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Sample records for tenosynovitis

  1. Stenosing tenosynovitis

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    Vuillemin, V.; Guerini, H.; Bard, H.; Morvan, G.

    2012-01-01

    Tenosynovitis refers to an inflammatory condition involving the synovial sheath of a tendon. Stenosing tenosynovitis is a peculiar entity caused by multiple factors, including local anatomy, mechanical factors, and hormonal factors. The main forms include de Quervain tendinopathy; trigger finger (stenosing tenosynovitis involving the flexor digitorum tendons); stenosing tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, or extensor comunis tendons; stenosing tenosynovitis o...

  2. Tuberculous Peroneal Tenosynovitis

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    Yu Chung Wong; Tun Hing Lui

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal tuberculosis accounts for 1–5% of all cases of tuberculosis. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is an uncommon form of musculoskeletal tuberculosis occurring primarily in the hands and wrists and is rarely reported in the tendons of the feet. A case of tuberculous peroneal tenosynovitis is reported. Although tuberculosis is an uncommon cause of tenosynovitis, particularly in the foot, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients suffering from persistent swelling and...

  3. Peroneus longus tenosynovitis.

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    Folan, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Tenosynovitis of the tendon of peroneus longus has rarely been described in the literature (Aberle-Horstenegg, 1932; Burman and Lapidus, 1931). This is a report on the condition in two athletes and in one of whom the os peroneum was absent on the side of the tenosynovitis. It emphasises the importance of a detailed review of athletes' training patterns when assessing their injuries.

  4. Tuberculous Peroneal Tenosynovitis

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    Yu Chung Wong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal tuberculosis accounts for 1–5% of all cases of tuberculosis. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is an uncommon form of musculoskeletal tuberculosis occurring primarily in the hands and wrists and is rarely reported in the tendons of the feet. A case of tuberculous peroneal tenosynovitis is reported. Although tuberculosis is an uncommon cause of tenosynovitis, particularly in the foot, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients suffering from persistent swelling and pain in the hind foot, especially in countries where tuberculosis is prevalent.

  5. Sonographic characterization of tenosynovitis

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    Seo, Gwy Suk; Lim, Hyo Keum; Lee, In Jae; Lee, Kil Woo; Bae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kyung Hwan [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Tenosynovitis of the extremities is not uncommon but its diagnosis is not easy owing to its non-specific clinical manifestation. Thus it was beyond the field of imaging diagnosis so far. Recently the development of high resolution ultrasonogram has aided preoperative imaging diagnosis of tenosynovitis. The authors performed a retrospective reviewed of 27 patients who had ultrasonography due to tendon pathology(including 18 tenosynovitis) by observing sonographic findings and evaluation the diagnosis value of each finding. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 81.1% and common sonographic findings were focal swelling of the tendon, well-defined margin of the lesion, preserved fibrillar pattern, echo change of the lesion site and fluid collection. Above all, fluid collection. was the only statistically significant criterion for diagnosis of tenosynovitis(p<0.05). But its sensitivity was as low as 50%. In conclusion the ultrasonography is useful in diagnosis of tenosynovitis and fluid collection is of diagnostic value, but the differentiation between nodular tenosynovitis without fluid collection and other benign tumor is still beyond the scope of ultrasonographic diagnosis.

  6. Sonographic characterization of tenosynovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Gwy Suk; Lim, Hyo Keum; Lee, In Jae; Lee, Kil Woo; Bae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kyung Hwan

    1992-01-01

    Tenosynovitis of the extremities is not uncommon but its diagnosis is not easy owing to its non-specific clinical manifestation. Thus it was beyond the field of imaging diagnosis so far. Recently the development of high resolution ultrasonogram has aided preoperative imaging diagnosis of tenosynovitis. The authors performed a retrospective reviewed of 27 patients who had ultrasonography due to tendon pathology(including 18 tenosynovitis) by observing sonographic findings and evaluation the diagnosis value of each finding. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 81.1% and common sonographic findings were focal swelling of the tendon, well-defined margin of the lesion, preserved fibrillar pattern, echo change of the lesion site and fluid collection. Above all, fluid collection. was the only statistically significant criterion for diagnosis of tenosynovitis(p<0.05). But its sensitivity was as low as 50%. In conclusion the ultrasonography is useful in diagnosis of tenosynovitis and fluid collection is of diagnostic value, but the differentiation between nodular tenosynovitis without fluid collection and other benign tumor is still beyond the scope of ultrasonographic diagnosis

  7. Tuberculous flexor tenosynovitis of the hand

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    Mohamed Ali Sbai; Sofien Benzarti; Monia Boussen; Riadh Maalla

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in developing countries. Flexor tenosynovitis of the fingers constitutes an exceptional tuberculosis localization (Gabl et al., 1997; Senda et al., 2011) [1],[2]. Unusual presentations, such as tuberculous tenosynovitis, often go undetected and are associated with a diagnostic and therapeutic delay, especially when bacteriological research proves to be negative. Here, we report a case of tuberculous flexor tenosynovitis of the hand.

  8. Subcutaneous sarcoidosis associated with sarcoid tenosynovitis.

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    Enzenauer, R J; Waterhouse, W J; West, S G

    1996-10-01

    Subcutaneous sarcoidosis and sarcoid tenosynovitis are unusual manifestations of systemic sarcoidosis. We report two Japanese women with disseminated sarcoidosis presenting with subcutaneous and tenosynovial involvement demonstrated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Sarcoidosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained subcutaneous nodulosis or tenosynovitis in patients with or without a previous diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

  9. Tenosynovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... away. Your provider will prescribe antibiotics. In severe cases, emergency surgery is needed to release the pus around ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  10. Pyogenic Flexor Tenosynovitis in an Infant

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    James I. Gragg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is a rare, though well known infectious process of the flexor tendon sheath of the hand. This condition is generally diagnosed in adults by the observance of the four Kanavel signs. Application of the Kanavel signs to diagnosis in the pediatric population, however, is of unknown utility. We present the case of a 13-month-old male with pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis who presented with all four of the Kanavel signs.

  11. Pyogenic Tenosynovitis in Infants: A Case Series.

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    Lironi, Céline; Steiger, Christina; Juchler, Céline; Spyropoulou, Vasiliki; Samara, Eleftheria; Ceroni, Dimitri

    2017-11-01

    Pyogenic tenosynovitis is an uncommon condition in children, and there are few published case reports. We present a series of 11 cases who were treated in the Geneva Children Hospital in the last 10 years. Kingella kingae was the main pathogen, and the characteristics of infection (inflammatory indices, clinical findings and severity) are similar to other osteoarticular K. kingae infections in infants.

  12. Corticosteroid injection for de Quervain's tenosynovitis

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    Peters-Veluthamaningal, Cyriac; van der Windt, Danielle A. W. M.; Winters, Jan C.; Jong, Betty Meyboom-de

    2009-01-01

    Back ground De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a disorder characterised by pain on the radial (thumb) side of the wrist and functional disability of the hand. It can be treated by corticosteroid injection, splinting and surgery. Objectives To summarise evidence on the efficacy and safety of

  13. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis of the extensor tendons of the wrist

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    Mrabet, Dalila; Ouenniche, Kmar; Mizouni, Habiba; Ounaies, Mouna; Khémiri, Chékib; Sahli, Héla; Sellami, Slaheddine

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterial tuberculous tenosynovitis of the extensor tendon sheath is an extremely rare manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The diagnosis may be easily delayed because of its non-specific clinical signs. We report a new case of tuberculous tenosynovitis of the extensor without concomitant pulmonary tuberculosis or documented immunodeficiency.

  14. Tubercular tenosynovitis of extensor tendons of foot--a rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of soft tissues as a result of spread from adjacent bone or joint is a well recognized entity. However isolated tuberculous pyomyositis, bursitis and tenosynovitis are rare, constituting about 1% of skeletal tuberculosis. Tubercular tenosynovitis commonly involves tendon sheaths of wrist and hand. Cases of ...

  15. Ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical and ultrasonographic evaluation

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    Ana Luiza Naves Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients, regarding its presence, the kind of tendon involved and the concordance between clinical and ultrasound findings. Methods: Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis and pain or swollen ankle joint were evaluated. Tendon involvement was evaluated with ultrasound imaging. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ was performed for disability evaluation. Age, sex, disease duration, and vocational activity levels were also obtained. The statistical analysis included Fisher’s exact test. The significance level was 0.05. Results: Tenosynovitis was found in 13 of 20 (65.0% patients in 19 joints, in which 6 were bilaterally (46.1% and unilateral in 7 (53.8%. Tibialis posterior tenosynovitis was seen in nine (45.0% patients, Achilles tenosynovitis in seven (35.0%, tibialis anterior tenosynovitis in three (15.0%, and peroneal tenosynovitis in three (15.0% patients. We found concordance between symptomatic ankle and ultrasonographic findings in 92.3% of the patients with tenosynovitis. Association between severe HAQ with tendon involvement was not found (p>0.05. Disease duration was not associated with tenosynovitis. Patients were predominantly older, female, with mean age around 50.8 years. The long disease duration of patients presented a mean of 11.4 years and, most of them, with no vocational activity (65.0%. Conclusions: The results indicate that ankle tenosynovitis is very common in rheumatoid arthritis patients, both unilateral and bilateral. Tibialis posterior was the most common tendon involvement found. Finally, we found concordance between the clinical and ultrasound findings in almost all rheumatoid arthritis patients with ankle tenosynovitis.

  16. Forgotten but Not Gone! Syphilis Induced Tenosynovitis

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    Felicia Ratnaraj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Tenosynovitis, inflammation of a tendon and its synovial sheath, is a rare manifestation of secondary syphilis and if diagnosed early is reversible. Background. A 52-year-old male with past medical history of untreated syphilis presented with gradual onset of swelling and pain of the right fourth metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP. He reported a history of painless penile lesions after having sexual intercourse with a new partner approximately five months ago which was treated with sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. An RPR done at that time came back positive with a high titer; however, patient was lost to follow-up. On examination, patient had an edematous, nonerythematous right fourth proximal interphalangeal (PIP joint. Urgent irrigation, debridement, and exploration of the right hand into the tendon sheath were performed. With his history of syphillis, an RPR was done, which was reactive with a titer of 1 : 64. A confirmatory FTA-ABS test was completed, rendering a positive result. Based on his history of untreated syphilis, dormancy followed by clinical scenario of swelling of the right fourth finger, and a high RPR titer, he was diagnosed with secondary syphilis manifesting as tenosynovitis.

  17. Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist: MRI findings in three patients

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    Sueyoshi, E. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Uetani, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Kohzaki, S. [Nagasaki Municipal Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    We report recent MRI findings in patients with tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist. Marked synovial thickening around the flexor tendons and fluid in the tendon sheath were clearly shown on MRI. Post-contrast study was useful in distinguishing the thick tenosynovium from the surrounding structures and fluid in the tendon sheath. The well-enhanced tenosynovium was also seen in the carpal tunnel in all cases. On the basis of these findings, we could easily distinguish tenosynovitis from other soft-tissue-mass lesions, such as tumors or infected ganglia. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is often not diagnosed early, and its differentiation from soft tissue tumors may be clinically difficult. MRI, particularly post-contrast study, is useful for early diagnosis of, and planning treatment for, tuberculous tenosynovitis. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  18. Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist: MRI findings in three patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueyoshi, E.; Uetani, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kohzaki, S.

    1996-01-01

    We report recent MRI findings in patients with tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist. Marked synovial thickening around the flexor tendons and fluid in the tendon sheath were clearly shown on MRI. Post-contrast study was useful in distinguishing the thick tenosynovium from the surrounding structures and fluid in the tendon sheath. The well-enhanced tenosynovium was also seen in the carpal tunnel in all cases. On the basis of these findings, we could easily distinguish tenosynovitis from other soft-tissue-mass lesions, such as tumors or infected ganglia. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is often not diagnosed early, and its differentiation from soft tissue tumors may be clinically difficult. MRI, particularly post-contrast study, is useful for early diagnosis of, and planning treatment for, tuberculous tenosynovitis. (orig.). With 3 figs

  19. Tuberculous Tenosynovitis Presenting as Ganglion of Wrist

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    Shahaji Chavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is still endemic in many developed countries. Involvement of the hand and wrist at presentation is extremely rare, and the diagnosis is often missed. A 57 years old male presented with swelling over the left wrist since 3 years Three swellings over dorsal aspect of the left wrist Soft in consistency Non tender Non compressible Mobile at right angles to the plane of the wrist joint. ESR: 45 mm in 1 hr and rest blood investigations were normal. Ultrsonography showed giant cell tumor of Extensor Digitorum sheath. X-ray: soft tissue swelling and MRI was suggestive of extensor tendon sheath extraskeletal synovial Koch’s, or giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision of swelling was planned and intraoperatively, rice bodies were seen inside it. Histopathological examination showed caseous necrosis with granuloma formation. Patient was put on DOT1 therapy. Tuberculous tenosynovitis was first described by Acrel in 1777. Rice bodies occurring in joints affected by tuberculosis were first described in 1895 by Reise. Rice bodies will be diagnosed on plain radiographs when mineralization occurs. More than 50% of cases recur within 1 year of treatment. The currently recommended 6-month course is often adequate with extensive curettage lavage and synovectomy should be performed. Surgery is essential, but the extent of surgical debridement is still debatable. The surgeon has to be aware of the significance of loose bodies when performing routine excision of innocuous looking wrist ganglia.

  20. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Rowbotham, Emma L. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Freeston, Jane E. [Department of Rheumatology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Emery, Paul [University of Leeds, Arthritis Research UK, Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT Leeds Institute of Rheumatic Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, Andrew J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Chapel Allerton Hospital, NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was recorded alongside MCP joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis and ulnar drift. Twenty-one (47.7 %) patients with RA showed interosseous tendon tenosynovitis. Fifty-two (14.8 %) interosseous tendons showed tenosynovitis amongst the RA patients. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more commonly seen in association with adjacent MCP joint synovitis (p < 0.001), but nine MCP joints (5.1 %) showed adjacent interosseous tenosynovitis in the absence of joint synovitis. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more frequently seen in fingers which also showed flexor tendon tenosynovitis (p < 0.001) and in patients with ulnar drift of the fingers (p = 0.01). Tenosynovitis of the hand interosseous tendons was found in 47.7 % of patients with RA. In the majority of cases this was adjacent to MCP joint synovitis; however, interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was also seen in isolation. (orig.)

  1. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowbotham, Emma L.; Freeston, Jane E.; Emery, Paul; Grainger, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was recorded alongside MCP joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis and ulnar drift. Twenty-one (47.7 %) patients with RA showed interosseous tendon tenosynovitis. Fifty-two (14.8 %) interosseous tendons showed tenosynovitis amongst the RA patients. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more commonly seen in association with adjacent MCP joint synovitis (p < 0.001), but nine MCP joints (5.1 %) showed adjacent interosseous tenosynovitis in the absence of joint synovitis. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more frequently seen in fingers which also showed flexor tendon tenosynovitis (p < 0.001) and in patients with ulnar drift of the fingers (p = 0.01). Tenosynovitis of the hand interosseous tendons was found in 47.7 % of patients with RA. In the majority of cases this was adjacent to MCP joint synovitis; however, interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was also seen in isolation. (orig.)

  2. An Unusual Cause of Flexor Tenosynovitis: Streptococcus mitis

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    Ulucay, Cağatay; Ozler, Turhan

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Streptococcus mitis is a commensal organism of the human oropharynx that rarely causes infection in healthy individuals. Herein, we describe a previously healthy 35-year-old woman who presented with acute pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis of the left index finger due to S. mitis infection. The patient’s infection was treated successfully via surgical and medical interventions, and during follow-up, it was determined that she was complement component C3 deficient. Tenosynovitis is an emergent clinical syndrome that can result in permanent disability or amputation. To the best of our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe tenosynovitis due to S. mitis; in addition, it highlights the importance of initiating therapy with antibiotics that are effective against this rare pathogen. PMID:25587497

  3. Acute Hemorrhagic Flexor Tenosynovitis due to Vincula Injury

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    Maher, Rory

    2015-01-01

    Summary: A 20-year-old previously well woman presented to the emergency department with classical signs of acute flexor tenosynovitis, 4 hours after a minor puncture wound over the volar aspect of her right middle finger distal interphalangeal joint. Exploration of the flexor sheath in theatre revealed frank blood within the sheath and extension of the puncture wound through the profundus tendon into the short vincula beneath. The blood was irrigated from the sheath, and the patient made a complete recovery by 2 weeks postoperatively. Although rare, irritation and distension of the flexor sheath caused by vincular hemorrhage can be an alternative mechanism for the development of acute flexor tenosynovitis, and as with pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis, prompt surgical treatment can minimize the risk of long-term functional impairment. PMID:26301147

  4. An Unusual Cause of Flexor Tenosynovitis: Streptococcus mitis

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    Ugur Anil Bingol, MD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Streptococcus mitis is a commensal organism of the human oropharynx that rarely causes infection in healthy individuals. Herein, we describe a previously healthy 35-year-old woman who presented with acute pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis of the left index finger due to S. mitis infection. The patient’s infection was treated successfully via surgical and medical interventions, and during follow-up, it was determined that she was complement component C3 deficient. Tenosynovitis is an emergent clinical syndrome that can result in permanent disability or amputation. To the best of our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe tenosynovitis due to S. mitis; in addition, it highlights the importance of initiating therapy with antibiotics that are effective against this rare pathogen.

  5. Tenosynovitis of the ankles as onset of sarcoidosis in a patient with ulcerative colitis

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    F. Cozzi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis and tenosynovitis are frequently reported as complications of inflammatory bowel diseases. About 10% of patients with ulcerative colitis presents articular inflammation, usually in the phases of activity of intestinal disease. Tenosynovitis is also a frequent complication of ulcerative colitis. We describe here a case of tenosynovitis of both ankles occurring in a patient affected by ulcerative colitis not in active phase. Chest X-ray and TC showed hilar lymphonode enlargement and transbronchial biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. In this disease tenosynovitis is very rare, unlike arthritis that is rather common. In conclusion we observed a case of ankle bilateral tenosynovitis as onset manifestation of sarcoidosis.

  6. Tenosynovitis caused by Pyracantha coccinea injury of the hand

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    Theuvenet, W.J.; Essed, C.E.; Eggelmeijer, F.; Alink, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    Tenosynovitis caused by Pyracantha coccinea (fire thorn) has not been reported before, most likely because it is uncommon and the diagnosis is difficult to confirm. The symptoms, differential diagnosis, and the surgical treatment are described. Three cases are reported. It is postulated that natural

  7. Tibialis Posterior Tenosynovitis: A Unique Musculoskeletal Manifestation of Gout.

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    Shupper, Peter; Stitik, Todd P

    2018-02-01

    Extra-articular manifestations of gout can present in several ways, including tenosynovitis. We present a rare case of acute tibialis posterior gouty tenosynovitis. An 82-year-old man with a history of well-controlled gout presented with acute onset of left ankle pain, occurring without inciting event. The medial ankle was slightly erythematous with moderate dorsal-medial swelling and mild dorsal-lateral swelling, with severe tenderness to palpation over the medial retro-malleolar region. Range of motion and manual muscle testing were pain limited throughout. Ultrasound examination revealed a left posterior tibialis tendon sheath tenosynovitis with effusion and overlying soft tissue edema. Tendon sheath aspirate revealed sodium urate crystals and a white blood cell count of 6400/μL. Tendon sheath injection with a mixture of 1% lidocaine and dexamethasone 4 mg resulted in symptom resolution. Repeat ultrasound examination demonstrated no evidence of tibialis posterior tendon sheath effusion. This case is unique not only because acute gouty posterior tibialis tenosynovitis is very rare, particularly in a normouricemic individual, but also because the sonographic evidence of gouty infiltration into the posterior tibialis tendon and overlying subcutaneous tissue considerably aided in arriving at the correct diagnosis in a timely manner.

  8. Wrist Tenosynovitis due to Mycobacterium bovis Infection: Case Series and Review of the Literature

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    Mehmet Derviş Güner, MD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Tuberculosis infections are still one of the most important public health problems among developing countries. Musculoskeletal involvement represents 10–15% of all extrapulmonary cases. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis is usually misdiagnosed as nonspecific tenosynovitis. To avoid misdiagnosis and mistreatment, it is important to be alert for mycobacterial infections. This article presents 3 patients with wrist tenosynovitis, which was caused by Mycobacterium bovis infection. The article also includes review of the literature.

  9. Tenosynovitis of the ankles as onset of sarcoidosis in a patient with ulcerative colitis

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    F. Cozzi; M. Podswiadek; A. Furlan; S. Todesco

    2011-01-01

    Arthritis and tenosynovitis are frequently reported as complications of inflammatory bowel diseases. About 10% of patients with ulcerative colitis presents articular inflammation, usually in the phases of activity of intestinal disease. Tenosynovitis is also a frequent complication of ulcerative colitis. We describe here a case of tenosynovitis of both ankles occurring in a patient affected by ulcerative colitis not in active phase. Chest X-ray and TC showed hilar lymphonode enlargement and t...

  10. Wrist Tenosynovitis due to Mycobacterium bovis Infection: Case Series and Review of the Literature

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    Güner, Mehmet Derviş; Bektaş, Umut; Akmeşe, Ramazan; Armangil, Mehmet; Ay, Şadan

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Tuberculosis infections are still one of the most important public health problems among developing countries. Musculoskeletal involvement represents 10–15% of all extrapulmonary cases. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis is usually misdiagnosed as nonspecific tenosynovitis. To avoid misdiagnosis and mistreatment, it is important to be alert for mycobacterial infections. This article presents 3 patients with wrist tenosynovitis, which was caused by Mycobacterium bovis infection. The article also includes review of the literature. PMID:25587496

  11. MRI features in de Quervain's tenosynovitis of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glajchen, N.; Schweitzer, M.

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain's stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal extensor component is traditionally diagnosed clinically but may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. A retrospective review of wrist MR images was performed in cases where the diagnosis of de Quervain's synovitis was suggested (n=5). Imaging findings were correlated with clinical findings in four cases and with wrist arthroscopy in one case. Increased thickness of the extensor pollicus brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendons was the most reliable finding on MRI, being present in all cases. Peritendinous edema was also a reliable finding. Surrounding subcutaneous edema and increased intratendinous signal were less reliable findings in confirmed cases of de Quervain's disease. De Quervain's tenosynovitis may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. Increased tendon thickness and peritendinous edema are the most reliable imaging findings. (orig.)

  12. Hyperparathyroidism-related extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist: a general review of the literature.

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    Ichihara, Satoshi; Hidalgo-Diaz, Juan Jose; Prunières, Guillaume; Facca, Sybille; Bodin, Frédéric; Boucher, Stéphanie; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tenosynovitis often occurs accompanying with rheumatoid arthritis, gout, trauma, mycobacterium and dialysis-related amyloidosis. However, there is no recognition of extensor tenosynovitis accompanying with hyperparathyroidism. The purpose of this general review was to describe the clinical condition and to report the results of surgical intervention in the extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist related to hyperparathyroidism. Hyperparathyroidism is thought to be a rare disease in adult. Although renal symptoms are the commonest symptom, musculoskeletal complaints also occur in hyperparathyroidism. From our general review, hyperparathyroidism deserves consideration in the differential diagnosis of extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist.

  13. Flexor pollicis longus tenosynovitis in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

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    Manfield, Laura; Thomas, Mark; Lee, Se Won

    2014-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is typically diagnosed from history and physical examination then confirmed with electrodiagnosis. Electrodiagnosis provides only limited anatomic information and evaluation of space-occupying lesions. The authors present two cases in which demonstrated flexor pollicis longus tenosynovitis coexistent with carpal tunnel syndrome was diagnosed with ultrasonography. Ultrasonography is an effective modality that enhances the investigation of diseases in the soft tissues of the wrist and the hand. It can be useful in directing specific treatment by increasing diagnostic accuracy.

  14. Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexors - or trigger finger

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    Rames Mattar Junior

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Stenosing tenosynovitis of the fl exors, known as trigger fi nger, is a verycommon problem seen by the Occupational Medicine practitioners,the orthopaedic surgeon and the hand surgeon. The purpose of thischapter is to summarize information on aspects of this conditionlikely to be of interest and relevant to the health professionals. Topicscovered include clinical observations related to ethiology, risk factors,diagnosis and case management.

  15. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Tenosynovitis in the Hand: Two Case Reports with the MR Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol; Choi, Sang Hee

    2011-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial infections can cause destructive tenosynovitis of the hand. We report on and discuss the clinical course and distinctive radiologic findings of two patients with hand tenosynovitis secondary to M. marinum and intracellulare infection, which are different from those of the nontuberculous mycobacterial infections reported in the previous literature.

  16. Randomised controlled trial of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Veluthamaningal, Cyriac; Winters, Jan C.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Meyboom-deJong, Betty

    2009-01-01

    Background: De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and leads to wrist pain and to impaired function of the wrist and hand. It can be treated by splinting, local corticosteroid injection and operation. In this study effectiveness of local

  17. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Tenosynovitis in the Hand: Two Case Reports with the MR Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol; Choi, Sang Hee [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial infections can cause destructive tenosynovitis of the hand. We report on and discuss the clinical course and distinctive radiologic findings of two patients with hand tenosynovitis secondary to M. marinum and intracellulare infection, which are different from those of the nontuberculous mycobacterial infections reported in the previous literature.

  18. Interobserver reliability of the Amsterdam Severity Scale in Stenosing Tenosynovitis (ASSiST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, W.F.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; Mesman, T.; Dekker, J.; Hoeksma, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Interobserver reliability study. INTRODUCTION: A scale was developed to measure the severity of stenosing tenosynovitis: the Amsterdam Severity Scale in Stenosing Tenosynovitis (ASSiST). PURPOSE OF THE STUDY: To study the interobserver reliability of the ASSiST. METHODS: Patients

  19. Reliability of a consensus-based ultrasound score for tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, Esperanza; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Wakefield, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To produce consensus-based scoring systems for ultrasound (US) tenosynovitis and to assess the intraobserver and interobserver reliability of these scoring systems in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: We undertook a Delphi process on US-defined tenosynovitis and US scoring system...... recruited. Ten rheumatologists expert in MSUS blindly, independently and consecutively scored for tenosynovitis in B-mode and PD mode three wrist extensor compartments, two finger flexor tendons and two ankle tendons of each patient in two rounds in a blinded fashion. Intraobserver reliability was assessed...... Doppler signal within the synovial sheath. The intraobserver reliability for tenosynovitis scoring on B-mode and PD mode was good (κ value 0.72 for B-mode; κ value 0.78 for PD mode). Interobserver reliability assessment showed good κ values for PD tenosynovitis scoring (first round, 0.64; second round, 0...

  20. The Use of the OMERACT Ultrasound Tenosynovitis Scoring System in Multicenter Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammitzbøll-Danielsen, Mads; Østergaard, Mikkel; Naredo, Esperanza; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Möller, Ingrid; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Terslev, Lene

    2018-02-01

    To test the sensitivity to change of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) ultrasound (US) scoring system for tenosynovitis when applied in a multicenter design. RA patients with US-verified tenosynovitis were recruited when scheduled for treatment intensification. Tenosynovitis was assessed at baseline, and 3 and 6 months followup, using the semiquantitative OMERACT scoring system. Expressed in median (25th; 75th percentiles), the overall greyscale and Doppler score decreased significantly from baseline at 4 (2; 7) and 3 (2; 6), to 6 months at 2 (0; 3) and 0 (0; 1, p The OMERACT US scoring system for tenosynovitis showed high responsiveness, supporting its use for diagnosing and monitoring tenosynovitis in multicenter trials.

  1. Tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients on biologic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Hilde Berner; Kvien, Tore K; Terslev, Lene

    2017-01-01

    , clinical and laboratory assessments were performed when starting biologic DMARD (bDMARD) and after 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months including bilateral grey-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) semi-quantitatively (0-3) scoring of ECU and TP tendons and 18 joints. Changes from baseline to follow-up were explored...... by Wilcoxon signed rank test, associations by Spearman's rank correlations and responses to treatment by Standardised Response Means (SRMs). RESULTS: 157 patients (mean age/disease duration 52.4/10.2 years) were included. ECU/TP tenosynovitis was frequent (baseline GS/PD pathology in 76/50% of patients...

  2. MRI assessment of tenosynovitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: inter- and intra-observer variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambot, Karen; Brunelle, Francis; Boavida, Peter; Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico; Desgranges, Marie; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Quartier, Pierre; Malattia, Clara; Bracaglia, Claudia; Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Elie, Caroline; Rosendahl, Karen

    2013-01-01

    There is sparse knowledge about grading tenosynovitis using MRI. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a tenosynovitis MRI scoring system in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and wrist involvement were enrolled in two paediatric centres, from October 2006 to January 2010. The extensor (compartments II, IV and VI) and flexor tendons were assessed for the presence of tenosynovitis on T1-weighted postcontrast fat-saturated MR images and were scored from 0 (normal) to 2 (moderate to severe) by two observers independently. Intra- and interobserver agreement was assessed. Ninety children (age range: 5-18.5 years) were included, of whom 34 had tenosynovitis involving extensors and 28 had tenosynovitis involving flexors. A total of 360 tendon areas were analysed, of which 114 had tenosynovitis (86/270 extensors and 28/90 flexors). Intra-reader 1 agreement was excellent for the extensors (k = 0.82-0.91) and for the flexors (k = 0.85); intra-reader 2 agreement was moderate to good for the extensors (k = 0.51-0.72) and good for the flexors (k = 0.64). Inter-reader agreement was good for the extensors (k = 0.69-0.73) and moderate for the flexors (k = 0.49). The proposed MRI scoring system for the assessment of wrist tenosynovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis appears feasible with an observer agreement sufficient for clinical use. (orig.)

  3. MRI assessment of tenosynovitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: inter- and intra-observer variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambot, Karen; Brunelle, Francis [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Damasio, Maria Beatrice [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Desgranges, Marie; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Quartier, Pierre [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Paediatric Immunology, Hematology and Rheumatology, APHP French Reference Center ' ' Arthrites juveniles' ' , Paris (France); Malattia, Clara [University of Genoa, Department of Paediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Bracaglia, Claudia [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Paediatrics, Rome (Italy); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); University Hospital of North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Elie, Caroline [Paris Descartes University, Department of Biostatistics, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Rosendahl, Karen [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway)

    2013-07-15

    There is sparse knowledge about grading tenosynovitis using MRI. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a tenosynovitis MRI scoring system in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and wrist involvement were enrolled in two paediatric centres, from October 2006 to January 2010. The extensor (compartments II, IV and VI) and flexor tendons were assessed for the presence of tenosynovitis on T1-weighted postcontrast fat-saturated MR images and were scored from 0 (normal) to 2 (moderate to severe) by two observers independently. Intra- and interobserver agreement was assessed. Ninety children (age range: 5-18.5 years) were included, of whom 34 had tenosynovitis involving extensors and 28 had tenosynovitis involving flexors. A total of 360 tendon areas were analysed, of which 114 had tenosynovitis (86/270 extensors and 28/90 flexors). Intra-reader 1 agreement was excellent for the extensors (k = 0.82-0.91) and for the flexors (k = 0.85); intra-reader 2 agreement was moderate to good for the extensors (k = 0.51-0.72) and good for the flexors (k = 0.64). Inter-reader agreement was good for the extensors (k = 0.69-0.73) and moderate for the flexors (k = 0.49). The proposed MRI scoring system for the assessment of wrist tenosynovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis appears feasible with an observer agreement sufficient for clinical use. (orig.)

  4. Ultrasonography for diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of tenosynovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, Mads Ammitzbøll

    2018-03-01

    Rheumatod arthritis is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease, characterized by inflammation in joints and tendon sheaths, which frequently leads to permanent and serious disability due to joint destruction, but also tendon and ligament ruptures. Clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis has traditionally been supported by biochemical and radiographic findings. However, imaging modalities like ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have improved the possibility for better management of rheumatoid arthritis patients, due to higher sensitivity and specificity for detecting ongoing inflammation, this thesis is focusing on tenosynovitis as recent studies have shown that inflammation in tendon sheaths, i.e. tenosynovitis, is a very common manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis and may often be mistaken for synovitis. Furthermore, presence of ultrasonographic tenosynovitis may predict clinical flare and erosive progression. 
The main aim of this PhD thesis was to further develop and validate ultrasound as a tool for diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of tenosynovitis. This was investigated in four studies: 
Study I: 3D Doppler Ultrasound findings in healthy wrist and finger tendon sheaths - Can feeding vessels lead to misinterpretation in Doppler-detected tenosynovitis? 
Study II: Image fusion of Ultrasound and MRI and B-flow evaluation of tenosynovitis - A pilot study on new imaging techniques in rheumatoid arthritis patients. 
Study III: Validity and sensitivity to change of the semi-quantitative Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) ultrasound scoring system for tenosynovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and for the quantitative scoring system, pixel index. 
Study IV: Intramuscular versus ultrasound guided intratenosynovial glucocorticoid injection for tenosynovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis - A randomised, double-blind, controlled study with ultrasound and clinical follow up at 4 and 12 weeks. 
From the

  5. Bicipital tenosynovitis in the dog: evaluation with positive contrast arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthez, P.Y.; Morgan, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes seven dogs with traumatic bicipital tenosynovitis in which complete clinical, radiographic, and surgical evaluations were performed. All were adult dogs of medium to large breed and were presented with a chronic front limb lameness of several months' duration and shoulder muscle atrophy. Survey radiographs of the scapulohumeral joint showed new bone production almost exclusively in the region of the biceps tendon, i.e., the intertubercular groove and the supraglenoid tuberosity. Arthrograms in six of seven dogs revealed difficulty in filling or irregular filling of the bicipital tendon sheath, best seen on the mediolateral view of the shoulder. On surgical exploration, macroscopic lesions of the tendon and/or the sheath were observed in all dogs and included adhesions, fibrosis, scar tissue, edema, and thickening. Partial tear of the tendon was observed in three dogs

  6. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rowbotham, EL; Freeston, JE; Emery, P; Grainger, AJ

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. METHODS: Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon t...

  7. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in a dog with chronic bicipital tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzin, C; Ohlerth, S; Koch, D; Spreng, D

    2004-03-01

    A 15-month-old, spayed female, Bernese mountain dog was presented to the Institute of Small Animal Surgery at the University of Zurich because of chronic left forelimb lameness. The referring veterinarian diagnosed pain in the left shoulder region and had treated the dog with systemic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and restricted exercise for a two-week period. The follow-up examination revealed only minimal improvement and therefore, the dog was referred for further diagnostic evaluation. Chronic bicipital tenosynovitis and tendinitis of the infraspinatus muscle was diagnosed based on survey radiographs, arthrography, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and synovial fluid cytology. The dog underwent three sessions of extracorporeal shockwave therapy and substantial clinical improvement was observed. On follow-up examinations, only mild left forelimb lameness was evident following exercise, and changes in the intertubercular groove and at the supraglenoid tuberosity appeared less active on radiographs and CT. However, six months following treatment, mild degenerative joint disease was apparent.

  8. Predictors of Stenosing Tenosynovitis in the Hand and Hand-Related Activity Limitations in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Horsten, N.C.; Hoeksma, A.F.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Knol, D.L.; van Schaardenburg, D.; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Ursum J, Horsten NC, Hoeksma AF, Dijkmans BA, Knol DL, van Schaardenburg D, Dekker J, Roorda LD. Predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Objectives To identify early predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the

  9. A prolonged case of Mycobacterium marinum flexor tenosynovitis: radiographic and histological correlation, and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongworawat, M.D.; Holtom, P.; Learch, T.J.; Fedenko, A.; Stevanovic, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a 30-year-old man with prolonged Mycobacterium marinum flexor tenosynovitis. Due to low clinical suspicion, diagnosis was not made until 8 years after initial presentation. The history and magnetic resonance and tissue examination findings are consistent with mycobacterial tenosynovitis. These findings are presented, together with a review of the literature. (orig.)

  10. A prolonged case of Mycobacterium marinum flexor tenosynovitis: radiographic and histological correlation, and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongworawat, M.D. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); USC Univ. Hospital, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Holtom, P.; Learch, T.J.; Fedenko, A.; Stevanovic, M.V. [USC Univ. Hospital, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2003-09-01

    We report on a 30-year-old man with prolonged Mycobacterium marinum flexor tenosynovitis. Due to low clinical suspicion, diagnosis was not made until 8 years after initial presentation. The history and magnetic resonance and tissue examination findings are consistent with mycobacterial tenosynovitis. These findings are presented, together with a review of the literature. (orig.)

  11. INTRA SHEATH STEROID INJECTIONS IN MANAGEMENT OF DE QUERVAIN’S TENOSYNOVITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is a painful and often disabling condition that is mainly observed in workers who perform repetitive manual tasks, wrestlers and bowlers. MATERIALS AND METHODS A Retrospective study was done in orthopaedic department at tertiary care hospital for one year from June 2013 to May 2014. 60 patients were included in the present study. RESULTS Out of 60 patients diagnosed with De Quervain’s tenosynovitis 54(90% were treated conservatively and surgical management was done in 9(10% cases. CONCLUSION Conservative treatment of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis with steroid injections is a preferable method of treatment. Surgical release should be confined to patients resistant to conservative treatment

  12. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S. [Univ. of California, Orange (United States). Dept. of Radiological Sciences

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with peroneal tendinopathy and peroneal tenosynovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijowski, Richard; Smet, Arthur de; Mukharjee, Rajat

    2007-01-01

    To compare the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of a group of patients with clinically diagnosed peroneal tendonopathy and peroneal tenosynovitis with the MR imaging findings of a control group of patients with no clinical evidence of peroneal tendon disorder. The MR examinations of 24 patients with symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis and 70 patients with no clinical evidence of peroneal tendon disorder were retrospectively reviewed to determine the presence or absence of four MR imaging findings: 1) predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on one or more axial proton density-weighted images, 2) predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on three consecutive axial proton density-weighted images, 3) intermediate T2 signal intensity within the peroneal tendons, and 4) circumferential fluid within the common peroneal tendon sheath greater than 3 mm in maximal width. The sensitivity and specificity of these MR imaging findings for determining the presence or absence or symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were calculated. The sensitivity of MR imaging findings 1, 2, 3, and 4 for determining the presence of peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were 92%, 92%, 50%, and 17% respectively. The specificity of MR imaging findings 1, 2, 3, and 4 for determining the absence of peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were 57%, 79%, 93%, and 100% respectively. The presence of predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on three consecutive axial proton density-weighted images is a highly sensitive and moderately specific indicator of symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy. The presence of intermediate T2 signal within the peroneal tendons, and the presence of circumferential fluid within the peroneal tendon sheath greater than 3 mm in maximal width, are highly specific indicators of peroneal

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with peroneal tendinopathy and peroneal tenosynovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Smet, Arthur de [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Mukharjee, Rajat [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Statistics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2007-02-15

    To compare the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of a group of patients with clinically diagnosed peroneal tendonopathy and peroneal tenosynovitis with the MR imaging findings of a control group of patients with no clinical evidence of peroneal tendon disorder. The MR examinations of 24 patients with symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis and 70 patients with no clinical evidence of peroneal tendon disorder were retrospectively reviewed to determine the presence or absence of four MR imaging findings: 1) predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on one or more axial proton density-weighted images, 2) predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on three consecutive axial proton density-weighted images, 3) intermediate T2 signal intensity within the peroneal tendons, and 4) circumferential fluid within the common peroneal tendon sheath greater than 3 mm in maximal width. The sensitivity and specificity of these MR imaging findings for determining the presence or absence or symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were calculated. The sensitivity of MR imaging findings 1, 2, 3, and 4 for determining the presence of peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were 92%, 92%, 50%, and 17% respectively. The specificity of MR imaging findings 1, 2, 3, and 4 for determining the absence of peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were 57%, 79%, 93%, and 100% respectively. The presence of predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on three consecutive axial proton density-weighted images is a highly sensitive and moderately specific indicator of symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy. The presence of intermediate T2 signal within the peroneal tendons, and the presence of circumferential fluid within the peroneal tendon sheath greater than 3 mm in maximal width, are highly specific indicators of peroneal

  15. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb

  16. Intramuscular versus ultrasound-guided intratenosynovial glucocorticoid injection for tenosynovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll-Danielsen, Mads; Østergaard, Mikkel; Fana, Viktoria

    2017-01-01

    and tenosynovitis were randomised into two double-blind groups: (A) 'intramuscular group', receiving intramuscular injection of betamethasone and US-guided intratenosynovial isotonic saline injection and (B) 'intratenosynovial group' receiving saline intramuscularly and US-guided intratenosynovial betamethasone......% (2/24) versus 44% (11/25), that is, difference of ?36pp (?58pp to ?13pp), p=0.003. Most US, clinical and patient-reported scores improved more in the 'intratenosynovial group' at all follow-up visits. Conclusions In this randomised double-blind clinical trial, patients with RA and tenosynovitis...

  17. Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist: diagnosis with US and contribution of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miquel, A.; Frouge, C.; Adrien, C.; Hibou, I.; Bittoun, J.; Bisson, M.; Blery, M.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic tenosynovitis of the hand due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis has become rare. In the two cases presented here, the final diagnosis was obtained by isolation of the organism in the intercarpal fluid (1 case), or by a synovial biopsy (1 case). Ultrasonography showed a hypoechoic thickening of one or several tendon sheaths. MR enabled better differentiation between the thickening of the synovium itself and a fluid effusion. The criteria permitting to differentiate tuberculous from non-infectious tenosynovitis are: young age, male sex, specific epidemiological factors, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, marked local swelling, association with other foci of tuberculosis, unusual exudation and synovial thickening, and association with osteitis. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  18. Tenosynovitis of a digit due to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tolis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacterium that in humans causes skin infections, such as erysipeloid, as a result of direct contact with contaminated animals or their waste or products. We present the first reported case of tenosynovitis of a finger in a 30-year-old woman.

  19. Recurrent Mycobacterium marinum tenosynovitis of the wrist mimicking extraarticular synovial chondromatosis on MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Rubin, David A. [Department of Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brown, David M. [The Orthopedic Center of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Tenosynovitis caused by atypical mycobacterial infections may produce rice bodies within affected tendon sheaths. We report a case of recurrent M. marinum infection involving the flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel in which the rice bodies were mistaken for synovial chondromatosis on MR images. (orig.)

  20. Point-of-Care Ultrasound in the Evaluation of Pyogenic Flexor Tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stephanie G; Beck, Sierra C

    2015-11-01

    A 4-year-old girl presented to the emergency department for evaluation of finger swelling after a dog bite. Point-of-care ultrasound was used to diagnose pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis of the digit after visualizing a fluid collection within the flexor tendon sheath. The patient underwent emergent incision and drainage of the digit with good outcome.

  1. Recurrent Mycobacterium marinum tenosynovitis of the wrist mimicking extraarticular synovial chondromatosis on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Rubin, David A.; Brown, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Tenosynovitis caused by atypical mycobacterial infections may produce rice bodies within affected tendon sheaths. We report a case of recurrent M. marinum infection involving the flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel in which the rice bodies were mistaken for synovial chondromatosis on MR images. (orig.)

  2. MR arthrographic findings in tenosynovitis of the long bicipital tendon of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueckel, C.; Nidecker, A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MR arthrographic findings of bicipital tenosynovitis in correlation with arthroscopy. Design and patients. The shoulder MR arthrographies of 500 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed for signs of bicipital tenosynovitis and associated pathologies. Forty patients (8%) had MR evidence of bicipital tenosynovitis, but only 17 (3%) with arthroscopic confirmation were included in the study. The MR findings in these patients were compared with those of 10 patients with rotator cuff lesions but arthroscopically normal long biceps tendons. MR arthrography was performed with 10-15 ml of a 250 mmol/l gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA) solution injected under fluoroscopic guidance, and transaxial, oblique coronal and sagittal MR sequences were obtained. Results. All 17 patients showed one or more abnormal findings: signal increase in the tendon with or without fusiform distension was seen in 12, surface irregularities in six, adhesions in 11 and noncommunicating effusions of the tendon sheath in six. Associated abnormalities of the rotator cuff were present in 16 while the seventeenth patient had glenohumeral synovitis without rotator cuff pathology. MR arthrograms correlated with arthroscopic findings in the joint but comparison was not possible in the intertubercular groove portion of the biceps tendon. None of the 10 patients with an arthroscopically normal biceps tendon showed any of the MR findings of bicipital tenosynovitis. Conclusion. Bicipital tenosynovitis is detectable by MR arthrography. In most cases it is an associated finding of rotator cuff abnormalities and likely to have a similar etiology. When lesions of the anterior rotator cuff are recognized, the biceps tendon should be scrutinized for inflammatory changes. (orig.)

  3. MR arthrographic findings in tenosynovitis of the long bicipital tendon of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueckel, C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Basel, Petersgraben 4, CH-4031 Basel (Switzerland); Nidecker, A. [MRI Institut Rebgasse, Untere Rebgasse 18, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland)

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MR arthrographic findings of bicipital tenosynovitis in correlation with arthroscopy. Design and patients. The shoulder MR arthrographies of 500 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed for signs of bicipital tenosynovitis and associated pathologies. Forty patients (8%) had MR evidence of bicipital tenosynovitis, but only 17 (3%) with arthroscopic confirmation were included in the study. The MR findings in these patients were compared with those of 10 patients with rotator cuff lesions but arthroscopically normal long biceps tendons. MR arthrography was performed with 10-15 ml of a 250 mmol/l gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA) solution injected under fluoroscopic guidance, and transaxial, oblique coronal and sagittal MR sequences were obtained. Results. All 17 patients showed one or more abnormal findings: signal increase in the tendon with or without fusiform distension was seen in 12, surface irregularities in six, adhesions in 11 and noncommunicating effusions of the tendon sheath in six. Associated abnormalities of the rotator cuff were present in 16 while the seventeenth patient had glenohumeral synovitis without rotator cuff pathology. MR arthrograms correlated with arthroscopic findings in the joint but comparison was not possible in the intertubercular groove portion of the biceps tendon. None of the 10 patients with an arthroscopically normal biceps tendon showed any of the MR findings of bicipital tenosynovitis. Conclusion. Bicipital tenosynovitis is detectable by MR arthrography. In most cases it is an associated finding of rotator cuff abnormalities and likely to have a similar etiology. When lesions of the anterior rotator cuff are recognized, the biceps tendon should be scrutinized for inflammatory changes. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 22 refs.

  4. MRI features in de Quervain`s tenosynovitis of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glajchen, N. [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Schweitzer, M. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain`s stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal extensor component is traditionally diagnosed clinically but may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. A retrospective review of wrist MR images was performed in cases where the diagnosis of de Quervain`s synovitis was suggested (n=5). Imaging findings were correlated with clinical findings in four cases and with wrist arthroscopy in one case. Increased thickness of the extensor pollicus brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendons was the most reliable finding on MRI, being present in all cases. Peritendinous edema was also a reliable finding. Surrounding subcutaneous edema and increased intratendinous signal were less reliable findings in confirmed cases of de Quervain`s disease. De Quervain`s tenosynovitis may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. Increased tendon thickness and peritendinous edema are the most reliable imaging findings. (orig.)

  5. High-intensity laser therapy during chronic degenerative tenosynovitis experimentally induced in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Damiano; Rossi, Giacomo; Bilotta, Teresa W.; Zati, Allesandro; Gazzotti, Valeria; Venturini, Antonio; Pinna, Stefania; Serra, Christian; Masotti, Leonardo

    2002-10-01

    The aims of this study was the safety and the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) on chronic degenerative tenosynovitis. We have effectuated the histological evaluation and seroassay (C reactive protein) on 18 chickens affect by chronic degenerative tenosynovitis experimentally induced. We have been employed a Nd:YAG laser pulsed wave; all irradiated subjects received the same total energy (270 Joule) with a fluence of 7,7 J/cm2 and intensity of 10,7 W/cm2. The histological findings revealed a distinct reduction of the mineralization of the choral matrix, the anti-inflammatory effect of the laser, the hyperplasia of the synoviocytes and ectasia of the lymphatic vessels.

  6. Isolated Tenosynovitis as a Sole Manifestation: The Great Mimicker Still Continues to Surprise Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Abhishek; Surana, Trupti V; Biswas, Saugato; Reja, Abu Hena Hasanoor; Chatterjee, Gobinda

    2015-01-01

    A middle aged male presented with non-tender cystic swelling over left distal forearm since 1 year. No other cutaneous abnormality could be found except mild paresthesia of the overlying skin and equivocal thickening of the ipsilateral ulnar nerve. Routine investigation was within normal limits. Detailed workup of the patient including MRI of the lesion suggested the diagnosis as tenosynovitis with a soft tissue mass. Fine needle aspiration cytology from the cyst showed foamy macrophages and acid fast bacilli; while PCR of the aspirate confirmed the etiological agent as M. leprae. We, thus, report a unique case of isolated tenosynovitis as a sole manifestation of pure neural leprosy which is extremely rare in world literature. PMID:25814736

  7. Effects of metabolic syndrome on the functional outcomes of corticosteroid injection for De Quervain tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Y H; Noh, J H; Gong, H S; Baek, G H

    2017-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of medical conditions that arise from insulin resistance and abnormal adipose deposition and function. In patients with metabolic syndrome and De Quervain tenosynovitis this might affect the outcome of treatment by local corticosteroid injection. A total of 64 consecutive patients with De Quervain tenosynovitis and metabolic syndrome treated with corticosteroid injection were age- and sex-matched with 64 control patients without metabolic syndrome. The response to treatment, including visual analogue scale score for pain, objective findings consistent with De Quervain tenosynovitis (tenderness at first dorsal compartment, Finkelstein test result), and Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score were assessed at 6, 12, and 24 weeks follow-up. Treatment failure was defined as persistence of symptoms or surgical intervention. Prior to treatment, patients with metabolic syndrome had mean initial pain visual analogue scale and Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores similar to those in the control group. The proportion of treatment failure in the metabolic syndrome group (43%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (20%) at 6 months follow-up. The pain visual analogue scale scores in the metabolic syndrome group were higher than the scores in the control group at the 12- and 24-week follow-ups. The Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores of the metabolic syndrome group were higher (more severe symptoms) than those of the control group at the 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Although considerable improvements in symptom severity and hand function will likely occur in patients with metabolic syndrome, corticosteroid injection for De Quervain tenosynovitis is not as effective in these patients compared with age- and sex-matched controls in terms of functional outcomes and treatment failure. III.

