensis skull displays a remarkable mosaic of autapomophic, ungulate-like and generalized eutherian-like characters. Autapomorphies include striking anthropoid-like characters of the rostrum and dentition. Besides having a basically eutherian-like skull construction, Ocepeia daouiensis is characterized by ungulate-like, and especially paenungulate-like characters of skull and dentition (e.g., selenodonty). However, some plesiomorphies such as absence of hypocone exclude Ocepeia from crown Paenungulata. Such a combination of plesiomorphic and derived characters best fits with a stem position of Ocepeia relative to Paenungulata. In our cladistic analyses Ocepeia is included in Afrotheria, but its shared derived characters with paenungulates are not optimized as exclusive synapomorphies. Rather, within Afrotheria Ocepeia is reconstructed as more closely related to insectivore-like afroinsectiphilians (i.e., aardvarks, sengis, tenrecs, and golden moles) than to paenungulates. This results from conflict with undetected convergences of Paenungulata and Perissodactyla in our cladistic analysis, such as the shared bilophodonty. The selenodont pattern best supports the stem paenungulate position of Ocepeia; that, however, needs further support. The remarkable character mosaic of Ocepeia makes it the

  15. The energetics of a Malagasy rodent, Macrotarsomys ingens (Nesomyinae): a test of island and zoogeographical effects on metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobban, Kerileigh D; Lovegrove, Barry G; Rakotondravony, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    , and hence there was no strong driving force for change. Unlike small tenrecs and lemurs that radiated on Madagascar prior to the Oligocene, traits associated with an insular existence, such as daily torpor and hibernation, were not evident in M. ingens.