  8. Infectious tenosynovitis with bloodstream infection caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, a case report on an occupational pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofseth, Kristine; Dalen, Håvard; Kibsgaard, Leif; Nebb, Solrun; Kümmel, Angela; Mehl, Arne

    2017-01-05

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is an established animal pathogen, which may cause infections in humans. It is a gram-positive rod and found in the tonsils or the digestive tracts of animals. The bacterium is occupationally related, as usually only people with frequent animal contacts are infected. We report a case of a patient who was admitted with an infectious tenosynovitis with bloodstream infection due to E. rhusiopathiae, and to our knowledge, this is the first report of a tenosynovitis with systemic manifestation associated with this bacterium. A 52-year old Norwegian man, who worked with transportation of swine cadavers, was admitted to the local hospital with sepsis and unknown focus of infection. A few days earlier he had an injury to the skin of one of his fingers that later proved to be infected with E. rhusiopathiae. There were no other causes for his symptoms than the infectious tenosynovitis with systemic manifestation. The infection resolved on treatment with antibiotics and surgery. A transoesophageal echocardiogram was performed to exclude endocarditis, which may be associated with this pathogen. This case report highlights the importance of clinicians being aware of this bacterium, and we describe risk factors for infection, differences in the clinical manifestations of the disease, challenges with diagnosing the bacterium and adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Recommended treatment is appropriate antibiotic therapy and adequate debridement and surgical drainage of the tendon sheath.

  9. Distal intersection tenosynovitis of the wrist: a lesser-known extensor tendinopathy with characteristic MR imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parellada, Antoni J.; Gopez, Angela G.; Morrison, William B.; Sweet, Stephanie; Leinberry, Charles F.; Reiter, Sean B.; Kohn, Mark

    2007-01-01

    To present the MRI imaging findings of extensor tenosynovitis at the distal intersection or crossover between the second (extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB)) and third (extensor pollicis longus (EPL)) extensor compartment tendons, and the anatomical details that may play a role in the pathogenesis of this condition. The imaging studies and clinical records of five patients (three females and two males, with ages ranging between 22 and 78 years; mean age, 49 years) presenting with pain on the dorsal and radial aspect of the wrist were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. Three cases were identified serendipitously during routine clinical reading sessions; a follow-up computerized database search for additional cases reported in the prior two years yielded two additional cases. The overall number of cases screened was 1,031. The diagnosis of tendinopathy affecting the second and third compartment extensor tendons was made on the basis of MRI findings and clinical follow-up, or synovectomy. All patients showed signs of tenosynovitis: in four patients both the tendons of the second and third extensor compartments were affected; the fifth patient showed signs of tenosynovitis of the EPL tendon, and tendinosis of the extensor carpi radialis tendons. Three patients showed tenosynovitis proximal and distal to the point of intersection; and in two of them, a discrete point of constriction was appreciated at the crossover site in relation to the extensor retinaculum. Two patients showed tenosynovitis limited to the segment distal to the point of decussation. Tendinosis tended to follow the presence of tenosynovitis. In one of the patients, subtendinous reactive marrow edema in Lister's tubercle was noted. Distal intersection tenosynovitis may be related to the biomechanical pulley effect exerted by Lister's tubercle on the EPL tendon as it leaves the third compartment and crosses over the extensor carpi radialis tendons, as well as

  10. Distal intersection tenosynovitis of the wrist: a lesser-known extensor tendinopathy with characteristic MR imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parellada, Antoni J. [DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Frankford Hospitals - Torresdale Campus, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gopez, Angela G.; Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sweet, Stephanie [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia Hand Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leinberry, Charles F. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery - Hand Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Reiter, Sean B.; Kohn, Mark [DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2007-03-15

    To present the MRI imaging findings of extensor tenosynovitis at the distal intersection or crossover between the second (extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB)) and third (extensor pollicis longus (EPL)) extensor compartment tendons, and the anatomical details that may play a role in the pathogenesis of this condition. The imaging studies and clinical records of five patients (three females and two males, with ages ranging between 22 and 78 years; mean age, 49 years) presenting with pain on the dorsal and radial aspect of the wrist were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. Three cases were identified serendipitously during routine clinical reading sessions; a follow-up computerized database search for additional cases reported in the prior two years yielded two additional cases. The overall number of cases screened was 1,031. The diagnosis of tendinopathy affecting the second and third compartment extensor tendons was made on the basis of MRI findings and clinical follow-up, or synovectomy. All patients showed signs of tenosynovitis: in four patients both the tendons of the second and third extensor compartments were affected; the fifth patient showed signs of tenosynovitis of the EPL tendon, and tendinosis of the extensor carpi radialis tendons. Three patients showed tenosynovitis proximal and distal to the point of intersection; and in two of them, a discrete point of constriction was appreciated at the crossover site in relation to the extensor retinaculum. Two patients showed tenosynovitis limited to the segment distal to the point of decussation. Tendinosis tended to follow the presence of tenosynovitis. In one of the patients, subtendinous reactive marrow edema in Lister's tubercle was noted. Distal intersection tenosynovitis may be related to the biomechanical pulley effect exerted by Lister's tubercle on the EPL tendon as it leaves the third compartment and crosses over the extensor carpi radialis tendons

  11. Randomised controlled trial of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenier Klaas H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and leads to wrist pain and to impaired function of the wrist and hand. It can be treated by splinting, local corticosteroid injection and operation. In this study effectiveness of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis provided by general practitioners was assessed. Methods Participants with de Quervain's tenosynovitis were recruited by general practitioners. Short-term outcomes (one week after injections were assessed in a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Long-term effectiveness was evaluated in an open prospective cohort-study of steroid responders during a follow-up period of 12 months. Participants were randomised to one or two local injections of 1 ml of triamcinolonacetonide (TCA or 1 ml of NaCl 0.9% (placebo. Non-responders to NaCl were treated with additional TCA injections. Main outcomes were immediate treatment response, severity of pain, improvement as perceived by participant and functional disability using sub items hand and finger function of the Dutch Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (Dutch AIMS-2-HFF. Results 11 general practitioners included 21 wrists in 21 patients. The TCA-group had better results for short-term outcomes treatment response (78% vs. 25%; p = 0.015, perceived improvement (78% vs. 33%; p = 0.047 and severity of pain (4.27 vs. 1.33; p = 0.031 but not for the Dutch-AIMS-HFF (2.71 vs. 1.92; p = 0.112. Absolute risk reduction for the main outcome short-term treatment response was 0.55 (95% CI: 0.34, 0.76 with a number needed to treat of 2 (95% CI: 1, 3. In the cohort of steroid responders (n = 12 the beneficial effects of steroid injections were sustained during the follow-up of 12 months regarding severity of pain (p = 0.67 and scores of Dutch AIMS-2-HFF (p = 0.36, but not for patient perceived improvement (p = 0.02. No adverse events were observed during the 12

  12. Validity and sensitivity to change of the semi-quantitative OMERACT ultrasound scoring system for tenosynovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll-Danielsen, Mads; Østergaard, Mikkel; Naredo, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to evaluate the metric properties of the semi-quantitative OMERACT US scoring system vs a novel quantitative US scoring system for tenosynovitis, by testing its intra- and inter-reader reliability, sensitivity to change and comparison with clinical tenosynovitis scoring...... in a 6-month follow-up study. METHODS: US and clinical assessments of the tendon sheaths of the clinically most affected hand and foot were performed at baseline, 3 and 6 months in 51 patients with RA. Tenosynovitis was assessed using the semi-quantitative scoring system (0-3) proposed by the OMERACT US...... tenosynovitis score was performed, calculating a sum score per patient. RESULTS: The intra- and inter-observer agreements for US tenosynovitis assessments were very good at baseline and for change for GS and CD, but less good for PI. The smallest detectable change was 0.97 for GS, 0.93 for CD and 30.1 for PI...

  13. A comparison of ultrasound and clinical examination in the detection of flexor tenosynovitis in early arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouqal Redouane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tenosynovitis is widely accepted to be common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and postulated to be the first manifestation of RA, but its true prevalence in early disease and in particular the hand has not been firmly established. The aims of this study were first to investigate the frequency and distribution of finger flexor tenosynovitis using ultrasound in early arthritis, second to compare clinical examination with ultrasound (US using the latter as the gold standard. Methods 33 consecutive patients who had who were initially diagnosed with polyarthritis and suspected of polyarthritis and clinical suspicion of inflammatory arthritis of the hands and wrists were assessed during consecutive, routine presentations to the rheumatology outpatient clinic. We scanned a total of 165 finger tendons and subsequent comparisons were made using clinical examination. Results Flexor tenosynovitis was found in 17 patients (51.5% on ultrasound compared with 16 (48.4% of all patients on clinical examination. Most commonly damaged joint involved on US was the second finger followed by the third, fifth, and fourth. Both modalities demonstrated more pathology on the second and third metacarpophalangeal (MCP compared with the fourth and fifth MCP. A joint-by-joint comparison of US and clinical examination demonstrated that although the sensitivity, specificities and positive predictive values of clinical examination were relatively high, negative predictive value of clinical examination was low (0.23. Conclusions Our study suggest that clinical examination can be a valuable tool for detecting flexor disease in view of its high specificity and positive predictive values, but a negative clinical examination does not exclude inflammation and an US should be considered. Further work is recommended to standardize definitions and image acquisition for peritendinous inflammation for ultrasound.

  14. Bicipital tendinitis and tenosynovitis in the dog: a study of 15 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, W J; Burbidge, H M; Bray, J P; Broome, C J

    2000-04-01

    To describe the clinical, radiographic, and sonographic features of 15 dogs with bicipital tendinitis and tenosynovitis, classify them according to cause, and evaluate the long-term efficacy of treatment. Dogs exhibiting forelimb lameness with pain localised to the biceps tendon were included in the study. Sonographic examination of the tendon and tendon sheath, and radiographic examination including positive contrast arthrograms of the shoulder joint were performed, and assessed for features consistent with biceps tendon disease. In some cases, synovial-fluid analysis and surgical investigation were also undertaken. The causes of the conditions were classified as either traumatic, mechanical, neoplastic or inflammatory. Dogs were treated conservatively with rest and anti-inflammatory drugs, or surgically by either transection of the transverse humeral ligament or tenodesis of the biceps tendon. Assessment of the effects of treatment was made by re-examination at six weeks and from information gained by telephone interview with the dog's owner at longer-term follow-up. Bicipital tendinitis and tenosynovitis were common causes of forelimb lameness in active, middle-aged or older, medium to large-breed dogs. The most sensitive physical tests for localising pain to the biceps apparatus were shoulder flexion with the elbow extended, focal digital pressure applied directly to the biceps origin, and the biceps retraction test. Sonographic assessment was found to be more sensitive than shoulder radiography or arthrography for characterising the lesion. Conservative treatment of 11 traumatic cases resulted in good or excellent function at long-term follow-up. One mechanical bicipital tendinitis secondary to mineral deposits within the supraspinatus tendon improved following transection of the transverse humeral ligament and removal of the deposits. One of two cases of inflammatory tendinitis/ tenosynovitis improved following tenodesis. One dog with neoplastic disease did

  15. [Effects of vacuum sealing drainage technique in acute and chronic suppurative tenosynovitis of hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Xia, F; Xing, D M; Ren, D; Feng, W; Chen, Y; Xiao, Z H; Zhao, Z M

    2017-05-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of vacuum sealing drainage technique in acute and chronic suppurative tenosynovitis of hand. Methods: A total of 9 cases acute and chronic suppurative tenosynovitis patients from January 2013 to April 2015 in Puai Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology were retrospectively reviewed. There were 6 males and 3 females, aging from 27 to 65 years, the average age was 55 years. There were 3 cases of index finger, 3 cases of middle finger, 2 cases of ring finger, 1 case include three fingers. The infection causes included stabbing with fishbone in 3 cases, stabbing with animal bone fragments in 3 cases, wound by sawdust in 3 cases, meat grinder injury in 1 case, multiple fingers crush injury postoperative infection of garbage truck in 1 case. Bacterial infection included 2 cases with Staphylococcus aureus, 2 cases with Staphylococcus epidermidis, 1 case with normal Escherichia coli, 1 case with mixed infection of Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella oxytoca and Staphylococcus, 1 case with Bauman Acinetobacter bacillus, 1 case with Proteus mirabilis and 1 case of no growth of pathogenic bacteria culture. After thorough debridement, vacuum sealing drainage was used to observe the characteristics of irrigation fluid, the formation of cavity inflammation, the prognosis of infection and the recovery of finger function. Results: Seven patients with suppurative tenosynovitis were treated for 7 to 14 days, replaced the vacuum sealing drainage dressing once; 1 patient was an illustration of the finger tip defect flap infected patients after 21 days of treatment, replaced the vacuum sealing drainage dressing twice, 1 patient was an illustration of the central refers to trauma, postoperative infection patients 28 d, replaced three times in the VSD. The follow-up time was 3 to 12 months (mean 8.2 months), 7 patients without tendon necrosis, secondary suture with no infection, 2 cases of

  16. Development and validation of the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance tenosynovitis scoring system in a multireader exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop and validate a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tenosynovitis (TS) score for tendons at the wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Axial T1-weighted precontrast and postcontrast fat-saturated MR image sets...... of the hands of 43 patients with RA initiating rituximab therapy were obtained at baseline and after 14, 26, 38, or 52 weeks. The MR images were scored twice by 4 readers. Nine tendon compartments of the wrist and 4 flexor tendon compartments at the MCP joints were assessed. Tenosynovitis was scored as follows...

  17. Biomechanical effects of steroid injections used to treat pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turvey Blake R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent study from our laboratory has demonstrated improved range of motion in the toes of broiler chickens afflicted with pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis when treated with local antibiotic and corticosteroid injections, without surgical drainage. However, the use of corticosteroids as an adjunct treatment raised peer concern, as steroids are thought to have deleterious effects on tendon strength. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile strength of the aforementioned steroid treated tendons, to a group of tendons administered with the current standard treatment: systemic antibiotics, surgical drainage and no corticosteroids. Methods Twenty-three tendons’ structural and material properties were investigated (fifteen receiving the standard treatment, eight receiving the steroid treatment. The measurements from each group were interpreted via Student’s unpaired t-test and a post-hoc power analysis. Results The steroid treated tendons did demonstrate a trend toward decreased mechanical properties when compared with the standard treatment group, but the results were not statistically significant. Conclusions Treatment of septic tenosynovitis with local corticosteroid and local antibiotic injections resulted in better digital motion, without a significant loss of tendon strength, over a twenty-eight day recovery period.

  18. Flexor Tenosynovitis Due to Tuberculosis in Hand and Wrist: Is Tenosynovectomy Imperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabakaş, Fatih; Uğurlar, Meriç; Turan, Derya Bayirli; Yeşiloğlu, Nebil; Mersa, Berkan; Özçelik, İsmail Bülent

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of flexor tenosynovitis in the hand and wrist due to tuberculosis is controversial. Although some authors recommend the antituberculous chemotherapy, the others recommend the surgical treatment. In this article, 12 patients with synovial tuberculosis of the flexor aspect of the hand and the wrist were evaluated with respect to diagnosis and treatment modalities. None of the patients had a history of tuberculosis, concomitant disease, immunosuppressive drug use, drug abuse, and human immunodefficiency virus positivity. A chest x-ray and family screening were performed in all of the cases, none had evidence of tuberculosis in the lung. The biopsy, histopathological examination, acid-fast bacillus staining, and BACTEC tuberculosis culture were performed. Antituberculous chemotherapy was initiated in patients diagnosed with tuberculosis by either histological or microbiological examinations. The patients did not undergo any further surgery after biopsy procedures. The lesions regressed totally in all patients after 3 months of treatment. Carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms and signs recruited at five months of treatment. In patients with flexor tuberculosis tenosynovitis, it is possible to achieve good results by applying only medical therapy after a biopsy, and without the need for further surgery.

  19. Tenosynovitis Evaluation Using Image Fusion and B-Flow - A Pilot Study on New Imaging Techniques in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll-Danielsen, Mads; Glinatsi, Daniel; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    .40) for tendon sheaths. No statistically significant difference was found between US tendon area and MRI tendon area 2 (Wilcoxon's test; p = 0.47). Overall, the agreement between grayscale and color Doppler (CD) US and MRI tenosynovitis visualization and scoring was good, but not between CD and BFI. Conclusion...

  20. The Efficacy of Local Injection of Methylprednisolone and Lidocaine with and Without Splint, in Treating Patients with De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Suffering from de Quervain's tenosynovitis due to repetitive and routine activities leads to considerable referrals to orthopedic clinics and increasing health care costs and wasting of patients' time. The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of local injection of methylprednisolone with and without splint for treatment of patients suffering from de Quervain's tenosynovitis. Methods: In a clinical trial study, 72 patients with de Quervain's tenosynovitis were selected in 2010 and were randomly divided into two groups. Therapeutic intervention in the first group was injection of 40 mg methylprednisone and 1 ml lidocaine with splint, and in the second group it was injection 40 mg methylprednisone and 1ml lidocaine without splint. Both groups followed this treatment for three periods(21 day. The related data were collected by visual analogue scale. Then data was analyzed by SPSS (ver. 16 using Fisher exact test and t test. Results: The findings of this study revealed that after the 3-week period of treatment the mean reduced pain intensity and improvement in the first group was significantly lower than the second group(p<0/05. Conclusion: Therefore, local injection of methylprednisone and lidocaine with splint is an effective method in the treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis.

  1. Predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Horsten, N.C.; Hoeksma, A.F.; Dijkmans, B.A.; Knol, D.L.; Schaardenburg, D. van; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To identify early predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design: A longitudinal study of an inception cohort. Setting: A large outpatient clinic. Participants: Consecutive patients who attended

  2. Isolated Tuberculous Tenosynovitis of the Anterior Tibial and Extensor Digitorum Longus Tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhan Genç

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal system is involved in 1-5% of extrapulmonary cases of tuberculosis. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is a rare form of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of the tendon sheath in the hand has been seen in a few cases. Involvement of the tendons of the leg is less common. Diagnosis is not easy as there are no specific clinical symptoms or signs. A 33-year-old male presented with painful swelling in the distal right lower limb that caused restriction of movement. Imaging studies showed inflammation and infection of the extensor digitorium longus and tibialis anterior tendons. Histopathological studies showed a necrotizing granulomatous inflammation in the synovial tissue. A diagnosis of tuberculosis was made and medical treatment was initiated that proved successful. Patient remained infection-free at 26-month follow-up examination.

  3. Conservative care of De Quervain's tenosynovitis/ tendinopathy in a warehouse worker and recreational cyclist: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Emily R

    2012-06-01

    This case study was conducted to evaluate the conservative management of a patient presenting with right sided wrist and thumb pain diagnosed as De Quervain's tenosynovitis/tendinopathy. A 49-year-old female warehouse worker and recreational cyclist with right-sided De Quervain's tenosynovitis/tendinopathy that began after a long-distance cycling trip. Treatment included ultrasound, soft tissue and myofascial release therapy, tool assisted fascial stripping or "guasha", acupuncture, mobilizations and kinesiology taping. Home advice included icing, rest, wrist bracing, elevation and eccentric rehabilitation exercises. The positive outcome was a complete resolution of the patient's complaint. This case demonstrates how De Quervain's disease is a challenging condition to treat with conservative methods and can be aggravated with new exacerbating factors as treatment continues. In this case, the addition of the active care (including eccentric exercises and self-care) helped to reinforce the passive care given in the office and accelerate the recovery.

  4. Development and Validation of the OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Tenosynovitis Scoring System in a Multireader Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Peterfy, Charles G; Vital, Edward M; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2017-11-01

    To develop and validate a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tenosynovitis (TS) score for tendons at the wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Axial T1-weighted precontrast and postcontrast fat-saturated MR image sets of the hands of 43 patients with RA initiating rituximab therapy were obtained at baseline and after 14, 26, 38, or 52 weeks. The MR images were scored twice by 4 readers. Nine tendon compartments of the wrist and 4 flexor tendon compartments at the MCP joints were assessed. Tenosynovitis was scored as follows: 0: No; 1: The overall PEA/PCA intrareader and interreader agreements for change scores in all tendons were 73.8%/97.6% and 47.9%/85.0%, respectively. Average SRM was moderate for total scores and 60.5% of the patients had a tenosynovitis change score ≥ SDC. The TS score showed high intrareader and interreader agreement for wrist and finger tendons, with moderate responsiveness, and the majority of the patients showed a change above the SDC. This scoring system may be included as a component of the RAMRIS.

  5. De Qeurvian Tenosynovitis: Clinical Outcomes of Surgical Treatment with Longitudinal and Transverse Incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arefah Dehghani Tafti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectives: De Quervain disease is a mechanical tenosynovitis due to inadequacy volume between abductor pollicis longus, extensor pollicis brevis and their tunnel. Treatment methods include immobilization, steroid injections, and operation. For the first time Fritz De Quervain described surgical treatment of this disease. Since then, various ways of treatment have been reported. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical outcomes of a longitudinal incision with a transverse incision in De Quervain disease.Methods: This was a randomized controlled clinical trial conducted in three hospitals in Iran, Yazd from March 2003 to September 2008. One hundred-twenty patients with De Quervain disease who did not respond to conservative treatment were operated with two different incisions. The patients were followed for three months to compare the surgical outcomes.Results: During a three month follow-up, a significant difference was shown between the two methods (p=0.03. Results of surgical treatment with longitudinal incision were excellent (only 5 hypertrophic scars, but there were 13 postoperative complaints with transverse incision.Conclusion: According to our findings, longitudinal incision in surgical treatment of De Quervain disease is better than transverse incision.

  6. The effects of implant composition on extensor tenosynovitis in a canine distal radius fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinicropi, Stefano M; Su, Brian W; Raia, Frank J; Parisien, May; Strauch, Robert J; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2005-03-01

    Dorsal plating of distal radius fractures with titanium plates has resulted in clinically observed tenosynovitis and tendon rupture. The goal of this study was to investigate whether titanium-based implants result in more extensor tendon inflammation than matched stainless-steel implants in a canine fracture model. An osteotomy was created in the distal radius of 18 beagles and fixed with 2.7-mm 4-hole plates composed of commercially pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-Al6-V4), or 316L stainless steel. Animals were killed at an average of 4 months. Tendon gliding was assessed by applying a force at the extensor musculotendinous junction and noting gliding. Histologic grading (mild, moderate, severe) was based on cellular hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and leukocytic infiltration. Tendons glided freely in 100% stainless-steel specimens, 75% of titanium alloy, and 43% of commercially pure titanium groups. A severe inflammatory reaction was identified in 60% of the titanium alloy (Ti-A16-V4) group, 57% of the pure titanium group, and 0% of the stainless-steel group. Dorsal plating of the canine radius with commercially pure titanium or titanium alloy implants produced a greater inflammatory peritendinous response than matched stainless-steel implants.

  7. Systematic review and meta-analysis on the work-related cause of de Quervain tenosynovitis: a critical appraisal of its recognition as an occupational disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Stéphane; Vida, Daniel; Meisner, Christoph; Lotter, Oliver; Rothenberger, Jens; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Stahl, Adelana Santos

    2013-12-01

    The authors systematically reviewed all of the etiopathologic factors discussed in the literature to verify the classification of de Quervain tenosynovitis on the list of occupational diseases. The authors searched Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for articles discussing the cause of de Quervain tenosynovitis. The literature was classified by the level of evidence presented, the etiopathologic hypothesis discussed, the authors' conclusion about the role of the etiopathologic hypothesis, and the first author's professional background. The quality of reporting of the observational studies was evaluated by an extended Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statement checklist. A meta-analysis of all controlled cohort studies was performed. The Bradford Hill criteria were used to evaluate a causal relationship between de Quervain tenosynovitis and occupational risk factors. A total of 179 references were found, and 80 articles were included. On average, only 35 percent (median, 35 percent; range, 16 to 60 percent) of all items on the extended Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology checklist were addressed per article. The meta-analysis to evaluate the strength of the association between de Quervain tenosynovitis and (1) repetitive, (2) forceful, or (3) ergonomically stressful manual work suggested an odds ratio of 2.89 (95 percent CI, 1.4 to 5.97; p = 0.004). No evidence was found to support the Bradford Hill criteria for a causal relationship between de Quervain tenosynovitis and occupational risk factors. No sufficient scientific evidence was provided to confirm a causal relationship between de Quervain tenosynovitis and occupational risk factors. Risk, III.

  8. Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist: diagnosis with US and contribution of MRI; Tenosynovite tuberculeuse du poignet: diagnostic echographique et apport de l`IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miquel, A.; Frouge, C.; Adrien, C.; Hibou, I.; Bittoun, J.; Bisson, M.; Blery, M. [Hopital de Bicetre, 94 - le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    1995-05-01

    Chronic tenosynovitis of the hand due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis has become rare. In the two cases presented here, the final diagnosis was obtained by isolation of the organism in the intercarpal fluid (1 case), or by a synovial biopsy (1 case). Ultrasonography showed a hypoechoic thickening of one or several tendon sheaths. MR enabled better differentiation between the thickening of the synovium itself and a fluid effusion. The criteria permitting to differentiate tuberculous from non-infectious tenosynovitis are: young age, male sex, specific epidemiological factors, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, marked local swelling, association with other foci of tuberculosis, unusual exudation and synovial thickening, and association with osteitis. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Detection of vascularity in wrist tenosynovitis: power doppler ultrasound compared with contrast-enhanced grey-scale ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauser, Andrea S; Franz, Magdalena; Arora, Rohit; Feuchtner, Gudrun M; Gruber, Johann; Schirmer, Michael; Jaschke, Werner R; Gabl, Markus F

    2010-01-01

    We sought to assess vascularity in wrist tenosynovitis by using power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) and to compare detection of intra- and peritendinous vascularity with that of contrast-enhanced grey-scale ultrasound (CEUS). Twenty-six tendons of 24 patients (nine men, 15 women; mean age ± SD, 54.4 ± 11.8 years) with a clinical diagnosis of tenosynovitis were examined with B-mode ultrasonography, PDUS, and CEUS by using a second-generation contrast agent, SonoVue (Bracco Diagnostics, Milan, Italy) and a low-mechanical-index ultrasound technique. Thickness of synovitis, extent of vascularized pannus, intensity of peritendinous vascularisation, and detection of intratendinous vessels was incorporated in a 3-score grading system (grade 0 to 2). Interobserver variability was calculated. With CEUS, a significantly greater extent of vascularity could be detected than by using PDUS (P < 0.001). In terms of peri- and intratendinous vessels, CEUS was significantly more sensitive in the detection of vascularization compared with PDUS (P < 0.001). No significant correlation between synovial thickening and extent of vascularity could be found (P = 0.089 to 0.097). Interobserver reliability was calculated to be excellent when evaluating the grading score (κ = 0.811 to 1.00). CEUS is a promising tool to detect tendon vascularity with higher sensitivity than PDUS by improved detection of intra- and peritendinous vascularity.

  10. Stenosing Tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Associated with the Plantar Capsular Accessory Ossicle at the Interphalangeal Joint of the Great Toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ho Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with the plantar capsular accessory ossicle at the interphalangeal joint of the great toe, which was confirmed by intraoperative observation and was successfully treated with surgical resection of the ossicle. As the plantar capsular accessory ossicle was not visible radiographically due to the lack of ossification, ultrasonography was helpful for diagnosing this disorder.

  11. Poliartritis y tenosinovitis grave por Streptococcus agalactiae en un paciente con hipoesplenia funcional Severe polyarthritis and tenosynovitis caused by Streptococcus agalactiae in a patient with functional hyposplenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo C. Balderramo

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available La artritis por Streptococcus agalactiae es infrecuente. No conocemos publicaciones de casos sobre la afección tendinosa por este microorganismo. Se presenta una mujer de 46 años que consultó por fiebre, poliartralgias, mialgias, diarrea y vómitos. Como antecedentes presentaba carcinoma papilar de tiroides e hipoesplenia funcional. Al examen se encontraba hemodinámicamente inestable, febril, con artritis de mano izquierda, muñecas, codos, hombro derecho y tobillo izquierdo. Presentaba tenosinovitis en ambos pies y en la mano izquierda. Los hemocultivos y el cultivo de la bursa olecraniana derecha fueron positivos para S. agalactiae. La ecografía mostró signos de tenosinovitis del tibial anterior izquierdo. Completó 20 días de tratamiento endovenoso con cefazolina y 12 días de cefuroxima oral. El cuadro articular revirtió completamente en 60 días. El Streptococcus agalactiae puede causar, en forma infrecuente, un síndrome de poliartritis, tenosinovitis y fiebre similar al producido por la infección gonocócica.Cases of arthritis caused by Streptococcus agalactiae are infrequent and in our knowledge there are no case reports of tenosynovitis caused by S. agalactiae. A 46-year-old woman presented with fever, polyarthralgia, myalgia, diarrhea and vomiting. She had a history of papillary thyroid carcinoma and functional hyposplenia. She was febrile, with arthritis in hands, wrists, elbows, right shoulder and left ankle joints, and presented tenosynovitis in both feet and left hand. Blood and right olecranon bursa sample cultures were positive for S. agalactiae. An ultrasound scan made at the musculus tibialis anterior of left foot revealed signs of tenosynovitis. She was treated with intravenous cefazolin for 20 days and oral cefuroxime for 12 days. The joint involvement completely subsided in 60 days. Streptococcus agalactiae can cause, infrequently, a polyarthritis and tenosynovitis syndrome similar to disseminated gonococcal

  12. Guyon's canal syndrome due to tortuous ulnar artery with DeQuervain stenosing tenosynovitis, ligamentous injuries and dorsal intercalated segmental instability syndrome, a rare presentation: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeshan, Muhammad; Ahmed, Farhan; Kanwal, Darakhshan; Khalid, Qazi Saad Bin; Ahmed, Muhammad Nadeem

    2009-01-01

    The Guyon's canal syndrome is a well known clinical entity and may have significant impact on patient's quality of life. We report a case of 43-year-old male who presented with complaints of pain and numbness in right hand and difficulty in writing for past one month. On imaging diagnosis of Guyon's canal syndrome because of tortuous ulnar artery was made with additional findings of DeQuervain's stenosing tenosynovitis and dorsal intercalated segmental instability syndrome with ligamentous in...

  13. Mycobacterium arupense, Mycobacterium heraklionense, and a Newly Proposed Species, "Mycobacterium virginiense" sp. nov., but Not Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, as Species of the Mycobacterium terrae Complex Causing Tenosynovitis and Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wengenack, Nancy L; Eke, Uzoamaka A; Benwill, Jeana L; Turenne, Christine; Wallace, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Mycobacterium terrae complex has been recognized as a cause of tenosynovitis, with M. terrae and Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum reported as the primary etiologic pathogens. The molecular taxonomy of the M. terrae complex causing tenosynovitis has not been established despite approximately 50 previously reported cases. We evaluated 26 isolates of the M. terrae complex associated with tenosynovitis or osteomyelitis recovered between 1984 and 2014 from 13 states, including 5 isolates reported in 1991 as M. nonchromogenicum by nonmolecular methods. The isolates belonged to three validated species, one new proposed species, and two novel related strains. The majority of isolates (20/26, or 77%) belonged to two recently described species: Mycobacterium arupense (10 isolates, or 38%) and Mycobacterium heraklionense (10 isolates, or 38%). Three isolates (12%) had 100% sequence identity to each other by 16S rRNA and 99.3 to 100% identity by rpoB gene region V sequencing and represent a previously undescribed species within the M. terrae complex. There were no isolates of M. terrae or M. nonchromogenicum, including among the five isolates reported in 1991. The 26 isolates were susceptible to clarithromycin (100%), rifabutin (100%), ethambutol (92%), and sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (70%). The current study suggests that M. arupense, M. heraklionense, and a newly proposed species ("M. virginiense" sp. nov.; proposed type strain MO-233 [DSM 100883, CIP 110918]) within the M. terrae complex are the major causes of tenosynovitis and osteomyelitis in the United States, with little change over 20 years. Species identification within this complex requires sequencing methods. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Consensus-based identification of factors related to false-positives in ultrasound scanning of synovitis and tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kei; Narita, Akihiro; Ogasawara, Michihiro; Ohno, Shigeru; Kawahito, Yutaka; Kawakami, Atsushi; Ito, Hiromu; Matsushita, Isao; Suzuki, Takeshi; Misaki, Kenta; Ogura, Takehisa; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Seto, Yohei; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Kaneko, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takayuki; Henmi, Mihoko; Fukae, Jun; Nishida, Keiichiro; Sumida, Takayuki; Koike, Takao

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify causes of false-positives in ultrasound scanning of synovial/tenosynovial/bursal inflammation and provide corresponding imaging examples. We first performed systematic literature review to identify previously reported causes of false-positives. We next determined causes of false-positives and corresponding example images for educational material through Delphi exercises and discussion by 15 experts who were an instructor and/or a lecturer in the 2013 advanced course for musculoskeletal ultrasound organized by Japan College of Rheumatology Committee for the Standardization of Musculoskeletal Ultrasonography. Systematic literature review identified 11 articles relevant to sonographic false-positives of synovial/tenosynovial inflammation. Based on these studies, 21 candidate causes of false-positives were identified in the consensus meeting. Of these items, 11 achieved a predefined consensus (≥ 80%) in Delphi exercise and were classified as follows: (I) Gray-scale assessment [(A) non-specific synovial findings and (B) normal anatomical structures which can mimic synovial lesions due to either their low echogenicity or anisotropy]; (II) Doppler assessment [(A) Intra-articular normal vessels and (B) reverberation)]. Twenty-four corresponding examples with 49 still and 23 video images also achieved consensus. Our study provides a set of representative images that can help sonographers to understand false-positives in ultrasound scanning of synovitis and tenosynovitis.

  15. Guyon's canal syndrome due to tortuous ulnar artery with DeQuervain stenosing tenosynovitis, ligamentous injuries and dorsal intercalated segmental instability syndrome, a rare presentation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Muhammad; Ahmed, Farhan; Kanwal, Darakhshan; Khalid, Qazi Saad Bin; Ahmed, Muhammad Nadeem

    2009-12-23

    The Guyon's canal syndrome is a well known clinical entity and may have significant impact on patient's quality of life. We report a case of 43-year-old male who presented with complaints of pain and numbness in right hand and difficulty in writing for past one month. On imaging diagnosis of Guyon's canal syndrome because of tortuous ulnar artery was made with additional findings of DeQuervain's stenosing tenosynovitis and dorsal intercalated segmental instability syndrome with ligamentous injury and subsequently these were confirmed on surgery.Although it is a rare syndrome, early diagnosis and treatment prevents permanent neurological deficits and improve patient's quality of life.

  16. Subclinical synovitis and tenosynovitis by ultrasonography (US) 7 score in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with synthetic drugs, in clinical remission by DAS28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Ríos, Lucio; Sánchez Bringas, Guadalupe; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Cruz-Arenas, Esteban; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén

    2017-11-29

    To identify synovitis and tenosynovitis active by using the Ultrasound 7 (US 7) scoring system in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission induced by synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). This is a multicentric, cross-sectional, observational study including 94 RA patients >18 years old who were in remission as defined by the 28-joints disease activity score (DAS28) <2.6 induced by synthetic DMARD during at least 6 months. Patients with a previous or current history of biologic DMARD treatment were not included in the study. Demographic and clinical data were collected by the local rheumatologist; the US evaluation was performed by a calibrated rheumatologist, who intended to detect grayscale synovitis and power Doppler (PD) using the 7-joint scale. Intra and inter-reader exercises of images between 2 ultrasonographers were realized. Patients' mean age was 49.1±13.7 years; 83% were women. The mean disease duration was 8±7 years and remission lasted for 27.5±31.8 months. The mean DAS28 score was 1.9±0.66. Grayscale synovitis was present in 94% of cases; it was mild in 87.5% and moderate in 12.5%. Only 12.8% of the patients had PD. The metatarsophalangeal, metacarpophalangeal, and carpal joints of the dominant hand were the joints more frequently affected by synovitis. Tenosynovitis by grayscale was observed in 9 patients (9.6%). The intra and inter-reading kappa value were 0.77, p<0.003 (CI 95%, 0.34-0.81) and 0.81, p<0.0001 (CI 95%, 0.27-0.83) respectively. Low percentage of synovitis and tenosynovitis active were founded according to PD US by 7 score in RA patients under synthetic DMARDs during long remission. This score has benefit because evaluate tenosynovitis, another element of subclinical disease activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Variations of anatomy on MRI of the first extensor compartment of the wrist and association with DeQuervain tenosynovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Kheterpal, Arvin B.; Terneria Vicentini, Joao Rafael; Huang, Ambrose J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    To study anatomical variations on MRI of the first extensor compartment of the wrist in DeQuervain tenosynovitis (DQT). A retrospective search for DQT patients yielded 47 subjects (51 ± 15 years, 36 female, 11 male). The age-matched control group (normal first extensor compartment) was 49 ± 15 years (29 female, 18 male). Two independent readers reviewed: the number of abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendon slips, tendon sheath septations (compartmentalization), and APL and EPB cross-sectional area (CSA) at the radial styloid. A tendon slip was defined as a discrete structure for ≥5 contiguous slices with its own insertion. The distribution of APL tendon slips was different for the DQT and control groups (Reader 1/Reader 2: P = 0.0001 and 0.001). The most common arrangement for both groups was two APL tendon slips. One tendon slip was less common (P = 0.03 and 0.1) and compartmentalization was more common (P = 0.003; < 0.0001) for the DQT group than the control group. There was no difference in tendon slip insertions on one or multiple bones (P = 0.1; 0.7). APL and EPB compartment CSAs were also higher for the DQT group (combined first extensor compartment area: 21.3 ± 7.6 mm{sup 2}; 21.0 ± 7.1) than the control group (17.2 ± 3.8; 17.1 ± 3.9) (P = 0.002; 0.002). We found a statistically significantly increased proportion of supernumerary tendon slips and compartmentalization of the first extensor compartment in patients with DQT and greater CSA of the first extensor compartment at the radial styloid, consistent with previous anatomical, surgical, and ultrasound studies. (orig.)

  18. Tenosinovitis flexora piógena de la mano: hallazgos ecográficos Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis of the hand: sonographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodríguez

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Los autores describen los hallazgos ecográficos en tres pacientes con tenosinovitis flexora piógena (TFP de la mano. Los hallazgos patológicos encontrados en el Eco-Doppler Color fueron un halo hipoecogénico peritendinoso y una hipervascularización de la vaina sinovial. La Ecografía es un procedimiento no invasivo que permite diagnosticar de manera eficiente y precoz la TFP y permite además realizar un estadiaje preoperatorio siendo una guía útil para planificar la cirugía en función de la cantidad y localización de la colección purulenta y de la integridad tendinosa.The authours describe the sonographic findings in three cases of pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis of the hand. Hipoechogenic peritendinous area and hipervascularization of the synovial sheath revealed as the pathologic findings. In Color Doppler US Ultrasound is a non-invasive procedure that allows to make an accurate and early diagnosis of pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis, it is an useful guide for planning surgery taking account the amount and localization of the purulence and the integrity of the tendons.

  19. De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality Birth Control Family Health Infants and Toddlers Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources ...

  20. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Trigger Finger Email to a friend * required fields ...

  1. Mycobacterium arupense, Mycobacterium heraklionense, and a Newly Proposed Species, “Mycobacterium virginiense” sp. nov., but Not Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, as Species of the Mycobacterium terrae Complex Causing Tenosynovitis and Osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasireddy, Sruthi; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Wengenack, Nancy L.; Eke, Uzoamaka A.; Benwill, Jeana L.; Turenne, Christine; Wallace, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium terrae complex has been recognized as a cause of tenosynovitis, with M. terrae and Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum reported as the primary etiologic pathogens. The molecular taxonomy of the M. terrae complex causing tenosynovitis has not been established despite approximately 50 previously reported cases. We evaluated 26 isolates of the M. terrae complex associated with tenosynovitis or osteomyelitis recovered between 1984 and 2014 from 13 states, including 5 isolates reported in 1991 as M. nonchromogenicum by nonmolecular methods. The isolates belonged to three validated species, one new proposed species, and two novel related strains. The majority of isolates (20/26, or 77%) belonged to two recently described species: Mycobacterium arupense (10 isolates, or 38%) and Mycobacterium heraklionense (10 isolates, or 38%). Three isolates (12%) had 100% sequence identity to each other by 16S rRNA and 99.3 to 100% identity by rpoB gene region V sequencing and represent a previously undescribed species within the M. terrae complex. There were no isolates of M. terrae or M. nonchromogenicum, including among the five isolates reported in 1991. The 26 isolates were susceptible to clarithromycin (100%), rifabutin (100%), ethambutol (92%), and sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (70%). The current study suggests that M. arupense, M. heraklionense, and a newly proposed species (“M. virginiense” sp. nov.; proposed type strain MO-233 [DSM 100883, CIP 110918]) within the M. terrae complex are the major causes of tenosynovitis and osteomyelitis in the United States, with little change over 20 years. Species identification within this complex requires sequencing methods. PMID:26962085

  2. 9 CFR 113.332 - Tenosynovitis Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... source and hatch shall be injected intra-muscularly with an amount of Master Seed equal to 100 label... shall be unvaccinated and serve as negative controls; 5 or more shall be injected with subgroup A... reactions from each virus inoculated group and negative reactions from the uninoculated controls. If any of...

  3. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in a dog with chronic bicipital tenosynovitis

    OpenAIRE

    Venzin, Claudio; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Koch, D; Spreng, D

    2004-01-01

    A 15-month-old, spayed female, Bernese mountain dog was presented to the Institute of Small Animal Surgery at the University of Zurich because of chronic left forelimb lameness. The referring veterinarian diagnosed pain in the left shoulder region and had treated the dog with systemic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and restricted exercise for a two-week period. The follow-up examination revealed only minimal improvement and therefore, the dog was referred for further diagnostic evaluat...

  4. Case report 466: Granulomatous tenosynovitis (left 3rd finger)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggenspack, G.A.; Amparo, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic resonance features of a digital flexor tendon sheath mass are described in a patient with a painless enlarged digit. MRI provided precise anatomical localization of a caseating granulomatous mass within the flexor tendon sheath space and facilitated definitive surgical treatment, whereas the radiographic findings showed soft tissue swelling of the phalanx but were unable to compartmentalize or characterize the underlying abnormality. (orig.)

  5. Case report 466: Granulomatous tenosynovitis (left 3rd finger)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waggenspack, G.A.; Amparo, E.G.

    1988-03-01

    The magnetic resonance features of a digital flexor tendon sheath mass are described in a patient with a painless enlarged digit. MRI provided precise anatomical localization of a caseating granulomatous mass within the flexor tendon sheath space and facilitated definitive surgical treatment, whereas the radiographic findings showed soft tissue swelling of the phalanx but were unable to compartmentalize or characterize the underlying abnormality.

  6. Surgical and anatomical studies on De Quervain's tenosynovitis syndrome: Variations in the first extensor compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Randal Pires J and uacute;nior

    2016-08-01

    Clinical relevance: As septation of the first extensor compartment and multiple APL tendons appears to represent risk factors for the development of DQT, prior knowledge of the frequency of such anomalies may assist surgeons in pre-operative evaluation and perioperative procedures. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 50-55

  7. Outcome of low level lasers versus ultrasonic therapy in de Quervain’s tenosynovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Results: Significant improvement was seen within both groups in the following outcome measures assessed: Ritchie’s tenderness scale, grip strength and VAS. Finkelstein’s test was not significantly improved in either groups. Ultrasonographic measurement of tendon sheath diameters, the mediolateral (ML, and anteroposterior (AP diameters was not found to be significantly different in the US Th. group and the laser therapy group after treatment. On comparing both the groups, no statistically significant difference was found. However, looking at the mean values, the grip strength and VAS showed better improvement in the US Th. group as compared to the laser therapy group.

  8. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis with multiple rice bodies of the flexor tendons in the wrist: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: M. tuberculosis should be kept in mind as an infectious agent, especially in developing countries. In order to prevent any delay in diagnostic evaluation, all steps should be taken carefully.

  9. PET/CT imaging in polymyalgia rheumatica: praepubic 18F-FDG uptake correlates with pectineus and adductor longus muscles enthesitis and with tenosynovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehak Zdenek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT is increasing in the diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR, one of the most common inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In addition to other locations, increased 18F-FDG accumulation has been detected in the praepubic region in some patients. However, a deeper description and pathophysiological explanation of this increased praepubic accumulation has been lacking. The aim of the presented study is to confirm a decrease in praepubic 18F-FDG accumulation in response to therapy and to describe potential correlations to other 18F-FDG PET/CT scan characteristics during the course of disease. As a secondary objective, we describe the pathological aspects of the observed praepubic 18F-FDG uptake.

  10. Repetitive Motion Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or daily activities. RMDs include carpal tunnel syndrome, bursitis, tendonitis, epicondylitis, ganglion cyst, tenosynovitis, and trigger finger. ... or daily activities. RMDs include carpal tunnel syndrome, bursitis, tendonitis, epicondylitis, ganglion cyst, tenosynovitis, and trigger finger. ...

  11. A treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular triamcinolone with or without adalimumab effectively reduces MRI synovitis, osteitis and tenosynovitis and halts structural damage progression in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Eshed, Iris; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular glucocorticosteroid injections suppresses MRI inflammation and halts structural damage progression in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA), and whether adalimumab provides an additional effect....

  12. [A rare case of tubercular tenosynovitis in hospital surgeon as a result of an occupational accident caused by puncture with an infected needle. Prevention aspects and legal-medical evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delli Carri, R; Piscozzi, Paola; Massimelli, M; Falcetta, R

    2010-01-01

    The subject was a hospital surgeon who, in the course of routine outpatient surgery with aspiration to collect right lumbar material in a patient with suspected TB infection, accidentally punctured the fifth finger of the left hand with the needle used for this procedure. This led to involvement of the fifth finger of the left hand restricted to the soft tissue with preservation of joint and bone and tenosynovial involvement of the entire extremity. To draw attention to the repercussions for insurance with resulting absence from work for 126 days and an assessment of biological impairment of 2% by the Insurance Institute (INAIL). A case report is described of rare occupational tubercular synovitis. A rare event is reported that occurred in a senior staff member with particular insurance repercussions.

  13. Pets and Pasteurella Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... present in some children, including an infection of the joints ( arthritis ), bones (osteomyelitis), and tendons (tenosynovitis). Less frequently, youngsters may have pneumonia , urinary tract ...

  14. Musculoskeletal ultrasound on the hand and wrist in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha M Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Ultrasound was more accurate than clinical examination and conventional radiography in the detection of subclinical synovitis, tenosynovitis, and the underlying fibrotic changes of tendon friction rub. In SSc patients, on using MSUS, articular involvement was found to be less frequent compared with that in RA patients, with specific appearance of sclerosing tenosynovitis in SSc patients.

  15. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    S. aureus is associated with many clinical syndromes including tenosynovitis, omphalitis, femoral head necrosis, .... Markey, 2008) where occurrence of multidrug ... Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in. Denmark. Veterinary.

  16. Trigger finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digit; Trigger finger release; Locked finger; Digital flexor tenosynovitis ... cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  17. Compartment syndrome can also be seen in the forearm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Ali; Broholm, Rikke; Bülow, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Chronic compartment syndrome is a challenge for the clinician and symptomatic similar to neuropathies, tenosynovitis, stress fractures and referred pain from lumbar cervicalis. Thus, chronic compartment syndrome of the upper extremities is probably an underdiagnosed condition. In patients...

  18. Plantar pain is not always fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Romano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The case is described of a patient with chronic plantar pain, diagnosed as fasciitis, which was not improved by conventional treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, which improved after local glucocorticoid injection.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: demonstration of progression between 1 and 6 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Neal R. [Auckland Hospital, Department of Radiology, Private Bag 92024, Auckland (New Zealand); Auckland Radiology Group, Auckland (New Zealand); Crabbe, Jeffrey P. [Auckland Radiology Group, Auckland (New Zealand); McQueen, Fiona M. [Auckland Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2004-12-01

    To describe the changes seen in the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging obtained at 1 year and 6 years. A cohort of patients with RA has been studied prospectively from symptom onset. MR scans of the dominant wrist in 31 patients obtained at 1 year and 6 years were compared for bone erosions, marrow signal change (oedema), synovial thickness and tenosynovitis. Twenty-two patients had an increase in erosion score in the interval and three patients showed a decrease in erosion score suggesting erosion healing. Fourteen patients had an increase in oedema score in the interval and eight patients had a decrease in oedema score. Synovial thickness increased in 13 patients and decreased in eight. Tenosynovitis increased in 15 patients and decreased in five. Bone erosions developed immediately adjacent to the tenosynovitis in two patients. MR imaging is useful in following the progress of bone erosions, marrow oedema, synovitis and tenosynovitis in RA. (orig.)

  20. Diclofenac Patch for Treatment of Mild to Moderate Tendonitis or Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-05

    Rotator Cuff Tendonitis; Bicipital Tendonitis; Subdeltoid Bursitis of the Shoulder; Subacromial Bursitis of the Shoulder; Medial Epicondylitis of the Elbow; Lateral Epicondylitis of the Elbow; DeQuervain's Tenosynovitis of the Wrist

  1. Rheumatological manifestations of diabetes mellitus - a review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... strongly associated with diabetes mellitus including limited joint mobility, specific arthropathies of the hand (carpal tunnel syndrome, Dupytrens contracture, flexor tenosynovitis and diabetic sclerodactyly), shoulder (adhesive capsulitis-frozen shoulder, and calcific periarthritis) and spontaneous infarction of skeletal muscle.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: demonstration of progression between 1 and 6 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Neal R.; Crabbe, Jeffrey P.; McQueen, Fiona M.

    2004-01-01

    To describe the changes seen in the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging obtained at 1 year and 6 years. A cohort of patients with RA has been studied prospectively from symptom onset. MR scans of the dominant wrist in 31 patients obtained at 1 year and 6 years were compared for bone erosions, marrow signal change (oedema), synovial thickness and tenosynovitis. Twenty-two patients had an increase in erosion score in the interval and three patients showed a decrease in erosion score suggesting erosion healing. Fourteen patients had an increase in oedema score in the interval and eight patients had a decrease in oedema score. Synovial thickness increased in 13 patients and decreased in eight. Tenosynovitis increased in 15 patients and decreased in five. Bone erosions developed immediately adjacent to the tenosynovitis in two patients. MR imaging is useful in following the progress of bone erosions, marrow oedema, synovitis and tenosynovitis in RA. (orig.)

  3. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients wer...

  4. Effect of a treat-to-target strategy based on methotrexate and intra-articular betamethasone with or without additional cyclosporin on MRI-assessed synovitis, osteitis, tenosynovitis, bone erosion, and joint space narrowing in early rheumatoid arthritis: results from a 2-year randomized double

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Bisgaard, S.; Ejbjerg, B. J.; Eshed, I.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy based on methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular (IA) betamethasone suppresses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-determined measures of disease activity and reduces joint destruction in early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) patients, and to i......Objectives: To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy based on methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular (IA) betamethasone suppresses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-determined measures of disease activity and reduces joint destruction in early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) patients......, and to investigate whether concomitant cyclosporin A (CyA) provides an additional effect.Method: In the 2-year randomized, double-blind, treat-to-target trial CIMESTRA, 160 patients with eRA (intra-articular betamethasone and CyA, or placebo CyA. A total of 129 patients participated...

  5. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, C.L.F. [Department of Radiology, North District Hospital, NTEC, Fanling, NT, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: c8681@yahoo.com; Griffith, J.F. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, NTEC, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented.

  6. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, C.L.F.; Griffith, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented

  7. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol: can Gd contrast administration be eliminated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Oestergaard, Mikkel [University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spinal Diseases, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients were evaluated by two readers for synovitis of the radioulnar, radiocarpal, and intercarpal joints, according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring method (RAMRIS), and for tenosynovitis in ten compartments. Scores of MRI images without Gd contrast enhancement were compared to scores obtained when evaluating all, including contrast-enhanced, MRI images as reference. Subsequently, a literature review and pooled analysis of data from the present and two previous studies were performed. At the individual joint/tendon level, sensitivity to detect synovitis without Gd contrast was 91 % and 72 % for the two readers, respectively, with a specificity of 51 % and 81 %. For tenosynovitis, the sensitivity was 67 % and 54 %, respectively, with a specificity of 87 % and 91 %. Pooled data analysis revealed an overall sensitivity of 81 % and specificity of 50 % for evaluation of synovitis. Variations in tenosynovitis scoring systems hindered pooled analyses. Eliminating Gd contrast administration resulted in low specificity for synovitis and low sensitivity for tenosynovitis, indicating that Gd contrast administration remains essential for an optimal assessment. (orig.)

  8. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol: can Gd contrast administration be eliminated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique; Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der; Oestergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients were evaluated by two readers for synovitis of the radioulnar, radiocarpal, and intercarpal joints, according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring method (RAMRIS), and for tenosynovitis in ten compartments. Scores of MRI images without Gd contrast enhancement were compared to scores obtained when evaluating all, including contrast-enhanced, MRI images as reference. Subsequently, a literature review and pooled analysis of data from the present and two previous studies were performed. At the individual joint/tendon level, sensitivity to detect synovitis without Gd contrast was 91 % and 72 % for the two readers, respectively, with a specificity of 51 % and 81 %. For tenosynovitis, the sensitivity was 67 % and 54 %, respectively, with a specificity of 87 % and 91 %. Pooled data analysis revealed an overall sensitivity of 81 % and specificity of 50 % for evaluation of synovitis. Variations in tenosynovitis scoring systems hindered pooled analyses. Eliminating Gd contrast administration resulted in low specificity for synovitis and low sensitivity for tenosynovitis, indicating that Gd contrast administration remains essential for an optimal assessment. (orig.)

  9. Risks associated with tendinitis: effects from demographic, socioeconomic, and psychological status among Brazilian workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazão, Paulo; Costa, Carla Maria; de Almeida, Márcia Furquim

    2010-01-01

    Self-reported tendinitis/tenosynovitis was evaluated by gender, age group, skin color, family income, and educational and psychological status. !The study was carried out in a representative sample of formally contracted Brazilian workers from a household survey. A total of 54,660 participants were included. Occupations were stratified according to estimated prevalences of self-reported injuries. Non-conditional logistic regression was performed, and all variables were analyzed in two occupational groups. The overall prevalence rate of tendinitis/tenosynovitis was 3.1%: 5.5% in high-prevalence occupations (n = 10,726); and 2.5% in low-prevalence occupations (n = 43,934). White female workers between the ages of 45 and 64 years and at a higher socioeconomic level were more likely to report tendinitis/tenosynovitis regardless of their occupational category. An adjusted OR = 3.59 [95% CI: 3.15--4.09] was found between tendinitis/tenosynovitis and psychological status. Among formally contracted Brazilian workers, higher income can imply greater physical and psychological demands that, regardless of occupational stratum, increase the risk of tendinitis/tenosynovitis. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and scintigraphy of the finger joints: one year follow up of patients with early arthritis. The TIRA Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, K E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate synovial membrane hypertrophy, tenosynovitis, and erosion development of the 2nd to 5th metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints by magnetic resonance imaging in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or suspected RA followed up for one......, and tenosynovitis score. RESULTS: MRI detected progression of erosions earlier and more often than did radiography of the same joints; at baseline the MRI to radiography ratio was 28:4. Erosions were exclusively found in patients with RA at baseline or fulfilling the ACR criteria at one year. At one year follow up......, scores of MR synovial membrane hypertrophy, tenosynovitis, and scintigraphic tracer accumulation had not changed significantly from baseline; in contrast, swollen and tender joint counts had declined significantly (p

  11. Joint involvement in patients with early polymyalgia rheumatica using high-resolution ultrasound and its contribution to the EULAR/ACR 2012 classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, Sandra; Ehrenstein, Boris; Fleck, Martin; Hartung, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    To assess joint involvement and the contribution of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) to the novel European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology (EULAR/ACR) 2012 classification criteria in patients with polymyalgia rheumatic (PMR). MSUS was performed in 54 consecutive patients with recent-onset PMR. Biceps tenosynovitis of at least 1 shoulder has been observed in 70.4% of patients, and 64.8% had a bilateral biceps tenosynovitis. Subdeltoid bursitis (27.8% unilateral, 5.6% bilateral), glenohumeral synovitis (22.2% unilateral, 9.3% bilateral), and hip involvement (22.2% unilateral, 16.7% bilateral) were observed less frequently. The sensitivities of the classification criteria were 85.2% for EULAR/ACR without MSUS and 81.5% for EULAR/ACR with MSUS. The most common MSUS pathology was a biceps tenosynovitis. However, US findings had no effect on the sensitivity of the novel EULAR/ACR criteria for PMR.

  12. Disseminated gonococcal infection: an unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Lohani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gonococcus typically affects the mucosal surfaces but in rare cases can spread to bloodstream causing disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI. The usual presentation of DGI is rash, polyarthralgia, and tenosynovitis. We present the case of a 23-year-old female who presented to our hospital with pustular rash and tenosynovitis of hand and was sent home on Augmentin. Her symptoms worsened despite treatment and she presented back to the ED. On investigation, she was found to have DGI and was appropriately treated. DGI should be kept in mind in sexually active youngsters who have only one or two features of the classic triad of rash, tenosynovitis, and arthritis. Timely management and appropriate treatment of DGI is very important to avoid complications and morbidity.

  13. Monitoring anti-TNF{alpha} treatment in RA: Responsiveness of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography of the dominant wrist compared to conventional measures of disease activity and structural damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, Espen A; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Hammer, Hilde Berner

    2008-01-01

    months. Responsiveness was assessed by standardized response means (SRM). Accepted thresholds were applied to classify responsiveness as trivial, low, moderate or good. RESULTS: MRI synovitis (SRM between -0.79 and -0.92) and the MRI total inflammation score comprising synovitis, tenosynovitis and bone...... marrow edema (SRM between -1.05 and -1.24) were highly responsive. Moderate to high responsiveness was found for MRI tenosynovitis and bone marrow edema, all the composite indices (DAS28, SDAI and CDAI) and the 28-swollen joint count. US displayed low to moderate responsiveness. The MRI erosion score...... was a composite measure comprising MRI synovitis, tenosynovitis and bone marrow edema, and this may be a promising outcome measure in clinical studies....

  14. MR Imaging and US of the Wrist Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Benjamin; Sampath, Srihari C; Sampath, Srinath C; Motamedi, Kambiz

    2016-10-01

    The tendons of the wrist are commonly symptomatic. They can be injured, infected, or inflamed. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are useful tools for evaluating the wrist. Pathologic conditions of the wrist tendons include de Quervain tenosynovitis, extensor carpi ulnaris tendinopathy, rheumatoid tenosynovitis, infectious synovitis, tendon tears, hydroxyapatite deposition disease, intersection syndrome, tenosynovial giant cell tumor, and fibroma of the tendon sheath. In this article, we review the normal appearance of the wrist tendons, discuss relevant anatomy, and give an overview of common pathologic conditions affecting the wrist tendons. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2016.

  15. Mycobacterium marinum infections of the distal upper extremities: clinical course and imaging findings in two cases with delayed diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amrami, K.K.; Sundaram, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, SW, Rochester, MN (United States); Shin, A.Y.; Bishop, A.T. [Dept. of Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infections cause tenosynovitis of the distal upper extremities and develop as a consequence of skin abrasions acquired in contaminated water. We report on two patients whose MR imaging studies showed tenosynovitis of the distal upper extremity secondary to M. marinum. In one patient sequential MR imaging showed development of bony erosions. Appropriate treatment was delayed in both patients because the diagnosis was not considered. We report on and discuss the clinical course and MR imaging findings in two patients with M. marinum infection. (orig.)

  16. Mycobacterium marinum infections of the distal upper extremities: clinical course and imaging findings in two cases with delayed diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amrami, K.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shin, A.Y.; Bishop, A.T.

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infections cause tenosynovitis of the distal upper extremities and develop as a consequence of skin abrasions acquired in contaminated water. We report on two patients whose MR imaging studies showed tenosynovitis of the distal upper extremity secondary to M. marinum. In one patient sequential MR imaging showed development of bony erosions. Appropriate treatment was delayed in both patients because the diagnosis was not considered. We report on and discuss the clinical course and MR imaging findings in two patients with M. marinum infection. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of partial tears of finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swen, W. A.; Jacobs, J. W.; Hubach, P. C.; Klasens, J. H.; Algra, P. R.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Finger extensor tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may lead to partial and eventually to complete tendon tears. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of sonography (SG) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize partial tendon tears. Twenty-one RA patients

  18. Frequency of inflammatory-like MR imaging findings in asymptomatic fingers of healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agten, Christoph A.; Rosskopf, Andrea B.; Jonczy, Maciej; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Buck, Florian M. [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Brunner, Florian [University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Physical Medicine and Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2018-02-15

    To describe the frequency of inflammatory-like findings on MR imaging in asymptomatic volunteers and compare them with patients with known rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. MR images of fingers in 42 asymptomatic volunteers and 33 patients with rheumatoid/psoriatic arthritis were analyzed. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) Rheumatoid/Psoriatic Arthritis MRI Scoring System (RAMRIS/PsAMRIS) and tenosynovitis scoring system were used to assess: bone marrow edema (BME), erosions, tendon sheath fluid/tenosynovitis, joint effusion, and soft-tissue edema. Findings and scores were compared between volunteers and patients. Inter-reader agreement was calculated (intraclass correlation coefficients, ICC). In volunteers, tendon sheath fluid was very common in at least one location (42/42 volunteers for reader 1, 34/42 volunteers for reader 2). BME, erosions, joint effusion, and soft-tissue edema were absent (except one BME in the 3rd proximal phalanx for reader 1). Tendon sheath fluid scores in volunteers and tenosynovitis scores in patients were high (reader 1, 7.17 and 5.39; reader 2, 2.31 and 5.45). Overall, inter-reader agreement was substantial (ICC = 0.696-0.844), except for tendon sheath fluid (ICC = 0.258). Fluid in the finger flexor tendon sheaths may be a normal finding and without gadolinium administration should not be interpreted as tenosynovitis. Bone marrow edema, erosions, joint effusion, and soft-tissue edema in the fingers most likely reflect pathology if present. (orig.)

  19. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    18 mai 2017 ... J Bone Joint Surg. 1934; 16(3): 631-. 9. PubMed | Google Scholar. 7. Abdelwahab I F, Bianchi S, Martinoli C, Klein M, Hermann G. Atypical extraspinal musculoskeletal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients : Part II, Tuberculous myositis, tuberculous bursitis, and tuberculous tenosynovitis. Can Assoc.

  20. ISSN 2073-9990 East Cent. Afr. J. s East Cent. Afr. J. s

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    Its other synonyms are pigmented villonodular tenosynovitis, fibrous histiocytoma of the synovium, tenosynovial giant cell tumour, localized nodular synovitis, benign synovioma and fibrous xanthoma of the synovium. The recurrence rates have been shown to be as high as 45% in some series 11,12. In our series all tumours ...

  1. Flexor hallucis longus tendon rupture in RA-patients is associated with MTP 1 damage and pes planus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baan, H.; Baan, Henriette; Drossaers-Bakker, K.W.; Dubbeldam, Rosemary; Dubbeldam, Rosemary; Buurke, Jaap J.; Nene, A.V.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2007-01-01

    Background: To assess the prevalence of and relation between rupture or tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus (FHL) tendon and range of motion, deformities and joint damage of the forefoot in RA patients with foot complaints. Methods: Thirty RA patients with painful feet were analysed, their

  2. Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL - Vol 7, No 2 (2012)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tubercular tenosynovitis of extensor tendons of foot--a rare presentation of musculoskeletal tuberculosis in an infant · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Ajai Singh, Vikas Verma, Shah Wali, RN Srivastava ...

  3. Safety, Efficacy and Recurrence rate following tenosynovectomy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was conducted to compare the safety, efficacy and recurrence rate of primary tenosynovectomy versus intralesional steroid injection in the treatment of sclerosing tenosynovitis of deQuervain. Method: A prospective, comparative study of the safety, efficacy and recurrence rate following intralesional ...

  4. Achilles tendon: US diagnosis of pathologic conditions. Work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blei, C.L.; Nirschl, R.P.; Grant, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-three patients were prospectively examined with ultra-sound (US) for acute or recurrent Achilles tendon symptoms. Three types of pathologic conditions of the Achilles tendon were found: tendinitis/tenosynovitis, acute tendon trauma, and postoperative changes. US appears to enable differentiation of these conditions and to contribute to the diagnosis of a broad range of Achilles tendon disorders

  5. An Easy Method for Drainage of Fluid in Cases of Continuous Irrigation of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhijani, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Description of a novel method to perform continuous irrigation for flexor tenosynovitis in a way that is comfortable for the patient and convenient for nursing staff by placing the hand in the suction pouch of a lithotomy style drape attached to wall suction. PMID:28293498

  6. A posterior tibial tendon skipping rope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sterkenburg, M. N.; Haverkamp, D.; van Dijk, C. N.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents an athletic patient with swelling and progressive pain on the posteromedial side of his right ankle on weight bearing. MRI demonstrated tenosynovitis and suspicion of a length rupture. On posterior tibial tendoscopy, there was no rupture, but medial from the tendon a tissue cord

  7. Frequency of inflammatory-like MR imaging findings in asymptomatic fingers of healthy volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agten, Christoph A.; Rosskopf, Andrea B.; Jonczy, Maciej; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Buck, Florian M.; Brunner, Florian

    2018-01-01

    To describe the frequency of inflammatory-like findings on MR imaging in asymptomatic volunteers and compare them with patients with known rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. MR images of fingers in 42 asymptomatic volunteers and 33 patients with rheumatoid/psoriatic arthritis were analyzed. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) Rheumatoid/Psoriatic Arthritis MRI Scoring System (RAMRIS/PsAMRIS) and tenosynovitis scoring system were used to assess: bone marrow edema (BME), erosions, tendon sheath fluid/tenosynovitis, joint effusion, and soft-tissue edema. Findings and scores were compared between volunteers and patients. Inter-reader agreement was calculated (intraclass correlation coefficients, ICC). In volunteers, tendon sheath fluid was very common in at least one location (42/42 volunteers for reader 1, 34/42 volunteers for reader 2). BME, erosions, joint effusion, and soft-tissue edema were absent (except one BME in the 3rd proximal phalanx for reader 1). Tendon sheath fluid scores in volunteers and tenosynovitis scores in patients were high (reader 1, 7.17 and 5.39; reader 2, 2.31 and 5.45). Overall, inter-reader agreement was substantial (ICC = 0.696-0.844), except for tendon sheath fluid (ICC = 0.258). Fluid in the finger flexor tendon sheaths may be a normal finding and without gadolinium administration should not be interpreted as tenosynovitis. Bone marrow edema, erosions, joint effusion, and soft-tissue edema in the fingers most likely reflect pathology if present. (orig.)

  8. Bone Marrow Edema: An MRI Diagnostic Clue in Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: bone marrow edema intrinsic to osseous lesions were noted in 22 patients. Bone marrow edema with associated soft tissue lesions were noted in 25 patients findings included tenosynovitis in 15, impingement syndromes in seven diabetic foot infection in two and diabetic osteoneuroarthropathy in one patient .

  9. Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Acute BronchitisHigh Blood PressureBursitis of the HipHigh CholesterolExercise-induced UrticariaMicroscopic HematuriaKidney CystsDe Quervain’s Tenosynovitis Home Diseases and Conditions Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) ...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 209 of 209 ... Vol 7, No 2 (2012), Tubercular tenosynovitis of extensor tendons of foot--a rare presentation of musculoskeletal tuberculosis in an infant, Abstract PDF. Ajai Singh, Vikas Verma, Shah Wali, RN Srivastava. Vol 12, No 2 (2017), Type II perforation of the body of the gallbladder in acalculous cholecystitis: a ...

  11. Achilles tendon: US diagnosis of pathologic conditions. Work in progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blei, C.L.; Nirschl, R.P.; Grant, E.G.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-three patients were prospectively examined with ultra-sound (US) for acute or recurrent Achilles tendon symptoms. Three types of pathologic conditions of the Achilles tendon were found: tendinitis/tenosynovitis, acute tendon trauma, and postoperative changes. US appears to enable differentiation of these conditions and to contribute to the diagnosis of a broad range of Achilles tendon disorders.

  12. Achilles Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  13. Cervical Spondylitis and Epidural Abscess Caused by Brucellosis: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reşorlu Hatice

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease widely seen in endemic regions and that can lead to systemic involvement. The musculoskeletal system is frequently affected, and the disease can exhibit clinical involvements such as arthritis, spondylitis, spondylodiscitis, osteomyelitis, tenosynovitis and bursitis. Spondylitis and spondylodiscitis, common complications of brucellosis, predominantly affect the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae.

  14. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    15 mars 2016 ... Médecine et Chirurgie du Pied. 2011; 27(4):106-108. PubMed | Google Scholar. 2. Jaffe HL, Lichtenstein L, Sutro CJ. Pigmented villonodularsynovitis,bursitis and tenosynovitis. Archives. Pathology.1941;31(3):731-765. PubMed | Google Scholar. 3. Myers BW, Masi AT. Pigmented villonodular synovitis and.

  15. CASE REPORT CASE Atypical tuberculosis of the knee joint CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MRI of TB arthritis can present with a wide range of findings.2. These include bone marrow oedema, synovitis, cartilage/bony destruc- tion, myositis, cellulitis, granulation tissue, abscess-fistula, tenosynovitis, bursitis, fibrosis, etc.2. Findings which should alert one to the possibility of TB include. T1WI hyperintense soft tissue, ...

  16. Hand assessment with the E-Cone in rheumatoid arthritis and hand osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merendonk, N.; van Alebeek, V.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Spreeuwers, D.; Kroon, P.J.; Roorda, L.; Dekker, J.; Hoeksma, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory, progressive disease resulting in deformities of the hand. Besides synovitis, tenosynovitis of the extrinsic flexor tendons is one of the initial features of RA, leading to friction and consequently to an imbalanced coordination of the

  17. A systematic literature review of US definitions, scoring systems and validity according to the OMERACT filter for tendon lesion in RA and other inflammatory joint diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, María; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Bruyn, George A W; Möller, Ingrid; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Wakefield, Richard J; Naredo, Esperanza

    2012-07-01

    To present the published data concerning the US assessment of tendon lesions as well as the US metric properties investigated in inflammatory arthritis. A systematic literature search of PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library was performed. Selection criteria were original articles in the English language reporting US, Doppler, tenosynovitis and other tendon lesions in patients with RA and other inflammatory arthritis. Data extraction focused on the definition and quantification of US-detected tenosynovitis and other tendon abnormalities and the metric properties of US according to the OMERACT filter for evaluating the above tendon lesions. Thirty-three of 192 identified articles were included in the review. Most articles were case series (42%) or case-control (33%) studies describing hand and/or foot tenosynovitis in RA patients. The majority of older articles used only B-mode, whereas the most recent studies have incorporated Doppler mode. Definition of tenosynovitis or other tendon lesion was provided in 70% of the evaluated studies. Most of the studies (61%) used a binary score for evaluating tendon abnormalities. Concerning the OMERACT filter, 24 (73%) articles dealt with construct validity. The comparator most commonly used was clinical assessment and MRI. There were few studies assessing criterion validity. Some studies evaluated reliability (36%), responsiveness (21%) and feasibility (12%). US seems a promising tool for evaluating inflammatory tendon lesions. However, further validation is necessary for implementation in clinical practice and trials.

  18. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  19. Karpaltunnelsyndrom. En arbejdsbetinget lidelse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, F H; Jensen, O C

    1991-01-01

    Attention is drawn to early and correct diagnosis of the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Our case history describes how a 44 year old man contracted bilateral CTS by forceful repetitive bending of plastic frames with both hands. The syndrome is most often referred to as a result of a tenosynovitis ...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and scintigraphy of the finger joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, M; Ostergaard, M; Jensen, K E

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate synovial membrane hypertrophy, tenosynovitis, and erosion development of the 2nd to 5th metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints by magnetic resonance imaging in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or suspected RA followed up for one year...

  1. Spontaneous Extensor Tendon Rupture in the Rheumatoid Wrist: Risk Factors and Preventive Role of Extended Tenosynovectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Jung-Hua; Liu, Wen-Chung; Yang, Kuo-Chung; Hsu, Kuei-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Ta; Chen, Lee-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous extensor tendon rupture is often seen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, but the risk factors are not clearly defined. We therefore collected the data of RA patients with previous extensor tendon rupture and those with tenosynovitis and analyzed the relationship between extended tenosynovectomy and spontaneous extensor tendon rupture. We retrospectively reviewed 17 spontaneous extensor tendon rupture episodes in 15 RA patients and 14 tenosynovitis episodes that required tenosynovectomy in 12 RA patients from 1997 to 2013. Correlations between the incidence of tendon rupture, X-ray findings, and clinical findings in the affected wrists before tendon rupture were analyzed statistically using the test for proportion. The following parameters were significantly correlated with spontaneous extensor tendon rupture: disease duration longer than 8 years, persistent tenosynovitis longer than 1 year duration, and Larsen grade greater than 4 (P = 0.02, 0.03, and 0.01, respectively). Dislocation of the distal end of the ulna, carpal collapse, and the scallop sign on X-ray contributed to a higher spontaneous extensor tendon rupture rate among RA patients (P = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.03, respectively). Extended tenosynovectomy was performed on 14 wrists in 12 RA patients with persistent tenosynovitis longer than 6 months, and Larsen grade did not deteriorate in this group compared with those who did not undergo the surgery. No spontaneous extensor tendon rupture occurred following the surgery. Risk factors of spontaneous extensor tendon rupture included disease duration longer than 8 years, persistent tenosynovitis longer than 1 year, and wrist Larsen grade greater than 4. Dislocation of the distal end of the ulna, carpal collapse, and the scallop sign on X-ray indicated a higher probability of extensor tendon rupture. Rheumatologists should consult with hand surgeons promptly to preserve hand function before tendon rupture. Prophylactic extended tenosynovectomy

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of synovial inflammation of the hindfoot in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other polyarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillefert, Jean Francis E-mail: jean-francis.maillefert@chu-dijon.fr; Dardel, Pascal; Cherasse, Anne; Mistrih, Rami; Krause, Denis; Tavernier, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Objectives: To describe the localisation of synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hindfoot observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic polyarthritis, and to correlate the findings of physical examination and MRI. Methods: Patients with chronic polyarthritis, and one or two painful hindfoot were included. On physical examination and on MRI, the tibio-talar, talo-calcaneal, and talo-navicular and calcaneo-cuboidal joints were adjudged to have or not synovitis, and the tibialis anterior and posterior, the peroneus longus and brevis, the flector digitorum and hallucis longus tendons to have or not tenosynovitis. Criteria for synovitis and tenosynovitis were a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, a low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, and enhancement after Gd-DTPA injection, in the joint area, and around the tendon, respectively. The correlation between the findings of physical examination and those of MRI were evaluated using the Kappa statistics. Results: 12 patients (three men, nine women, mean age of 55.5 years{+-}11.4 S.D.) with chronic polyarthritis (rheumatoid arthritis (RA): nine, ankylosing spondylitis: one; psoriatic arthritis: one, unclassified: one) were included. All presented with one (7 patients) or two (5 patients) painful hindfeet (and swelling for 16 out of 17 hindfeet). On physical examination, 25 joints and eight tendons were adjudged to have synovitis and tenosynovitis. MRI showed synovitis in 12 out of 25 of these joints (48%), and tenosynovotis in three out of eight of these tendons (37.5%). Moreover, MRI showed ten and seven clinically unsuspected synovitis and tenosynovitis, respectively. The proportion of agreements between physical examination and MRI were 54.9% (kappa=0.1) and 88.2% (kappa=0.27) for synovitis and tenosynovitis, respectively. Conclusion: A weak correlation was observed between the findings of physical examination and MRI in patients with chronic polyarthritis and a painful hindfoot. MRI

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of synovial inflammation of the hindfoot in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other polyarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillefert, Jean Francis; Dardel, Pascal; Cherasse, Anne; Mistrih, Rami; Krause, Denis; Tavernier, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the localisation of synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hindfoot observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic polyarthritis, and to correlate the findings of physical examination and MRI. Methods: Patients with chronic polyarthritis, and one or two painful hindfoot were included. On physical examination and on MRI, the tibio-talar, talo-calcaneal, and talo-navicular and calcaneo-cuboidal joints were adjudged to have or not synovitis, and the tibialis anterior and posterior, the peroneus longus and brevis, the flector digitorum and hallucis longus tendons to have or not tenosynovitis. Criteria for synovitis and tenosynovitis were a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, a low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, and enhancement after Gd-DTPA injection, in the joint area, and around the tendon, respectively. The correlation between the findings of physical examination and those of MRI were evaluated using the Kappa statistics. Results: 12 patients (three men, nine women, mean age of 55.5 years±11.4 S.D.) with chronic polyarthritis (rheumatoid arthritis (RA): nine, ankylosing spondylitis: one; psoriatic arthritis: one, unclassified: one) were included. All presented with one (7 patients) or two (5 patients) painful hindfeet (and swelling for 16 out of 17 hindfeet). On physical examination, 25 joints and eight tendons were adjudged to have synovitis and tenosynovitis. MRI showed synovitis in 12 out of 25 of these joints (48%), and tenosynovotis in three out of eight of these tendons (37.5%). Moreover, MRI showed ten and seven clinically unsuspected synovitis and tenosynovitis, respectively. The proportion of agreements between physical examination and MRI were 54.9% (kappa=0.1) and 88.2% (kappa=0.27) for synovitis and tenosynovitis, respectively. Conclusion: A weak correlation was observed between the findings of physical examination and MRI in patients with chronic polyarthritis and a painful hindfoot. MRI

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, N.R.; Crabbe, J.P.; McQueen, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    This pictorial essay describes the changes seen in the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate bone erosions, bone marrow signal changes, synovitis and tenosynovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist can identify erosions in RA earlier than plain radiographs and can detect more erosions. Common sites include the capitate, lunate and scaphoid. Bone marrow signal changes occur frequently and are most common in the capitate, lunate and triquetrum. Synovial thickening and enhancement are clearly demonstrated with MRI and are most commonly seen in the radiocarpal joint (RCJ). Tenosynovitis can be seen in the wrist in more than half of patients presenting with RA. This most commonly involves the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and is seen as sheath fluid, thickening and enhancement. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  5. MR imaging findings of trigger thumb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chen, Karen C.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Trigger finger (or trigger thumb), also known as sclerosing tenosynovitis, is a common clinical diagnosis that rarely presents for imaging. Because of this selection bias, many radiologists may not be familiar with the process. Furthermore, patients who do present for imaging frequently have misleading examination indications. To our knowledge, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of trigger thumb have not been previously reported in the literature. In this article, we review the entity of trigger thumb, the anatomy involved, and associated imaging findings, which include flexor pollicis longus tendinosis with a distinct nodule, A1 pulley thickening, and tenosynovitis. In addition, in some cases, an abnormal Av pulley is apparent. In the rare cases of trigger finger that present for MR imaging, accurate diagnosis by the radiologist can allow initiation of treatment and avoid further unnecessary workup. (orig.)

  6. MR imaging findings of trigger thumb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chen, Karen C.; Chung, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Trigger finger (or trigger thumb), also known as sclerosing tenosynovitis, is a common clinical diagnosis that rarely presents for imaging. Because of this selection bias, many radiologists may not be familiar with the process. Furthermore, patients who do present for imaging frequently have misleading examination indications. To our knowledge, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of trigger thumb have not been previously reported in the literature. In this article, we review the entity of trigger thumb, the anatomy involved, and associated imaging findings, which include flexor pollicis longus tendinosis with a distinct nodule, A1 pulley thickening, and tenosynovitis. In addition, in some cases, an abnormal Av pulley is apparent. In the rare cases of trigger finger that present for MR imaging, accurate diagnosis by the radiologist can allow initiation of treatment and avoid further unnecessary workup. (orig.)

  7. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST (tendinitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, etc. are one of the most common causes of disability and one the most common reasons for seeking medical advice. To manage patients with RDJAST is an important part of practising rheumatologists’ work. But unfortunately, the issues of diagnosis and therapy of this pathology have been relatively rarely discussed on the pages of Russian medical journals and at the scientific congresses and conferences of rheumatologists in recent years. This review is to refresh physicians’interest in this problem. Part 1 of this review briefly considers the general issues relating to the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of RDJAST of the upper extremity, such as rotator cuff tendinitis, lateral and medial epicondylitis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, de Quervain’s syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  8. Tubercular myositis of infraspinatus: a rare clinical entity

    OpenAIRE

    Vikas Verma; Yogesh Kumar Yadav; Anuj Rastogi; Farid Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the musculoskeletal system is generally confined to bones and joints. The surrounding soft tissue is secondarily infected. Tuberculous bursitis, tenosynovitis and primary pyomyositis are rarer manifestations of the disease. Of these, primary tuberculouspyomyositis is probably the rarest entity. We report a case of tubercular myositis of infraspinatus in an 8 year-old female who presented with pain, low grade fever, weight loss, anorexia, progressively increasing pain in the sc...

  9. Hand and wrist involvement in systemic sclerosis: US features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Véronique; Bazeli, Ramin; Elhai, Muriel; Campagna, Raphaël; Pessis, Éric; Avouac, Jérôme; Allanore, Yannick; Drapé, Jean-Luc; Guérini, Henri

    2013-12-01

    To characterize ultrasonographic (US) features in the hand of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and to evaluate the sensitivity of US in the detection of calcinosis and acroosteolysis. The local ethics committee approved this study, and oral informed consent was obtained. A total of 44 consecutive patients with SSc (34 women; mean age, 56.1 years ± 12.1 [standard deviation]; 10 men; mean age, 45.0 years ± 14.0) and 30 healthy control subjects (20 women; mean age, 46.3 years ± 12.1; 10 men; mean age, 39.6 years ± 10.8) were included between October 2010 and December 2011. Bilateral US, including Doppler assessment of the wrists, hands, and fingers, was performed, and presence of synovitis, tenosynovitis with or without a layered appearance, calcifications, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization was recorded. Radiography of both hands was performed to assess for acroosteolysis and calcinosis. Frequency of US features, sensitivity of US for calcinosis and acroosteolysis, and respective confidence intervals were calculated. Synovitis was found in 17 patients (39%). Tenosynovitis was found in 12 patients (27%), and it had a layered pattern in 15 (41%) of 37 cases. Calcinosis was found in 17 patients (39%) with US, with a sensitivity of 89%. Acroosteolysis was found in nine (20%) patients with US and in 10 (23%) patients with radiography, with 90% sensitivity for US. Distal vascularization was detected in 26 patients (59%) and 30 control subjects (100%) and was in contact with the acroosteolysis bed in seven (78%) of nine patients with SSc. US can be used to assess features of SSc, including synovitis, tenosynovitis, calcinosis, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization and is sensitive for calcinosis and acroosteolysis detection. A layered pattern (similar to the appearance of an artichoke heart) of tenosynovitis was seen commonly. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2013.

  10. Extranodal Rosai-Dorfman disease in a carpal bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpalata Tripathy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of extranodal Rosai-Dorfman Disease (RDD of the scophoid in a 52-year old female. The patient presented with pain, swelling, and tenderness on deep palpation of the left wrist. Clinicoradiological diagnosis was osteomyelitis or tenosynovitis and curettage was performed on the lytic lesion over scaphoid to procure tissue. Diagnosis was made by histomorphology supported by immunostaining. The patient was managed conservatively with resolution of the lesion.

  11. Synovitis maps for the assessment of inflammatory diseases of the hand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlo, Christoph; Zanetti, Marco; Stolzmann, Paul; Hodler, Juerg; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Steurer-Dober, Isabelle; Brunner, Florian

    2011-01-01

    To compare accuracy and review times of FLASH-MRI-derived synovitis maps (SM) with conventional MR images (cMRI) in the assessment of articular synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hand. 80 hands in 40 patients (mean age, 48 years; range, 15-72 years) were assessed for synovitis on cMRI and SM by two readers independently. Reporting times and diagnostic confidence (scale: 1 = least, 5 = most confident) were measured. Results from an assessment of a panel of senior musculoskeletal radiologists served as the standard of reference. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of articular synovitis were 0.91/1.00 (R1) and 1.00/0.67 (R2) on cMRI and 0.87/0.75 (R1) and 0.91/0.45 (R2) on SM and for the detection of tenosynovitis 0.95/0.63 (R1) and 0.67/0.79 (R2) on cMRI and 0.67/0.89 (R1) and 0.38/1.00 (R2) on SM. Mean review times (cMRI/SM, sec) were 142/37 (R1) and 167/25 (R2). Mean diagnostic confidence (cMRI/SM) was 3.7/3.4 (R1) and 3.2/3.5 (R2) for articular synovitis and 4.0/4.0 (R1), 3.3/3.7 (R2) for tenosynovitis. Synovitis maps provide a comparable diagnostic accuracy to conventional MR images in the assessment of articular synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hand. Because of short review times, synovitis maps provide a fast overview of locations with synovial enhancement. (orig.)

  12. ACR/EULAR Definitions of Remission Are Associated with Lower Residual Inflammatory Activity Compared with DAS28 Remission on Hand MRI in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisbona, Maria Pilar; Solano, Albert; Ares, Jesús; Almirall, Miriam; Salman-Monte, Tarek Carlos; Maymó, Joan

    2016-09-01

    To determine the level of residual inflammation [synovitis, bone marrow edema (BME), tenosynovitis, and total inflammation] quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging (h-MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in remission according to 3 different definitions of clinical remission, and to compare these remission definitions. A cross-sectional study. To assess the level of residual MRI inflammation in remission, cutoff levels associated to remission and median scores of MRI residual inflammatory lesions were calculated. Data from an MRI register of patients with RA who have various levels of disease activity were used. These were used for the analyses: synovitis, BME according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring system, tenosynovitis, total inflammation, and disease activity composite measures recorded at the time of MRI. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was used to identify the best cutoffs associated with remission for each inflammatory lesion on h-MRI. Median values of each inflammatory lesion for each definition of remission were also calculated. A total of 388 h-MRI sets of patients with RA with different levels of disease activity, 130 in remission, were included. Cutoff values associated with remission according to the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤ 3.3 and the Boolean American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) definitions for BME and tenosynovitis (1 and 3, respectively) were lower than BME and tenosynovitis (2 and 5, respectively) for the Disease Activity Score on 28 joints (DAS28) ≤ 2.6. Median scores for synovitis, BME, and total inflammation were also lower for the SDAI and Boolean ACR/EULAR remission criteria compared with DAS28. Patients with RA in remission according to the SDAI and Boolean ACR/EULAR definitions showed lower levels of MRI-detected residual inflammation compared with DAS28.

  13. Synovitis maps for the assessment of inflammatory diseases of the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlo, Christoph [Kantonsspital Luzern, Department of Radiology, Luzern (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Zanetti, Marco; Stolzmann, Paul; Hodler, Juerg; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Steurer-Dober, Isabelle [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Luzern, Department of Radiology, Luzern (Switzerland); Brunner, Florian [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    To compare accuracy and review times of FLASH-MRI-derived synovitis maps (SM) with conventional MR images (cMRI) in the assessment of articular synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hand. 80 hands in 40 patients (mean age, 48 years; range, 15-72 years) were assessed for synovitis on cMRI and SM by two readers independently. Reporting times and diagnostic confidence (scale: 1 = least, 5 = most confident) were measured. Results from an assessment of a panel of senior musculoskeletal radiologists served as the standard of reference. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of articular synovitis were 0.91/1.00 (R1) and 1.00/0.67 (R2) on cMRI and 0.87/0.75 (R1) and 0.91/0.45 (R2) on SM and for the detection of tenosynovitis 0.95/0.63 (R1) and 0.67/0.79 (R2) on cMRI and 0.67/0.89 (R1) and 0.38/1.00 (R2) on SM. Mean review times (cMRI/SM, sec) were 142/37 (R1) and 167/25 (R2). Mean diagnostic confidence (cMRI/SM) was 3.7/3.4 (R1) and 3.2/3.5 (R2) for articular synovitis and 4.0/4.0 (R1), 3.3/3.7 (R2) for tenosynovitis. Synovitis maps provide a comparable diagnostic accuracy to conventional MR images in the assessment of articular synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hand. Because of short review times, synovitis maps provide a fast overview of locations with synovial enhancement. (orig.)

  14. Subdeltoid Bursa Tuberculosis with Rice Body Formation–A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh L. Munde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous tenosynovitis and bursitis account for approximately 1%. A 56 years old female presented with swelling in left shoulder, gradually increasing in size with slight restriction in movement since last three months. X-ray revealed no abnormality of humerus head. Histopathological examination showed granulomatous tissue with multiple rice bodies. A positive culture of mycobacterium tuberculosis confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculosis. We here report a case of subdeltoid bursitis with rice body formation and without active bone and joint tuberculosis.

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of articular and extraarticular synovial structures of the hands in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Barbieri, Francesca; Boesen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), the quantification of enhancement within the synovial membrane and bone by extracting curves using fast T1-weighted sequences during intravenous administration of contrast agent, evaluates synovitis and bone marrow edema in psoriati...... arthritis (PsA). In this pilot study, we looked at possible differences between joint synovitis and tenosynovitis in PsA as compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  16. OSTEOID OSTEOMA IN SCAPHOID: CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severo, Antônio Lourenço; de Araújo Filho, Raimundo; Puentes, Rulby; Lemos, Marcelo Barreto; Piluski, Paulo Faiad; Lech, Osvandré

    2012-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign osteoblastic tumor that is unusual in the hand. A location in the carpal bones is infrequent, which leads to errors in diagnosing it because of polymorphism of the clinical symptoms. Reviewing the literature shows that nine cases of osteoid osteoma in the scaphoid have been reported. Here, one case of osteoid osteoma in the scaphoid that was initially treated as De Quervain's stenosing tenosynovitis is reported, with a definitive diagnosis that was delayed for five years.

  17. The Value of Interior Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    static muscle loading leads to this disorder. A common shoulder tendon disorder is called rotator cuff tendinitis . The rotator cuff includes four...as air and power supply units. One method has been to build receptacles into their new light fixtures to allow the fixtures to be rotated and moved by...obvious physical causes. The various health problems include but are not limited to tendinitis , tenosynovitis of the upper limb, lateral epicondylitis

  18. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Volume 47. Number RR-1. 1998 Guidelines for Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-23

    Syndrome Health-care providers should be alert for the symptoms and signs of acute retroviral syndrome, which is characterized by fever , malaise...provider should be alert for symptoms or signs that suggest advanced HIV infection (e.g., fever , weight loss, diarrhea, cough, shortness of breath, and...DGI results from gonococcal bacteremia. DGI often results in petechial or pustu- lar acral skin lesions, asymmetrical arthralgia, tenosynovitis, or

  19. OSTEOID OSTEOMA IN SCAPHOID: CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severo, Antônio Lourenço; de Araújo Filho, Raimundo; Puentes, Rulby; Lemos, Marcelo Barreto; Piluski, Paulo Faiad; Lech, Osvandré

    2015-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign osteoblastic tumor that is unusual in the hand. A location in the carpal bones is infrequent, which leads to errors in diagnosing it because of polymorphism of the clinical symptoms. Reviewing the literature shows that nine cases of osteoid osteoma in the scaphoid have been reported. Here, one case of osteoid osteoma in the scaphoid that was initially treated as De Quervain's stenosing tenosynovitis is reported, with a definitive diagnosis that was delayed for five years. PMID:27047881

  20. Tarsal tunnel disease and talocalcaneal coalition: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Petchprapa, Catherine N. [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Rossi, Ignacio [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Centro de Diagnostico Dr. Enrique Rossi, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    To assess, utilizing MRI, tarsal tunnel disease in patients with talocalcaneal coalitions. To the best of our knowledge, this has only anecdotally been described before. Sixty-seven ankle MRIs with talocalcaneal coalition were retrospectively reviewed for disease of tendons and nerves of the tarsal tunnel. Interobserver variability in diagnosing tendon disease was performed in 30 of the 67 cases. Tarsal tunnel nerves were also evaluated in a control group of 20 consecutive ankle MRIs. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL) by osseous excrescences was seen in 14 of 67 cases (21 %). Attenuation, split tearing, tenosynovitis, or tendinosis of the FHL was present in 26 cases (39 %). Attenuation or tenosynovitis was seen in the flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) in 18 cases (27 %). Tenosynovitis or split tearing of the posterior tibial tendon (PT) was present in nine cases (13 %). Interobserver variability ranged from 100 % to slight depending on the tendon and type of disease. Intense increased signal and caliber of the medial plantar nerve (MPN), indicative of neuritis, was seen in 6 of the 67 cases (9 %). Mildly increased T2 signal of the MPN was seen in 15 (22 %) and in 14 (70 %) of the control group. Talocalcaneal coalitions may be associated with tarsal tunnel soft tissue abnormalities affecting, in decreasing order, the FHL, FDL, and PT tendons, as well as the MPN. This information should be provided to the referring physician in order to guide treatment and improve post-surgical outcome. (orig.)

  1. MR imaging of the early rheumatoid arthritis: usefulness of contrast enhanced fat suppressed SPGR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Joo, Kyung Bin; Kim, Seong Tae; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate value of post-contrast 3-Dimensional fat suppressed Spoiled GRASS (FS SPGR) in detecting subtle bony erosion and tenosynovitis of hands and wrists due to early rheumatoid arthritis. Fourteen MR imagings of the hands and wrists were performed in 7 early rheumatoid arthritis without any abnormalities in plain radiography and in 7 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent MR sequence of coronal 3D FS SPGR with and without contrast enhancement in 1.5T MR unit. We evaluated the number of the bony erosion and tenosynovitis respectively in pre-and post-contrast FS SPGR images. The abnormal enhancing areas were not demonstrated in 7 healthy volunteers. Seven patients had 25 bony erosions in pre-contrast FS SPGR and 52 bony erosions with tenosynovitis (n = 10) in post-contrast FS SPGR. Enhancing joint spaces were shown in 8 cases. Post-contrast FS SPGR was better than pre-contrast FS SPGR in the evaluation of early rheumatoid arthritis and is valuable as a baseline study

  2. Atypical extraspinal musculoskeletal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients: Part II, tuberculous myositis, tuberculous bursitis, and tuberculous tenosynovites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahab, I.F. [Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Bianchi, S. [Clinique et Fondation des Grangettes, Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: stefanobianchi@bluewin.ch; Martinoli, C. [Universita di Genova, Cattedra di Radiologia, DICMI, Genoa (Italy); Klein, M. [Univ. of Alabama School of Medicine, Dept. of Pathology, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Hermann, G. [Mount Sinai Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, New York, New York (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Tuberculosis involving the soft tissue from adjacent bone or joint is well recognized. However, primary tuberculous pyomyositis, tuberculous bursitis, and tuberculous tenosynovitis are rare entities constituting 1% of skeletal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis involves most commonly the tendon sheaths of the hand and wrist, and tuberculous bursitis occurs most commonly around the hip. The greater trochanteric bursa and the greater trochanter are the most frequent sites of tuberculous bursitis. Cases of primary tuberculous pyomyositis and tenosynovitis of the tendons of the ankle and foot are seldom reported in the radiology literature. All imaging modalities - plain radiography, bone scan, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - provide information that is helpful in determining therapy. MRI in particular, with its multiplanar capabilities and superb contrast of soft tissue, can demonstrate the extent of the soft tissue mass and access the adjacent bones and joints. However, MRI has no diagnostic specificity in regard to tuberculosis, and in nonendemic areas, biopsy is strongly recommended. All patients in this review were permanent residents of North America or Western Europe and were immunocompetent. Examples of atypical presentations of the above entities are demonstrated. (author)

  3. Growth performance of broilers in experimental Reovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar P. Awandkar

    Full Text Available Background: The avian reoviruses have emerged to induce various manifestations in chickens. They are associated with disease conditions including malabsorption syndrome, tenosynovitis etc. Reoviruses are an important cause of suboptimum performance in broilers, resulting in poor growth performance. Poultry industry in India is facing a catastrophe due to such infections which go unnoticed in field due to masking of the symptoms by secondary infections and commonly observed nutritional disorders. Aim: To investigate the effect of reovirus infection on overall performance of broiler birds. Material and Methods: The broiler birds were challenged with homologous strains of malabsorption syndrome and tenosynovitis syndrome of reovirus. The growth performance was recorded. Results and conclusion: The growth performance and immune response to NDV did not differ in the birds challenged with tenosynovitis syndrome strain of reo virus as compared to un challenged birds. However, poor live body weight, feed intake, FCR, PE and BPEI and better serum NDV titres were found in chicks challenged with malabsorption syndrome strain of reovirus as compared to the chicks from control group. [Vet World 2012; 5(11.000: 685-689

  4. MR imaging of the early rheumatoid arthritis: usefulness of contrast enhanced fat suppressed SPGR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Joo, Kyung Bin; Kim, Seong Tae; Hahm, Chang Kok [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    To evaluate value of post-contrast 3-Dimensional fat suppressed Spoiled GRASS (FS SPGR) in detecting subtle bony erosion and tenosynovitis of hands and wrists due to early rheumatoid arthritis. Fourteen MR imagings of the hands and wrists were performed in 7 early rheumatoid arthritis without any abnormalities in plain radiography and in 7 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent MR sequence of coronal 3D FS SPGR with and without contrast enhancement in 1.5T MR unit. We evaluated the number of the bony erosion and tenosynovitis respectively in pre-and post-contrast FS SPGR images. The abnormal enhancing areas were not demonstrated in 7 healthy volunteers. Seven patients had 25 bony erosions in pre-contrast FS SPGR and 52 bony erosions with tenosynovitis (n = 10) in post-contrast FS SPGR. Enhancing joint spaces were shown in 8 cases. Post-contrast FS SPGR was better than pre-contrast FS SPGR in the evaluation of early rheumatoid arthritis and is valuable as a baseline study.

  5. Tarsal tunnel disease and talocalcaneal coalition: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Petchprapa, Catherine N.; Rossi, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    To assess, utilizing MRI, tarsal tunnel disease in patients with talocalcaneal coalitions. To the best of our knowledge, this has only anecdotally been described before. Sixty-seven ankle MRIs with talocalcaneal coalition were retrospectively reviewed for disease of tendons and nerves of the tarsal tunnel. Interobserver variability in diagnosing tendon disease was performed in 30 of the 67 cases. Tarsal tunnel nerves were also evaluated in a control group of 20 consecutive ankle MRIs. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL) by osseous excrescences was seen in 14 of 67 cases (21 %). Attenuation, split tearing, tenosynovitis, or tendinosis of the FHL was present in 26 cases (39 %). Attenuation or tenosynovitis was seen in the flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) in 18 cases (27 %). Tenosynovitis or split tearing of the posterior tibial tendon (PT) was present in nine cases (13 %). Interobserver variability ranged from 100 % to slight depending on the tendon and type of disease. Intense increased signal and caliber of the medial plantar nerve (MPN), indicative of neuritis, was seen in 6 of the 67 cases (9 %). Mildly increased T2 signal of the MPN was seen in 15 (22 %) and in 14 (70 %) of the control group. Talocalcaneal coalitions may be associated with tarsal tunnel soft tissue abnormalities affecting, in decreasing order, the FHL, FDL, and PT tendons, as well as the MPN. This information should be provided to the referring physician in order to guide treatment and improve post-surgical outcome. (orig.)

  6. Tendo-ligamentous pathologies of the wrist joint: Can ultrasonography replace magnetic resonance imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwarpal Singh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Characterization of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist remains problematic, despite advances in imaging. By using clinical history and imaging appearance, one can determine the diagnosis. USG is used as first imaging modality whereas MRI aids in making a specific diagnosis of few of the lesions. Aims: To investigate the etiological spectrum of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist on USG & MRI with statistical correlation. Patients and methods: 80 patients (male/female = 46/34 with complaint of swelling or pain in wrist were included and underwent USG and MRI of both the wrists. Results: The spectrum included ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, ligament tears and fibrosis. The analysis was done using kappa coefficient and spearman's rho correlation coefficient. The strength of agreement between USG and MRI for the diagnosis of ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis and tendinopathy was found to be very good. Conclusion: USG provides detailed depiction of superficial structures, is less expensive, and allows dynamic examinations of the wrist. It should be the first choice of investigation for majority of the cystic, tendinous, vascular, and fibrotic pathologies of the wrist. However, less promising results were observed for ligamentous pathologies on USG in our study. Keywords: Tendo-ligamentous pathologies, Ganglion cyst, Tenosynovitis, Ultrasonography, MRI

  7. Comprehensive evaluation of finger flexor tendon entheseal soft tissue and bone changes by ultrasound can differentiate psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinazzi, Ilaria; McGonagle, Dennis; Zabotti, Alen; Chessa, Donatella; Marchetta, Antonio; Macchioni, Pierluigi

    2018-02-28

    To determine whether a detailed sonographic evaluation of the hand flexor tendon compartment could help differentiate between psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thirty-seven patients with PsA, 47 with RA and 10 healthy controls (HC) had flexor tendon (FT) compartment imaging of the dominant hand 2nd to 4th tendons using grey scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound (US) with evaluation for tenosynovitis, peri-tendinous lesions, soft tissue oedema and bony changes at FT insertions. 24/37 PsA and 19/47 RA cases had morning stiffness and 19/37 PsA and 10/47 RA had swollen and/or tender fingers. Tenosynovitis was more common in PsA (25/37) despite higher DAS28 scores in RA (25/37 versus 10/45; pthe insertional site was significantly more common in PsA (p=0.001). Considering a total inflammatory score per patient summing up the three modifications of the flexor tendon (tenosynovitis, peri-tendinous oedema and insertional enthesophytes) the difference between PsA and RA remained statistically significant (pthe growing body of literature that high resolution US of the hand FT compartment may help differentiate between RA and PsA, which needs assessment in the diagnostic setting.

  8. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Responsiveness in Active Psoriatic Arthritis at Multiple Timepoints during the First 12 Weeks of Antitumor Necrosis Factor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feletar, Marie; Hall, Stephen; Bird, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To assess the responsiveness of high- and low-field extremity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables at multiple timepoints in the first 12 weeks post-antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy initiation in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and active dactylitis. Twelve patients with active PsA and clinical evidence of dactylitis involving at least 1 digit were recruited. Patients underwent sequential high-field conventional (1.5 Tesla) and extremity low-field MRI (0.2 Tesla) of the affected hand or foot, pre- and postgadolinium at baseline (pre-TNF), 2 weeks (post-TNF), 6 weeks, and 12 weeks. A blinded observer scored all images on 2 occasions using the PsA MRI scoring system. Eleven patients completed the study, but only 6 patients completed all high-field and low-field MRI assessments. MRI scores demonstrated rapid response to TNF inhibition with score reduction in tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis at 2 weeks. Intraobserver reliability was good to excellent for all variables. High-field MRI demonstrated greater sensitivity to tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis and greater responsiveness to change posttreatment. Treatment responses were maintained to 12 weeks. This study demonstrates the use of MRI in detecting early response to biologic therapy. MRI variables of tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis demonstrated responsiveness posttherapy with high-field scores more responsive to change than low-field scores.

  9. Power Doppler Ultrasound Evaluation of Peripheral Joint, Entheses, Tendon, and Bursa Abnormalities in Psoriatic Patients: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanjiao; Yang, Yujia; Xiang, Xi; Wang, Liyun; Zhang, Lingyan; Qiu, Li

    2018-04-15

    To evaluate the prevalence rates of peripheral joint, enthesis, tendon, and bursa abnormalities by power Doppler (PD) ultrasonic examination in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), psoriatic patients without clinical signs of arthritis (non-PsA psoriasis group), and healthy individuals, to detect subclinical PsA. A total of 253 healthy volunteers, 242 non-PsA psoriatic patients, and 86 patients with PsA were assessed by 2-dimensional and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound. Peripheral joint, enthesis, tendon, and bursa abnormalities were observed, characterizing abnormal PD. The affected patients and sites with abnormalities in various ages were compared among groups; PD signal grades for the abnormalities were also compared. In the PsA group, significantly higher percentages of sites showing joint effusion/synovitis, enthesitis, and tenosynovitis in all age groups, and markedly higher rates of sites with bursitis were found in young and middle age groups, compared with the non-PsA and control groups (all p the non-PsA group showed significantly higher rates of joint effusion/synovitis and enthesitis sites, and elevated PD signal grades of synovitis, enthesitis, and tenosynovitis in comparison with the control group, both in young and middle age groups (all p tenosynovitis.

  10. Atypical extraspinal musculoskeletal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients: Part II, tuberculous myositis, tuberculous bursitis, and tuberculous tenosynovites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, I.F.; Bianchi, S.; Martinoli, C.; Klein, M.; Hermann, G.

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis involving the soft tissue from adjacent bone or joint is well recognized. However, primary tuberculous pyomyositis, tuberculous bursitis, and tuberculous tenosynovitis are rare entities constituting 1% of skeletal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis involves most commonly the tendon sheaths of the hand and wrist, and tuberculous bursitis occurs most commonly around the hip. The greater trochanteric bursa and the greater trochanter are the most frequent sites of tuberculous bursitis. Cases of primary tuberculous pyomyositis and tenosynovitis of the tendons of the ankle and foot are seldom reported in the radiology literature. All imaging modalities - plain radiography, bone scan, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - provide information that is helpful in determining therapy. MRI in particular, with its multiplanar capabilities and superb contrast of soft tissue, can demonstrate the extent of the soft tissue mass and access the adjacent bones and joints. However, MRI has no diagnostic specificity in regard to tuberculosis, and in nonendemic areas, biopsy is strongly recommended. All patients in this review were permanent residents of North America or Western Europe and were immunocompetent. Examples of atypical presentations of the above entities are demonstrated. (author)

  11. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-12-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals. A 4.0-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope is used. Soft tissues around the talus are cleared with a motorized shaver and a radiofrequency device. The posterior aspects of the talus, os trigonum, and FHL tendon surrounded by the tendon sheath are visualized. The dynamic pathology of the FHL tendon is well observed on passive motion of the great toe. The prominent bone fragment of the talus is removed and the tendon sheath is cut with a retrograde knife and a motorized shaver from the superior border down to the entrance of the fibro-osseous tunnel. Arthroscopic release of the FHL tendon sheath is a useful and easy method to directly approach the dynamic pathology of FHL tenosynovitis in female ballet dancers.

  12. Omega "Ω" Pulley Plasty for Surgical Management of DeQuervain's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhach, Joseph; Chaya, Bachar; Papazian, Nazareth

    2018-06-01

    DeQuervain tenosynovitis, refractory to medical conservative treatment, has been traditionally treated by a simple division of the pulley, a procedure associated with several complications. Many authors attempted to prevent these complications by describing techniques of pulley reconstruction after its release necessitating suturing the different flaps and subsequently promoting extensor tendons adhesions. The authors present an alternative procedure for the first extensor compartment pulley decompression: "Omegaplasty". 25 Patients with 29 DeQuervain tenosynovitis cases were enrolled in a prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial from 2012 to 2016. At enrollment they were offered the option of Omegaplasty as a surgical treatment modality for their cases. The procedure is based on liberating the anterior attachment of the pulley from the anterior lip of the styloïd process while respecting its continuity with the periosteal flap as well as promoting expansion of the tunnel volume. All operated patients were evaluated using the "Opposition Kapandji Score". The authors present the results of 29 different "Omegaplasty" procedures. Based on the Kapandji opposition score, twenty cases scored 10/10 while the remaining nine cases yielded an 8/10 score each. The described technique is simple, reliable and respects the extensor tendons gliding physiology and biodynamics. By preserving the anatomical continuity of the first extensor compartment pulley at the wrist, the risk of adhesion formation is reduced. The preliminary results are encouraging and provide the "Ω" plasty the potential to be considered as a surgical option for treatment of De Quervain Tenosynovitis.

  13. Evaluation of Snake Bites with Bedside Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef E Jolissaint

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: While watering his lawn, a 36-year-old man felt two sharp bites to his bilateral ankles. He reports that he then saw a light brown, 2-foot snake slither away from him. He came to the emergency department because of pain and swelling in his ankles and inability to bear weight. Physical examination revealed bilateral ankle swelling and puncture marks on his left lateral heel and medial right ankle. Palpation, passive flexion and extension elicited severe pain bilaterally. Blood work including prothrombin time (PT, partial thromboplastin time (PTT, international normalized ratio (INR, and fibrinogen were within normal limits. Consultation with Poison Control indicated the snake was likely a copperhead, which is a venomous snake whose bites rarely require antivenin. Significant findings: In this case, ultrasonography of the lateral surface of the left foot revealed soft tissue edema (red arrow and fluid collection (white asterisk adjacent to the extensor tendon (white arrow. The edematous area resembles cobblestones, with hypoechoic areas of fluid spanning relatively hyperechoic fat lobules. The tendon is surrounded by anechoic fluid, expanding the potential space in the sheath. No hyperechoic foreign objects were noted. Discussion: The patient was diagnosed with soft tissue injury and extensor tenosynovitis after a snake envenomation. Snake venom contains metalloproteinases and other enzymatic proteins that cause local tissue edema and necrosis.1 After a snake bite, ultrasound can be used to assess for retained fangs, soft tissue edema, tendon sheath fluid, muscle fasciculation, and injury to deeper musculature that may not be readily apparent on physical exam.2,3 Most patients with tenosynovitis will recover with immobilization of the joint and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications.4 Rarely, the tendon may become infected requiring antibiotics and surgical intervention.4 Topics: Ultrasound, snake envenomation

  14. Development and Reliability of a Preliminary Foot Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Jill; Martín-Hervás, Carmen; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; McGonagle, Dennis; Keenan, Anne-Maree; Redmond, Anthony C; Conaghan, Philip G

    2017-08-01

    Foot osteoarthritis (OA) is very common but underinvestigated musculoskeletal condition and there is little consensus as to common magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. The aim of this study was to develop a preliminary foot OA MRI score (FOAMRIS) and evaluate its reliability. This preliminary semiquantitative score included the hindfoot, midfoot, and metatarsophalangeal joints. Joints were scored for joint space narrowing (JSN; 0-3), osteophytes (0-3), joint effusion/synovitis, and bone cysts (present/absent). Erosions and bone marrow lesions (BML) were scored (0-3) and BML were evaluated adjacent to entheses and at sub-tendon sites (present/absent). Additionally, tenosynovitis (0-3) and midfoot ligament pathology (present/absent) were scored. Reliability was evaluated in 15 people with foot pain and MRI-detected OA using 3.0T MRI multi-sequence protocols, and assessed using ICC as an overall score and per anatomical site. Intrareader agreement (ICC) was generally good to excellent across the foot in joint features (JSN 0.90, osteophytes 0.90, effusion/synovitis 0.46, cysts 0.87), bone features (BML 0.83, erosion 0.66, BML entheses 0.66, BML sub-tendon 0.60) and soft tissue features (tenosynovitis 0.83, ligaments 0.77). Interreader agreement was lower for joint features (JSN 0.43, osteophytes 0.27, effusion/synovitis 0.02, cysts 0.48), bone features (BML 0.68, erosion 0.00, BML entheses 0.34, BML sub-tendon 0.13), and soft tissue features (tenosynovitis 0.35, ligaments 0.33). This preliminary FOAMRIS demonstrated good intrareader reliability and fair interreader reliability when assessing the total feature scores. Further development is required in cohorts with a range of pathologies and to assess the psychometric measurement properties.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and scintigraphy of the finger joints: one year follow up of patients with early arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarlund, M; Ostergaard, M; Jensen, K; Madsen, J; Skjodt, H; Lorenzen, I; the, T

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate synovial membrane hypertrophy, tenosynovitis, and erosion development of the 2nd to 5th metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints by magnetic resonance imaging in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or suspected RA followed up for one year. Additionally, to compare the results with radiography, bone scintigraphy, and clinical findings.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Fifty five patients were examined at baseline, of whom 34 were followed up for one year. Twenty one patients already fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA at baseline, five fulfilled the criteria only after one year's follow up, whereas eight maintained the original diagnosis of early unclassified polyarthritis. The following MRI variables were assessed at baseline and one year: synovial membrane hypertrophy score, number of erosions, and tenosynovitis score.
RESULTS—MRI detected progression of erosions earlier and more often than did radiography of the same joints; at baseline the MRI to radiography ratio was 28:4. Erosions were exclusively found in patients with RA at baseline or fulfilling the ACR criteria at one year. At one year follow up, scores of MR synovial membrane hypertrophy, tenosynovitis, and scintigraphic tracer accumulation had not changed significantly from baseline; in contrast, swollen and tender joint counts had declined significantly (pthe changes seen over time in clinically assessed swollen and tender joint counts. Although joint disease activity may be assessed as quiescent by conventional clinical methods, a more detailed evaluation by MRI may show that a pathological condition is still present within the synovium.

 PMID:10873961

  16. Responsiveness in rheumatoid arthritis. a report from the OMERACT 11 ultrasound workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iagnocco, Annamaria; Naredo, Esperanza; Wakefield, Richard; Bruyn, George A W; Collado, Paz; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Finzel, Stephanie; Ohrndorf, Sarah; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Backhaus, Marina; Berner-Hammer, Hilde; Gandjbakhch, Frederique; Kaeley, Gurjit; Loeuille, Damien; Moller, Ingrid; Terslev, Lene; Aegerter, Philippe; Aydin, Sibel; Balint, Peter V; Filippucci, Emilio; Mandl, Peter; Pineda, Carlos; Roth, Johannes; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Tzaribachev, Niolay; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Conaghan, Philip G; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta

    2014-02-01

    To summarize the work performed by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound (US) Task Force on the validity of different US measures in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) presented during the OMERACT 11 Workshop. The Task Force is an international group aiming to iteratively improve the role of US in arthritis clinical trials. Recently a major focus of the group has been the assessment of responsiveness of a person-level US synovitis score in RA: the US Global Synovitis Score (US-GLOSS) combines synovial hypertrophy and power Doppler signal in a composite score detected at joint level. Work has also commenced examining assessment of tenosynovitis in RA and the role of US in JIA. The US-GLOSS was tested in a large RA cohort treated with biologic therapy. It showed early signs of improvement in synovitis starting at Day 7 and increasing to Month 6, and demonstrated sensitivity to change of the proposed grading. Subsequent voting questions concerning the application of the US-GLOSS were endorsed by > 80% of OMERACT delegates. A standardized US scoring system for detecting and grading severity of RA tenosynovitis and tendon damage has been developed, and acceptable reliability data were presented from a series of exercises. A preliminary consensus definition of US synovitis in pediatric arthritis has been developed and requires further testing. At OMERACT 11, consensus was achieved on the application of the US-GLOSS for evaluating synovitis in RA; and work continues on development of RA tenosynovitis scales as well as in JIA synovitis.

  17. Evaluation of a novel 7-joint ultrasound score in daily rheumatologic practice: a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, M; Ohrndorf, S; Kellner, H; Strunk, J; Backhaus, T M; Hartung, W; Sattler, H; Albrecht, K; Kaufmann, J; Becker, K; Sörensen, H; Meier, L; Burmester, G R; Schmidt, W A

    2009-09-15

    To introduce a new standardized ultrasound score based on 7 joints of the clinically dominant hand and foot (German US7 score) implemented in daily rheumatologic practice. The ultrasound score included the following joints of the clinically dominant hand and foot: wrist, second and third metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal, and second and fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. Synovitis and synovial/tenosynovial vascularity were scored semiquantitatively (grade 0-3) by gray-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound. Tenosynovitis and erosions were scored for presence. The scoring range was 0-27 for GS synovitis, 0-39 for PD synovitis, 0-7 for GS tenosynovitis, 0-21 for PD tenosynovitis, and 0-14 for erosions. Patients with arthritis were examined at baseline and after the start or change of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) inhibitor therapy 3 and 6 months later. C-reactive protein level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide, Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), and radiographs of the hands and feet were performed. One hundred twenty patients (76% women) with rheumatoid arthritis (91%) and psoriatic arthritis (9%) were enrolled. In 52 cases (43%), erosions were seen in radiography at baseline. Patients received DMARDs (41%), DMARDs plus TNFalpha inhibitors (41%), or TNFalpha inhibitor monotherapy (18%). At baseline, the mean DAS28 was 5.0 and the synovitis scores were 8.1 in GS ultrasound and 3.3 in PD ultrasound. After 6 months of therapy, the DAS28 significantly decreased to 3.6 (Delta = 1.4), and the GS and PD ultrasound scores significantly decreased to 5.5 (-32%) and 2.0 (-39%), respectively. The German US7 score is a viable tool for examining patients with arthritis in daily rheumatologic practice because it significantly reflects therapeutic response.

  18. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    in real-time and facilitates diagnostic and therapeutic interventions such as joint aspiration and injection. Exciting experimental modalities are also being developed with the potential to provide not just morphological but functional imaging. Techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET......) and high-resolution computerized tomography. Erosions are very clearly depicted using these modalities and MRI also allows imaging of soft tissues with assessment of joint inflammation. High-resolution ultrasound is a convenient clinical technique for the assessment of erosions, synovitis and tenosynovitis...

  19. Validation of the OMERACT Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) for the Hand and Foot in a Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess changes following treatment and the reliability and responsiveness to change of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) in a randomized controlled trial. Methods. Forty patients with PsA randomized to either...... placebo or abatacept (ABA) had MRI of either 1 hand (n = 20) or 1 foot (n = 20) at baseline and after 6 months. Images were scored blindly twice by 3 independent readers according to the PsAMRIS (for synovitis, tenosynovitis, periarticular inflammation, bone edema, bone erosion, and bone proliferation...

  20. Tuberculous arthritis of the appendicular skeleton: MR imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Hemant E-mail: parurad@hotmail.com; Shah, Jeshil; Patkar, Deepak; Singrakhia, Manoj; Patankar, Tufail; Hutchinson, Charles

    2004-12-01

    Tuberculosis [TB] of the appendicular skeleton is an uncommon infection caused by the tuberculous bacilli and constitutes only 1-3% of all tuberculosis infections. MR imaging features of tuberculous arthritis include bone marrow oedema, cortical erosions, synovitis, joint effusion, tenosynovitis, soft tissue collections, and myositis. These imaging features are at times non-specific, but in the correct clinical context help in diagnosis of tuberculosis. We present the various pathological manifestations of TB arthritis involving the different joints of appendicular skeleton and discuss their MR imaging appearances.

  1. The ultrasound assessment of the psoriatic arthritis: from joint to skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ariani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing number of papers investigating the diagnostic potential of ultrasonography in the assessment of patients with psoriatic arthritis and supporting its higher sensitivity over clinical examination in the diagnosis of synovitis, enthesitis and tenosynovitis. Less attention has been paid on both skin and nail, frequently involved in this condition. The aim of this paper is to show the potential of ultrasound in a multi-target assessment (joints, tendons, entesis, skin and nails in patients with psoriatic arthritis, using the last generation ultrasound equipment.

  2. Standardisation of the MRI image evaluation in the diagnostics of rheumatoid arthritis within the wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapuscinska, K.; Urbanik, A.; Wojciechowski, W.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease of the connective tissue, which results in disability and earlier death. Thus it is very important to recognise this pathologic condition as early as possible, to lessen and delay its consequences. Currently, magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality, depicting every stage of this disease and allowing for monitoring of the treatment response. The process of standardisation is needed in assessing MR pictures. The aim of this article was to present the MR protocols of hand and wrist MR examinations for rheumatologic demand and standards of results, according to worldwide OMERACT RAMRIS 2002 and supplemented by tenosynovitis system. (authors)

  3. Productive osseous changes about the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor, R.M.; Braunstein, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Radiographs of 225 consecutive patients with adult-form rheumatoid arthritis were examined for evidence of productive osseous changes about the wrist. The prevalence of new bone on the ulnar styloid was 10%. This form of new bone is probably due to overlying chronic tenosynovitis. A collar of new bone around the ulnar head is a result of degenerative change in the distal radioulnar joint. In general, productive osseous changes in theumatoid arthritis may represent inflammatory periosteal bone formation, osteophytosis, or contact remodeling. We found no evidence of an association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and extensive productive osseous changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  4. Productive osseous changes about the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, R.M.; Braunstein, E.M.

    1987-07-01

    Radiographs of 225 consecutive patients with adult-form rheumatoid arthritis were examined for evidence of productive osseous changes about the wrist. The prevalence of new bone on the ulnar styloid was 10%. This form of new bone is probably due to overlying chronic tenosynovitis. A collar of new bone around the ulnar head is a result of degenerative change in the distal radioulnar joint. In general, productive osseous changes in theumatoid arthritis may represent inflammatory periosteal bone formation, osteophytosis, or contact remodeling. We found no evidence of an association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and extensive productive osseous changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Spontaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus Tendon due to Unusual Etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Taş

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon includes systemic or local steroid injections, wrist fracture, tenosynovitis, synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and repetitive wrist motions. Case Report: We encountered a case of extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture with an unusual etiology, cow milking. In this case, transfer of the extensor indicis proprius tendon was performed successfully. At 1 year after surgery, extension of the thumb was sufficient. Conclusion: It appears that patients with occupations involving repetitive motions are at a high risk of closed tendon ruptures.

  6. Tarsaltunnel syndrome - MRI diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Helbich, T.; Imhof, H.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical findings and symptoms of tarsal tunnel are commonly vague and diffuse and electrodiagnostic studies do not provide definitive diagnosis. MR imaging with its excellent soft tissue contrast can demonstrate clearly the anatomy of the tarsal tunnel and its contents. MRI is able to demonstrate a space-occypyinglesion and its relationship to the posterior tibial nerve and its branches. This information aids in surgical planning by determining the extent of the decompression required. MR imaging may also be used to follow up non-surgical causes of tarsal tunnel syndrome such as tenosynovitis. (orig.) [de

  7. Normal tendon sheath of the second to fifth fingers as seen on oblique views

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, E.

    1984-01-01

    Oblique views of the fingers, using a low kilovolt technique, show a portion of the tendon sheaths which can be regarded as representative of the entire sheath. Because of the varying obliquity of each finger, this proportion differs in the fingers. With increasing age the projected portion of the sheath becomes smaller because it is covered by increasing bone formation in the insertion of the tendon sheat. Normal values have been obtained for adults according to their decades; from these, quite minor degrees of tendon sheat thickening can be determined. In camptodactyly of the fifth finger, which is not uncommon, the tendon sheat may be widened in the absence of a tenosynovitis.

  8. Tuberculous arthritis of the appendicular skeleton: MR imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Hemant; Shah, Jeshil; Patkar, Deepak; Singrakhia, Manoj; Patankar, Tufail; Hutchinson, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis [TB] of the appendicular skeleton is an uncommon infection caused by the tuberculous bacilli and constitutes only 1-3% of all tuberculosis infections. MR imaging features of tuberculous arthritis include bone marrow oedema, cortical erosions, synovitis, joint effusion, tenosynovitis, soft tissue collections, and myositis. These imaging features are at times non-specific, but in the correct clinical context help in diagnosis of tuberculosis. We present the various pathological manifestations of TB arthritis involving the different joints of appendicular skeleton and discuss their MR imaging appearances

  9. Trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by hand intramuscular intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan C Dulgeroglu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trigger wrist is a clinical entity characterized by triggering or the crackling of the wrist. Here, a case is reported of intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma that caused trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome. This is the only case report where trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by the intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma were developed simultaneously. it is believed that that adhesive tenosynovitis developing in the tendons may have contributed to the triggering and carpal tunnel syndrome in the wrist as a result of inflammation occuring as a consequence of intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 107-109

  10. Destructive arthritis in a patient with chikungunya virus infection with persistent specific IgM antibodies

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    Receveur Marie-Catherine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya fever is an emerging arboviral disease characterized by an algo-eruptive syndrome, inflammatory polyarthralgias, or tenosynovitis that can last for months to years. Up to now, the pathophysiology of the chronic stage is poorly understood. Case presentation We report the first case of CHIKV infection with chronic associated rheumatism in a patient who developed progressive erosive arthritis with expression of inflammatory mediators and persistence of specific IgM antibodies over 24 months following infection. Conclusions Understanding the specific features of chikungunya virus as well as how the virus interacts with its host are essential for the prevention, treatment or cure of chikungunya disease.

  11. Soft tissue changes in the metacarpal region of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, E.

    1984-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis causes changes in the soft tissues in the metacarpal portion of the hand which can be demonstrated by low Kv exposures. Indirect signs of inflammation consist of oedema extending from the synovial compartments to the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the intermuscular fat septa and the peritendinous tissue. Increased blood flow leads to dilatation of veins. Direct signs of inflammation consists of tenosynovitis and synovitis of the joints, with enlargement of the corresponding compartments. Limited mobility of the hand over a long period, or improvement in motility are paralleled by changes in muscle mass.

  12. Soft tissue changes in the metacarpal region of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.

    1984-01-01

    Rheumatoid arhtritis causes changes in the soft tissues in the metacarpal portion of the hand which can be demonstrated by low Kv exposures. Indirect signs of inflammation consist of oedema extending from the synovial compartments to the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the intermuscular fat septa and the peritendinous tissue. Increased blood flow leads to dilatation of veins. Direct signs of inflammation consists of tenosynovitis and synovitis of the joints, with enlargement of the corresponding compartments. Limited mobility of the hand over a long period, or improvement in motility are paralleled by changes in muscle mass. (orig.) [de

  13. Association of systemic sclerosis and psoriatic arthritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Musio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The association of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc and Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA is unfrequent; only few cases are reported in literature. We describe a case of a patient with SSc following the onset of PsA. The disease begun with tenosynovitis, polyarthritis in association with psoriasis. After two years, Raynaud’s phenomenon and sclerodactyly appeared, and, later, pulmonary interstizial fibrosis and esophageal dysfunction. The existence of a common pathogenesis of the two diseases, SSc and PsA, is discussed.

  14. OSTEOID OSTEOMA OF THE HAMATE AS A CAUSE OF COMPRESSION NEUROPATHY OF THE ULNAR NERVE IN GUYON CANAL (CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Semenkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid  osteoma of the wrist bones is rare and its diagnostics is complicated. A clinical case of the surgical treatment of the patient with osteoid osteoma is presented. The clinical manifestations included  pain, extensors  tenosynovitis and neuropathy of the ulnar nerve in guyon’s canal. The diagnosis was confirmed by computer tomography, ultrasonography and electromyography. Partial resection of the hamate including pathology area, and mobilization of the ulnar nerve in the wrist enabled authors  to obtain a good functional outcome.

  15. High-field MR imaging of the tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Burk, J.M.; Herman, L.J.; Mosure, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging was used to investigate normal anatomy and pathologic conditions of the tendons. Tendons of experimental animals, cadaver joints, normal volunteers, and patients with suspected tendon pathology were studied. Tendon anatomy is easily identified because of the hypointensity of the tendons contrasting with the hyperintendensity of the surrounding fat. Pathologic conditions including posttraumatic and postsurgical tendon rupture, peritendinous scarring, tendinitis, and tenosynovitis are well seen with MR imaging. A detailed study of normal and abnormal tendon anatomy of the finger, wrist, shoulder, knee, and ankle is displayed, including MR images, gross specimens, and line drawings

  16. Three-dimensional Doppler ultrasound findings in healthy wrist and finger tendon sheaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzboll-Danielsen, Mads; Janta, Iustina; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    interpretation of Doppler signals when diagnosing tenosynovitis. Method Forty healthy participants (20 women and 20 men age 23-67 years) without prior history of arthritis, tendon diseases or present pain in their hands were included. Twenty participants had 3D Doppler US of the second and third finger...... participant. No significant difference in feeding vessels was seen between the radial and carpal level in the wrist (p = 0.06) or between the second and third flexor tendon sheath (p = 0.84). Conclusion Doppler findings in or in close proximity to the tendon sheaths were common in wrists and fingers...

  17. Ultrasound Findings on Hands and Wrists of Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Relationship with Physical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Carolina Freitas; Lima de Sá Ribeiro, Daniel; Dourado Santos, Willer Gonçalves; Rosa, Genevievi; Machicado, Viviane; Pedreira, Ana Luisa; Pimenta da Fonseca, Emanuela; Mota Duque Sousa, Anna Paula; Rodrigues Silva, Carla Baleeiro; Matos, Marcos Antonio Almeida; Santiago, Mittermayer Barreto

    2017-09-01

    Diagnosis of synovitis/tenosynovitis by physical examination can be difficult. Ultrasound (US) can be an effective tool for the evaluation of joint involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study will describe musculoskeletal findings by US in SLE patients and the evaluation of their correlation with physical examination. SLE patients underwent clinical/sonographic evaluation of hand/wrists. In total, 896 joints were evaluated: at least 1 change on physical examination was found in 136 joints and at least 1 US abnormality was found in 65 of 896 joints. Out of the 65 joints with US changes, only 13 had findings on physical examination. Conversely, 111 joints had tenderness on physical examination with no sonographic abnormalities. Tenosynovitis was statistically significant more frequently with joint edema (41%) (p = 0.0003). US can detect musculoskeletal changes in only a minority of symptomatic SLE patients. Clinical findings may be related to some reasons that cannot be explained using US. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Are rheumatoid arthritis patients discernible from other early arthritis patients using 1.5T extremity magnetic resonance imaging? a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée; Huizinga, Tom W J; Bloem, Johan L; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Reijnierse, Monique

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) research. A European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) task force recently suggested that MRI can improve the certainty of RA diagnosis. Because this recommendation may reflect a tendency to use MRI in daily practice, thorough studies on the value of MRI are required. Thus far no large studies have evaluated the accuracy of MRI to differentiate early RA from other patients with early arthritis. We performed a large cross-sectional study to determine whether patients who are clinically classified with RA differ in MRI features compared to patients with other diagnoses. In our study, 179 patients presenting with early arthritis (median symptom duration 15.4 weeks) underwent 1.5T extremity MRI of unilateral wrist, metacarpophalangeal, and metatarsophalangeal joints according to our arthritis protocol, the foot without contrast. Images were scored according to OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring (RAMRIS) by 2 independent readers. Tenosynovitis was also assessed. The main outcome was fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA. Test characteristics and areas under the receiver-operator-characteristic curves (AUC) were evaluated. In subanalyses, the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria were used as outcome, and analyses were stratified for anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). The ACR 1987 criteria were fulfilled in 43 patients (24.0%). Patients with RA had higher scores for synovitis, tenosynovitis, and bone marrow edema (BME) than patients without RA (p arthritis patients.

  19. Ultrasound Findings of the Painful Ankle and Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheil Artul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To document the prevalence and spectrum of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS findings at different parts of the foot. Materials and Methods: All MSKUS studies conducted on the foot during a 2-year period (2012-2013 at the Department of Radiology were reviewed. Demographic parameters including age, gender, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Three hundred and sixty-four studies had been conducted in the 2-year period. Ninety-three MSKUS evaluations were done for the ankle, 30 studies for the heel, and 241 for the rest of the foot. The most common MSKUS finding at the ankle was tenosynovitis, mostly in female patients; at the heel it was Achilles tendonitis, also mostly in female patients; and for the rest of the foot it was fluid collection and presence of foreign body, mainly in male patients. The number of different MSKUS abnormalities that were reported was 9 at the ankle, 9 at the heel, and 21 on the rest of the foot. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing a huge spectrum of abnormalities. The most common finding was collection/hematoma and foreign bodies at the foot, tenosynovitis at the ankle, and Achilles tendinitis at the heel.

  20. The frondiform ligament and pseudotenosynovitis of the extensor digitorum longus tendon: MRI evaluation with cadaveric correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zember, Jonathan; Rosenberg, Zehava; Mba-Jones, Chimere; Bencardino, Jenny; Rossi, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Fluid along the frondiform ligament, the sinus tarsi stem of the inferior extensor retinaculum (IER), can approximate the extensor digitorum longus (EDL), at times simulating tenosynovitis. Our purpose, based on MRI and cadaveric studies, was to further evaluate this scantly described phenomenon, to identify associated findings and to alert the radiologists to the potential pitfall of over diagnosing EDL tenosynovitis. Two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed the radiology reports and MRI studies of 258 ankle MRI exams, performed at our institution, for fluid along the frondiform ligament extending toward the EDL. No patient had EDL pathology clinically. MRI was performed in two cadaveric ankles following injection of the sinus tarsi and EDL tendon sheath, under ultrasound guidance. Altogether, 31 MRIs demonstrated fluid extending from the sinus tarsi along the frondiform ligament toward the EDL. In 30 cases (97 %), the fluid partially surrounded the tendon, without tendon sheath distension. Based on the radiology reports, in 11 of the 31 cases (35 %), the fluid was misinterpreted as abnormal. Most common associated findings included ligamentous injury, posterior tibial tendon (PTT) tear, flat-foot, and osteoarthrosis. In the cadavers, fluid extended along the frondiform ligament toward the EDL after sinus tarsi injection; there was no communication between EDL tendon sheath and the sinus tarsi. Fluid within the sinus tarsi can extend along the frondiform ligament and partially surround the EDL, manifesting as pseudotenosynovitis. This phenomenon, often seen with ligamentous tears or PTT dysfunction, should not be misdiagnosed as true pathology of the EDL. (orig.)

  1. A Case Report of Herpetic Whitlow with Positive Kanavel’s Cardinal Signs: A Diagnostic and Treatment Difficulty

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    Milos Brkljac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpetic whitlow is an acute viral infection of the hand caused by either herpes simplex virus (HSV 1 or 2. Its characteristic findings are significant pain and erythema with overlying nonpurulent vesicles. The differential diagnosis includes flexor tenosynovitis. We present a case of recurrent infection of the middle finger in an immunocompetent 19-year-old girl. Multiple painful pustules with tracking cellulitis were partially treated by oral antibiotics. A recurrence with positive Kanavel’s signs suggested flexor tenosynovitis at seven months. Her symptoms improved transiently following emergent surgical open flexor sheath exploration and washout however, she required two further washouts; at eleven and thirteen months to improve symptoms. Viral cultures were obtained from the third washout as HSV infection was disclosed from further history taking. These were positive for HSV2. Treatment with acyclovir at thirteen months after presentation led to a complete resolution of her symptoms with no further recurrences to date. This rare case highlights the similarity in presentation between flexor sheath infection and herpetic whitlow which can lead to diagnostic confusion and mismanagement. We emphasise the importance of careful past medical history taking as well as considering herpetic whitlow as a differential diagnosis despite the presence of strongly positive Kanavel’s signs.

  2. Tarsaltunnel syndrome - MRI diagnosis; Tarsaltunnelsyndrom. MR-Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, S. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteoradiologie; Breitenseher, M. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteoradiologie; Haller, J. [Radiologische Abt., Hanuschkrankenhaus, Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig Boltzmann-Institut fuer Osteologie, Wien (Austria); Helbich, T. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteoradiologie; Gaebler, C. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Wien (Austria); Imhof, H. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteoradiologie

    1995-07-01

    Clinical findings and symptoms of tarsal tunnel are commonly vague and diffuse and electrodiagnostic studies do not provide definitive diagnosis. MR imaging with its excellent soft tissue contrast can demonstrate clearly the anatomy of the tarsal tunnel and its contents. MRI is able to demonstrate a space-occypyinglesion and its relationship to the posterior tibial nerve and its branches. This information aids in surgical planning by determining the extent of the decompression required. MR imaging may also be used to follow up non-surgical causes of tarsal tunnel syndrome such as tenosynovitis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Klinische Befunde und Symptomoe des Tarsaltunnelsyndroms sind haeufig diffus, und elektrodiagnostische Untersuchungen liefern keine definitive Diagnose. Die MRT mit ihrem exzellenten Weichteilkontrast erlaubt eine ausgezeichnete Darstellung der Anatomie des Tarsaltunnels und seines Inhaltes. Die MRT ermoeglicht auch die Darstellung von raumfordernden Laesionen und ihre Beziehung zum N.tibialis posterior bzw. seiner Aeste. Diese Information hilft in der chirurigschen Planung, in dem das Ausmass der notwendigen Dekompression bestimmt werden kann. Die MRT ist auch geeignet als nichtinvasive Verlaufskontrolle von Ursachen eines Tarsaltunnelsyndroms, die keinen chirugischen Eingriff erfordern wie z.B. einer Tenosynovitis. (orig.)

  3. Intersection Syndrome: The Subtle Squeak of an Overused Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Thomas M

    2017-01-01

    Patient histories that include wrist pain can be pivotal in the distinction between intersection syndrome (IS) and the more common de Quervain's tenosynovitis (DQT). Presented here is a 26-year-old pregnant woman with a history of rowing who developed left radial/dorsal wrist pain and a rubbing/squeaking sensation. Nine months of conservative DQT therapy and a landmark-guided corticosteroid injection failed to relieve her symptoms. An in-clinic ultrasound showed tenosynovitis at the intersection of the first and second compartments, confirming a diagnosis of IS. She found immediate relief with ultrasound-guided saline hydrodissection, the injection of saline into the intercompartmental space to reduce adhesions. Both DQT and IS are overuse injuries caused by repetitive wrist extension, as occurs in rowing, and either condition can worsen after pregnancy. Distinguishing the subtleties between DQT and IS can be challenging. Close attention to the patient's description of the pain can guide treatment, potentially expediting recovery. In addition, saline hydrodissection can be both a diagnostic tool and a potentially therapeutic alternative to steroid injections for such tendinopathies. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  4. US findings of metacarpophalangeal joints in children with idiopathic juvenile arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmazyn, Boaz; Bowyer, Suzanne L.; Murphy Schmidt, Kara; Ballinger, Susan H.; Beam, Thuy T.; Buckwalter, Kenneth; Ying, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common cause of chronic arthritis in children, with frequent involvement of the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPJ). To compare US findings with those of radiography and clinical examination. All MCPJs in 20 children with JIA (17 females, median age 9.7 years, range 3.6 to 16.8 years) were evaluated clinically and imaged with gray-scale and color Doppler US, and 90 MCPJs were also imaged radiographically. Each MCPJ was graded on physical examination from 0 (normal) to 4 (severe) by the patient's rheumatologist. US demonstrated abnormalities in 64 of 200 MCPJs (32.0%), including pannus vascularity and/or tenosynovitis in 55 joints (27.5%) (pannus vascularity in 43, tenosynovitis in 40) and bone destruction in 25 joints (12.5%). Overall, US abnormalities and physical examination scores were significantly associated (P < 0.001). However, interobserver agreement between US and clinical evaluation was poor (kappa 0.1) and between US and radiography was only fair (kappa 0.4). US of the MCPJ in children with JIA can demonstrate cartilage thinning, bone erosions, and pannus vascularity. Abnormal US findings are significantly correlated with severity of disease as evaluated clinically. (orig.)

  5. US findings of metacarpophalangeal joints in children with idiopathic juvenile arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmazyn, Boaz [Riley Hospital for Children, Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Bowyer, Suzanne L.; Murphy Schmidt, Kara; Ballinger, Susan H.; Beam, Thuy T. [Indiana University, Pediatric Rheumatology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Buckwalter, Kenneth [University Hospital, Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Ying, Jun [University of Cincinnati, Biostatistics, Institute for the Study of Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common cause of chronic arthritis in children, with frequent involvement of the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPJ). To compare US findings with those of radiography and clinical examination. All MCPJs in 20 children with JIA (17 females, median age 9.7 years, range 3.6 to 16.8 years) were evaluated clinically and imaged with gray-scale and color Doppler US, and 90 MCPJs were also imaged radiographically. Each MCPJ was graded on physical examination from 0 (normal) to 4 (severe) by the patient's rheumatologist. US demonstrated abnormalities in 64 of 200 MCPJs (32.0%), including pannus vascularity and/or tenosynovitis in 55 joints (27.5%) (pannus vascularity in 43, tenosynovitis in 40) and bone destruction in 25 joints (12.5%). Overall, US abnormalities and physical examination scores were significantly associated (P < 0.001). However, interobserver agreement between US and clinical evaluation was poor (kappa 0.1) and between US and radiography was only fair (kappa 0.4). US of the MCPJ in children with JIA can demonstrate cartilage thinning, bone erosions, and pannus vascularity. Abnormal US findings are significantly correlated with severity of disease as evaluated clinically. (orig.)

  6. The diabetic foot: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Campanini, D.S.; Knight, C.; McCalla, M.

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint (Charcot Joint) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an attempt to assess the extent of the infection and also to distinguish infection from the changes seen with neuroarthropathy. The majority of patients with infection had more than one site of involvement and the following diagnoses were made by MRI evaluation: Osteomyelitis (n=8), abscess (n=7), neuropathic joint (n=5), septic arthritis (n=4), and tenosynovitis (n=4). Clinical or surgical/pathological confirmation of the MRI diagnoses was obtained in all but nine sites of infection or cases of neuropathic joint. If the two diagnostic categories of septic arthritis and tenosynovitis are excluded, all but four of the MRI diagnoses were confirmed. A distinctive pattern for neuroarthropathy was identified in five cases, consisting of low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images within the bone marrow space adjacent to the involved joint. We conclude that MRI is a valuable adjunct in the evaluation of the diabetic foot, and that it provides accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection in this subset of patients. MRI has proven particularly helpful in differentiating neuroarthropathy from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  7. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The ''rheumatoid'' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with PsA of

  8. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States); University of California Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences R-140, Orange, CA (United States); Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The 'rheumatoid' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with

  9. Giant Cell Tumour of Tendon Sheath Masquerading As Trigger Finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Rahimawati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 59-year-old female who presented in the general orthopaedic clinic with triggering of her right middle finger. She did not respond to conventional treatment methods; subsequently she underwent surgical open release under local anaesthesia. Five months postoperatively, the patient presented with signs and symptoms of acute flexor tenosynovitis, and was thought to have a postoperative infection. Re-examination by a hand surgeon raised the possibility of a different aetiology. Based on clinical findings and response to initial treatment, giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath was suspected and later confirmed following surgical biopsy. A high index of suspicion and knowledge of the variegated presentations of giant cell tumour in the hand are beneficial in these types of cases.

  10. Compound palmar ganglion causing compressive neuropathy of the median nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tribhuwan Narayan Singh Gaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB of synovial sheath of tendon is uncommon, it is a severe form of extrapulmonary TB, diagnosis is obvious on clinical grounds in later stages, but is always confirmed by histopathology. Here, we are presenting a case of a 50-year-old female, who presented to us with gradual increasing swelling in her left hand and wrist and numbness over left thenar eminence. The patient was successfully treated with debulking operation and anti-tubercular drugs. Tubercular tenosynovitis of wrist and hand is a severe form of extrapulmonary TB. Intraoperatively, the presence of rice body or melon seed bodies is pathognomonic for confirming the diagnosis. Early diagnosis and intervention give good prognosis.

  11. MR imaging evaluation of diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Campanini, D.S.; McCalla, M.; Knight, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint were evaluated with MR imaging to identify the presence and extent of infection and also to exclude coexistent infection in the neuropathic joint. Osteomyelitis (n = 8), abscess (n = 7), septic arthritis (n = 4), tenosynovitis (n = 4), and neuropathic joint (n = 5) were diagnosed with MR imaging. Osteomyelitis and/or abscess were excluded by MR findings in 13 instances. Most patients with infection had one more than one site of involvement. Clinical or surgical confirmation of the MR diagnoses was obtained in all but nine of the infection sites or cases of neuropathic joint. Only one false-negative diagnosis of osteomyelitis was made in this series. It is concluded that MR imaging provided accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection and that this information was decisive in patient management

  12. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos [Department of CT and MR Imaging, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Narvaez, Javier [Department of Medicine, Delfos Medical Center, Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  13. The OMERACT ultrasound task force--status and perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naredo, Esperanza

    2011-09-01

    This article reports the most recent work of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Task Force, and highlights the future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 10 meeting. Results of the following studies were presented: (1) intra- and interobserver reliability of ultrasound detecting and scoring synovitis in different joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); (2) systematic review of previous ultrasound scoring systems of synovitis in RA; (3) enthesitis systematic review and Delphi definition exercise in spondyloarthritis enthesitis; (4) enthesitis intra- and interobserver reliability exercise; and (5) Delphi definition exercise in hand osteoarthritis, and reliability exercises. Study conclusions were discussed, and a future research agenda was approved, notably further validation of an OMERACT ultrasound global synovitis score (GLOSS) in RA, emphasizing the importance of testing feasibility, predictive value, and added value over standard clinical variables. Future research areas will include validating scoring systems for enthesitis and osteoarthritis, and testing the metric qualities of ultrasound for evaluating tenosynovitis and structural damage in RA.

  14. Ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand: How to do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo; Silvestri, Enzo; Serafini, Giovanni; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Mauri, Giovanni; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound has emerged as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to detect joint abnormalities and to guide percutaneous procedures. Being superficial, wrist and hand tendons and joints represent a good target to perform such procedures using ultrasound guidance. This kind of approach allows for a clear and real-time visualization of the needles during their whole path. In this setting, the knowledge of technical aspects and tips is essential to act in the most accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. The aim of this review is to summarize the local treatments of inflammatory and degenerative disease described in literature (such as treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, trigger finger, trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis, etc.), emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand

  15. Imaging of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turecki, Marcin B.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Holden, Dean A.; Hunter, Tim B.; Rogers, Lee F. [University of Arizona HSC, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Stubbs, Alana Y. [Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Graham, Anna R. [University of Arizona HSC, Department of Pathology, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Prompt and appropriate imaging work-up of the various musculoskeletal soft tissue infections aids early diagnosis and treatment and decreases the risk of complications resulting from misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. The signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections can be nonspecific, making it clinically difficult to distinguish between disease processes and the extent of disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of soft tissue infections. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, radiography and nuclear medicine studies are considered ancillary. This manuscript illustrates representative images of superficial and deep soft tissue infections such as infectious cellulitis, superficial and deep fasciitis, including the necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis/soft tissue abscess, septic bursitis and tenosynovitis on different imaging modalities, with emphasis on MRI. Typical histopathologic findings of soft tissue infections are also presented. The imaging approach described in the manuscript is based on relevant literature and authors' personal experience and everyday practice. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, K.G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Cellulitis and Bacteremia Caused by Bergeyella zoohelcum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ru Lin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bergeyella zoohelcum is a rod-shaped, aerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile and non-saccharolytic bacterium. It is frequently isolated from the upper respiratory tract of dogs, cats and other mammals. Clinically, B. zoohelcum has been known to cause cellulitis, leg abscess, tenosynovitis, septicemia, pneumonia and meningitis, and is associated with animal bites. In addition, food-borne transmission was considered in a recent case report. We report a 73-year-old man with liver cirrhosis who had no history of dog bite but had dog exposure, who developed cellulitis of the left lower leg and B. zoohelcum was isolated from blood culture. This patient, without evidence of polymicrobial infection, was treated with cefazolin and gentamicin with a good outcome. B. zoohelcum is a zoonotic pathogen that may cause bacteremia in patients with underlying disease such as liver cirrhosis; it can be treated with a beta-lactam or quinolone.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella paurometabola type strain (no. 33T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, Christine [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2011-01-01

    Tsukamurella paurometabola corrig. (Steinhaus 1941) Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus Tsukamurella, which is the type genus to the family Tsukamurellaceae. The spe- cies is not only of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location, but also because it is a human opportunistic pathogen with some strains of the species reported to cause lung in- fection, lethal meningitis, and necrotizing tenosynovitis. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Tsukamurella and the first genome sequence of a member of the family Tsukamurellaceae. The 4,479,724 bp long genome contains a 99,806 bp long plasmid and a total of 4,335 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes, and is a part of the Ge- nomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Progress in the clinical imaging research of bone diseases on ankle and foot sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhong; Shi, Lenian; Liu, Taiyun; Wang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Summary Sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles are research focuses of foot and ankle surgery. Pains of the foot and ankle are related to sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles. The specific anatomical and functional relationship of sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles can cause such bone diseases as the dislocation of sesamoid bones and accessory bones, infection, inflammation and necrosis of sesamoid bones, cartilage softening, tenosynovitis of sesamoid bones and the sesamoid bone syndrome. However, these bone diseases are often misdiagnosed or mistreated. In patients with trauma history, relevant diseases of sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles as above mentioned are highly probable to be misdiagnosed as avulsion fractures. In such cases, radiographic findings may provide a basis for clinical diagnosis. PMID:25343083

  20. Synovial tuberculosis of the hand: An ancient disease in an unusual localisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Franz Matta Ramos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis is the most prevalent infectious disease in the world. It is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Osteoarticular tuberculosis represents 1%–3%. Tenosynovitis is the most common form of the disease in the hand. Aims: The aim of this study is to present an update of synovial tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: The authors present a literature review, the clinical and surgical management and case reports. Results: The outcomes were satisfactory and were not report complications. Conclusions: Early diagnosis, surgical transection of the transverse carpal ligament, debridement and complete excision of the infected synovium may be required, along with antituberculosis drugs. Knowledge of this disease in the hand can provide a better diagnosis and outcome.

  1. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos; Narvaez, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  2. High-resolution sonography in carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbiati, L.; De Pra, L.; Rizzatto, G.; Derchi, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome, caused by the compression on the median nerve under the transverse carpal ligament, has multiple causes and clinical presentations. One hundred eighteen patients with carpal tunnel sydrome underwent high-resolution US which demonstrated unpalpable cystic masses in 25 patients (lobulated stalked synovial cysts in 19 and retrotendinous cysts in six, all confirmed at surgery), and diffuse thickening and decreased echogenicity of the tendon sheaths in 87 patients, suggesting tenosynovitis (confirmed at surgery in 64). In six patients simple encasement of muscle bellies in the carpal tunnel was shown. US can delineate the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome, suggest the need for surgery, and aid the surgeon in locating the lesion to be removed

  3. Neglected ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon mimics a soft tissue tumor in the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Chi-Lun; Yen, Tze-Hsun; Wu, Lien-Chen; Huang, Yi-You; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2014-04-01

    A wrist mass is rarely caused by a ruptured tendon in the forearm. The common pathologies are ganglia, tendon tenosynovitis, and giant cell tumors of tendon sheaths. Less common causes are nerve sheath tumors, vascular lesions, or an accessory muscle belly. The authors investigated a case of neglected ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon that mimics a mass in the wrist. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report in relevant literature. During investigation, the high-resolution musculoskeletal ultrasound suggested a soft tissue tumor or a ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon. The magnetic resonance imaging scan indicated an accessory flexor carpi ulnaris muscle belly. The diagnosis of ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon was confirmed by surgical exploration. This case indicates that ultrasound may be better suited than magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating a wrist mass for its accuracy, availability, and portability.

  4. Arthrosonography as a method of assessment of xefocam efficacy in rheumatoid gonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Much

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthrosonography of 74 knee joints performed in 37 pts with rheumatoid arthritis before treatment with xefocam (Nicomed in 34 revealed signs of intra and extra-articular inflammation with presence in 100% fluid in fore part of the joint, increase B. Suprapatellaris size and thickening of synovial membrane. Fluid in lateral parts was revealed in 33 joints and in back part - in 22 joints. Semimembranosus muscle tenosynovitis was revealed at 22 joints. After xefocam administration (intra-articular injections 8 mg once a week for 3 weeks signs of intra-articular inflammation decreased in 28 and extra-articular - in 21 joints. So xefocam provides anti-inflammatory effect and can be used for treatment of synovitis.

  5. The normal tendon sheath of the second to fifth fingers as seen on oblique views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.

    1984-01-01

    Oblique views of the fingers, using a low kilovolt technique, show a portion of the tendon sheaths which can be regarded as representative of the entire sheath. Because of the varying obliquity of each finger, this proportion differs in the fingers. With increasing age the projected portion of the sheath becomes smaller because it is covered by increasing bone formation in the insertion of the tendon sheat. Normal values have been obtained for adults according to their decades; from these, quite minor degrees of tendon sheat thickening can be determined. In camptodactyly of the fifth finger, which is not uncommon, the tendon sheat may be widened in the absence of a tenosynovitis. (orig.) [de

  6. Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome in an adolescent with short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ester; Estanqueiro, Paula; Almeida, Susana; Ferreira, Ricardo; Tellechea, Oscar; Salgado, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome (BADAS) is a neutrophilic dermatosis, characterized by the occurrence of arthritis and skin lesions related to bowel disease with or without bowel bypass. We report an unusual case of BADAS in a 15-year-old white male with congenital aganglionosis of the colon and hypoganglionosis of the small intestine and multiple bowel surgeries in childhood complicated by short bowel syndrome. He presented with recurrent peripheral polyarthritis, tenosynovitis, and painful erythematous subcutaneous nodules located on the dorsolateral regions of the legs and on the dorsa of the feet. Histological examination disclosed a neutrophilic dermatosis confirming the diagnosis of BADAS.Although an uncommon disease, especially at pediatric age, it is important to evoke the diagnosis of BADAS in children and adolescents with bowel disease, because treatment options and prognosis are distinct from other rheumatologic conditions.

  7. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath of the hand - magnetic resonance image and orthopaedic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, G.; Monovska, T.; Jablanski, V.; Alexieva, K.; Velev, M.

    2009-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS), also known as localized nodular tenosynovitis, is a benign neoplasm that occurs dominantly on the digits. These tumours most commonly occur in patients aged 30-50 years and are associated with degenerative joint disease. GCT-TS usually arises from the synovium of tendon sheets, affecting interfalangeal joints of the hand, feet, ankle and knees. Magnetic Resonance Imaging is able to depict characteristic signal intensities and can accurately assess the tumor size and degree of extent around the phalanx. We present a case of a 36 years-old male patient with GCT-TS in the flexor tendon of his left second finger, diagnosed with Magnetic Resonance imaging. The mass was excised widely with preservation of the flexor tendon without recurrence. (authors)

  8. CT of peroneal tendon injury in patients with calcaneal fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Z.S.; Feldman, F.; Singson, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Injury to the peroneal tendons is a major complication of intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Heretofore, the injury has been difficult to diagnose by routine imaging modalities. However, CT studies of 24 intraarticular calcaneal fractures revealed evidence of peroneal tendon injury in 22 cases. The pathologic conditions included lateral displacement, subluxation, dislocation, and impingement on the tendons by bony fragments, hematomas, and scar tissue. Patients studied 6-12 months after injury had CT evidence consistent with clinical symptoms of peroneal tenosynovitis. Since peroneal tendon injury is surgically correctable, it should be differentiated from other known and more obvious complications, of calcaneal fractures. CT therefore serves as a valuable, noninvasive tool in evaluating these otherwise nonvisualized soft tissue structures in the immediate posttraumatic period as well as during long-term follow up

  9. Do not rush to return to sports after trigger finger injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeehae; Jo, Leechan; Lee, Jong In

    2015-04-01

    Trigger finger, or digital stenosing tenosynovitis, is a common hand problem. A widely accepted treatment is steroid injection into the flexor tendon sheath. This can cause rupture of the flexor tendon. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no report on tendon rupture after a single corticosteroid injection. Moreover, there are no guidelines for patients with tendinopathy who want to return to sports after corticosteroid injection. Clinicians who perform local steroid injections for tendinopathy treatment should be aware of the possible dangers of tendon rupture and should confirm that steroids are not administrated into the tendon. Patients should also be warned about returning to sports prematurely and should be encouraged to gradually resume sports after the injection to prevent further damage. Herein, we report an unusual case of flexor digitorum profundus rupture after a single corticosteroid injection in a 57-yr-old male golfer and we also present a review of the literature.

  10. MR imaging of the carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, D.; Lind, J.; Blair, S.; Light, T.; Wisniewski, R.; Moncado, R.

    1987-01-01

    MR is an ideal noninvasive means to image the structures forming the carpal tunnel in both normal and pathologic conditions. The carpal tunnel syndrome is a frequently encountered entity caused by compression of the median nerve as it passes through the carpal tunnel. This may result from a variety of conditions including edema from acute chronic trauma, rheumatoid tenosynovitis, degenerative joint disease or soft-tissue masses. This exhibit demonstrates the optimal MR imaging techniques to display the structures of the carpal tunnel. The normal anatomy is reviewed and variations in normal anatomy that may predispose to disease are included. Examples of the morphologic changes demonstrated in 20 patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome are displayed. The exhibit also reviews the findings in 20 postoperative cases

  11. Hypothenar hammer syndrome: case report and literature review Síndrome do martelo hipotenar: relato de caso e revisão da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Maria Muniz de Queiroz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Case report of a 69 year-old patient, with history of repetitive trauma events in the wrist, clinically simulating tenosynovitis, being held with Doppler Ultrasound and Magnetic Nuclear Resonance, which showed ulnar artery thrombosis. The accurate diagnosis of the hammer hypothenar disease through those tests enable an early intervention, improving the prognosis of patients affected by this rare disease.Paciente de 69 anos, com história de traumas repetitivos no punho, simulando clinicamente tenossinovite, sendo feitas ultrassonografia com doppler e ressonância nuclear magnética, que evidenciaram trombose da artéria ulnar. O diagnóstico preciso da doença do martelo hipotenar por meio desses exames possibilita uma intervenção precoce e melhora o prognóstico dos pacientes acometidos por essa rara afecção.

  12. Conventional X-ray examination and computed tomography in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingg, G.

    1996-01-01

    Plain-film radiography is an important and basic element in the assessment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Its various uses include assessment of inflammatory osseous destruction and the activity of inflammatory changes. Furthermore, the inflammatory collateral phenomena can indicate an acute clinical phase, and the articular soft tissue swelling and tenosynovitis are shown directly and indirectly very clearly. On the other hand, high-resolution computed tomography is very capable of showing cortical structures of bone complementary to MR. In some special clinical questions and anatomical regions, especially the axial skeleton, it delivers information of high specifity, partly for definitive diagnosis and partly for planning surgical procedures. The assessment of changes in the sacroiliac joints, sternoclavicular joints and craniocervical junction are domains of computed tomography. (orig.) [de

  13. Possibilities opened up by MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Steinbach, L.; Stoller, D.; Genant, H.

    1989-01-01

    MRI studies of 63 patients with various abnormalities of the hand and wrist were analyzed. Studies were performed on scanners with a field strength of 0.35, 0.5, or 1.5 T. Imaging parameters included T1- and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal and transverse planes and contiguous slices 3-5 mm thick. In 37 patients with post-traumatic disorders, MRI revealed carpal avascular necrosis, tendon abnormalities and, in some cases, abnormalities of interosseous ligaments and the triangular fibrocartilage. In 15 patients with such inflammatory diseases as arthritis, tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel syndrome and in 11 patients with tumors, MRI provided clear delineation of osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. The current role of MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities is discussed on the basis of these results. (orig.) [de

  14. Musculoskeletal manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merashli, M; Chowdhury, T A; Jawad, A S M

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are increasing significantly worldwide. Whilst vascular complications of diabetes are well recognized, and account for principle mortality and morbidity from the condition, musculoskeletal manifestations of diabetes are common and whilst not life threatening, are an important cause of morbidity, pain and disability. Joints affected by diabetes include peripheral joints and the axial skeleton. Charcot neuroarthropathy is an important cause of deformity and amputation associated with peripheral neuropathy. A number of fibrosing conditions of the hands and shoulder are recognized, including carpal tunnel syndrome, adhesive capsulitis, tenosynovitis and limited joint mobility. People with diabetes are more prone to gout and osteoporosis. Management of these conditions requires early recognition and close liaison between diabetes and rheumatology specialists. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis, tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis, and the spine (spondylitis. In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Imaging of compound palmar ganglion with pathologic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Talukder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compound palmar ganglion, or chronic flexor tenosynovitis, most commonly of tuberculousorigin, is a rare extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis (TB. The flexor synovialsheath is not a common site for TB but, once involved, causes rapid involvement of all flexortendons. We discuss the case of a 70-year-old farmer who presented to us with pain and progressive swelling of the palmar aspect of the wrist. On clinical examination, swelling both above and below the proximal wrist crease was found, with positive cross-fluctuation. Onultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, features suggestive of compound palmarganglion were present. The patient underwent surgical resection (extensive tenosynovectomyand chemotherapy. Post-operative histopatholgical findings correlated with the radiological features.

  17. Hand infections: anatomy, types and spread of infection, imaging findings, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dakshesh B; Emmanuel, Neelmini B; Stevanovic, Milan V; Matcuk, George R; Gottsegen, Christopher J; Forrester, Deborah M; White, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Infections of the hand are common, particularly in immunocompromised patients, and can lead to significant morbidity, including amputation, if not treated properly. Hand infection can spread far and wide from the original site of inoculation through interconnections between the synovium-lined and nonsynovial potential spaces. Because surgery is the mainstay of treatment, knowledge of the pertinent anatomy is imperative for accurately describing the presence, location, and extent of infection. The authors review the pertinent anatomy of the spaces of the hand and describe different types of infection-including cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, paronychia, felon, pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis, deep space infections, septic arthritis, and osteomyelitis-and common causative organisms of these infections. They also describe various modes of spread; the common radiologic appearances of hand infections, with emphasis on findings at magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography; and the role of radiology in the management of these infections, along with a brief overview of treatment options. ©RSNA, 2014.

  18. Imaging of musculoskeletal tuberculosis; Imagerie de la tuberculose osteo-articulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussel, L.; Marchand, B.; Blineau, N.; Picaud, G.; Emn, M.; Coulon, A.; Pagnon, P.; Rode, A.; Pin-Leveugle, J.; Berthezene, Y.; Pariset, C.; Boibieux, A. [Hopital de la Croix-Rousse, 69 - Lyon (France); Hermier, M. [Hopital de la Croix-Rousse, Serv. de Neuroradiologie, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2002-09-01

    Purpose and methods. To perform an illustrated and educational review of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Results. As the incidence of musculoskeletal tuberculosis still increases, a review appears justified. The following four main presentations are detailed and illustrated, by emphasizing the value of both CT and MR imaging: a) spine tuberculosis ({approx} 50 %/) commonly involves two adjacent vertebral bodies with usual large paravertebral abscesses. The following lesions are highly suggestive of tuberculosis: solitary vertebral involvement, solitary epidural abscess with or without erosive spondylitis; b) osteo-arthritis: peripherally located erosions at synovial insertions with gradual narrowing of the joint space are highly suggestive; c) osteomyelitis: unusual, may involve any bones; d) tenosynovitis and bursitis. Conclusion. Imaging studies are essential for diagnosis and to assess the extent of musculo-skeletal tuberculosis. (author)

  19. Osteomyelitis Infection of Mycobacterium marinum: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao H. Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium marinum (M. marinum is a ubiquitous waterborne organism that grows optimally at temperatures around 30°C. It is a nontuberculous Mycobacterium found in nonchlorinated water with worldwide prevalence. It is the most common atypical Mycobacterium that causes opportunistic infection in humans. M. marinum can cause superficial infections and localized invasive infections in humans, with the hands being the sites most frequently affected. It can cause skin lesions, which are either single, papulonodular lesions, confined to an extremity, or may resemble cutaneous sporotrichosis. This infection can also cause deeper infections including tenosynovitis, bursitis, arthritis, and osteomyelitis. Disseminated infections and visceral involvements have been reported in immunocompromised patients. We here report a case of severe deep soft tissue infection with necrotizing fasciitis and osteomyelitis of the left upper extremity (LUE caused by M. marinum in an immunocompromised patient.

  20. Imaging of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turecki, Marcin B.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Holden, Dean A.; Hunter, Tim B.; Rogers, Lee F.; Stubbs, Alana Y.; Graham, Anna R.

    2010-01-01

    Prompt and appropriate imaging work-up of the various musculoskeletal soft tissue infections aids early diagnosis and treatment and decreases the risk of complications resulting from misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. The signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections can be nonspecific, making it clinically difficult to distinguish between disease processes and the extent of disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of soft tissue infections. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, radiography and nuclear medicine studies are considered ancillary. This manuscript illustrates representative images of superficial and deep soft tissue infections such as infectious cellulitis, superficial and deep fasciitis, including the necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis/soft tissue abscess, septic bursitis and tenosynovitis on different imaging modalities, with emphasis on MRI. Typical histopathologic findings of soft tissue infections are also presented. The imaging approach described in the manuscript is based on relevant literature and authors' personal experience and everyday practice. (orig.)

  1. Influence of Angiotensin-Aldosterone System on Ultrasound of Joints in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.B. Komarova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with rheumatoid arthritis and high level of angiotensin II in the blood at ultrasound of joints there are often being detected effusion in the joint cavity, hypervascularization of synovium with 2–3 points and tenosynovitis characterizing inflammatory exudative processes. In patients with high level of aldosterone, hyperplasia of synovium, presence of pannus and bone and cartilage erosions, indicating proliferative-destructive processes, were predominated. Identified correlations show that with increasing levels of angiotensin II in the blood increases the intensity of the vascularization of the synovial membrane, joint effusion, and an increase in the concentration of aldosterone in the blood affects the synovial thickness indicators, the presence of pannus and bone erosions amount.

  2. Interobserver reliability in musculoskeletal ultrasonography: results from a "Teach the Teachers" rheumatologist course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, ee.; Møller, I.; Moragues, C.

    2006-01-01

    , tendon lesions, bursitis, and power Doppler signal. Afterwards they compared the ultrasound findings and re-examined the patients together while discussing their results. RESULTS: Overall agreements were 91% for joint effusion/synovitis and tendon lesions, 87% for cortical abnormalities, 84......: The shoulder, wrist/hand, ankle/foot, or knee of 24 patients with rheumatic diseases were evaluated by 23 musculoskeletal ultrasound experts from different European countries randomly assigned to six groups. The participants did not reach consensus on scanning method or diagnostic criteria before...... the investigation. They were unaware of the patients' clinical and imaging data. The experts from each group undertook a blinded ultrasound examination of the four anatomical regions. The ultrasound investigation included the presence/absence of joint effusion/synovitis, bony cortex abnormalities, tenosynovitis...

  3. Ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and clinical assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in fingers and toes of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess ultrasonography (US) for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in finger and toe joints, tendons, and entheses in patients with psoriasis-associated arthritis (PsA) by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), projection radiography...... (x-ray), and clinical findings. Fifteen patients with PsA, 5 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 5 healthy control persons were examined by means of US, contrast-enhanced MRI, x-ray, and clinical assessment. Each joint of the 2nd-5th finger (metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal interphalangeal [PIP...... tendons of the fingers were assessed for the presence of insertional changes and tenosynovitis. One hand was assessed by means of MRI for the aforementioned changes. X-rays of both hands and feet were assessed for bone erosions and proliferations. US was repeated in 8 persons by another ultrasonographer...

  4. EULAR RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE USE OF IMAGING IN SPONDYLOARTHRITIS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandl, P; Navarro-Compán, V; Terslev, L

    2014-01-01

    , tenosynovitis, bursitis and particularly peripheral enthesitis, which may support the diagnosis of SpA. MRI of the SIJ and/or spine may be used to assess and monitor disease activity, while CR of the SIJ and/or spine may be used for long-term monitoring of structural damage, particularly new bone formation...... of the included studies was performed using the QUADAS-2 tool. Results: A total of 7550 references were identified in the search process, from which 157 studies were included in the systematic review. Ten recommendations were produced encompassing the role of imaging in making a diagnosis of axial Sp...... in axial SpA. In patients with AS (not nonradiographic axial SpA), initial CRs of the lumbar and cervical spine are recommended to detect syndesmophytes, which are predictive of development of new syndesmophytes. MRI (vertebral corner inflammatory lesion) may also be used to predict development of new...

  5. Optimal use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Møller-Bisgaard, Signe

    2014-01-01

    the benefits of including MRI in treat-to-target strategies. The benefits of incorporating MRI into clinical registries are not yet known, but may include improved knowledge about the real-life advantages of MRI, as well as opportunities to develop better clinical and laboratory composite measures to monitor......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly is more sensitive than clinical examination and conventional radiography (x-ray) for detection of inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema (osteitis) and tenosynovitis) and damage (bone erosion and cartilage loss/joint space narrowing) in patients...... with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The question is when and how MRI should be used. The present article reviews our knowledge about, and provides suggestions for, the use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries. In clinical trials, the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) is a thoroughly...

  6. Ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand: How to do

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via L.B. Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Silvestri, Enzo [Diagnostica per Immagini, Ospedale Evangelico Internazionale, Corso Solferino 29A, 16100 Genova (Italy); Serafini, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Diagnostica per Immagini, Ospedale Santa Corona, Via XXV Aprile 38, 17037 Pietra Ligure, Savona (Italy); Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Oncologiche e Gastroenterologiche, Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Giustiniani, Padova (Italy); Garlaschi, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Scienze per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via L.B. Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Mauri, Giovanni [Servizio di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza Malan 2, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy); Cimmino, Marco Amedeo [Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via L.B. Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca Maria, E-mail: io@lucasconfienza.it [Servizio di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza Malan 2, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Piazza Malan 2, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    Ultrasound has emerged as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to detect joint abnormalities and to guide percutaneous procedures. Being superficial, wrist and hand tendons and joints represent a good target to perform such procedures using ultrasound guidance. This kind of approach allows for a clear and real-time visualization of the needles during their whole path. In this setting, the knowledge of technical aspects and tips is essential to act in the most accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. The aim of this review is to summarize the local treatments of inflammatory and degenerative disease described in literature (such as treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, trigger finger, trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis, etc.), emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand.

  7. Association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris tendon pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Torriani, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon pathology. We retrospectively reviewed 71 adult wrist MRI studies with ECU tendon pathology (tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, or tear), and/or ECU subluxation. Subjects did not have a history of trauma, surgery, infection, or inflammatory arthritis. MRI studies from 46 subjects without ECU tendon pathology or subluxation were used as controls. The following morphological parameters of the distal ulna were measured independently by two readers: ulnar variance relative to radius, ulnar styloid process length, ECU groove depth and length. Subjects and controls were compared using Student's t test. Inter-observer agreement (ICC) was calculated. There was a significant correlation between negative ulnar variance and ECU tendon pathology (reader 1 [R1], P = 0.01; reader 2 [R2], P 0.64 for all parameters. Distal ulnar morphology may be associated with ECU tendon abnormalities. (orig.)

  8. Ultrasonography as a prognostic and objective parameter in Achilles tendinopathy:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakkegaard, Mads; Johannsen, Finn E; Højgaard, Betina

    2015-01-01

    eccentric exercises of the calf muscles and if needed supplemented with corticosteroid injections. The patients were examined clinically and by US (tendon thickness, hyper- and hypoechogenicity, calcification, bursitis, calcaneusspure, tenosynovitis, gray scale and color Doppler focusing on increased flow...... was statistically associated with a decrease in palpatory pain. CONCLUSION: Heterogeneity is a prognostic marker in AT. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased Doppler activity can be used as objective outcome parameters for the treatment effect of AT....... intra- or peritendinous). The clinical and US examination were performed at entry, 1, 2, 3 and at 6 month. RESULTS: 42 women and 50 men were included (mean age of 47 years). They had symptoms for more than 13 months and a symptomatic Achilles tendon mean thickness of 7.4±2.3mm. Heterogeneity...

  9. Possibilities opened up by MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuck, A; Steinbach, L; Stoller, D; Genant, H; Neumann, C

    1989-02-01

    MRI studies of 63 patients with various abnormalities of the hand and wrist were analyzed. Studies were performed on scanners with a field strength of 0.35, 0.5, or 1.5 T. Imaging parameters included T1- and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal and transverse planes and contiguous slices 3-5 mm thick. In 37 patients with post-traumatic disorders, MRI revealed carpal avascular necrosis, tendon abnormalities and, in some cases, abnormalities of interosseous ligaments and the triangular fibrocartilage. In 15 patients with such inflammatory diseases as arthritis, tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel syndrome and in 11 patients with tumors, MRI provided clear delineation of osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. The current role of MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities is discussed on the basis of these results.

  10. Imaging of musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussel, L.; Marchand, B.; Blineau, N.; Picaud, G.; Emn, M.; Coulon, A.; Pagnon, P.; Rode, A.; Pin-Leveugle, J.; Berthezene, Y.; Pariset, C.; Boibieux, A.; Hermier, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose and methods. To perform an illustrated and educational review of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Results. As the incidence of musculoskeletal tuberculosis still increases, a review appears justified. The following four main presentations are detailed and illustrated, by emphasizing the value of both CT and MR imaging: a) spine tuberculosis (∼ 50 %/) commonly involves two adjacent vertebral bodies with usual large paravertebral abscesses. The following lesions are highly suggestive of tuberculosis: solitary vertebral involvement, solitary epidural abscess with or without erosive spondylitis; b) osteo-arthritis: peripherally located erosions at synovial insertions with gradual narrowing of the joint space are highly suggestive; c) osteomyelitis: unusual, may involve any bones; d) tenosynovitis and bursitis. Conclusion. Imaging studies are essential for diagnosis and to assess the extent of musculo-skeletal tuberculosis. (author)

  11. 3D splint prototype system for applications in muscular rehab by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña-Martínez, M. I.; Guzmán-González, J. V.; Barajas-González, O. G.; Guzman-Ramos, V.; García-Garza, A. K.; González-García, R. B.; García-Ramírez, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    It is quite common that patients with ligamentous ruptures, tendonitis, tenosynovitis or sprains are foreseen the use of ad hoc splints for a swift recovery. In this paper, we propose a rehabilitation split that is focused on upper-limb injuries. By considering that upper-limb patient shows a set of different characteristics, our proposal personalizes and prints the splint custom made though a digital model that is generated by a 3D commercial scanner. To fabricate the 3D scanned model the Stereolithography material (SLA) is considered due to the properties that this material offers. In order to complement the recovery process, an electronic system is implemented within the splint design. This system generates a set of pulses for a fix period of time that focuses mainly on a certain group of muscles to allow a fast recovery process known as Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Principle (TENS).

  12. Psoriasis and associated variables in classification and outcome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - an eight-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Maria; Aalto, Kristiina; Fasth, Anders

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To study the impact of psoriasis and features associated with psoriasis on classification and outcome in a population-based follow-up cohort of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: In all, 440 children with JIA were followed for a median of 8 years...... in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data for remission was available for 427 of these children. The presence of psoriasis, psoriasis-like rash, dactylitis, nail pitting, enthesitis, tenosynovitis and heredity was assessed in relation to ILAR classification and remission. RESULTS: Clinical...... findings associated with psoriasis developed consecutively during the 8-year period. Six of 14 children with psoriasis were not classified as juvenile psoriatic arthritis according to the ILAR criteria at 8 year follow-up. Dactylitis was more common in children with early onset of JIA. After 8 years we...

  13. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Yvonne M.; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E.; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Ángel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subjects. For DM patients, disease duration, glycemic control, and DM long-term complications were also examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders. The mean (SD) age for DM patients and non-diabetic controls were 53.3 (12.9) and 50.0 (13.1) years; 64.0 and 64.7 % of DM patients and controls were females, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of bursitis/tendonitis was higher in DM patients than among non-diabetics (59.0 % vs. 29.4 %, pdiabetics. Specifically, DM patients had a higher frequency of flexor tenosynovitis, De Quervain’s tenosynovitis, lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, and anserine bursitis than non-diabetic subjects (p<0.05). Among DM patients, multivariate analyses showed that those with bursitis/tendonitis were more likely to be female [OR (95 % CI) 4.55 (1.42, 14.55)] and have peripheral vascular disease [OR (95 % CI) 8.48 (1.71, 41.93)]. In conclusion, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were common in this population of Hispanics with DM. Among DM patients, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were more frequent in women and those with long-term complications such as peripheral vascular disease. PMID:24522480

  14. Dynamic 3D-MR-angiography for assessing rheumatoid disease of the hand—A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Glaser, Christian; Horng, Annie; Helck, Andreas; Bauner, Kerstin U.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hatz, Hans J.; Weckbach, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate highly temporally resolved MR-angiography (MRA) with time-resolved imaging with stochastic trajectories (TWIST) of the hand as supplementary tool for dynamic assessment of synovitis and vascular pathologies in rheumatoid diseases. Material and methods: A coronal dynamic TWIST–MRA-sequence (0.7 mm × 0.7 mm × 1.4 mm, temporal resolution 2.5 s, time of acquisition 4 min) of the predominantly affected hand of 17 patients with suspected rheumatoid disease was acquired after contrast administration (Multihance, Bracco Imaging SpA) at 3 T (Magnetom VERIO, 8-channel-knee-coil, Siemens Healthcare). As standard of reference, contrast enhanced non fat-saturated coronal and fat-saturated axial T1-w sequences were acquired. These static sequences and the dynamic TWIST–MRA–maximum-intensity-projections (MIP) were separately assessed by two readers in consensus, recording the number of synovial lesions (wrist, intercarpal, metacarpophaleangal/proximal/distal interphalangeal joints), signs of tenosynovitis and vasculitis. Diagnostic confidence was rated (4-point-scale: 4 = excellent; 1 = non-diagnostic). Statistical significance was tested using the Wilcoxon-rank-sum-test. Results: An insignificantly lower number of synovial lesions (n = 72 vs. 89; p = 0.1) and only 3/9 cases with tenosynovitis were identified by the TWIST–MRA. For detected lesions, diagnostic confidence was comparable (MRA: 3.64; static T1-w post contrast: 3.47). In patients with high clinical activity dynamic MRA showed very early synovial enhancement. Only dynamic MRA detected 3 cases of vasculitis (subsequently confirmed with digital-subtraction-angiography). Conclusion: TWIST–MRA facilitates fast detection of synovitis. Although dynamic MRA of the hand is inferior to static contrast enhanced sequences in assessing the number of synovitic and tenosynovitic lesions, its high temporal resolution allows for fast visual grading of disease activity and assessment of vasculitis

  15. Validation of the OMERACT Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) for the Hand and Foot in a Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frederique; Mease, Philip J; Bøyesen, Pernille; Peterfy, Charles G; Conaghan, Philip G; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-12-01

    To assess changes following treatment and the reliability and responsiveness to change of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) in a randomized controlled trial. Forty patients with PsA randomized to either placebo or abatacept (ABA) had MRI of either 1 hand (n = 20) or 1 foot (n = 20) at baseline and after 6 months. Images were scored blindly twice by 3 independent readers according to the PsAMRIS (for synovitis, tenosynovitis, periarticular inflammation, bone edema, bone erosion, and bone proliferation). Inflammatory features improved numerically but statistically nonsignificantly in the ABA group but not the placebo group. Baseline intrareader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were good (≥ 0.50) to very good (≥ 0.80) for all features in both hand and foot. Baseline interreader ICC were good (ICC 0.72-0.96) for all features, except periarticular inflammation and bone proliferation in the hand and tenosynovitis in the foot (ICC 0.25-0.44). Intrareader and interreader ICC for change scores varied. Guyatt's responsiveness index (GRI) was high for inflammatory features in the hand and metatarsophalangeal joints (GRI -0.67 to -3.13; bone edema not calculable). Minimal change and low prevalence resulted in low ICC and GRI for bone damage. PsAMRIS showed overall good intrareader agreement in the hand and foot, and inflammatory feature scores were responsive to change, suggesting that PsAMRIS may be a valid tool for MRI assessment of hands and feet in PsA clinical trials.

  16. Orthogonal views improves localisation in bone scans of wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Of all nuclear medicine studies, bone scans are the most fundamental. However, straightforward these may seem, there are always mechanisms that can be implemented which assist in a more precise diagnosis, particularly in areas with an intricate bone structure. An 18-year-old right-handed student presented to her doctor with a one month history of pain over the right distal radio-ulna joint area. Clinically, she had prominence of the right ulna, which suggested that there may have been a previous injury to the wrist. Also, pronation/supination were painful where there was swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, as well as some discomfort with clicking in ulna deviation/rotation. The X-rays demonstrated some premature radial epiphysial closure. A bone scan was requested to attempt to localise the main inflammatory focus. The dynamic study was performed in the planar projection with an immediate blood pool for 300k being taken. These demonstrated a vascular blush medially. A medial blood pool image was acquired and it localised the abnormal vascularity as being dorsal. A separate focal area of less intense blood pooling was also noted in the line of the distal ulna. Delayed images showed increased uptake localised to the ulna styloid. Anatomically, the superficial vascular blush correlated with tenosynovitis. Hence, the orthogonal initial and delayed images were definitive in the diagnoses of tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. This clearly complements the information provided by the palmar view. However, it is important to remember that an increased radiation dose to the technologist is incurred as a result of the extra orthogonal view, hence attention to technique is imperative

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic findings of seal finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjelund, S.; Tikkakoski, T.; Isokangas, M.; Raeisaenen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic findings of five patients with seal finger. Material and Methods: The MR images and radiographs of five patients with seal finger were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed on four patients in the subacute phase, and follow-up imaging was done on one of them at 5 months. One patient had MRI only at a later stage 5 years after onset. Radiographs were taken three times in the subacute phase and once at a later stage. One patient had had seal finger in another finger previously. Results: Short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence showed extensive subcutaneous soft tissue edema in all four patients in the subacute phase and tenosynovitis of the flexion tendons in two cases. Three patients had edema in 2-3 phalanges, and effusion in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was seen in one case. At the later stage, no signal pathology in soft tissues or bones was seen in STIR images. In the subacute phase, radiographs showed digital soft-tissue swelling in three patients, and one patient had a narrowed DIP joint, periarticular osteoporosis, and a periosteal reaction. At the later stage, flexion contracture of the finger was seen. Conclusion: In addition to soft-tissue infection, seal finger causes bone marrow edema, tenosynovitis, and effusion in the interphalangeal joints visible as increased signal intensity in STIR images. Radiographs reveal periarticular osteoporosis with loss of cartilage in the subacute phase and flexion contracture at the later stage. MRI (STIR) allows more precise delineation of the inflammatory process compared to radiography

  18. Detailed Joint Region Analysis of the 7-Joint Ultrasound Score: Evaluation of an Arthritis Patient Cohort over One Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ohrndorf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the 7-joint ultrasound (US7 score by detailed joint region analysis of an arthritis patient cohort. Methods. The US7 score examines the clinically most affected wrist, MCP and PIP II, III, MTP II, and V joints for synovitis, tenosynovitis/paratenonitis, and erosions. Forty-five patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (84.4% and spondyloarthritis with polyarticular peripheral arthritis (PsA 13.3%; AS 2.2% with a median disease duration of 6.5 yrs (range 7.5 mths–47.6 yrs were included and examined at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months after starting or changing therapy (DMARD/biologic. In this study, detailed US7 score joint region analysis was firstly performed. Results. The joint region analysis performed at baseline disclosed synovitis in 95.6% of affected wrists in the dorsal aspect by greyscale (GS US where Grade 2 (moderate was most often (48.9% detected. Palmar wrist regions presented Grade 1 (minor capsule elevation in 40% and Grade 2 (moderate synovitis in 37.8%. Tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU tendon was found in 40%, with PD activity in 6.6%. Most of the erosions in MCP II were detected in the radial (68.9%, followed by the dorsal (48.9% and palmar (44.4% aspects. In MTP V, erosions were seen in 75.6% from lateral. Conclusions. Synovitis in GSUS was more often detected in the wrist in the dorsal than in the palmar aspect. ECU tendon involvement was frequent. Most erosions were found in the lateral scan of MTP V and the medial (radial scan of MCP II.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application; Magnetresonanztomographie der Hand bei rheumatoider Arthritis. Wissenschaftliche Ergebnisse und praktische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, K.G.A. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institut fuer Radiologie am Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) ist ein sensitives Verfahren zur Detektion entzuendlicher Veraenderungen der peripheren Gelenke. Den breiten Einsatz der MRT im Fruehstadium der rheumatoiden Arthritis behindern derzeit jedoch der im Vergleich zur konventionellen Roentgendiagnostik hoehere technische Aufwand und vermehrte Kosten. Diese Uebersichtsarbeit fasst wichtige Studienergebnisse zusammen und gibt praktische Hinweise fuer Hand-MRTs. Ein geeignetes Sequenzprotokoll wird vorgestellt, Vor- und Nachteile von Niederfeld-MRTs werden beruecksichtigt, moegliche Fehlerquellen und Artefakte diskutiert. Magnetresonanztomographische Befunde bei rheumatoider Arthritis wie Synovitis, Tenosynovitis, Erosionen und Knochenmarkoedeme werden beschrieben und deren prognostische Bedeutung dargestellt. Gesicherte Fakten zur Validierung und Moeglichkeiten der Graduierung MR-tomographischer Veraenderungen bei rheumatoider Arthritis werden zusammengefasst. Der Nutzen der MRT zur differenzialdiagnostischen

  20. Association of bone edema with the progression of bone erosions quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisbona, Maria Pilar; Pàmies, Anna; Ares, Jesús; Almirall, Miriam; Navallas, Maria; Solano, Albert; Maymó, Joan

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the association of synovitis, bone marrow edema (BME), and tenosynovitis in the progression of erosions quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 year in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in remission. A total of 56 of 196 patients with early RA in remission at 1 year and with available MRI data at baseline and at 12 months were included. MRI images were assessed according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring (RAMRIS) system. Persistent remission was defined as 28-joint Disease Activity Score-erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≤ 2.6 and/or Simplified Disease Activity Index ≤ 3.3 and/or the new boolean American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism remission criteria for a continuous period of at least 6 months. Progression of bone erosions was defined as an increase of 1 or more units in annual RAMRIS score for erosions compared to baseline. At 1 year, the majority of patients with RA in sustained remission showed some inflammatory activity on MRI (94.6% synovitis, 46.4% BME, and 58.9% tenosynovitis) and 19 of the 56 patients (33.9%) showed MRI progression of bone erosions. A significant difference was observed in MRI BME at 1 year, with higher mean score in patients with progression compared to nonprogression of erosions (4.8 ± 5.6 and 1.4 ± 2.6, p = 0.03). Subclinical inflammation was identified by MRI in 96.4% of patients with RA in sustained clinical remission. Significantly higher scores of BME after sustained remission were observed in patients with progression of erosions compared to patients with no progression. The persistence of higher scores of BME may explain the progression of bone erosions in patients with persistent clinical remission.

  1. Orthogonal views improves localisation in bone scans of wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, A.L.

    1997-09-01

    Full text: Of all nuclear medicine studies, bone scans are the most fundamental. However, straightforward these may seem, there are always mechanisms that can be implemented which assist in a more precise diagnosis, particularly in areas with an intricate bone structure. An 18-year-old right-handed student presented to her doctor with a one month history of pain over the right distal radio-ulna joint area. Clinically, she had prominence of the right ulna, which suggested that there may have been a previous injury to the wrist. Also, pronation/supination were painful where there was swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, as well as some discomfort with clicking in ulna deviation/rotation. The X-rays demonstrated some premature radial epiphysial closure. A bone scan was requested to attempt to localise the main inflammatory focus. The dynamic study was performed in the planar projection with an immediate blood pool for 300k being taken. These demonstrated a vascular blush medially. A medial blood pool image was acquired and it localised the abnormal vascularity as being dorsal. A separate focal area of less intense blood pooling was also noted in the line of the distal ulna. Delayed images showed increased uptake localised to the ulna styloid. Anatomically, the superficial vascular blush correlated with tenosynovitis. Hence, the orthogonal initial and delayed images were definitive in the diagnoses of tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. This clearly complements the information provided by the palmar view. However, it is important to remember that an increased radiation dose to the technologist is incurred as a result of the extra orthogonal view, hence attention to technique is imperative.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic findings of seal finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjelund, S.; Tikkakoski, T.; Isokangas, M.; Raeisaenen, S. [Oulu Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic findings of five patients with seal finger. Material and Methods: The MR images and radiographs of five patients with seal finger were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed on four patients in the subacute phase, and follow-up imaging was done on one of them at 5 months. One patient had MRI only at a later stage 5 years after onset. Radiographs were taken three times in the subacute phase and once at a later stage. One patient had had seal finger in another finger previously. Results: Short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence showed extensive subcutaneous soft tissue edema in all four patients in the subacute phase and tenosynovitis of the flexion tendons in two cases. Three patients had edema in 2-3 phalanges, and effusion in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was seen in one case. At the later stage, no signal pathology in soft tissues or bones was seen in STIR images. In the subacute phase, radiographs showed digital soft-tissue swelling in three patients, and one patient had a narrowed DIP joint, periarticular osteoporosis, and a periosteal reaction. At the later stage, flexion contracture of the finger was seen. Conclusion: In addition to soft-tissue infection, seal finger causes bone marrow edema, tenosynovitis, and effusion in the interphalangeal joints visible as increased signal intensity in STIR images. Radiographs reveal periarticular osteoporosis with loss of cartilage in the subacute phase and flexion contracture at the later stage. MRI (STIR) allows more precise delineation of the inflammatory process compared to radiography.

  3. Osteomyelitis of the proximal sesamoid bone in a horse - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kofler, J.

    1994-01-01

    Suppurative osteomyelitis of the lateral proximal sesamoid bone and chronic septic tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath of the right hind limb was diagnosed in a 8 year old warmblood mare. Three months earlier the horse had received a puncture wound in the plantar fetlock region, penetrating the plantar annular ligament, tendon sheath and intersesamoidian ligament up to the plantaro-axial surface of the lateral sesamoid bone. The clinical, radiographic and ultrasonographic findings are described. The horse showed grade 2 / 4 right hindlimb lameness, marked thickening of the entire digital flexor tendon sheath area as well as the puncture wound in the middle of the annular ligament region. Radiographs revealed a 10 x 12 mm centro-axial, circular translucent lesion and marked bony proliferation on the abaxial and plantar margins of the lateral proximal sesamoid. Adhesions and marked anechoic areas between the plantar septum of the tendon sheath and the superficial flexor tendon, a thickening of the plantar annular ligament and structural alterations of the deep flexor tendon were demonstrated by sonography. Due to these severe findings a very poor prognosis was given and therefore surgery was not recommended. The horse was euthanized 4 months later as a result of further deterioration. Additional clinical, radiographic and sonographic findings as well as post mortem findings are mentioned. Gross pathology showed a fibrino-purulent tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath and tendinitis of both flexor tendons, as well as a fistulous lesion of the intersesamoidian ligament over the lateral proximal sesamoid bone. The patho-histologic examination revealed focal suppurative osteomyelitis of the lateral sesamoid bone with necrotic bone tissue in the osteolytic area and accumulated neutrophils and macrophages [de

  4. Escravos de Jó, Kanban e L.E.R

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    Leda Leal Ferreira

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Casos de tenossinovite numa empresa metalúrgica foram analisados através da Análise Coletiva do Trabalho, da qual participaram treze trabalhadores e o Sindicato da categoria. A partir da descrição de sua atividade de trabalho, feita em duas reuniões coletivas, ficou claro que a tenossinovite era um termo geral utilizado para várias queixas (dores, formigamento, perda de força dos membros superiores e inferiores que acometiam os trabalhadores. O problema atingia trabalhadores de vários setores da empresa, cujas tarefas exigiam movimentos estereotipados, localizados e repetidos dos braços ou pernas e um ritmo de trabalho elevado. Os casos aumentaram quando houve uma reorganização da produção da empresa, com a introdução de células de produção, Kanban e polivalência dos operários, reorganização que foi apresentada aos trabalhadores sob o nome de "Escravos de Jó". O artigo termina com comentários sobre a intensificação do trabalho, no Brasil e no mundo, provocada pelas novas formas de organização da produção e a necessidade de levá-la em consideração nos estudos técnicos sobre a gênese das L.E.R.Tenosynovitis cases in a metal plant were studied using the Collective Work Analysis, involving 13 workers and their union. From the description of their work activities, during two group meetings, it became clear that tenosynovitis was a generic term used to describe several complaints (pains, loss of strenght of the the superior and inferior limbs, suffered by the workers. The problem afflicted workers of several sectors of the company, whose tasks required stereotyped, repetitive and localized movements of the arms or legs and a high work rate. The number of cases rised when the company reorganized its production, introducing productions cells, Kanban and multivalence of workers, reorganization presented to the workers under the name of "escravos de Jó". The paper ends with comments on the intensification of work, in

  5. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of hand and foot MRI for early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, Wouter P; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Mangnus, Lukas; Newsum, Elize C; Bloem, Johan L; Huizinga, Tom W J; le Cessie, Saskia; Reijnierse, Monique; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2017-08-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of MRI for early RA. In some RA patients, a classifiable diagnosis cannot be made at first presentation; these patients present with unclassified arthritis (UA). The use of MRI for early diagnosis of RA is recommended, yet the evidence for its reliability is limited. MRI of hand and foot was performed in 589 early arthritis patients included in the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (229 presented with RA, 159 with other arthritides and 201 with UA). Symptom-free controls provided a reference for defining an abnormal MRI. In preliminary investigations, MRI of patients who presented with RA was compared with MRI of symptom-free controls and of patients with other arthritides. Thereafter, the value of MRI in early RA diagnosis was determined in UA patients using the 1-year follow-up on fulfilling the 1987 RA criteria and start of disease-modifying drugs as outcomes. Preliminary investigations were promising. Of the UA patients, 14% developed RA and 37% started disease-modifying treatment. MRI-detected tenosynovitis was associated with RA development independent of other types of MRI-detected inflammation [odds ratio (OR) = 7.5, 95% CI: 2.4, 23] and also independent of age and other inflammatory measures (swollen joints, CRP) (OR = 4.2, 95% CI: 1.4, 12.9). Within UA patients, the negative predictive value of abnormal tenosynovitis was 95% (95% CI: 89%, 98%) and the positive predictive value 25% (95% CI: 17%, 35%). The performance was best in the subgroup of UA patients presenting with oligoarthritis (18% developed RA): the positive predictive value was 36% (95% CI: 23%, 52%), the negative predictive value was 98% (95% CI: 88%, 100%), the sensitivity was 93% (95% CI: 70%, 99%) and the specificity was 63% (95% CI: 51%, 74%). MRI contributes to the identification of UA patients who will develop RA, mostly in UA patients presenting with oligoarthritis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for

  6. Upper extremities musculoskeletal disorders: Prevalence and associated ergonomic factors in an electronic assembly factory

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    Somthus Pullopdissakul

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:To determine the magnitude, distribution and associated ergonomic factors of upper extremities musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSD among workers of electronic assembly in Thailand. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. 591 of 853 workers in an electronic and electrical appliance assembly factory in Bangkok, Thailand, participated in this study. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of demographic data and ergonomic factors was collected from October 2010 to January 2011. Clinical examination of each worker was performed by an occupational physician. The criteria for diagnosis of UEMSD came as a result of a consensus reached by a group of orthopedists. The associated factors were analyzed using a multiple logistic regression. Results: The point prevalence of clinically diagnosed UEMSD was as follows: radial styloid tenosynovitis - 13.03% (95% CI: 10.31-15.75, trigger finger - 9.48% (95% CI: 7.11-11.84, carpal tunnel syndrome - 8.12% (95% CI: 5.91-10.33, lateral epicondylitis - 3.38% (95% CI: 1.92-4.85, and medial epicondylitis - 1.69% (95% CI: 0.65-2.73, respectively. The adjusted odds ratio with statistical significance associated with UEMSD was as follows: high force of wrist - 1.78 (95% CI: 1.06-2.99, awkward posture of wrist - 2.37 (95% CI: 1.28-4.37 and contact stress at wrists - 1.75 (95% CI: 1.02-3.00 to develop radial styloid tenosynovitis. For trigger finger, the ratios were awkward posture of fingers - 2.09 (95% CI: 1.12-3.90 and contact stress on finger - 1.86 (95% CI: 1.04-3.34. For medial epicondylitis, it was an awkward posture of using elbows - 3.14 (95% CI: 1.10-8.95. However, this study did not find any associations between repetitive motion and any UEMSD. Conclusions: UEMSD are most commonly found in electronic assembly workers. The relevant parties should provide comprehensive ergonomic resolution for these workers.

  7. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the hip in systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report

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    Anders Hans-Joachim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease of unknown etiology mostly affecting the knee and foot. Until now an association with autoimmune diseases has not been reported. Case presentation The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made in a 15-year-old Caucasian girl based on otherwise unexplained fatigue, arthralgia, tenosynovitis, leukopenia, low platelets and the presence of antinuclear and deoxyribonucleic antibodies. At the age of 20 a renal biopsy revealed lupus nephritis class IV and she went into complete remission with mycophenolate mofetil and steroids. She was kept on mycophenolate mofetil for maintenance therapy. At the age of 24 she experienced a flare-up of lupus nephritis with nephrotic syndrome and new onset of pain in her right hip. Magnetic resonance imaging, arthroscopy and subtotal synovectomy identified pigmented villonodular synovitis as the underlying diagnosis. Although her systemic lupus erythematosus went into remission with another course of steroids and higher doses of mycophenolate mofetil, the pigmented villonodular synovitis persisted and she had to undergo open synovectomy to control her symptoms. Conclusion Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with many different musculoskeletal manifestations including synovitis and arthritis. Pigmented villonodular synovitis has not previously been reported in association with systemic lupus erythematosus, but as its etiology is still unknown, the present case raises the question about a causal relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus and pigmented villonodular synovitis.

  8. Shaggy Lame Fox Syndrome in Pribilof Island Arctic Foxes ( Alopex lagopus pribilofensis), Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraker, T R; White, P A

    2017-03-01

    A previously unrecognized condition is described in wild free-ranging Pribilof arctic foxes ( Alopex lagopus pribilofensis) from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, USA. This condition is called shaggy lame fox syndrome (SLFS) denoting the primary clinical signs first observed. Criteria used to suspect SLFS on gross examination included emaciation, failure to shed winter pelage and moderate to severe polyarthritis. Criteria used to confirm SLFS histologically included polyarthritis (characterized by lymphoplasmacytic synovitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, periosteal bony proliferation, and periarticular lymphoplasmacytic vasculitis) and systemic leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Other histological lesions often found included renal cortical infarcts, myocarditis with myocardial infarcts, lymphoplasmacytic meningitis, lymphoplasmacytic cuffing of meningeal and a few cerebral vessels, and cavitating infarcts of the brainstem and thalamus. The cause of SLFS is not known at this time; however, the gross and histological lesions suggest that the cause of SLFS may be a bacterial polyarthritis with a secondary immune-mediated vasculitis. These lesions are consistent with changes described with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in domestic dogs; E. rhusiopathiae was identified from the synovial membrane of a swollen stifle joint and the kidney from one fox using real-time polymerase chain reaction and with culture from a fox that had gross and histological lesions of SLFS. Therefore, E. rhusiopathiae is a possible etiological agent for SLFS.

  9. First Report of Psoriatic-Like Dermatitis and Arthritis in a 4-Year-Old Female Spayed Pug Mix

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    Stephanie A. Regan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis manifests as chronic dermatitis and arthritis (PsA in people. Psoriasis with concurrent PsA is characterized by erythematous, silvery, scaly plaques, especially on the extremities, and concurrent arthritis with enthesitis, tenosynovitis, and dactylitis. To date, no such disease has spontaneously occurred in domestic animals. This case report aims to describe the clinical, radiographic, and histologic appearance of a psoriasis-like dermatitis and psoriatic-like arthritis in a dog. A 4-year-old female spayed pug mix presented for the evaluation of chronic history of hyperkeratotic footpads and deforming arthritis. After ruling out other differential diagnoses and based on the similarity of clinical, radiographic, and histologic findings to human psoriasis and PsA, a tentative diagnosis of psoriasis-like disease was made. Treatment was begun to control pain (tramadol, gabapentin, and carprofen and psoriatic dermatitis (clobetasol propionate 0.05%, calcipotriene 0.005%, and urea 40% ointment twice daily. Dramatic positive response to treatment was achieved confirming the tentative diagnosis. This case may provide preliminary evidence for the existence of a psoriasis-like condition in dogs and may elucidate treatment options in otherwise refractory cases of chronic dermatitis and polyarthropathy in dogs.

  10. MRI of the hand and wrist joint of climbers. Imaging of lesions and overstrain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Hochholzer, T.; Keinath, C.

    1992-01-01

    The hands and wrists of 20 top-level rock climbers with sports injuries and overstress abnormalities were compared with the hands and wrists of 10 normal volunteers. They were all studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. The imaging protocol included spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences with 1- to 5-mm-thick contiguous slices in the axial, coronal and/or sagittal planes, depending on the location and nature of the suspected injury. Typical hand and wrist lesions depicted with MRI in climbers consisted of annular ligament tears, lesions of the flexor tendons, tenosynovitis, ganglion cysts, joint effusion and functional carpal tunnel syndrome. The MRI findings on these abnormalities were compared to normal findings and those with ultrasound and plain films. In addition, hypertrophic changes in the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones of top-level rock climbers were assessed morphometrically. MRI proved to be the superior imaging modality in the diagnosis of sports injuries and overstress abnormalities of the hand the wrist in rock-climbing athletes. (orig.) [de

  11. Evaluation and diagnosis of wrist pain: a case-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, Ramsey; Mirabelli, Mark H

    2013-04-15

    Patients with wrist pain commonly present with an acute injury or spontaneous onset of pain without a definite traumatic event. A fall onto an outstretched hand can lead to a scaphoid fracture, which is the most commonly fractured carpal bone. Conventional radiography alone can miss up to 30 percent of scaphoid fractures. Specialized views (e.g., posteroanterior in ulnar deviation, pronated oblique) and repeat radiography in 10 to 14 days can improve sensitivity for scaphoid fractures. If a suspected scaphoid fracture cannot be confirmed with plain radiography, a bone scan or magnetic resonance imaging can be used. Subacute or chronic wrist pain usually develops gradually with or without a prior traumatic event. In these cases, the differential diagnosis is wide and includes tendinopathy and nerve entrapment. Overuse of the muscles of the forearm and wrist may lead to tendinopathy. Radial pain involving mostly the first extensor compartment is commonly de Quervain tenosynovitis. The diagnosis is based on history and examination findings of a positive Finkelstein test and a negative grind test. Nerve entrapment at the wrist presents with pain and also with sensory and sometimes motor symptoms. In ulnar neuropathies of the wrist, the typical presentation is wrist discomfort with sensory changes in the fourth and fifth digits. Activities that involve repetitive or prolonged wrist extension, such as cycling, karate, and baseball (specifically catchers), may increase the risk of ulnar neuropathy. Electrodiagnostic tests identify the area of nerve entrapment and the extent of the pathology. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Family Physicians.

  12. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Rodgers, Mark; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years) underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body.

  13. Biceps tendinitis and subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, W C; McCluskey, G M

    2001-07-01

    Since the 17th century, the long head of the biceps tendon as a source of shoulder pain and its functional significance has been a source of debate. Although the term tendinitis is commonly used, overuse tendon injuries infrequently demonstrate inflammatory cells; instead, degenerative changes resulting from the failure of self-repair usually are found. Bicipital tendinitis or bicipital tenosynovitis is most often secondary to impingement beneath the coracoacromical arch. Primary bicipital tendinitis and tendinitis secondary to instability are possible, however. Through a careful history, physical examination, and appropriate imaging studies, the clinician can establish the diagnosis of disorders of the biceps tendon Arthroscopic evaluation greatly improves the diagnosis and treatment of biceps tendon and related shoulder pathology. Although the exact functional role of the biceps tendon remains incompletely defined, a growing body of evidence supports its role as a stabilizer of the glenohumeral joint. This stabilizing function should be incorporated into the treatment of biceps tendon disorders. Routine tenodesis has been replaced by a more individualized approach, taking into consideration physiologic age, activity level, expectations, and exact shoulder pathology present. New repair techniques are under development, and preservation of the biceps-labral complex is now preferred when possible.

  14. Aiming for a shorter rheumatoid arthritis MRI protocol: can contrast-enhanced MRI replace T2 for the detection of bone marrow oedema?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    To determine whether T1 post-gadolinium chelate images (T1Gd) can replace T2-weighted images (T2) for evaluating bone marrow oedema (BME), thereby allowing a shorter magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In 179 early arthritis patients and 43 advanced RA patients, wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints were examined on a 1.5-T extremity MRI system with a standard protocol (coronal T1, T2 fat-saturated and coronal and axial T1 fat-saturated after Gd). BME was scored according to OMERACT RAMRIS by two observers with and without T2 images available. Agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for semi-quantitative scores and test characteristics with T2 images as reference. Agreement between scores based on T2 and T1Gd images was excellent ICC (0.80-0.99). At bone level, sensitivity and specificity of BME on T1Gd compared to T2 were high for both patient groups and both readers (all ≥80 %). T1Gd and T2 images are equally suitable for evaluating BME. Because contrast is usually administered to assess (teno)synovitis, a short MRI protocol of T1 and T1Gd is sufficient in RA. (orig.)

  15. The Estrogen Receptor-β Expression in De Quervain’s Disease

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    Po-Chuan Shen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist (a.k.a. de Quervain’s disease is common but how estrogen is involved is still unknown. We previously reported that inflammation was involved in the pathogenesis of this ailment. In the present study, we extended our investigation of estrogen receptor (ER-β expression to determine whether estrogen is involved in the pathogenesis of de Quervain’s. Intraoperative retinaculum samples were collected from 16 patients with the ailment. Specimens were histologically graded by collagen structure and immunohistochemically evaluated by quantifying the expression of ER-β, interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 (inflammatory cytokines, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 (an inflammatory enzyme, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and Von Willebrand’s factor (vWF. De Quervain’s occurs primarily in women. The female:male ratio in our study was 7:1. We found that ER-β expression in the retinaculum was positively correlated with disease grade and patient age. Additionally, disease severity was associated with inflammatory factors—IL-1β and IL-6, COX-2, and VEGF and vWF in tenosynovial tissue. The greater the levels of ER-β expression, tissue inflammation, and angiogenesis are, the more severe de Quervain’s disease is. ER-β might be a useful target for novel de Quervain’s disease therapy.

  16. Optimal management of dactylitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis

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    Yamamoto T

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki YamamotoDepartment of Dermatology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, JapanAbstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthropathy associated with cutaneous psoriasis, which is currently classified as a seronegative spondyloarthropathy. The presence of cutaneous psoriasis is important for correct and early diagnosis of PsA, because the onset of cutaneous lesions usually precedes the appearance of joint manifestation. Thus, dermatologists are able to detect the condition at its inception. PsA has several unique characteristics such as enthesopathy, dactylitis, and abnormal bone remodeling. In particular, dactylitis occurs on the easily observed sites such as digits, and is thus a significant indicator of PsA. It is important to observe not only the fingers but also the toes, because dactylitis involves both digits of the hands and feet. Recently, new ideas regarding the involvement of the interleukin (IL-23/Th17 axis have emerged, and the dramatic effects of targeting therapies have highlighted the physiological roles of key cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-17A, and IL-23 in psoriasis. As recent insights are shedding light on the pathogenesis of PsA, understanding of the pathogenesis of dactylitis and enthesitis are also progressing. In this article, current views on the optimal management of dactylitis are discussed.Keywords: pathogenesis, therapy, enthesitis, tenosynovitis

  17. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: value of fat suppression pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, N.; Uetani, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kawahara, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Oda, J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To determine the usefulness of fat-suppressed gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design and patients. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) images were obtained and compared with other standard techniques in 38 wrists of 27 patients (22-77 years) with RA. Scoring based on the degree of synovial enhancement of each joint was developed and the total scores (J-score) were correlated with radiographic stage, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and symptomatic change in the follow-up study. Results. Synovial proliferations showed marked enhancement in all the wrists. In addition, contrast enhancement in the bone marrow and tenosynovium was seen in 36 and eight wrists respectively. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images demonstrated these abnormalities better than other techniques. The J-scores correlated well with values of CRP (P=0.0034), but not with radiographic stages and ESR. Conclusion. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted SE images can clearly demonstrate most of the essential lesions in RA including the proliferative synovium, bone erosion, bone marrow inflammatory change, and tenosynovitis. Scoring based on the extent of Gd-enhancement of synovium can be useful in the assessment of the inflammatory status. (orig.). With 8 figs

  18. Plantar tendons of the foot: MR imaging and US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T; Velez, Zoraida Restrepo; Blonder, David B; Ciavarra, Gina A; Adler, Ronald Steven

    2013-01-01

    Tendon disorders along the plantar aspect of the foot may lead to significant symptoms but are often clinically misdiagnosed. Familiarity with the normal anatomy of the plantar tendons and its appearance at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and ultrasonography (US) is essential for recognizing plantar tendon disorders. At MR imaging, the course of the plantar tendons is optimally visualized with dedicated imaging of the midfoot and forefoot. This imaging should include short-axis images obtained perpendicular to the long axis of the metatarsal shafts, which allows true cross-sectional evaluation of the plantar tendons. Normal plantar tendons appear as low-signal-intensity structures with all MR sequences. At US, accurate evaluation of the tendons requires that the ultrasound beam be perpendicular to the tendon. The normal tendon appears as a compact linear band of echogenic tissue that contains a fine, mixed hypoechoic and hyperechoic internal fibrillar pattern. Tendon injuries can be grouped into six major categories: tendinosis, peritendinosis, tenosynovitis, entrapment, rupture, and instability (subluxation or dislocation) and can be well assessed with both MR imaging and US. The radiologist plays an important role in the diagnosis of plantar tendon disorders, and recognizing their imaging appearances at MR imaging and US is essential.

  19. MRI of the hand and wrist joint of climbers. Imaging of lesions and overstrain injury. Die MRT von Hand und Handgelenk bei Sportkletterern. Darstellung von Verletzungen und Ueberlastungsfolgen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuck, A. (Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie); Hochholzer, T.; Keinath, C. (Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Sportverletzungen)

    1992-05-01

    The hands and wrists of 20 top-level rock climbers with sports injuries and overstress abnormalities were compared with the hands and wrists of 10 normal volunteers. They were all studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. The imaging protocol included spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences with 1- to 5-mm-thick contiguous slices in the axial, coronal and/or sagittal planes, depending on the location and nature of the suspected injury. Typical hand and wrist lesions depicted with MRI in climbers consisted of annular ligament tears, lesions of the flexor tendons, tenosynovitis, ganglion cysts, joint effusion and functional carpal tunnel syndrome. The MRI findings on these abnormalities were compared to normal findings and those with ultrasound and plain films. In addition, hypertrophic changes in the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones of top-level rock climbers were assessed morphometrically. MRI proved to be the superior imaging modality in the diagnosis of sports injuries and overstress abnormalities of the hand the wrist in rock-climbing athletes. (orig.).

  20. Sonographic evaluation of digital annular pulley tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E.; Bianchi, S.; Garcia, J.F.; Nebiolo, M.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the sonographic (US) appearance of digital annular pulley (DAP) tears in high-level rock climbers. Design and patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the US examinations of 16 high-level rock climbers with clinical signs of DAP lesions. MRI and surgical evaluation were performed in five and three patients respectively. The normal US and MRI appearances of DAP were evaluated in 40 and three normal fingers respectively. Results. Nine of 16 patients presented a DAP tear. In eight subjects (seven with complete tears involving the fourth finger and one the fifth finger), US diagnosis was based on the indirect sign of volar bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Injured pulleys were not appreciated by US. Tears concerned the A2 and A3 in six patients and the A3 and A4 in two patients. A2 pulley thickening and hypoechogenicity compatible with a partial tear was demonstrated in one patient. MRI and surgical data correlated well with the US findings. Four patients had tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons but no evidence of pulley disruption. US examinations of three patients were normal. In the healthy subjects US demonstrated DAP in 16 of 40 digits. Conclusion. US can diagnose DAP tears and correlates with the MRI and surgical data. Because of its low cost and non-invasiveness we suggest US as the first imaging modality in the evaluation of injuries of the digital pulley. (orig.)

  1. Painful ankle region in rheumatoid arthritis. Analysis of soft-tissue changes with ultrasonography and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Paimela, L. [Dept of Rheumatology, Helsinki City Hospital (Finland); Kreula, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Leirisalo-Repo, M. [Dept of Medicine, Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Taavitsainen, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-07-01

    Purpose: To establish the diagnostic usefulness of ultrasonography (US) and MR imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffering from prolonged pain in the ankle region, where plain radiography did not demonstrate any changes. Material and Methods: Seventeen patients were studied with 0.1 T MR imaging and with high-frequency US. Talocrural and subtalar joints (including talonavicular joints), and medial, lateral, and extensor tendons and their synovial sheaths were examined b MR and US. Results: Abnormal findings were found by MR imaging and US in altogether 76% of the patients, by MR alone in 53%, and by US alone in 59%. In 41% of the patients, lesions were demonstrated only by one method. Talocurural and subtalar joints were the most often affected sites (41% each), followed by the peroneus tendon (23%). In the joints, the abnormal findings were interpreted as synovitis; in the tendon areas, mostly as tenosynovitis. MR and US were highly significantly concordant (p<0.0001), but correlation with clinical features was poor. Conclusion: In patients with pain in the ankle region, US and MR imaging can contribute to the diagnosis and localization of the abnormality when the plain radiography is normal Easily available and inexpensive US can be recommended as the first imaging method after plain radiography. Some divergence seems to exist between US and MR, and in complicated cases both methods are recommended. (orig.).

  2. MRI features of posterior ankle impingement syndrome in ballet dancers: a review of 25 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peace, K.A.L. E-mail: kalpeace@hotmail.com; Hillier, J.C.; Hulme, A.; Healy, J.C

    2004-11-01

    AIM: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS) in classical ballet dancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of 25 MRI examinations of the ankle performed on 23 ballet dancers over a 26-month period. Images were examined for the presence of osseous and soft-tissue anatomical variants at the posterior ankle and imaging signs of PAIS. All patients presented with symptoms and signs suggestive of PAIS including posterior ankle pain, swelling and stiffness during plantar flexion. RESULTS: Anatomical variants predisposing to PAIS including as os trigonum and tuberosity arising from the superior calcaneum were clearly depicted. The most common imaging feature of PAIS in our series was high T2 signal posterior to the talocalcaneal joint indicating synovitis (n=25). Thickening of the posterior capsule (n=13) and tenosynovitis of flexor hallucis longus (n=17) were also common. An os trigonum was an infrequent finding (n=7). Bone marrow oedema, commonly in the posterior talus (n=10) or in a patchy distribution (n=10) was often noted. CONCLUSION: MRI is a useful diagnostic tool in PAIS, and in the present series, clearly demonstrates the anatomical variants and range of osseous and soft-tissue abnormalities associated with this condition. Prospective studies are needed to understand the significance and importance of individual MRI findings in producing the symptoms of PAIS.

  3. Comparison of Quantitative Cartilage T2 Measurements and Qualitative MR Imaging between Professional Ballet Dancers and Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Yi, Ji Sook; Han, Jong Kyu; Lee, Young Koo

    2015-07-01

    To compare qualitative magnetic resonance (MR) images and quantitative T2 measurements of the tibiotalar cartilage between ballerinas and healthy volunteers. Institutional review board approval for this study and informed consent (from all participants) were obtained. MR examinations were performed by using a 3-T MR imaging system with 21 professional female ballet dancers and 20 healthy female volunteers. Two musculoskeletal radiologists qualitatively measured tibiotalar cartilage T2 values in the anterior zones, middle zones, and posterior zones of cartilage. MR findings were also qualitatively analyzed in both groups. The tibial cartilage T2 values measured in the anterior and posterior zones and the talar cartilage T2 values measured in all three zones were significantly higher in the ballerina group than in the control group (P The posterior zones exhibited the highest T2 values among the three tibiotalar cartilage zones in both groups (P the presence of posterior soft-tissue edema (P = .001) and flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis (P The findings showed a trend toward increasing cartilage T2 values in ballerinas when compared with control subjects, indicating that quantitative T2 measurement may potentially be used as a noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of cartilage lesions in the tibiotalar joint.

  4. Posteromedial subtalar coalition: imaging appearances in three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, E.G.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To define the imaging appearances in three cases of posteromedial subtalar coalition.Design. Three patients who presented with hindfoot pain were found to have non-osseous coalition involving the posteromedial hindfoot. This entity is distinct from conventional middle facet coalition as the sustentaculum is uninvolved.Results. Plain radiographs, available in two cases, demonstrated subtle irregularity of the posterior facet. MRI (three cases) demonstrated a mixed bony and cartilaginous mass lying posterior to the sustentaculum. There was trabecular oedema within the mass and adjacent talus, and narrowing of the space between the middle and posterior facets. Prominence and dilatation of the posterior tibial veins with tenosynovitis of the adjacent tibialis posterior tendon was seen. CT demonstrated the bony mass but did not detect the adjacent bony oedema.Conclusion. Posteromedial subtalar coalition may present with hindfoot pain and stiffness. The presence of a pseudarthrosis posterior to a normal middle facet is characteristic. The abnormality can be difficult to detect on plain radiographs. (orig.)

  5. Bone scintigraphy compared to MRI and ultrasound in the early diagnosis of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrock, D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory arthritis is recognized specifically by bone erosions, caused by characteristic pannus tissue. In the finger joints dynamic low-Tesla MRI is nearly double but not completely sensitive in the detection of erosions than conventional radiography, sonography takes an intermediate position. Less specific signs of synovitis and tenosynovitis are shown with high sensitivity by both 3(2)-phase bone scintigraphy and ultrasound, MRI is less sensitive in this respect. However, standard situation of inflammation in bone scintigraphy - positive finding in early as well as late phase - is of surprisingly low sensitivity, any singular finding in the early or late phase has to be regarded as positive. Specificity of these singular findings is nevertheless sufficiently high, acute inflammatory joint changes and even erosions are also seen with MRI in obviously healthy persons. Only 2-phase bone scintigraphy is easily able to present a simultaneous survey of all joints of the body. For this reason 2-phase bone scintigraphy is most suitable for exclusion but also for primary diagnosis of disease, specification must be done afterwards by other imaging modalities or by laboratory findings. (orig.)

  6. Omitting histopathology in wrist ganglions. A risky proposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubairi, Akbar J.; Kumar, Santosh; Mohib, Yasir; Rashid, Rizwan H.; Noordin, Shahryar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify incidence and utility of histopathology in wrist ganglions. Methods: A retrospective study of 112 patients operated for wrist swellings between January 2009 and March 2014 at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, was conducted. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, history, location and associated symptoms, provisional diagnosis and operative details. Histopathology reports were reviewed to confirm the final diagnosis. Results: One hundred and twelve patients were included in the study (34 males and 78 females) with a mean age of 28 ± 12 years. Ninety-five percent of ganglia were dorsally located and 85% were solitary in nature. Histopathology reports confirmed 107 as ganglion cysts, whereas 3 had giant cell tumor of tendon sheath and 2 were reported to be tuberculous tenosynovitis. Conclusion: Although most of the time, the clinical diagnosis conforms to the final diagnosis, the possibility of an alternate diagnosis cannot be ignored (4% in this study). We suggest routine histopathological analysis so that such diagnoses are not missed. PMID:27464871

  7. The OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Scoring System: Updated Recommendations by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Peterfy, Charles G; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Glinatsi, Daniel; Eshed, Iris; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Lillegraven, Siri; Bøyesen, Pernille; Ejbjerg, Bo; Foltz, Violaine; Emery, Paul; Genant, Harry K; Conaghan, Philip G

    2017-11-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scoring system (RAMRIS), evaluating bone erosion, bone marrow edema/osteitis, and synovitis, was introduced in 2002, and is now the standard method of objectively quantifying inflammation and damage by MRI in RA trials. The objective of this paper was to identify subsequent advances and based on them, to provide updated recommendations for the RAMRIS. MRI studies relevant for RAMRIS and technical and scientific advances were analyzed by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group, which used these data to provide updated considerations on image acquisition, RAMRIS definitions, and scoring systems for the original and new RA pathologies. Further, a research agenda was outlined. Since 2002, longitudinal studies and clinical trials have documented RAMRIS variables to have face, construct, and criterion validity; high reliability and sensitivity to change; and the ability to discriminate between therapies. This has enabled RAMRIS to demonstrate inhibition of structural damage progression with fewer patients and shorter followup times than has been possible with conventional radiography. Technical improvements, including higher field strengths and improved pulse sequences, allow higher image resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio. These have facilitated development and validation of scoring methods of new pathologies: joint space narrowing and tenosynovitis. These have high reproducibility and moderate sensitivity to change, and can be added to RAMRIS. Combined scores of inflammation or joint damage may increase sensitivity to change and discriminative power. However, this requires further research. Updated 2016 RAMRIS recommendations and a research agenda were developed.

  8. Posteromedial subtalar coalition: imaging appearances in three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, E.G. [Dept. of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-01

    Objective. To define the imaging appearances in three cases of posteromedial subtalar coalition.Design. Three patients who presented with hindfoot pain were found to have non-osseous coalition involving the posteromedial hindfoot. This entity is distinct from conventional middle facet coalition as the sustentaculum is uninvolved.Results. Plain radiographs, available in two cases, demonstrated subtle irregularity of the posterior facet. MRI (three cases) demonstrated a mixed bony and cartilaginous mass lying posterior to the sustentaculum. There was trabecular oedema within the mass and adjacent talus, and narrowing of the space between the middle and posterior facets. Prominence and dilatation of the posterior tibial veins with tenosynovitis of the adjacent tibialis posterior tendon was seen. CT demonstrated the bony mass but did not detect the adjacent bony oedema.Conclusion. Posteromedial subtalar coalition may present with hindfoot pain and stiffness. The presence of a pseudarthrosis posterior to a normal middle facet is characteristic. The abnormality can be difficult to detect on plain radiographs. (orig.)

  9. MR Imaging in symptomatic osteochondromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Chun, Kyung Ah; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the MR findings of symptomatic osteochondromas. We evaluated 31 patients who between July, 1994 and May, 1997 underwent MR imaging for symptomatic osteochondroma. Fourteen were males and 17 were females, and their ages ranged from 8 to 49 (mean, 23) years. Using T1WI, T2WI and gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced T1WI, images were analysed according to signal intensity in the osseous component of the osteochondroma, thickness of the cartilage cap, and associated change in surrounding soft tissue. Clinical manifestation included a palpable mass or tendency to grow (n=22) and pain on movement (n=9). Complications were of three types : that which followed change in the osseous component of the tumor, associated change in surrounding soft tissue, and malignant transformation. In the osseous component, bone marrow edema or contusion was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), and in two (65%), fracture was observed. In surrounding soft tissue, muscle impingement was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), bursitis was in 7 cases (22.6 %), tenosynovitis in seven (22.6 %), and vascular compression in five (16.1 %). In three cases (9.7%), transformation to chondrosarcoma had occurred; two of these were derived from osteochondromatosis and one from a single osteochondroma. The thickness of the cartilage cap was as follow : 10 mm (n=3). In patients with symptomatic osteochondroma, MR imaging is useful for detecting both complications and malignant transformation. (author). 21 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  10. Flexor Hallucis Longus tendon rupture in RA-patients is associated with MTP 1 damage and pes planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buurke Jaap J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the prevalence of and relation between rupture or tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus (FHL tendon and range of motion, deformities and joint damage of the forefoot in RA patients with foot complaints. Methods Thirty RA patients with painful feet were analysed, their feet were examined clinically for the presence of pes planus and range of motion (ROM, radiographs were scored looking for the presence of forefoot damage, and ultrasound examination was performed, examining the presence of tenosyovitis or rupture of the FHL at the level of the medial malleolus. The correlation between the presence or absence of the FHL and ROM, forefoot damage and pes planus was calculated. Results In 11/60(18% of the feet, a rupture of the FHL was found. This was associated with a limited motion of the MTP1-joint, measured on the JAM (χ2 = 10.4, p = 0.034, a higher prevalence of pes planus (χ2 = 5.77, p = 0.016 and a higher prevalence of erosions proximal at the MTP-1 joint (χ2 = 12.3, p = 0.016, and joint space narrowing of the MTP1 joint (χ2 = 12.7, p = 0.013. Conclusion Rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon in RA-patients is associated with limited range of hallux motion, more erosions and joint space narrowing of the MTP-1-joint, as well as with pes planus.

  11. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: value of fat suppression pulse sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, N. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Uetani, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Kawahara, Y. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Sakamoto 1-7-1, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Matsumoto, T. [Department of Orthopedics, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan); Oda, J. [Department of Orthopedics, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Objective. To determine the usefulness of fat-suppressed gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging of the wrist in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design and patients. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) images were obtained and compared with other standard techniques in 38 wrists of 27 patients (22-77 years) with RA. Scoring based on the degree of synovial enhancement of each joint was developed and the total scores (J-score) were correlated with radiographic stage, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and symptomatic change in the follow-up study. Results. Synovial proliferations showed marked enhancement in all the wrists. In addition, contrast enhancement in the bone marrow and tenosynovium was seen in 36 and eight wrists respectively. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images demonstrated these abnormalities better than other techniques. The J-scores correlated well with values of CRP (P=0.0034), but not with radiographic stages and ESR. Conclusion. Fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1-weighted SE images can clearly demonstrate most of the essential lesions in RA including the proliferative synovium, bone erosion, bone marrow inflammatory change, and tenosynovitis. Scoring based on the extent of Gd-enhancement of synovium can be useful in the assessment of the inflammatory status. (orig.). With 8 figs.

  12. THE PATHOLOGIC EFFECTS OF STREPTOCOCCI FROM CASES OF POLIOMYELITIS AND OTHER SOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Carroll G.

    1917-01-01

    Streptococci cultivated from the tonsils of thirty-two cases of poliomyelitis were used to inoculate various laboratory animals. In no case was a condition induced resembling poliomyelitis clinically or pathologically in guinea pigs, dogs, cats, rabbits, or monkeys. On the other hand, a considerable percentage of the rabbits and a smaller percentage of some of the other animals developed lesions due to streptococci. These lesions consisted of meningitis, meningo-encephalitis, abscess of the brain, arthritis, tenosynovitis, myositis, abscess of the kidney, endocarditis, pericarditis, and neuritis. No distinction in the character or frequency of the lesions could be determined between the streptococci derived from poliomyelitic patients and from other sources. Streptococci isolated from the poliomyelitic brain and spinal cord of monkeys which succumbed to inoculation with the filtered virus failed to induce in monkeys any paralysis or the characteristic histological changes of poliomyelitis. These streptococci are regarded as secondary bacterial invaders of the nervous organs. Monkeys which have recovered from infection with streptococci derived from cases of poliomyelitis are not protected from infection with the filtered virus, and their blood does not neutralize the filtered virus in vitro. We have failed to detect any etiologic or pathologic relationship between streptococci and epidemic poliomyelitis in man or true experimental poliomyelitis in the monkey. PMID:19868109

  13. A Case of Spondyloarthritis in Patient Affected by Unicentric Castleman’s Disease Effectively Managed with Surgery Resection and Tocilizumab Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Filippini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for rheumatologic manifestations (migrant arthritis and tenosynovitis, without psoriasis or family history of psoriasis, gastroenteric manifestations, or recent genitourinary infections. The instrumental and laboratory tests have suggested a diagnosis of undifferentiated seronegative HLA-B27-positive spondyloarthritis with predominantly peripheral involvement. The symptoms were very severe and resistant to anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids. She had a history of hyaline-vascular unicentric Castleman’s disease (HBV, HIV, and HHV-8 negative treated with surgery resection. After a first pharmacological attempt with sulfasalazine (suspended for urticarial rash, we managed the patient with monotherapy tocilizumab 8 mg/kg, with full response of rheumatologic manifestations. The efficacy of tocilizumab was confirmed even after a follow-up of three years. Our experience seems to describe a new late-onset autoimmune disease (only 21 cases described in literature potentially related to Castleman’s disease. The patient experienced marked improvement from IL-6-based therapy (tocilizumab.

  14. Evaluation of the conservative treatment of Trigger finger by local instillation of corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muris Pecar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trigger Finger (tenosynovitis stenosans is a specific, named disease from a group of repetitive strain injury (RSI diseases, caused by inflammation which results in difficulties during muscle contraction and weakened and painful tendon movement. It is common in the outpatient physical medicine and rehabilitation practice. The aim of our study was to evaluate the success of conservative treatment of Trigger Finger by local instillation of corticosteroids.Methods: The study was designed as an observational and open analysis of the results of conservative treatment of 45 patients. We used precise instillation of steroid anti-inflammatory antirheumatic drugs in the area of patho-anatomic, microtraumatic injuries of tendon and its sheath. Patients were evaluated before and after the treatment with 0 to 5 evaluation score scale. The data were analyzed using X2 test.Results: Most of the patients had evaluation score of 2, 3 and 4, before the treatment. After the treatment 10 (29% patients had achieved score 4 and 35 (71% patients had achieved score 5. All of the patients with score 5 had excellent working ability with full working capacity. Other patients had well-preserved working ability, which improved to excellent in maximum of 7 days.Conclusions: Conservative treatment of Trigger finger shows good therapeutic effects and taking into account the benefits, convenience and generally lower cost of conservative treatment for the patient, should be considered as an effective alternative to surgical treatment.

  15. Sonographic evaluation of digital annular pulley tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E. [Istituto di Radiologia, Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Bianchi, S.; Garcia, J.F. [Dept. de Radiologie, Hopital Cantonal Universitaire de Geneve (Switzerland); Nebiolo, M. [Reparto Pronto Soccorso Medico, Pietra Ligure (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Objective. To evaluate the sonographic (US) appearance of digital annular pulley (DAP) tears in high-level rock climbers. Design and patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the US examinations of 16 high-level rock climbers with clinical signs of DAP lesions. MRI and surgical evaluation were performed in five and three patients respectively. The normal US and MRI appearances of DAP were evaluated in 40 and three normal fingers respectively. Results. Nine of 16 patients presented a DAP tear. In eight subjects (seven with complete tears involving the fourth finger and one the fifth finger), US diagnosis was based on the indirect sign of volar bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Injured pulleys were not appreciated by US. Tears concerned the A2 and A3 in six patients and the A3 and A4 in two patients. A2 pulley thickening and hypoechogenicity compatible with a partial tear was demonstrated in one patient. MRI and surgical data correlated well with the US findings. Four patients had tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons but no evidence of pulley disruption. US examinations of three patients were normal. In the healthy subjects US demonstrated DAP in 16 of 40 digits. Conclusion. US can diagnose DAP tears and correlates with the MRI and surgical data. Because of its low cost and non-invasiveness we suggest US as the first imaging modality in the evaluation of injuries of the digital pulley. (orig.)

  16. Conventional X-ray examination and computed tomography in inflammatory rheumatic diseases; Roentgendiagnostik und Computertomographie bei entzuendlich-rheumatischen Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingg, G. [Rheumazentrum Bad Kreuznach (Germany). Zentrales Roentgeninstitut

    1996-08-01

    Plain-film radiography is an important and basic element in the assessment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Its various uses include assessment of inflammatory osseous destruction and the activity of inflammatory changes. Furthermore, the inflammatory collateral phenomena can indicate an acute clinical phase, and the articular soft tissue swelling and tenosynovitis are shown directly and indirectly very clearly. On the other hand, high-resolution computed tomography is very capable of showing cortical structures of bone complementary to MR. In some special clinical questions and anatomical regions, especially the axial skeleton, it delivers information of high specifity, partly for definitive diagnosis and partly for planning surgical procedures. The assessment of changes in the sacroiliac joints, sternoclavicular joints and craniocervical junction are domains of computed tomography. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das konventionelle Roentgenbild muss auch heute noch bei klinischer Frage nach entzuendlich-rheumatischer Erkrankung als Basisuntersuchung angesehen werden. Sein Informationspotential umfasst nicht nur knoecherne entzuendliche Destruktionen, sondern es laesst auch deren derzeitige Aktivitaet beurteilen. Weiterhin vermag das Roentgenbild ueber die Kollateralphaenomene auf eine klinische Schubsituation hinzuweisen und die entzuendliche Volumenvermehrung der Gelenke und Sehnenscheiden direkt und indirekt darzustellen. Darueber hinaus bietet die hochaufloesende Computertomographie, insbesondere durch die detaillierte Darstellung kortikaler knoecherner Strukturen - komplementaer zur MR -, bei einigen speziellen Fragestellungen, insbesondere am Stammskelett und an einzelnen grossen Gelenken, hochspezifische Informationen, teils zur definitiven Diagnosestellung, teils auch fuer die Operationsplanung. Dies gilt u.a. fuer die Kreuzdarmbeingelenke, die Sternoklavikulargelenke und die obere HWS. (orig.)

  17. Essential hand surgery procedures for mastery by graduating plastic surgery residents: a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Shelley S; Fischer, Lauren H; Lee, Gordon K; Friedrich, Jeffrey B; Hentz, Vincent R

    2013-12-01

    This study was designed to establish the essential hand surgery procedures that should be mastered by graduating plastic surgery residents. This framework can then be used as a guideline for developing Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill to teach technical skills in hand surgery. Ten expert hand surgeons were surveyed regarding the essential hand surgery procedures that should be mastered by graduating plastic surgery residents. The top 10 procedures from this survey were then used to survey all 89 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved plastic surgery program directors. There was a 69 percent response rate to the program director survey (n = 61). The top nine hand surgery procedures included open carpal tunnel release, open A1 pulley release, digital nerve repair with microscope, closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of metacarpal fracture, excision of dorsal or volar ganglion, zone II flexor tendon repair with multistrand technique, incision and drainage of the flexor tendon sheath for flexor tenosynovitis, flexor tendon sheath steroid injection, and open cubital tunnel release. Surgical educators need to develop objective methods to teach and document technical skill. The Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill is a valid method for accomplishing this task. There has been no consensus regarding which hand surgery procedures should be mastered by graduating plastic surgery residents. The authors have identified nine procedures that are overwhelmingly supported by plastic surgery program directors. These nine procedures can be used as a guideline for developing Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill to teach and document technical skills in hand surgery.

  18. Os trigonum syndrome: A retrospective and comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Taşdemir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the os trigonum syndrome by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.Materials and methods: A total of 76 ankle MRI images were evaluated, retrospectively. All MRI examinations were done in supine position with the injured foot in neutral position and then in forced plantar flexion.Results: Os trigonum syndrome was seen in 16/76 cases. Four of 16 os trigonum syndrome patients are female. The average age of this 16 patients who were defined as os trigonum syndrome by MRI was 34.81±14.16 years. Twelve of 16 os trigonum syndrome was seen in right ankle. Disruption of the cartilaginous synchondrosis between the accessory bone and the talus was observed in 12 patients. Tenosynovitis of the flexor halluces longus was associated in 7 patients. Subcutan edema, surrounding the os trigonum was detected in 11 patients.Conclusion: In patients with ostrigonum syndrome MR imaging allows complete diagnosis.

  19. Painful ankle region in rheumatoid arthritis. Analysis of soft-tissue changes with ultrasonography and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtinen, A.; Paimela, L.; Kreula, J.; Leirisalo-Repo, M.; Taavitsainen, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the diagnostic usefulness of ultrasonography (US) and MR imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffering from prolonged pain in the ankle region, where plain radiography did not demonstrate any changes. Material and Methods: Seventeen patients were studied with 0.1 T MR imaging and with high-frequency US. Talocrural and subtalar joints (including talonavicular joints), and medial, lateral, and extensor tendons and their synovial sheaths were examined b MR and US. Results: Abnormal findings were found by MR imaging and US in altogether 76% of the patients, by MR alone in 53%, and by US alone in 59%. In 41% of the patients, lesions were demonstrated only by one method. Talocurural and subtalar joints were the most often affected sites (41% each), followed by the peroneus tendon (23%). In the joints, the abnormal findings were interpreted as synovitis; in the tendon areas, mostly as tenosynovitis. MR and US were highly significantly concordant (p<0.0001), but correlation with clinical features was poor. Conclusion: In patients with pain in the ankle region, US and MR imaging can contribute to the diagnosis and localization of the abnormality when the plain radiography is normal Easily available and inexpensive US can be recommended as the first imaging method after plain radiography. Some divergence seems to exist between US and MR, and in complicated cases both methods are recommended. (orig.)

  20. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part I: Infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R.; Steinbach, Lynne S.

    2004-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of abnormalities in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although not as common as complications involving other organ systems, such as the pulmonary and the central nervous systems, HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders are sometimes the initial presentation of the viral illness. Knowledge of the existence and the characteristic appearance of the conditions affecting bone, joint, and muscle in HIV-infected patients is valuable to radiologists for diagnosis and to clinicians for detection and appropriate treatment. We reviewed recent literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of the HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders, and present radiologic examples from our own collection. This article is divided into two parts. In the first part we review the infectious musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV illness and AIDS, including cellulitis, abscesses, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacillary angiomatosis. We also present a comprehensive spectrum of mycobacterial infections, consisting of tuberculous spondylitis and spondylodiskitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and tenosynovitis, as well as infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Part II of this review will concentrate on non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatic disorders and neoplasms. (orig.)

  1. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part I: Infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Rt. 140, 101 The City Drive ZC 5005, CA 92868-3298, Orange (United States); Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R. [College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of abnormalities in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although not as common as complications involving other organ systems, such as the pulmonary and the central nervous systems, HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders are sometimes the initial presentation of the viral illness. Knowledge of the existence and the characteristic appearance of the conditions affecting bone, joint, and muscle in HIV-infected patients is valuable to radiologists for diagnosis and to clinicians for detection and appropriate treatment. We reviewed recent literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of the HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders, and present radiologic examples from our own collection. This article is divided into two parts. In the first part we review the infectious musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV illness and AIDS, including cellulitis, abscesses, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacillary angiomatosis. We also present a comprehensive spectrum of mycobacterial infections, consisting of tuberculous spondylitis and spondylodiskitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and tenosynovitis, as well as infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Part II of this review will concentrate on non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatic disorders and neoplasms. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of a PCR multiplex for detection and differentiation of Mycoplasma synoviae, M. gallisepticum, and M. gallisepticum strain F-vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Mettifogo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS are the mycoplasma infections of most concern for commercial poultry industry. MG infection is commonly designated as chronic respiratory disease (CRD of chickens and infections sinusitis of turkeys. MS causes sub clinical upper respiratory infection and tenosynovitis or bursitis in chickens and turkeys. The multiplex PCR was standardized to detect simultaneously the MS, MG field strains and MG F-vaccine strain specific. The generic PCR for detection of any species of Mollicutes Class was performed and compared to the multiplex PCR and to PCR using species-specific primers. A total of 129 avian tracheal swabs were collected from broiler-breeders, layer hens and broilers in seven different farms and were examined by multiplex PCR methods. The system (multiplex PCR demonstrated to be very rapid, sensitive, and specific. Therefore, the results showed a high prevalence of MS in the flocks examined (27.9%, and indicate that the MS is a recurrent pathogen in Brazilian commercial poultry flocks.

  3. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  4. Bone scintigraphy compared to MRI and ultrasound in the early diagnosis of arthritis; Skelettszintigraphie im Vergleich mit MRT und Sonographie beim Fruehnachweis der Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrock, D. [Klinikum Chemnitz gGmbH, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Chronic inflammatory arthritis is recognized specifically by bone erosions, caused by characteristic pannus tissue. In the finger joints dynamic low-Tesla MRI is nearly double but not completely sensitive in the detection of erosions than conventional radiography, sonography takes an intermediate position. Less specific signs of synovitis and tenosynovitis are shown with high sensitivity by both 3(2)-phase bone scintigraphy and ultrasound, MRI is less sensitive in this respect. However, standard situation of inflammation in bone scintigraphy - positive finding in early as well as late phase - is of surprisingly low sensitivity, any singular finding in the early or late phase has to be regarded as positive. Specificity of these singular findings is nevertheless sufficiently high, acute inflammatory joint changes and even erosions are also seen with MRI in obviously healthy persons. Only 2-phase bone scintigraphy is easily able to present a simultaneous survey of all joints of the body. For this reason 2-phase bone scintigraphy is most suitable for exclusion but also for primary diagnosis of disease, specification must be done afterwards by other imaging modalities or by laboratory findings. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot involvement in patients with spondyloarthritides: Comparison of low-field and high-field strength units

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    Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E. [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Feist, Eugen [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Minden, Kirsten [Helios Clinics, 2nd Children' s Hospital Berlin-Buch, Rheumatology Unit, Berlin (Germany); German Rheumatology Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Schink, Tania [Department of Medical Biometry, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hermann, Kay-Geert A. [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: kgh@charite.de

    2008-01-15

    Objective: To compare MRI evaluation of a painful hindfoot of patients with spondyloarthritides (SpA) on low-field (0.2 T) versus high-field (1.5 T) MRI. Materials and methods: Patients with SpA and hindfoot pain were randomly referred to either high-field or low-field MRI. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated (male/female: 17:10; mean age: 39 {+-} 1.4 years). Fifteen patients were examined by low-field and 12 by high-field MRI. Two patients (evaluated by high-field MRI) were excluded. Images were separately read by two radiologists who later reached a consensus. In each patient the prevalence of erosions, fluid, synovitis or bone marrow edema of the hindfoot joints, tendinosis or tenosynovitis of tendons, enthesitis of the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and retrocalcaneal bursitis were recorded. Clinical and demographic parameters were comparable between both groups. Results: MRI evaluation of joints and tendons of the hindfoot revealed no significant differences in patients with SpA groups for all parameters. Analyzing all joints or tendons together, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Low-field and high-field MRI provide comparable information for evaluation of inflammatory hindfoot involvement. Thus, low-field MRI can be considered as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of hindfoot abnormalities in SpA patients.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot involvement in patients with spondyloarthritides: Comparison of low-field and high-field strength units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E.; Feist, Eugen; Minden, Kirsten; Schink, Tania; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare MRI evaluation of a painful hindfoot of patients with spondyloarthritides (SpA) on low-field (0.2 T) versus high-field (1.5 T) MRI. Materials and methods: Patients with SpA and hindfoot pain were randomly referred to either high-field or low-field MRI. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated (male/female: 17:10; mean age: 39 ± 1.4 years). Fifteen patients were examined by low-field and 12 by high-field MRI. Two patients (evaluated by high-field MRI) were excluded. Images were separately read by two radiologists who later reached a consensus. In each patient the prevalence of erosions, fluid, synovitis or bone marrow edema of the hindfoot joints, tendinosis or tenosynovitis of tendons, enthesitis of the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and retrocalcaneal bursitis were recorded. Clinical and demographic parameters were comparable between both groups. Results: MRI evaluation of joints and tendons of the hindfoot revealed no significant differences in patients with SpA groups for all parameters. Analyzing all joints or tendons together, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Low-field and high-field MRI provide comparable information for evaluation of inflammatory hindfoot involvement. Thus, low-field MRI can be considered as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of hindfoot abnormalities in SpA patients

  7. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

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    Erdem, C. Zuhal [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)], E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Tekin, Nilgun Solak [Department of Dermatology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Sarikaya, Selda [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot.

  8. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal; Tekin, Nilgun Solak; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot

  9. Leprae reaction resembling rheumatologic disease as presenting feature of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharuddin, Hazlyna; Taib, Tarita; Zain, Mollyza Mohd; Ch'ng, Shereen

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by Mycobacterium leprae with predominant involvement of skin and nerves. We present a 70-year-old man with leprosy whose initial presentation resembled rheumatologic disease, due to leprae reaction. He presented with an 8-week history of worsening neuropathic pain in the right forearm, associated with necrotic skin lesions on his fingers that had ulcerated. Physical examination revealed two tender necrotic ulcers at the tip of the right middle finger and the dorsal aspect of the left middle finger. The patient had right wrist tenosynovitis and right elbow bursitis. Apart from raised inflammatory markers, the investigations for infection, connective tissue disease, vasculitis, thromboembolic disease and malignancy were negative. During the fourth week of hospitalization, we noticed a 2-cm hypoesthetic indurated plaque on the right inner arm. Further examination revealed thickened bilateral ulnar, radial and popliteal nerves. A slit skin smear was negative. Two skin biopsies and a biopsy of the olecranon bursa revealed granulomatous inflammation. He was diagnosed with paucibacillary leprosy with neuritis. He responded well to multidrug therapy and prednisolone; his symptoms resolved over a few weeks. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing a case of leprosy with atypical presentation in a non-endemic country. © 2016 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Lupus Flare: An Uncommon Presentation of Disseminated Gonorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uyen To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gonorrhea is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the US with 700,000 annual cases. Although most cases of gonorrhea are localized, approximately 0.5–3% become disseminated. Here we discuss a rare case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE who developed septic shock from disseminated gonorrhea infection (DGI. Our patient is a 24-year-old woman with SLE, mixed connective tissue disease with cutaneous vasculitis, and lupus nephritis who presented with several weeks of malaise and generalized body aches associated with a diffuse rash along her fingers, palms, and trunk. Infectious workup was unrevealing with the exception of a positive gonorrhea test obtained from a cervical swab. Given her symptoms of tenosynovitis, the appearance of her skin lesions, and her positive gonorrhea test, she was diagnosed with septic shock secondary to DGI. With antibiotic treatment, the patient reported a dramatic improvement of the pain in her swollen joints and her rash receded. Patients diagnosed with SLE carry an increased risk of gonorrhea regardless of whether or not they are being treated for their SLE. Although it is well-documented that SLE is associated with severe DGI, few describe it resulting in overt septic shock.

  11. Carpometacarpal subchondral cysts due to repetitive movements in shoemaker: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Stefano; Candura, Stefano M; Lanfranco, Andrea; Mennoia, N Valerio

    2011-12-01

    Subchondral carpometacarpal cysts are classic and almost pathognomonic lesions found in workers using vibrating instruments over prolonged periods of time. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman who worked for 30 years sewing shoe uppers, a task which required grasping firmly a pear-shaped handle awl and pushing it through the leather upper and the sole of the shoe, with combined flexion and supination movement of the wrist. After approximately 20 years of working, the patient noted gradual onset of paresthesias in the dominant (right) hand, with increasing difficulty in grasping the awl. Subsequent diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome was confirmed by electrophysiologic testing and its surgical release was performed. Nevertheless, hand pain, paresthesias and weakness persisted. Ultrasound of the snuffbox tendons excluded DeQuervain tenosynovitis. Radiographic imaging of the symptomatic hand showed carpometacarpal subchondral cystic formations. In addition to demonstrating the usefulness of radiographic imaging in patients with persistent hand pain post-carpal release, this case is important in illustrating that repetitive movements with high pressure over the palmar carpal area may cause bone cysts, even if the subjects do not use vibrating tools.

  12. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

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    Jorge Pablo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion.

  13. Ultrasound Guidance in Performing a Tendoscopic Surgery to Treat Posterior Tibial Tendinitis: A Useful Tool?

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    Akinobu Nishimura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old man with a pronation-external rotation type of fracture was surgically treated using a fibular plate. Five years later, he underwent resection of bone hyperplasia because of the ankle pain and limitation of range of motion. Thereafter, the left ankle became intermittently painful, which persisted for about one year. He presented at the age of 43 with persistent ankle pain. Physical and image analysis findings indicated a diagnosis of posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis, which we surgically treated using tendoscopy. Endoscopic findings showed tenosynovitis and fibrillation on the tendon surface. We cleaned and removed the synovium surrounding the tendon and deepened the posterior tibial tendon groove to allow sufficient space for the posterior tibial tendon. Full weight-bearing ambulation was permitted one day after surgery and he returned to his occupation in the construction industry six weeks after surgery. The medial aspect of the ankle was free of pain and symptoms at a review two years after surgery. Although tendoscopic surgery for stage 1 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction has been reported, tendoscopic surgery to treat posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis has not. Our experience with this patient showed that tendoscopic surgery is useful not only for stage 1 posterior tibial dysfunction, but also for posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis.

  14. Shock-absorbing insoles reduce the incidence of lower limb overuse injuries sustained during Royal Marine training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Carol; Reece, Allyson; Roiz de Sa, Dan

    2013-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the incidence of lower limb overuse injuries (LLOIs) sustained during Royal Marine training could be reduced by issuing the recruits with shock-absorbing insoles (SAIs) to wear in their military boots. This was a retrospective longitudinal trial conducted in two phases. Injury data from 1,416 recruits issued with standard Saran insoles and 1,338 recruits issued with SAI were compared. The recruits in the two groups were of similar height, body mass, and aerobic fitness and followed the same training course. The incidence of LLOI sustained by the recruits was lower (p tibial periostitis, tenosynovitis of foot, achilles tendonopathy, other tendonopathy and anterior knee pain were lower (p Tibial stress fracture incidence was lower (p < 0.05) in the SAI Group but metatarsal and femoral stress fracture incidences were the same for the two insole groups. Thus, issuing SAIs to military recruits undertaking a sustained, arduous physical training program with a high incidence of LLOI would provide a beneficial reduction in the incidence of LLOI. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. Risks of musculoskeletal disorders among betel quid preparers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jer-Hao; Wu, Jyun-De; Chen, Chih-Yong; Sumd, Shih-Bin; Yin, Hsin-I; Hsu, Der-Jen

    2014-04-01

    Betel quid chewing is common in Taiwan. The work of betel quid preparers is characterized by long hours of static work, awkward working posture and highly repetitive hand/wrist motion. However, the musculoskeletal health of betel quid preparers receives very little attention. The Chinese version of the Standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was administered, and electrogoniometers and electromyography were used in this cross-sectional study to characterize the hand/wrist motion of the subjects. Physical examinations on the thumbs and wrists of the subjects were conducted by means of Phalen's test and Finkelstein's test, respectively. Among the 225 participants, more than 95% attributed their musculoskeletal complaints to their work, and shoulder, neck, hand/wrist, and lower back discomfort were most frequently reported. More than 70% of the preparers did not seek medical treatment for their musculoskeletal problems. Based on the physical examination, 24% of the participants had suspected symptom of either carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) or DeQuervain's tenosynovitis. The instrumental measurements indicated that betel quid preparation is characterized by extreme angle ranges and moderate repetition of wrist motion as well as low forceful exertion. This study concludes that betel quid preparers are a high risk group of developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Future studies by electrogoniometers and detailed physical examination on betel quid preparers are needed to determine the predisposing factors for CTS. Some intervention measures to prevent MSDs and to lessen psychological stress for this group of workers are strongly suggested. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography delineates ankle symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Yukihiro; Tamura, Maasa; Kirino, Yohei; Sugiyama, Yumiko; Tsuchida, Naomi; Kunishita, Yosuke; Kishimoto, Daiga; Kamiyama, Reikou; Miura, Yasushi; Minegishi, Kaoru; Yoshimi, Ryusuke; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    To clarify the use of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) of ankle joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Consecutive RA patients with or without ankle symptoms participated in the study. The US, clinical examination (CE), and patients' visual analog scale for pain (pVAS) for ankles were assessed. Prevalence of tibiotalar joint synovitis and tenosynovitis were assessed by grayscale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) US using a semi-quantitative grading (0-3). The positive US and CE findings were defined as GS score ≥2 and/or PD score ≥1, and joint swelling and/or tenderness, respectively. Multivariate analysis with the generalized linear mixed model was performed by assigning ankle pVAS as a dependent variable. Among a total of 120 ankles from 60 RA patients, positive ankle US findings were found in 21 (35.0%) patients. The concordance rate of CE and US was moderate (kappa 0.57). Of the 88 CE negative ankles, US detected positive findings in 9 (10.2%) joints. Multivariate analysis revealed that ankle US, clinical disease activity index, and foot Health Assessment Questionnaire, but not CE, was independently associated with ankle pVAS. US examination is useful to illustrate RA ankle involvement, especially for patients who complain ankle pain but lack CE findings.

  17. Detection of soft tissue pathology on the blood pool phase of bone scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondo, A.J.; Turner, H.A.; Kitchener, M.I.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: It is important to optimize information obtained from isotope bone scanning in musculoskeletal imaging. Although important at all times, it is especially imperative in the current climate of health services rationalization, capping of imaging expenditure and the promotion of newer modalities that are increasingly versatile and sensitive for imaging the musculoskeletal system. Careful attention must be paid to the blood flow and blood pool images, to visualize soft tissue as well as bony pathology. A series of cases and images will be presented that demonstrated blood pool pathology that was not appreciated on delayed imaging, or where reliance only on the delayed images would have led to an incorrect diagnosis. These include the detection of tendonitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, muscle tears and soft tissue neoplasms, including neuromas. In cases where the bone scan cannot provide a definitive diagnosis, it will at least direct the referring clinician to the most appropriate confirmatory diagnostic imaging modality, thus reinforcing the value that isotope imaging provides in musculoskeletal medicine

  18. Anomalous bilateral contribution of extensor pollicis longus and muscle fusion of the first compartment of the wrist

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    Rodrigo César Rosa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the muscles of the first dorsal compartments of the wrist is clinically relevant to De Quervain's tenosynovitis and to reconstructive surgeries. In the literature, there are many reports of the presence of multiple insertion tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, but few reports describe occurrences of fusion and muscle contributions. This case report describes an anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus. This anomalous contribution was found through a slender auxiliary tendon that crossed laterally under the extensor retinaculum, entered the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and merged with the tendon of the extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In the same cadaver in which this contribution was present, there was atypical muscle fusion of the abductor pollicis longus muscle and extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In conclusion, anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus muscle and atypical muscle fusion, concomitant with a variant insertion pattern, are the highlight of this case report. Furthermore, it is concluded that additional tendons may be effectively used in reconstructive surgeries, but that there is a need for knowledge of the possible numerical and positional variations of these tendons, with a view to making more effective surgical plans.

  19. Lipofibromatous Hamartoma of the Plantar Nerve An Extremely Rare Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Murat; Hacısalihoglu, Payam

    2018-03-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma (LFH) is a rare, benign, tumor-like soft-tissue lesion that affects the peripheral nerves and forms a palpable neurogenic mass. Lipofibromatous hamartoma is associated with pain and sensory and/or motor deficits in the area of innervation of the affected nerve. This report describes a rare case of LFH of the plantar nerve. A 48-year-old woman presented to our outpatient orthopedic clinic with pain and a burning sensation on her left foot. The patient had a history of Morton's neuroma and had undergone a tarsal tunnel operation 2 years earlier at another center. None of her symptoms was alleviated by two previous operations. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast revealed tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon and signal changes at deep tissue planes of the foot at the levels of the second and third toes, on the dorsal site and subcutaneous soft-tissue planes, suggesting edema and Morton's neuroma. The lesion was excised under spinal anesthesia, and histopathologic examination of the specimen revealed a diagnosis of LFH. The patient was discharged without any symptoms and her foot was normal at 8-month outpatient follow-up, with no indications of postoperative complications and/or recurrence.

  20. Aiming for a shorter rheumatoid arthritis MRI protocol: can contrast-enhanced MRI replace T2 for the detection of bone marrow oedema?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique; Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether T1 post-gadolinium chelate images (T1Gd) can replace T2-weighted images (T2) for evaluating bone marrow oedema (BME), thereby allowing a shorter magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In 179 early arthritis patients and 43 advanced RA patients, wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints were examined on a 1.5-T extremity MRI system with a standard protocol (coronal T1, T2 fat-saturated and coronal and axial T1 fat-saturated after Gd). BME was scored according to OMERACT RAMRIS by two observers with and without T2 images available. Agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for semi-quantitative scores and test characteristics with T2 images as reference. Agreement between scores based on T2 and T1Gd images was excellent ICC (0.80-0.99). At bone level, sensitivity and specificity of BME on T1Gd compared to T2 were high for both patient groups and both readers (all ≥80 %). T1Gd and T2 images are equally suitable for evaluating BME. Because contrast is usually administered to assess (teno)synovitis, a short MRI protocol of T1 and T1Gd is sufficient in RA. (orig.)

  1. MRI features of posterior ankle impingement syndrome in ballet dancers: a review of 25 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peace, K.A.L.; Hillier, J.C.; Hulme, A.; Healy, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS) in classical ballet dancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of 25 MRI examinations of the ankle performed on 23 ballet dancers over a 26-month period. Images were examined for the presence of osseous and soft-tissue anatomical variants at the posterior ankle and imaging signs of PAIS. All patients presented with symptoms and signs suggestive of PAIS including posterior ankle pain, swelling and stiffness during plantar flexion. RESULTS: Anatomical variants predisposing to PAIS including as os trigonum and tuberosity arising from the superior calcaneum were clearly depicted. The most common imaging feature of PAIS in our series was high T2 signal posterior to the talocalcaneal joint indicating synovitis (n=25). Thickening of the posterior capsule (n=13) and tenosynovitis of flexor hallucis longus (n=17) were also common. An os trigonum was an infrequent finding (n=7). Bone marrow oedema, commonly in the posterior talus (n=10) or in a patchy distribution (n=10) was often noted. CONCLUSION: MRI is a useful diagnostic tool in PAIS, and in the present series, clearly demonstrates the anatomical variants and range of osseous and soft-tissue abnormalities associated with this condition. Prospective studies are needed to understand the significance and importance of individual MRI findings in producing the symptoms of PAIS

  2. Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema associated with parvovirus B19 infection: two new cases and review of the comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Francesco; Ciccarese, Giulia; Agnoletti, Arianna F; Cogorno, Ludovica; Muda, Alessandro; Cozzani, Emanuele; Parodi, Aurora

    2015-10-01

    Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) is a rare syndrome consisting of acute symmetrical tenosynovitis of the hands and wrists associated with pain and marked pitting edema of the dorsum of the hands or the feet. Persistent rheumatoid factor seronegativity and elevated acute phase reactants are the rule, while radiographic findings are characterized by the absence of bony erosions. The syndrome has occasionally been associated with a wide range of diseases including solid and hematological malignancies, polymyalgia rheumatica, and other inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Two patients with skin eruption on hands and feet associated with arthromyalgias have been investigated to confirm diagnosis of RS3PE and to detect comorbidities. A revision of all the possible medical conditions correlated to RS3PE has been performed. We report two cases of RS3PE associated with Parvovirus B19 infection/reactivation. There are very few reports on the association between RS3PE and infectious agents, and in only one case the syndrome has been correlated to parvovirus infection. We want to underline the importance for patients with RS3PE to be seen by dermatologists who should become familiar with this syndrome and remark that Parvovirus B19 infection may be a potential cause of RS3PE. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  3. Osteoma osteoide em escafoide: relato de caso Osteoid osteoma in scaphoid: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Lourenço Severo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available O osteoma osteoide é um tumor benigno osteoblástico, incomum na mão. A localização nos ossos do carpo é infrequente, a qual leva a erros no diagnóstico em decorrência do polimorfismo de sinais clínicos. Na revisão bibliográfica foram referidos nove casos de osteoma osteoide no escafoide. Relata-se um caso de osteoma osteoide no escafoide, tratado inicialmente como tenossinovite estenosante de De Quervain, tendo diagnóstico definitivo retardado por cinco anos.Osteoid osteoma is a benign osteoblastic tumor that is unusual in the hand. A location in the carpal bones is infrequent, which leads to errors in diagnosing it because of polymorphism of the clinical symptoms. Reviewing the literature shows that nine cases of osteoid osteoma in the scaphoid have been reported. Here, one case of osteoid osteoma in the scaphoid that was initially treated as De Quervain's stenosing tenosynovitis is reported, with a definitive diagnosis that was delayed for five years.

  4. An Unusual Stress Fracture in an Archer with Hypophosphatasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Yavuz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 45-year-old male archer with stress fracture in his left ulna on the background of adult type of hypophosphatasia. The patient presented to several medical centers for pain around the left elbow and received medical treatment upon diagnosis of tenosynovitis. History of the patient revealed that he had had diagnosis of hypophosphatasia ten years ago and underwent percutaneous screwing for stress fracture on both of his femoral necks. Upon finding nondisplaced stress fracture on proximal metaphysis of the ulna on X-ray, the patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in order to exclude pathological causes. No additional pathology was observed in MRI scanning. The patient’s sportive activities were restricted for 6 weeks and he received conservative management with arm slings. Adult type of hypophosphatasia is a disease manifesting with widespread osteoporosis and presenting with low serum level of alkali phosphatase (ALP. Stress fracture should definitely be considered in the patients with history of hypophosphatasia and refractory extremity pain.

  5. The Usefulness of the Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in the Evaluation of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyun Jin; Lee, Sheen Woo; Jeong, Yu Mi; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Gil Hospital, Gacheon University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hong Gi; Kwak, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Gil Hospital, Gacheon University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to access the diverse conditions that lead to the clinical manifestations of tarsal tunnel syndrome and evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation. Thirty-three patients who underwent ankle MRI and surgery under the impression of tarsal tunnel syndrome were retrospectively analyzed. The findings on ankle MRI were categorized into space occupying lesions within the tarsal tunnel, space occupying lesions of the tunnel wall, and non-space occupying lesions. Associated plantar muscle atrophy was also evaluated. Medical records were reviewed for correlation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and surgical findings. There were 21 space occupying lesions of the tarsal tunnel, and eight lesions of tarsal tunnel wall. There were three cases with accessory muscle, three with tarsal coalition, five with ganglion cysts, one neurogenic tumor, five flexor retinaculum hypertrophy, three varicose veins, and nine with tenosynovitis of the posterior tibialis, flexor digitorum longus, or flexor hallucis longus tendon. One patient was found to have a deltoid ligament sprain. Of the 32, eight patients experienced fatty atrophic change within any one of the foot muscles. NCV was positive in 79% of the MRI-positive lesions. MRI provides detailed information on ankle anatomy, which includes that of tarsal tunnel and beyond. Pathologic conditions that cause or mimic tarsal tunnel syndrome are well demonstrated. MRI can enhance surgical planning by indicating the extent of decompression required, and help with further patient management. Patients with tarsal tunnel syndrome can greatly benefit from preoperative MRI. However, it should be noted that not all cases with tarsal tunnel syndrome have MRI-demonstrable causes.

  6. The Usefulness of the Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in the Evaluation of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Jin; Lee, Sheen Woo; Jeong, Yu Mi; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, Hong Gi; Kwak, Ji Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to access the diverse conditions that lead to the clinical manifestations of tarsal tunnel syndrome and evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation. Thirty-three patients who underwent ankle MRI and surgery under the impression of tarsal tunnel syndrome were retrospectively analyzed. The findings on ankle MRI were categorized into space occupying lesions within the tarsal tunnel, space occupying lesions of the tunnel wall, and non-space occupying lesions. Associated plantar muscle atrophy was also evaluated. Medical records were reviewed for correlation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and surgical findings. There were 21 space occupying lesions of the tarsal tunnel, and eight lesions of tarsal tunnel wall. There were three cases with accessory muscle, three with tarsal coalition, five with ganglion cysts, one neurogenic tumor, five flexor retinaculum hypertrophy, three varicose veins, and nine with tenosynovitis of the posterior tibialis, flexor digitorum longus, or flexor hallucis longus tendon. One patient was found to have a deltoid ligament sprain. Of the 32, eight patients experienced fatty atrophic change within any one of the foot muscles. NCV was positive in 79% of the MRI-positive lesions. MRI provides detailed information on ankle anatomy, which includes that of tarsal tunnel and beyond. Pathologic conditions that cause or mimic tarsal tunnel syndrome are well demonstrated. MRI can enhance surgical planning by indicating the extent of decompression required, and help with further patient management. Patients with tarsal tunnel syndrome can greatly benefit from preoperative MRI. However, it should be noted that not all cases with tarsal tunnel syndrome have MRI-demonstrable causes.

  7. Evaluation of lesser metatarsophalangeal joint plantar plate tears with contrast-enhanced and fat-suppressed MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinoa, Vanessa; Ranke, Felipe von; Costa, Flavia; Marchiori, Edson

    2016-01-01

    To present findings of plantar plate (PP) lesions from MRI with administration of gadolinium and to differentiate PP lesions from others causes of metatarsalgia. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed 249 contrast-enhanced forefoot MRI scans from patients with metatarsalgia between June 2012 and June 2013. Evaluations focused on hyper-vascularized/fibrous tissue and other findings associated with PP tears. Fifty-nine patients had PP tears, 59 % were female. Most of these patients, 48/59 (81.4 %), had a single metatarsophalangeal (MTP) PP lesion in one foot, although 7/59 patients had one lesion in each foot, 3/59 (5.1 %) had two in one foot, and 1/59 (1.7 %) had three lesions in one foot. The second MTP joint was the most common location for PP tears (n = 56), followed by the third (n = 12) and fourth (n = 3) MTP joints. Lateral (n = 33) and full thickness (n = 28) PP lesions were the most frequent, and central (n = 3) and lateral/central (n = 7) tears were less prevalent. Fifty (70.5 %) PP lesions showed pericapsular fibrosis in pre-contrast sequences, and 21 (29.5 %) were visible only after administration of gadolinium. All PP lesions had collateral ligament involvement. Others findings included interosseous tendon lesions (n = 29), interosseous tendon rupture (n = 29), synovitis (n = 49), flexor tenosynovitis (n = 28), crossover toe (n = 2), hammertoe (n = 1), intermetatarsal space (IS) neuromas (n = 11), and third IS neuromas (n = 12). PP tears are a common cause of metatarsalgia, accounting for more than 20 % of cases in our sample. A substantial portion of the lesions (29.5 %) became visible only after the administration of gadolinium. (orig.)

  8. Ultrasonography as a prognostic and objective parameter in Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkegaard, Mads; Johannsen, Finn E.; Højgaard, Betina; Langberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study prospectively whether structural changes determined by ultrasound scanning (US) can be used as prognostic markers for outcome in patients with symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and to investigate whether there exists an association between US findings and pain measured by visual analog scale (VAS) and a general assessment score (GA). Methods: 92 consecutive patients with AT symptoms were recruited from two outpatient clinics in rheumatology. The patients underwent a conservative treatment protocol consisting of reduced activities, controlled rehabilitation including eccentric exercises of the calf muscles and if needed supplemented with corticosteroid injections. The patients were examined clinically and by US (tendon thickness, hyper- and hypoechogenicity, calcification, bursitis, calcaneusspure, tenosynovitis, gray scale and color Doppler focusing on increased flow intra- or peritendinous). The clinical and US examination were performed at entry, 1, 2, 3 and at 6 month. Results: 42 women and 50 men were included (mean age of 47 years). They had symptoms for more than 13 months and a symptomatic Achilles tendon mean thickness of 7.4 ± 2.3 mm. Heterogeneity at the initial examination was found to be a prognostic marker for the clinical outcome. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased flow at any time point were significantly correlated to pain at function, palpatory pain and morning pain at the same time points. A reduction in tendon thickness was statistically associated with a decrease in palpatory pain. Conclusion: Heterogeneity is a prognostic marker in AT. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased Doppler activity can be used as objective outcome parameters for the treatment effect of AT

  9. MRI findings on de Quervain's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Keiji; Shimada, Kozo; Tokumaru, Hiroshi; Komi, Katsumi.

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain's disease is a stenosing tenosynovitis affecting the first extensor compartment of the wrist. Conservative treatment including steroid injection is primarily indicated and satisfactory result can be obtained in most cases. However, it often fails in cases where fibrocartilagenous septum exists within the first compartment. Surgical release of the compartment and resection of the septum is recommended for these instances. The incidence of the septum in the compartment is reported to be about 30 to 40 per cent in normal population, though over 90 per cent in operative cases. In this study, MRI was employed to evaluate the anatomical variation in the first extensor compartment of the wrist in de Quervain's disease. There were 13 hands in 5 men and 10 women. Their average age was 49.5 years old (19 to 76 y.o.). Axial T1 weighted MR images around the radial styloid process were obtained. Eight hands which resisted conservative treatment were operated on and first compartment was directly inspected. The other 5 were well treated with one or two steroid injection. In all operative cases, MRI revealed that the EPB tendon exists apart from the APL tendon surrounded with thick high intensity area. That finding correspond to the operative findings. That were fibrocartilagenous septum dividing the first compartment and dense synovium around the EPB tendon. On the other hands, in 5 hands which responded to steroid injection, EPB was identified only in 2 on MRI and could not be distinguished from APL in the other 3. Consequently, MRI provides useful information to make a strategy for treating de Quervain's disease. In cases whose MRI show that EPB and APL are accommodated in one common canal non-surgical treatment should be continued while in the cases of separate EPB tunnel with surrounding proliferating synovium early operation might be considered. (author)

  10. Musculoskeletal Ultrasonography in CRPS: Assessment of Muscles Before and After Motor Function Recovery with Dry Needling as the Sole Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Lakshmi Champak; Pai, Renuka; Pattnaik, Manorama

    2016-01-01

    tenosynovitis causing the CDC and return of normal myoarchitecture.

  11. Evaluation of lesser metatarsophalangeal joint plantar plate tears with contrast-enhanced and fat-suppressed MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinoa, Vanessa; Ranke, Felipe von; Costa, Flavia; Marchiori, Edson [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    To present findings of plantar plate (PP) lesions from MRI with administration of gadolinium and to differentiate PP lesions from others causes of metatarsalgia. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed 249 contrast-enhanced forefoot MRI scans from patients with metatarsalgia between June 2012 and June 2013. Evaluations focused on hyper-vascularized/fibrous tissue and other findings associated with PP tears. Fifty-nine patients had PP tears, 59 % were female. Most of these patients, 48/59 (81.4 %), had a single metatarsophalangeal (MTP) PP lesion in one foot, although 7/59 patients had one lesion in each foot, 3/59 (5.1 %) had two in one foot, and 1/59 (1.7 %) had three lesions in one foot. The second MTP joint was the most common location for PP tears (n = 56), followed by the third (n = 12) and fourth (n = 3) MTP joints. Lateral (n = 33) and full thickness (n = 28) PP lesions were the most frequent, and central (n = 3) and lateral/central (n = 7) tears were less prevalent. Fifty (70.5 %) PP lesions showed pericapsular fibrosis in pre-contrast sequences, and 21 (29.5 %) were visible only after administration of gadolinium. All PP lesions had collateral ligament involvement. Others findings included interosseous tendon lesions (n = 29), interosseous tendon rupture (n = 29), synovitis (n = 49), flexor tenosynovitis (n = 28), crossover toe (n = 2), hammertoe (n = 1), intermetatarsal space (IS) neuromas (n = 11), and third IS neuromas (n = 12). PP tears are a common cause of metatarsalgia, accounting for more than 20 % of cases in our sample. A substantial portion of the lesions (29.5 %) became visible only after the administration of gadolinium. (orig.)

  12. Association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris tendon pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Torriani, Martin [General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon pathology. We retrospectively reviewed 71 adult wrist MRI studies with ECU tendon pathology (tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, or tear), and/or ECU subluxation. Subjects did not have a history of trauma, surgery, infection, or inflammatory arthritis. MRI studies from 46 subjects without ECU tendon pathology or subluxation were used as controls. The following morphological parameters of the distal ulna were measured independently by two readers: ulnar variance relative to radius, ulnar styloid process length, ECU groove depth and length. Subjects and controls were compared using Student's t test. Inter-observer agreement (ICC) was calculated. There was a significant correlation between negative ulnar variance and ECU tendon pathology (reader 1 [R1], P = 0.01; reader 2 [R2], P < 0.0001; R1 and R2 averaged data, P < 0.0001) and ECU tendon subluxation (P = 0.001; P = 0.0001; P < 0.0001). In subjects with ECU tendon subluxation there was also a trend toward a shorter length (P = 0.3; P <0.0001; P = 0.001) and a shallower ECU groove (P = 0.01; P = 0.03; P = 0.01; R1 and R2 averaged data with Bonferroni correction, P = 0.08). ECU groove depth (P = 0.6; P = 0.8; P = 0.9) and groove length (P = 0.1; P = 0.4; P = 0.7) showed no significant correlation with ECU tendon pathology, and length of the ulnar styloid process showed no significant correlation with ECU tendon pathology (P = 0.2; P = 0.3; P = 0.2) or subluxation (P = 0.4; P = 0.5; P = 0.5). Inter-observer agreement (ICC) was >0.64 for all parameters. Distal ulnar morphology may be associated with ECU tendon abnormalities. (orig.)

  13. MRI of fractures of the distal radius: comparison with conventional radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, L.D.; Eustace, S.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To compare the evaluation of fractures of the distal radius with MRI and conventional radiographs. To demonstrate the ability of MRI to detect unsuspected soft tissue derangement accompanying this common injury. Design and patients. Twenty-one consecutive inpatients admitted following fracture of the distal radius underwent preoperative evaluation with both conventional radiographs and MRI. In each case, analysis was made of both the osseous and soft tissue injury. MRI findings were compared with those identified on conventional radiographs and at subsequent surgical fixation. Results. Of 21 patients with fractures of the distal radius, 20 had extension to the radiocarpal articulation, 14 had distal radio-ulnar joint extension and 5 had avulsion of the ulnar styloid.Occult carpal bone fractures accompanying fracture of the distal radius were identified in two patients: one of the capitate and the other of the second metacarpal base. Ten patients (48%) had associated soft tissue injury: six patients had scapholunate ligament rupture, two patients had disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage, one patient had extensor carpi ulnaris tenosynovitis and one patient had a tear of a dorsal radiocarpal ligament. Of five patients with ulnar styloid avulsions, none had evidence of triangular fibrocartilage tears. Conclusion. MRI affords better evaluation of osseous injury accompanying distal radial fractures than conventional radiographs. Intra-articular soft tissue injury accompanies distal radial fractures in almost 50% of cases. Scapholunate ligament disruption commonly accompanies intra-articular fracture through the lunate facet of the distal radius. Fracture of the ulnar styloid is infrequently associated with tear of the triangular fibrocartilage. (orig.)

  14. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of psoriatic dactylitis: status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakewell, Catherine J; Olivieri, Ignazio; Aydin, Sibel Z; Dejaco, Christian; Ikeda, Kei; Gutierrez, Marwin; Terslev, Lene; Thiele, Ralf; D'Agostino, Maria Antionetta; Kaeley, Gurjit S

    2013-12-01

    Dactylitis, a characteristic feature of the spondyloarthropathies, occurs in up to 48% of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). No clear consensus on the underlying components and pathogenesis of dactylitis exists in the literature. We undertook a systematic review of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) literature to better define imaging elements that contribute to the dactylitic digit seen in PsA. Our objectives were to determine first the level of homogeneity of each imaging modality's definition of the components of dactylitis, and second, to evaluate the metric properties of each imaging modality according to the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) filter. Searches were performed in PUBMED and EMBASE for articles pertaining to MRI, US, and dactylitis. Data regarding the reported features of dactylitis were collected and categorized, and the metrological qualities of the studies were assessed. The most commonly described features of dactylitis were flexor tendon tenosynovitis and joint synovitis (90%). Extratendinous soft tissue thickening and extensor tendonitis were described nearly equally as being present and absent. Discrepancy exists as to whether entheses proper contribute to the etiology of dactylitis. An increasing number of studies categorize abnormalities in several tissue compartments including the soft tissue, tendon sheaths, and joints, as well as ligaments. The understanding of which tissues contribute to dactylitic inflammation has evolved. However, there is a lack of literature regarding the natural history of these abnormalities. This systematic review provides guidance in defining elementary lesions that may discriminate dactylitic digits from normal digits, leading to development of a composite measure of activity and severity of dactylitis.

  15. MRI findings on de Quervain`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, Tsuyoshi [Osaka National Hospital (Japan); Kitano, Keiji; Shimada, Kozo; Tokumaru, Hiroshi; Komi, Katsumi

    1996-08-01

    de Quervain`s disease is a stenosing tenosynovitis affecting the first extensor compartment of the wrist. Conservative treatment including steroid injection is primarily indicated and satisfactory result can be obtained in most cases. However, it often fails in cases where fibrocartilagenous septum exists within the first compartment. Surgical release of the compartment and resection of the septum is recommended for these instances. The incidence of the septum in the compartment is reported to be about 30 to 40 per cent in normal population, though over 90 per cent in operative cases. In this study, MRI was employed to evaluate the anatomical variation in the first extensor compartment of the wrist in de Quervain`s disease. There were 13 hands in 5 men and 10 women. Their average age was 49.5 years old (19 to 76 y.o.). Axial T1 weighted MR images around the radial styloid process were obtained. Eight hands which resisted conservative treatment were operated on and first compartment was directly inspected. The other 5 were well treated with one or two steroid injection. In all operative cases, MRI revealed that the EPB tendon exists apart from the APL tendon surrounded with thick high intensity area. That finding correspond to the operative findings. That were fibrocartilagenous septum dividing the first compartment and dense synovium around the EPB tendon. On the other hands, in 5 hands which responded to steroid injection, EPB was identified only in 2 on MRI and could not be distinguished from APL in the other 3. Consequently, MRI provides useful information to make a strategy for treating de Quervain`s disease. In cases whose MRI show that EPB and APL are accommodated in one common canal non-surgical treatment should be continued while in the cases of separate EPB tunnel with surrounding proliferating synovium early operation might be considered. (author)

  16. Cuboid oedema due to peroneus longus tendinopathy: a report of four cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, Paul; Saifuddin, Asif

    2005-01-01

    To highlight focal bone abnormality in the cuboid due to tendinopathy of the adjacent peroneus longus. A retrospective review was carried out of the relevant clinical and imaging features. Two male and two female patients were studied, mean age 51.5 years (range 32 - 67 years), referred with foot pain and imaging showing an abnormal cuboid thought to represent either tumour or infection. A long history of foot pain was usual with a maximum of 8 years. Radiographs were normal in two cases and showed erosion in two, one of which exhibited periosteal new bone formation affecting the cuboid. Bone scintigraphy was undertaken in two patients, both of whom showed increased uptake of isotope. MRI, performed in all patients, showed oedema in the cuboid adjacent to the peroneus longus tendon. The tendon and/or paratendinous tissues were abnormal in all cases, but no tendon discontinuity was identified. One patient possessed an os peroneum. Unequivocal evidence of bone erosion was seen using MRI in three patients, but with greater clarity in two cases using CT. Additional findings of tenosynovitis of tibialis posterior, oedema in the adjacent medial malleolus and synovitis of multiple joints in the foot were seen in one patient. Imaging diagnosis was made in all cases avoiding bone biopsy, but surgical exploration of the peroneal tendons was performed in two cases and biopsy of ankle synovium in one. Oedema with erosion of the cuboid bone, simulating a bone lesion (cuboid ''pseudotumour''), may be caused by adjacent tendinopathy of peroneus longus. It is vital to be aware of this entity to avoid unnecessary biopsy of the cuboid. (orig.)

  17. Baseline Shoulder Ultrasonography Is Not a Predictive Marker of Response to Glucocorticoids in Patients with Polymyalgia Rheumatica: A 12-month Followup Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Maria Concetta; Zoli, Angelo; Peluso, Giusy; Bosello, Silvia; Gremese, Elisa; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated whether ultrasound (US) subdeltoid bursitis (SB) and/or biceps tenosynovitis (BT) presence at baseline could represent a predictive marker of response to standard therapy after 12 months of followup, and whether a positive US examination could highlight the need of higher maintenance dosage of glucocorticoids (GC) at 6 and 12 months in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Sixty-six consecutive patients with PMR underwent bilateral shoulder US evaluations before starting therapy and after 12 months of followup. Absence of girdle pain and morning stiffness (clinical remission) and laboratory variables were evaluated. After diagnosis, all patients were treated with prednisone. At baseline, SB and/or BT were present in 46 patients (70%), of whom 33 (72%) became negative while 13 (28%) remained positive at the 12-month US evaluation. All patients rapidly achieved a clinical remission, and at 6 months 26 (39%) also achieved a laboratory variable normalization. According to US positivity at baseline, no difference was found in remission or relapse rate after 12 months. Thirty patients (46%) at 6 months and 7 (11%) at 12 months were still taking more than 5 mg/day of prednisone. According to the US pattern at baseline, no difference was found in the mean GC dose at 6 and 12 months. In patients with PMR, the presence of SB and/or BT on US at diagnosis is not a predictive marker of GC response or of a higher GC dosage to maintain remission in a 12-month prospective followup study.

  18. The WISTAH hand study: A prospective cohort study of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg Arun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few prospective cohort studies of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders have been performed. Past studies have provided somewhat conflicting evidence for occupational risk factors and have largely reported data without adjustments for many personal and psychosocial factors. Methods/design A multi-center prospective cohort study was incepted to quantify risk factors for distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and potentially develop improved methods for analyzing jobs. Disorders to analyze included carpal tunnel syndrome, lateral epicondylalgia, medial epicondylalgia, trigger digit, deQuervain’s stenosing tenosynovitis and other tendinoses. Workers have thus far been enrolled from 17 different employment settings in 3 diverse US states and performed widely varying work. At baseline, workers undergo laptop administered questionnaires, structured interviews, two standardized physical examinations and nerve conduction studies to ascertain demographic, medical history, psychosocial factors and current musculoskeletal disorders. All workers’ jobs are individually measured for physical factors and are videotaped. Workers are followed monthly for the development of musculoskeletal disorders. Repeat nerve conduction studies are performed for those with symptoms of tingling and numbness in the prior six months. Changes in jobs necessitate re-measure and re-videotaping of job physical factors. Case definitions have been established. Point prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome is a combination of paraesthesias in at least two median nerve-served digits plus an abnormal nerve conduction study at baseline. The lifetime cumulative incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome will also include those with a past history of carpal tunnel syndrome. Incident cases will exclude those with either a past history or prevalent cases at baseline. Statistical methods planned include survival analyses and logistic regression. Discussion A

  19. The OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group - Update on Status and Future Research Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Eshed, Iris; Haugen, Ida K; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Lillegraven, Siri; Foltz, Violaine; Glinatsi, Daniel; Peterfy, Charles; Ejbjerg, Bo; Bøyesen, Pernille; Mease, Philip J; Hermann, Kay-Geert; Emery, Paul; Genant, Harry K; Conaghan, Philip G

    2015-12-01

    To provide an update on the status and future research priorities of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in arthritis working group. A summary is provided of the activities of the group within rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and osteoarthritis (OA), and its research priorities. The OMERACT RA MRI score (RAMRIS) evaluating bone erosion, bone edema (osteitis), and synovitis is now the standard method of quantifying articular pathology in RA trials. Cartilage loss is another important part of joint damage, and at the OMERACT 12 conference, we provided longitudinal data demonstrating reliability and sensitivity to change of the RAMRIS JSN component score, supporting its use in future clinical trials. The MRI group has previously developed a PsA MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 12, PsAMRIS was evaluated in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of patients with PsA, demonstrating the responsiveness and discriminatory ability of applying the PsAMRIS to hands and feet. A hand OA MRI score (HOAMRIS) was introduced at OMERACT 11, and has subsequently been further validated. At OMERACT 12, good cross-sectional interreader reliability, but variable reliability of change scores, were reported. Potential future research areas were identified at the MRI session at OMERACT 12 including assessment of tenosynovitis in RA and enthesitis in PsA and focusing on alternative MRI techniques. MRI has been further developed and validated as an outcome measure in RA, PsA, and OA. The group will continue its efforts to optimize the value of MRI as a robust biomarker in rheumatology clinical trials.

  20. Cuboid oedema due to peroneus longus tendinopathy: a report of four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, Paul; Saifuddin, Asif [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    To highlight focal bone abnormality in the cuboid due to tendinopathy of the adjacent peroneus longus. A retrospective review was carried out of the relevant clinical and imaging features. Two male and two female patients were studied, mean age 51.5 years (range 32 - 67 years), referred with foot pain and imaging showing an abnormal cuboid thought to represent either tumour or infection. A long history of foot pain was usual with a maximum of 8 years. Radiographs were normal in two cases and showed erosion in two, one of which exhibited periosteal new bone formation affecting the cuboid. Bone scintigraphy was undertaken in two patients, both of whom showed increased uptake of isotope. MRI, performed in all patients, showed oedema in the cuboid adjacent to the peroneus longus tendon. The tendon and/or paratendinous tissues were abnormal in all cases, but no tendon discontinuity was identified. One patient possessed an os peroneum. Unequivocal evidence of bone erosion was seen using MRI in three patients, but with greater clarity in two cases using CT. Additional findings of tenosynovitis of tibialis posterior, oedema in the adjacent medial malleolus and synovitis of multiple joints in the foot were seen in one patient. Imaging diagnosis was made in all cases avoiding bone biopsy, but surgical exploration of the peroneal tendons was performed in two cases and biopsy of ankle synovium in one. Oedema with erosion of the cuboid bone, simulating a bone lesion (cuboid ''pseudotumour''), may be caused by adjacent tendinopathy of peroneus longus. It is vital to be aware of this entity to avoid unnecessary biopsy of the cuboid. (orig.)

  1. Effectiveness of physical treatment at De Quervain᾽s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir Katana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: De Quervain᾽s disease is a stenosing tenosynovitis of common tendon sheath of abducktor policis longus and extensor policis brevis muscles. Due to the superficial positions it can easily lead tomechanical injuries of tendons and their sheaths. The disease more often affects women over 40 years old and people with certain professions who intensively use hand and fingers in their daily work. Pathologicalchanges consist of sheath᾽s fibrous layer thickening. The clinical condition develops gradually with the pain of varying intensity. It is localized above the radial styloid process and radiates from the back side of thethumb. The aim is to determine the efficacy of physical therapy at De Quervain᾽s disease.Methods: The study was conducted on 50 patients with De Quervain's disease who were reported to the CBR "Praxis" Sarajevo. With retrospective analysis the data was processed for the period from 01.01.2001. to 31.12.2011. year. Before the initiation of physical therapy assessment of functional status scored from 0 to 6 was performed. In the chronic phase physical therapy was performed, after which it underwent assessment of therapy success scores of 0-5. Criteria for inclusion in the study were patients with confirmed De Quervain's disease, patients of both sex and of all ages, and criterion for exclusion was non-compliance withtreatment protocols.Results: In the CBR "Praxis" with De Quervain᾽s disease total of 50 patients were treated in that period, of which 34 women and 16 men. 38% of respondents received a score of 4, while 56% of patients at the end oftreatment received a score of 5.Conslusion: Physical therapy and kinesiotherapeutical procedures have greatly contributed to the elimination of symptoms and consequences of De Quervainove disease.

  2. Ultrasound and PET-CT Correlation in Shoulder Pathology: A 5-Year Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher J; Walter, William R; Adler, Ronald S; Babb, James S; Sanger, Joseph; Ponzo, Fabio

    2017-10-01

    To correlate shoulder ultrasound and radiography with F-FDG PET-CT to establish FDG uptake and therefore range of metabolic activity, as defined by SUV analysis, in various symptomatic shoulder pathologies. Retrospective database query was performed for shoulder ultrasound and PET-CT scans between January 2012 and January 2017. Patients who had both studies within 1 year were included. Age- and sex-matched control patients with PET-CT scans only were also included. Retrospective image review determined shoulder pathology, and F-FDG SUVmax was measured using regions of interest placed at the glenohumeral joint, rotator cuff/bursa, and bicipital groove. Glenohumeral and acromioclavicular osteoarthrosis was assessed by radiography using the Kellgren-Lawrence classification system. Thirty-three patients had both imaging studies within 1 year. Ten patients (11 cases) were included, ranging in age from 56 to 90 years (mean, 67.9 years). Control subjects were selected among patients receiving PET-CT within 1 week of symptomatic patients. Glenohumeral osteoarthrosis was mild in 3 (27%), moderate in 2 (18%), and severe in 2 (18%). Six full-thickness rotator cuff tears (55%) were identified. SUVmax means were compared between the pathologic and control groups and were significantly higher in the former: glenohumeral joint (1.96 vs 1.32; P = 0.016), rotator cuff/bursa (2.80 vs 2.0; P = 0.005), and bicipital groove (2.19 vs 1.48; P = 0.007). The highest values were seen in full-thickness rotator cuff tear and severe biceps tenosynovitis. Increased metabolic activity about the shoulder is associated with a spectrum of rotator cuff, glenohumeral joint, and other soft tissue pathology that can be correlated with diagnostic ultrasound findings.

  3. US Evaluation of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Osteoarticular Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jie C; Lee, Kenneth S; Thapa, Mahesh M; Rosas, Humberto G

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and osteoarticular infection can cause nonspecific articular and periarticular complaints in children. Although contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is the reference standard imaging modality, musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) is emerging as an important adjunct imaging modality that can provide valuable information relatively quickly without use of radiation or the need for sedation. However, diagnostic accuracy requires a systemic approach, familiarity with various US techniques, and an understanding of maturation-related changes. Specifically, the use of dynamic, Doppler, and/or multifocal US assessments can help confirm sites of disease, monitor therapy response, and guide interventions. In patients with JIA, ongoing synovial inflammation can lead to articular and periarticular changes, including synovitis, tenosynovitis, cartilage damage, bone changes, and enthesopathy. Although these findings can manifest in adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis, important differences and pitfalls exist because of the unique changes associated with an immature and maturing skeleton. In patients who are clinically suspected of having osteoarticular infection, the inability of US to evaluate the bone marrow decreases its sensitivity. Therefore, the US findings should be interpreted with caution because juxtacortical inflammation is suggestive, but neither sensitive nor specific, for underlying osteomyelitis. Similarly, the absence of a joint effusion makes septic arthritis extremely unlikely but not impossible. US findings of JIA and osteoarticular infection often overlap. Although certain clinical scenarios, laboratory findings, and imaging appearances can favor one diagnosis over the other, fluid analysis may still be required for definitive diagnosis and optimal treatment. US is the preferred modality for fluid aspiration and administering intra-articular corticosteroid therapy. © RSNA, 2017.

  4. The etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Evaluation from the viewpoint of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Jun

    2003-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome has not been clarified. A cross sectional area of carpal tunnel, flexor tendons, median nerve, and thickness of transverse carpal ligament were evaluated by MRI. Twenty-six patients who were electrophysiologically diagnosed with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were tested by MRI. All patients were females; the mean age was sixty-four years old. The cross sectional area of carpal tunnel, the median nerve area, the area of the flexor tendons and its synovium in carpal tunnel, and thickness of the transverse carpal ligament were calculated. The following are of a seuere type carpal tunnel syndrome: Mean area of the flexor tendons and its synovium in carpal tunnel, 110.5±25.5 mm 2 (control group; 79.3±13.8 mm 2 ); ratio of flexor tendons and its synovium area to carpal tunnel area, 51.6±8.8% (control; 40.5±2.3%); and thickness of the transverse carpal ligament, 3.3±0.4 mm (control; 2.4±0.4 mm). These mean areas in severe carpal tunnel syndrome were significantly greater than those in mild type (p<0.05 or p<0.01). From the viewpoint of this result, it is possible that tenosynovitis is strongly to the etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. In other words, synovium edema causes chronic high pressure environment in carpal tunnel. Moreover, we classified these MRI findings into the following subgroups: enlargement of cross sectional area of flexor tendon and its synovia (n=8; 25.8%), thickened transverse carpal ligament (n=11; 35.5%), and combined type (n=7; 22.6%). This classification by MRI imaging was related to a clinical course and electro-physiologic severity. The present study suggests that to evaluate the cross sectional, area of an MRI image is useful for diagnosis and cure of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. (author)

  5. High-resolution US and MR imaging of peroneal tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Alcala, Jennifer N; Gimber, Lana H; Rieke, Joshua D; Chilvers, Margaret M; Latt, L Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Injuries of the peroneal tendon complex are common and should be considered in every patient who presents with chronic lateral ankle pain. These injuries occur as a result of trauma (including ankle sprains), in tendons with preexisting tendonopathy, and with repetitive microtrauma due to instability. The peroneus brevis and peroneus longus tendons are rarely torn simultaneously. Several anatomic variants, including a flat or convex fibular retromalleolar groove, hypertrophy of the peroneal tubercle at the lateral aspect of the calcaneus, an accessory peroneus quartus muscle, a low-lying peroneus brevis muscle belly, and an os peroneum, may predispose to peroneal tendon injuries. High-resolution 1.5-T and 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with use of dedicated extremity coils and high-resolution ultrasonography (US) with high-frequency linear transducers and dynamic imaging are proved to adequately depict the peroneal tendons for evaluation and can aid the orthopedic surgeon in injury management. An understanding of current treatment approaches for partial- and full-thickness peroneal tendon tears, subluxation and dislocation of these tendons with superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR) injuries, intrasheath subluxations, and peroneal tendonopathy and tenosynovitis can help physicians achieve a favorable outcome. Patients with low functional demands do well with conservative treatment, while those with high functional demands may benefit from surgery if nonsurgical treatment is unsuccessful. Radiologists should recognize the normal anatomy and specific pathologic conditions of the peroneal tendons at US and MR imaging and understand the various treatment options for peroneal tendon and SPR superior peroneal retinaculum injuries. Online supplemental material is available for this article. RSNA, 2015

  6. IMPINGEMENT-SYNDROME OF PERONEUS BREVIS TENDON AFTER CALCANEAL FRACTURES (MORPHOLOGICAL ASPECTS

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    N. S. Konovalchuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the main causes of pain in patients with consequences of calcaneal fractures is the lateral impingement syndrome. This term means lateral displacement of outer calcaneal wall at the moment of fracture, narrowing of anatomical space under the lateral malleolus and compression of soft tissues in this region, including tendons of short and long peroneal muscles. This leads to chronic traumatization of tendons, alteration of their normal tracking and development of tendinitis and tenosynovitis. At this moment there are no articles in foreign or Russian literature describing how prolonged traumatization influences the internal structure of the tendons. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes in structure of peroneus brevis tendon after different duration of compression between outer wall of calcaneus and the tip of the lateral malleolus in patients with calcaneal malunion.Materials and methods. Fifteen patients with calcaneal malunion and lateral impingement syndrome were treated operatively between 2016 and 2017. To confirm the lateral impingement syndrome, the authors performed clinical examination and AP x-rays of ankle joint. Two peroneus brevis tendon specimens were obtained intraoperatively in each of 15 patients: one specimen from compressed and one from non-compressed area. Obtained specimens were histologically examined according to standard protocol.Results. Microscopically all specimens showed separation of collagen bundles with loose connective tissue degeneration, increase of vascularization and inflammation. The degree of these changes differed according to the compression duration. This allowed us to analyze the dynamics of these changes.Conclusion. The morphological changes in structure of peroneus brevis tendon during the compression between outer wall of calcaneus and the tip of the lateral malleolus correspond with dynamics of common pathologic reactions. Early stages showed signs of

  7. Impact of hepatitis C virus infection on disease activity, functional status and ultrasonography findings in Egyptian rheumatoid arthritis patients

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    Nabila Abd EI-Hamid Gohar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the most frequently encountered public health problems in Egypt. It is associated with many autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Aim of the work: To assess the impact of HCV infection in rheumatoid arthritis (RA Egyptian patients; its relation to disease activity, functional status and ultrasonography findings. Patients and methods: The study included 155 RA patients further classified according to the presence of concomitant HCV infection into 2 groups; rheumatoid arthritis (RA and rheumatoid arthritis/hepatitis C virus (RA/HCV groups. All patients were subjected to full history taking, thorough clinical examination, laboratory investigations, assessment of disease activity using the disease activity score 28 (DAS28 and assessment of functional status using the modified health assessment questionnaire (MHAQ. Ultrasonography (US assessment was done using the German US7 score. Results: Both DAS28 and MHAQ scores showed significant differences between both the RA and the RA/HCV groups (p < 0.001, with higher mean values observed in the RA/HCV group (5.4 ± 1.1 and 1.05 ± 0.79 respectively. Significantly higher US7 synovitis scores were found in the RA/HCV group compared to the RA group (p = 0.03. US7 synovitis tenosynovitis scores revealed significant correlations with DAS28 and US7 synovitis scores correlated with MHAQ in both groups. Conclusion: Concomitant HCV infection in RA patients had an impact on disease activity. RA patients with concomitant HCV infection (RA/HCV had higher DAS28 and MHAQ scores, with higher US7 synovitis scores compared to RA patients. US7 score is a valuable objective tool for the assessment of RA disease activity. Keywords: Rheumatoid arthritis, HCV infection, Ultrasonography, DAS28, MHAQ

  8. ASCOT: Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Use for Osteoarthritis of the Thumb—First Carpometacarpal Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christina; Sugrue, Conor; Carr, Emma; O’Reilly, Aine; O’Neill, Shane; Carroll, Sean M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The first carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) in the hand is a commonly affected joint by osteoarthritis. It causes significant thumb base pain, limiting functional capacity. Microfracturing and application of autologous stem cells has been performed on large joints such as the knee but has never been evaluated for use in the smaller joints in the hand. Our aim was to determine the potential benefit of microfracturing and autologous bone marrow stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis of the first CMCJ in the hand. Methods: All inclusion criteria were satisfied. Preoperative assessment by the surgeon, physiotherapist, and occupational therapist was performed. The first CMCJ was microfractured and the Bone Marrow Stem Cells were applied directly. Postoperatively, the patients were followed up for 1 year. Results: Fifteen patients met inclusion criteria; however, 2 patients were excluded due to postoperative cellulitis and diagnosis of De Quervain's tenosynovitis. The mean scores of the 13-patient preoperative and 1 year follow-up assessments are visual analog score at rest of 3.23–1.69 (P = 0.0292), visual analog score on activity of 7.92–4.23 (P = 0.0019), range of motion 45.77o–55.15o (P = 0.0195), thumb opposition score 7.62–9.23 (P = 0.0154), Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score of 51.67–23.08 (P = 0.0065). Strength improved insignificantly from 4.7 kg preoperatively to 5.53 kg at 12 months (P = 0.1257). All patients had a positive Grind test preoperatively and a negative test after 12 months. Conclusions: This innovative pilot study is a new approach to osteoarthritis of the thumb. PMID:29062653

  9. MR-imaging of anterior tibiotalar impingement syndrome: Agreement, sensitivity and specificity of MR-imaging and indirect MR-arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Osteology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Bernt, Reinhard [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: reinhard.bernt@wgkk.sozvers.at; Seeger, Thomas [Department of Trauma Surgery, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Weissenbaeck, Alexander [Department of Trauma Surgery, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Tuechler, Heinrich [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Hematology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Resnick, Donald [Department of Radiology, VA Medical Center, UCSD, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr, San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Objective: To clarify the role of MR-imaging in the diagnosis of anterior ankle impingement syndromes. Materials and methods: We prospectively examined 51 consecutive patients with chronic ankle pain by MR-imaging. Arthroscopy was performed in 29 patients who previously underwent non-enhanced MR-imaging; in 11 patients, indirect MR-arthrography additionally was performed. MR-examinations were correlated with clinical findings; MR and arthroscopy scores were statistically compared, agreement was measured. Results: Arthroscopy demonstrated granulation tissue in the lateral gutter (38%) and anterior recess (31%), lesions of the anterior tibiofibular (31%) and the anterior talofibular ligament (21%) as well as intraarticular bodies (10%). Stenosing tenosynovitis and a ganglionic cyst were revealed as extraarticular causes for chronic ankle pain by MR-examination (17%). Agreement of MR-imaging and arthroscopy was fair for the anterior talofibular ligament and the anterior joint cavity (kappa 0.40). Major discrepancy was found for non-enhanced MR scans (kappa 0.49) when compared with indirect MR-arthrography (kappa 0.03) in the anterior cavity. The sensitivity for lesions of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligament and the anterior cavity (0.91-0.87) detected by MR-imaging was superior in comparison to lesions of the anterior tibiofibular ligament and anteromedial cavity (0.50-0.24). Conclusion: MR-imaging provides additional information about the mechanics of chronic ankle impingement rather than an accurate diagnosis of this clinical entity. The method is helpful in differentiating extra- from intra-articular causes of ankle impingement. Indirect MR-arthrography has little or no additional value in patients with ankle impingement syndrome.

  10. MR Imaging in symptomatic osteochondromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Chun, Kyung Ah; Park, Young Ha [Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the MR findings of symptomatic osteochondromas. We evaluated 31 patients who between July, 1994 and May, 1997 underwent MR imaging for symptomatic osteochondroma. Fourteen were males and 17 were females, and their ages ranged from 8 to 49 (mean, 23) years. Using T1WI, T2WI and gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced T1WI, images were analysed according to signal intensity in the osseous component of the osteochondroma, thickness of the cartilage cap, and associated change in surrounding soft tissue. Clinical manifestation included a palpable mass or tendency to grow (n=22) and pain on movement (n=9). Complications were of three types : that which followed change in the osseous component of the tumor, associated change in surrounding soft tissue, and malignant transformation. In the osseous component, bone marrow edema or contusion was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), and in two (65%), fracture was observed. In surrounding soft tissue, muscle impingement was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), bursitis was in 7 cases (22.6 %), tenosynovitis in seven (22.6 %), and vascular compression in five (16.1 %). In three cases (9.7%), transformation to chondrosarcoma had occurred; two of these were derived from osteochondromatosis and one from a single osteochondroma. The thickness of the cartilage cap was as follow : < 5 mm (n=16), 5-10 mm (n=12), and > 10 mm (n=3). In patients with symptomatic osteochondroma, MR imaging is useful for detecting both complications and malignant transformation. (author). 21 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  11. A Newly Emergent Turkey Arthritis Reovirus Shows Dominant Enteric Tropism and Induces Significantly Elevated Innate Antiviral and T Helper-1 Cytokine Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer A Sharafeldin

    Full Text Available Newly emergent turkey arthritis reoviruses (TARV were isolated from tendons of lame 15-week-old tom turkeys that occasionally had ruptured leg tendons. Experimentally, these TARVs induced remarkable tenosynovitis in gastrocnemius tendons of turkey poults. The current study aimed to characterize the location and the extent of virus replication as well as the cytokine response induced by TARV during the first two weeks of infection. One-week-old male turkeys were inoculated orally with TARV (O'Neil strain. Copy numbers of viral genes were estimated in intestines, internal organs and tendons at ½, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 14 days Post inoculation (dpi. Cytokine profile was measured in intestines, spleen and leg tendons at 0, 4, 7 and 14 dpi. Viral copy number peaked in jejunum, cecum and bursa of Fabricius at 4 dpi. Copy numbers increased dramatically in leg tendons at 7 and 14 dpi while minimal copies were detected in internal organs and blood during the same period. Virus was detected in cloacal swabs at 1-2 dpi, and peaked at 14 dpi indicating enterotropism of the virus and its early shedding in feces. Elevation of IFN-α and IFN-β was observed in intestines at 7 dpi as well as a prominent T helper-1 response (IFN-γ at 7 and 14 dpi. IFN-γ and IL-6 were elevated in gastrocnemius tendons at 14 dpi. Elevation of antiviral cytokines in intestines occurred at 7dpi when a significant decline of viral replication in intestines was observed. T helper-1 response in intestines and leg tendons was the dominant T-helper response. These results suggest the possible correlation between viral replication and cytokine response in early infection of TARV in turkeys. Our findings provide novel insights which help elucidate viral pathogenesis in turkey tendons infected with TARV.

  12. Metástase cutânea rara de provável carcinoma basaloide de cólon simulando granuloma piogênico Rare cutaneous metastasis from a probable basaloid carcinoma of the colon mimicking pyogenic granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Costa Verardino

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available As acrometástases, principalmente para as mãos, são incomuns e representam cerca de 0,0070,2% de todas as lesões metastáticas. O pulmão é o sítio de origem mais comum, colaborando com 4050% dos casos relatados na literatura. Os rins e mamas são outras localizações também relacionadas a neoplasias que metastatizam para as mãos, além de, mais raramente, trato gastrointestinal, outros tumores sistêmicos e sarcomas. Seu diagnóstico precoce é difícil, pois pode ser assintomático, se assemelhar a tenossinovite, artrite, paroníquia, granuloma piogênico ou infecção local. No presente relato, os autores apresentam paciente com diagnóstico de acrometástase, em ambos os quartos quirodáctilos, oriunda de carcinoma basaloide de canal anal, com pobre resposta à radioterapiaAcrometastasis is a rare occurrence, especially when affecting the hands. It represents around 0.007-0.2% of all metastatic lesions. The most common site of origin is the lung, accounting for 40-50% of all cases reported in the literature. Kidneys and breasts are other sites also associated with neoplastic lesions that disseminate to the hands. More rarely, the site of origin may be the gastrointestinal tract or other systemic tumors or sarcomas. Early diagnosis is difficult, since the condition may be asymptomatic or may mimic tenosynovitis, arthritis, paronychia, pyogenic granuloma or a local infection. In the present paper, the authors report on a patient with the diagnosis of acrometastasis on both hands originating from a basaloid carcinoma of the anal canal. Response to radiotherapy was poor

  13. MR-imaging of anterior tibiotalar impingement syndrome: Agreement, sensitivity and specificity of MR-imaging and indirect MR-arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, Joerg; Bernt, Reinhard; Seeger, Thomas; Weissenbaeck, Alexander; Tuechler, Heinrich; Resnick, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the role of MR-imaging in the diagnosis of anterior ankle impingement syndromes. Materials and methods: We prospectively examined 51 consecutive patients with chronic ankle pain by MR-imaging. Arthroscopy was performed in 29 patients who previously underwent non-enhanced MR-imaging; in 11 patients, indirect MR-arthrography additionally was performed. MR-examinations were correlated with clinical findings; MR and arthroscopy scores were statistically compared, agreement was measured. Results: Arthroscopy demonstrated granulation tissue in the lateral gutter (38%) and anterior recess (31%), lesions of the anterior tibiofibular (31%) and the anterior talofibular ligament (21%) as well as intraarticular bodies (10%). Stenosing tenosynovitis and a ganglionic cyst were revealed as extraarticular causes for chronic ankle pain by MR-examination (17%). Agreement of MR-imaging and arthroscopy was fair for the anterior talofibular ligament and the anterior joint cavity (kappa 0.40). Major discrepancy was found for non-enhanced MR scans (kappa 0.49) when compared with indirect MR-arthrography (kappa 0.03) in the anterior cavity. The sensitivity for lesions of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligament and the anterior cavity (0.91-0.87) detected by MR-imaging was superior in comparison to lesions of the anterior tibiofibular ligament and anteromedial cavity (0.50-0.24). Conclusion: MR-imaging provides additional information about the mechanics of chronic ankle impingement rather than an accurate diagnosis of this clinical entity. The method is helpful in differentiating extra- from intra-articular causes of ankle impingement. Indirect MR-arthrography has little or no additional value in patients with ankle impingement syndrome

  14. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

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    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  15. Handwriting difficulties in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Visser, Bart; Daffertshofer, Andreas; van Rossum, Marion Aj; Roorda, Leo D; van der Leeden, Marike; Dekker, Joost; Hoeksma, Agnes F

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe handwriting difficulties of primary school children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and to investigate possible correlations with hand function and writing performance. In a cross-sectional approach, 15 children with JIA and reported handwriting difficulties were included together with 15 healthy matched controls. Impairments (signs of arthritis or tenosynovitis, reduced grip force and limited range of motion of the wrist (wrist-ROM)), activity limitations (reduced quality and speed of handwriting, pain during handwriting), and participation restrictions (perceived handwriting difficulties at school) were assessed and analysed. Although selected by the presence of handwriting difficulties, the majority of the JIA children (73%) had no active arthritis of the writing hand, and only minor hand impairments were found. Overall, the JIA children performed well during the short handwriting test, but the number of letters they wrote per minute decreased significantly during the 5-minute test, compared to the healthy controls. JIA patients had significantly higher pain scores on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale, compared to the healthy controls. The actual presence of arthritis, and limitation in grip force and wrist-ROM did not correlate with reported participation restrictions with regard to handwriting at school. The JIA children reported pain during handwriting, and inability to sustain handwriting for a longer period of time. The results of this pilot study show that JIA children with handwriting difficulties, experience their restrictions mainly through pain and the inability to sustain handwriting for a longer period of time. No correlations could be found with impairments.

  16. MRI of fractures of the distal radius: comparison with conventional radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, L.D.; Eustace, S. [Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiol.; Savenor, A.; Nwachuku, I.; Tilsley, J. [Department of Orthopedics, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Objective. To compare the evaluation of fractures of the distal radius with MRI and conventional radiographs. To demonstrate the ability of MRI to detect unsuspected soft tissue derangement accompanying this common injury. Design and patients. Twenty-one consecutive inpatients admitted following fracture of the distal radius underwent preoperative evaluation with both conventional radiographs and MRI. In each case, analysis was made of both the osseous and soft tissue injury. MRI findings were compared with those identified on conventional radiographs and at subsequent surgical fixation. Results. Of 21 patients with fractures of the distal radius, 20 had extension to the radiocarpal articulation, 14 had distal radio-ulnar joint extension and 5 had avulsion of the ulnar styloid.Occult carpal bone fractures accompanying fracture of the distal radius were identified in two patients: one of the capitate and the other of the second metacarpal base. Ten patients (48%) had associated soft tissue injury: six patients had scapholunate ligament rupture, two patients had disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage, one patient had extensor carpi ulnaris tenosynovitis and one patient had a tear of a dorsal radiocarpal ligament. Of five patients with ulnar styloid avulsions, none had evidence of triangular fibrocartilage tears. Conclusion. MRI affords better evaluation of osseous injury accompanying distal radial fractures than conventional radiographs. Intra-articular soft tissue injury accompanies distal radial fractures in almost 50% of cases. Scapholunate ligament disruption commonly accompanies intra-articular fracture through the lunate facet of the distal radius. Fracture of the ulnar styloid is infrequently associated with tear of the triangular fibrocartilage. (orig.) With 5 figs., 16 refs.

  17. Ultrasonography as a prognostic and objective parameter in Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkegaard, Mads, E-mail: mbakkegaard@hotmail.com [Department of Rheumatology, Holbæk Hospital, Smedelundsgade 60, 4300 Holbæk (Denmark); Johannsen, Finn E., E-mail: f.e.johannsen@dadlnet.dk [Private Department of Rheumatology, Furesø-reumatologerne, Farum and ISMC, Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2. Tværvej, Indgang 8, 1. sal, 2400 København NV (Denmark); Højgaard, Betina, E-mail: beho@kora.dk [Danish Institute for Local and Regional Government Research, Købmagergade 22, 1150 København K (Denmark); Langberg, Henning, E-mail: henninglangberg@gmail.com [Institute of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Centre for Healthy Ageing, Faculty of Heath Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, bygn. 24, postboks 2099, 1014 København (Denmark)

    2015-03-15

    Objectives: To study prospectively whether structural changes determined by ultrasound scanning (US) can be used as prognostic markers for outcome in patients with symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and to investigate whether there exists an association between US findings and pain measured by visual analog scale (VAS) and a general assessment score (GA). Methods: 92 consecutive patients with AT symptoms were recruited from two outpatient clinics in rheumatology. The patients underwent a conservative treatment protocol consisting of reduced activities, controlled rehabilitation including eccentric exercises of the calf muscles and if needed supplemented with corticosteroid injections. The patients were examined clinically and by US (tendon thickness, hyper- and hypoechogenicity, calcification, bursitis, calcaneusspure, tenosynovitis, gray scale and color Doppler focusing on increased flow intra- or peritendinous). The clinical and US examination were performed at entry, 1, 2, 3 and at 6 month. Results: 42 women and 50 men were included (mean age of 47 years). They had symptoms for more than 13 months and a symptomatic Achilles tendon mean thickness of 7.4 ± 2.3 mm. Heterogeneity at the initial examination was found to be a prognostic marker for the clinical outcome. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased flow at any time point were significantly correlated to pain at function, palpatory pain and morning pain at the same time points. A reduction in tendon thickness was statistically associated with a decrease in palpatory pain. Conclusion: Heterogeneity is a prognostic marker in AT. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased Doppler activity can be used as objective outcome parameters for the treatment effect of AT.

  18. [Work-related diseases and health-related compensation claims, Northeastern Brazil, 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Norma Suely Souto; Santana, Vilma Sousa; Albuquerque-Oliveira, Paulo Rogério; Barbosa-Branco, Anadergh

    2008-08-01

    To estimate the contribution of work-related diseases to sick leaves due to general and occupational health problems. Sociodemographic, occupational and health data from 29,658 records of temporary disability benefits, granted on account of health problems by the Instituto Nacional do Seguro Social (National Institute of Social Security) in the state of Bahia (Northeastern Brazil), were analyzed. All constant ICD-10 clinical diagnoses were taken into consideration, except for those referring to external causes and factors that influence contact with health services. The link between diagnosis and occupation was based on the ICD-10 code and whether the type of compensation was due to a "work-related accident/disease" or not. From all the benefits, 3.1% were granted due to work-related diseases: 70% were musculoskeletal system and connective tissue diseases, while 14.5% were related to the nervous system. In general, benefits granted at more than two times the expected frequency were as follows: tenosynovitis in the manufacturing sector (Proportion Ratio-PR=2.70), carpal tunnel syndrome in the financial intermediation sector (PR=2.43), and lumbar disc degeneration in the transportation, postal service and telecommunications sectors (PR=2.17). However, no causal connection could be established for these diseases, in these activity sectors, in a significant percentage of benefits. Results suggest the existence of possible occupational risk factors for diseases in these fields of activity, as well as the underreporting of the link between diseases and work, thus disguising the responsibility of companies and the perspective of prevention through work reorganization.

  19. MR imaging in the diagnosis of the os trigonum syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamburrini, O.; Porpiglia, H.; Barresi, D.; Bertucci, B.; Console, D.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper is investigated the yield of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in hind foot conditions, particularly the os trigonum syndrome, which are very difficult to diagnose clinically. 7 consecutive patients were examined. They were complaining of hind foot pain for more than 4 months (male:female=1:6; age range 16-22 years, average 18.6). Three patients practiced competitive sports and 4 ballet. It was performed conventional radiography (orthogonal projections) and then MRI with a 0.5 T superconductive unit with surface coils; MR images were acquired with T1-weighted spin-echo (SE), T2-weighted gradient-echo (GRE), and fast inversion recovery (FIR) fat-suppressed sequences with 4 mm thickness and 0 mm gap. In 2 cases the os trigonum had irregular margins with subchondral sclerosis and widened synchondrosis. In 3 patients it was found flessor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, likely caused by tendon compression and displacement within its sheath; there were neither os trigonum marrow edema nor synchondrosis widening. One patient had os trigonum hypertrophy, mild synchondrosis widening and marrow edema, in the os trigonum and the posterior aspect of talus. One patient had the os trigonum, but no signs referable to the os trigonum syndrome. In the posterior impingement syndrome, the objective is to show inflammatory changes in the posterior capsule of the ankle joint, adjacent ligaments, tendons and chondrosynovial surface. MR provides important information on soft tissues involvement, synovial reaction, chondral and subchondral bone injuries and the association of flexor hallucis longus synovitis, if present. MRI also yields detailed information for correct therapeutic approach. In conclusion, MRI appears to be the technique of choice, after conventional radiography, thanks to its non invasiveness, multi planarity, and high spatial and contrast resolution [it

  20. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streit JJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan J Streit,1 Yousef Shishani,1 Mark Rodgers,2 Reuben Gobezie1 1The Cleveland Shoulder Institute, 2Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH, USA Background: Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Methods: Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Results: Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Conclusion: Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body. Keywords: biceps tendinitis, biceps tendinopathy, tenosynovium, anterior shoulder pain, long head biceps

  1. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy by Sectorisation of Port Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindhu, M. A.; Haq, I.; Rehman, S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the results of 160 consecutive laparoscopic cholecystectomy using sectorisation based port site selection to improve ergonomics for surgeons. Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of study: PNS Shifa Karachi, Pakistan from Feb 2011 to Feb 2012. Patients and Methods: In this prospective study, 160 consecutive patients had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a tertiary care hospital using sectorisation for trocar placement. All patients with symptomatic gallstones, acute calculous cholecystitis and empyema gallbladder were included. Patients with choledocholithiasis were excluded from the study. The collected data included age, sex, diagnosis, history of previous surgery, conversion to open surgery and its reasons, operative time, post-operative hospital stay, complications and laparoscopy related complications to the surgeon such as shoulder pain, wrist stress and pain, finger joint pain and stress exhaustion. Result: One hundred and sixty patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy with mean age 45 +- 12.9 years. Female to male ratio was 7.8:1. A total of 110 patients had chronic cholecystitis / biliary colic, 34 patients were with acute cholecystitis and 16 patients had diagnosis of empyema gallbladder. The mean operative time was 35.3+-14.6 min. Conversion rate to open surgery was 1.2%. Complications included bleeding from cystic artery (n=1) and injury to common hepatic duct (CHD) (n=1). One patient developed port site hernia post operatively. There was no incidence of laparoscopy related complications in surgeon such as pain shoulder, strains on the wrist joint, stress exhaustion and hand-finger joint pain. Conclusion: Sectorisation technique can be used in laparoscopic cholecystectomy in order to avoid the physical constraints of laparoscopic shoulder, hand finger joint pain, tenosynovitis, stress exhaustion, and hand muscle injury without increasing any morbidity to the patients. (author)

  2. Sports injuries in school gaelic football: a study over one season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A W

    1996-01-01

    School football injuries were studied over the seven months of one season on 150 males aged 16.94 +/- 0.82 years. Training averaged 4.13 +/- 1.47 hours per week and matches 1.84 +/- 0.60 hours per week. Mean time injured was: 0.51 +/- 1.7 days in hospital, 34.27 +/- 37.08 days off sport and 13.98 +/- 5.22 days of restricted activity. There were 136 match and 63 training injuries giving 175.98 injuries per 10000 hours of matches and 31.06 injuries per 10000 hours of training. Injuries were treated as follows: hospital 83, general practitioners 51, physiotherapists 28, no treatment 38. The most common injuries were: ankle sprain (11.6% of the total), hamstring strain (6.5%), contusion (6.5%) back strain (6%) knee sprain (5.0%), finger sprain (5.0%), other muscle strains (5.0%), fracture of the wrist (5.0%), dislocation of the finger (4.5%), overuse injury of the back (4.0%), tenosynovitis (3.5%), fracture of the ankle (3.0%). Thirteen injuries were to goal-keepers, 85 to backs, 31 to mid-field players and 70 to forwards. In 34.83% of the injuries foul play was given as the major cause. This was followed by "Lack of fitness", "Poor kit or boots" and "Previous injury" (all 11.24%). The most common minor cause was "Poor state of the pitch" (17.42% of injuries).

  3. Profile of the subjects with soft tissue injuries attended at an occupational health service and the RSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Freitas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the profile of subjects with soft tissue injuries attended at the Reference Center of Occupational Health – CEREST in the municipality of Santos, Sao Paulo state, in 2010, and the social insurance benefits granted.Materials and Methods: Analysis of medical records of the subjects assisted at CEREST in 2010, surveying data on gender, age, occupation, clinical diagnostics, clinical complaints, retirement, etc. The clinical diagnostics were categorized according to the International Classification of Diseases - ICD-10, subjects with soft tissue injuries were selected, and the diagnostics related to mental health disorders were registered. Data were recorded in Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and analyzed using statistical software R Development Core Team.Results: Of the 206 medical records analyzed, 18.0% (n=37 showed soft tissue injuries, 81.1% were female and 18.9% were male, and the subjects’ mean age was 43.24 years (SD=8.76. Subjects between 31 and 50 years old (70.2% were the most affected. The most affected occupations were cleaners, general service workers, and bank clerks. The most prevalent clinical diagnoses were synovitis and tenosynovitis, shoulder bursitis, and rotator cuff syndrome, with 62.2% of the subjects presenting more than one clinical diagnosis. 13.5% of the subjects also presented mental disorders. Association between retirement from work and the presence of soft tissue injury was observed (p=0.032. Only 13.5% of the diagnoses had some association with the work conditions.Conclusions: The general profile of the workers with soft tissue injuries was obtained: prevalence in women, diseases manifested in productive age, difficulty of association with work conditions, need for interdisciplinary interventions.

  4. Work disability benefits due to musculoskeletal disorders among Brazilian private sector workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, E R; Albuquerque-Oliveira, P R; Barbosa-Branco, A

    2011-05-14

    To evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of disability benefits due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) granted to Brazilian private sector workers. This was a population-based epidemiological study of MSD-related benefits among registered private sector workers (n=32 959 329). The prevalence (benefits/10 000 workers/year) of work disability benefits was calculated by gender, age, state, Human Development Index (HDI), economic activity, MSD type and work-relatedness. The prevalence of MSD-related benefits in Brazil among registered private sector workers in 2008 was 93.6/10 000 workers. The prevalence increased with age, and was higher for women (112.2) than for men (88.1), although the former had shorter benefit duration. The gender-adjusted prevalence by state varied from 16.6 to 90.3 for non-work-related, and from 7.8 to 59.6 for work-related benefits. The Brazilian states with a high-very high HDI had the highest prevalence. The top four most common types of MSD-related benefits were due to back pain, intervertebral disc disorders, sinovitis/tenosynovitis and shoulder disorders. MSD is a frequent cause of work disability in Brazil. There were differences in prevalence among economic activities and between states grouped by HDI. This study demonstrates that further evaluation of the contributing factors associated with MSD-related disability benefits is required. Factors that should be considered include production processes, political organisation, socioeconomic and educational characteristics, the compensation and recording systems, and employee-employer power relationships. These factors may play an important role in the prevalence of MSD-related disability benefits, especially in countries with large socioeconomic iniquities such as Brazil.

  5. [A case of ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by Cupriavidus pauculus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşbakan, Mehmet Sezai; Yamazhan, Tansu; Aydemir, Söhret; Bacakoğlu, Feza

    2010-01-01

    Cupriavidus pauculus (formerly CDC Group IVc-2) is a non-fermentative, motile, gram-negative bacillus, rarely associated with human infections. It has been isolated from water, water from ultrafiltration systems and bottled mineral water. To date, 19 cases of bacteremia, two cases of peritonitis and one case of tenosynovitis associated with C. pauculus have been reported in English literature. In this paper, we report the first case of C. pauculus ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in Turkey. A 47 years-old female with breast cancer was performed total mastectomy six years ago and received six cures of chemotherapy after surgery. The patient was hospitalized in medical oncology clinic with complaints of weight loss, nausea and vomiting for one year. Since she had problems of consiousness, dysphagia and pitosis, lumbar puncture was performed to rule out central nervous system infection or metastasis. Cryptococcal meningitis was diagnosed upon the examination of Indian-ink stained smear of cerebrospinal fluid and amphotericin B was initiated. On the 11th day of her follow up, she developed respiratory distress and was transferred to pulmonary intensive care and underwent invasive mechanical ventilator (IMV) therapy. On the 4th day of IMV; a new infiltration was detected on the upper zone of chest X-ray in addition to fever (38.3 degrees C) and intense endotracheal secretion. Therefore, bronchoscopic examination was performed and bronchoalveolar lavage and bronchoscope aspiration materials were obtained and cultivated. Bacteria grown at blood agar and EMB agar after 48 hours of incubation were stained as gram-negative bacilli and identified as C. pauculus by VITEK 2 compact system (bioMérieux Inc, USA). The strain was susceptible to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, piperacilin/tazobactam and resistant to amikacin. The case was considered as C. pauculus VAP and imipenem (500 mg, 4 x 1) for 14 days was initiated. Clinical and

  6. Dupuytren’s disease digital radius IV right hand and carpal tunnel syndrome on ipsilateral hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teona Sebe Ioana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dupuytren’s contracture is a fibroproliferative disease whose etiology and pathophysiology are unclear and controversial. It is a connective tissue disorder, which takes part in the palmar’s fibromatosis category and has common characteristics with the healing process. Dupuytren’s disease is characterized by the flexion contracture of the hand due to palmar and digital aponevrosis. It generally affects the 4th digital radius, followed by the 5th one. Without surgery, it leads to functional impotence of those digital rays and/or hand. It is associated with other diseases and situational conditions like Peyronie’s disease, the Lederhose disease (plantar fibromatosis, Garrod’s digital knuckle-pads, diabetes, epilepsy, alcoholism, micro traumatisms, stenosing tenosynovitis and not the least with carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel syndrome is a peripheral neuropathy with the incarceration of the median nerve at the ARC level, expressed clinically by sensory and motor disturbances in the distribution territory of the median nerve, which cause functional limitations of daily activities of the patient. After the failure of the nonsurgical treatment or the appearance of the motor deficit, is established the open or endoscopic surgical treatment with the release of the median nerve. Postoperative recovery in both diseases is crucial to the functionality of the affected upper limb and to the quality of the patient’s life. The patient, a 61 years old man, admitted to the clinic for the functional impotence of the right hand, for the permanent flexion contracture of the metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP of the 4th finger with extension deficit, for the damage of the thumb pulp clamp of the 4th finger, for nocturnal paresthesia of fingers I-III and pain that radiates into the fingertips. After clinical, paraclinical, imagistic and electrical investigations, surgery is practiced partial aponevrectomy

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in diagnosing arthritis of the hand joints: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciechomska, A.; Bachta, A.; Tlustochowicz, W.; Serafin-Krol, M.; Jakubowski, W.; Andrysiak, R.; Krolicki, L.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of joint inflammation in clinical practice is based on physical examination. Imaging modalities which allow soft tissues to be visualized may be helpful in making the assessment impartial and to evaluate the severity of inflammation. The aim of the study was to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (USG) findings in visualizing joint inflammation of the hand. The study comprised 113 patients with chronic arthritis, of whom 88 patients had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 25 arthritis of etiology unconnected with RA. MRI of the hand was performed in 98 patients and USG of the hand in 86 patients. Sixty-four patients underwent both USG and MRI. In the USG examinations a linear, high-frequency transducer of 5-9 MHz and a Color Doppler option (CD-USG) were used. MRI was performed with a 1.5 T unit in the SE sequences T1, T1 with fat saturation, and before and after Gd-DTPA injection. Assessed joints included the wrist joints, etacarpophalangeal joints, and proximal and distal interphalangeal joints (1921 joints in total). Tenosynovitis of the flexors and extensors was also evaluated. MRI showed inflammation in 277 joints (16.6%) of 66 patients. The mean number of inflamed joints found using MRI was 2.8 ± 2.9. US visualized synovitis in a larger number of joints (350, 23.9%) in 63 patients. The mean number of inflamed joints found by USG was 4.1 ± 4.0. Increased blood flow on CD-USG was seen in 202 joints (13.8%) of 72 patients. The difference between RA and non-RA patients as visible on MRI and USG were statistically significant. There were correlations in showing joint inflammation between MRI and USG (τ = 0.64; p < 0.00001) and between CD-USG and MRI (τ = 0.44; p < 0.00001) and concordance in showing flexor tendon sheath inflammation. MRI and USG both show inflammation of the joints. The concordance between the methods in showing joint inflammation depends upon analyzing the features of inflammation. Availability and the

  8. Develop and Manufacture an Ergonomically Sound Glovebox Glove Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, Cindy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-18

    Ergonomic injury and radiation exposure are two safety concerns for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This facility employs the largest number of gloveboxes (GB) at LANL with approximately 6000 gloves installed. The current GB glove design dates back to the 1960’s and is not based on true hand anatomy, revealing several issues: short fingers, inappropriate length from the wrist to finger webbing, nonexistent joint angles and incorrect thumb placement. These design flaws are directly related to elbow (lateral epicondylitis) and thumb (DeQuervain’s tenosynovitis) injuries. The current design also contributes to increased wear on the glove, causing unplanned glove openings (failures) which places workers at risk of exposure. An improved glovebox glove design has three significant benefits: 1) it will reduce the risk of injury, 2) it will improve comfort and productivity, and 3) it will reduce the risk of a glovebox failures. The combination of these three benefits has estimated savings of several million dollars. The new glove design incorporated the varied physical attributes of workers ranging from the 5th percentile female to the 95th percentile male. Anthropometric hand dimensions along with current GB worker dimensions were used to develop the most comprehensive design specifications for the new glove. Collaboration with orthopedic hand surgeons also provided major contributtions to the design. The new glovebox glove was developed and manufactured incorporating over forty dimensions producing the most comprehensive ergonomically sound design. The new design received a LANL patent (patent attorney docket No: LANS 36USD1 “Protective Glove”, one of 20 highest patents awarded by the Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation. The glove dimensions were inputed into a solid works model which was used to produce molds. The molds were then shipped to a glove manufacturer for production of the new glovebox gloves. The new

  9. Risk of Hand Syndromes in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu-Hsuan; Li, Chung-Yi; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Wang, Liang-Yi; Kuo, Ken N.; Jou, I-Ming; Hou, Wen-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the overall and cause-specific incidences of diabetic hand syndromes (DHS) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) by using age and sex stratifications. The DM and control cohorts comprised 606,152 patients with DM and 609,970 age- and sex-matched subjects, respectively, who were followed up from 2000 to 2008. We estimated the incidence densities (IDs) of overall and cause-specific DHS, namely carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), stenosing flexor tenosynovitis (SFT), limited joint mobility (LJM), and Dupuytren disease (DD), and calculated the hazard ratios (HRs) of DHS in relation to DM by using a Cox proportional hazards model with adjustment for potential confounders. Over a 9-year period, 51,207 patients with DM (8.45%) and 39,153 matched controls (6.42%) sought ambulatory care visits for various DHS, with an ID of 117.7 and 80.7 per 10,000 person-years, respectively. The highest cause-specific ID was observed for CTS, followed by SFT, LJM, and DD, regardless of the diabetic status. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with DM had a significantly high HR of overall DHS (1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.48–1.53). Men and women aged the highest HR (2.64, 95% CI = 2.15–3.24 and 2.99, 95% CI = 2.55–3.50, respectively). Cause-specific analyses revealed that DM was more strongly associated with SFT (HR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.86–1.95) and DD (HR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.39–2.39) than with CTS (HR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.28–1.34) and LJM (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.13–1.35). Men and younger patients with DM have the highest risk of DHS. Certain hand syndromes, such as SFT and DD, were more strongly associated with DM than with other syndromes and require the attention of clinicians. PMID:26469895

  10. Duration of remission after halving of the etanercept dose in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized, prospective, long-term, follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannini C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabrizio Cantini, Laura Niccoli, Emanuele Cassarà, Olga Kaloudi, Carlotta NanniniDivision of Rheumatology, Misericordia e Dolce Hospital, Prato, ItalyBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the proportion of patients with ankylosing spondylitis maintaining clinical remission after reduction of their subcutaneous etanercept dose to 50 mg every other week compared with that in patients receiving etanercept 50 mg weekly.Methods: In the first phase of this randomized, prospective, follow-up study, all biologic-naïve patients identified between January 2005 and December 2009 as satisfying the modified New York clinical criteria for ankylosing spondylitis treated with etanercept 50 mg weekly were evaluated for disease remission in January 2010. In the second phase, patients meeting the criteria for remission were randomized to receive subcutaneous etanercept as either 50 mg weekly or 50 mg every other week. The randomization allocation was 1:1. Remission was defined as Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index < 4, no extra-axial manifestations of peripheral arthritis, dactylitis, tenosynovitis, or iridocyclitis, and normal acute-phase reactants. The patients were assessed at baseline, at weeks 4 and 12, and every 12 weeks thereafter. The last visit constituted the end of the follow-up.Results: During the first phase, 78 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (57 males and 21 females, median age 38 years, median disease duration 12 years were recruited. In January 2010, after a mean follow-up of 25 ± 11 months, 43 (55.1% patients achieving clinical remission were randomized to one of the two treatment arms. Twenty-two patients received etanercept 50 mg every other week (group 1 and 21 received etanercept 50 mg weekly (group 2. At the end of follow-up, 19 of 22 (86.3% subjects in group 1 and 19 of 21 (90.4% in group 2 were still in remission, with no significant difference between the two groups. The mean follow-up duration in group

  11. Initial Experience of Using Dual-Energy CT with an Iodine Overlay Image for Hand Psoriatic Arthritis: Comparison Study with Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Tojo, Shinjiro; Yonenaga, Takenori; Asahina, Akihiko; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility of dual-energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) with an iodine overlay image (IOI) for evaluation of psoriatic arthritis in the hand. Materials and Methods Approval from the institutional ethics committee and written informed consent from all patients were obtained. This prospective study included 16 patients who had psoriasis with finger joint symptoms from January 2015 to January 2016. Contrast material-enhanced (CE) DE CT and 1.5-T CE magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed within 1 month of each other. DE CT was performed with a tube voltage of 80 kV and 140 kV with use of a 0.4-mm tin filter. Images acquired with both modalities were evaluated by two radiologists independently by using a semiquantitative scoring system. Interreader agreement was calculated for each modality: Weighted κ values were calculated for synovitis, flexor tenosynovitis, and extensor peritendonitis, and κ values were calculated for periarticular inflammation. With consensus scores and CE MR images as the reference, the sensitivity and specificity of IOI DE CT for inflammatory lesions were calculated. Statistical analysis of discordant readings was performed by using the McNemar test. Results Interreader agreement for inflammatory lesions was excellent or good (weighted κ = 0.83 and κ = 0.75 in IOI DE CT; weighted κ = 0.81 and κ = 0.87 in CE MR imaging). The sensitivity and specificity of IOI DE CT were 0.78 and 0.87, respectively. Total agreement was 86.3%; however, there were significantly more lesions detected with IOI DE CT than with CE MR imaging alone (134 vs 20 lesions in 1120 evaluated items; P the abnormalities detected with IOI DE CT alone were located in distal interphalangeal joints. Conclusion IOI DE CT is a new imaging modality that may be useful for evaluating psoriatic arthritis in the hand, particularly in the detection of inflammatory lesions in small joints, and may be more useful than CE MR imaging, within the limitation

  12. Risk of Hand Syndromes in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu-Hsuan; Li, Chung-Yi; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Wang, Liang-Yi; Kuo, Ken N; Jou, I-Ming; Hou, Wen-Hsuan

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the overall and cause-specific incidences of diabetic hand syndromes (DHS) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) by using age and sex stratifications.The DM and control cohorts comprised 606,152 patients with DM and 609,970 age- and sex-matched subjects, respectively, who were followed up from 2000 to 2008. We estimated the incidence densities (IDs) of overall and cause-specific DHS, namely carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), stenosing flexor tenosynovitis (SFT), limited joint mobility (LJM), and Dupuytren disease (DD), and calculated the hazard ratios (HRs) of DHS in relation to DM by using a Cox proportional hazards model with adjustment for potential confounders.Over a 9-year period, 51,207 patients with DM (8.45%) and 39,153 matched controls (6.42%) sought ambulatory care visits for various DHS, with an ID of 117.7 and 80.7 per 10,000 person-years, respectively. The highest cause-specific ID was observed for CTS, followed by SFT, LJM, and DD, regardless of the diabetic status. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with DM had a significantly high HR of overall DHS (1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.48-1.53). Men and women aged the highest HR (2.64, 95% CI = 2.15-3.24 and 2.99, 95% CI = 2.55-3.50, respectively). Cause-specific analyses revealed that DM was more strongly associated with SFT (HR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.86-1.95) and DD (HR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.39-2.39) than with CTS (HR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.28-1.34) and LJM (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.13-1.35).Men and younger patients with DM have the highest risk of DHS. Certain hand syndromes, such as SFT and DD, were more strongly associated with DM than with other syndromes and require the attention of clinicians.

  13. Síndrome de Brown inflamatória: relato de caso Inflammatory Brown syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Guedes Candido Marculino

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Brown enquadra-se no grupo de estrabismos restritivos e é causada pela limitação de movimento do tendão do oblíquo superior através da tróclea. Caracteriza-se por ortotropia ou hipotropia na primária do olhar, limitação ou ausência de elevação em adução, frequente depressão do olho em adução com anisotropia em V e dução passiva positiva na elevação em adução. Denomina-se síndrome de Brown inflamatória, o distúrbio secundário, que tem como principais causas inflamações locais na órbita e doenças inflamatórias como artrite reumatóide e tenossinovite. Apresentamos o caso de um paciente de 44 anos, do sexo masculino, com queixa de diplopia binocular vertical à dextroversão recorrente. Diagnosticado como síndrome de Brown inflamatória sem etiologia definida, confirmada por ressonância nuclear magnética e com resolução espontânea.Brown syndrome fits the group of restrictive strabismus and is caused by a movement limitation of the superior oblique tendon through the trochlea. It is characterized by parallelism in the primary gaze position, limitation or absence of elevation in adduction, frequent depression of the eye in adduction with anisotropy in V-pattern and positive passive duction in the elevation in adduction. It is called inflammatory Brown syndrome, a secondary disorder, which main causes are local inflammation in the orbit and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and tenosynovitis. A case of a 44 year-old patient, male, complaining of binocular vertical diplopia due to recurring dextroversion is reported. It was diagnosed as inflammatory Brown syndrome of uncertain etiology, confirmed by magnetic nuclear resonance, and with spontaneous resolution.

  14. MR imaging features of foot involvement in ankylosing spondylitis

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    Erdem, C. Zuhal E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L. Oktay; Ozdolap, Senay; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissue, tendon, cartilage, joint space, and bone of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Materials and Method: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 23 AS patients (46 feet). Ten asymptomatic volunteers (20 feet) were studied on MR imaging, as a control group. MR imaging protocol included; T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted fast-field echo (FFE) and fat-suppressed short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences in sagittal, sagittal oblique, and coronal planes using a head coil. Specifically, we examined: bone erosions, tendinitis (acute and chronic), para-articular enthesophyte, joint effusion, plantar fasciitis, joint space narrowing, soft tissue edema, bone marrow edema, enthesopathy in the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia attachment, subchondral signal intensity abnormalities (edema and sclerosis), tenosynovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, subchondral cysts, subchondral fissures, and bony ankylosis. Midfoot, hindfoot, and ankle were included in examined anatomic regions. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in 3 (13%) of the patients while frequency of involvement was 21 (91%) with MR imaging assessment. The MR imaging findings were bone erosions (65%), Achilles tendinitis (acute and chronic) (61%), para-articular enthesophyte (48%), joint effusion (43%), plantar fasciitis (40%), joint space narrowing (40%), subchondral sclerosis (35%), soft tissue edema (30%), bone marrow edema (30%), enthesopathy of the Achilles attachment (30%), subchondral edema (26%), enthesopathy in the plantar fascia attachment (22%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (22%), subchondral cysts (17%), subchondral fissures (17%), tendinitis and enthesopathy of the plantar ligament (13%), and bony ankylosis (9%). The most common involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (83%) following by midfoot (69% ) and ankle (22

  15. MR imaging features of foot involvement in ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L. Oktay; Ozdolap, Senay; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissue, tendon, cartilage, joint space, and bone of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Materials and Method: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 23 AS patients (46 feet). Ten asymptomatic volunteers (20 feet) were studied on MR imaging, as a control group. MR imaging protocol included; T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted fast-field echo (FFE) and fat-suppressed short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences in sagittal, sagittal oblique, and coronal planes using a head coil. Specifically, we examined: bone erosions, tendinitis (acute and chronic), para-articular enthesophyte, joint effusion, plantar fasciitis, joint space narrowing, soft tissue edema, bone marrow edema, enthesopathy in the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia attachment, subchondral signal intensity abnormalities (edema and sclerosis), tenosynovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, subchondral cysts, subchondral fissures, and bony ankylosis. Midfoot, hindfoot, and ankle were included in examined anatomic regions. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in 3 (13%) of the patients while frequency of involvement was 21 (91%) with MR imaging assessment. The MR imaging findings were bone erosions (65%), Achilles tendinitis (acute and chronic) (61%), para-articular enthesophyte (48%), joint effusion (43%), plantar fasciitis (40%), joint space narrowing (40%), subchondral sclerosis (35%), soft tissue edema (30%), bone marrow edema (30%), enthesopathy of the Achilles attachment (30%), subchondral edema (26%), enthesopathy in the plantar fascia attachment (22%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (22%), subchondral cysts (17%), subchondral fissures (17%), tendinitis and enthesopathy of the plantar ligament (13%), and bony ankylosis (9%). The most common involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (83%) following by midfoot (69% ) and ankle (22

  16. Disparity between ultrasound and clinical findings in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husic, Rusmir; Gretler, Judith; Felber, Anja; Graninger, Winfried B; Duftner, Christina; Hermann, Josef; Dejaco, Christian

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the association between psoriatic arthritis (PsA)-specific clinical composite scores and ultrasound-verified pathology as well as comparison of clinical and ultrasound definitions of remission. We performed a prospective study on 70 consecutive PsA patients. Clinical assessments included components of Disease Activity Index for Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and the Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI). Minimal disease activity (MDA) and the following remission criteria were applied: CPDAI joint, entheses and dactylitis domains (CPDAI-JED)=0, DAPSA≤3.3, Boolean's remission definition and physician-judged remission (rem-phys). B-mode and power Doppler (PD-) ultrasound findings were semiquantitatively scored at 68 joints (evaluating synovia, peritendinous tissue, tendons and bony changes) and 14 entheses. Ultrasound remission and minimal ultrasound disease activity (MUDA) were defined as PD-score=0 and PD-score ≤1, respectively, at joints, peritendinous tissue, tendons and entheses. DAPSA but not CPDAI correlated with B-mode and PD-synovitis. Ultrasound signs of enthesitis, dactylitis, tenosynovitis and perisynovitis were not linked with clinical composites. Clinical remission or MDA was observed in 15.7% to 47.1% of PsA patients. Ultrasound remission and MUDA were present in 4.3% and 20.0% of patients, respectively. Joint and tendon-related PD-scores were higher in patients with active versus inactive disease according to CPDAI-JED, DAPSA, Boolean's and rem-phys, whereas no difference was observed regarding enthesitis and perisynovitis. DAPSA≤3.3 (OR 3.9, p=0.049) and Boolean's definition (OR 4.6, p=0.03) were more useful to predict MUDA than other remission criteria. PsA-specific composite scores partially reflect ultrasound findings. DAPSA and Boolean's remission definitions better identify MUDA patients than other clinical criteria. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  17. Ultrasound imaging-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: success in short-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzocchi, Alberto; Pelotti, Patrizia; Serraino, Salvatore; Battaglia, Milva; Bettelli, Graziano; Fusaro, Isabella; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Rotini, Roberto; Albisinni, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    for pain showed similar results. Pain at admission was also related to age, calcification size, ultrasound and Gärtner score, power Doppler positivity, bursal wall thickening and biceps tenosynovitis. The success of the procedure with quick improvement in function and symptoms is warranted in soft and middle-sized calcifications, in young adults. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous procedures for RCCT must be safe, effective and with prompt pain relief and function restoration. This study shows which clinical picture is more favourable to this purpose and actual prognostic factors for DNL (soft and middle-sized calcifications, in young adults, are more favourable).

  18. Síndrome do impacto posterior do tornozelo: um diagnóstico que deve ser lembrado pelo reumatologista. Relato de dois casos Posterior ankle impingement syndrome: a diagnosis rheumatologists should not forget. Two case reports

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    Adriano Chiereghin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O tornozelo é sítio frequente de sintomas dolorosos em atletas e não atletas. A dor localizada na região posterior pode ser o resultado final de diversas patologias, sendo um desafio diagnóstico para o reumatologista. A síndrome do impacto (pinçamento posterior do tornozelo, também denominada síndrome os trigonum e síndrome compressiva tibiotalar posterior, é um distúrbio clínico caracterizado por dor aguda ou crônica na região posterior do tornozelo, desencadeada pela flexão plantar forçada, que promove microtrauma crônico repetitivo. A patologia do processo os trigonum-talar é a causa mais comum dessa síndrome, mas existem outras causas, como tenossinovite do flexor longo do hálux, osteocondrite de tornozelo, doença da articulação subtalar e fratura. O diagnóstico baseia-se na história clínica e exame físico, e complementado por achados na radiografia simples (RX, ultrassom (US, cintilografia, tomografia computadorizada (TC e ressonância magnética (RM. Destacamos o RX por seu baixo custo e boa sensibilidade, o US pela possibilidade de guiar infiltrações terapêuticas e a RM pela possibilidade de avaliar partes moles adjacentes.The ankle is a common site of painful symptoms in athletes and nonathletes. Posterior ankle pain can be the end result of several pathologies, and a diagnostic challenge for rheumatologists. The posterior ankle impingement syndrome, also known as os trigonum syndrome and posterior tibiotalar compression syndrome, is a clinical disorder characterized by acute or chronic posterior ankle pain triggered by forced plantar flexion, which causes chronic repetitive microtrauma. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but there are other causes, such as tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Diagnosis is based on clinical history and physical examination, and complemented by findings on

  19. Real-life effectiveness of spa therapy in rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases: a retrospective study of 819 patients

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    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the use and efficacy of spa therapy in patients with a wide spectrum of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases under real-life clinical practice circumstances. In this retrospective observational study at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Department of Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, the records of all adult patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases who were prescribed a spa therapy in various health resorts in Turkey between 2002 and 2012 were analyzed. Patients sojourned to and stayed at a health resort and followed a usual 2-week course of spa therapy. The patients were examined within a week before and after the spa therapy at the department by the physicians and outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analog scale, VAS), patient's general evaluation (VAS), physician's general evaluation (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Lequesne's Functional Index (LFI), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC), Waddell Index (WI), Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPDS), Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). In total, 819 patients were included in the analysis. The diagnoses were 536 osteoarthritis; 115 fibromyalgia; 50 lumbar disc herniation; 34 cervical disc herniation; 23 nonspecific low back pain; 22 ankylosing spondylitis; 16 rheumatoid arthritis; 9 rotator cuff tendinitis; and 14 other conditions/diseases including scoliosis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, congenital hip dislocation in adult, Behçet's disease, de Quervain tendinopathy, psoriatic arthritis, osteoporosis, fracture rehabilitation, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Statistically significant decrease in pain scores was found in all patients except hip osteoarthritis ( p = 0.063) and rheumatoid arthritis ( p = 0.134) subgroups; and statistically significant improvement in function in all patients except hip osteoarthritis ( p

  20. Afecções mais freqüentes do aparelho locomotor dos eqüídeos de tração no município de Belo Horizonte Most frequent pathologies of the locomotor system in equids used for wagon traction in Belo Horizonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P.A. Maranhão

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Determinaram-se as enfermidades mais comuns do sistema músculo-esquelético dos animais de tração na cidade de Belo Horizonte. Foram utilizados 58 animais (42 eqüinos e 16 muares, sendo 31 machos e 27 fêmeas. O diagnóstico baseou-se no histórico e nos exames físico e radiológico. A freqüência observada para tenossinovite nos membros torácicos e pélvicos foi 55,2%, para tendinite nos membros torácicos, 81,0%, para tendinite nos membros pélvicos, 58,6%, e para desmite do ligamento suspensório nos membros torácicos, 77,6%. Para as lesões osteoarticulares, os resultados foram 13,8%, 12,1%, 27,6% e 12,1% de lesões osteoartríticas para a articulação interfalangeana distal dos membros torácicos e pélvicos e articulação interfalangeana proximal dos membros torácicos e pélvicos, respectivamente. Na articulação metacarpo-falangeana, a incidência foi 41,4% e, nos membros pélvicos, 39,7%. A incidência na articulação cárpica foi 62,1% e, na articulação társica, 96,6%. Os achados dos tecidos moles indicaram sobrecarga nos aparatos flexor e suspensório nesse tipo de atividade. Em ambos os casos, a atividade desenvolvida pelos animais parece ser a principal causa envolvida.The most common conditions of the musculoskeletal system of draft equidae in the city of Belo Horizonte were determined. Fifty-eight animals (42 horses and 16 mules were randomly examined, being 31 males and 27 females. Diagnosis was based on history, clinical and radiological examinations. The frequency observed for tenosynovitis in the fore and hindlimbs was 55.2%, 81.0%, for tendinitis in the forelimbs, 58.6% for tendinitis in the himblimbs, and 77.6% for suspensory ligament desmitis in the forelimbs. The results showed 13.8%, 12.1%, 27.6% and 12.1% of osteoarthritic lesions for distal interphalangeal joint of fore and hindlimbs and proximal interphalangeal joint of fore and hindlimbs, respectively. In the fetlock joints of the forelimbs, the

  1. A retrospective study on incidence of lameness in domestic animals

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    A. Mohsina

    2014-08-01

    .5%each due to tenosynovitis, arthritis and bone spavin, 7% due to laminitis of right hind and forelimbs and 4.5% due to quittor. Conclusion: The results show that lameness in animals is significantly affected by species, breed, age and sex of the animal. In dogs and cats, HQW is the most common cause of lameness. Among dogs, Mongrel and GSD breeds most affected. Male animals of less than 1 year or above 6 years are affected more. Hip dislocation is found to be more in male GSD and Labrador dogs and bilateral hip dislocation in spitz breeds. Hip dysplasia is also found to be more in GSD breed. Incidence of rickets is more in spitz dogs below 5 months of age. In equine and caprine species, right forelimb lameness, and in cattle right hind limb lameness is more. Hip dislocation, upward luxation of patella and wound are the major lameness causes in buffaloes.

  2. Os trigonum tarsi syndrome. Magnetic Resonance features; Sindrome dell'os trigonum tarsi. Ruolo della Risonanza Magnetica

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    Iovane, A.; Finazzo, M.; Carcione, A.; De Maria, M; Lagalla, R. [Palermo Policlinico Univ. P. Giaccone, Palermo (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia; Midiri, M. [Bari Policlinico Univ., Bari (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia

    2000-02-01

    The os trigonum tarsi is an accessory bone of the foot localized posterolateral to the lateral tubercle of talus. It is usually an asymptomatic condition. However, particular activities such as ballet, soccer, of football may cause repeated stress and chronic microtraumas to the hindfoot, resulting in the os trigonum syndrome. Pain is typically localized anterior to the Achilles tendon; nevertheless, diagnosis may be very difficult because other conditions may show the same symptoms. Radiography can only demonstrate the os trigonum and its morpho structural changes, while MR (Magnetic Resonance) imaging can also depict associated soft tissue damage. It is reported on 9 cases of os trigonum tarsi syndrome studied with MR imaging. Nine patients with the os trigonum syndrome were submitted to MRI. All the examinations were performed with the patients in supine recumbency with the injured foot in neutral position and then in forced plantar flexion. Axial and sagittal T1 SE, T2* GE and FIR images were acquired. It was evaluated os trigonum location and shape, signal intensity of bone, cartilages and adjacent soft tissues, and possible associated tendon injuries. No changes were found in the os trigonum location and shape. Signal intensity changes were seen in 2/9 cases. Disruption of the cartilaginous synchondrosis between the accessory navicular bone and the posterior tibial aspect was observed in 7/9 patients. Tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus was associated in 6/9 patients. Pseudoarthrosis with irregular bone margins and high-signal spots within the cartilage was found in 3 cases. MR imaging allows complete morpho structural assessment because it depicts the margins and the signal intensity of bone and ligaments on the 3 spatial planes. Particularly, sagittal T2 images best demonstrate the cartilage changes indicating synchondrosis disruption. This condition may cause abnormal mobility of the accessory bone with possible impingement with the posterior

  3. Doenças do trabalho e benefícios previdenciários relacionados à saúde, Bahia, 2000 Enfermedades del trabajo y beneficios de la previsión relacionados a la salud, Bahia (Brasil, 2000 Work-related diseases and health-related compensation claims, Northeastern Brazil, 2000

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    Norma Suely Souto Souza

    2008-08-01

    and factors that influence contact with health services. The link between diagnosis and occupation was based on the ICD-10 code and whether the type of compensation was due to a "work-related accident/disease" or not. RESULTS: From all the benefits, 3.1% were granted due to work-related diseases: 70% were musculoskeletal system and connective tissue diseases, while 14.5% were related to the nervous system. In general, benefits granted at more than two times the expected frequency were as follows: tenosynovitis in the manufacturing sector (Proportion Ratio-PR=2.70, carpal tunnel syndrome in the financial intermediation sector (PR=2.43, and lumbar disc degeneration in the transportation, postal service and telecommunications sectors (PR=2.17. However, no causal connection could be established for these diseases, in these activity sectors, in a significant percentage of benefits. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest the existence of possible occupational risk factors for diseases in these fields of activity, as well as the underreporting of the link between diseases and work, thus disguising the responsibility of companies and the perspective of prevention through work reorganization.

  4. Doenças do sistema osteomuscular em trabalhadores de enfermagem Enfermedades del sistema osteomuscular en trabajadores de enfermería Diseases of the osteomuscular system in nursing workers

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    Neide Tiemi Murofuse

    2005-06-01

    limbs. Diseases legally considered as occupational diseases related to the muscle-skeletal system were identified in 255 (35% care sessions, especially back pain (20% and synovitis and tenosynovitis (13.7%, which were grouped as RSI. This research revealed that greater attention must be given to workers' postures in the execution of their work activities and furniture conditions. Furthermore, ergonomically planned instruments and equipment need to be offered with a view to reducing the incidence levels of osteomuscular problems.

  5. MR imaging in the diagnosis of the os trigonum syndrome; Il ruolo della Risonanza Magnetica nella diagnosi della sindrome dell'os trigonum

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    Tamburrini, O.; Porpiglia, H.; Barresi, D.; Bertucci, B.; Console, D. [Catanzaro Univ. Magna Grecia, Catanzaro (Italy). Radiologia, Dipt. di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica

    1999-12-01

    In this paper is investigated the yield of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in hind foot conditions, particularly the os trigonum syndrome, which are very difficult to diagnose clinically. 7 consecutive patients were examined. They were complaining of hind foot pain for more than 4 months (male:female=1:6; age range 16-22 years, average 18.6). Three patients practiced competitive sports and 4 ballet. It was performed conventional radiography (orthogonal projections) and then MRI with a 0.5 T superconductive unit with surface coils; MR images were acquired with T1-weighted spin-echo (SE), T2-weighted gradient-echo (GRE), and fast inversion recovery (FIR) fat-suppressed sequences with 4 mm thickness and 0 mm gap. In 2 cases the os trigonum had irregular margins with subchondral sclerosis and widened synchondrosis. In 3 patients it was found flessor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, likely caused by tendon compression and displacement within its sheath; there were neither os trigonum marrow edema nor synchondrosis widening. One patient had os trigonum hypertrophy, mild synchondrosis widening and marrow edema, in the os trigonum and the posterior aspect of talus. One patient had the os trigonum, but no signs referable to the os trigonum syndrome. In the posterior impingement syndrome, the objective is to show inflammatory changes in the posterior capsule of the ankle joint, adjacent ligaments, tendons and chondrosynovial surface. MR provides important information on soft tissues involvement, synovial reaction, chondral and subchondral bone injuries and the association of flexor hallucis longus synovitis, if present. MRI also yields detailed information for correct therapeutic approach. In conclusion, MRI appears to be the technique of choice, after conventional radiography, thanks to its non invasiveness, multi planarity, and high spatial and contrast resolution. [Italian] Scopo di questo lavoro e' quello di sottolineare il determinante contributo informativo della